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Sample records for virus lacking critical

  1. Mouse neutrophils lacking lamin B-receptor expression exhibit aberrant development and lack critical functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Peter; Tien, Chiung W; Olins, Ada L; Olins, Donald E; Shultz, Leonard D; Carney, Lisa; Berliner, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    The capacity of neutrophils to eradicate bacterial infections is dependent on normal development and activation of functional responses, which include chemotaxis and generation of oxygen radicals during the respiratory burst. A unique feature of the neutrophil is its highly lobulated nucleus, which is thought to facilitate chemotaxis, but may also play a role in other critical neutrophil functions. Nuclear lobulation is dependent on expression of the inner nuclear envelope protein, the lamin B receptor (LBR), mutations of which cause hypolobulated neutrophil nuclei in human Pelger-Huët anomaly and the "ichthyosis" (ic) phenotype in mice. In this study, we have investigated roles for LBR in mediating neutrophil development and activation of multiple neutrophil functions, including chemotaxis and the respiratory burst. A progenitor EML cell line was generated from an ic/ic mouse, and derived cells that lacked LBR expression were induced to mature neutrophils and then examined for abnormal morphology and functional responses. Neutrophils derived from EML-ic/ic cells exhibited nuclear hypolobulation identical to that observed in ichthyosis mice. The ic/ic neutrophils also displayed abnormal chemotaxis, supporting the notion that nuclear segmentation augments neutrophil extravasation. Furthermore, promyelocytic forms of ic/ic cells displayed decreased proliferative responses and produced a deficient respiratory burst upon terminal maturation. Our studies of promyelocytes that lack LBR expression have identified roles for LBR in regulating not only the morphologic maturation of the neutrophil nucleus, but also proliferative and functional responses that are critical to innate immunity.

  2. Graduating Surgical Residents Lack Competence in Critical Care Ultrasound.

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    Tripu, Renuka; Lauerman, Margaret H; Haase, Daniel; Fatima, Syeda; Glaser, Jacob; Cardarelli, Cassandra; Scalea, Thomas M; Murthi, Sarah

    2017-10-13

    Ultrasound provides accessible imaging for bedside diagnostics and procedural guidance, but may lead to misdiagnosis in untrained users. The main objective of this study was to determine observed and self-perceived competence with critical care ultrasound in graduated general surgery residents. The design of this study was a retrospective review. Ultrasound training program records were reviewed for number of prior ultrasound examinations performed, self-perceived competence, observed competence on faculty examinations, and intended future use of individual critical care ultrasound examinations. This study was undertaken at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, which is a tertiary care center in Baltimore, MD. Graduated general surgery residents were identified at the beginning of their surgical critical care fellowship at our institution, and were included if they participated in our critical care ultrasound education program. Fifteen graduated general surgery residents were included. Prior ultrasound experience ranged from 100% for focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST) to 13.3% for advanced cardiac assessment. Self-perceived competence ranged from 46.7% with FAST to 0% for advanced cardiac assessment. Observed competence ranged from 20.0% for FAST examinations to 0% for basic cardiac assessment, advanced cardiac assessment, and inferior vena cava (IVC) assessment. All participants intended to use ultrasound in the future for FAST, pneumothorax detection and basic cardiac assessment, and 86.7% for IVC assessment and advanced cardiac assessment. Of participants with self-perceived competence, 28.6% had observed competence with FAST, 0% with IVC assessment, and 100% with pneumothorax detection. Graduated general surgery residents are not competent in multiple critical care ultrasound examinations despite universally planning to use critical care ultrasound in future practice. Current exposure to ultrasound in residency may give a false sense of

  3. Hepatitis b virus lacks immune activating capacity, but actively inhibits plasmacytoid dendritic cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Woltman (Andrea); M.L.O. den Brouw; P.J. Biesta (Paula); C.C. Shi (Cui); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractChronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is caused by inadequate anti-viral immunity. Activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) leading to IFNα production is important for effective anti-viral immunity. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection lacks IFNα induction in animal models and

  4. Oncolysis of canine tumor cells by myxoma virus lacking the serp2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbasic, Ashlee S; Hynes, Stacy; Somrak, Amy; Contakos, Stacey; Rahman, Masmudur M; Liu, Jia; MacNeill, Amy L

    2012-08-01

    To determine the oncolytic efficacy of an attenuated form of myxoma virus lacking the serp2 gene in canine tumor cells. Primary cells were isolated from tumors that were surgically removed from dogs and from connective tissue obtained from the cadaver of a dog. Cells of various established cell lines from tumors and nontumorous tissues were obtained. Experiments were performed with cells in monolayer culture. Cell cultures were inoculated with wild-type myxoma viruses or myxoma viruses lacking the serp2 gene, and measures of cytopathic effects, viral growth kinetics, and cell death and apoptosis were determined. Myxoma viruses replicated in cells of many of the primary and established canine tumor cell lines. Canine tumor cells in which expression of activated protein kinase B was upregulated were more permissive to myxoma virus infection than were cells in which expression of activated protein kinase B was not upregulated. Myxoma viruses lacking the serp2 gene caused more cytopathic effects in canine tumor cells because of apoptosis than did wild-type myxoma viruses. Results of the present study indicated myxoma viruses lacking the serp2 gene may be useful for treatment of cancer in dogs. Impact for Human Medicine-Results of the present study may be useful for development of novel oncolytic treatments for tumors in humans.

  5. Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Matthew H; McGowan, Eileen; Jadi, Ramesh; Young, Ellen; Lopez, Cesar A; Baric, Ralph S; Lazear, Helen M; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-05-01

    Cross-reactive antibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) infection might affect Zika virus infection and confound serologic tests. Recent data demonstrate neutralization of Zika virus by monoclonal antibodies or human serum collected early after DENV infection. Whether this finding is true in late DENV convalescence (>6 months after infection) is unknown. We studied late convalescent serum samples from persons with prior DENV or Zika virus exposure. Despite extensive cross-reactivity in IgG binding, Zika virus neutralization was not observed among primary DENV infections. We observed low-frequency (23%) Zika virus cross-neutralization in repeat DENV infections. DENV-immune persons who had Zika virus as a secondary infection had distinct populations of antibodies that neutralized DENVs and Zika virus, as shown by DENV-reactive antibody depletion experiments. These data suggest that most DENV infections do not induce durable, high-level Zika virus cross-neutralizing antibodies. Zika virus-specific antibody populations develop after Zika virus infection irrespective of prior DENV immunity.

  6. Reciprocal complementation of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 lacking either the membrane or fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Marina; Matsuura, Ryosuke; Kokuho, Takehiro; Tsuboi, Takamitsu; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2017-11-01

    Two defective bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) strains were generated, one lacking the membrane (M) protein gene and expressing EGFP (ΔM-EGFP) and the other lacking the fusion (F) protein gene and expressing mStrawberry (ΔF-mSB), by supplying deficient proteins in trans. When Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells were co-infected with ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, complemented viruses were easily obtained. Complemented viruses grew as efficiently as wild-type BPIV3 and could be passaged in MDBK cell cultures even at an MOI of 0.01, possibly due to multiploid virus particles containing genomes of both ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB. This reciprocal complementation method using two defective viruses would be useful to express large or multiple proteins in cell cultures using paramyxovirus vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  8. Generation of a non-transmissive Borna disease virus vector lacking both matrix and glycoprotein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Kan; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Daito, Takuji; Makino, Akiko; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2017-09-01

    Borna disease virus (BoDV), a prototype of mammalian bornavirus, is a non-segmented, negative strand RNA virus that often causes severe neurological disorders in infected animals, including horses and sheep. Unique among animal RNA viruses, BoDV transcribes and replicates non-cytopathically in the cell nucleus, leading to establishment of long-lasting persistent infection. This striking feature of BoDV indicates its potential as an RNA virus vector system. It has previously been demonstrated by our team that recombinant BoDV (rBoDV) lacking an envelope glycoprotein (G) gene develops persistent infections in transduced cells without loss of the viral genome. In this study, a novel non-transmissive rBoDV, rBoDV ΔMG, which lacks both matrix (M) and G genes in the genome, is reported. rBoDV-ΔMG expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP), rBoDV ΔMG-GFP, was efficiently generated in Vero/MG cells stably expressing both BoDV M and G proteins. Infection with rBoDV ΔMG-GFP was persistently maintained in the parent Vero cells without propagation within cell culture. The optimal ratio of M and G for efficient viral particle production by transient transfection of M and G expression plasmids into cells persistently infected with rBoDV ΔMG-GFP was also demonstrated. These findings indicate that the rBoDV ΔMG-based BoDV vector may provide an extremely safe virus vector system and could be a novel strategy for investigating the function of M and G proteins and the host range of bornaviruses. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Lack of efficacy of aurintricarboxylic acid and ethacrynic acid against vaccinia virus respiratory infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Donald F; Hurst, Brett L; Wong, Min-Hui

    2010-04-14

    Aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) and ethacrynic acid (ECA) have been reported to exhibit antiviral activity against vaccinia virus infections in cell culture by inhibiting early and late gene transcription, respectively. The purpose of this work was to determine if these inhibitors would effectively treat vaccinia virus infections in mice, which has not previously been studied. ECA was investigated by cell culture plaque reduction assay for the inhibition of cowpox and vaccinia virus infections to clarify issues regarding its potency and selectivity. Mice infected intranasally with vaccinia virus were treated by intraperitoneal route twice daily for 5 days with ATA (10 and 30 mg/kg/day) and ECA (15 and 30 mg/kg/day) or once daily for 2 days with cidofovir (100 mg/kg/day). ECA caused 50% inhibition of virus plaque formation at 20-79 muM in four cultured cell lines, with 50% cytotoxicity at 84-173 muM, giving low (1.3-4.2) selectivity index values. Preliminary toxicity tests in uninfected mice indicated that ATA and ECA were both overtly toxic at 100 mg/kg/day. No protection from mortality was afforded by treatment of vaccinia virus infections with ATA or ECA, but 100% survival was achieved in the cidofovir group. ATA- and ECA-treated mice died significantly sooner than placebo-treated animals, indicating that these compounds exacerbated the infection. Both ATA and ECA lack antiviral potency and selectivity in cell culture. The compounds were ineffective in treating mice at intraperitoneal doses of

  10. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  11. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  12. Interaction of rabies virus P-protein with STAT proteins is critical to lethal rabies disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltzer, Linda; Okada, Kazuma; Yamaoka, Satoko; Larrous, Florence; Kuusisto, Henna Veera; Sugiyama, Makoto; Blondel, Danielle; Bourhy, Hervé; Jans, David Andrew; Ito, Naoto; Moseley, Gregory William

    2014-06-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes rabies disease resulting in >55,000 human deaths/year. The multifunctional RABV P-protein has essential roles in genome replication, and forms interactions with cellular STAT proteins that are thought to underlie viral antagonism of interferon-dependent immunity. However, the molecular details of P-protein-STAT interaction, and its importance to disease are unresolved. Studies were performed using sequence/structure analysis, mutagenesis, immunoprecipitation, luciferase and qRT-PCR-based signaling assays, confocal microscopy and reverse genetics/in vivo infection. We identified a hydrophobic pocket of the P-protein C-terminal domain as critical to STAT-binding/antagonism. This interface was found to be functionally and spatially independent of the region responsible for N-protein interaction, which is critical to genome replication. Based on these findings, we generated the first mutant RABV lacking STAT-association. Growth of the virus in vitro was unimpaired, but it lacked STAT-antagonist function and was highly sensitive to interferon. Importantly, growth of the virus was strongly attenuated in brains of infected mice, producing no major neurological symptoms, compared with the invariably lethal wild-type virus. These data represent direct evidence that P-protein-STAT interaction is critical to rabies, and provide novel insights into the mechanism by which RABV coordinates distinct functions in interferon antagonism and replication.

  13. Lack of Epstein-Barr virus infection in Chinese myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, F; Wei, D; Wang, D; Li, N; Cui, F; Yang, F; Chen, Z; Huang, X

    2013-11-01

    There are three recent contradictory reports on the incidence of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, with all studies carried out in Caucasian patients. The current study evaluated whether Epstein-Barr virus infection had a role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis in a cohort of 30 Chinese patients. Serial paraffin sections of thymic hyperplasia obtained from myasthenia gravis patients were analyzed for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1 and Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Epstein-Barr virus(+) cervical lymph nodes from lymphoma patients and Epstein-Barr virus(-) thymus specimens obtained during cardiac surgery served as the positive and negative control groups, respectively. All the 30 myasthenia gravis specimens were negative for both Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1 and Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 tests. However, we obtained well-characterized membrane and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization staining for both Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1, respectively, in the positive control samples. Our results therefore do not support a role of thymic Epstein-Barr virus infection in myasthenia gravis pathogenesis and calls for an integration of methodological and interpretation issues in detecting Epstein-Barr virus incidence in myasthenia gravis patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Lack of Virus-Specific Bacterial Adherence to Bovine Embryonic Lung Cells Infected with Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 †

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Thomas E.; Gates, Connie

    1983-01-01

    Infection of bovine embryonic lung cells with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 did not induce in vitro, virus-specific, hemadsorption-related adherence of Corynebacterium pyogenes, Haemophilus somnus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Pasteurella haemolytica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Brucella sp., or Salmonella typhimurium.

  15. Apparent lack of effect of vaccination against mink enteritis virus (MEV). A challenge study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse

    1988-01-01

    The mink enteritis virus part of a triple vaccine was tested in mink. No raise in antibody response was measured after vaccination. Subsequent challenge of groups of vaccinated or not-vaccinated animals revealed no differences in virus excretion or antibody response in the different animals....

  16. Lack of Critical Slowing Down Suggests that Financial Meltdowns Are Not Critical Transitions, yet Rising Variability Could Signal Systemic Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwesha Guttal

    Full Text Available Complex systems inspired analysis suggests a hypothesis that financial meltdowns are abrupt critical transitions that occur when the system reaches a tipping point. Theoretical and empirical studies on climatic and ecological dynamical systems have shown that approach to tipping points is preceded by a generic phenomenon called critical slowing down, i.e. an increasingly slow response of the system to perturbations. Therefore, it has been suggested that critical slowing down may be used as an early warning signal of imminent critical transitions. Whether financial markets exhibit critical slowing down prior to meltdowns remains unclear. Here, our analysis reveals that three major US (Dow Jones Index, S&P 500 and NASDAQ and two European markets (DAX and FTSE did not exhibit critical slowing down prior to major financial crashes over the last century. However, all markets showed strong trends of rising variability, quantified by time series variance and spectral function at low frequencies, prior to crashes. These results suggest that financial crashes are not critical transitions that occur in the vicinity of a tipping point. Using a simple model, we argue that financial crashes are likely to be stochastic transitions which can occur even when the system is far away from the tipping point. Specifically, we show that a gradually increasing strength of stochastic perturbations may have caused to abrupt transitions in the financial markets. Broadly, our results highlight the importance of stochastically driven abrupt transitions in real world scenarios. Our study offers rising variability as a precursor of financial meltdowns albeit with a limitation that they may signal false alarms.

  17. Lack of Critical Slowing Down Suggests that Financial Meltdowns Are Not Critical Transitions, yet Rising Variability Could Signal Systemic Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Vishwesha; Raghavendra, Srinivas; Goel, Nikunj; Hoarau, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems inspired analysis suggests a hypothesis that financial meltdowns are abrupt critical transitions that occur when the system reaches a tipping point. Theoretical and empirical studies on climatic and ecological dynamical systems have shown that approach to tipping points is preceded by a generic phenomenon called critical slowing down, i.e. an increasingly slow response of the system to perturbations. Therefore, it has been suggested that critical slowing down may be used as an early warning signal of imminent critical transitions. Whether financial markets exhibit critical slowing down prior to meltdowns remains unclear. Here, our analysis reveals that three major US (Dow Jones Index, S&P 500 and NASDAQ) and two European markets (DAX and FTSE) did not exhibit critical slowing down prior to major financial crashes over the last century. However, all markets showed strong trends of rising variability, quantified by time series variance and spectral function at low frequencies, prior to crashes. These results suggest that financial crashes are not critical transitions that occur in the vicinity of a tipping point. Using a simple model, we argue that financial crashes are likely to be stochastic transitions which can occur even when the system is far away from the tipping point. Specifically, we show that a gradually increasing strength of stochastic perturbations may have caused to abrupt transitions in the financial markets. Broadly, our results highlight the importance of stochastically driven abrupt transitions in real world scenarios. Our study offers rising variability as a precursor of financial meltdowns albeit with a limitation that they may signal false alarms.

  18. Hepatitis C virus positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas have distinct molecular features and lack BCL2 translocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visco, Carlo; Wang, Jinfen; Tisi, Maria Chiara

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical presentation of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is different from their HCV-negative counterparts, but the underlying molecular and pathological characteristics are largely under investigated. The virus has a role...... apoptotic pathways, have higher proliferative index, and lack BCL2 translocations. CONCLUSIONS: HCV-positive DLBCL have distinct molecular and pathological features compared to the HCV-negative counterparts.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 26 September 2017; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.345 www.bjcancer.com....

  19. Bioinformatic and immunological analysis reveals lack of support for measles virus related mimicry in Crohn's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polymeros, Dimitrios; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Smyk, Daniel S; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Ladas, Spiros D

    2014-01-01

    A link between measles virus and Crohn's disease (CD) has been postulated. We assessed through bioinformatic and immunological approaches whether measles is implicated in CD induction, through molecular mimicry...

  20. A Viable Recombinant Rhabdovirus Lacking Its Glycoprotein Gene and Expressing Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Is a Potent Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B.; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell

  1. A viable recombinant rhabdovirus lacking its glycoprotein gene and expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase is a potent influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian; Rose, John K

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell culture and induced a

  2. Do 45% of College Students Lack Critical Thinking Skills? Revisiting a Central Conclusion of "Academically Adrift"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David; Oswald, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    The educational literature, the popular press, and educated laypeople have all echoed a conclusion from the book "Academically Adrift" by Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa (which has now become received wisdom), namely, that 45% of college students showed no significant gains in critical thinking skills. Similar results were reported by…

  3. A highly attenuated recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus lacking the G protein induces long-lasting protection in cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N; Boes, Jolande; van Bers, Marleen; van Remmerden, Yvonne; Roholl, Paul J M; Luytjes, Willem

    2010-06-02

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a primary cause of serious lower respiratory tract illness for which there is still no safe and effective vaccine available. Using reverse genetics, recombinant (r)RSV and an rRSV lacking the G gene (DeltaG) were constructed based on a clinical RSV isolate (strain 98-25147-X). Growth of both recombinant viruses was equivalent to that of wild type virus in Vero cells, but was reduced in human epithelial cells like Hep-2. Replication in cotton rat lungs could not be detected for DeltaG, while rRSV was 100-fold attenuated compared to wild type virus. Upon single dose intranasal administration in cotton rats, both recombinant viruses developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies and conferred comparable long-lasting protection against RSV challenge; protection against replication in the lungs lasted at least 147 days and protection against pulmonary inflammation lasted at least 75 days. Collectively, the data indicate that a single dose immunization with the highly attenuated DeltaG as well as the attenuated rRSV conferred long term protection in the cotton rat against subsequent RSV challenge, without inducing vaccine enhanced pathology. Since DeltaG is not likely to revert to a less attenuated phenotype, we plan to evaluate this deletion mutant further and to investigate its potential as a vaccine candidate against RSV infection.

  4. Serum-free microcarrier based production of replication deficient Influenza vaccine candidate virus lacking NS1 using Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Mylene L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus is a major health concern that has huge impacts on the human society, and vaccination remains as one of the most effective ways to mitigate this disease. Comparing the two types of commercially available Influenza vaccine, the live attenuated virus vaccine is more cross-reactive and easier to administer than the traditional inactivated vaccines. One promising live attenuated Influenza vaccine that has completed Phase I clinical trial is deltaFLU, a deletion mutant lacking the viral Nonstructural Protein 1 (NS1 gene. As a consequence of this gene deletion, this mutant virus can only propagate effectively in cells with a deficient interferon-mediated antiviral response. To demonstrate the manufacturability of this vaccine candidate, a batch bioreactor production process using adherent Vero cells on microcarriers in commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media is described. Results Five commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media (SFM were evaluated for growth of Vero cells in agitated Cytodex 1 spinner flask microcarrier cultures. EX-CELL Vero SFM achieved the highest cell concentration of 2.6 × 10^6 cells/ml, whereas other SFM achieved about 1.2 × 10^6 cells/ml. Time points for infection between the late exponential and stationary phases of cell growth had no significant effect in the final virus titres. A virus yield of 7.6 Log10 TCID50/ml was achieved using trypsin concentration of 10 μg/ml and MOI of 0.001. The Influenza vaccine production process was scaled up to a 3 liter controlled stirred tank bioreactor to achieve a cell density of 2.7 × 10^6 cells/ml and virus titre of 8.3 Log10 TCID50/ml. Finally, the bioreactor system was tested for the production of the corresponding wild type H1N1 Influenza virus, which is conventionally used in the production of inactivated vaccine. High virus titres of up to 10 Log10 TCID50/ml were achieved. Conclusions We describe for the

  5. Serum-free microcarrier based production of replication deficient influenza vaccine candidate virus lacking NS1 using Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen; Poh, Swan Li; Dietzsch, Christian; Roethl, Elisabeth; Yan, Mylene L; Ng, Say Kong

    2011-08-11

    Influenza virus is a major health concern that has huge impacts on the human society, and vaccination remains as one of the most effective ways to mitigate this disease. Comparing the two types of commercially available Influenza vaccine, the live attenuated virus vaccine is more cross-reactive and easier to administer than the traditional inactivated vaccines. One promising live attenuated Influenza vaccine that has completed Phase I clinical trial is deltaFLU, a deletion mutant lacking the viral Nonstructural Protein 1 (NS1) gene. As a consequence of this gene deletion, this mutant virus can only propagate effectively in cells with a deficient interferon-mediated antiviral response. To demonstrate the manufacturability of this vaccine candidate, a batch bioreactor production process using adherent Vero cells on microcarriers in commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media is described. Five commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media (SFM) were evaluated for growth of Vero cells in agitated Cytodex 1 spinner flask microcarrier cultures. EX-CELL Vero SFM achieved the highest cell concentration of 2.6 × 10^6 cells/ml, whereas other SFM achieved about 1.2 × 10^6 cells/ml. Time points for infection between the late exponential and stationary phases of cell growth had no significant effect in the final virus titres. A virus yield of 7.6 Log10 TCID50/ml was achieved using trypsin concentration of 10 μg/ml and MOI of 0.001. The Influenza vaccine production process was scaled up to a 3 liter controlled stirred tank bioreactor to achieve a cell density of 2.7 × 10^6 cells/ml and virus titre of 8.3 Log10 TCID50/ml. Finally, the bioreactor system was tested for the production of the corresponding wild type H1N1 Influenza virus, which is conventionally used in the production of inactivated vaccine. High virus titres of up to 10 Log10 TCID50/ml were achieved. We describe for the first time the production of Influenza viruses using Vero

  6. Attenuation of Marek's disease virus lacking the Meq oncogene in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles the jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. Chickens vaccinated with ...

  7. Complete protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-mediated lethal respiratory disease in aged mice by immunization with a mouse-adapted virus lacking E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Craig; DeDiego, Marta L; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Enjuanes, Luis; Perlman, Stanley

    2013-06-01

    Zoonotic coronaviruses, including the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific therapy for any human coronavirus is available, making vaccine development critical for protection against these viruses. We previously showed that recombinant SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (Urbani strain based) lacking envelope (E) protein expression (rU-ΔE) provided good but not perfect protection in young mice against challenge with virulent mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (MA15). To improve vaccine efficacy, we developed a second set of E-deleted vaccine candidates on an MA15 background (rMA15-ΔE). rMA15-ΔE is safe, causing no disease in 6-week-, 12-month-, or 18-month-old BALB/c mice. Immunization with this virus completely protected mice of three ages from lethal disease and effected more-rapid virus clearance. Compared to rU-ΔE, rMA15-ΔE immunization resulted in significantly greater neutralizing antibody and SARS-CoV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. After challenge, inflammatory cell infiltration, edema, and lung destruction were decreased in the lungs of rMA15-ΔE-immunized mice compared to those in rU-ΔE-immunized 12-month-old mice. Collectively, these results show that immunization with a species-adapted attenuated coronavirus lacking E protein expression is safe and provides optimal immunogenicity and long-term protection against challenge with lethal virus. This approach will be generally useful for development of vaccines protective against human coronaviruses as well as against coronaviruses that cause disease in domestic and companion animals.

  8. Infection and transmission of Rift Valley fever viruses lacking the NSs and/or NSm genes in mosquitoes: potential role for NSm in mosquito infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Mary B; Kent Crockett, Rebekah J; Bird, Brian H; Nichol, Stuart T; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Miller, Barry R

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus is an arthropod-borne human and animal pathogen responsible for large outbreaks of acute and febrile illness throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Reverse genetics technology has been used to develop deletion mutants of the virus that lack the NSs and/or NSm virulence genes and have been shown to be stable, immunogenic and protective against Rift Valley fever virus infection in animals. We assessed the potential for these deletion mutant viruses to infect and be transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, which are the principal vectors for maintenance of the virus in nature and emergence of virus initiating disease outbreaks, and by Culex mosquitoes which are important amplification vectors. Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were fed bloodmeals containing the deletion mutant viruses. Two weeks post-exposure mosquitoes were assayed for infection, dissemination, and transmission. In Ae. aegypti, infection and transmission rates of the NSs deletion virus were similar to wild type virus while dissemination rates were significantly reduced. Infection and dissemination rates for the NSm deletion virus were lower compared to wild type. Virus lacking both NSs and NSm failed to infect Ae. aegypti. In Cx. quinquefasciatus, infection rates for viruses lacking NSm or both NSs and NSm were lower than for wild type virus. In both species, deletion of NSm or both NSs and NSm reduced the infection and transmission potential of the virus. Deletion of both NSs and NSm resulted in the highest level of attenuation of virus replication. Deletion of NSm alone was sufficient to nearly abolish infection in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, indicating an important role for this protein. The double deleted viruses represent an ideal vaccine profile in terms of environmental containment due to lack of ability to efficiently infect and be transmitted by mosquitoes.

  9. Infection and transmission of Rift Valley fever viruses lacking the NSs and/or NSm genes in mosquitoes: potential role for NSm in mosquito infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary B Crabtree

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever virus is an arthropod-borne human and animal pathogen responsible for large outbreaks of acute and febrile illness throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Reverse genetics technology has been used to develop deletion mutants of the virus that lack the NSs and/or NSm virulence genes and have been shown to be stable, immunogenic and protective against Rift Valley fever virus infection in animals. We assessed the potential for these deletion mutant viruses to infect and be transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, which are the principal vectors for maintenance of the virus in nature and emergence of virus initiating disease outbreaks, and by Culex mosquitoes which are important amplification vectors. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were fed bloodmeals containing the deletion mutant viruses. Two weeks post-exposure mosquitoes were assayed for infection, dissemination, and transmission. In Ae. aegypti, infection and transmission rates of the NSs deletion virus were similar to wild type virus while dissemination rates were significantly reduced. Infection and dissemination rates for the NSm deletion virus were lower compared to wild type. Virus lacking both NSs and NSm failed to infect Ae. aegypti. In Cx. quinquefasciatus, infection rates for viruses lacking NSm or both NSs and NSm were lower than for wild type virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In both species, deletion of NSm or both NSs and NSm reduced the infection and transmission potential of the virus. Deletion of both NSs and NSm resulted in the highest level of attenuation of virus replication. Deletion of NSm alone was sufficient to nearly abolish infection in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, indicating an important role for this protein. The double deleted viruses represent an ideal vaccine profile in terms of environmental containment due to lack of ability to efficiently infect and be transmitted by mosquitoes.

  10. Mechanism of West Nile Virus Neuroinvasion: A Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Willy W.; Prow, Natalie A.; Hall, Roy A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an important emerging neurotropic virus, responsible for increasingly severe encephalitis outbreaks in humans and horses worldwide. However, the mechanism by which the virus gains entry to the brain (neuroinvasion) remains poorly understood. Hypotheses of hematogenous and transneural entry have been proposed for WNV neuroinvasion, which revolve mainly around the concepts of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and retrograde axonal transport, respectively. However, an over‑representation of in vitro studies without adequate in vivo validation continues to obscure our understanding of the mechanism(s). Furthermore, WNV infection in the current rodent models does not generate a similar viremia and character of CNS infection, as seen in the common target hosts, humans and horses. These differences ultimately question the applicability of rodent models for pathogenesis investigations. Finally, the role of several barriers against CNS insults, such as the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the CSF-brain and the blood-spinal cord barriers, remain largely unexplored, highlighting the infancy of this field. In this review, a systematic and critical appraisal of the current evidence relevant to the possible mechanism(s) of WNV neuroinvasion is conducted. PMID:25046180

  11. Pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in Danish pigs: Diagnosis and lack of surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Nielsen, L. P.; Breum, Solvej Østergaard

    in swine with a genetic profile similar to older circulating strains implied a challenge for the veterinary diagnostic laboratories. We report the development, validation and implementation of a diagnostic strategy for specific diagnosis of H1N1v in pigs and the results of tests of pigs performed...... likely would recognize the H1N1v virus and this was further confirmed in the laboratory by test of samples from pvH1N1 infected humans. However, these assays could not discriminate between the typical circulating strains and the H1N1v subtype. For specific detection of the H1N1v subtype, an rRT-PCR assay...... targeting the HA gene developed at the Staten Serum Institute for diagnosis of H1N1v in humans was validated for use on pig specimens. In silico analysis showed that the probe and primers had 100% identity to published H1N1v strains and 80- 95% identity to classical-swine H1N1 which do not circulate...

  12. Ebola virus glycoprotein directly triggers T lymphocyte death despite of the lack of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iampietro, Mathieu; Younan, Patrick; Nishida, Andrew; Dutta, Mukta; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Santos, Rodrigo I; Koup, Richard A; Katze, Michael G; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Fatal outcomes of Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are typically preceded by a 'sepsis-like' syndrome and lymphopenia despite T cells being resistant to Ebola infection. The mechanisms that lead to T lymphocytes death remain largely unknown; however, the degree of lymphopenia is highly correlative with fatalities. Here we investigated whether the addition of EBOV or its envelope glycoprotein (GP) to isolated primary human CD4+ T cells induced cell death. We observed a significant decrease in cell viability in a GP-dependent manner, which is suggestive of a direct role of GP in T cell death. Using immunoprecipitation assays and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that EBOV directly binds to CD4+ T cells through interaction of GP with TLR4. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the addition of EBOV to CD4+ T cells results in the significant upregulation of pathways associated with interferon signaling, pattern recognition receptors and intracellular activation of NFκB signaling pathway. Both transcriptome analysis and specific inhibitors allowed identification of apoptosis and necrosis as mechanisms associated with the observed T cell death following exposure to EBOV. The addition of the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 significantly reduced CD4+ T cell death induced by GP. EBOV stimulation of primary CD4+ T cells resulted in a significant increase in secreted TNFα; inhibition of TNFα-mediated signaling events significantly reduced T cell death while inhibitors of both necrosis and apoptosis similarly reduced EBOV-induced T cell death. Lastly, we show that stimulation with EBOV or GP augments monocyte maturation as determined by an overall increase in expression levels of markers of differentiation. Subsequently, the increased rates of cellular differentiation resulted in higher rates of infection further contributing to T cell death. These results demonstrate that GP directly subverts the host's immune response by increasing the susceptibility of monocytes to EBOV infection and

  13. Lack of association between measles virus vaccine and autism with enteropathy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Mady; Briese, Thomas; Buie, Timothy; Bauman, Margaret L; Lauwers, Gregory; Siemetzki, Ulrike; Hummel, Kimberly; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; O'Leary, John J; Sheils, Orla; Alden, Errol; Pickering, Larry; Lipkin, W Ian

    2008-09-04

    The presence of measles virus (MV) RNA in bowel tissue from children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances was reported in 1998. Subsequent investigations found no associations between MV exposure and ASD but did not test for the presence of MV RNA in bowel or focus on children with ASD and GI disturbances. Failure to replicate the original study design may contribute to continued public concern with respect to the safety of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The objective of this case-control study was to determine whether children with GI disturbances and autism are more likely than children with GI disturbances alone to have MV RNA and/or inflammation in bowel tissues and if autism and/or GI episode onset relate temporally to receipt of MMR. The sample was an age-matched group of US children undergoing clinically-indicated ileocolonoscopy. Ileal and cecal tissues from 25 children with autism and GI disturbances and 13 children with GI disturbances alone (controls) were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for presence of MV RNA in three laboratories blinded to diagnosis, including one wherein the original findings suggesting a link between MV and ASD were reported. The temporal order of onset of GI episodes and autism relative to timing of MMR administration was examined. We found no differences between case and control groups in the presence of MV RNA in ileum and cecum. Results were consistent across the three laboratory sites. GI symptom and autism onset were unrelated to MMR timing. Eighty-eight percent of ASD cases had behavioral regression. This study provides strong evidence against association of autism with persistent MV RNA in the GI tract or MMR exposure. Autism with GI disturbances is associated with elevated rates of regression in language or other skills and may represent an endophenotype distinct from other ASD.

  14. Lack of association between measles virus vaccine and autism with enteropathy: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mady Hornig

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of measles virus (MV RNA in bowel tissue from children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and gastrointestinal (GI disturbances was reported in 1998. Subsequent investigations found no associations between MV exposure and ASD but did not test for the presence of MV RNA in bowel or focus on children with ASD and GI disturbances. Failure to replicate the original study design may contribute to continued public concern with respect to the safety of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccine.The objective of this case-control study was to determine whether children with GI disturbances and autism are more likely than children with GI disturbances alone to have MV RNA and/or inflammation in bowel tissues and if autism and/or GI episode onset relate temporally to receipt of MMR. The sample was an age-matched group of US children undergoing clinically-indicated ileocolonoscopy. Ileal and cecal tissues from 25 children with autism and GI disturbances and 13 children with GI disturbances alone (controls were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR for presence of MV RNA in three laboratories blinded to diagnosis, including one wherein the original findings suggesting a link between MV and ASD were reported. The temporal order of onset of GI episodes and autism relative to timing of MMR administration was examined. We found no differences between case and control groups in the presence of MV RNA in ileum and cecum. Results were consistent across the three laboratory sites. GI symptom and autism onset were unrelated to MMR timing. Eighty-eight percent of ASD cases had behavioral regression.This study provides strong evidence against association of autism with persistent MV RNA in the GI tract or MMR exposure. Autism with GI disturbances is associated with elevated rates of regression in language or other skills and may represent an endophenotype distinct from other ASD.

  15. Residues in the Hendra Virus Fusion Protein Transmembrane Domain Are Critical for Endocytic Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R.; Smith, Stacy E.; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of H...

  16. Characterization of a replication-incompetent pseudorabies virus mutant lacking the sole immediate early gene IE180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brendan W; Engel, Esteban A; Enquist, Lynn W

    2014-11-11

    The alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) encodes a single immediate early gene called IE180. The IE180 protein is a potent transcriptional activator of viral genes involved in DNA replication and RNA transcription. A PRV mutant with both copies of IE180 deleted was constructed 20 years ago (S. Yamada and M. Shimizu, Virology 199:366-375, 1994, doi:10.1006/viro.1994.1134), but propagation of the mutant depended on complementing cell lines that expressed the toxic IE180 protein constitutively. Recently, Oyibo et al. constructed a novel set of PRV IE180 mutants and a stable cell line with inducible IE180 expression (H. Oyibo, P. Znamenskiy, H. V. Oviedo, L. W. Enquist, A. Zador, Front. Neuroanat. 8:86, 2014, doi:10.3389/fnana.2014.00086), which we characterized further here. These mutants failed to replicate new viral genomes, synthesize immediate early, early, or late viral proteins, and assemble infectious virions. The PRV IE180-null mutant did not form plaques in epithelial cell monolayers and could not spread from primary infected neurons to second-order neurons in culture. PRV IE180-null mutants lacked the property of superinfection exclusion. When PRV IE180-null mutants infected cells first, subsequent superinfecting viruses were not blocked in cell entry and formed replication compartments in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and neurons. Cells infected with PRV IE180-null mutants survived as long as uninfected cells in culture while expressing a fluorescent reporter gene. Transcomplementation with IE180 in epithelial cells restored all mutant phenotypes to wild type. The conditional expression of PRV IE180 protein enables the propagation of replication-incompetent PRV IE180-null mutants and will facilitate construction of long-term single-cell-infecting PRV mutants for precise neural circuit tracing and high-capacity gene delivery vectors. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is widely used for neural tracing in animal models. The virus replicates and spreads between

  17. Lack of the pattern recognition molecule mannose-binding lectin increases susceptibility to influenza A virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartshorn Kevan L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a pattern recognition innate immune molecule, inhibits influenza A virus infection in vitro. MBL deficiency due to gene polymorphism in humans has been associated with infection susceptibility. These clinical observations were confirmed by animal model studies, in which mice genetically lacking MBL were susceptible to certain pathogens, including herpes simplex virus 2. Results We demonstrate that MBL is present in the lung of naïve healthy wild type (WT mice and that MBL null mice are more susceptible to IAV infection. Administration of recombinant human MBL (rhMBL reverses the infection phenotype, confirming that the infection susceptibility is MBL-mediated. The anti-viral mechanisms of MBL include activation of the lectin complement pathway and coagulation, requiring serum factors. White blood cells (WBCs in the lung increase in WT mice compared with MBL null mice on day 1 post-infection. In contrast, apoptotic macrophages (MΦs are two-fold higher in the lung of MBL null mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, MBL deficient macrophages appear to be susceptible to apoptosis in vitro. Lastly, soluble factors, which are associated with lung injury, are increased in the lungs of MBL null mice during IAV infection. These results suggest that MBL plays a key role against IAV infection. Conclusion MBL plays a key role in clearing IAV and maintaining lung homeostasis. In addition, our findings also suggest that MBL deficiency maybe a risk factor in IAV infection and MBL may be a useful adjunctive therapy for IAV infection.

  18. Identification of group B respiratory syncytial viruses that lack the 60-nucleotide duplication after six consecutive epidemics of total BA dominance at coastal Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoti, Charles N; Gitahi, Caroline W; Medley, Graham F; Cane, Patricia A; Nokes, D James

    2013-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus BA genotype has reportedly replaced other group B genotypes worldwide. We report the observation of three group B viruses, all identical in G sequence but lacking the BA duplication, at a coastal district hospital in Kenya in early 2012. This follows a period of six consecutive respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics with 100% BA dominance among group B isolates. The new strains appear only distantly related to BA variants and to previously circulating SAB1 viruses last seen in the district in 2005, suggesting that they were circulating elsewhere undetected. These results are of relevance to an understanding of RSV persistence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons.

  19. Critical role of the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail sequence in parainfluenza virus assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raychel Stone

    Full Text Available Interactions between viral glycoproteins, matrix protein and nucleocapsid sustain assembly of parainfluenza viruses at the plasma membrane. Although the protein interactions required for virion formation are considered to be highly specific, virions lacking envelope glycoprotein(s can be produced, thus the molecular interactions driving viral assembly and production are still unclear. Sendai virus (SeV and human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1 are highly similar in structure, however, the cytoplasmic tail sequences of the envelope glycoproteins (HN and F are relatively less conserved. To unveil the specific role of the envelope glycoproteins in viral assembly, we created chimeric SeVs whose HN (rSeVhHN or HN and F (rSeVh(HN+F were replaced with those of hPIV1. rSeVhHN grew as efficiently as wt SeV or hPIV1, suggesting that the sequence difference in HN does not have a significant impact on SeV replication and virion production. In sharp contrast, the growth of rSeVh(HN+F was significantly impaired compared to rSeVhHN. rSeVh(HN+Fstail which expresses a chimeric hPIV1 F with the SeV cytoplasmic tail sequence grew similar to wt SeV or rSeVhHN. Further analysis indicated that the F cytoplasmic tail plays a critical role in cell surface expression/accumulation of HN and F, as well as NP and M association at the plasma membrane. Trafficking of nucelocapsids in infected cells was not significantly affected by the origin of F, suggesting that F cytoplasmic tail is not involved in intracellular movement. These results demonstrate the role of the F cytoplasmic tail in accumulation of structural components at the plasma membrane assembly sites.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Vaccine Lacking Meq Oncogene in Commercial Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus oncogene meq has been identified as the gene involved in tumorigenesis in chickens. We have recently developed a Meq-null virus, rMd5delMeq, in which the oncogene Meq was deleted. Vaccine efficacy experiments conducted in ADOL 15I5 x 71 chickens vaccinated with rMd5delMeq virus...

  1. Lack of Association between Hepatitis C Virus core Gene Variation 70/91aa and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Paula Scalioni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV in insulin resistance (IR is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of amino acid (aa substitutions in the core region of HCV according to IR and to identify clinical and laboratory associations. Ninety-two treatment-naive HCV patients were recruited to determine laboratory data and blood cell count. IR was determined using Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA index where IR was defined as HOMA ≥2. HCV RNA load and genotype were determined by Abbott Real time HCV. HCV core region was determined by direct nucleotide sequencing. Bivariate analysis was conducted using HOMA IR ≥2 as a dependent factor. IR prevalence was 43.5% (n = 40, vitamin D sufficiency was found in 76.1% (n = 70 and 72.8% (n = 67 had advanced liver fibrosis. In the bivariate analyses, elevated values of γGT (p = 0.024 and fibrosis staging (p = 0.004 were associated with IR, but IR was not related to core mutations. The presence of glutamine in position 70 was associated with low vitamin D concentration (p = 0.005. In the multivariate analysis, no variable was independently associated with HOMA-IR. In conclusion, lack of association between IR and HCV core mutations in positions 70 and 91 suggests that genetic variability of this region has little impact on IR.

  2. Lack of Association between Polymorphisms of the TLR4 Gene and Infection with the Hepatitis B and C Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando de Souza Pires-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays a crucial role in the early recognition of pathogenic microorganisms and provides an ideal model to investigate the consequences of genetic variation and susceptibility to diseases. The present study investigated the occurrence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs4986790 (A>G and rs4986791 (C>T in the TLR4 gene in chronic carriers of the hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viruses. A total of 420 blood samples were collected (HBV, 49; HCV, 72; and controls, 299 at the liver disease outpatient clinic of Hospital da Fundação Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Pará (FSCMPA. Genomic DNA extracted from leukocytes was subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analysis to identify the genetic profile of the participants. No significant differences were found in the allele and genotype frequencies between the infected participants and controls. No significant associations were found between the investigated polymorphisms and inflammatory activity, fibrosis, and the presence of cirrhosis; the same results were obtained in the haplotype analysis. The results showed a lack of association between the rs4986790 and rs4986791 SNPs and susceptibility to infection with HBV and HCV, as well as clinical and laboratory information of the patients.

  3. Lack of Association between Hepatitis C Virus core Gene Variation 70/91aa and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalioni, Letícia de Paula; da Silva, Allan Peres; Miguel, Juliana Custódio; do Espírito Santo, Márcia Paschoal; Marques, Vanessa Alves; Brandão-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2017-01-01

    The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in insulin resistance (IR) is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of amino acid (aa) substitutions in the core region of HCV according to IR and to identify clinical and laboratory associations. Ninety-two treatment-naive HCV patients were recruited to determine laboratory data and blood cell count. IR was determined using Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index where IR was defined as HOMA ≥2. HCV RNA load and genotype were determined by Abbott Real time HCV. HCV core region was determined by direct nucleotide sequencing. Bivariate analysis was conducted using HOMA IR ≥2 as a dependent factor. IR prevalence was 43.5% (n = 40), vitamin D sufficiency was found in 76.1% (n = 70) and 72.8% (n = 67) had advanced liver fibrosis. In the bivariate analyses, elevated values of γGT (p = 0.024) and fibrosis staging (p = 0.004) were associated with IR, but IR was not related to core mutations. The presence of glutamine in position 70 was associated with low vitamin D concentration (p = 0.005). In the multivariate analysis, no variable was independently associated with HOMA-IR. In conclusion, lack of association between IR and HCV core mutations in positions 70 and 91 suggests that genetic variability of this region has little impact on IR. PMID:28753979

  4. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Lacking the Meq Oncogene in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously reported that deletion of Meq gene from oncogenic rMd5 virus rendered it apathogenic for chickens. Here we examined multiple factors affecting Marek’s disease (MD) vaccine efficacy of this non-pathogenic recombinant Meq null rMd5 virus (rMd5deltaMeq). These factors included host g...

  5. On the response (or lack thereof) of Japanese fans to criticism that yaoi is antigay discrimination [symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Akiko Hori

    2013-01-01

    In this essay I examine Japanese criticisms of yaoi as antigay discrimination and the reactions to these criticisms from Japanese yaoi fans. Japanese fans are often described as apolitical, and their apolitical attitude has been the subject of much controversy. Here, I identify the most salient aspects of fannish reaction to the charge that yaoi constitutes antigay discrimination. I want to reconsider criticisms of fans' reactions via an argument centered around people's conceptions of realit...

  6. Residues in the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain are critical for endocytic recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R; Smith, Stacy E; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of Hendra virus F following endocytosis and showed that it is primarily present in Rab5- and Rab4-positive endosomal compartments, suggesting that cathepsin L cleavage occurs in early endosomes. Hendra virus F transmembrane domain (TMD) residues S490 and Y498 were found to be important for correct Hendra virus F recycling, with the hydroxyl group of S490 and the aromatic ring of Y498 important for this process. In addition, changes in association of isolated Hendra virus F TMDs correlated with alterations to Hendra virus F recycling, suggesting that appropriate TMD interactions play an important role in endocytic trafficking.

  7. On the response (or lack thereof of Japanese fans to criticism that yaoi is antigay discrimination [symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Hori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I examine Japanese criticisms of yaoi as antigay discrimination and the reactions to these criticisms from Japanese yaoi fans. Japanese fans are often described as apolitical, and their apolitical attitude has been the subject of much controversy. Here, I identify the most salient aspects of fannish reaction to the charge that yaoi constitutes antigay discrimination. I want to reconsider criticisms of fans' reactions via an argument centered around people's conceptions of reality and fantasy, which gives more weight to the status of yaoi as a part of popular culture.

  8. Bioinformatic and immunological analysis reveals lack of support for measles virus related mimicry in Crohn’s disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polymeros, Dimitrios; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Smyk, Daniel S; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Ladas, Spiros D

    2014-01-01

    A link between measles virus and Crohn?s disease (CD) has been postulated. We assessed through bioinformatic and immunological approaches whether measles is implicated in CD induction, through molecular mimicry...

  9. The effect of critical pH on virus fate and transport in saturated porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huade; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Schaffer, Steve; Pillai, Suresh D

    2003-01-01

    Several viral transport experiments were conducted in a model aquifer 1 m long, using bacteriophages MS2 and phiX174 at various pH (4.6 to 8.3) conditions, to increase our understanding of virus behavior in ground water. The results indicate the existence of a critical pH at which the virus behavior changes abruptly. This is supported by data from field and batch experiments. The critical pH is determined to be 0.5 unit below the highest isoelectric point of the virus and porous medium. When water pH is below the critical pH, the virus has an opposite charge to at least one component of the porous medium, and is almost completely and irreversibly removed from the water. This suggests that electrostatic attraction at a subcritical water pH condition is an important factor controlling virus attenuation in ground water. The concept of critical pH can assist in the design of geologic barriers for preventing viral contamination in ground water.

  10. Lack of detection of host associated differences in Newcastle disease viruses of genotype VIId isolated from chickens and geese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuyang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goose is usually considered to be resistant even to strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV that are markedly virulent for chickens. However, ND outbreaks have been frequently reported in goose flocks in China since the late 1990s with the concurrent emergence of genotype VIId NDV in chickens. Although the NDVs isolated from both chickens and geese in the past 15 years have been predominantly VIId viruses, published data comparing goose- and chicken-originated ND viruses are scarce and controversial. Results In this paper, we compared genotype VIId NDVs originated from geese and chickens genetically and pathologically. Ten entire genomic sequences and 329 complete coding sequences of individual genes from genotype VIId NDVs of both goose- and chicken-origin were analyzed. We then randomly selected two goose-originated and two chicken-originated VIId NDVs and compared their pathobiology in both geese and chickens in vivo and in vitro with genotype IV virus Herts/33 as a reference. The results showed that all the VIId NDVs either from geese or from chickens shared high sequence homology and characteristic amino acid substitutions and clustered together in phylogenetic trees. In addition, geese and chickens infected by goose or chicken VIId viruses manifested very similar pathological features distinct from those of birds infected with Herts/33. Conclusions There is no genetic or phenotypic difference between genotype VIId NDVs originated from geese and chickens. Therefore, no species-preference exists for either goose or chicken viruses and more attention should be paid to the trans-species transmission of VIId NDVs between geese and chickens for the control and eradication of ND.

  11. Specific mutations in the PB2 protein of influenza A virus compensate for the lack of efficient IFN antagonism of the NS1 protein of bat influenza A-like viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; Pavlisin, Amzie; Martinez-Romero, Carles; Tripathi, Shashank; Mena, Ignacio; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Vicente-Santos, Amanda; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Schwemmle, Martin; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2018-01-10

    Recently, two new influenza A-like viruses have been discovered in bats, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11. The hemagglutinin-like (HL) and neuraminidase like (NL) proteins of these viruses lack hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities despite their sequence and structural homologies with the HA and NA proteins of conventional influenza A virus. We now have investigated whether the NS1 proteins of HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 viruses can functionally substitute the NS1 protein of a conventional influenza A virus. For this purpose we generated recombinant influenza A/PR8/34 (PR8) H1N1 viruses containing the NS1 protein of PR8 WT, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 viruses. These viruses (r/NS1PR8, r/NS1HL17, r/NS1HL18) were tested for replication in bat and non-bat mammalian cells and in mice. Our results demonstrate that r/NS1HL17 and r/NS1HL18 viruses are attenuated in vitro and in vivo However, bat NS1 recombinant viruses showed similar phenotypes as r/NS1PR8 virus in STAT1-/- human A549 cells and mice, unable to respond to IFN. Interestingly, multiple mouse passages of r/NS1HL17 and r/NS1HL18 viruses resulted in selection of mutant viruses containing single amino acid mutations in the viral PB2 protein. In contrast to the parental viruses, the selected PB2 mutants restored virulence and IFN antagonism. Our results indicate that the NS1 protein of bat influenza A-like viruses is less efficient than its conventional influenza A virus NS1 counterpart in antagonizing the IFN response, and that this deficiency can be overcome by the influenza virus PB2 protein.ImportanceSignificant gaps are still uncovered in our understanding of the basic features of the recently discovered bat influenza A-like viruses, HL17NL10 and HL18NL11. These unique viruses display both similarities and differences in basic biology compared to conventional influenza A viruses. In here, we show that recombinant influenza A viruses containing the NS1 protein from HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 are attenuated. This attenuation was

  12. Delayed contraction of the CD8+ T cell response toward lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice lacking serglycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Christensen, Jan P; Sørensen, Maria R

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that the lack of serglycin proteoglycan affects secretory granule morphology and granzyme B (GrB) storage in in vitro generated CTLs. In this study, the role of serglycin during viral infection was studied by infecting wild-type (wt) mice and serglycin-deficient (SG...

  13. NK cells lacking FcεRIγ are associated with reduced liver damage in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun S; Ali, Alaa K; Kim, Sungjin; Corsi, Daniel J; Cooper, Curtis L; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-04-01

    A novel subset of human natural killer (NK) cells, which displays potent and broad antiviral responsiveness in concert with virus-specific antibodies, was recently uncovered in cytomegalovirus (CMV)+ individuals. This NK-cell subset (g-NK) was characterized by a deficiency in the expression of FcεRIγ adaptor protein and the long-lasting memory-like NK-cell phenotype, suggesting a role in chronic infections. This study investigates whether the g-NK-cell subset is associated with the magnitude of liver disease during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Analysis of g-NK-cell proportions and function in the PBMCs of healthy controls and chronic HCV subjects showed that chronic HCV subjects had slightly lower proportions of the g-NK-cell subset having similarly enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses compared to conventional NK cells. Notably, among CMV+ chronic HCV patients, lower levels of liver enzymes and fibrosis were found in those possessing g-NK cells. g-NK cells were predominant among the CD56(neg) NK cell population often found in chronic HCV patients, suggesting their involvement in immune response during HCV infection. For the first time, our findings indicate that the presence of the g-NK cells in CMV+ individuals is associated with amelioration of liver disease in chronic HCV infection, suggesting the beneficial roles of g-NK cells during a chronic infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lack of Awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Problems and Solutions With Self-reported HIV Serostatus of Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Travis H; Kelley, Colleen F; Rosenberg, Eli; Luisi, Nicole; O'Hara, Brandon; Lambert, Rodriques; Coleman, Raphael; Frew, Paula; Salazar, Laura F; Tao, Sijia; Clarke, William; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2014-09-01

    Lack of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection awareness may be a driver of racial disparities in HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM). Lack of awareness is typically measured by comparing HIV test result to self-reported HIV status. This measure may be subject to reporting bias and alternatives are needed. The InvolveMENt study examined HIV disparities between black and white MSM from Atlanta. Among HIV-positive participants who did not report knowing they were positive, we examined other measures of awareness: HIV viral load (VL) HIV case surveillance report. Using self-report only, 32% (62 of 192) of black and 16% (7 of 45) of white MSM were not aware of their HIV infection (P = .03). Using self-report and low VL, 25% (48 of 192) black and 16% (7 of 45) white MSM lacked awareness (P = .18). Using self-report and ARVs, 26% (50 of 192) black and 16% (7 of 45) white MSM lacked awareness (P = .14). Using self-report and surveillance report, 15% (28 of 192) black and 13% (6 of 45) white MSM lacked awareness (P = .83). Self-report only may overestimate true lack of awareness of HIV status for black MSM. If, as our data suggest, black MSM are not less likely to be aware of their HIV infection than are white MSM, then this factor is not a substantial driver of HIV disparity. Future HIV research that depends on accurate measurement of HIV status awareness should consider including additional laboratory and case surveillance data.

  15. Lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA is critical for neonatal lethality in Prader-Willi syndrome mouse models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Feng [Stanford University; Prints, Yelena [Stanford University; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Garnacho-Montero, Carmen [University of Pennsylvania; Nicholls, Robert [University of Pennsylvania; Francke, Uta [Stanford University

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by the lack of paternal expression of imprinted genes in the human chromosome region 15q11-13. Recent studies of rare human translocation patients narrowed the PWS critical genes to a 121-kb region containing PWCR1/HBII-85 and HBII-438 snoRNA genes. The existing mouse models of PWS that lack the expression of multiple genes, including Snrpn, Ube3a, and many intronic snoRNA genes, are characterized by 80%-100% neonatal lethality. To define the candidate region for PWS-like phenotypes in mice,we analyzed the expression of several genetic elements in mice carrying the large radiation-induced p30PUb deletion that includes the p locus. Mice having inherited this deletion from either parent develop normally into adulthood. By Northern blot and RTPCR assays of brain tissue, we found that Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNAs are expressed normally, while MBII-52 snoRNAs are not expressed when the deletion is paternally inherited. Mapping of the distal deletion breakpoint indicated that the p30PUb deletion includes the entire MBII-52 snoRNA gene cluster and three previously unmapped EST sequences. The lack of expression of these elements in mice with a paternal p30PUb deletion indicates that they are not critical for the neonatal lethality observed in PWS mouse models. In addition, we identified MBII-436, the mouse homolog of the HBII-436 snoRNA, confirmed its imprinting status, and mapped it outside of the p30PUb deletion. Taking together all available data, we conclude that the lack of Pwcr1/MBII-85 snoRNA expression is the most likely cause for the neonatal lethality in PWS model mice.

  16. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  17. Virus Detection in Critically Ill Children with Acute Respiratory Disease : A New Profile in View of New Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Bates, Angela; Lee, Bonita E; Drews, Steven; Garros, Daniel

    2017-11-13

    To describe the epidemiology of critically ill children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with acute respiratory disease. The association with intubation was analyzed for the three most prevalent viruses and in those with and without viral co-infection. Patients admitted to the PICU (2004 - 2014) with acute respiratory disease were included. Analyses were performed utilizing each respiratory viral infection or multiple viral infections as an exposure. There were 1,766 admissions with acute respiratory disease of which 1,372 had respiratory virus testing and 748 had one or more viruses detected. The risk of intubation before or during the PICU stay was higher if parainfluenza virus was detected compared to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (OR: 2.20; 95%CI: 1.06 - 4.56). Sixty-three admissions had two or more viruses detected and the combination of RSV and rhino/entero virus was the most common. No significant difference was observed in the risk of intubation between patients with multiple and single viral infections. Higher risk of intubation was found in patients with parainfluenza as compared to RSV. The risk of intubation comparing parainfluenza virus to other viruses and for patients with multiple versus single virus needs to be further studied. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 Is Critical for Protection against Theiler's Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Seung Jae; So, Eui Young; Meng, Liping; Colonna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Infection of dendritic and glial cells with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces various cytokines via Toll-like receptor- and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-dependent pathways. However, the involvement and role of MDA5 in cytokine gene activation and the pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that MDA5 plays a critical role in the production of TMEV-induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) during early viral infection and in protection against the development of virus-induced demyelinating disease. Our results indicate that MDA5-deficient 129SvJ mice display significantly higher viral loads and apparent demyelinating lesions in the central nerve system (CNS) accompanied by clinical symptoms compared with wild-type 129SvJ mice. During acute viral infection, MDA5-deficient mice produced elevated levels of chemokines, consistent with increased cellular infiltration, but reduced levels of IFN-α, known to control T cell responses and cellular infiltration. Additional studies with isolated CNS glial cells from these mice suggest that cells from MDA5-deficient mice are severely compromised in the production of IFN-α upon viral infection, which results in increased cellular infiltration and viral loads in the CNS. Despite inadequate stimulation, the overall T cell responses to the viral determinants were significantly elevated in MDA5-deficient mice, reflecting the increased cellular infiltration. Therefore, the lack of MDA5-mediated IFN-α production may facilitate a massive viral load and elevated cellular infiltration in the CNS during early viral infection, leading to the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. PMID:22090123

  19. Uncertainty, lack of control and emotional functioning in women with metastatic breast cancer: a review and secondary analysis of the literature using the critical appraisal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M

    2010-09-01

    A diagnosis of metastatic (or secondary) breast cancer is frequently more distressing than the diagnosis of a primary tumour since it indicates that the cancer is no longer curable. Relatively little is known, however, about women's experiences of this condition in comparison with those diagnosed with primary breast cancer. This paper therefore reports findings from a secondary analysis of the published literature on the topic using tools from the critical appraisal skills programme to identify and analyse appropriate papers, and the constant comparative method as a means of identifying any overarching or dominant themes emerging from the literature. Uncertainty, lack of control and poor emotional functioning emerged as the main themes affecting women with metastatic breast cancer. These are discussed in relation to their antecedents in the original studies and their implications for nursing care. The themes demonstrate that living with metastatic (or secondary) breast cancer is a multifaceted experience that is influenced by a large number of factors, many of which are under-researched in comparison with those affecting women diagnosed with primary disease. It is clear, however, that women affected by the condition need a great deal more support than they currently receive, and new services may be required to meet these needs.

  20. Two Case Reports of Neuroinvasive West Nile Virus Infection in the Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo M. Flores Anticona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical course of two cases of neuroinvasive West Nile Virus (WNV infection in the critical care unit. The first case is a 70-year-old man who presented during summer with mental status changes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis revealed pleocytosis with lymphocyte predominance. WNV serology was positive in the CSF. His condition worsened with development of left-sided weakness and deterioration of mental status requiring intensive care. The patient gradually improved and was discharged with residual left-sided weakness and near-complete improvement in his mental status. The second case is an 81-year-old man who presented with mental status changes, fever, lower extremity weakness, and difficulty in walking. CSF analysis showed pleocytosis with neutrophil predominance. WNV serology was also positive in CSF. During the hospital stay his mentation worsened, eventually requiring intubation for airway protection and critical care support. The patient gradually improved and was discharged with residual upper and lower extremity paresis. Neuroinvasive WNV infection can lead to significant morbidity, especially in the elderly. These cases should be suspected in patients with antecedent outdoor activities during summer. It is important for critical care providers to be aware of and maintain a high clinical suspicion of this disease process.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus: A Critical Appraisal of New Approaches to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The HCV council 2011 convened 11 leading clinicians and researchers in hepatitis C virus from academic medical centers in the United States to provide a forum for the practical and comprehensive evaluation of current data regarding best practices for integrating new direct-acting antiviral agents into existing treatment paradigms. The council investigated 10 clinical practice statements related to HCV treatment that reflect key topical areas. Faculty members reviewed and discussed the data related to each statement, and voted on the nature of the evidence and their level of support for each statement. In this new era of DAAs, a comprehensive and critical analysis of the literature is needed to equip clinicians with the knowledge necessary to design, monitor, and modify treatment regimens in order to optimize patient outcomes.

  2. Low Virulence and Lack of Airborne Transmission of the Dutch Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N8 in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Richard

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N8 viruses that emerged in poultry in East Asia spread to Europe and North America by late 2014. Here we show that the European HPAI H5N8 viruses differ from the Korean and Japanese HPAI H5N8 viruses by several amino acids and that a Dutch HPAI H5N8 virus had low virulence and was not transmitted via the airborne route in ferrets. The virus did not cross-react with sera raised against pre-pandemic H5 vaccine strains. This data is useful for public health risk assessments.

  3. Lack of Epstein-Barr virus- and HIV-specific CD27- CD8+ T cells is associated with progression to viral disease in HIV-infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarle, Debbie; Kostense, Stefan; Hovenkamp, Egbert; Ogg, Graham; Nanlohy, Nening; Callan, Margaret F. C.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; McMichael, Andrew J.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Miedema, Frank

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite readily detectable virus-specific CD8+ T cells in most HIV-infected patients, immune surveillance is eventually lost, leading to progression to AIDS. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this loss of immune control phenotypic analysis of HIV- and Epstein-Barr virus

  4. Lack of T cell dysfunction and programmed cell death in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected chimpanzees correlates with absence of monocytotropic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, H.; Meyaard, L.; Kootstra, N. A.; Dubbes, R.; Otto, S. A.; Tersmette, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    In asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, disturbed T cell functions such as anergy and programmed cell death, thought to result from inappropriate signaling by antigen-presenting cells due to HIV infection, precede increase in virus load, decline in CD4+ T cell

  5. Lack of a clinically significant drug-drug interaction in healthy volunteers between the hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor boceprevir and the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanter, C.T. de; Blonk, M.I.; Colbers, A.P.; Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Burger, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are likely to use both HIV and HCV treatment. Drug-drug interactions have been demonstrated between boceprevir, an HCV protease inhibitor, and frequently prescribed antiretroviral drugs, such as

  6. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus......-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely...... deleted, indicating that host genotype influences the severity of the T cell defect. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the less persisting virus, CD8(+) T cell dysfunction was not as pronounced, although it was clearly present. Most importantly, the appearance of dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells clearly...

  7. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely deleted, indicating that host genotype influences the severity of the T cell defect. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the less persisting virus, CD8(+) T cell dysfunction was not as pronounced, although it was clearly present. Most importantly, the appearance of dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells clearly precedes recrudescence of detectable virus, indicating that the T cell defect is not simply a secondary event due to virus buildup resulting from the failure of B(-/-) mice to produce neutralizing Abs. In contrast with CD8(+) T cells, which initially respond almost as in wild-type mice, the priming of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells was markedly impaired in B(-/-) mice infected with either virus strain. Thus, our results indicate that B cells play an important role in antiviral immunity not only as Ab producers, but also in promoting an optimal and sustained T cell response. The T cell defects are likely to contribute to the chronic course of viral infection in B(-/-) mice.

  8. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  9. Expansion and Protection by a Virus-Specific NK Cell Subset Lacking Expression of the Inhibitory NKR-P1B Receptor during Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mir Munir A; Wight, Andrew; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Aguilar, Oscar A; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Vidal, Silvia M; Carlyle, James R; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-09-15

    NK cells play a major role in immune defense against human and murine CMV (MCMV) infection. Although the MCMV genome encodes for MHC class I-homologous decoy ligands for inhibitory NK cell receptors to evade detection, some mouse strains have evolved activating receptors, such as Ly49H, to recognize these ligands and initiate an immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that approximately half of the Ly49H-expressing (Ly49H(+)) NK cells in the spleen and liver of C57BL/6 mice also express the inhibitory NKR-P1B receptor. During MCMV infection, the NKR-P1B(-)Ly49H(+) NK cell subset proliferates to constitute the bulk of the NK cell population. This NK cell subset also confers better protection against MCMV infection compared with the NKR-P1B(+)Ly49H(+) subset. The two populations are composed of cells that differ in their surface expression of receptors such as Ly49C/I and NKG2A/C/E, as well as developmental markers, CD27 and CD11b, and the high-affinity IL-2R (CD25) following infection. Although the NKR-P1B(+) NK cells can produce effector molecules such as IFNs and granzymes, their proliferation is inhibited during infection. A similar phenotype in MCMV-infected Clr-b-deficient mice, which lack the ligand for NKR-P1B, suggests the involvement of ligands other than the host Clr-b. Most interestingly, genetic deficiency of the NKR-P1B, but not Clr-b, results in accelerated virus clearance and recovery from MCMV infection. This study is particularly significant because the mouse NKR-P1B:Clr-b receptor:ligand system represents the closest homolog of the human NKR-P1A:LLT1 system and may have a direct relevance to human CMV infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Cholesterol-rich lipid rafts play a critical role in bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyang; Yu, Liyun; Hou, Xilin

    2017-10-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized lipid domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipid, which can be utilized in the lifecycle of numerous enveloped viruses. Bovine parainfluenza virustype3 (BPIV3) entry to cell is mediated by receptor binding and membrane fusion, but how lipid rafts in host cell membrane and BPIV3 envelope affect virus infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of lipid rafts in the different stages of BPIV3 infection. The MDBK cells were treated by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to disrupt cellular lipid raft, and the virus infection was determined. The results showed that MβCD significantly inhibited BPIV3 infection in a dose-dependent manner, but didn't block the binding of virus to the cell membrane. Whereas, the MDBK cells treated by MβCD after virus-entry had no effects on the virus infection, to suggest that BPIV3 infection was associated with lipid rafts in cell membrane during viral entry stage. To further confirm lipid rafts in viral envelope also affected BPIV3 infection, we treated BPIV3 with MβCD to determine the virus titer. We found that disruption of the viral lipid raft caused a significant reduction of viral yield. Cholesterol reconstitution experiment showed that BPIV3 infection was successfully restored by cholesterol supplementation both in cellular membrane and viral envelope, which demonstrated that cholesterol-rich lipid rafts played a critical role in BPIV3 infection. These findings provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of BPIV3 infection and imply that lipid raft might be a good potential therapeutic target to prevent virus infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Chimeric avian paramyxovirus-based vector immunization against highly pathogenic avian influenza followed by conventional Newcastle disease vaccination eliminates lack of protection from virulent ND virus

    OpenAIRE

    Steglich, C.; Grund, C.; A. Röder; Zhao, N.; Mettenleiter, T C; Römer-Oberdörfer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we described a chimeric, hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5 expressing Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-based vector vaccine (chNDVFHNPMV8H5) in which NDV envelope glycoproteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus-8 (APMV-8). This chimeric vaccine induced solid protection against lethal HPAIV H5N1 even in chickens with maternal antibodies against NDV (MDA+). However, due to the absence of the major NDV immunogens it failed to induce protection...

  12. Lack of infection with XMRV or other MLV-related viruses in blood, post-mortem brains and paternal gametes of autistic individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Lintas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD is characterized by impaired language, communication and social skills, as well as by repetitive and stereotypic patterns of behavior. Many autistic subjects display a dysregulation of the immune system which is compatible with an unresolved viral infection with prenatal onset, potentially due to vertical viral transmission. Recently, the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV has been implicated in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and in prostate cancer by several, though not all studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed whether XMRV or other murine leukemia virus (MLV-related viruses are involved in autistic disorder. Using nested PCR targeted to gag genomic sequences, we screened DNA samples from: (i peripheral blood of 102 ASD patients and 97 controls, (ii post-mortem brain samples of 20 ASD patients and 17 sex- and age-matched controls, (iii semen samples of 11 fathers of ASD children, 25 infertile individuals and 7 fertile controls. No XMRV gag DNA sequences were detected, whereas peripheral blood samples of 3/97 (3.1% controls were positive for MLV. CONCLUSIONS| SIGNIFICANCE: No MLV-related virus was detected in blood, brain, and semen samples of ASD patients or fathers. Hence infection with XMRV or other MLV-related viruses is unlikely to contribute to autism pathogenesis.

  13. Patterns of Human Respiratory Viruses and Lack of MERS-Coronavirus in Patients with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Southwestern Province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abdulhaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We undertook enhanced surveillance of those presenting with respiratory symptoms at five healthcare centers by testing all symptomatic outpatients between November 2013 and January 2014 (winter time. Nasal swabs were collected from 182 patients and screened for MERS-CoV as well as other respiratory viruses using RT-PCR and multiplex microarray. A total of 75 (41.2% of these patients had positive viral infection. MERS-CoV was not detected in any of the samples. Human rhinovirus (hRV was the most detected pathogen (40.9% followed by non-MERS-CoV human coronaviruses (19.3%, influenza (Flu viruses (15.9%, and human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV (13.6%. Viruses differed markedly depending on age in which hRV, Flu A, and hCoV-OC43 were more prevalent in adults and RSV, hCoV-HKU1, and hCoV-NL63 were mostly restricted to children under the age of 15. Moreover, coinfection was not uncommon in this study, in which 17.3% of the infected patients had dual infections due to several combinations of viruses. Dual infections decreased with age and completely disappeared in people older than 45 years. Our study confirms that MERS-CoV is not common in the southwestern region of Saudi Arabia and shows high diversity and prevalence of other common respiratory viruses. This study also highlights the importance and contribution of enhanced surveillance systems for better infection control.

  14. Experimentally infected domestic ducks show efficient transmission of Indonesian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, but lack persistent viral shedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Wibawa

    Full Text Available Ducks are important maintenance hosts for avian influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. A previous study indicated that persistence of H5N1 viruses in ducks after the development of humoral immunity may drive viral evolution following immune selection. As H5N1 HPAI is endemic in Indonesia, this mechanism may be important in understanding H5N1 evolution in that region. To determine the capability of domestic ducks to maintain prolonged shedding of Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 virus, two groups of Pekin ducks were inoculated through the eyes, nostrils and oropharynx and viral shedding and transmission investigated. Inoculated ducks (n = 15, which were mostly asymptomatic, shed infectious virus from the oral route from 1 to 8 days post inoculation, and from the cloacal route from 2-8 dpi. Viral ribonucleic acid was detected from 1-15 days post inoculation from the oral route and 1-24 days post inoculation from the cloacal route (cycle threshold <40. Most ducks seroconverted in a range of serological tests by 15 days post inoculation. Virus was efficiently transmitted during acute infection (5 inoculation-infected to all 5 contact ducks. However, no evidence for transmission, as determined by seroconversion and viral shedding, was found between an inoculation-infected group (n = 10 and contact ducks (n = 9 when the two groups only had contact after 10 days post inoculation. Clinical disease was more frequent and more severe in contact-infected (2 of 5 than inoculation-infected ducks (1 of 15. We conclude that Indonesian clade 2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not persist in individual ducks after acute infection.

  15. Characterization of Marek's disease virus insertion and deletion mutants that lack US1 (ICP22 homolog), US10, and/or US2 and neighboring short-component open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, M S; Anderson, A S; Cantello, J L; Morgan, R W

    1994-01-01

    We report the characterization of Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains having mutations in various genes that map to the unique short (US) region of the viral genome. A deletion mutant (GA delta 4.8lac) lacks 4.8 kbp of US region DNA, the deleted segment having been replaced by the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli. This deletion results in the loss of the MDV-encoded US1, US10, and US2 homologs of herpes simplex virus type 1, as well as three putative MDV-specific genes, Sorf1, Sorf2, and Sorf3. Two mutants containing lacZ insertions in the US1 and US10 genes have been constructed, and we have previously reported a US2lac insertion mutant (J. L. Cantello, A. S. Anderson, A. Francesconi, and R. W. Morgan, J. Virol. 65:1584-1588, 1991). The isolation of these mutants indicates that the relevant genes are not required for growth of MDV in chicken embryo fibroblasts. The mutants had early growth kinetics indistinguishable from those of their parent viruses; however, 5 to 7 days after being plated, the US1 insertion mutant (US1lac) and the GA delta 4.8lac deletion mutant showed a 5- to 10-fold decrease in virus growth. This decrease in virus accumulation correlated with a 30 to 50% decrease in plaquing efficiency when these viruses were plated onto established versus fresh chicken embryo fibroblast monolayers compared with a 10 to 15% decrease seen for the parent viruses and for the US10lac or US2lac insertion mutants. Finally, GA delta 4.8lac could be reisolated from chickens, indicating that the deleted genes are not required for the infection of chickens following intra-abdominal inoculation of an attenuated serotype 1 MDV. Images PMID:7966617

  16. Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provides lack of evidence for epidemiological peak of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Wasley, Jeff; Esler, Daniel N.; Stalknecht, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provided no evidence for an epidemiologic peak of infection. Isolates were recovered, however, that provide information on viral diversity and dispersal that may not be realized through sampling efforts focused on other avian taxa.

  17. Marek’s disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotrophic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unimmunized host birds. The causative pathogen, Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres during viral latency an...

  18. A Simulation Study Reveals Lack of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment in De-escalated Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Mieke; Roberts, Jason A; Stove, Veronique; Verstraete, Alain G; Lipman, Jeffrey; De Waele, Jan J

    2015-08-01

    De-escalation of empirical antibiotic therapy is often included in antimicrobial stewardship programs in critically ill patients, but differences in target attainment when antibiotics are switched are rarely considered. The primary objective of this study was to compare the fractional target attainments of contemporary dosing of empirical broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics and narrower-spectrum antibiotics for a number pathogens for which de-escalation may be considered. The secondary objective was to determine whether alternative dosing strategies improve target attainment. We performed a simulation study using published population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in critically ill patients for a number of broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics and narrower-spectrum antibiotics. Simulations were undertaken using a data set obtained from critically ill patients with sepsis without absolute renal failure (n = 49). The probability of target attainment of antibiotic therapy for different microorganisms for which de-escalation was applied was analyzed. EUCAST MIC distribution data were used to calculate fractional target attainment. The probability that therapeutic exposure will be achieved was lower for the narrower-spectrum antibiotics with conventional dosing than for the broad-spectrum alternatives and could drastically be improved with higher dosages and different modes of administrations. For a selection of microorganisms, the probability that therapeutic exposure will be achieved was overall lower for the narrower-spectrum antibiotics using conventional dosing than for the broad-spectrum antibiotics. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Evidence of psittacine beak and feather disease virus spillover into wild critically endangered Orange-bellied Parrots (Neophema chrysogaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew; Patterson, Edward I; Baker, Barry G B; Holdsworth, Mark; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-04-01

    We report the recent emergence of a novel beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotype in the last remaining wild population of the critically endangered Orange-bellied Parrot (Neophema chrysogaster). This virus poses a significant threat to the recovery of the species and potentially its survival in the wild. We used PCR to detect BFDV in the blood of three psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD)-affected wild Orange-bellied Parrot fledglings captured as founders for an existing captive breeding recovery program. Complete BFDV genome sequence data from one of these birds demonstrating a 1,993-nucleotide-long read encompass the entire circular genome. Maximum-likelihood (ML) and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic analysis supported the solitary position of this viral isolate in a genetically isolated branch of BFDV. On Rep gene sequencing, a homologous genotype was present in a second wild orange-bellied parrot and the third bird was infected with a distantly related genotype. These viruses have newly appeared in a population that has been intensively monitored for BFDV for the last 13 yr. The detection of two distinct lineages of BFDV in the remnant wild population of Orange-bellied Parrots, consisting of fewer than 50 birds, suggests a role for other parrot species as a reservoir for infection by spillover into this critically endangered species. The potential for such a scenario to contribute to the extinction of a remnant wild animal population is supported by epidemiologic theory.

  20. Infectious Epstein-Barr virus lacking major glycoprotein BLLF1 (gp350/220) demonstrates the existence of additional viral ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, A; Oezel, M; Kurzeder, C; Mautner, J; Pich, D; Kost, M; Hammerschmidt, W; Delecluse, H J

    2000-11-01

    The binding of the viral major glycoprotein BLLF1 (gp350/220) to the CD21 cellular receptor is thought to play an essential role during infection of B lymphocytes by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). However, since CD21-negative cells have been reported to be infectible with EBV, additional interactions between viral and cellular molecules seem to be probable. Based on a recombinant genomic EBV plasmid, we deleted the gene that encodes the viral glycoprotein BLLF1. We tested the ability of the viral mutant to infect different lymphoid and epithelial cell lines. Primary human B cells, lymphoid cell lines, and nearly all of the epithelial cell lines that are susceptible to wild-type EBV infection could also be successfully infected with the viral mutant in vitro, although the efficiency of infection with BLLF1-negative virus was clearly lower than the one observed with wild-type EBV. Our studies show that the interaction between BLLF1 and CD21 is not absolutely required for the infection of lymphocytes and epithelial cells, indicating that viral molecules other than BLLF1 can mediate the binding of EBV to its target cells. In this context, our results further suggest the hypothesis that additional cellular molecules, apart from CD21, allow virus entry into these cells.

  1. Recombinant myxoma virus lacking all poxvirus ankyrin-repeat proteins stimulates multiple cellular anti-viral pathways and exhibits a severe decrease in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Stephanie A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2014-09-01

    Although the production of single gene knockout viruses is a useful strategy to study viral gene functions, the redundancy of many host interactive genes within a complex viral genome can obscure their collective functions. In this study, a rabbit-specific poxvirus, myxoma virus (MYXV), was genetically altered to disrupt multiple members of the poxviral ankyrin-repeat (ANK-R) protein superfamily, M-T5, M148, M149 and M150. A particularly robust activation of the NF-κB pathway was observed in A549 cells following infection with the complete ANK-R knockout (vMyx-ANKsKO). Also, an increased release of IL-6 was only observed upon infection with vMyx-ANKsKO. In virus-infected rabbit studies, vMyx-ANKsKO was the most extensively attenuated and produced the smallest primary lesion of all ANK-R mutant constructs. This study provides the first insights into the shared functions of the poxviral ANK-R protein superfamily in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  3. A candidate HIV/AIDS vaccine (MVA-B lacking vaccinia virus gene C6L enhances memory HIV-1-specific T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV C6 protein has sequence similarities with the poxvirus family Pox_A46, involved in regulation of host immune responses, but its role is unknown. Here, we have characterized the C6 protein and its effects in virus replication, innate immune sensing and immunogenicity in vivo. C6 is a 18.2 kDa protein, which is expressed early during virus infection and localizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Deletion of the C6L gene from the poxvirus vector MVA-B expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (MVA-B ΔC6L had no effect on virus growth kinetics; therefore C6 protein is not essential for virus replication. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B ΔC6L in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs are characterized by the up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β and IFN-α/β-inducible genes. In a DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice, flow cytometry analysis revealed that MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell memory immune responses, with most of the HIV-1 responses mediated by the CD8+ T-cell compartment with an effector phenotype. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env- and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔC6L induced more Gag-Pol-Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the levels of antibodies against Env in comparison with MVA-B. These findings revealed that C6 can be considered as an immunomodulator and that deleting C6L gene in MVA-B confers an immunological benefit by enhancing IFN-β-dependent responses and increasing the magnitude and quality of the T-cell memory immune responses to HIV-1 antigens. Our observations are relevant for the improvement of MVA vectors as HIV-1 vaccines.

  4. Lack of Correlation between Virus Barosensitivity and the Presence of a Viral Envelope during Inactivation of Human Rotavirus, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus, and Avian Metapneumovirus by High-Pressure Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fangfei; Neetoo, Hudaa; Li, Junan; Chen, Haiqiang; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    High-pressure processing (HPP) is a nonthermal technology that has been shown to effectively inactivate a wide range of microorganisms. However, the effectiveness of HPP on inactivation of viruses is relatively less well understood. We systematically investigated the effects of intrinsic (pH) and processing (pressure, time, and temperature) parameters on the pressure inactivation of a nonenveloped virus (human rotavirus [HRV]) and two enveloped viruses (vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] and avian metapneumovirus [aMPV]). We demonstrated that HPP can efficiently inactivate all tested viruses under optimal conditions, although the pressure susceptibilities and the roles of temperature and pH substantially varied among these viruses regardless of the presence of a viral envelope. We found that VSV was much more stable than most food-borne viruses, whereas aMPV was highly susceptible to HPP. When viruses were held for 2 min under 350 MPa at 4°C, 1.1-log, 3.9-log, and 5.0-log virus reductions were achieved for VSV, HRV, and aMPV, respectively. Both VSV and aMPV were more susceptible to HPP at higher temperature and lower pH. In contrast, HRV was more easily inactivated at higher pH, although temperature did not have a significant impact on inactivation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the damage of virion structure by disruption of the viral envelope and/or capsid is the primary mechanism underlying HPP-induced viral inactivation. In addition, VSV glycoprotein remained antigenic although VSV was completely inactivated. Taken together, our findings suggest that HPP is a promising technology to eliminate viral contaminants in high-risk foods, water, and other fomites. PMID:22003028

  5. Critical factors for the replication of mumps virus in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts defined by the use of design of experiments (DoE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markusic, Maja; Pavlović, Nediljko; Santak, Maja; Marić, Gorana; Kotarski, Ljerka; Forcic, Dubravko

    2013-02-01

    Live attenuated vaccines against mumps virus (MuV) have been traditionally produced by passaging the virus in the embryonated chicken eggs or primary chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Virus propagation on these cell substrates enables successful virus attenuation and retains it sufficiently antigenic to induce lasting protective immunity in humans. The aim of this study was to identify critical factors for MuV replication in primary CEFs grown on a small-scale level in order to explore possibilities for improvements in the virus replication and yield. The effect of differently prepared cells, culturing conditions, and infection conditions on virus yield was estimated by employing statistical design of experiments (DoE) methodology. Our results show that the preparation of primary CEFs and the way of their infection substantially impact virus yield and are critical for efficient MuV replication. These process parameters should be considered in further process optimization. We also demonstrate the applicability of DoE in optimization of virus replication as a crucial step in obtaining high virus yields.

  6. Neutralizing Antibodies in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C, Genotype 1, against a Panel of Genotype 1 Culture Viruses: Lack of Correlation to Treatment Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Jensen, Tanja B.; Carlsen, Thomas H. R.; Schønning, Kristian; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Laursen, Alex Lund; Krarup, Henrik; Bukh, Jens; Weis, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The correlation of neutralizing antibodies to treatment outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether neutralizing antibodies could be used as an outcome predictor in patients with chronic HCV, genotype 1, infection treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. Thirty-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1a or 1b, with either sustained virologic response (n = 23) or non-sustained virologic response (n = 16) were enrolled. Samples taken prior to treatment were tested for their ability to neutralize 6 different HCV genotype 1 cell culture recombinants (1a: H77/JFH1, TN/JFH1, DH6/JFH1; 1b: J4/JFH1, DH1/JFH1, DH5/JFH1). The results were expressed as the highest dilution yielding 50% neutralization (NAb50-titer). We observed no genotype or subtype specific differences in NAb50-titers between patients with chronic HCV infection with and without sustained virologic response when tested against any of the included culture viruses. However, NAb50-titers varied significantly with a mean reciprocal NAb50-titer of 800 (range: 100–6400) against DH6/JFH1 compared to a mean NAb50-titer of 50 (range: genotype 1 isolates could not predict treatment outcome in patients with chronic HCV infection. High neutralization susceptibility of DH6/JFH1 could be correlated with adaptive envelope mutations previously highlighted as important for neutralization. Our study emphasizes the importance of using multiple culture viruses for neutralization studies and contributes to the current knowledge about neutralizing epitopes, important for future therapeutic- and vaccine-studies. PMID:23667506

  7. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, Jared R; Dar, Pervaiz A; Waters, Ryan; Toka, Felix N; Barrera, Jose; Schutta, Christopher; Kondabattula, Ganesh; Golde, William T

    2014-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a disease of cloven-hoofed animals and remains a threat to livestock industries throughout the world. IL-2 stimulation of PBMC resulted in poor killing of human K562 cells, which are often used as NK target cells, while lysis of the bovine BL3.1 cell line was readily detected. Depletion of NKp46-expressing cells revealed that 80% of the killing induced by IL-2 could be attributed to NKp46(+) cells. In order to characterize the response of NK cells against FMDV in vivo, we infected groups of cattle with three different strains of the virus (A24 Cruzeiro, O1 Manisa, O Hong Kong) and evaluated the cytolytic ability of NK cells through the course of infection. We consistently observed a transient increase in cytolysis, although there was variation in magnitude and kinetics. This increase in cytolysis remained when CD3(+) cells were removed from the preparation of lymphocytes, indicating that cytolysis was independent of MHC-T cell receptor interaction or γδ T cell activation. In contrast, animals monitored following vaccination against FMDV did not exhibit any increase in NK killing. These data suggest that NK cells play a role in the host immune response of cattle against FMDV, and contrast with the suppression of NK activity previously observed in swine infected with FMDV. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Deep sequencing-based transcriptome profiling reveals comprehensive insights into the responses of Nicotiana benthamiana to beet necrotic yellow vein virus infections containing or lacking RNA4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, encodes either four or five plus-sense single stranded RNAs and is the causal agent of sugar beet rhizomania disease, which is widely distributed in most regions of the world. BNYVV can also infect Nicotiana benthamiana systemically, and causes severe curling and stunting symptoms in the presence of RNA4 or mild symptoms in the absence of RNA4. RESULTS: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analyses showed that the RNA4-encoded p31 protein fused to the red fluorescent protein (RFP accumulated mainly in the nuclei of N. benthamiana epidermal cells. This suggested that severe RNA4-induced symptoms might result from p31-dependent modifications of the transcriptome. Therefore, we used next-generation sequencing technologies to analyze the transcriptome profile of N. benthamiana in response to infection with different isolates of BNYVV. Comparisons of the transcriptomes of mock, BN3 (RNAs 1+2+3, and BN34 (RNAs 1+2+3+4 infected plants identified 3,016 differentially expressed transcripts, which provided a list of candidate genes that potentially are elicited in response to virus infection. Our data indicate that modifications in the expression of genes involved in RNA silencing, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, cellulose synthesis, and metabolism of the plant hormone gibberellin may contribute to the severe symptoms induced by RNA4 from BNYVV. CONCLUSIONS: These results expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of N. benthamiana as well as provide valuable clues to identify genes potentially involved in resistance to BNYVV infection. Our global survey of gene expression changes in infected plants reveals new insights into the complicated molecular mechanisms underlying symptom development, and aids research into new strategies to protect crops against viruses.

  9. Neutralizing antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1, against a panel of genotype 1 culture viruses: lack of correlation to treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannie Pedersen

    Full Text Available The correlation of neutralizing antibodies to treatment outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether neutralizing antibodies could be used as an outcome predictor in patients with chronic HCV, genotype 1, infection treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. Thirty-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1a or 1b, with either sustained virologic response (n = 23 or non-sustained virologic response (n = 16 were enrolled. Samples taken prior to treatment were tested for their ability to neutralize 6 different HCV genotype 1 cell culture recombinants (1a: H77/JFH1, TN/JFH1, DH6/JFH1; 1b: J4/JFH1, DH1/JFH1, DH5/JFH1. The results were expressed as the highest dilution yielding 50% neutralization (NAb50-titer. We observed no genotype or subtype specific differences in NAb50-titers between patients with chronic HCV infection with and without sustained virologic response when tested against any of the included culture viruses. However, NAb50-titers varied significantly with a mean reciprocal NAb50-titer of 800 (range: 100-6400 against DH6/JFH1 compared to a mean NAb50-titer of 50 (range: <50-400 against all other included isolates. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the efficient neutralization of DH6/JFH1 could be linked to engineered adaptive mutations in the envelope-2 protein. In analysis of envelope 1 and 2 sequences of HCV, recovered from a subset of patients, we observed no apparent link between relatedness of patient sequences with culture viruses used and the corresponding neutralization results. In conclusion, pre-treatment levels of neutralizing antibodies against HCV genotype 1 isolates could not predict treatment outcome in patients with chronic HCV infection. High neutralization susceptibility of DH6/JFH1 could be correlated with adaptive envelope mutations previously highlighted as important for neutralization. Our

  10. Lack of association between ectoparasite intensities and rabies virus neutralizing antibody seroprevalence in wild big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), Fort Collins, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, R.D.; O'Shea, T.J.; Shankar, V.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, bat ectoparasites have been demonstrated to harbor pathogens of potential importance to humans. We evaluated antirabies antibody seroprevalence and the presence of ectoparasites in big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) sampled in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado to investigate if an association existed between ectoparasite intensity and exposure to rabies virus (RV). We used logistic regression and Akaike's Information Criteria adjusted for sample size (AICc) in a post-hoc analysis to investigate the relative importance of three ectoparasite species, as well as bat colony size, year sampled, age class, colony size, and year interaction on the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) in serum of wild E. fuscus. We obtained serum samples and ectoparasite counts from big brown bats simultaneously in 2002 and 2003. Although the presence of ectoparasites (Steatonyssus occidentalis and Spinturnix bakeri) were important in elucidating VNA seroprevalence, their intensities were higher in seronegative bats than in seropositive bats, and the presence of a third ectoparasite (Cimex pilosellus) was inconsequential. Colony size and year sampled were the most important variables in these AICc models. These findings suggest that these ectoparasites do not enhance exposure of big brown bats to RV. ?? 2007 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  11. Chimeric avian paramyxovirus-based vector immunization against highly pathogenic avian influenza followed by conventional Newcastle disease vaccination eliminates lack of protection from virulent ND virus

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    C. Steglich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a chimeric, hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5 expressing Newcastle disease virus (NDV-based vector vaccine (chNDVFHNPMV8H5 in which NDV envelope glycoproteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus-8 (APMV-8. This chimeric vaccine induced solid protection against lethal HPAIV H5N1 even in chickens with maternal antibodies against NDV (MDA+. However, due to the absence of the major NDV immunogens it failed to induce protection against Newcastle disease (ND. Here, we report on protection of MDA+ chickens against HPAI H5N1 and ND, by vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 either on day 1 or day seven after hatch, and subsequent immunization with live attenuated NDV seven days later. Vaccination was well tolerated and three weeks after immunization, challenge infections with highly pathogenic NDV as well as HPAIV H5N1 were carried out. All animals remained healthy without exhibiting any clinical signs, whereas non-vaccinated animals showed morbidity and mortality. Therefore, vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 can be followed by NDV vaccination to protect chickens from HPAIV as well as NDV, indicating that the antibody response against chNDVFHNPMV8H5 does not interfere with live ND vaccination.

  12. Emulsified nanoparticles containing inactivated influenza virus and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides critically influences the host immune responses in mice.

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    Ming-Hsi Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antigen sparing and cross-protective immunity are regarded as crucial in pandemic influenza vaccine development. Both targets can be achieved by adjuvantation strategy to elicit a robust and broadened immune response. We assessed the immunogenicity of an inactivated H5N1 whole-virion vaccine (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 NIBRG-14, clade 1 formulated with emulsified nanoparticles and investigated whether it can induce cross-clade protecting immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After formulation with PELC, a proprietary water-in-oil-in-water nanoemulsion comprising of bioresorbable polymer/Span(R85/squalene, inactivated virus was intramuscularly administered to mice in either one-dose or two-dose schedule. We found that the antigen-specific serum antibody responses elicited after two doses of non-adjuvanted vaccine were lower than those observed after a single dose of adjuvanted vaccine, PELC and the conventional alum adjuvant as well. Moreover, 5 microg HA of PELC-formulated inactivated virus were capable of inducing higher antibodies than those obtained from alum-adjuvanted vaccine. In single-dose study, we found that encapsulating inactivated virus into emulsified PELC nanoparticles could induce better antibody responses than those formulated with PELC-adsorbed vaccine. However, the potency was rather reduced when the inactivated virus and CpG (an immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide containing unmethylated cytosine-guanosine motifs were co-encapsulated within the emulsion. Finally, the mice who received PELC/CpG(adsorption-vaccine could easily and quickly reach 100% of seroprotection against a homologous virus strain and effective cross-protection against a heterologous virus strain (A/Whooper swan/Mongolia/244/2005, clade 2.2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Encapsulating inactivated H5N1 influenza virus and CpG into emulsified nanoparticles critically influences the humoral responses against pandemic influenza. These results demonstrated

  13. The V Protein of Mumps Virus Plays a Critical Role in Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Luthra, Priya; Li, Zhuo; Fuentes, Sandra; D'Andrea, James Alexander; Wu, Jianguo; Rubin, Steven; Rota, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) causes an acute infection in humans characterized by a wide array of symptoms ranging from relatively mild manifestations, such as parotitis, to more-severe complications, such as meningitis and encephalitis. Widespread mumps vaccination has reduced mumps incidence dramatically; however, outbreaks still occur in vaccinated populations. The V protein of MuV, when expressed in cell culture, blocks interferon (IFN) expression and signaling and interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling. In this work, we generated a recombinant MuV incapable of expressing the V protein (rMuVΔV). The rescued MuV was derived from a clinical wild-type isolate from a recent outbreak in the United States (MuVIowa/US/06, G genotype). Analysis of the virus confirmed the roles of V protein in blocking IFN expression and signaling and IL-6 signaling. We also found that the rMuVIowa/US/06ΔV virus induced high levels of IL-6 expression in vitro, suggesting that V plays a role in reducing IL-6 expression. In vivo, the rMuVIowa/US/06ΔV virus was highly attenuated, indicating that the V protein plays an essential role in viral virulence. PMID:22090137

  14. The V protein of mumps virus plays a critical role in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Luthra, Priya; Li, Zhuo; Fuentes, Sandra; D'Andrea, James Alexander; Wu, Jianguo; Rubin, Steven; Rota, Paul A; He, Biao

    2012-02-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) causes an acute infection in humans characterized by a wide array of symptoms ranging from relatively mild manifestations, such as parotitis, to more-severe complications, such as meningitis and encephalitis. Widespread mumps vaccination has reduced mumps incidence dramatically; however, outbreaks still occur in vaccinated populations. The V protein of MuV, when expressed in cell culture, blocks interferon (IFN) expression and signaling and interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling. In this work, we generated a recombinant MuV incapable of expressing the V protein (rMuVΔV). The rescued MuV was derived from a clinical wild-type isolate from a recent outbreak in the United States (MuV(Iowa/US/06), G genotype). Analysis of the virus confirmed the roles of V protein in blocking IFN expression and signaling and IL-6 signaling. We also found that the rMuV(Iowa/US/06)ΔV virus induced high levels of IL-6 expression in vitro, suggesting that V plays a role in reducing IL-6 expression. In vivo, the rMuV(Iowa/US/06)ΔV virus was highly attenuated, indicating that the V protein plays an essential role in viral virulence.

  15. Lack of nasal carriage of novel corona virus (HCoV-EMC) in French Hajj pilgrims returning from the Hajj 2012, despite a high rate of respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, P; Charrel, R; Belhouchat, K; Drali, T; Benkouiten, S; Nougairede, A; Zandotti, C; Memish, Z A; al Masri, M; Gaillard, C; Brouqui, P; Parola, P

    2013-07-01

    A cohort of 154 French Hajj pilgrims participating in the 2012 Hajj were systematically sampled with nasal swabs prior to returning to France, and screened for the novel HCoV-EMC coronavirus by two real-time RT-PCR assays. Despite a high rate of respiratory symptoms (83.4%), including 41.0% influenza-like illness, no case of HCoV-EMC infection was detected. Despite the fact that zoonotic transmission was suspected in the first few cases, a recent family cluster in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia suggests that the virus might show at least limited spread from person to person, which justifies continuing epidemiological surveillance. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  16. Lack of evidence for human T cell lymphotrophic virus type I or II infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, R T; Lazo, A; Harisdangkul, V; Ehrlich, G D; Gray, L S; Whisler, R L; Blakeslee, J R

    1994-12-01

    Human retroviruses including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell lymphotrophic virus Types I and II (HTLV-I/II) have been associated with forms of connective tissue autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We looked for evidence of HTLV-I/II infection in a large population of SLE, RA, and control patients. One hundred fifteen patients with connective tissue autoimmune disease and other rheumatological disorders were screened for antibodies to HTLV-I/II by Western immunoblots (WIB). Due to the transforming characteristic of these retroviruses, the patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were cultured in attempts to establish continuous cell lines. Furthermore, PBMNC culture supernatants were analyzed for reverse transcriptase activity and/or HTLV-I/II gag antigen production. The presence of HTLV-I/II proviral sequences in short term culture and fresh PBMNC was determined by Southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. respectively. All 115 patients were HTLV-I/II and HIV seronegative. Seventy-four attempts to establish PBMNC cell lines from 65 patients were unsuccessful with a mean culture survival time of 3.6 (+/- 1.4) months. Reverse transcriptase activity and HTLV-I/II gag antigen production were not detected in 51 and 16 culture supernatants tested, respectively. Cells from 11 patients tested by Southern blot analysis and from 57 patients tested by PCR were negative for HTLV-I/II related sequences. Our results failed to establish an association between human retroviruses (HTLV-I/II and HIV) and SLE, RA, or other rheumatological disorders. However, these results do not rule out other exogenous or endogenous retroviruses that may play a role in the initiation and/or promotion of these diseases.

  17. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Liss, Nathan M; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liao, Maofu; Fox, Julie M; Shimak, Raeann M; Fong, Rachel H; Chafets, Daniel; Bakkour, Sonia; Keating, Sheila; Fomin, Marina E; Muench, Marcus O; Sherman, Michael B; Doranz, Benjamin J; Diamond, Michael S; Simmons, Graham

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G) at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Critical role of TLR7 signaling in the priming of cross-protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses by a whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Budimir

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines fail to induce protection against antigenically distinct virus strains. Accordingly, there is a need for the development of cross-protective vaccines. Previously, we and others have shown that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV induces cross-protective cellular immunity in mice. To probe the mechanistic basis for this finding, we investigated the role of TLR7, a receptor for single-stranded RNA, in induction of cross-protection. Vaccination of TLR7-/- mice with influenza WIV failed to protect against a lethal heterosubtypic challenge; in contrast, wild-type mice were fully protected. The lack of protection in TLR7-/- mice was associated with high viral load and a relative paucity of influenza-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses. Dendritic cells (DCs from TLR7-/- mice were unable to cross-present WIV-derived antigen to influenza-specific CTLs in vitro. Similarly, TLR7-/- DCs failed to mature and become activated in response to WIV, as determined by the assessment of surface marker expression and cytokine production. Plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs derived from wild-type mice responded directly to WIV while purified conventional DCs (cDCs did not respond to WIV in isolation, but were responsive in mixed pDC/cDC cultures. Depletion of pDCs prior to and during WIV immunization resulted in reduced numbers of influenza-specific CTLs and impaired protection from heterosubtypic challenge. Thus, TLR7 plays a critical role in the induction of cross-protective immunity upon vaccination with WIV. The initial target cells for WIV appear to be pDCs which by direct or indirect mechanisms promote activation of robust CTL responses against conserved influenza epitopes.

  19. Critical appraisal and update on tenofovir in management of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Elena Alvarez1, Judit Morello1, Vincent Soriano2, Pablo Labarga2, Sonia Rodriguez-Nóvoa11Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacogenetic Unit, Service of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Carlos III, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Tenofovir is currently one of the most widely used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV due to its good efficacy, tolerability, and convenience as a once-daily dosage. It is a drug of choice both for first-line therapy in naïve and pretreated patients, along with two other active drugs as part of a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Moreover, tenofovir can be used to treat hepatitis B virus-infected patients as well as coinfected patients who meet criteria to be treated for HIV or hepatitis B virus infection, and more recently some studies have supported its use as part of pre-exposure prophylaxis. Although large clinical trials and postmarketing studies have shown a gentle renal profile for tenofovir, some prospective cohort studies and case reports have raised concern about renal damage and bone disorders associated with use of tenofovir in a small proportion of patients, and apprehension lingers over its long-term usage. Renal toxicity from tenofovir seems to be linked to tubular damage, so classical markers for monitoring renal function that mainly assess glomerular function would not be advisable to detect early renal impairment. Management of toxicity associated with tenofovir should be based on assessment of optimal biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of renal disease.Keywords: tenofovir, antiretroviral treatment, kidney, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B

  20. Critical reappraisal of risk factors for occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Savino Bruno1, Daniela Savojardo1, Piero L Almasio2, Mario U Mondelli31Liver Unit, Department of Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliera Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico, Milan, Italy; 2Unità Complessa di Gastroenterologia ed Epatologia, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 3Struttura Complessa Laboratori di Infettivologia, Dipartimento di Malattie Infettive, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo e Università di Pavia, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: More than one and half of current cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in the US, Europe, and Japan are attributable to hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. HCV is also the primary cause of death in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis, with annual incidences of 0.5%–5% in Europe and 4%–10% in Asia. Screening is based on serum alpha-fetoprotein determination and liver ultrasound scan, but the sensitivity of the former is far less than optimal, and screening intervals are still poorly defined for the latter. Risk factors related to the host or environment, or both, appear to be more relevant than viral factors, such as HCV genotype, in determining disease progression to cirrhosis and cancer, and include age, male gender, severity of liver disease at presentation, coinfection with hepatitis B virus or human immunodeficiency virus, and alcohol abuse. Early liver transplantation in selected cases can be curative, but most patients are not eligible for liver grafting and are treated with locoregional ablative therapies, after which recurrence is common. Recently, orally available inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor have shown a significant, albeit modest, increment of survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, thus paving the way for modern molecular approaches to treatment of this highly malignant tumor.Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus 

  1. Intrahepatic B-cell follicles of chronically hepatitis C virus-infected individuals lack signs of an ectopic germinal center reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Felicia A; Broering, Ruth; Lutterbeck, Melanie; Schlaak, Joerg F; Küppers, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) often affects the B-cell compartment, leading to the occurrence of autoimmunity and B-cell lymphoproliferation, in particular mixed cryoglobulinemia and B-cell lymphomas. HCV presumably causes these lymphoproliferations by chronic antigenic stimulation and/or direct mutagenic effects on B cells. It has been speculated that the interaction of HCV with B cells and the expansion of antigen-triggered B cells happens in germinal center-like structures in the livers of HCV carriers. We studied rearranged immunoglobulin V(H) genes from seven B-cell follicles microdissected from the livers of three unselected chronic HCV patients. The follicles consisted of polyclonal naive and memory B-cell populations with only rare indication of minor clonal expansions and no evidence for active somatic hypermutation. Frequent detection of V(H) rearrangements using the VH1-69 gene segment nevertheless indicated that at least a fraction of the B cells is HCV-specific and/or autoreactive. Thus, the typical intrahepatic B-cell follicles in chronic HCV carriers do not function as ectopic germinal centers for clonal expansion and affinity maturation of B cells. Hence, autoreactive and HCV-specific B-cell clones might either develop in secondary lymphoid organs or in intrahepatic follicles only under particular, yet undefined, circumstances. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Broad-Based CD4+ T Cell Responses to Influenza A Virus in a Healthy Individual Who Lacks Typical Immunodominance Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Anthony, Anjaleena; Oveissi, Sara; Huang, Miaojuan; Zanker, Damien; Xiao, Kun; Wu, Chao; Zou, Quanming; Chen, Weisan

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. CD4+ T cell responses have been shown to be important for influenza protection in mouse models and in human volunteers. IAV antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses were found to focus on matrix 1 (M1) and nucleoprotein (NP) at the protein antigen level. At the epitope level, only several epitopes within M1 and NP were recognized by CD4+ T cells. And the epitope-specific CD4+ T cell responses showed a typical immunodominance hierarchy in most of the healthy individuals studied. In this study, we reported one case of atypical immunodominance hierarchy of CD4+ T cell responses to IAV. M1 and NP were still the immunodominant targets of CD4+ T cell responses. However, CD4+ T cell responses specific to 11 epitopes derived from M1 and NP were detected and showed no significant immunodominance hierarchy. Such an atypical pattern is likely determined by the individual's HLA alleles. These findings will help us better understand the anti-IAV immunity as a whole and improve future vaccines against IAV.

  3. Phylogenetic characterization of circulating Dengue and Alkhumra Hemorrhagic Fever viruses in western Saudi Arabia and lack of evidence of Zika virus in the region: A retrospective study, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saeed, Moneerah S; El-Kafrawy, Sherif A; Farraj, Suha A; Al-Subhi, Tagreed L; Othman, Norah A; Alsultan, Arwa; Ben Helaby, Huda G; Alshawdari, Mustafa M; Hassan, Ahmed M; Charrel, Remi N; Azhar, Esam I; Hashem, Anwar M

    2017-08-01

    Flaviviruses represent a global public health concern. They consist of ∼70 viruses with almost half of them causing human diseases with unspecified febrile illnesses. Cities in western Saudi Arabia are endemic for viruses (DENV) with sporadic infections due to Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV). They also represent a major destination for travelers coming for annual religious pilgrimages (Hajj and Umrah) from all over the world. However, whether other flaviviruses are circulating is not known because of the limited number of surveillance studies. Here, we retrospectively screened 690 samples for flaviviruses in samples from patients with unexplained febrile illnesses between 2010 and 2015 in western Saudi Arabia using a pan-flaviviruses RT-PCR assay. Despite Zika virus RNA was not detected, this study confirms circulation and/or sporadic spread of DENV-2, DENV-3, and AHFV, higher prevalence of DENV-2, and a role for visitors from DENV endemic countries in DENV importation into the Kingdom. Further analysis also showed very low genetic diversity of AHFV confirming its slow microevolution. Accordingly, continuous and prospective surveillance for flaviviruses using such assay are warranted in Saudi Arabia which receives millions of Muslims annually to implement effective control measures in light of the global widespread and outbreaks of several flaviviruses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An apparent lack of epidemiologic association between hepatitis C virus knowledge and the prevalence of hepatitis C infection in a national survey in Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiam Chemaitelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Egypt has by far the largest hepatitis C virus (HCV prevalence in the world with 14.7% of the population being antibody positive for HCV. The aim of this study was to examine the association between knowledge of HCV and HCV antibody positivity among the Egyptian population. METHODS: We characterized different measures of HCV knowledge and examined their associations with HCV prevalence, by analyzing a nationally representative database using standard epidemiologic methods. The database, the 2008 Egyptian Demographic and Health Survey, included demographic, health, and HCV biomarker information for a sample of over 12,000 individuals. RESULTS: Basic knowledge of HCV was found to be high, but multiple gaps were identified in the specific knowledge of HCV and its modes of transmission. There was no statistically significant difference in HCV prevalence between those who have heard of HCV infection and those who have not (14.4% vs. 15.9%, p>.05. Similar results were found for the other HCV knowledge measures including those specific to HCV modes of transmission and to the sources of information for HCV awareness. Logistic regression analyses did not demonstrate an association between HCV knowledge and HCV prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not provide support for an effect of awareness on reducing the risk of HCV infection in Egypt. Public health messages directed at the lay public may not provide sufficient empowerment for individuals to avoid HCV infection, and should be complemented with prevention programs to promote and strengthen infection control in the settings of exposure, particularly in health care facilities.

  5. Myxoma virus lacking the pyrin-like protein M013 is sensed in human myeloid cells by both NLRP3 and multiple Toll-like receptors, which independently activate the inflammasome and NF-κB innate response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2011-12-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded pyrin domain-containing protein M013 coregulates inflammatory responses mediated by both the inflammasome and the NF-κB pathways. Infection of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a MYXV construct deleted for the M013 gene (vMyxM013-KO), but not the parental MYXV, activates both the inflammasome and NF-κB pathways and induces a spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. Here, we report that vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of inflammasomes and secretion of IL-1β are dependent on the adaptor protein ASC, caspase-1, and NLRP3 receptor. However, vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of NF-κB signaling, which induces TNF secretion, was independent of ASC, caspase-1, and either the NLRP3 or AIM2 inflammasome receptors. We also report that early synthesis of pro-IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO infection is dependent upon the components of the inflammasome complex. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β was also dependent on the release of cathepsin B and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). By using small interfering RNA screening, we further demonstrated that, among the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), only TLR2, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9 contribute to the NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF and the inflammasome-dependent secretion of IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO virus infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that early triggering of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by vMyxM013-KO virus infection of THP-1 cells plays a critical common upstream role in the coordinate induction of both NF-κB and inflammasome pathways. We conclude that an additional cellular sensor(s)/receptor(s) in addition to the known RLRs/TLRs plays a role in the M013 knockout virus-induced activation of NF-κB pathway signaling, but the activation of inflammasomes entirely depends

  6. Myxoma Virus Lacking the Pyrin-Like Protein M013 Is Sensed in Human Myeloid Cells by both NLRP3 and Multiple Toll-Like Receptors, Which Independently Activate the Inflammasome and NF-κB Innate Response Pathways▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2011-01-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded pyrin domain-containing protein M013 coregulates inflammatory responses mediated by both the inflammasome and the NF-κB pathways. Infection of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a MYXV construct deleted for the M013 gene (vMyxM013-KO), but not the parental MYXV, activates both the inflammasome and NF-κB pathways and induces a spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. Here, we report that vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of inflammasomes and secretion of IL-1β are dependent on the adaptor protein ASC, caspase-1, and NLRP3 receptor. However, vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of NF-κB signaling, which induces TNF secretion, was independent of ASC, caspase-1, and either the NLRP3 or AIM2 inflammasome receptors. We also report that early synthesis of pro-IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO infection is dependent upon the components of the inflammasome complex. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β was also dependent on the release of cathepsin B and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). By using small interfering RNA screening, we further demonstrated that, among the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), only TLR2, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9 contribute to the NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF and the inflammasome-dependent secretion of IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO virus infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that early triggering of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by vMyxM013-KO virus infection of THP-1 cells plays a critical common upstream role in the coordinate induction of both NF-κB and inflammasome pathways. We conclude that an additional cellular sensor(s)/receptor(s) in addition to the known RLRs/TLRs plays a role in the M013 knockout virus-induced activation of NF-κB pathway signaling, but the activation of inflammasomes entirely depends

  7. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  8. Endocytosis Plays a Critical Role in Proteolytic Processing of the Hendra Virus Fusion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Meulendyke, Kelly Ann; Wurth, Mark Allen; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-01-01

    The Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is synthesized as a precursor protein, F0, which is proteolytically processed to the mature form, F1+F2. Unlike the case for the majority of paramyxovirus F proteins, the processing event is furin independent, does not require the addition of exogenous proteases, is not affected by reductions in intracellular Ca2+, and is strongly affected by conditions that raise the intracellular pH (C. T. Pager, M. A. Wurth, and R. E. Dutch, J. Virol. 78:9154-9163, 2004)...

  9. Non-detection of Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus in a region of high gastric cancer risk indicates a lack of a role for these viruses in gastric carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric mucosa tissue was collected from patients with gastroduodenal diseases in a region of norrteastern China showing a high risk of gastric cancer incidence. The presence of EBV and HPV were assayed to investigate the relationship between gastric carcinomas and virus infection. Neither EBV nor HPV DNA was detected in tissue from the patients. The role of EBV and HPV in gastric cancer is not well understood and still needs to be clarified.

  10. TCTP is a critical factor in shrimp immune response to virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin Wu

    Full Text Available The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP is an abundant, ubiquitous, and conserved protein which plays important roles in a number of biological processes. In the present study, the TCTP in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was analyzed. The TCTP of L.vannamei, a 168-amino-acid polypeptide, shares a high degree of similarity with TCTPs from other species, having two TCTP protein signatures at the 45-55 aa and 123-145 aa motif. The mRNA and protein levels from different tissues were detected with the highest in muscle and the lowest in heart among all examined tissues. In addition, temporal TCTP expression was significantly up-regulated at 16 h and 48 h following infection with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. Lastly, silencing of TCTP with dsRNA led to a significant increase of WSSV loads. These results provide new insights into the importance of TCTP as an evolutionarily conserved molecule for shrimp innate immunity against virus infection.

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus-Related Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Hematologic Emergency in the Critical Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi-Sadraei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a rare and potential life-threatening clinical syndrome that results from uncontrolled activation of the immune system. Secondary HLH, more commonly observed in adult patients, is seen in the context of underlying triggering conditions. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been recognized as the leading infectious cause and is associated with a poor outcome. As clinical and laboratory features of HLH could overlap with septic shock syndrome in most patients, the diagnosis of HLH, especially in adults, is the most challenging aspect of the disease that results in delayed recognition and treatment of rapidly progressive multiorgan system failure. We report a case of Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in a patient who presented with signs of septic shock syndrome and we review the literature on the topic.

  12. Critical issues in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in methadone maintenance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, David M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2008-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common chronic complication of injection drug use. Methadone maintenance programs contain large numbers of patients infected with HCV. This paper reviews HCV infection with emphasis on the medical care of HCV-infected, or HCV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infected, patients on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance. Literature searches using PubMed, PsycINFO and SocINDEX were used to identify papers from 1990-present on antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients and on liver transplantation in methadone maintenance patients. Injection drug use is the most significant risk factor for HCV infection in most western countries. The prevalence of HCV antibody is high in injection drug users (53-96%) and in patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs (67-96%). Studies of antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients show rates of sustained virological response (SVR), defined as negative HCV-RNA 24 weeks after the end of treatment, of 28-94%. In studies with contrast groups, no significant differences in SVR between methadone and contrast groups were found. Excellent completion rates of antiviral therapy (72-100%) were found in five of six studies. There are many barriers to methadone maintenance patients' receiving antiviral therapy, and research on overcoming barriers is discussed. Liver transplantation has been successful in methadone maintenance patients but has not been utilized widely. High quality medical care for all aspects of HCV infection can be provided to methadone maintenance patients. The literature supports the effectiveness of such services, but the reality is that most patients do not receive them.

  13. Zika virus-induced neurological critical illness in Latin America: Severe Guillain-Barre Syndrome and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Ugarte Ubiergo; Ricardo, Arenas Villamizar Angel; Alvarez, Bruno C; Cubides, Angela; Luna, Angélica F; Arroyo-Parejo, Max; Acuña, Cayri E; Quintero, Agamenón V; Villareal, Orlando Ch; Pinillos, Oscar S; Vieda, Elías; Bello, Manuel; Peña, Susana; Dueñas-Castell, Carmelo; Rodriguez, Gloria M V; Ranero, Jorge L M; López, Rosa L M; Olaya, Sandra G; Vergara, José C; Tandazo, Ana; Ospina, Juan P S; Leyton Soto, Igor M; Fowler, R A; Marshall, John C

    2017-08-09

    Zika virus (ZIKAV) is classically described as causing minor symptoms in adult patients, however neurologic complications have been recognized. The recent outbreak in Central and South America has resulted in serious illness in some adult patients. We report adult patients in Latin America diagnosed with ZIKAV infection admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Multicenter, prospective case series of adult patients with laboratory diagnosis of ZIKAV in 16 ICUs in 8 countries. Between December 1st 2015 and April 2nd 2016, 16 ICUs in 8 countries enrolled 49 critically ill patients with diagnosis of ZIKAV infection. We included 10 critically ill patients with ZIKAV infection, as diagnosed with RT-PCR, admitted to the ICU. Neurologic manifestations concordant with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) were present in all patients, although 2 evolved into an encephalitis-like picture. 2 cases died, one due to encephalitis, the other septic shock. Differing from what was usually reported, ZIKAV infection can result in life-threatening neurologic illness in adults, including GBS and encephalitis. Collaborative reporting to identify severe illness from an emerging pathogen can provide valuable insights into disease epidemiology and clinical presentation, and inform public health authorities about acute care priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recommendations for dealing with waste contaminated with Ebola virus: a Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points approach/ Recommandations pour le traitement des dechets contamines par le virus Ebola--une approche avec la methode d'analyse des risques et maitrise des points critiques (HACCP)/ Recomendaciones para tratar desechos contaminados con el virus del Ebola: un analisis de peligros en puntos criticos de control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Elrahman, Samira Abd; Bell, Diana J; Brainard, Julii; Dervisevic, Samir; Fedha, Tsimbiri P; Few, Roger; Howard, Guy; Lake, Iain; Maes, Peter; Matofari, Joseph; Minnigh, Harvey; Mohamedani, Ahmed A; Montgomery, Maggie; Morter, Sarah; Muchiri, Edward; Mudau, Lutendo S; Mutua, Benedict M; Ndambuki, Julius M; Pond, Katherine; Sobsey, Mark D; van der Es, Mike; Zeitoun, Mark; Hunter, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    .... Methods A team with expertise in the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework identified waste products from the care of individuals with Ebola virus disease and constructed, tested...

  15. Critical role for cross-linking of trimeric lectin domains of surfactant protein D in antiviral activity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tecle, Tesfaldet; White, Mitchell R; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2008-01-01

    binding activity for some ligands and mediate some functional activities. The lung collectin SP-D (surfactant protein D) has strong neutralizing activity for IAVs (influenza A viruses) in vitro and in vivo, however, the NCRD derived from SP-D has weak viral-binding ability and lacks neutralizing activity...... and antiviral activity of NCRDs as assessed by haemagglutination and neuraminidase inhibition and by viral neutralization. mAb-mediated cross-linking also enabled NCRDs to induce viral aggregation and to increase viral uptake by neutrophils and virus-induced respiratory burst responses by these cells...

  16. Economic evaluation of human papilloma virus vaccination in the European Union: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Daniela; De Compadri, Paola; Padula, Anna; Garattini, Livio

    2011-04-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine is a new and expensive vaccine potentially effective in the prevention of a cancer. We reviewed the economic evaluations (EEs) on the vaccine in the EU to assess their potential contribution to public decision-making in a fairly homogeneous setting where HPV vaccination has been widely adopted. A literature search on PubMed selected EEs on HPV vaccines in the EU for the period 2007-2010 using the terms "HPV vaccines" and "Costs and cost analysis." Fifteen articles were eventually selected. All studies were based on modelling techniques, either "cohort" or "dynamic transmission": three were cost utility, three cost-effectiveness, and the remainder included both. The ten studies explicitly assessing one of the two vaccines were all sponsored by their manufacturer, while the five studies unrelated to the vaccine type were funded by public agencies. Apart from two studies, utility estimates were always obtained from three US sources. Direct costs were always vaccination, diagnosis and treatment of related pathologies. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) results were less favourable when life years gained were valued rather than quality-adjusted life years, genital warts were excluded, and booster doses and extension of vaccination to men were included in the base-case analysis. All but one of the sponsored EEs recommend in favour of the vaccination strategy, which is dominant in one English study. The ICER results were very sensitive to discount rates, followed by duration of protection and vaccine price. At such an early stage, when the vaccines' efficacy have been demonstrated by well-designed studies, it is not possible (and not even reasonable) to wait for several years to measure their effectiveness; public decision-makers might benefit more from EEs designed to indicate sustainable prices using realistic estimates of crucial variables like coverage rates, rather than referring to a large number of assumptions in

  17. Quantification and localization of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Geminiviridae in populations of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera, Aleyrodidae with differential virus transmission characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Kollenberg

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is one of the economically most damaging insects to crops in tropical and subtropical regions. Severe damage is caused by feeding and more seriously by transmitting viruses. Those of the genus begomovirus (Geminiviridae cause the most significant crop diseases and are transmitted by B. tabaci in a persistent circulative mode, a process which is largely unknown. To analyze the translocation and to identify critical determinants for transmission, two populations of B. tabaci MEAM1 were compared for transmitting Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. Insect populations were chosen because of their high and respectively low virus transmission efficiency to compare uptake and translocation of virus through insects. Both populations harbored Rickettsia, Hamiltonella and Wolbachia in comparable ratios indicating that endosymbionts might not contribute to the different transmission rates. Quantification by qPCR revealed that WmCSV uptake and virus concentrations in midguts and primary salivary glands were generally higher than TYLCV due to higher virus contents of the source plants. Both viruses accumulated higher in insects from the efficiently compared to the poorly transmitting population. In the latter, virus translocation into the hemolymph was delayed and virus passage was impeded with limited numbers of viruses translocated. FISH analysis confirmed these results with similar virus distribution found in excised organs of both populations. No virus accumulation was found in the midgut lumen of the poor transmitter because of a restrained virus translocation. Results suggest that the poorly transmitting population comprised insects that lacked transmission competence. Those were selected to develop a population that lacks virus transmission. Investigations with insects lacking transmission showed that virus concentrations in midguts were reduced and only negligible virus amounts

  18. ISG15 is critical in the control of Chikungunya virus infection independent of UbE1L mediated conjugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Werneke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging alphavirus that has caused significant disease in the Indian Ocean region since 2005. During this outbreak, in addition to fever, rash and arthritis, severe cases of CHIKV infection have been observed in infants. Challenging the notion that the innate immune response in infants is immature or defective, we demonstrate that both human infants and neonatal mice generate a robust type I interferon (IFN response during CHIKV infection that contributes to, but is insufficient for, the complete control of infection. To characterize the mechanism by which type I IFNs control CHIKV infection, we evaluated the role of ISG15 and defined it as a central player in the host response, as neonatal mice lacking ISG15 were profoundly susceptible to CHIKV infection. Surprisingly, UbE1L⁻/⁻ mice, which lack the ISG15 E1 enzyme and therefore are unable to form ISG15 conjugates, displayed no increase in lethality following CHIKV infection, thus pointing to a non-classical role for ISG15. No differences in viral loads were observed between wild-type (WT and ISG15⁻/⁻ mice, however, a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was observed in ISG15⁻/⁻ mice, suggesting that the innate immune response to CHIKV contributes to their lethality. This study provides new insight into the control of CHIKV infection, and establishes a new model for how ISG15 functions as an immunomodulatory molecule in the blunting of potentially pathologic levels of innate effector molecules during the host response to viral infection.

  19. ISG15 is critical in the control of Chikungunya virus infection independent of UbE1L mediated conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneke, Scott W; Schilte, Clementine; Rohatgi, Anjali; Monte, Kristen J; Michault, Alain; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Fontanet, Arnaud; Albert, Matthew L; Lenschow, Deborah J

    2011-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus that has caused significant disease in the Indian Ocean region since 2005. During this outbreak, in addition to fever, rash and arthritis, severe cases of CHIKV infection have been observed in infants. Challenging the notion that the innate immune response in infants is immature or defective, we demonstrate that both human infants and neonatal mice generate a robust type I interferon (IFN) response during CHIKV infection that contributes to, but is insufficient for, the complete control of infection. To characterize the mechanism by which type I IFNs control CHIKV infection, we evaluated the role of ISG15 and defined it as a central player in the host response, as neonatal mice lacking ISG15 were profoundly susceptible to CHIKV infection. Surprisingly, UbE1L⁻/⁻ mice, which lack the ISG15 E1 enzyme and therefore are unable to form ISG15 conjugates, displayed no increase in lethality following CHIKV infection, thus pointing to a non-classical role for ISG15. No differences in viral loads were observed between wild-type (WT) and ISG15⁻/⁻ mice, however, a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was observed in ISG15⁻/⁻ mice, suggesting that the innate immune response to CHIKV contributes to their lethality. This study provides new insight into the control of CHIKV infection, and establishes a new model for how ISG15 functions as an immunomodulatory molecule in the blunting of potentially pathologic levels of innate effector molecules during the host response to viral infection.

  20. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  1. Two key residues in ephrinB3 are critical for its use as an alternative receptor for Nipah virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Negrete

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available EphrinB2 was recently discovered as a functional receptor for Nipah virus (NiV, a lethal emerging paramyxovirus. Ephrins constitute a class of homologous ligands for the Eph class of receptor tyrosine kinases and exhibit overlapping expression patterns. Thus, we examined whether other ephrins might serve as alternative receptors for NiV. Here, we show that of all known ephrins (ephrinA1-A5 and ephrinB1-B3, only the soluble Fc-fusion proteins of ephrinB3, in addition to ephrinB2, bound to soluble NiV attachment protein G (NiV-G. Soluble NiV-G bound to cell surface ephrinB3 and B2 with subnanomolar affinities (Kd = 0.58 nM and 0.06 nM for ephrinB3 and B2, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that the relatively lower affinity of NiV-G for ephrinB3 was largely due to a faster off-rate (K(off = 1.94 x 10(-3 s(-1 versus 1.06 x 10(-4 s(-1 for ephrinB3 and B2, respectively. EphrinB3 was sufficient to allow for viral entry of both pseudotype and live NiV. Soluble ephrinB2 and B3 were able to compete for NiV-envelope-mediated viral entry on both ephrinB2- and B3-expressing cells, suggesting that NiV-G interacts with both ephrinB2 and B3 via an overlapping site. Mutational analysis indicated that the Leu-Trp residues in the solvent exposed G-H loop of ephrinB2 and B3 were critical determinants of NiV binding and entry. Indeed, replacement of the Tyr-Met residues in the homologous positions in ephrinB1 with Leu-Trp conferred NiV receptor activity to ephrinB1. Thus, ephrinB3 is a bona fide alternate receptor for NiV entry, and two residues in the G-H loop of the ephrin B-class ligands are critical determinants of NiV receptor activity.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and respiratory disease in critically-ill patients: Real pathogen or innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoons-Smit, A. M.; Kraan, E. M.; Beishuizen, A.; Strack van Schijndel, R. J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been associated with pulmonary disease, mostly in severely immunocompromised patients. After reactivation and shedding in the oropharynx, the virus may reach the lower respiratory tract by aspiration or by contiguous spread. HSV-1 can be detected in clinical

  3. The YLDL sequence within Sendai virus M protein is critical for budding of virus-like particles and interacts with Alix/AIP1 independently of C protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Takashi; Shimazu, Yukie; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Sakaguchi, Takemasa

    2007-03-01

    For many enveloped viruses, cellular multivesicular body (MVB) sorting machinery has been reported to be utilized for efficient viral budding. Matrix and Gag proteins have been shown to contain one or two L-domain motifs (PPxY, PT/SAP, YPDL, and FPIV), some of which interact specifically with host cellular proteins involved in MVB sorting, which are recruited to the viral budding site. However, for many enveloped viruses, L-domain motifs have not yet been identified and the involvement of MVB sorting machinery in viral budding is still unknown. Here we show that both Sendai virus (SeV) matrix protein M and accessory protein C contribute to virus budding by physically interacting with Alix/AIP1. A YLDL sequence within the M protein showed L-domain activity, and its specific interaction with the N terminus of Alix/AIP1(1-211) was important for the budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) of M protein. In addition, M-VLP budding was inhibited by the overexpression of some deletion mutant forms of Alix/AIP1 and depletion of endogenous Alix/AIP1 with specific small interfering RNAs. The YLDL sequence was not replaceable by other L-domain motifs, such as PPxY and PT/SAP, and even YPxL. C protein was also able to physically interact with the N terminus of Alix/AIP1(212-357) and enhanced M-VLP budding independently of M-Alix/AIP1 interaction, although it was not released from the transfected cells itself. Our results suggest that the interaction of multiple viral proteins with Alix/AIP1 may enhance the efficiency of the utilization of cellular MVB sorting machinery for efficient SeV budding.

  4. Critical role of the virus-encoded microRNA-155 ortholog in the induction of Marek's disease lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the well-characterised roles of a number of oncogenes in neoplastic transformation, microRNAs (miRNAs are increasingly implicated in several human cancers. Discovery of miRNAs in several oncogenic herpesviruses such as KSHV has further highlighted the potential of virus-encoded miRNAs to contribute to their oncogenic capabilities. Nevertheless, despite the identification of several possible cancer-related genes as their targets, the direct in vivo role of virus-encoded miRNAs in neoplastic diseases such as those induced by KSHV is difficult to demonstrate in the absence of suitable models. However, excellent natural disease models of rapid-onset Marek's disease (MD lymphomas in chickens allow examination of the oncogenic potential of virus-encoded miRNAs. Using viruses modified by reverse genetics of the infectious BAC clone of the oncogenic RB-1B strain of MDV, we show that the deletion of the six-miRNA cluster 1 from the viral genome abolished the oncogenicity of the virus. This loss of oncogenicity appeared to be primarily due to the single miRNA within the cluster, miR-M4, the ortholog of cellular miR-155, since its deletion or a 2-nucleotide mutation within its seed region was sufficient to inhibit the induction of lymphomas. The definitive role of this miR-155 ortholog in oncogenicity was further confirmed by the rescue of oncogenic phenotype by revertant viruses that expressed either the miR-M4 or the cellular homolog gga-miR-155. This is the first demonstration of the direct in vivo role of a virus-encoded miRNA in inducing tumors in a natural infection model. Furthermore, the use of viruses deleted in miRNAs as effective vaccines against virulent MDV challenge, enables the prospects of generating genetically defined attenuated vaccines.

  5. Myxoma virus M-T7, a secreted homolog of the interferon-gamma receptor, is a critical virulence factor for the development of myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, K; Nation, P; Macen, J; Garbutt, M; Lucas, A; McFadden, G

    1996-01-01

    Myxoma virus is a leporipoxvirus of New World rabbits (Sylvilagus sp.) that induces a rapidly lethal infection known as myxomatosis in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, myxoma virus encodes a plethora of proteins to circumvent or inhibit a variety of host antiviral immune mechanisms. M-T7, the most abundantly secreted protein of myxoma virus-infected cells, was originally identified as an interferon-gamma receptor homolog (Upton, Mossman, and McFadden, Science 258, 1369-1372, 1992). Here, we demonstrate that M-T7 is dispensable for virus replication in cultured cells but is a critical virulence factor for virus pathogenesis in European rabbits. Disruption of both copies of the M-T7 gene in myxoma virus was achieved by the deletion of 372 bp of M-T7 coding sequences, replacement with a selectable marker, p7.5Ecogpt, and selection of a recombinant virus (vMyxlac-T7gpt) resistant to mycophenolic acid. vMyxlac-T7gpt expressed no detectable M-T7 protein and infected cells supernatants were devoid of any detectable interferon-gamma binding activities. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-beta-galactosidase and anti-CD43 antibodies demonstrated that in vMyxlac-T7gpt-infected rabbits the loss of M-T7 not only caused a dramatic reduction in disease symptoms and viral dissemination to secondary sites, but also dramatically influenced host leukocyte behavior. Notably, primary lesions in wild-type virus infections were generally underlayed by large masses of inflammatory cells that did not effectively migrate into the dermal sites of viral replication, whereas in vMyxlac-T7gpt infections this apparent block to leukocyte influx was relieved. A second major phenotypic distinction noted for the M-T7 knockout virus was the extensive activation of lymphocytes in secondary immune organs, particularly the spleen and lymph nodes, by Day 4 of the infection. This is in stark contrast to infection by wild-type myxoma virus, which results in relatively

  6. The Cuticle Protein Gene MPCP4 of Myzus persicae (Homoptera: Aphididae) Plays a Critical Role in Cucumber Mosaic Virus Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Gao, Xi-Wu

    2017-06-01

    Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae) is one of the most important agricultural pests worldwide. In addition to sucking phloem sap, M. persicae also transmits Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) as a vector in a nonpersistent manner. At present, the infection mechanism remains unclear, especially the process of aphid virus acquisition. In this study, we isolated four M. persicae cuticle protein genes (MPCP1, MPCP2, MPCP4, and MPCP5) from M. persicae. The relative amount of the gene encoding Cucumber mosaic virus capsid protein (CMV CP) and the transcript levels of these four cuticle protein genes were investigated in aphid virus acquisition by feeding the tobacco preinfested by CMV. The relative expression of MPCP1, MPCP2, and MPCP4 were significantly higher than MPCP5 at 24 h after aphids feeding on virus-infested tobacco. Yeast two-hybrid assays demonstrated that the protein encoded by MPCP4 gene was closely associated with the CMV CP through the direct interaction. Moreover, the ability of M. persicae to acquire CMV was suppressed by RNA interference of MPCP4. All these lines of evidence indicate that MPCP4, as a viral putative receptor in the stylet of aphid, plays an important role in aphid acquisition of CMV. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 63 Latency-Associated Protein Is Critical for Establishment of Latency

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Cox, Edward; Pesnicak, Lesley; Srinivas, Shamala; Krogmann, Tammy

    2004-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) expresses at least six viral transcripts during latency. One of these transcripts, derived from open reading frame 63 (ORF63), is one of the most abundant viral RNAs expressed during latency. The VZV ORF63 protein has been detected in human and experimentally infected rodent ganglia by several laboratories. We have deleted >90% of both copies of the ORF63 gene from the VZV genome. Animals inoculated with the ORF63 mutant virus had lower mean copy numbers of latent...

  8. Endocytic function is critical for influenza A virus infection via DC-SIGN and L-SIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Leah; Roosendahl, Paula; Ng, Wy Ching; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.; Londrigan, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of cell-surface sialic acid (SIA) has complicated efforts to identify specific transmembrane glycoproteins that function as bone fide entry receptors for influenza A virus (IAV) infection. The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) DC-SIGN (CD209) and L-SIGN (CD209L) enhance IAV infection however it is not known if they act as attachment factors, passing virions to other unknown receptors for virus entry, or as authentic entry receptors for CLR-mediated virus uptake and infection. Sialic acid-deficient Lec2 Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines were resistant to IAV infection whereas expression of DC-SIGN/L-SIGN restored susceptibility of Lec2 cells to pH- and dynamin-dependent infection. Moreover, Lec2 cells expressing endocytosis-defective DC-SIGN/L-SIGN retained capacity to bind IAV but showed reduced susceptibility to infection. These studies confirm that DC-SIGN and L-SIGN are authentic endocytic receptors for IAV entry and infection. PMID:26763587

  9. Feline leukemia virus and other pathogens as important threats to the survival of the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Marina L; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; López, Guillermo; Vargas, Astrid; Simón, Miguel A; Zorrilla, Irene; Muñoz, Alvaro; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, Jose V; Pastor, Josep; Tandon, Ravi; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis), and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma) infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive). All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (pspecies. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the domestic cat population if the lynx population is to be maintained.

  10. Feline Leukemia Virus and Other Pathogens as Important Threats to the Survival of the Critically Endangered Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Marina L.; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; López, Guillermo; Vargas, Astrid; Simón, Miguel A.; Zorrilla, Irene; Muñoz, Alvaro; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, Jose V.; Pastor, Josep; Tandon, Ravi; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. Methodology/ Principal Findings We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis), and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma) infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive). All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (plynx's habitats. Data available regarding the time frame, co-infections, and outcome of FeLV-infections suggest that, in contrast to the domestic cat, the FeLV strain affecting the lynxes in 2007 is highly virulent to this species. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the domestic cat population if the lynx population is to be maintained. PMID:19270739

  11. A Critical Role for the Type I Interferon Receptor in Virus-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Natasha; Lin, Suvana; Ryan, Glennice; Yang, Chaoxing; Oikemus, Sarah R.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Bortell, Rita; Mordes, John P.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human type 1 diabetes, characterized by immune-mediated damage of insulin-producing β-cells of pancreatic islets, may involve viral infection. Essential components of the innate immune antiviral response, including type I interferon (IFN) and IFN receptor–mediated signaling pathways, are candidates for determining susceptibility to human type 1 diabetes. Numerous aspects of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis are recapitulated in the LEW.1WR1 rat model. Diabetes can be induced in LEW.1WR1 weanling rats challenged with virus or with the viral mimetic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). We hypothesized that disrupting the cognate type I IFN receptor (type I IFN α/β receptor [IFNAR]) to interrupt IFN signaling would prevent or delay the development of virus-induced diabetes. We generated IFNAR1 subunit–deficient LEW.1WR1 rats using CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–associated protein 9) genome editing and confirmed functional disruption of the Ifnar1 gene. IFNAR1 deficiency significantly delayed the onset and frequency of diabetes and greatly reduced the intensity of insulitis after poly I:C treatment. The occurrence of Kilham rat virus–induced diabetes was also diminished in IFNAR1-deficient animals. These findings firmly establish that alterations in innate immunity influence the course of autoimmune diabetes and support the use of targeted strategies to limit or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27999109

  12. The 5′-End Sequence of the Genome of Aichi Virus, a Picornavirus, Contains an Element Critical for Viral RNA Encapsidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    Picornavirus positive-strand RNAs are selectively encapsidated despite the coexistence of viral negative-strand RNAs and cellular RNAs in infected cells. However, the precise mechanism of the RNA encapsidation process in picornaviruses remains unclear. Here we report the first identification of an RNA element critical for encapsidation in picornaviruses. The 5′ end of the genome of Aichi virus, a member of the family Picornaviridae, folds into three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the most 5′ end). In the previous study, we constructed a mutant, termed mut6, by exchanging the seven-nucleotide stretches of the middle part of the stem in SL-A with each other to maintain the base pairings of the stem. mut6 exhibited efficient RNA replication and translation but formed no plaques. The present study showed that in cells transfected with mut6 RNA, empty capsids were accumulated, but few virions containing RNA were formed. This means that mut6 has a severe defect in RNA encapsidation. Site-directed mutational analysis indicated that as the mutated region was narrowed, the encapsidation was improved. As a result, the mutation of the 7 bp of the middle part of the stem in SL-A was required for abolishing the plaque-forming ability. Thus, the 5′-end sequence of the Aichi virus genome was shown to play an important role in encapsidation. PMID:12610129

  13. Feline leukemia virus and other pathogens as important threats to the survival of the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina L Meli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis, and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive. All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (p<0.001. Sequencing of the FeLV surface glycoprotein gene revealed a common origin for ten of the eleven samples. The ten sequences were closely related to FeLV-A/61E, originally isolated from cats in the USA. Endogenous FeLV sequences were not detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It was concluded that the FeLV infection most likely originated from domestic cats invading the lynx's habitats. Data available regarding the time frame, co-infections, and outcome of FeLV-infections suggest that, in contrast to the domestic cat, the FeLV strain affecting the lynxes in 2007 is highly virulent to this species. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the

  14. A Critical Role of Glutamine and Asparagine γ-Nitrogen in Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Cancer Cells Hijacked by an Oncogenic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available While glutamine is a nonessential amino acid that can be synthesized from glucose, some cancer cells primarily depend on glutamine for their growth, proliferation, and survival. Numerous types of cancer also depend on asparagine for cell proliferation. The underlying mechanisms of the glutamine and asparagine requirement in cancer cells in different contexts remain unclear. In this study, we show that the oncogenic virus Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV accelerates the glutamine metabolism of glucose-independent proliferation of cancer cells by upregulating the expression of numerous critical enzymes, including glutaminase 2 (GLS2, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1, and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2, to support cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cell crisis is rescued only completely by supplementation with asparagine but minimally by supplementation with α-ketoglutarate, aspartate, or glutamate upon glutamine deprivation, implying an essential role of γ-nitrogen in glutamine and asparagine for cell proliferation. Specifically, glutamine and asparagine provide the critical γ-nitrogen for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, as knockdown of four rate-limiting enzymes in the pathways, including carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2 (CAD, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PPAT, and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetases 1 and 2 (PRPS1 and PRPS2, respectively, suppresses cell proliferation. These findings indicate that glutamine and asparagine are shunted to the biosynthesis of nucleotides and nonessential amino acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle to support the anabolic proliferation of KSHV-transformed cells. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus hijacks a metabolic pathway for cell proliferation and imply potential therapeutic applications in specific types of cancer that depend on this pathway.

  15. The Critical Role of Supply Chains in Preventing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drug Resistance in Low- and Middle-Income Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minior, Thomas; Douglas, Meaghan; Edgil, Dianna; Srivastava, Meena; Crowley, John; Firth, Jacqueline; Lapidos-Salaiz, Ilana; Williams, Jason; Lee, Lana

    2017-12-01

    The functioning of the supply chain may be a driving factor behind the development of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (HIVDR) in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Additionally, the effectiveness of supply chains will likely impact the scale-up of both viral-load monitoring and HIVDR testing. This article describes the complexities of global supply chains relevant for LMICs and presents early data on stock-outs and drug substitutions in several countries supported by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Supply chain systems will need to be strengthened to minimize interruptions as new antiretroviral therapy regimens are introduced and to facilitate adoption of new laboratory technologies. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Household size is critical to varicella-zoster virus transmission in the tropics despite lower viral infectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nichols, Richard A; Averbeck, Karin T; Poulsen, Anja G

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology and severity of infections can vary dramatically in different geographical regions. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a particularly tractable model for investigating such global differences, since infections can be unambiguously identified. VZV is spread by aerosol to cause...... chickenpox, which, in temperate countries, is a relatively benign childhood infection; yet in tropical countries it tends to occur at later age, a trend associated with markedly increased severity including complications, hospitalization, and overall burden of care. To investigate global differences...... infectivity in tropical Guinea Bissau is reduced four-fold compared with temperate climates (14.8% versus 61-85%), with an intermediate rate between members of the same family who are in more intimate contact (23.5%). All else being equal, these lower infection rates would be expected to lead to a later age...

  17. Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stefan L; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Rajamani, Jaya; Vlaycheva-Beisheim, Leonssia; Stamatis, Shaye; Cheng, Jason; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the alphaherpesvirus that causes chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). The two VZV glycoproteins gE and gI form a heterodimer that mediates efficient cell-to-cell spread. Deletion of gI yields a small-plaque-phenotype virus, ΔgI virus, which is avirulent in human skin using the xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. In the present study, 10 mutant viruses were generated to determine which residues were required for the typical function of gI. Three phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of gI were not required for VZV virulence in vivo. Two deletion mutants mapped a gE binding region in gI to residues 105 to 125. A glycosylation site, N116, in this region did not affect virulence. Substitution of four cysteine residues highly conserved in the Alphaherpesvirinae established that C95 is required for gE/gI heterodimer formation. The C95A and Δ105-125 (with residues 105 to 125 deleted) viruses had small-plaque phenotypes with reduced replication kinetics in vitro similar to those of the ΔgI virus. The Δ105-125 virus was avirulent for human skin in vivo. In contrast, the C95A mutant replicated in vivo but with significantly reduced kinetics compared to those of the wild-type virus. In addition to abolished gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI from the C95A or the Δ105-125 mutant was not recognized by monoclonal antibodies that detect the canonical conformation of gI, demonstrating structural disruption of gI in these viruses. This alteration prevented gI incorporation into virus particles. Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin.

  18. Critical Role for Monocytes/Macrophages in Rapid Progression to AIDS in Pediatric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Merino, Kristen M; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Wang, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Xavier A; Wakao, Hiroshi; Mori, Kazuyasu; Kim, Woong-Ki; Veazey, Ronald S; Didier, Elizabeth S; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2017-09-01

    Infant humans and rhesus macaques infected with the human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV or SIV), respectively, express higher viral loads and progress more rapidly to AIDS than infected adults. Activated memory CD4(+) T cells in intestinal tissues are major primary target cells for SIV/HIV infection, and massive depletion of these cells is considered a major cause of immunodeficiency. Monocytes and macrophages are important cells of innate immunity and also are targets of HIV/SIV infection. We reported previously that a high peripheral blood monocyte turnover rate was predictive for the onset of disease progression to AIDS in SIV-infected adult macaques. The purpose of this study was to determine if earlier or higher infection of monocytes/macrophages contributes to the more rapid progression to AIDS in infants. We observed that uninfected infant rhesus macaques exhibited higher physiologic baseline monocyte turnover than adults. Early after SIV infection, the monocyte turnover further increased, and it remained high during progression to AIDS. A high percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP nick end label (TUNEL)-positive macrophages in the lymph nodes (LNs) and intestine corresponded with an increasing number of macrophages derived from circulating monocytes (bromodeoxyuridine positive [BrdU(+)] CD163(+)), suggesting that the increased blood monocyte turnover was required to rapidly replenish destroyed tissue macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis further demonstrated that macrophages were a significant portion of the virus-producing cells found in LNs, intestinal tissues, and lungs. The higher baseline monocyte turnover in infant macaques and subsequent macrophage damage by SIV infection may help explain the basis of more rapid disease progression to AIDS in infants.IMPORTANCE HIV infection progresses much more rapidly in pediatric cases than in adults; however, the mechanism for this difference is unclear. Using the rhesus macaque model

  19. Hepatitis B surface antigen genetic elements critical for immune escape correlate with hepatitis B virus reactivation upon immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpini, Romina; Colagrossi, Luna; Bellocchi, Maria Concetta; Surdo, Matteo; Becker, Christina; Alteri, Claudia; Aragri, Marianna; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Armenia, Daniele; Pollicita, Michela; Di Santo, Fabiola; Carioti, Luca; Louzoun, Yoram; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Lichtner, Miriam; Paoloni, Maurizio; Esposito, Mariarosaria; D'Amore, Chiara; Marrone, Aldo; Marignani, Massimo; Sarrecchia, Cesare; Sarmati, Loredana; Andreoni, Massimo; Angelico, Mario; Verheyen, Jens; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Svicher, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppression can lead to severe acute hepatitis, fulminant liver failure, and death. Here, we investigated hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) genetic features underlying this phenomenon by analyzing 93 patients: 29 developing HBV reactivation and 64 consecutive patients with chronic HBV infection (as control). HBsAg genetic diversity was analyzed by population-based and ultradeep sequencing (UDS). Before HBV reactivation, 51.7% of patients were isolated hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positive, 31.0% inactive carriers, 6.9% anti-HBc/anti-HBs (hepatitis B surface antibody) positive, 6.9% isolated anti-HBs positive, and 3.4% had an overt HBV infection. Of HBV-reactivated patients, 51.7% were treated with rituximab, 34.5% with different chemotherapeutics, and 13.8% with corticosteroids only for inflammatory diseases. In total, 75.9% of HBV-reactivated patients (vs. 3.1% of control patients; Pviral population as a predominant species. In control patients carrying such mutations, their median intrapatient prevalence was 4.6% (range, 2.5%-11.3%; Pimmunosuppressive settings at reactivation risk and of establishing a prompt therapy to prevent HBV-related clinical complications. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. Infectious genotype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 5a, 6a and 7a hepatitis C virus lacking the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present inventors used the previously developed H77/JFH 1.sub.T27OOC,A4O8OT (1a/2a), J4/JFH .sub.1T2996C,A4827T,.DELTA.HVRI (1b/2a), J6/JFH .sub.1.DELTA.HVRI (2a/2a), J8/JFH 1.sub..DELTA.HVRI (2b/2a), S52/JFH 1.sub.T27i8G,.tau.7i6oc (3a/2a), SA13/JFH 1.sub.C34O5G,A3696G (5a/2a) and HK6a/JFH 1...... of the viruses identified mutations adapting H77/JFH 1.sub.T27OOC,A4O8OT,.DELTA.HVR1 (1a/2a), J8/JFH .sub.1.DELTA.HVR1 (2b/2a), S52/JFH 1.sub.T2718G,T716OC,.DELTA.HVR1 (3a/2a) and J4/JFH 1.sub.T2996C,A4827T,.DELTA.HVR1 (1b/2a) to the HVR1 deletion........sub.1389c,A1590G (6a/2a) constructs for the deletion of Hypervariable Region 1 (HVR1) to construct viable, JFH 1 (genotype 2a) based, genomes. The present inventors serially passaged the viruses in cell culture obtaining relatively high HCV RNA titers and infectivity titers. Sequence analysis...

  1. The microbiome composition of Aedes aegypti is not critical for Wolbachia-mediated inhibition of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Michelle D; Ye, Yixin H; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is primarily vectored by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is estimated to cause 390 million human infections annually. A novel method for DENV control involves stable transinfection of Ae. aegypti with the common insect endosymbiont Wolbachia, which mediates an antiviral effect. However, the mechanism by which Wolbachia reduces the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to DENV is not fully understood. In this study we assessed the potential of resident microbiota, which can play important roles in insect physiology and immune responses, to affect Wolbachia-mediated DENV blocking. The microbiome of Ae. aegypti stably infected with Wolbachia strain wMel was compared to that of Ae. aegypti without Wolbachia, using 16s rDNA profiling. Our results indicate that although Wolbachia affected the relative abundance of several genera, the microbiome of both the Wolbachia-infected and uninfected mosquitoes was dominated by Elizabethkingia and unclassified Enterobacteriaceae. To assess the potential of the resident microbiota to affect the Wolbachia-mediated antiviral effect, we used antibiotic treatment before infection with DENV by blood-meal. In spite of a significant shift in the microbiome composition in response to the antibiotics, we detected no effect of antibiotic treatment on DENV infection rates, or on the DENV load of infected mosquitoes. Our findings indicate that stable infection with Wolbachia strain wMel produces few effects on the microbiome of laboratory-reared Ae. aegypti. Moreover, our findings suggest that the microbiome can be significantly altered without affecting the fundamental DENV blocking phenotype in these mosquitoes. Since Ae. aegypti are likely to encounter diverse microbiota in the field, this is a particularly important result in the context of using Wolbachia as a method for DENV control.

  2. Antibody Epitopes Identified in Critical Regions of Dengue Virus Nonstructural 1 Protein in Mouse Vaccination and Natural Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Tomer; Beatty, P Robert; MacMillen, Zachary; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva

    2017-05-15

    Dengue is a global public health problem and is caused by four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV1-4). A major challenge in dengue vaccine development is that cross-reactive anti-DENV Abs can be protective or potentially increase disease via Ab-dependent enhancement. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has long been considered a vaccine candidate as it avoids Ab-dependent enhancement. In this study, we evaluated survival to challenge in a lethal DENV vascular leak model in mice immunized with NS1 combined with aluminum and magnesium hydroxide, monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax, or Sigma adjuvant system+CpG DNA, compared with mice infected with a sublethal dose of DENV2 and mice immunized with OVA (negative control). We characterized Ab responses to DENV1, 2, and 3 NS1 using an Ag microarray tiled with 20-mer peptides overlapping by 15 aa and identified five regions of DENV NS1 with significant levels of Ab reactivity in the NS1 + monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax group. Additionally, we profiled the Ab responses to NS1 of humans naturally infected with DENV2 or DENV3 in serum samples from Nicaragua collected at acute, convalescent, and 12-mo timepoints. One region in the wing domain of NS1 was immunodominant in both mouse vaccination and human infection studies, and two regions were identified only in NS1-immunized mice; thus, vaccination can generate Abs to regions that are not targeted in natural infection and could provide additional protection against lethal DENV infection. Overall, we identified a small number of immunodominant regions, which were in functionally important locations on the DENV NS1 protein and are potential correlates of protection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    The interferon (IFN) response to viral pathogens is critical for host survival. In humans and mouse models, defects in IFN responses can result in lethal herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, usually from encephalitis. Although rare, HSV-1 can also cause fulminant hepatic failure, which is often fatal. Although herpes simplex encephalitis has been extensively studied, HSV-1 generalized infections and subsequent acute liver failure are less well understood. We previously demonstrated that IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice are exquisitely susceptible to liver infection following corneal infection with HSV-1. In this study, we used bone marrow chimeras of IFN-αβγR(-/-) (AG129) and wild-type (WT; 129SvEv) mice to probe the underlying IFN-dependent mechanisms that control HSV-1 pathogenesis. After infection, WT mice with either IFN-αβγR(-/-) or WT marrow exhibited comparable survival, while IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice with WT marrow had a significant survival advantage over their counterparts with IFN-αβγR(-/-) marrow. Furthermore, using bioluminescent imaging to maximize data acquisition, we showed that the transfer of IFN-competent hematopoietic cells controlled HSV-1 replication and damage in the livers of IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice. Consistent with this, the inability of IFN-αβγR(-/-) immune cells to control liver infection in IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice manifested as profoundly elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, indicative of severe liver damage. In contrast, IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice receiving WT marrow exhibited only modest elevations of AST and ALT levels. These studies indicate that IFN responsiveness of the immune system is a major determinant of viral tropism and damage during visceral HSV infections. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is an incurable viral infection with the most significant morbidity and mortality occurring in neonates and patients with compromised immune systems. Severe pathologies from HSV include the

  4. Ebola virus: current and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Surender Singh; Kumar, Anoop; Ahsan, Mohamed Jawed; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    The present outbreak associated with Ebola disease in Western countries of the African continent which is believed to be one of the massive eruptions caused by the Ebola viral infections. In the present scenario ebola has been transmitted to the European and American regions through the travelers from wide spread countries like Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The viral disease is spreading through the contact in any form by the infected persons or patients and creating huge risks to the mortals. The symptoms related to ebola virus are often highly pathogenic; about 70-80% of death cases are reported due to critical hemorrhagic fever. Early in infection, ebola virus infects macrophages and endothelial cells. It mainly produces a Viral Protein 24 (eVP24) which prevents interferon-based signals which are important for destruction of viruses. How ebola virus manipulates the function of the immune system is still unclear. Due to lack of this knowledge, no approved treatment is available. In this review, we have tried to compile the epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of ebola virus infection. The promising ligands against ebola virus have been also discussed which will be helpful for researchers to design drugs for the treatment of ebola virus disease.

  5. Information Technology in Education: The Critical Lack of Principled Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests there is a crisis in educational leadership, especially as it affects information technology. Highlights include educational leaders as managers; the commercialization of education; management strategies on campus; students as customers; quality control, online distance education, and the business model; and the future of online distance…

  6. Critical role for the chemokine receptor CXCR6 in NK cell-mediated antigen-specific memory of haptens and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paust, Silke; Gill, Harvinder S; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Flynn, Michael P; Moseman, E Ashley; Senman, Balimkiz; Szczepanik, Marian; Telenti, Amalio; Askenase, Philip W; Compans, Richard W; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells mediate antigen-specific contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice deficient in T cells and B cells. We report here that hepatic NK cells, but not splenic or naive NK cells, also developed specific memory of vaccines containing antigens from influenza, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Adoptive transfer of virus-sensitized NK cells into naive recipient mice enhanced the survival of the mice after lethal challenge with the sensitizing virus but not after lethal challenge with a different virus. NK cell memory of haptens and viruses depended on CXCR6, a chemokine receptor on hepatic NK cells that was required for the persistence of memory NK cells but not for antigen recognition. Thus, hepatic NK cells can develop adaptive immunity to structurally diverse antigens, an activity that requires NK cell-expressed CXCR6.

  7. Research on computer virus database management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoquan

    2011-12-01

    The growing proliferation of computer viruses becomes the lethal threat and research focus of the security of network information. While new virus is emerging, the number of viruses is growing, virus classification increasing complex. Virus naming because of agencies' capture time differences can not be unified. Although each agency has its own virus database, the communication between each other lacks, or virus information is incomplete, or a small number of sample information. This paper introduces the current construction status of the virus database at home and abroad, analyzes how to standardize and complete description of virus characteristics, and then gives the information integrity, storage security and manageable computer virus database design scheme.

  8. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log 10 ), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log 10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes chickenpox and shingles. Individuals afflicted with shingles risk developing the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), which has

  9. Concept analysis: lack of anonymity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Marilyn A; Hobbs, Barbara B

    2017-05-01

    To re-examine and expand understanding of the concept 'lack of anonymity' as a component of rural nursing theory. Early healthcare literature reports lack of anonymity as part of social and working environments, particularly rural nursing. Rural nursing theory included the first published concept analysis on lack of anonymity but lacked empirical referents. Workforce, societal and rural healthcare changes support an updated analysis. To further understand lack of anonymity, its present day use and applicability to diverse environments, research from multiple disciplines was reviewed. Concept analysis. A literature search using eight terms in eleven databases was conducted of literature published between 2008-2013. Walker and Avant's concept analysis methodology guided the analysis. The previous concept analysis is supported in part by current literature. The defining attributes, 'identifiable', 'establishing boundaries for public and private self and interconnectedness' in a community were updated. Updated antecedents include: (i) environmental context; (ii) opportunities to become visible; (iii) developing relationships and (iv) unconscious or limited awareness of public or personal privacy. Consequences are: (i) familiarity; (ii) visibility; (iii) awareness of privacy and (iv) manage or balance of lack of anonymity. Cases were constructed and empirical referents identified. The concept of lack of anonymity was updated; portions of the original definition remain unchanged. Empirical referents reveal the defining attributes in daily life and may guide future research on the effect of lack of anonymity on nursing practice. This analysis advances the conceptual understanding of rural nursing theory. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. TNF-α and Macrophages Are Critical for Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Exacerbations in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hiep; Maltby, Steven; Simpson, Jodie L; Eyers, Fiona; Baines, Katherine J; Gibson, Peter G; Foster, Paul S; Yang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Viral respiratory infections trigger severe exacerbations of asthma, worsen disease symptoms, and impair lung function. To investigate the mechanisms underlying viral exacerbation, we established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced exacerbation after allergen sensitization and challenge. RSV infection of OVA-sensitized/challenged BALB/c mice resulted in significantly increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and macrophage and neutrophil lung infiltration. Exacerbation was accompanied by increased levels of inflammatory cytokines (including TNF-α, MCP-1, and keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine [KC]) compared with uninfected OVA-treated mice or OVA-treated mice exposed to UV-inactivated RSV. Dexamethasone treatment completely inhibited all features of allergic disease, including AHR and eosinophil infiltration, in uninfected OVA-sensitized/challenged mice. Conversely, dexamethasone treatment following RSV-induced exacerbation only partially suppressed AHR and failed to dampen macrophage and neutrophil infiltration or inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC). This mimics clinical observations in patients with exacerbations, which is associated with increased neutrophils and often poorly responds to corticosteroid therapy. Interestingly, we also observed increased TNF-α levels in sputum samples from patients with neutrophilic asthma. Although RSV-induced exacerbation was resistant to steroid treatment, inhibition of TNF-α and MCP-1 function or depletion of macrophages suppressed features of disease, including AHR and macrophage and neutrophil infiltration. Our findings highlight critical roles for macrophages and inflammatory cytokines (including TNF-α and MCP-1) in viral-induced exacerbation of asthma and suggest examination of these pathways as novel therapeutic approaches for disease management. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. CD4 T cell immunity is critical for the control of simian varicella virus infection in a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Haberthur

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV results in varicella (more commonly known as chickenpox after which VZV establishes latency in sensory ganglia. VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles, a debilitating disease that affects one million individuals in the US alone annually. Current vaccines against varicella (Varivax and herpes zoster (Zostavax are not 100% efficacious. Specifically, studies have shown that 1 dose of varivax can lead to breakthrough varicella, albeit rarely, in children and a 2-dose regimen is now recommended. Similarly, although Zostavax results in a 50% reduction in HZ cases, a significant number of recipients remain at risk. To design more efficacious vaccines, we need a better understanding of the immune response to VZV. Clinical observations suggest that T cell immunity plays a more critical role in the protection against VZV primary infection and reactivation. However, no studies to date have directly tested this hypothesis due to the scarcity of animal models that recapitulate the immune response to VZV. We have recently shown that SVV infection of rhesus macaques models the hallmarks of primary VZV infection in children. In this study, we used this model to experimentally determine the role of CD4, CD8 and B cell responses in the resolution of primary SVV infection in unvaccinated animals. Data presented in this manuscript show that while CD20 depletion leads to a significant delay and decrease in the antibody response to SVV, loss of B cells does not alter the severity of varicella or the kinetics/magnitude of the T cell response. Loss of CD8 T cells resulted in slightly higher viral loads and prolonged viremia. In contrast, CD4 depletion led to higher viral loads, prolonged viremia and disseminated varicella. CD4 depleted animals also had delayed and reduced antibody and CD8 T cell responses. These results are similar to clinical observations that children with agammaglobulinemia have

  12. Functional analyses of GB virus B p13 protein: development of a recombinant GB virus B hepatitis virus with a p7 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takikawa, Shingo; Engle, Ronald E; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2006-01-01

    plus part of p7) was nonviable. However, a mutant lacking amino acid 614-669 (p6) produced high titer viremia and acute resolving hepatitis; viruses recovered from both animals lacked the deleted sequence and had no other mutations. Thus, p6 was dispensable but p7 was essential for infectivity...... processing at both sites, suggesting that p13 is processed into two components (p6 and p7). Mutants with substitution at amino acid 669 or 681 were viable in vivo, but the recovered viruses had changes at amino acid 669 and 681, respectively, which restored cleavage. A mutant lacking amino acid 614-681 (p6......GB virus B (GBV-B), which infects tamarins, is the virus most closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV has a protein (p7) that is believed to form an ion channel. It is critical for viability. In vitro studies suggest that GBV-B has an analogous but larger protein (p13). We found...

  13. Functional analyses of GB virus B p13 protein: Development of a recombinant GB virus B hepatitis virus with a p7 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takikawa, Shingo; Engle, Ronald E; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2006-01-01

    plus part of p7) was nonviable. However, a mutant lacking amino acid 614-669 (p6) produced high titer viremia and acute resolving hepatitis; viruses recovered from both animals lacked the deleted sequence and had no other mutations. Thus, p6 was dispensable but p7 was essential for infectivity...... processing at both sites, suggesting that p13 is processed into two components (p6 and p7). Mutants with substitution at amino acid 669 or 681 were viable in vivo, but the recovered viruses had changes at amino acid 669 and 681, respectively, which restored cleavage. A mutant lacking amino acid 614-681 (p6......GB virus B (GBV-B), which infects tamarins, is the virus most closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV has a protein (p7) that is believed to form an ion channel. It is critical for viability. In vitro studies suggest that GBV-B has an analogous but larger protein (p13). We found...

  14. RNA binding is more critical to the suppression of silencing function of Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein than nuclear localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Inmaculada; Rakitina, Daria; Semashko, Maria; Taliansky, Michael; Praveen, Shelly; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P.; Kalinina, Natalia; Canto, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that silencing suppression by the 2b protein and six mutants correlated both with their ability to bind to double-stranded (ds) small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and with their nuclear/nucleolar localization. To further discern the contribution to suppression activity of sRNA binding and of nuclear localization, we have characterized the kinetics of in vitro binding to a ds sRNA, a single-stranded (ss) sRNA, and a micro RNA (miRNA) of the native 2b protein and eight mutant variants. We have also added a nuclear export signal (NES) to the 2b protein and assessed how it affected subcellular distribution and suppressor activity. We found that in solution native protein bound ds siRNA, miRNA, and ss sRNA with high affinity, at protein:RNA molar ratios ∼2:1. Of the four mutants that retained suppressor activity, three showed sRNA binding profiles similar to those of the native protein, whereas the remaining one bound ss sRNA at a 2:1 molar ratio, but both ds sRNAs with 1.5–2 times slightly lower affinity. Three of the four mutants lacking suppressor activity failed to bind to any sRNA, whereas the remaining one bound them at far higher ratios. NES-tagged 2b protein became cytoplasmic, but suppression activity in patch assays remained unaffected. These results support binding to sRNAs at molar ratios at or near 2:1 as critical to the suppressor activity of the 2b protein. They also show that cytoplasmically localized 2b protein retained suppressor activity, and that a sustained nuclear localization was not required for this function. PMID:22357910

  15. The critical role of Notch ligand Delta-like 1 in the pathogenesis of influenza A virus (H1N1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Ito

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viral infections have been identified as the etiologic agents for historic pandemics, and contribute to the annual mortality associated with acute viral pneumonia. While both innate and acquired immunity are important in combating influenza virus infection, the mechanism connecting these arms of the immune system remains unknown. Recent data have indicated that the Notch system is an important bridge between antigen-presenting cells (APCs and T cell communication circuits and plays a central role in driving the immune system to overcome disease. In the present study, we examine the role of Notch signaling during influenza H1N1 virus infection, focusing on APCs. We demonstrate here that macrophages, but not dendritic cells (DCs, increased Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (Dll1 expression following influenza virus challenge. Dll1 expression on macrophages was dependent on retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I induced type-I IFN pathway, and not on the TLR3-TRIF pathway. We also found that IFNα-Receptor knockout mice failed to induce Dll1 expression on lung macrophages and had enhanced mortality during influenza virus infection. Our results further showed that specific neutralization of Dll1 during influenza virus challenge induced higher mortality, impaired viral clearance, and decreased levels of IFN-γ. In addition, we blocked Notch signaling by using γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI, a Notch signaling inhibitor. Intranasal administration of GSI during influenza infection also led to higher mortality, and higher virus load with excessive inflammation and an impaired production of IFN-γ in lungs. Moreover, Dll1 expression on macrophages specifically regulates IFN-γ levels from CD4(+and CD8(+T cells, which are important for anti-viral immunity. Together, the results of this study show that Dll1 positively influences the development of anti-viral immunity, and may provide mechanistic approaches for modifying and controlling the immune response

  16. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  17. Imaging single retrovirus entry through alternative receptor isoforms and intermediates of virus-endosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Naveen K; Latinovic, Olga; Martin, Erik; Novitskiy, Gennadiy; Marin, Mariana; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Naughton, John; Young, John A T; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2011-01-20

    A large group of viruses rely on low pH to activate their fusion proteins that merge the viral envelope with an endosomal membrane, releasing the viral nucleocapsid. A critical barrier to understanding these events has been the lack of approaches to study virus-cell membrane fusion within acidic endosomes, the natural sites of virus nucleocapsid capsid entry into the cytosol. Here we have investigated these events using the highly tractable subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein (EnvA)-TVA receptor system. Through labeling EnvA pseudotyped viruses with a pH-sensitive fluorescent marker, we imaged their entry into mildly acidic compartments. We found that cells expressing the transmembrane receptor (TVA950) internalized the virus much faster than those expressing the GPI-anchored receptor isoform (TVA800). Surprisingly, TVA800 did not accelerate virus uptake compared to cells lacking the receptor. Subsequent steps of virus entry were visualized by incorporating a small viral content marker that was released into the cytosol as a result of fusion. EnvA-dependent fusion with TVA800-expressing cells occurred shortly after endocytosis and delivery into acidic endosomes, whereas fusion of viruses internalized through TVA950 was delayed. In the latter case, a relatively stable hemifusion-like intermediate preceded the fusion pore opening. The apparent size and stability of nascent fusion pores depended on the TVA isoforms and their expression levels, with TVA950 supporting more robust pores and a higher efficiency of infection compared to TVA800. These results demonstrate that surface receptor density and the intracellular trafficking pathway used are important determinants of efficient EnvA-mediated membrane fusion, and suggest that early fusion intermediates play a critical role in establishing low pH-dependent virus entry from within acidic endosomes.

  18. Imaging single retrovirus entry through alternative receptor isoforms and intermediates of virus-endosome fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen K Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large group of viruses rely on low pH to activate their fusion proteins that merge the viral envelope with an endosomal membrane, releasing the viral nucleocapsid. A critical barrier to understanding these events has been the lack of approaches to study virus-cell membrane fusion within acidic endosomes, the natural sites of virus nucleocapsid capsid entry into the cytosol. Here we have investigated these events using the highly tractable subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein (EnvA-TVA receptor system. Through labeling EnvA pseudotyped viruses with a pH-sensitive fluorescent marker, we imaged their entry into mildly acidic compartments. We found that cells expressing the transmembrane receptor (TVA950 internalized the virus much faster than those expressing the GPI-anchored receptor isoform (TVA800. Surprisingly, TVA800 did not accelerate virus uptake compared to cells lacking the receptor. Subsequent steps of virus entry were visualized by incorporating a small viral content marker that was released into the cytosol as a result of fusion. EnvA-dependent fusion with TVA800-expressing cells occurred shortly after endocytosis and delivery into acidic endosomes, whereas fusion of viruses internalized through TVA950 was delayed. In the latter case, a relatively stable hemifusion-like intermediate preceded the fusion pore opening. The apparent size and stability of nascent fusion pores depended on the TVA isoforms and their expression levels, with TVA950 supporting more robust pores and a higher efficiency of infection compared to TVA800. These results demonstrate that surface receptor density and the intracellular trafficking pathway used are important determinants of efficient EnvA-mediated membrane fusion, and suggest that early fusion intermediates play a critical role in establishing low pH-dependent virus entry from within acidic endosomes.

  19. Molecular analysis of critical sequences within the EBNA-2 type 1 gene from Epstein-Barr virus isolates from patients with infectious mononucleosis, tonsillar hyperplasia, and HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Homsi, A. S.; Berger, C.; van Baarle, D.; Kersten, M. J.; Klein, M. R.; McQuain, C.; van Oers, R.; Knecht, H.

    1998-01-01

    EBNA-2 is the first protein to be detected after infection of primary B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and plays an essential role as transcriptional activator in EBV-induced lymphocyte transformation. We analysed by PCR and sequencing regions of the EBNA-2 type 1 gene from isolates from 13

  20. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  1. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David C.; Yates, Nicole L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G.; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W.; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D.; Weiss, Deborah E.; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    protection. Here we developed novel replicating poxvirus NYVAC-based HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates expressing clade C HIV-1 antigens, with one of them lacking the vaccinia virus B19 protein, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response. Immunization of nonhuman primates with these novel NYVAC-C-KC vectors and the protein component gp120 elicited high levels of T cell and humoral immune responses, with the vector containing a deletion in B19R inducing a trend toward a higher magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and neutralization of some HIV-1 strains. These poxvirus vectors could be considered HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates based on their activation of potential immune correlates of protection. PMID:28179536

  2. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Yates, Nicole L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D; Weiss, Deborah E; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V; Jacobs, Bertram L; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Esteban, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    . Here we developed novel replicating poxvirus NYVAC-based HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates expressing clade C HIV-1 antigens, with one of them lacking the vaccinia virus B19 protein, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response. Immunization of nonhuman primates with these novel NYVAC-C-KC vectors and the protein component gp120 elicited high levels of T cell and humoral immune responses, with the vector containing a deletion in B19R inducing a trend toward a higher magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and neutralization of some HIV-1 strains. These poxvirus vectors could be considered HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates based on their activation of potential immune correlates of protection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Critical Role of K1685 and K1829 in the Large Protein of Rabies Virus in Viral Pathogenicity and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dayong; Luo, Zhaochen; Zhou, Ming; Li, Mingming; Yu, Lan; Wang, Chong; Yuan, Jiaolong; Li, Fang; Tian, Bin; Sui, Baokun; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2015-10-14

    Rabies, one of the oldest infectious diseases, still presents a public health threat in most parts of the world today. Its pathogen, rabies virus (RABV), can utilize its viral proteins, such as the nucleoprotein and phosphorylation protein, to subvert the host innate immune system. For a long time, the large (L) protein was believed to be essential for RABV transcription and replication, but its role in viral pathogenicity and immune evasion was not known. Recent studies have found that the conserved K-D-K-E tetrad motif in the L protein is related to the methyltransferase (MTase) activity in the viral mRNA process. In the present study, a series of RABV mutations in this motif was constructed with the recombinant CVS-B2c (rB2c) virus. Two of these mutants, rB2c-K1685A and rB2c-K1829A, were found to be stable and displayed an attenuated phenotype in both in vitro growth and in vivo pathogenicity in adult and suckling mice. Further studies demonstrated that these two mutants were more sensitive to the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene product IFIT2 than the parent virus. Taken together, our results suggest that K1685 and K1829 in the L protein play important roles in pathogenicity and immune evasion during RABV infection. Rabies continues to present a public health threat in most areas of the world, especially in the developing countries of Asia and Africa. The pathogenic mechanisms for rabies are not well understood. In the present study, it was found that the recombinant rabies viruses rB2c-K1685A and rB2c-K1829A, carrying mutations at the predicted MTase catalytic sites in the L protein, were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that these mutants were more sensitive to the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene product IFIT2 than the parent virus. These findings improve our understanding of rabies pathogenesis, which may help in developing potential therapeutics and an avirulent rabies vaccine. Copyright © 2015

  4. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In cultured cells, infection by Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB disease has not been determined. We used tissue-specific CAR gene deletion to generate mice that lacked CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. Deletion of CAR from the pancreas resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in virus titers within the pancreas during infection, and a significant reduction in virus-induced tissue damage and inflammation. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a 100-fold reduction in virus titer within the heart, and a marked reduction in cytokine production and histopathology. Although primary cardiomyocytes from control animals were susceptible to virus infection, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo, and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas. PMID:19616768

  5. The amino acid linker between the endonuclease and helicase domains of adeno-associated virus type 5 Rep plays a critical role in DNA-dependent oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggin, Jenna E; James, Jeffrey A; Chappie, Joshua S; Dyda, Fred; Hickman, Alison Burgess

    2012-03-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome encodes four Rep proteins, all of which contain an SF3 helicase domain. The larger Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, are required for viral replication, whereas Rep40 and Rep52 are needed to package AAV genomes into preformed capsids; these smaller proteins are missing the site-specific DNA-binding and endonuclease domain found in Rep68/78. Other viral SF3 helicases, such as the simian virus 40 large T antigen and the papillomavirus E1 protein, are active as hexameric assemblies. However, Rep40 and Rep52 have not been observed to form stable oligomers on their own or with DNA, suggesting that important determinants of helicase multimerization lie outside the helicase domain. Here, we report that when the 23-residue linker that connects the endonuclease and helicase domains is appended to the adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5) helicase domain, the resulting protein forms discrete complexes on DNA consistent with single or double hexamers. The formation of these complexes does not require the Rep binding site sequence, nor is it nucleotide dependent. These complexes have stimulated ATPase and helicase activities relative to the helicase domain alone, indicating that they are catalytically relevant, a result supported by negative-stain electron microscopy images of hexameric rings. Similarly, the addition of the linker region to the AAV5 Rep endonuclease domain also confers on it the ability to bind and multimerize on nonspecific double-stranded DNA. We conclude that the linker is likely a key contributor to Rep68/78 DNA-dependent oligomerization and may play an important role in mediating Rep68/78's conversion from site-specific DNA binding to nonspecific DNA unwinding.

  6. Functional Analysis of Glycosylation of Zika Virus Envelope Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila R. Fontes-Garfias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Zika virus (ZIKV infection causes devastating congenital abnormities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The ZIKV envelope (E protein is responsible for viral entry and represents a major determinant for viral pathogenesis. Like other flaviviruses, the ZIKV E protein is glycosylated at amino acid N154. To study the function of E glycosylation, we generated a recombinant N154Q ZIKV that lacks the E glycosylation and analyzed the mutant virus in mammalian and mosquito hosts. In mouse models, the mutant was attenuated, as evidenced by lower viremia, decreased weight loss, and no mortality; however, knockout of E glycosylation did not significantly affect neurovirulence. Mice immunized with the mutant virus developed a robust neutralizing antibody response and were completely protected from wild-type ZIKV challenge. In mosquitoes, the mutant virus exhibited diminished oral infectivity for the Aedes aegypti vector. Collectively, the results demonstrate that E glycosylation is critical for ZIKV infection of mammalian and mosquito hosts. : Zika virus (ZIKV causes devastating congenital abnormities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Fontes-Garfias et al. showed that the glycosylation of ZIKV envelope protein plays an important role in infecting mosquito vectors and pathogenesis in mouse. Keywords: Zika virus, glycosylation, flavivirus entry, mosquito transmission, vaccine

  7. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-07-01

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Systems Approach Reveals MAVS Signaling in Myeloid Cells as Critical for Resistance to Ebola Virus in Murine Models of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta Dutta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unprecedented 2013–2016 outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV resulted in over 11,300 human deaths. Host resistance to RNA viruses requires RIG-I-like receptor (RLR signaling through the adaptor protein, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, but the role of RLR-MAVS in orchestrating anti-EBOV responses in vivo is not known. Here we apply a systems approach to MAVS−/− mice infected with either wild-type or mouse-adapted EBOV. MAVS controlled EBOV replication through the expression of IFNα, regulation of inflammatory responses in the spleen, and prevention of cell death in the liver, with macrophages implicated as a major cell type influencing host resistance. A dominant role for RLR signaling in macrophages was confirmed following conditional MAVS deletion in LysM+ myeloid cells. These findings reveal tissue-specific MAVS-dependent transcriptional pathways associated with resistance to EBOV, and they demonstrate that EBOV adaptation to cause disease in mice involves changes in two distinct events, RLR-MAVS antagonism and suppression of RLR-independent IFN-I responses.

  9. A complex comprising phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, ACBD3, and Aichi virus proteins enhances phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis and is critical for formation of the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Sasaki, Kumiko; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2014-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. We previously showed that nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB of Aichi virus (AiV), a picornavirus, interact with the Golgi protein, acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), which interacts with PI4KB. These five viral proteins, ACBD3, PI4KB, and the PI4KB product phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) colocalize to the AiV RNA replication sites (J. Sasaki et al., EMBO J. 31:754-766, 2012). We here examined the roles of these viral and cellular molecules in the formation of AiV replication complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of AiV polyprotein-expressing cells with a small interfering RNA targeting ACBD3 abolished colocalization of the viral 2B, 2C, and 3A proteins with PI4KB. A PI4KB-specific inhibitor also prevented their colocalization. Virus RNA replication increased the level of cellular PI4P without affecting that of PI4KB, and individual expression of 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, or 3AB stimulated PI4P generation. These results suggest that the viral protein/ACBD3/PI4KB complex plays an important role in forming the functional replication complex by enhancing PI4P synthesis. Of the viral proteins, 3A and 3AB were shown to stimulate the in vitro kinase activity of PI4KB through forming a 3A or 3AB/ACBD3/PI4KB complex, whereas the ACBD3-mediated PI4KB activation by 2B and 2C remains to be demonstrated. The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KB is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. Aichi virus, a picornavirus belonging to the genus Kobuvirus, forms a complex comprising one of the viral nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB, the Golgi protein ACBD3, and PI4KB to synthesize PI4P at the sites for viral RNA replication. However, the roles of this protein complex in forming the replication complex are unknown. This study showed that virus RNA replication

  10. [Ebola virus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Gałas, Aleksander; Garlicki, Aleksander; Gawda, Anna; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Gil, Krzysztof; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Olszanecki, Rafał; Piatek, Anna; Zawilińska, Barbara; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Ebola is one of the most virulent zoonotic RNA viruses causing in humans haemorrhagic fever with fatality ratio reaching 90%. During the outbreak of 2014 the number of deaths exceeded 8.000. The "imported" cases reported in Western Europe and USA highlighted the extreme risk of Ebola virus spreading outside the African countries. Thus, haemorrhagic fever outbreak is an international epidemiological problem, also due to the lack of approved prevention and therapeutic strategies. The editorial review article briefly summarizes current knowledge on Ebola virus disease epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis as well as possible prevention and treatment.

  11. The Liberal Virus in Critical Pedagogy: Beyond "Anti-This-and-That" Postmodernism and Three Problems in the Idea of Communism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachur, Jerrold L.

    2012-01-01

    In the shadow of triumphalist and hubristic capitalism, many adherents to critical pedagogy promote "democracy" as a kind of anti-capitalist challenge to inequality, oppression and exploitation. However, American culture has gone global, immersing the world in the received wisdom of a variety of liberalisms or in the reaction formations of…

  12. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... effector functions, accumulated in the spleen. These findings indicate that the localization of the adenoviral inoculum and not the total Ag load determines the quality of the CD8(+) T cell response induced with adenoviral vaccines....

  13. Evaluation of Virus Inactivation by Formaldehyde to Enhance Biosafety of Diagnostic Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Möller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA fixation of infectious samples is a well-established protocol in diagnostic electron microscopy of viruses. However, published experimental data that demonstrate virus inactivation by these fixation procedures are lacking. Usually, fixation is performed immediately before the sample preparation for microscopy. The fixation procedure should transform viruses in a non–infectious but nonetheless structurally intact form in order to allow a proper diagnosis based on morphology. FA provides an essential advantage in comparison to other disinfectants, because it preserves the ultrastructure of biological material without interfering significantly with the preparation (i.e., the negative staining and the detection of viruses. To examine the efficiency of FA inactivation, we used Vaccinia virus, Human adenovirus and Murine norovirus as models and treated them with FA under various conditions. Critical parameters for the inactivation efficiency were the temperature, the duration of the FA treatment, and the resistance of the virus in question. Our results show that FA inactivation at low temperature (4 °C bears a high risk of incomplete inactivation. Higher temperatures (25 °C are more efficient, although they still require rather long incubation times to fully inactivate a complex and highly robust virus like Vaccinia. A protocol, which applied 2% buffered FA for 60 min and a temperature–shift from 25 to 37 °C after 30 min was efficient for the complete inactivation of all test viruses, and therefore has the potential to improve both biosafety and speed of diagnostic electron microscopy.

  14. Chikungunya, Influenza, Nipah, and Semliki Forest Chimeric Viruses with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus: Actions in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Mao, Guochao; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K; Davis, John N

    2017-03-15

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based chimeric viruses that include genes from other viruses show promise as vaccines and oncolytic viruses. However, the critical safety concern is the neurotropic nature conveyed by the VSV glycoprotein. VSVs that include the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene, even in most recombinant attenuated strains, can still show substantial adverse or lethal actions in the brain. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses in the brain, including those in which glycoprotein genes from Nipah, chikungunya (CHIKV), and influenza H5N1 viruses were substituted for the VSV glycoprotein gene. We also test a virus-like vesicle (VLV) in which the VSV glycoprotein gene is expressed from a replicon encoding the nonstructural proteins of Semliki Forest virus. VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV were all safe in the adult mouse brain, as were VSVΔG viruses expressing either the Nipah F or G glycoprotein. In contrast, a complementing pair of VSVΔG viruses expressing Nipah G and F glycoproteins were lethal within the brain within a surprisingly short time frame of 2 days. Intranasal inoculation in postnatal day 14 mice with VSVΔG-CHIKV or VLV evoked no adverse response, whereas VSVΔG-H5N1 by this route was lethal in most mice. A key immune mechanism underlying the safety of VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV in the adult brain was the type I interferon response; all three viruses were lethal in the brains of adult mice lacking the interferon receptor, suggesting that the viruses can infect and replicate and spread in brain cells if not blocked by interferon-stimulated genes within the brain.IMPORTANCE Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows considerable promise both as a vaccine vector and as an oncolytic virus. The greatest limitation of VSV is that it is highly neurotropic and can be lethal within the brain. The neurotropism can be mostly attributed to the VSV G glycoprotein. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses of VSV with glycoprotein genes from Nipah

  15. CriticalEd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Caspar Mølholt; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The best text method is commonly applied among music scholars engaged in producing critical editions. In this method, a comment list is compiled, consisting of variant readings and editorial emendations. This list is maintained by inserting the comments into a document as the changes are made...... such as Sibelius or Finale. It was hypothesized that it would be possible to develop a Sibelius plug-in, written in Manuscript 6, that would improve the critical editing work flow, but it was found that the capabilities of this scripting language were insufficient. Instead, a 3-part system was designed and built...

  16. Viral-mediated oncolysis is the most critical factor in the late-phase of the tumor regression process upon vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In principle, the elimination of malignancies by oncolytic virotherapy could proceed by different mechanisms - e.g. tumor cell specific oncolysis, destruction of the tumor vasculature or an anti-tumoral immunological response. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of these factors to elucidate the responsible mechanism for regression of human breast tumor xenografts upon colonization with an attenuated vaccinia virus (VACV. Methods Breast tumor xenografts were analyzed 6 weeks post VACV infection (p.i.; regression phase by immunohistochemistry and mouse-specific expression arrays. Viral-mediated oncolysis was determined by tumor growth analysis combined with microscopic studies of intratumoral virus distribution. The tumor vasculature was morphologically characterized by diameter and density measurements and vessel functionality was analyzed by lectin perfusion and extravasation studies. Immunological aspects of viral-mediated tumor regression were studied in either immune-deficient mouse strains (T-, B-, NK-cell-deficient or upon cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression (MHCII+-cell depletion in nude mice. Results Late stage VACV-infected breast tumors showed extensive necrosis, which was highly specific to cancer cells. The tumor vasculature in infected tumor areas remained functional and the endothelial cells were not infected. However, viral colonization triggers hyperpermeability and dilatation of the tumor vessels, which resembled the activated endothelium in wounded tissue. Moreover, we demonstrated an increased expression of genes involved in leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in VACV-infected tumors, which orchestrate perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration. The immunohistochemical analysis of infected tumors displayed intense infiltration of MHCII-positive cells and colocalization of tumor vessels with MHCII+/CD31+ vascular leukocytes. However, GI-101A tumor growth analysis upon VACV-infection in

  17. Feline leukemia virus outbreak in the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus): high-throughput sequencing of envelope variable region A and experimental transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geret, C P; Cattori, V; Meli, M L; Riond, B; Martínez, F; López, G; Vargas, A; Simón, M A; López-Bao, J V; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2011-05-01

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species. During winter/spring 2006/7, a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) outbreak of unexpected virulence killed about 2/3 of the infected Iberian lynxes. All FeLV-positive animals were co-infected with feline hemoplasmas. To further characterize the Iberian lynx FeLV strain and evaluate its potential virulence, the FeLV envelope gene variable region A (VRA) mutant spectrum was analyzed using the Roche 454 sequencing technology, and an in vivo transmission study of lynx blood to specified-pathogen-free cats was performed. VRA mutations indicated weak apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme and catalytic polypeptide-like cytidine deaminase (APOBEC) restriction of FeLV replication, and variants characteristic of aggressive FeLV strains, such as FeLV-C or FeLV-A/61C, were not detected. Cats exposed to FeLV/Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum-positive lynx blood did not show a particularly severe outcome of infection. The results underscore the special susceptibility of Iberian lynxes to infectious diseases.

  18. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  19. Hepatitis E virus and fulminant hepatitis - a virus or host-specific pathology?

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fulminant hepatitis is a rare outcome of infection with hepatitis E virus. Several recent reports suggest that virus variation is an important determinant of disease progression.AIMS: To critically examine the evidence that virus-specific factors underlie the development of fulminant hepatitis following hepatitis E virus infection.METHODS: Published sequence information of hepatitis E virus isolates from patients with and without fulminant hepatitis was collected and analysed usin...

  20. RIG-I Helicase-Independent Pathway in Sendai Virus-Activated Dendritic Cells Is Critical for Preventing Lung Metastasis of AT6.3 Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Kato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated highly efficient antitumor immunity against dermal tumors of B16F10 murine melanoma with the use of dendritic cells (DCs activated by replication-competent, as well as nontransmissible-type, recombinant Sendai viruses (rSeV, and proposed a new concept, “immunostimulatory virotherapy,” for cancer immunotherapy. However, there has been little information on the efficacies of thismethod: 1 inmore clinically relevant situations including metastatic diseases, 2 on other tumor types and other animal species, and 3 on the related molecular/cellular mechanisms. In this study, therefore, we investigated the efficacy of vaccinating DCs activated by fusion gene-deleted nontransmissible rSeV on a rat model of lung metastasis using a highly malignant subline of Dunning R-3327 prostate cancer, AT6.3. rSeV/dF-green fluorescent protein (GFP-activated bone marrow-derived DCs (rSeV/dF-GFP-DC, consistent with results previously observed in murine DCs. Vaccination of rSeV/dF-GFP-DC was highly effective at preventing lung metastasis after intravenous loading of R-3327 tumor cells, compared with the effects observed with immature DCs or lipopolysaccharide-activated DCs. Interestingly, neither CTL activity nor DC trafficking showed any apparent difference among groups. Notably, rSeV/dF-DCs expressing a dominant-negative mutant of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I (rSeV/dF-RIGIC-DC, an RNA helicase that recognizes the rSeV genome for inducing type I interferons, largely lost the expression of proinflammatory cytokines without any impairment of antitumor activity. These results indicate the essential role of RIG-I-independent signaling on antimetastatic effect induced by rSeV-activated DCs and may provide important insights to DC-based immunotherapy for advanced malignancies.

  1. Critical values in hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, A; Aslan, B; Raby, A; Bourner, G; Padmore, R

    2015-02-01

    Critical values are life-threatening results that require immediate notification to the patient's healthcare provider. Accreditation bodies require laboratories to establish critical values. A survey of Ontario laboratories was conducted to determine current practice for critical values in hematology. The survey was sent to 182 participants questioning sources for establishing critical values, levels, review frequency, delta checks, and reporting. The survey was completed by laboratory managers, supervisors, technical specialists, senior technologists, and bench technologists working in hematology. The majority of participating laboratories have established critical values limits for hemoglobin, leukocyte counts, and platelet counts. Most laboratories also include the presence of malaria parasites and blast cells. Some laboratories reported the presence of plasma cells, sickle cells, schistocytes, and spherocytes as critical values. Multiple sources are used for establishing a critical value policy. There was variability for the frequency of critical values review. Rules may differ for a first-time patient sample vs. a repeat patient sample. Delta checks are seldom used to determine whether a result should be called a critical value. Most participants require the individual taking the critical result(s) to read back and confirm that they are directly involved with the patient's care. There is a lack of consensus for critical values reporting in hematology. As critical value reporting is crucial for patient safety, standardization of this practice would be beneficial. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Activating Ras mutations fail to ensure efficient replication of adenovirus mutants lacking VA-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses lacking their PKR-antagonizing VA RNAs replicate poorly in primary cells. It has been suggested that these virus recombinants still replicate efficiently in tumor cells with Ras mutations and might therefore be useful in tumor therapy. The ability of interferon-sensitive viruses......-less viruses replicated with higher efficiency in Ras-mutant cells, as compared to cell lines without Ras mutation. However, several exceptions to this rule were observed, arguing against a direct inhibition of PKR by mutant Ras. Phosphorylation of the PKR-substrate eIF2alpha was observed regardless of the Ras...... the oncolytic effect of interferon-sensitive viruses. We propose that Ras mutations predispose tumor cells to undergo secondary changes that sometimes enable the replication of interferon-sensitive viruses....

  3. Toward critical bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnason, Vilhjálmur

    2015-04-01

    This article deals with the question as to what makes bioethics a critical discipline. It considers different senses of criticism and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses. A primary method in bioethics as a philosophical discipline is critical thinking, which implies critical evaluation of concepts, positions, and arguments. It is argued that the type of analytical criticism that restricts its critical role to critical thinking of this type often suffers from other intellectual flaws. Three examples are taken to demonstrate this: premature criticism, uncritical self-understanding of theoretical assumptions, and narrow framing of bioethical issues. Such flaws can lead both to unfair treatment of authors and to uncritical discussion of topics. In this context, the article makes use of Häyry's analysis of different rationalities in bioethical approaches and argues for the need to recognize the importance of communicative rationality for critical bioethics. A radically different critical approach in bioethics, rooted in social theory, focuses on analyses of power relations neglected in mainstream critical thinking. It is argued that, although this kind of criticism provides an important alternative in bioethics, it suffers from other shortcomings that are rooted in a lack of normative dimensions. In order to complement these approaches and counter their shortcomings, there is a need for a bioethics enlightened by critical hermeneutics. Such hermeneutic bioethics is aware of its own assumptions, places the issues in a wide context, and reflects critically on the power relations that stand in the way of understanding them. Moreover, such an approach is dialogical, which provides both a critical exercise of speech and a normative dimension implied in the free exchange of reasons and arguments. This discussion is framed by Hedgecoe's argument that critical bioethics needs four elements: to be empirically rooted, theory challenging, reflexive, and politely skeptical.

  4. Plants, viruses and the environment: Ecology and mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roossinck, Marilyn J

    2015-05-01

    Since the discovery of Tobacco mosaic virus nearly 120 years ago, most studies on viruses have focused on their roles as pathogens. Virus ecology takes a different look at viruses, from the standpoint of how they affect their hosts׳ interactions with the environment. Using the framework of symbiotic relationships helps put the true nature of viruses into perspective. Plants clearly have a long history of relationships with viruses that have shaped their evolution. In wild plants viruses are common but usually asymptomatic. In experimental studies plant viruses are sometimes mutualists rather than pathogens. Virus ecology is closely tied to the ecology of their vectors, and the behavior of insects, critical for transmission of many plant viruses, is impacted by virus-plant interactions. Virulence is probable not beneficial for most host-virus interactions, hence commensal and mutualistic relationships are almost certainly common, in spite of the paucity of literature on beneficial viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Marine Viruses: Truth or Dare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, Mya

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, marine virology has progressed from a curiosity to an intensely studied topic of critical importance to oceanography. At concentrations of approximately 10 million viruses per milliliter of surface seawater, viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans. The majority of these viruses are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Through lysing their bacterial hosts, marine phages control bacterial abundance, affect community composition, and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In addition, phages influence their hosts through selection for resistance, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of bacterial metabolism. Recent work has also demonstrated that marine phages are extremely diverse and can carry a variety of auxiliary metabolic genes encoding critical ecological functions. This review is structured as a scientific "truth or dare," revealing several well-established "truths" about marine viruses and presenting a few "dares" for the research community to undertake in future studies.

  6. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  7. VirusDetect: An automated pipeline for efficient virus discovery using deep sequencing of small RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate detection of viruses in plants and animals is critical for agriculture production and human health. Deep sequencing and assembly of virus-derived siRNAs has proven to be a highly efficient approach for virus discovery. However, to date no computational tools specifically designed for both k...

  8. Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sczyrba, Alexander; Hofmann, Peter; Belmann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Methods for assembly, taxonomic profiling and binning are key to interpreting metagenome data, but a lack of consensus about benchmarking complicates performance assessment. The Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) challenge has engaged the global developer community to benchmark...

  9. Development and Characterization of Recombinant Virus Generated from a New World Zika Virus Infectious Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Duggal, Nisha K; Bullard-Feibelman, Kristen; Veselinovic, Milena; Romo, Hannah; Nguyen, Chilinh; Rückert, Claudia; Brault, Aaron C; Bowen, Richard A; Stenglein, Mark; Geiss, Brian J; Ebel, Gregory D

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) is a rapidly expanding global pathogen that has been associated with severe clinical manifestations, including devastating neurological disease in infants. There are currently no molecular clones of a New World ZIKV available that lack significant attenuation, hindering progress toward understanding determinants of transmission and pathogenesis. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel ZIKV reverse genetics system based on a 2015 isolate from Puerto Rico (PRVABC59). We generated a two-plasmid infectious clone system from which infectious virus was rescued that replicates in human and mosquito cells with growth kinetics representative of wild-type ZIKV. Infectious clone-derived virus initiated infection and transmission rates in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes comparable to those of the primary isolate and displayed similar pathogenesis in AG129 mice. This infectious clone system provides a valuable resource to the research community to explore ZIKV molecular biology, vaccine development, antiviral development, diagnostics, vector competence, and disease pathogenesis. ZIKV is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne pathogen that has been linked to Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and congenital microcephaly in developing fetuses and infants. ZIKV can also be sexually transmitted. The viral molecular determinants of any of these phenotypes are not well understood. There is no reverse genetics system available for the current epidemic virus that will allow researchers to study ZIKV immunity, develop novel vaccines, or develop antiviral drugs. Here we provide a novel infectious clone system generated from a recent ZIKV isolated from a patient infected in Puerto Rico. This infectious clone produces virus with in vitro and in vivo characteristics similar to those of the primary isolate, providing a critical tool to study ZIKV infection and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Expression and partial characterisation of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus non-structural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakova, Nadya; Frese, Michael; Hall, Robyn N; Liu, June; Matthaei, Markus; Strive, Tanja

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular replication and molecular virulence mechanisms of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) are poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of an effective cell culture system for this virus. To increase our understanding of RHDV molecular biology, the subcellular localisation of recombinant non-structural RHDV proteins was investigated in transiently transfected rabbit kidney (RK-13) cells. We provide evidence for oligomerisation of p23, and an ability of the viral protease to cleave the p16:p23 junction in trans, outside the context of the nascent polyprotein chain. Notably, expression of the viral polymerase alone and in the context of the entire RHDV polyprotein resulted in a redistribution of the Golgi network. This suggests that, similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, RHDV may recruit membranes of the secretory pathway during replication, and that the viral polymerase may play a critical role during this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  12. Focused critical care echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Talmor, Daniel; Brown, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Portable ultrasound is now used routinely in many ICUs for various clinical applications. Echocardiography performed by noncardiologists, both transesophageal and transthoracic, has evolved to broad applications in diagnosis, monitoring, and management of critically ill patients. This review provides a current update on focused critical care echocardiography for the management of critically ill patients. Source data were obtained from a PubMed search of the medical literature, including the PubMed "related articles" search methodology. Although studies demonstrating improved clinical outcomes for critically ill patients managed by focused critical care echocardiography are generally lacking, there is evidence to suggest that some intermediate outcomes are improved. Furthermore, noncardiologists can learn focused critical care echocardiography and adequately interpret the information obtained. Noncardiologists can also successfully incorporate focused critical care echocardiography into advanced cardiopulmonary life support. Formal training and proctoring are important for safe application of focused critical care echocardiography in clinical practice. Further outcomes-based research is urgently needed to evaluate the efficacy of focused critical care echocardiography.

  13. The Zika virus envelope protein glycan loop regulates virion antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Leslie; DeMaso, Christina R; Pelc, Rebecca S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Kuhn, Richard J; Pierson, Theodore C

    2018-01-02

    Because antibodies are an important component of flavivirus immunity, understanding the antigenic structure of flaviviruses is critical. Compared to dengue virus (DENV), the loop containing the single N-linked glycosylation site on Zika virus (ZIKV) envelope (E) proteins extends further towards the DII fusion loop (DII-FL) on neighboring E proteins within E dimers on mature viruses. Although ZIKV is poorly neutralized by DII-FL antibodies, we demonstrated significantly increased neutralization sensitivity of ZIKV particles incorporating the DENV glycan loop. Increased neutralization sensitivity was independent of E protein glycosylation: ZIKV lacking E protein glycans remained poorly neutralized, whereas ZIKV loop chimeras with or without an E protein glycan were potently neutralized. ZIKV particles lacking the E protein glycan were capable of infecting Raji cells expressing the lectin DC-SIGNR, suggesting the prM glycan of partially mature particles can facilitate entry. Our study provides insight into the determinants of ZIKV E protein function and antigenicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skloot, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine...

  15. Research lacking on school discipline reforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    ...: 215-898-9642, katstein@gse.upenn.edu, Penn Graduate School of Education Research lacking on school discipline reforms Thin evidence on causes of and alternatives to suspensions, expulsions September 29, 2016--Since 2011, the Obama...

  16. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  17. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  18. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  19. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  20. The role of myristoylation in the membrane association of the Lassa virus matrix protein Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Robert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Z protein is the matrix protein of arenaviruses and has been identified as the main driving force for budding. Both LCMV and Lassa virus Z proteins bud from cells in the absence of other viral proteins as enveloped virus-like particles. Z accumulates near the inner surface of the plasma membrane where budding takes place. Furthermore, biochemical data have shown that Z is strongly membrane associated. The primary sequence of Z lacks a typical transmembrane domain and until now it is not understood by which mechanism Z is able to interact with cellular membranes. In this report, we analyzed the role of N-terminal myristoylation for the membrane binding of Lassa virus Z. We show that disruption of the N-terminal myristoylation signal by substituting the N-terminal glycine with alanine (Z-G2A mutant resulted in a significant reduction of Z protein association with cellular membranes. Furthermore, removal of the myristoylation site resulted in a relocalization of Z from a punctuate distribution to a more diffuse cellular distribution pattern. Finally, treatment of Lassa virus-infected cells with various myristoylation inhibitors drastically reduced efficient Lassa virus replication. Our data indicate that myristoylation of Z is critical for its binding ability to lipid membranes and thus, for effective virus budding.

  1. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  2. Functional Analysis of Glycosylation of Zika Virus Envelope Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes-Garfias, Camila R; Shan, Chao; Luo, Huanle; Muruato, Antonio E; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Mays, Elizabeth; Xie, Xuping; Zou, Jing; Roundy, Christopher M; Wakamiya, Maki; Rossi, Shannan L; Wang, Tian; Weaver, Scott C; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-10-31

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection causes devastating congenital abnormities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The ZIKV envelope (E) protein is responsible for viral entry and represents a major determinant for viral pathogenesis. Like other flaviviruses, the ZIKV E protein is glycosylated at amino acid N154. To study the function of E glycosylation, we generated a recombinant N154Q ZIKV that lacks the E glycosylation and analyzed the mutant virus in mammalian and mosquito hosts. In mouse models, the mutant was attenuated, as evidenced by lower viremia, decreased weight loss, and no mortality; however, knockout of E glycosylation did not significantly affect neurovirulence. Mice immunized with the mutant virus developed a robust neutralizing antibody response and were completely protected from wild-type ZIKV challenge. In mosquitoes, the mutant virus exhibited diminished oral infectivity for the Aedes aegypti vector. Collectively, the results demonstrate that E glycosylation is critical for ZIKV infection of mammalian and mosquito hosts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, P A; Featherstone, D A; Bellini, W J

    2009-01-01

    Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses provides a means to study the transmission pathways of the virus and is an essential component of laboratory-based surveillance. Laboratory-based surveillance for measles and rubella, including genetic characterization of wild-type viruses, is performed throughout the world by the WHO Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network, which serves 166 countries in all WHO regions. In particular, the genetic data can help confirm the sources of virus or suggest a source for unknown-source cases as well as to establish links, or lack thereof, between various cases and outbreaks. Virologic surveillance has helped to document the interruption of transmission of endemic measles in some regions. Thus, molecular characterization of measles viruses has provided a valuable tool for measuring the effectiveness of measles control programs, and virologic surveillance needs to be expanded in all areas of the world and conducted during all phases of measles control.

  4. Bluetongue Virus NS4 Protein Is an Interferon Antagonist and a Determinant of Virus Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinier, Maxime; Shaw, Andrew E; Barry, Gerald; Gu, Quan; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Janowicz, Anna; Varela, Mariana; Randall, Richard E; Caporale, Marco; Palmarini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue, a major infectious disease of ruminants with serious consequences to both animal health and the economy. The clinical outcome of BTV infection is highly variable and dependent on a variety of factors related to both the virus and the host. In this study, we show that the BTV nonstructural protein NS4 favors viral replication in sheep, the animal species most affected by bluetongue. In addition, NS4 confers a replication advantage on the virus in interferon (IFN)-competent primary sheep endothelial cells and immortalized cell lines. We determined that in cells infected with an NS4 deletion mutant (BTV8ΔNS4), there is increased synthesis of type I IFN compared to cells infected with wild-type BTV-8. In addition, using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that NS4 modulates the host IFN response and downregulates mRNA levels of type I IFN and interferon-stimulated genes. Moreover, using reporter assays and protein synthesis assays, we show that NS4 downregulates the activities of a variety of promoters, such as the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter, the IFN-β promoter, and a promoter containing interferon-stimulated response elements (ISRE). We also show that the NS4 inhibitory activity on gene expression is related to its nucleolar localization. Furthermore, NS4 does not affect mRNA splicing or cellular translation. The data obtained in this study strongly suggest that BTV NS4 is an IFN antagonist and a key determinant of viral virulence. Bluetongue is one of the main infectious diseases of ruminants and is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arthropod-borne virus transmitted from infected to susceptible animals by Culicoides biting midges. Bluetongue has a variable clinical outcome that can be related to both virus and host factors. It is therefore critical to understand the interplay between BTV and the host immune responses. In this study, we show that a nonstructural protein of BTV (NS4) is

  5. Broad protection against avian influenza virus by using a modified vaccinia Ankara virus expressing a mosaic hemagglutinin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K; Goldberg, Tony L; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-11-01

    A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Critical Theory and Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakomski, Gabriele

    1987-01-01

    Examines the claim that Habermasian critical theory is in a better position than other such perspectives to solve the theoretical and practical problems of educational administration. Concludes that critical theory has insufficient epistemological resources to justify its claims. The lack of empirical content questions the theory's value for…

  7. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  8. Tumour viruses and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcraft, Sharon E; Damania, Blossom

    2017-10-19

    Host cells sense viral infection through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an innate immune response. PRRs are localized to several different cellular compartments and are stimulated by viral proteins and nucleic acids. PRR activation initiates signal transduction events that ultimately result in an inflammatory response. Human tumour viruses, which include Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and Merkel cell polyomavirus, are detected by several different PRRs. These viruses engage in a variety of mechanisms to evade the innate immune response, including downregulating PRRs, inhibiting PRR signalling, and disrupting the activation of transcription factors critical for mediating the inflammatory response, among others. This review will describe tumour virus PAMPs and the PRRs responsible for detecting viral infection, PRR signalling pathways, and the mechanisms by which tumour viruses evade the host innate immune system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  10. Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John A

    2010-11-01

    Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (bPI(3)V) is a long-recognized, currently underappreciated, endemic infection in cattle populations. Clinical disease is most common in calves with poor passive transfer or decayed maternal antibodies. It is usually mild, consisting of fever, nasal discharge, and dry cough. Caused at least partly by local immunosuppressive effects, bPI(3)V infection is often complicated by coinfection with other respiratory viruses and bacteria, and is therefore an important component of enzootic pneumonia in calves and bovine respiratory disease complex in feedlot cattle. Active infection can be diagnosed by virus isolation from nasal swabs, or IF testing on smears made from nasal swabs. Timing of sampling is critical in obtaining definitive diagnostic test results. Parenteral and intranasal modified live vaccine combination vaccines are available. Priming early in calfhood with intranasal vaccine, followed by boosting with parenteral vaccine, may be the best immunoprophylactic approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) topology and selective isoform integration in artificial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrane modification of host subcellular compartments is critical to the replication of many RNA viruses. Enveloped viruses additionally require the ability to requisition cellular membranes during egress for the development of infectious progeny. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus...

  12. Ebola Virus Inactivation by Detergents Is Annulled in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Tintu, Andrei; Russcher, Henk; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.; Rijken, Mikel; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Koelewijn, Rob; de Jong, Menno D.; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Munster, Vincent J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of blood samples from hemorrhagic fever virus (HFV)-infected patients with 0.1% detergents has been recommended for virus inactivation and subsequent safe laboratory testing. However, data on virus inactivation by this procedure are lacking. Here we show the effect of this procedure on

  13. "The evil virus cell": Students' knowledge and beliefs about viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K; Enzinger, Sonja M; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics, and possibly lead to potentially dangerous neglect concerning vaccination. The effectiveness of newly developed virus-related teaching units and material could be tested with the instrument used here.

  14. Pathogenicity testing of influenza candidate vaccine viruses in the ferret model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Johnson, Adam; Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Pappas, Claudia; Pearce, Melissa B; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Hossain, M Jaber; Ridenour, Callie; Wang, Li; Chen, Li-Mei; Wentworth, David E; Katz, Jacqueline M; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2017-11-01

    The development of influenza candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) for pre-pandemic vaccine production represents a critical step in pandemic preparedness. The multiple subtypes and clades of avian or swine origin influenza viruses circulating world-wide at any one time necessitates the continuous generation of CVVs to provide an advanced starting point should a novel zoonotic virus cross the species barrier and cause a pandemic. Furthermore, the evolution and diversity of novel influenza viruses that cause zoonotic infections requires ongoing monitoring and surveillance, and, when a lack of antigenic match between circulating viruses and available CVVs is identified, the production of new CVVs. Pandemic guidelines developed by the WHO Global Influenza Program govern the design and preparation of reverse genetics-derived CVVs, which must undergo numerous safety and quality tests prior to human use. Confirmation of reassortant CVV attenuation of virulence in ferrets relative to wild-type virus represents one of these critical steps, yet there is a paucity of information available regarding the relative degree of attenuation achieved by WHO-recommended CVVs developed against novel viruses with pandemic potential. To better understand the degree of CVV attenuation in the ferret model, we examined the relative virulence of six A/Puerto Rico/8/1934-based CVVs encompassing five different influenza A subtypes (H2N3, H5N1, H5N2, H5N8, and H7N9) compared with the respective wild-type virus in ferrets. Despite varied virulence of wild-type viruses in the ferret, all CVVs examined showed reductions in morbidity and viral shedding in upper respiratory tract tissues. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type counterparts, none of the CVVs spread to extrapulmonary tissues during the acute phase of infection. While the magnitude of virus attenuation varied between virus subtypes, collectively we show the reliable and reproducible attenuation of CVVs that have the A/Puerto Rico/9/1934 backbone

  15. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  16. A Phenomenological Study on Lack of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research and Reviews, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to point out the underlying reasons about the lack of motivation at academic activities concerning Attribution Theory. Attribution Theory trys to understand how the people answer "why" question and how they do casual explanations. This research is a qualitative based research. It used the phenomenological…

  17. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. Vaccinia virus protein F12 associates with intracellular enveloped virions through an interaction with A36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sara C; Ward, Brian M

    2009-02-01

    Vaccinia virus is the prototypical member of the family Poxviridae. Three morphologically distinct forms are produced during infection: intracellular mature virions (IMV), intracellular enveloped virions (IEV), and extracellular enveloped virions (EEV). Two viral proteins, F12 and A36, are found exclusively on IEV but not on IMV and EEV. Analysis of membranes from infected cells showed that F12 was only associated with membranes and is not an integral membrane protein. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed an interaction between amino acids 351 to 458 of F12 and amino acids 91 to 111 of A36. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses an F12, which lacks residues 351 to 458. Characterization of this recombinant revealed a small-plaque phenotype and a subsequent defect in virus release similar to a recombinant virus that had F12L deleted. In addition, F12 lacking residues 351 to 458 was unable to associate with membranes in infected cells. These results suggest that F12 associates with IEV through an interaction with A36 and that this interaction is critical for the function of F12 during viral egress.

  19. Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation and mistakes in LCA studies are as old as the tool itself, and so is its critical review. Besides preventing misuse and unsupported claims, critical review may also help identifying mistakes and more justifiable assumptions as well as generally improve the quality of a study. It thus...

  20. Critical Muralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  1. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Suppresses Innate Immune Responses via a Ubiquitin and ISG15 Specific Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florine E.M. Scholte

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral responses are regulated by conjugation of ubiquitin (Ub and interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 to proteins. Certain classes of viruses encode Ub- or ISG15-specific proteases belonging to the ovarian tumor (OTU superfamily. Their activity is thought to suppress cellular immune responses, but studies demonstrating the function of viral OTU proteases during infection are lacking. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV, family Nairoviridae is a highly pathogenic human virus that encodes an OTU with both deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity as part of the viral RNA polymerase. We investigated CCHFV OTU function by inactivating protease catalytic activity or by selectively disrupting its deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity using reverse genetics. CCHFV OTU inactivation blocked viral replication independently of its RNA polymerase activity, while deubiquitinase activity proved critical for suppressing the interferon responses. Our findings provide insights into viral OTU functions and support the development of therapeutics and vaccines.

  2. Conceptualising the lack of health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J B

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the lack of health insurance coverage in the US as a public policy issue. It first compares the problem of health insurance coverage to the problem of unemployment to show that in terms of the numbers of individuals affected lack of health insurance is a problem comparable in importance to the problem of unemployment. Secondly, the paper discusses the methodology involved in measuring health insurance coverage, and argues that the current method of estimation of the uninsured underestimates the extent that individuals go without health insurance. Third, the paper briefly introduces Amartya Sen's functioning and capabilities framework to suggest a way of representing the extent to which individuals are uninsured. Fourth, the paper sketches a means of operationalizing the Sen representation of the uninsured in terms of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) measure.

  3. Laura: Soybean variety lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain of conventional soybean varieties requires heat processing to break down trypsin inhibitor's activity before using as food or animal feed. At the same time, protein denaturation and other qualitative changes occur in soybean grain, especially if the temperature of heating is not controlled. Two types of trypsin inhibitor were found in soybean grain the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Mature grain of soybean Laura is lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Grain yield of variety Laura is equal to high yielding varieties from the maturity group I, where it belongs. Lacking of Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor makes soybean grain suitable for direct feeding in adult non ruminant animals without previous thermal processing. Grain of variety Laura can be processed for a shorter period of time than conventional soybeans. This way we save energy, and preserve valuable nutritional composition of soybean grain, which is of interest in industrial processing.

  4. Black General Officers: Why We Lack Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    receives upon commissioning is based on the needs of the Army.24 The officer branching process is the first genuine discriminator the Black officer...most discriminating area that may contribute to the lack of Black officers at the general officer rank. “Assignments have a clear bearing on an...Mason, Diversity: 2015 and the Afro -American Army Officer, Strategy Research Project (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, April 6, 1998), 24.

  5. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  6. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  7. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Valery Z Grdzelishvili

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a sa...

  8. The history of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 permitted basic research to unravel critical components of a complex life cycle for this important human pathogen. HCV is a highly divergent group of viruses classified in 7 major genotypes and a great number of subtypes, and circulating in infected...

  9. Thinking critically about critical thinking: ability, disposition or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupat, Edward; Sprague, Jared M; Wolpaw, Daniel; Haidet, Paul; Hatem, David; O'Brien, Bridget

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the extent to which clinician-educators agree on definitions of critical thinking and to determine whether their descriptions of critical thinking in clinical practice are consistent with these definitions. Ninety-seven medical educators at five medical schools were surveyed. Respondents were asked to define critical thinking, to describe a clinical scenario in which critical thinking would be important, and to state the actions of a clinician in that situation who was thinking critically and those of another who was not. Qualitative content analysis was conducted to identify patterns and themes. The definitions mostly described critical thinking as a process or an ability; a minority of respondents described it as a personal disposition. In the scenarios, however, the majority of the actions manifesting an absence of critical thinking resulted from heuristic thinking and a lack of cognitive effort, consistent with a dispositional approach, rather than a lack of ability to analyse or synthesise. If we are to foster critical thinking among medical students, we must reconcile the way it is defined with the manner in which clinician-educators describe critical thinking--and its absence--in action. Such a reconciliation would include consideration of clinicians' sensitivity to complexity and their inclination to exert cognitive effort, in addition to their ability to master material and process information. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus gH is essential for penetration of B cells but also plays a role in attachment of virus to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesworth, S J; Lake, C M; Borza, C M; Turk, S M; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    2000-07-01

    Entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into B cells is initiated by attachment of glycoprotein gp350 to the complement receptor type 2 (CR2). A complex of three glycoproteins, gH, gL, and gp42, is subsequently required for penetration. Gp42 binds to HLA class II, which functions as an entry mediator or coreceptor and, by analogy with other herpesviruses, gH is then thought to be involved virus-cell fusion. However, entry of virus into epithelial cells is thought to be different. It can be initiated by attachment by an unknown glycoprotein in the absence of CR2. There is no interaction between gp42 and HLA class II and instead a distinct complex of only the two glycoproteins gH and gL interacts with a novel entry mediator. Again, by analogy with other viruses gH is thought to be critical to fusion. To investigate further the different roles of gH in infection of the two cell types and to examine its influence on the assembly of the gH-gL-gp42 complex, we constructed two viruses, one in which the gH open reading frame was interrupted by a cassette expressing a neomycin resistance gene and the gene for green fluorescent protein and one as a control in which the neighboring nonessential thymidine kinase gene was interrupted with the same cassette. Virus lacking gH exited from cells normally, although loss of gH resulted in rapid turnover of gL and gp42 as well. The virus bound normally to B lymphocytes but could not infect them unless cells and bound virus were treated with polyethylene glycol to induce fusion. In contrast, virus that lacked the gH complex was impaired in attachment to epithelial cells and the effects of monoclonal antibodies to gH implied that this resulted from loss of gH rather than other members of the complex. These results suggest a role for gH in both attachment and penetration into epithelial cells.

  11. Transmission of grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 by the vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C-W; Chau, J; Fernandez, L; Bosco, D; Daane, K M; Almeida, R P P

    2008-10-01

    Grapevine leafroll disease is caused by grapevine leafroll-associated viruses (GLRaVs). Within this virus complex, GLRaV-3 is the predominant species in the world. Several GLRaVs have been shown to be transmitted from vine to vine by mealybugs although a detailed characterization of transmission biology is lacking. The introduction of the vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus) in California and other regions of the world may result in increasing disease incidence of established GLRaVs. We studied the characteristics of GLRaV-3 transmission by the vine mealybug. Our results indicate that the vine mealybug transmits GLRaV-3 in a semipersistent manner. First instars were more efficient vectors than adult mealybugs. GLRaV-3 transmission lacked a latent period in the vector. Virus transmission occurred with a 1-h acquisition access period (AAP) and peaked with a 24-h AAP. Mealybugs inoculated GLRaV-3 with a 1-h inoculation access period (IAP), and transmission efficiency increased with longer plant access period up to 24 h, after which transmission rate remained constant. After an AAP of 24 h, mealybugs lost GLRaV-3 and infectivity 4 days after virus acquisition. In addition, GLRaV-3 was not transovarially transmitted from infected females to their progeny as detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In summary, we systematically analyzed transmission parameters of GLRaV-3 by the vine mealybug and showed that transmission of this virus occurs in a semipersistent manner. This research fills in important gaps in knowledge of leafroll virus transmission, which is critical for development of leafroll disease management practices.

  12. Development of Lead Compounds as Fusion Inhibitors for Dengue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Identification of antiviral agents is critical to the development of therapeutic treatments directed against dengue virus (DENV), for which there is no...infection and exposure of US military personnel to the disease might be offered by antiviral agents as a treatment strategy. The dengue virus...0285 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF LEAD COMPOUNDS AS FUSION INHIBITORS FOR DENGUE VIRUS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: TOMAS PEREZ-ACLE

  13. [An update on Lassa virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leparc-Goffart, I; Emonet, S F

    2011-12-01

    Lassa virus, the etiologic agent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever, infects 100,000 to 300,000 people every year in West Africa with an overall mortality rate ranging from 1 to 2%. It was discovered in 1969 and remains a significant public health risk in endemic areas. Because airborne transmission is possible and mortality can be high under certain conditions, Lassa virus has been classified as a category A bioterrorism agent. Early diagnosis is difficult due to insidious non-specific onset and to the great genetic divergence of the virus that makes RT-PCR assays unreliable. The lack of proper diagnostic tools promotes nosocomial infection and diminishes the efficacy of treatment. Recently, numerous advances have been made in the development of both diagnostic and vaccination techniques. The purpose of this review is to present an update on that research as well as the current epidemiology of Lassa virus.

  14. Evolutionary origins of hepatitis A virus in small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M.; Lukashev, Alexander N.; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Gmyl, Anatoly P.; Brünink, Sebastian; Rasche, Andrea; Seggewiβ, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Leijten, Lonneke M.; Vallo, Peter; Kuiken, Thijs; Dotzauer, Andreas; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an ancient and ubiquitous human pathogen recovered previously only from primates. The sole species of the genus Hepatovirus, existing in both enveloped and nonenveloped forms, and with a capsid structure intermediate between that of insect viruses and mammalian picornaviruses, HAV is enigmatic in its origins. We conducted a targeted search for hepatoviruses in 15,987 specimens collected from 209 small mammal species globally and discovered highly diversified viruses in bats, rodents, hedgehogs, and shrews, which by pairwise sequence distance comprise 13 novel Hepatovirus species. Near-complete genomes from nine of these species show conservation of unique hepatovirus features, including predicted internal ribosome entry site structure, a truncated VP4 capsid protein lacking N-terminal myristoylation, a carboxyl-terminal pX extension of VP1, VP2 late domains involved in membrane envelopment, and a cis-acting replication element within the 3Dpol sequence. Antibodies in some bat sera immunoprecipitated and neutralized human HAV, suggesting conservation of critical antigenic determinants. Limited phylogenetic cosegregation among hepatoviruses and their hosts and recombination patterns are indicative of major hepatovirus host shifts in the past. Ancestral state reconstructions suggest a Hepatovirus origin in small insectivorous mammals and a rodent origin of human HAV. Patterns of infection in small mammals mimicked those of human HAV in hepatotropism, fecal shedding, acute nature, and extinction of the virus in a closed host population. The evolutionary conservation of hepatovirus structure and pathogenesis provide novel insight into the origins of HAV and highlight the utility of analyzing animal reservoirs for risk assessment of emerging viruses. PMID:26575627

  15. Evolutionary origins of hepatitis A virus in small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M; Lukashev, Alexander N; van den Brand, Judith M A; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Brünink, Sebastian; Rasche, Andrea; Seggewiβ, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Leijten, Lonneke M; Vallo, Peter; Kuiken, Thijs; Dotzauer, Andreas; Ulrich, Rainer G; Lemon, Stanley M; Drosten, Christian

    2015-12-08

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an ancient and ubiquitous human pathogen recovered previously only from primates. The sole species of the genus Hepatovirus, existing in both enveloped and nonenveloped forms, and with a capsid structure intermediate between that of insect viruses and mammalian picornaviruses, HAV is enigmatic in its origins. We conducted a targeted search for hepatoviruses in 15,987 specimens collected from 209 small mammal species globally and discovered highly diversified viruses in bats, rodents, hedgehogs, and shrews, which by pairwise sequence distance comprise 13 novel Hepatovirus species. Near-complete genomes from nine of these species show conservation of unique hepatovirus features, including predicted internal ribosome entry site structure, a truncated VP4 capsid protein lacking N-terminal myristoylation, a carboxyl-terminal pX extension of VP1, VP2 late domains involved in membrane envelopment, and a cis-acting replication element within the 3D(pol) sequence. Antibodies in some bat sera immunoprecipitated and neutralized human HAV, suggesting conservation of critical antigenic determinants. Limited phylogenetic cosegregation among hepatoviruses and their hosts and recombination patterns are indicative of major hepatovirus host shifts in the past. Ancestral state reconstructions suggest a Hepatovirus origin in small insectivorous mammals and a rodent origin of human HAV. Patterns of infection in small mammals mimicked those of human HAV in hepatotropism, fecal shedding, acute nature, and extinction of the virus in a closed host population. The evolutionary conservation of hepatovirus structure and pathogenesis provide novel insight into the origins of HAV and highlight the utility of analyzing animal reservoirs for risk assessment of emerging viruses.

  16. Rewriting nature's assembly manual for a ssRNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikesh; Wroblewski, Emma; Leonov, German; Phillips, Simon E V; Tuma, Roman; Twarock, Reidun; Stockley, Peter G

    2017-11-14

    Satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV) is one of the smallest viruses known. Its genome encodes only its coat protein (CP) subunit, relying on the polymerase of its helper virus TNV for replication. The genome has been shown to contain a cryptic set of dispersed assembly signals in the form of stem-loops that each present a minimal CP-binding motif AXXA in the loops. The genomic fragment encompassing nucleotides 1-127 is predicted to contain five such packaging signals (PSs). We have used mutagenesis to determine the critical assembly features in this region. These include the CP-binding motif, the relative placement of PS stem-loops, their number, and their folding propensity. CP binding has an electrostatic contribution, but assembly nucleation is dominated by the recognition of the folded PSs in the RNA fragment. Mutation to remove all AXXA motifs in PSs throughout the genome yields an RNA that is unable to assemble efficiently. In contrast, when a synthetic 127-nt fragment encompassing improved PSs is swapped onto the RNA otherwise lacking CP recognition motifs, assembly is partially restored, although the virus-like particles created are incomplete, implying that PSs outside this region are required for correct assembly. Swapping this improved region into the wild-type STNV1 sequence results in a better assembly substrate than the viral RNA, producing complete capsids and outcompeting the wild-type genome in head-to-head competition. These data confirm details of the PS-mediated assembly mechanism for STNV and identify an efficient approach for production of stable virus-like particles encapsidating nonnative RNAs or other cargoes. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  17. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  18. Critical Proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Simon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  19. Critical proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  20. Why does Colombia lack agricultural commodity futures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Moreno-Alemay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the reasons why futures contracts are not traded as an alternative to price hedging for agricultural goods in Colombia. Based on surveys, interviews and statistical analysis, this study identified that conceptual gaps in contract negotiation, lack of consensus in the agricultural sector regarding the use of financial mechanisms and the sector’s infrequent contact with Colombia’s financial institutions, are the main reasons why a futures contracts market has not emerged.

  1. Ecology of prokaryotic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbauer, Markus G

    2004-05-01

    The finding that total viral abundance is higher than total prokaryotic abundance and that a significant fraction of the prokaryotic community is infected with phages in aquatic systems has stimulated research on the ecology of prokaryotic viruses and their role in ecosystems. This review treats the ecology of prokaryotic viruses ('phages') in marine, freshwater and soil systems from a 'virus point of view'. The abundance of viruses varies strongly in different environments and is related to bacterial abundance or activity suggesting that the majority of the viruses found in the environment are typically phages. Data on phage diversity are sparse but indicate that phages are extremely diverse in natural systems. Lytic phages are predators of prokaryotes, whereas lysogenic and chronic infections represent a parasitic interaction. Some forms of lysogeny might be described best as mutualism. The little existing ecological data on phage populations indicate a large variety of environmental niches and survival strategies. The host cell is the main resource for phages and the resource quality, i.e., the metabolic state of the host cell, is a critical factor in all steps of the phage life cycle. Virus-induced mortality of prokaryotes varies strongly on a temporal and spatial scale and shows that phages can be important predators of bacterioplankton. This mortality and the release of cell lysis products into the environment can strongly influence microbial food web processes and biogeochemical cycles. Phages can also affect host diversity, e.g., by 'killing the winner' and keeping in check competitively dominant species or populations. Moreover, they mediate gene transfer between prokaryotes, but this remains largely unknown in the environment. Genomics or proteomics are providing us now with powerful tools in phage ecology, but final testing will have to be performed in the environment.

  2. Lack of adaptation to human tetherin in HIV-1 Group O and P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haworth Kevin G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 viruses are categorized into four distinct groups: M, N, O and P. Despite the same genomic organization, only the group M viruses are responsible for the world-wide pandemic of AIDS, suggesting better adaptation to human hosts. Previously, it has been reported that the group M Vpu protein is capable of both down-modulating CD4 and counteracting BST-2/tetherin restriction, while the group O Vpu cannot antagonize tetherin. This led us to investigate if group O, and the related group P viruses, possess functional anti-tetherin activities in Vpu or another viral protein, and to further map the residues required for group M Vpu to counteract human tetherin. Results We found a lack of activity against human tetherin for both the Vpu and Nef proteins from group O and P viruses. Furthermore, we found no evidence of anti-human tetherin activity in a fully infectious group O proviral clone, ruling out the possibility of an alternative anti-tetherin factor in this virus. Interestingly, an activity against primate tetherins was retained in the Nef proteins from both a group O and a group P virus. By making chimeras between a functional group M and non-functional group O Vpu protein, we were able to map the first 18 amino acids of group M Vpu as playing an essential role in the ability of the protein to antagonize human tetherin. We further demonstrated the importance of residue alanine-18 for the group M Vpu activity. This residue lies on a diagonal face of conserved alanines in the TM domain of the protein, and is necessary for specific Vpu-tetherin interactions. Conclusions The absence of human specific anti-tetherin activities in HIV-1 group O and P suggests a failure of these viruses to adapt to human hosts, which may have limited their spread.

  3. Indication for pharmacological treatment is often lacking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoog, Jessica; Midlöv, Patrik; Beckman, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the elderly have a substantially higher drug use than younger patients, even after adjustment for multimorbidity, there is limited knowledge about the elderly's indication for treatment. It is essential for elderly patients to have a well-planned drug therapy. The first step......, if there are any differences in indication for treatment depending on gender, age, level of multimorbidity and income. METHOD: Data were collected on individuals aged 65 years or older in Östergötland County in Sweden. To estimate the individual level of multimorbidity the Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System...... and lowest in relation to age. The result may to some extent be explained by substandard registration of diagnoses. Since lack of quality of prescription drug use is highly associated with inconvenience among the elderly, as well as high costs to society, it is important that future research and allocation...

  4. European interlaboratory comparison of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) real-time RT-PCR detection in experimental and field samples: The method of extraction is critical for SBV RNA detection in semen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, C.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Ponsart, C.; Cay, A.B.; Steinbach, F.; Zientara, S.; Beer, M.; Hoffmann, B.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular methods for the detection of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) RNA were rapidly developed after the emergence of this novel orthobunyavirus in Europe. The SBV epizootic wave has declined, but infectious SBV in SBV RNA–positive semen remains a possible risk for the distribution of SBV. However, the

  5. Critical Thinking and Legal Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Guido Pincione

    2009-01-01

    We often lack clear procedures for assessing statements and arguments advanced in everyday conversations, political campaigns, advertisements, and the other multifarious uses to which ordinary language can be put. Critical thinking is a method for evaluating arguments couched in ordinary, non-formal language. Legal education should foster this argumentative skill as an ability to assess the open-end variety of arguments that may arise in legal disputes. I will argue that the ability of critic...

  6. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  7. His-tag based in situ labelling of progeny viruses for real-time single virus tracking in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin Ling; Li, Chun Mei; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-11-10

    Tracking virus infection events in live cells is useful for understanding the mechanism of virus infection, and fluorescent labelling is a critical step. Herein a noninvasive strategy for labelling viruses with His-tags was developed by in situ modifying the cell surface proteins with polypeptides containing His-tags during progeny virus assembly. The His-tagged viruses were further conjugated with Ni2+-nitrilotriacetate complex modified quantum dots, and retained their infectivity for real-time single virus tracking in living cells.

  8. Palace coup rocks University College: Critics turn on moderniser who 'failed to lead and lacked vison'

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, W

    2002-01-01

    Sir Christopher Llewellyn Smith has resigned as head of University College London, forced out by a group of senior academics and Lord Young of Graffham, chairman of UCL's ruling body. Sir Chris has will occupy an unspecified research position in Oxford physics department, from the autumn (1 page).

  9. Critical Vidders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svegaard, Robin Sebastian Kaszmarczyk

    2015-01-01

    This article will introduce and take a look at a specific subset of the fan created remix videos known as vids, namely those that deal with feminist based critique of media. Through examples, it will show how fans construct and present their critique, and finally broach the topic of the critical ...

  10. Extraterrestrial Viruses?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado Hernández, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Life - Origin and Fundamentals of Living Things. Evaluation rubric to evaluate the debate and presentation about the point of view regarding the possibility of viruses from the outer space.

  11. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  12. Zika Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especi...

  13. Definitions of Critical Thinking in Context

    OpenAIRE

    Gyenes, Adam

    2015-01-01

    With the impact of increasing global competition, calls for greater emphasis on critical thinking in secondary and higher education are frequently heard in Japan, yet there is a lack of agreement on what is meant by the term “critical thinking.” This paper provides a review of selected literature, charting the chronological development of definitions of critical thinking in education during the twentieth century, and reflections on the application of critical thinking to different contexts. W...

  14. Critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  15. Vaccinia Virus Protein F12 Associates with Intracellular Enveloped Virions through an Interaction with A36▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sara C.; Ward, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccinia virus is the prototypical member of the family Poxviridae. Three morphologically distinct forms are produced during infection: intracellular mature virions (IMV), intracellular enveloped virions (IEV), and extracellular enveloped virions (EEV). Two viral proteins, F12 and A36, are found exclusively on IEV but not on IMV and EEV. Analysis of membranes from infected cells showed that F12 was only associated with membranes and is not an integral membrane protein. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed an interaction between amino acids 351 to 458 of F12 and amino acids 91 to 111 of A36. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses an F12, which lacks residues 351 to 458. Characterization of this recombinant revealed a small-plaque phenotype and a subsequent defect in virus release similar to a recombinant virus that had F12L deleted. In addition, F12 lacking residues 351 to 458 was unable to associate with membranes in infected cells. These results suggest that F12 associates with IEV through an interaction with A36 and that this interaction is critical for the function of F12 during viral egress. PMID:19052096

  16. Critical reading and critical thinking Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of

  17. Viruses in the Oceanic Basement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Olivia D; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Miranda, Jaclyn A; Schvarcz, Christopher R; Rappé, Michael S; Steward, Grieg F

    2017-03-07

    Microbial life has been detected well into the igneous crust of the seafloor (i.e., the oceanic basement), but there have been no reports confirming the presence of viruses in this habitat. To detect and characterize an ocean basement virome, geothermally heated fluid samples (ca. 60 to 65°C) were collected from 117 to 292 m deep into the ocean basement using seafloor observatories installed in two boreholes (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program [IODP] U1362A and U1362B) drilled in the eastern sediment-covered flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Concentrations of virus-like particles in the fluid samples were on the order of 0.2 × 10 5 to 2 × 10 5  ml -1 ( n = 8), higher than prokaryote-like cells in the same samples by a factor of 9 on average (range, 1.5 to 27). Electron microscopy revealed diverse viral morphotypes similar to those of viruses known to infect bacteria and thermophilic archaea. An analysis of virus-like sequences in basement microbial metagenomes suggests that those from archaeon-infecting viruses were the most common (63 to 80%). Complete genomes of a putative archaeon-infecting virus and a prophage within an archaeal scaffold were identified among the assembled sequences, and sequence analysis suggests that they represent lineages divergent from known thermophilic viruses. Of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-containing scaffolds in the metagenomes for which a taxonomy could be inferred (163 out of 737), 51 to 55% appeared to be archaeal and 45 to 49% appeared to be bacterial. These results imply that the warmed, highly altered fluids in deeply buried ocean basement harbor a distinct assemblage of novel viruses, including many that infect archaea, and that these viruses are active participants in the ecology of the basement microbiome. IMPORTANCE The hydrothermally active ocean basement is voluminous and likely provided conditions critical to the origins of life, but the microbiology of this vast habitat is not

  18. Caterpillars lack a resident gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tobin J; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie; Jaffe, Samuel P; Fierer, Noah

    2017-09-05

    Many animals are inhabited by microbial symbionts that influence their hosts' development, physiology, ecological interactions, and evolutionary diversification. However, firm evidence for the existence and functional importance of resident microbiomes in larval Lepidoptera (caterpillars) is lacking, despite the fact that these insects are enormously diverse, major agricultural pests, and dominant herbivores in many ecosystems. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR, we characterized the gut microbiomes of wild leaf-feeding caterpillars in the United States and Costa Rica, representing 124 species from 15 families. Compared with other insects and vertebrates assayed using the same methods, the microbes that we detected in caterpillar guts were unusually low-density and variable among individuals. Furthermore, the abundance and composition of leaf-associated microbes were reflected in the feces of caterpillars consuming the same plants. Thus, microbes ingested with food are present (although possibly dead or dormant) in the caterpillar gut, but host-specific, resident symbionts are largely absent. To test whether transient microbes might still contribute to feeding and development, we conducted an experiment on field-collected caterpillars of the model species Manduca sexta Antibiotic suppression of gut bacterial activity did not significantly affect caterpillar weight gain, development, or survival. The high pH, simple gut structure, and fast transit times that typify caterpillar digestive physiology may prevent microbial colonization. Moreover, host-encoded digestive and detoxification mechanisms likely render microbes unnecessary for caterpillar herbivory. Caterpillars illustrate the potential ecological and evolutionary benefits of independence from symbionts, a lifestyle that may be widespread among animals.

  19. Polydactyly in Mice Lacking HDAC9/HDRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Brad E.; D’Mello, Santosh R.

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) and its truncated variant, HDRP, exhibit post-axial polydactyly that manifests as an extra big toe on the right hind foot. Polydactyly in HDAC9/HDRP knockout mice occurs with incomplete penetrance and affects both genders similarly. Because polydactyly can result from overactivity of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, we investigated whether HDRP acted as a negative regulator of the Shh pathway. We find that Gli1, a transcription factor and downstream mediator of Shh signaling, is expressed at substantially higher levels in the feet of perinatal HDAC9/HDRP-/- mice as compared with wild-type littermates. To more directly examine whether HDRP negatively-regulates Shh signaling we utilized cell lines that express components of the Shh pathway and that respond to the Shh agonist purmorphamine. We find that purmorphamine-mediated stimulation of Gli1 in the NIH 3T3 and HT22 cell lines is inhibited by the expression of HDRP. In HT22 cells, purmorphamine treatment leads to an increase in the rate of cell proliferation, which is also inhibited by HDRP. This inhibitory effect of HDRP on purmorphamine-mediated cell proliferation was also observed in primary cultures of glial cells. Although the mechanism by which it inhibits Gli1 induction and cell proliferation by purmorphamine is not clear, HDRP localizes to the nucleus suggesting it acts just upstream of Gli3 activation in the signaling cascade activated by Shh. Taken together our results suggest that HDRP acts as a negative regulator of the Shh pathway and that the absence of HDRP results in hyper-activation of this pathway resulting in polydactyly. PMID:18480421

  20. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle disease virus ( ...

  1. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  2. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  3. Avian influenza: Eco-epidemiological aspects of the virus in its natural hosts, the migratory waterfowls Influenza aviar: Aspectos ecoepidemiológicos del virus en su hospedero natural, las aves acuáticas migratorias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARICELA MONTALVO-CORRAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses produce mainly respiratory and intestinal diseases. Their relevance in the generation of pandemic strains has led to a large amount of research to understand their distribution in nature, as well as the relations that become established for the effective transmission among different hosts. Waterfowl have been recognized as their natural reservoir and they play an important role in the propagation and generation of the diversity of these viruses. The emergence of new influenza viruses with pandemic potential among the human population (H5N1 of avian origin or recombinant H1N1 with avian segments point our lack of information on many aspects of the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in their natural hosts to enable the implementation of more effective prevention and control measures. In this review, we attempt to make a critical essay on the current state of knowledge on the biotic and abiotic factors that influence the ecology and epidemiology of the influenza A viruses in wild birds.Los virus influenza ocasionan enfermedades respiratorias e intestinales. Su importancia en la generación de cepas pandémicas ha conducido a la realización de intensa investigación científica para entender y conocer su distribución en la naturaleza, así como las relaciones que se establecen para la transmisión efectiva entre diferentes hospederos. Las aves acuáticas principalmente del orden Anseriformes, se han reconocido como el reservorio de estos virus y tienen una participación crucial en la propagación y generación de diversidad de estos virus. La emergencia de nuevos virus influenza con potencial pandémico entre la población humana (H5N1 de origen aviar y el actual virus pandémico H1N1 que presenta segmentos aviares, resalta la falta de información sobre muchos aspectos de la ecología y epidemiología de estos virus en sus hospederos naturales, que permitan la implementación de medidas más efectivas de prevenci

  4. The ecology of viruses that infect eukaryotic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Steven M

    2012-09-01

    Because viruses of eukaryotic algae are incredibly diverse, sweeping generalizations about their ecology are rare. These obligate parasites infect a range of algae and their diversity can be illustrated by considering that isolates range from small particles with ssRNA genomes to much larger particles with 560 kb dsDNA genomes. Molecular research has also provided clues about the extent of their diversity especially considering that genetic signatures of algal viruses in the environment rarely match cultivated viruses. One general concept in algal virus ecology that has emerged is that algal viruses are very host specific and most infect only certain strains of their hosts; with the exception of viruses of brown algae, evidence for interspecies infectivity is lacking. Although some host-virus systems behave with boom-bust oscillations, complex patterns of intraspecies infectivity can lead to host-virus coexistence obfuscating the role of viruses in host population dynamics. Within the framework of population dynamics, host density dependence is an important phenomenon that influences virus abundances in nature. Variable burst sizes of different viruses also influence their abundances and permit speculations about different life strategies, but as exceptions are common in algal virus ecology, life strategy generalizations may not be broadly applicable. Gaps in knowledge of virus seasonality and persistence are beginning to close and investigations of environmental reservoirs and virus resilience may answer questions about virus inter-annual recurrences. Studies of algal mortality have shown that viruses are often important agents of mortality reinforcing notions about their ecological relevance, while observations of the surprising ways viruses interact with their hosts highlight the immaturity of our understanding. Considering that just two decades ago algal viruses were hardly acknowledged, recent progress affords the optimistic perspective that future studies

  5. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  6. Lack of efficacy of ergocalciferol repletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wasser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin D has become an area of intensive scrutiny, both in medical and lay literature. However, there are limited data to suggest proper repletion regimens for those patients who have hypovitaminosis D. Consequently, various methods are used in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies for hypovitaminosis D in an ambulatory internal medicine practice. Methods: A retrospective chart review between October 2005 and June 2010 of a suburban internal medicine practice was performed via query of the electronic medical record (Centricity, General Electric Healthcare, UK. Patients with a 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration less than 32 mg/dl were identified and treated. Treatment success was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations greater than 32 mg/dl. Statistical analysis to assess changes in vitamin D level controlling for season, comorbidities, and demographics were used. Results: A total of 607 treatment episodes were identified, with 395 excluded due to lack of follow-up vitamin D level within 16 weeks, no treatment documented, topical treatment, doxercalciferol treatment, or non-compliance. Of the remaining patients, there were 212 treatment instances on 178 patients. Ergocalciferol 50,000 international units (IU was used most frequently (71.4% of the time.. A higher initial vitamin D level was positively associated with treatment success (adjusted odds ratio = 1.11, p=0.002. Increased doses of ergocalciferol increased the likelihood of treatment success (p=0.0011. Seasonal variation was related to posttreatment 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as was body mass index (BMI (p=0.003 and p=0.044. Conclusion: Pretreatment levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, season, and vitamin D dose are predictors of successful hypovitaminosis D treatment. Our data suggest that patients with initial 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <20 should be treated with a higher total dose of

  7. Open drug discovery for the Zika virus [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus (ZIKV outbreak in the Americas has caused global concern that we may be on the brink of a healthcare crisis. The lack of research on ZIKV in the over 60 years that we have known about it has left us with little in the way of starting points for drug discovery. Our response can build on previous efforts with virus outbreaks and lean heavily on work done on other flaviviruses such as dengue virus. We provide some suggestions of what might be possible and propose an open drug discovery effort that mobilizes global science efforts and provides leadership, which thus far has been lacking. We also provide a listing of potential resources and molecules that could be prioritized for testing as in vitro assays for ZIKV are developed. We propose also that in order to incentivize drug discovery, a neglected disease priority review voucher should be available to those who successfully develop an FDA approved treatment. Learning from the response to the ZIKV, the approaches to drug discovery used and the success and failures will be critical for future infectious disease outbreaks.

  8. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  9. Viruses Avian influenza, bovine herpes, bovine viral diarrhea virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus I, influenza, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, measles, papilloma, rabies, respiratory syncitial virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, simian virus 40. Bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Moraxella bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, ...

  10. Computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, F.B.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protection mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.

  11. Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it.

  12. Resistant pathogens, fungi, and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Christopher A; Mansfield, Sara A; Sawyer, Robert G; Cook, Charles H

    2014-12-01

    Although originally described in Staphylococcus aureus, resistance among bacteria has now become a race to determine which classes of bacteria will become more resistant. Availability of antibacterial agents has allowed the development of entirely new diseases caused by nonbacterial pathogens, related largely to fungi that are inherently resistant to antibacterials. This article presents the growing body of knowledge of the herpes family of viruses, and their occurrence and consequences in patients with concomitant surgical disease or critical illness. The focus is on previously immunocompetent patients, as the impact of herpes viruses in immunosuppressed patients has received thorough coverage elsewhere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "The evil virus cell": Students‘ knowledge and beliefs about viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Sonja M.; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p biology students and grade 10 high school students. Students enrolled in university-level biology outperformed all other groups, even though they had not yet encountered this topic at their courses; part of this phenomenon might be due to their affinity for learning about biological topics. However, even many first-year biology students had a high number of severe misconceptions, e.g., defining a virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by

  14. "The evil virus cell": Students' knowledge and beliefs about viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe K Simon

    this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics, and possibly lead to potentially dangerous neglect concerning vaccination. The effectiveness of newly developed virus-related teaching units and material could be tested with the instrument used here.

  15. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  16. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influenza a virus migration and persistence in North American wild birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Bahl

    Full Text Available Wild birds have been implicated in the emergence of human and livestock influenza. The successful prediction of viral spread and disease emergence, as well as formulation of preparedness plans have been hampered by a critical lack of knowledge of viral movements between different host populations. The patterns of viral spread and subsequent risk posed by wild bird viruses therefore remain unpredictable. Here we analyze genomic data, including 287 newly sequenced avian influenza A virus (AIV samples isolated over a 34-year period of continuous systematic surveillance of North American migratory birds. We use a Bayesian statistical framework to test hypotheses of viral migration, population structure and patterns of genetic reassortment. Our results reveal that despite the high prevalence of Charadriiformes infected in Delaware Bay this host population does not appear to significantly contribute to the North American AIV diversity sampled in Anseriformes. In contrast, influenza viruses sampled from Anseriformes in Alberta are representative of the AIV diversity circulating in North American Anseriformes. While AIV may be restricted to specific migratory flyways over short time frames, our large-scale analysis showed that the long-term persistence of AIV was independent of bird flyways with migration between populations throughout North America. Analysis of long-term surveillance data provides vital insights to develop appropriately informed predictive models critical for pandemic preparedness and livestock protection.

  18. Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1976-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, which produced 20 per cent mortality when it first occured during 1967 in Germany and Yugoslavia, recently appeared again in South Africa. The source of the first outbreak was monkeys shipped from Africa; the origin of the second episode is unclear. Because distribution of the virus in nature is unknown, its threat to man cannot be readily determined. Differential laboratory diagnoses of hemorrhagic fevers should be encouraged in order to learn more about the epidemiology of these diseases and to better assess the risks which their etiologic agents may pose for attending medical personnel.

  19. Design of microarray probes for virus identification and detection of emerging viruses at the genus level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Mei-Shang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most virus detection methods are geared towards the detection of specific single viruses or just a few known targets, and lack the capability to uncover the novel viruses that cause emerging viral infections. To address this issue, we developed a computational method that identifies the conserved viral sequences at the genus level for all viral genomes available in GenBank, and established a virus probe library. The virus probes are used not only to identify known viruses but also for discerning the genera of emerging or uncharacterized ones. Results Using the microarray approach, the identity of the virus in a test sample is determined by the signals of both genus and species-specific probes. The genera of emerging and uncharacterized viruses are determined based on hybridization of the viral sequences to the conserved probes for the existing viral genera. A detection and classification procedure to determine the identity of a virus directly from detection signals results in the rapid identification of the virus. Conclusion We have demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the above strategy with a small number of viral samples. The probe design algorithm can be applied to any publicly available viral sequence database. The strategy of using separate genus and species probe sets enables the use of a straightforward virus identity calculation directly based on the hybridization signals. Our virus identification strategy has great potential in the diagnosis of viral infections. The virus genus and specific probe database and the associated summary tables are available at http://genestamp.sinica.edu.tw/virus/index.htm.

  20. Design of microarray probes for virus identification and detection of emerging viruses at the genus level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Te-Tsui; Chen, Chun-Houh; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yun; Lin, Yi-Ling; Ho, Mei-Shang; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Peck, Konan

    2006-04-28

    Most virus detection methods are geared towards the detection of specific single viruses or just a few known targets, and lack the capability to uncover the novel viruses that cause emerging viral infections. To address this issue, we developed a computational method that identifies the conserved viral sequences at the genus level for all viral genomes available in GenBank, and established a virus probe library. The virus probes are used not only to identify known viruses but also for discerning the genera of emerging or uncharacterized ones. Using the microarray approach, the identity of the virus in a test sample is determined by the signals of both genus and species-specific probes. The genera of emerging and uncharacterized viruses are determined based on hybridization of the viral sequences to the conserved probes for the existing viral genera. A detection and classification procedure to determine the identity of a virus directly from detection signals results in the rapid identification of the virus. We have demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the above strategy with a small number of viral samples. The probe design algorithm can be applied to any publicly available viral sequence database. The strategy of using separate genus and species probe sets enables the use of a straightforward virus identity calculation directly based on the hybridization signals. Our virus identification strategy has great potential in the diagnosis of viral infections. The virus genus and specific probe database and the associated summary tables are available at http://genestamp.sinica.edu.tw/virus/index.htm.

  1. Myxoma virus is a novel oncolytic virus with significant antitumor activity against experimental human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Xueqing; Yang, Wenqing; Alain, Tommy; Shi, Zhong-Qiao; Muzik, Huong; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Hamilton, Mark G; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2005-11-01

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus previously considered rabbit specific, can replicate productively in a variety of human tumor cells in culture. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was efficacy or toxicities of this oncolytic virus against experimental models of human malignant gliomas in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo in malignant glioma specimens. In vitro, the majority of glioma cell lines tested (7 of 8, 87.5%) were fully permissive for myxoma virus replication and killed by infection. In vivo, intracerebral (i.c.) myxoma virus inoculation was well tolerated and produced only minimal focal inflammatory changes at the site of viral inoculation. U87 and U251 orthotopic xenograft models were used to assess myxoma virus efficacy in vivo. A single intratumoral injection of myxoma virus dramatically prolonged median survival compared with treatment with UV-inactivated myxoma virus. Median survival was not reached in myxoma virus-treated groups versus 47.3 days (U87; P = 0.0002) and 50.7 days (U251; P = 0.0027) in UV-inactivated myxoma virus-treated groups. Most myxoma virus-treated animals (12 of 13, 92%) were alive and apparently "cured" when the experiment was finished (>130 days). Interestingly, we found a selective and long-lived myxoma virus infection in gliomas in vivo. This is the first demonstration of the oncolytic activity of myxoma virus in vivo. The nonpathogenic nature of myxoma virus outside of the rabbit host, its capacity to be genetically modified, its ability to produce a long-lived infection in human tumor cells, and the lack of preexisting antibodies in the human population suggest that myxoma virus may be an attractive oncolytic agent against human malignant glioma.

  2. Cryo-Electron Tomography of Rubella Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anthony J.; Yoder, Joshua D.; Plevka, Pavel; Winkler, Dennis C.; Mangala Prasad, Vidya; Kuhn, Richard J.; Frey, Teryl K.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2012-01-01

    Rubella virus is the only member of the Rubivirus genus within the Togaviridae family and is the causative agent of the childhood disease known as rubella or German measles. Here, we report the use of cryo-electron tomography to examine the three-dimensional structure of rubella virions and compare their structure to that of Ross River virus, a togavirus belonging the genus Alphavirus. The ectodomains of the rubella virus glycoproteins, E1 and E2, are shown to be organized into extended rows of density, separated by 9 nm on the viral surface. We also show that the rubella virus nucleocapsid structure often forms a roughly spherical shell which lacks high density at its center. While many rubella virions are approximately spherical and have dimensions similar to that of the icosahedral Ross River virus, the present results indicate that rubella exhibits a large degree of pleomorphy. In addition, we used rotation function calculations and other analyses to show that approximately spherical rubella virions lack the icosahedral organization which characterizes Ross River and other alphaviruses. The present results indicate that the assembly mechanism of rubella virus, which has previously been shown to differ from that of the alphavirus assembly pathway, leads to an organization of the rubella virus structural proteins that is different from that of alphaviruses. PMID:22855483

  3. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe.

  4. Nursing Education for Critical Thinking: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara L.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of 20 research studies of critical thinking in nursing, 1977-1995, found that the Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal was used in 18. There was no consistent evidence that nursing education increases critical thinking. Research design flaws, inconsistent definition of critical thinking, and lack of an appropriate measurement tool…

  5. Dictionary criticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Dictionary criticism is part of the lexicographical universe and reviewing of electronic and printed dictionaries is not an exercise in linguistics or in subject fields but an exercise in lexicography. It does not follow from this that dictionary reviews should not be based on a linguistic approach......, but that the linguistic approach is only one of several approaches to dictionary reviewing. Similarly, the linguistic and factual competences of reviewers should not be relegated to an insignificant position in the review process. Moreover, reviewers should define the object of their reviews, the dictionary, as a complex...... information tool with several components and in terms of significant lexicographical features: lexicographical functions, data and structures. This emphasises the fact that dictionaries are much more than mere vessels of linguistic categories, namely lexicographical tools that have been developed to fulfil...

  6. Influenza A and B Virus Intertypic Reassortment through Compatible Viral Packaging Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Steven F.; Nogales, Aitor; Finch, Courtney; Tuffy, Kevin M.; Domm, William; Perez, Daniel R.; Topham, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A and B viruses cocirculate in humans and together cause disease and seasonal epidemics. These two types of influenza viruses are evolutionarily divergent, and exchange of genetic segments inside coinfected cells occurs frequently within types but never between influenza A and B viruses. Possible mechanisms inhibiting the intertypic reassortment of genetic segments could be due to incompatible protein functions of segment homologs, a lack of processing of heterotypic segments by influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, an inhibitory effect of viral proteins on heterotypic virus function, or an inability to specifically incorporate heterotypic segments into budding virions. Here, we demonstrate that the full-length hemagglutinin (HA) of prototype influenza B viruses can complement the function of multiple influenza A viruses. We show that viral noncoding regions were sufficient to drive gene expression for either type A or B influenza virus with its cognate or heterotypic polymerase. The native influenza B virus HA segment could not be incorporated into influenza A virus virions. However, by adding the influenza A virus packaging signals to full-length influenza B virus glycoproteins, we rescued influenza A viruses that possessed HA, NA, or both HA and NA of influenza B virus. Furthermore, we show that, similar to single-cycle infectious influenza A virus, influenza B virus cannot incorporate heterotypic transgenes due to packaging signal incompatibilities. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the lack of influenza A and B virus reassortants can be attributed at least in part to incompatibilities in the virus-specific packaging signals required for effective segment incorporation into nascent virions. IMPORTANCE Reassortment of influenza A or B viruses provides an evolutionary strategy leading to unique genotypes, which can spawn influenza A viruses with pandemic potential. However, the mechanism preventing intertypic reassortment or

  7. Critical infrastructure protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, F. [Canadian Electricity Association, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-04-01

    The need to protect critical electrical infrastructure from terrorist attacks, or other physical damage, including weather related events, or the potential impact of computer viruses and other attacks on IT resources are discussed. Activities of the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) are highlighted which seek to safeguard the North American bulk electric power system principally through the Information Sharing and Analysis Sector (ES-ISAC). ES-ISAC serves the electricity sector by facilitating communication between electric sector participants, federal government and other critical infrastructure industries by disseminating threat indications, analyses and warnings, together with interpretations, to assist the industry in taking infrastructure protection actions. Attention is drawn to the numerous cyber incidents in recent years, which although resulted in no loss of service to electricity customers so far, in at least one instance (the January 25th SOL-Slammer worm incident) resulted in degradation of service in a number of sectors, including financial, transportation and telecommunication services. The increasing frequency of cyber-based attacks, coupled with the industry's growing dependence on e-commerce and electronic controls, are good reasons to believe that critical infrastructure protection (CIP) poses a serious challenge to the industry's risk management practices. The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) is an active participant in ES-ISAC and works cooperatively with a range of partners, such as the Edison Electric Institute and the American Public Power Association to ensure coordination and effective protection program delivery for the electric power sector. The Early Warning System (EWS) developed by the CIP Working Group is one of the results of this cooperation. EWS uses the Internet, e-mail, web-enabled cell phones and Blackberry hand-held devices to deliver real-time threat information to members on a 24/7 basis. EWS

  8. Usutu virus persistence and West Nile virus inactivity in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Mattia; Bonilauri, Paolo; Bellini, Romeo; Albieri, Alessandro; Defilippo, Francesco; Tamba, Marco; Tassinari, Massimo; Gelati, Antonio; Cordioli, Paolo; Angelini, Paola; Dottori, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of West Nile virus and Usutu virus was detected in the Emilia-Romagna region in 2008 and 2009. To evaluate the extent of circulation of both viruses, environmental surveillance, based on bird and mosquito testing, was conducted in 2008 and gradually improved over the years. In February-March 2009-2011, 5,993 hibernating mosquitoes were manually sampled, out of which 80.1% were Culex pipiens; none tested positive for the viruses. From 2008 to 2011, 946,213 mosquitoes, sampled between May and October, were tested; 86.5% were Cx. pipiens. West Nile virus was detected in 32 Cx. pipiens pools, and Usutu virus was detected in 229 mosquito pools (217 Cx. pipiens, 10 Aedes albopictus, one Anopheles maculipennis s.l., and one Aedes caspius). From 2009 to 2011, of 4,546 birds collected, 42 tested positive for West Nile virus and 48 for Usutu virus. West Nile virus and Usutu virus showed different patterns of activity during the 2008-2011 surveillance period. West Nile virus was detected in 2008, 2009, and 2010, but not in 2011. Usutu virus, however, was continuously active throughout 2009, 2010, and 2011. The data strongly suggest that both viruses overwinter in the surveyed area rather than being continually reintroduced every season. The lack of hibernating mosquitoes testing positive for the viruses and the presence of positive birds sampled early in the season support the hypothesis that the viruses overwinter in birds rather than in mosquitoes. Herd immunity in key bird species could explain the decline of West Nile virus observed in 2011, while the persistence of Usutu virus may be explained by not yet identified reservoirs. Reported results are comparable with a peri-Mediterranean circulation of the West Nile virus lineage 1 related strain, which became undetectable in the environment after two to three years of obvious circulation.

  9. Inactivation of rabies virus by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elghaffar, Asmaa A; Ali, Amal E; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-02-03

    Development of safe and protective vaccines against infectious pathogens remains a challenge. Inactivation of rabies virus is a critical step in the production of vaccines and other research reagents. Beta-propiolactone (βPL); the currently used inactivating agent for rabies virus is expensive and proved to be carcinogenic in animals. This study aimed to investigate the ability of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to irreversibly inactivate rabies virus without affecting its antigenicity and immunogenicity in pursuit of finding safe, effective and inexpensive alternative inactivating agents. H2O2 3% rapidly inactivated a Vero cell adapted fixed rabies virus strain designated as FRV/K within 2h of exposure without affecting its antigenicity or immunogenicity. No residual infectious virus was detected and the H2O2-inactivated vaccine proved to be safe and effective when compared with the same virus harvest inactivated with the classical inactivating agent βPL. Mice immunized with H2O2-inactivated rabies virus produced sufficient level of antibodies and were protected when challenged with lethal CVS virus. These findings reinforce the idea that H2O2 can replace βPL as inactivating agent for rabies virus to reduce time and cost of inactivation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Obstetric critical care services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OPINION. More than half of all global maternal deaths occur in Africa. A large percentage of these deaths are preventable, and lack of access to adequate critical care facilities is a contributing factor. There are limited published data on the clinical and management challenges presented by the critically ill obstetric patient ...

  11. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  12. High quality long-term CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory populations stimulated by DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK regimen in Leishmania major BALB/c model of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous vaccination based on priming with a plasmid DNA vector and boosting with an attenuated vaccinia virus MVA recombinant, with both vectors expressing the Leishmania infantum LACK antigen (DNA-LACK and MVA-LACK), has shown efficacy conferring protection in murine and canine models against cutaneus and visceral leishmaniasis, but the immune parameters of protection remain ill defined. Here we performed by flow cytometry an in depth analysis of the T cell populations induced in BALB/c mice during the vaccination protocol DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK, as well as after challenge with L. major parasites. In the adaptive response, there is a polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation against LACK antigen. At the memory phase the heterologous vaccination induces high quality LACK-specific long-term CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector memory cells. After parasite challenge, there is a moderate boosting of LACK-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Anti-vector responses were largely CD8(+)-mediated. The immune parameters induced against LACK and triggered by the combined vaccination DNA/MVA protocol, like polyfunctionality of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with an effector phenotype, could be relevant in protection against leishmaniasis.

  13. Subclinical infection without encephalitis in mice following intranasal exposure to Nipah virus-Malaysia and Nipah virus-Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Dups, Johanna; Middleton, Deborah; Long, Fenella; Arkinstall, Rachel; Glenn A Marsh; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Background Nipah virus and Hendra virus are closely related and following natural or experimental exposure induce similar clinical disease. In humans, encephalitis is the most serious outcome of infection and, hitherto, research into the pathogenesis of henipavirus encephalitis has been limited by the lack of a suitable model. Recently we reported a wild-type mouse model of Hendra virus (HeV) encephalitis that should facilitate detailed investigations of its neuropathogenesis, including mecha...

  14. Deciphering the Origin and Evolution of Hepatitis B Viruses by Means of a Family of Non-enveloped Fish Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lauber, Chris; Seitz, Stefan; Mattei, Simone; Suh, Alexander; Beck, Jürgen; Herstein, Jennifer; Börold, Jacob; Salzburger, Walter; Kaderali, Lars; Briggs, John A. G.; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (HBVs), which are enveloped viruses with reverse-transcribed DNA genomes, constitute the family Hepadnaviridae. An outstanding feature of HBVs is their streamlined genome organization with extensive gene overlap. Remarkably, the similar to 1,100 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding the envelope proteins is fully nested within the ORF of the viral replicase P. Here, we report the discovery of a diversified family of fish viruses, designated nackednaviruses, which lack the e...

  15. Lack of association of gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTD) with syphilis and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, E; Molykutty, J; Rajalekshmy, T N; Vijayasree, S R; Krishnan, N M; Prabha, B

    1998-07-01

    The association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis infection as an etiological factor in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease (GTD) was investigated by means of micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Micro-ELISA) and Treposcreen-Rapid Plasma Reagin Card Test in 138 sera from patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. We have found only one sample to be positive for HIV infection and one for VDRL. These findings suggest a lack of an etiologic role for the HIV and Syphilis infection in GTD.

  16. Entry of a Novel Marine DNA Virus, Singapore Grouper Iridovirus, into Host Cells Occurs via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Macropinocytosis in a pH-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowen; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Hao, Xian; Xu, Haijiao; Cai, Mingjun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iridoviruses are nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses which cause great economic losses in the aquaculture industry but also show significant threat to global biodiversity. However, a lack of host cells has resulted in poor progress in clarifying iridovirus behavior. We investigated the crucial events during virus entry using a combination of single-virus tracking and biochemical assays, based on the established virus-cell infection model for Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). SGIV infection in host cells was strongly inhibited when cells were pretreated with drugs blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including sucrose and chlorpromazine. Inhibition of key regulators of macropinocytosis, including Na+/H+ exchanger, Rac1 GTPase, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), protein kinase C (PKC), and myosin II, significantly reduced SGIV uptake. Cy5-labeled SGIV particles were observed to colocalize with clathrin and macropinosomes. In contrast, disruption of cellular cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin had no effect on virus infection, suggesting that SGIV entered grouper cells via the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway and macropinocytosis but not via caveola-dependent endocytosis. Furthermore, inhibitors of endosome acidification such as chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 blocked virus infection, indicating that SGIV entered cells in a pH-dependent manner. In addition, SGIV particles were observed to be transported along both microtubules and actin filaments, and intracellular SGIV motility was remarkably impaired by depolymerization of microtubules or actin filaments. The results of this study for the first time demonstrate that not only the clathrin-dependent pathway but also macropinocytosis are involved in fish DNA enveloped virus entry, thus providing a convenient tactic for exploring the life cycle of DNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Virus entry into host cells is critically important for initiating infections and is usually recognized as an ideal target for

  17. Entry of a novel marine DNA virus, Singapore grouper iridovirus, into host cells occurs via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis in a pH-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowen; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Hao, Xian; Xu, Haijiao; Cai, Mingjun; Wang, Hongda; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-11-01

    Iridoviruses are nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses which cause great economic losses in the aquaculture industry but also show significant threat to global biodiversity. However, a lack of host cells has resulted in poor progress in clarifying iridovirus behavior. We investigated the crucial events during virus entry using a combination of single-virus tracking and biochemical assays, based on the established virus-cell infection model for Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). SGIV infection in host cells was strongly inhibited when cells were pretreated with drugs blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including sucrose and chlorpromazine. Inhibition of key regulators of macropinocytosis, including Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, Rac1 GTPase, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), protein kinase C (PKC), and myosin II, significantly reduced SGIV uptake. Cy5-labeled SGIV particles were observed to colocalize with clathrin and macropinosomes. In contrast, disruption of cellular cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin had no effect on virus infection, suggesting that SGIV entered grouper cells via the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway and macropinocytosis but not via caveola-dependent endocytosis. Furthermore, inhibitors of endosome acidification such as chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 blocked virus infection, indicating that SGIV entered cells in a pH-dependent manner. In addition, SGIV particles were observed to be transported along both microtubules and actin filaments, and intracellular SGIV motility was remarkably impaired by depolymerization of microtubules or actin filaments. The results of this study for the first time demonstrate that not only the clathrin-dependent pathway but also macropinocytosis are involved in fish DNA enveloped virus entry, thus providing a convenient tactic for exploring the life cycle of DNA viruses. Virus entry into host cells is critically important for initiating infections and is usually recognized as an ideal target for the design of

  18. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  19. Control of plant virus diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: the possibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant viruses and virus diseases have been studied for more than 100 years and much attention has been given to their control. However, this has been difficult to achieve because of the lack of any effective means of curing virus-infected plants. Chemotherapy, thermotherapy and meristem-tip culture can be successful, but ...

  20. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean R. Vik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce “MArVD”, for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments.

  1. Long-Distance Interferon Signaling within the Brain Blocks Virus Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Siyuan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serious permanent neurological or psychiatric dysfunction may result from virus infections in the central nervous system (CNS). Olfactory sensory neurons are in direct contact with the external environment, making them susceptible to infection by viruses that can enter the brain via the olfactory nerve. The rarity of full brain viral infections raises the important question of whether unique immune defense mechanisms protect the brain. Here we show that both RNA (vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]) and DNA (cytomegalovirus [CMV]) virus inoculations of the nasal mucosa leading to olfactory bulb (OB) infection activate long-distance signaling that upregulates antiviral interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in uninfected remote regions of the brain. This signaling mechanism is dependent on IFN-α/β receptors deep within the brain, leading to the activation of a distant antiviral state that prevents infection of the caudal brain. In normal mice, VSV replication is limited to the OB, and these animals typically survive the infection. In contrast, mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor succumbed to the infection, with VSV spreading throughout the brain. Chemical destruction of the olfactory sensory neurons blocked both virus trafficking into the OB and the IFN response in the caudal brain, indicating a direct signaling within the brain after intranasal infection. Most signaling within the brain occurs across the 20-nm synaptic cleft. The unique long-distance IFN signaling described here occurs across many millimeters within the brain and is critical for survival and normal brain function. IMPORTANCE The olfactory mucosa can serve as a conduit for a number of viruses to enter the brain. Yet infections in the CNS rarely occur. The mechanism responsible for protecting the brain from viruses that successfully invade the OB, the first site of infection subsequent to infection of the nasal mucosa, remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that the protection is

  2. What roles for viruses in origin of life scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrka, Gladys

    2016-10-01

    Important roles in origin of life (OL) scenarios have been and still are attributed to viruses. Yet the strict dependence of viruses on cells for their multiplication has been widely acknowledged since the first decades of the 20th century. How could viruses play critical roles in the OL if life relies on cellular organization and if viruses are defined as parasites of cells? In other words, how could viruses play a role in the emergence of cellular life if the existence of cells is a prerequisite for the existence of viruses? This paper investigates this issue and describes past and current OL scenarios conferring viruses with important roles, thereby completing the work of historian of science and physician Scott Podolsky who identified three major roles of viruses in past OL scenarios. Some objections raised by present OL scenarios conferring viruses with an important role are discussed. I argue that disagreements concerning the roles of viruses in OL scenarios stem from the different concepts of life and of virus scientists defend. Investigating the roles of viruses in OL scenarios not only helps identifying different ways to define life in the context of OL theorizing. It also offers the opportunity to better understand how viruses could be conceptualized. The relevance of the replication-first versus metabolism-first dichotomy in OL theorizing is briefly discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mengenal Hanta Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijayanti, Tri

    2009-01-01

    Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).

  4. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  5. Viperin restricts chikungunya virus replication and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Terk-Shin; Foo, Suan-Sin; Simamarta, Diane; Lum, Fok-Moon; Teo, Teck-Hui; Lulla, Aleksei; Yeo, Nicholas K.W.; Koh, Esther G.L.; Chow, Angela; Leo, Yee-Sin; Merits, Andres; Chin, Keh-Chuang; Ng, Lisa F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthralgia arbovirus that is reemergent in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. CHIKV infection has been shown to be self-limiting, but the molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response that control CHIKV replication remain undefined. Here, longitudinal transcriptional analyses of PBMCs from a cohort of CHIKV-infected patients revealed that type I IFNs controlled CHIKV infection via RSAD2 (which encodes viperin), an enigmatic multifunctional IFN-stimulated gene (ISG). Viperin was highly induced in monocytes, the major target cell of CHIKV in blood. Anti-CHIKV functions of viperin were dependent on its localization in the ER, and the N-terminal amphipathic α-helical domain was crucial for its antiviral activity in controlling CHIKV replication. Furthermore, mice lacking Rsad2 had higher viremia and severe joint inflammation compared with wild-type mice. Our data demonstrate that viperin is a critical antiviral host protein that controls CHIKV infection and provide a preclinical basis for the design of effective control strategies against CHIKV and other reemerging arthrogenic alphaviruses. PMID:23160199

  6. Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Impact of virus preparation quality on parvovirus filter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Ashley; Burnham, Mike; Genest, Paul; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Chen, Dayue; Hughes, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Virus-removal filtration technology is commonly used in the manufacturing process for biologics to remove potential viral contaminants. Virus-removal filters designed for retaining parvovirus, one of the smallest mammalian viruses, are considered an industry standard as they can effectively remove broad ranges of viruses. It has long been observed that the performance of virus filters can be influenced by virus preparations used in the laboratory scale studies (PDA, 2010). However, it remains unclear exactly what quality attributes of virus preparations are critical or indicative of virus filter performance as measured by effectiveness of virus removal and filter capacity consistency. In an attempt to better understand the relationship between virus preparation and virus filter performance, we have systematically prepared and analyzed different grades of parvovirus with different purity levels and compared their performance profiles on Viresolve® Pro parvovirus filters using four different molecules. Virus preparations used in the studies were characterized using various methods to measure DNA and protein content as well as the hydrodynamic diameter of virus particles. Our results indicate that the performance of Viresolve® Pro filters can be significantly impacted depending on the purity of the virus preparations used in the spike and recovery studies. More importantly, we have demonstrated that the purity of virus preparations is directly correlated to the measurable biochemical and biophysical properties of the virus preparations such as DNA and protein content and monodispersal status, thus making it possible to significantly improve the consistency and predictability of the virus filter performance during process step validations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  9. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  11. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  12. Virus Ebola Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuryadi, Suharyono

    1996-01-01

    Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  13. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  14. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  15. Distribution of hepatitis B virus nuclear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Sohn, Ji A; Seeger, Christoph

    2017-10-18

    Chronic hepatitis B affects over 300 million people who are at risk of developing liver cancer. The basis for the persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in hepatocytes, even in the presence of available antiviral therapies, lies in the accumulation of covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA in nuclei of infected cells. While methods for cccDNA quantification from liver biopsies and cell lines expressing the virus are known, information about cccDNA formation, stability and turnover are lacking. In particular, little is known about the fate of cccDNA during cell division. To fill gaps in knowledge concerning cccDNA biology, we have developed a fluorescence imaging in situ hybridization (FISH)-based assay for the detection of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) cccDNA and HBV nuclear DNA in established cell lines. Using FISH, we determined the distribution of cccDNA under conditions mimicking chronic infections with and without antiviral therapy, which prevents de novo viral replication. Our results showed that the copy numbers of viral nuclear DNA can vary by as much as 1.8 orders of magnitude among individual cells, and that antiviral therapy leads to a reduction in nuclear DNA in a manner consistent with symmetrical distribution of viral DNA to daughter cells.Importance A mechanistic understanding of the stability of HBV cccDNA in the presence of antiviral therapy and during cell division induced by immune mediated lysis of infected hepatocytes, will be critical for the future design of curative antiviral therapies against chronic hepatitis B. To date, knowledge about cccDNA stability was largely derived from quantitative analyses of cccDNA levels present in liver samples, and little was known about the fate of cccDNA in individual cells. The development of a FISH-based assay for cccDNA tracking provided the first insights into the fate of DHBV cccDNA and nuclear HBV DNA during conditions mimicking antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI)

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  17. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv: New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV and endogenous (Mtv forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation.

  18. Endogenous mouse mammary tumor viruses (mtv): new roles for an old virus in cancer, infection, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Michael P; Shevach, Ethan M; Punkosdy, George A

    2013-11-26

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV) and endogenous (Mtv) forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation.

  19. Zika Virus Infection: Current Concerns and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Ranjan, Aruna; Chu, Jian Feng; Foo, Wei Lim; Chai, Zhi Xin; Lau, Eileen YinYien; Ye, Heuy Mien; Theam, Xi Jin; Lok, Yen Ling

    2016-12-01

    The Zika virus outbreaks highlight the growing importance need for a reliable, specific and rapid diagnostic device to detect Zika virus, as it is often recognized as a mild disease without being identified. Many Zika virus infection cases have been misdiagnosed or underreported because of the non-specific clinical presentation. The aim of this review was to provide a critical and comprehensive overview of the published peer-reviewed evidence related to clinical presentations, various diagnostic methods and modes of transmission of Zika virus infection, as well as potential therapeutic targets to combat microcephaly. Zika virus is mainly transmitted through bites from Aedes aegypti mosquito. It can also be transmitted through blood, perinatally and sexually. Pregnant women are advised to postpone or avoid travelling to areas where active Zika virus transmission is reported, as this infection is directly linked to foetal microcephaly. Due to the high prevalence of Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly in the endemic area, it is vital to confirm the diagnosis of Zika virus. Zika virus infection had been declared as a public health emergency and of international concern by the World Health Organisation. Governments and agencies should play an important role in terms of investing time and resources to fundamentally understand this infection so that a vaccine can be developed besides raising awareness.

  20. Astrovirology: Viruses at Large in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, Aaron J; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2018-02-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on modern Earth. They are highly diverse both in structure and genomic sequence, play critical roles in evolution, strongly influence terran biogeochemistry, and are believed to have played important roles in the origin and evolution of life. However, there is yet very little focus on viruses in astrobiology. Viruses arguably have coexisted with cellular life-forms since the earliest stages of life, may have been directly involved therein, and have profoundly influenced cellular evolution. Viruses are the only entities on modern Earth to use either RNA or DNA in both single- and double-stranded forms for their genetic material and thus may provide a model for the putative RNA-protein world. With this review, we hope to inspire integration of virus research into astrobiology and also point out pressing unanswered questions in astrovirology, particularly regarding the detection of virus biosignatures and whether viruses could be spread extraterrestrially. We present basic virology principles, an inclusive definition of viruses, review current virology research pertinent to astrobiology, and propose ideas for future astrovirology research foci. Key Words: Astrobiology-Virology-Biosignatures-Origin of life-Roadmap. Astrobiology 18, 207-223.

  1. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  2. Impaired liver regeneration in mice lacking methionine adenosyltransferase 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lixin; Zeng, Ying; Yang, Heping; Lee, Taunia D; French, Samuel W; Corrales, Fernando J; García-Trevijano, Elena R; Avila, Matías A; Mato, José M; Lu, Shelly C

    2004-05-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an essential enzyme because it catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal biological methyl donor. Of the two genes that encode MAT, MAT1A is mainly expressed in adult liver and MAT2A is expressed in all extrahepatic tissues. Mice lacking MAT1A have reduced hepatic SAMe content and spontaneously develop hepatocellular carcinoma. The current study examined the influence of chronic hepatic SAMe deficiency on liver regeneration. Despite having higher baseline hepatic staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen, MAT1A knockout mice had impaired liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) as determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This can be explained by an inability to up-regulate cyclin D1 after PH in the knockout mice. Upstream signaling pathways involved in cyclin D1 activation include nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3). At baseline, JNK and ERK are more activated in the knockouts whereas NFkappaB and STAT-3 are similar to wild-type mice. Following PH, early activation of these pathways occurred, but although they remained increased in wild-type mice, c-jun and ERK phosphorylation fell progressively in the knockouts. Hepatic SAMe levels fell progressively following PH in wild-type mice but remained unchanged in the knockouts. In culture, MAT1A knockout hepatocytes have higher baseline DNA synthesis but failed to respond to the mitogenic effect of hepatocyte growth factor. Taken together, our findings define a critical role for SAMe in ERK signaling and cyclin D1 regulation during regeneration and suggest chronic hepatic SAMe depletion results in loss of responsiveness to mitogenic signals.

  3. Global morphological analysis of marine viruses shows minimal regional variation and dominance of non-tailed viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Brum, Jennifer R.; Ryan O Schenck; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses influence oceanic ecosystems by causing mortality of microorganisms, altering nutrient and organic matter flux via lysis and auxiliary metabolic gene expression and changing the trajectory of microbial evolution through horizontal gene transfer. Limited host range and differing genetic potential of individual virus types mean that investigations into the types of viruses that exist in the ocean and their spatial distribution throughout the world's oceans are critical to understanding ...

  4. Polyomavirus-Specific Cellular Immunity: From BK-Virus-Specific Cellular Immunity to BK-Virus-Associated Nephropathy?

    OpenAIRE

    manon edekeyser; helene efrancois; severine ebeaudreuil; Antoine eDurrbach

    2015-01-01

    In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control vir...

  5. Physical activity: is a lack of time or a lack of motivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Eugenia Bastidas-Sanchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the physical activity and leisure time in medical students at the University of Cauca during the first period of 2013. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted with a population of 270 medical students. Multistage probability sampling was used. A survey taken from the University Students’ Life-style Questionnaire was applied. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 14 and the analysis included frequency measures (percentages and measures of central tendency and dispersion and a bivariate analysis with Chi square test, with a level of statistical significance of p < 0.05. Results: 121 men and 149 (n= 154 women participated, of whom 57% rarely or never do physical activity 30 minutes a day, three days a week, with lack of time and tools . In general, women do less physical activity (67.7% than men (43.8%; 35% chose the “laziness” as one of the aspects that influence in not doing physical activity. Conclusion: Students in the Medicine Program of Universidad of Cauca mostly make little or null physical activity, being the women more sedentary than men, having as main reason for not performing this activity the laziness. Also the women devote more time to leisure activities than men, while they devote more time to physical activity.

  6. Critical Pedagogy for Critical Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutak, Fatma Aslan; Bondy, Elizabeth; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to critical pedagogy and further discussion on critical mathematics education. Critical mathematics education enables students to read the world with mathematics. Three emerging domains of mathematics education related to critical mathematics education are discussed in this manuscript: ethnomathematics,…

  7. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that -integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of -integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was ...

  8. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that β-integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of β-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV ...

  9. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential....... Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds...

  10. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  11. Determinants of host species range in plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Benoît; Fabre, Frédéric; Hébrard, Eugénie; Froissart, Rémy

    2017-04-01

    Prediction of pathogen emergence is an important field of research, both in human health and in agronomy. Most studies of pathogen emergence have focused on the ecological or anthropic factors involved rather than on the role of intrinsic pathogen properties. The capacity of pathogens to infect a large set of host species, i.e. to possess a large host range breadth (HRB), is tightly linked to their emergence propensity. Using an extensive plant virus database, we found that four traits related to virus genome or transmission properties were strongly and robustly linked to virus HRB. Broader host ranges were observed for viruses with single-stranded genomes, those with three genome segments and nematode-transmitted viruses. Also, two contrasted groups of seed-transmitted viruses were evidenced. Those with a single-stranded genome had larger HRB than non-seed-transmitted viruses, whereas those with a double-stranded genome (almost exclusively RNA) had an extremely small HRB. From the plant side, the family taxonomic rank appeared as a critical threshold for virus host range, with a highly significant increase in barriers to infection between plant families. Accordingly, the plant-virus infectivity matrix shows a dual structure pattern: a modular pattern mainly due to viruses specialized to infect plants of a given family and a nested pattern due to generalist viruses. These results contribute to a better prediction of virus host jumps and emergence risks.

  12. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  13. Minimal plus one point designs for testing lack of fit for some sigmoid curve models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying; Raghavarao, Damaraju

    2013-03-11

    D-optimal designs for nonlinear models are often minimally supported. They have been frequently criticized for their inability to test for lack of fit. We construct alternative designs to address this issue for some commonly used sigmoid curves, including logistic, probit, and Gompertz models with two, three, or four parameters. For each model, we compare five nonminimally supported designs in terms of their efficiency, and propose designs that are both statistically efficient and practically convenient for practitioners.

  14. Depletion of macrophages in mice results in higher dengue virus titers and highlights the role of macrophages for virus control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, K.; Ng, C.; Nkenfou, C.; Vasudevan, S.G.; Rooijen, van N.; Schul, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are target cells for dengue infection. Besides their potential role for virus replication, activated monocytes/macrophages produce cytokines that may be critical for dengue pathology. To study the in vivo role of monocytes and macrophages for virus replication, we depleted

  15. A single vertebrate DNA virus protein disarms invertebrate immunity to RNA virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Don B; Duraffour, Sophie; Rozelle, Daniel K; Hehnly, Heidi; Sharma, Rita; Sparks, Michael E; West, Cara C; Chen, Ying; Moresco, James J; Andrei, Graciela; Connor, John H; Conte, Darryl; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E; Marshall, William L; Yates, John R; Silverman, Neal; Mello, Craig C

    2014-01-01

    Virus-host interactions drive a remarkable diversity of immune responses and countermeasures. We found that two RNA viruses with broad host ranges, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV), are completely restricted in their replication after entry into Lepidopteran cells. This restriction is overcome when cells are co-infected with vaccinia virus (VACV), a vertebrate DNA virus. Using RNAi screening, we show that Lepidopteran RNAi, Nuclear Factor-κB, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways restrict RNA virus infection. Surprisingly, a highly conserved, uncharacterized VACV protein, A51R, can partially overcome this virus restriction. We show that A51R is also critical for VACV replication in vertebrate cells and for pathogenesis in mice. Interestingly, A51R colocalizes with, and stabilizes, host microtubules and also associates with ubiquitin. We show that A51R promotes viral protein stability, possibly by preventing ubiquitin-dependent targeting of viral proteins for destruction. Importantly, our studies reveal exciting new opportunities to study virus-host interactions in experimentally-tractable Lepidopteran systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02910.001 PMID:24966209

  16. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  17. Tick-borne viruses: a review from the perspective of therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Rafidah; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Haghani, Amin; Chang, Li-Yen; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2014-09-01

    Several important human diseases worldwide are caused by tick-borne viruses. These diseases have become important public health concerns in recent years. The tick-borne viruses that cause diseases in humans mainly belong to 3 families: Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Reoviridae. In this review, we focus on therapeutic approaches for several of the more important tick-borne viruses from these 3 families. These viruses are Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHF) and the newly discovered tick-borne phleboviruses, known as thrombocytopenia syndromevirus (SFTSV), Heartland virus and Bhanja virus from the family Bunyaviridae, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Powassan virus (POWV), Louping-ill virus (LIV), Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV), Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV), and Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) from the Flaviviridae family. To date, there is no effective antiviral drug available against most of these tick-borne viruses. Although there is common usage of antiviral drugs such as ribavirin for CCHF treatment in some countries, there are concerns that ribavirin may not be as effective as once thought against CCHF. Herein, we discuss also the availability of vaccines for the control of these viral infections. The lack of treatment and prevention approaches for these viruses is highlighted, and we hope that this review may increase public health awareness with regard to the threat posed by this group of viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. European interlaboratory comparison of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) real-time RT-PCR detection in experimental and field samples: The method of extraction is critical for SBV RNA detection in semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Claudia; van der Poel, Wim H M; Ponsart, Claire; Cay, Ann Brigitte; Steinbach, Falko; Zientara, Stéphan; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Molecular methods for the detection of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) RNA were rapidly developed after the emergence of this novel orthobunyavirus in Europe. The SBV epizootic wave has declined, but infectious SBV in SBV RNA-positive semen remains a possible risk for the distribution of SBV. However, the abilities of SBV molecular detection methods used at European laboratories have not yet been assessed, to our knowledge. The performances of extraction and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) methods used at 27 German and 17 other European laboratories for SBV RNA detection in the matrices of whole blood, serum, tissue homogenate, RNA eluates, and bovine semen were evaluated in 2 interlaboratory trials with special emphasis on semen extraction methods. For reliable detection of viral genome in bovine semen samples, highly effective extraction methods are essential to cope with the potential inhibitory effects of semen components on PCR results. All methods used by the 44 laboratories were sufficiently robust to detect SBV RNA with high diagnostic sensitivity (100%) and specificity (95.8%) in all matrices, except semen. The trials demonstrated that the published recommended semen extraction methods (Hoffmann et al. 2013) and a combination of TRIzol LS with an alternative extraction kit have a considerably higher diagnostic sensitivity to detect SBV RNA in semen up to a detection limit of Cq ≤35 compared to other extraction methods used. A thorough validation of extraction methods with standardized semen batches is essential before their use for SBV RNA detection in bovine semen. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Molecular phylogeny of Duvenhage virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis H. Nel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Duvenhage virus (DUVV constitutes one of the 11 species in the Lyssavirus genus and causes fatal rabies encephalitis. The virus is associated with insectivorous bat species and three human cases have been reported, all of which were linked to contact with bats. Few of these isolates have been studied and thus little is known about the phylogeny and epidemiology of this lyssavirus. Until 2007, when an isolate was made from the East African country of Kenya, all isolations of this virus had been from southern Africa. This discovery led to many questions regarding the spread and diversity of this lyssavirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the DUVV isolates constitute two different lineages, in which the southern African isolates group together to form one lineage and the more recent isolate from Kenya constitutes a new, second lineage. We found that the new isolate has a genetic variation that has not yet been seen for DUVV. Not only is our lack of knowledge regarding the geographical distribution of this uniquely African virus emphasised, but we have also demonstrated the potential diversity within this genotype.

  20. Lack of material resources causes harsher moral judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Pitesa, Marko; Thau, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This research tested the idea that lack of material resources (e.g., low income) causes people to make harsher moral judgments because lack of material resources is associated with a lower ability to cope with the effects of others' harmful behavior. Consistent with this idea, a large cross-cultural survey (Study 1) found that both chronic (low income) and situational (inflation) lack of material resources were associated with harsher moral judgments. The effect of inflation was stronger for ...

  1. Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation-a benchmark of metagenomics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczyrba, Alexander; Hofmann, Peter; Belmann, Peter; Koslicki, David; Janssen, Stefan; Dröge, Johannes; Gregor, Ivan; Majda, Stephan; Fiedler, Jessika; Dahms, Eik; Bremges, Andreas; Fritz, Adrian; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jørgensen, Tue Sparholt; Shapiro, Nicole; Blood, Philip D; Gurevich, Alexey; Bai, Yang; Turaev, Dmitrij; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Chikhi, Rayan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Quince, Christopher; Meyer, Fernando; Balvočiūtė, Monika; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren J; Chia, Burton K H; Denis, Bertrand; Froula, Jeff L; Wang, Zhong; Egan, Robert; Don Kang, Dongwan; Cook, Jeffrey J; Deltel, Charles; Beckstette, Michael; Lemaitre, Claire; Peterlongo, Pierre; Rizk, Guillaume; Lavenier, Dominique; Wu, Yu-Wei; Singer, Steven W; Jain, Chirag; Strous, Marc; Klingenberg, Heiner; Meinicke, Peter; Barton, Michael D; Lingner, Thomas; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z; Cuevas, Daniel A; Edwards, Robert A; Saha, Surya; Piro, Vitor C; Renard, Bernhard Y; Pop, Mihai; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Rubin, Edward M; Darling, Aaron E; Rattei, Thomas; McHardy, Alice C

    2017-11-01

    Methods for assembly, taxonomic profiling and binning are key to interpreting metagenome data, but a lack of consensus about benchmarking complicates performance assessment. The Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) challenge has engaged the global developer community to benchmark their programs on highly complex and realistic data sets, generated from ∼700 newly sequenced microorganisms and ∼600 novel viruses and plasmids and representing common experimental setups. Assembly and genome binning programs performed well for species represented by individual genomes but were substantially affected by the presence of related strains. Taxonomic profiling and binning programs were proficient at high taxonomic ranks, with a notable performance decrease below family level. Parameter settings markedly affected performance, underscoring their importance for program reproducibility. The CAMI results highlight current challenges but also provide a roadmap for software selection to answer specific research questions.

  2. Are herpes virus associated to aggressive periodontitis? A review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patrícia Maria de Sousa; Teixeira, Ana Luísa; Kustner, Eduardo Chimenos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal Disease includes a wide variety of infectious entities with various clinical manifestations in the oral cavity and responses to treatment. The determinants of clinical manifestations of periodontal disease include the type of infectious agent, the host immune response and environmental factors. Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is defined as a type of inflammation with specific clinical and laboratory features, which distinguish it from other types of periodontitis, with high incidence rates in a sub-group of individuals. Bacteria have been frequently mentioned as the agent inciting gingival inflammation and tissue destruction that underlies the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, recent studies, with some controversial results, have suggested that the herpes family of viruses, including CMV and EBV-1 as well as papillomaviruses, HIV, Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, Torquetenovirus and hepatitis B and C occur with high frequency in active periodontal lesions. There is a lack of information about this disease and the role of herpesviruses in its pathophysiology. This review provides a critical analysis of the scientific evidence linking bacteria and viruses with AP and their potential impact on clinical characteristics, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26980964

  3. Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bortolato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of clinical and epidemiological evidence suggest that viral infections in early developmental stages may be a causal factor in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism-spectrum disorders. This etiological link, however, remains controversial in view of the lack of consistent and reproducible associations between viruses and mental illness. Animal models of virus-induced neurobehavioral disturbances afford powerful tools to test etiological hypotheses and explore pathophysiological mechanisms. Prenatal or neonatal inoculations of neurotropic agents (such as herpes-, influenza-, and retroviruses in rodents result in a broad spectrum of long-term alterations reminiscent of psychiatric abnormalities. Nevertheless, the complexity of these sequelae often poses methodological and interpretational challenges and thwarts their characterization. The recent conceptual advancements in psychiatric nosology and behavioral science may help determine new heuristic criteria to enhance the translational value of these models. A particularly critical issue is the identification of intermediate phenotypes, defined as quantifiable factors representing single neurochemical, neuropsychological, or neuroanatomical aspects of a diagnostic category. In this paper, we examine how the employment of these novel concepts may lead to new methodological refinements in the study of virus-induced neurobehavioral sequelae through animal models.

  4. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es ... Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West Nile virus? And why is everyone talking about mosquitoes ? Even ...

  5. Viruses infecting maize

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić, Branka; Stanković, Ivana; Bulajić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Over 40 plant viruses has been known to cause diseases of maize, but economically the most important yield looses, which in certain years can be total, are caused by viruses from Potyvirus genera, known to be aphid-transmitted in a non-persistant maner. The most important viruses, pathogens of maize, sugar cane and sorghum are considered to be Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV). In Serbia, the prese...

  6. Viruses in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, R

    2013-03-01

    Soon after the discovery that viruses cause human disease, started the idea of using viruses to treat cancer. After the initial indiscriminate use, crude preparations of each novel virus in the early twentieth century, a second wave of virotherapy blossomed in the 60s with purified and selected viruses. Responses were rare and short-lived. Immune rejection of the oncolytic viruses was identified as the major problem and virotherapy was abandoned. During the past two decades virotherapy has re-emerged with engineered viruses, with a trend towards using them as tumor-debulking immunostimulatory agents combined with radio or chemotherapy. Currently, oncolytic Reovirus, Herpes, and Vaccinia virus are in late phase clinical trials. Despite the renewed hope, efficacy will require improving systemic tumor targeting, overcoming stroma barriers for virus spread, and selectively stimulating immune responses against tumor antigens but not against the virus. Virotherapy history, viruses, considerations for clinical trials, and hurdles are briefly overviewed.

  7. 29 CFR 18.602 - Lack of personal knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Lack of personal knowledge. 18.602 Section 18.602 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.602 Lack of personal knowledge. A... witness has personal knowledge of the matter. Evidence to prove personal knowledge may, but need not...

  8. Reverse Genetics Plasmid for Cloning Unstable Influenza A Virus Gene Segments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Bin; Jerzak, Greta; Scholes, Derek T.; Donnelly, Matthew E.; Li, Yan; Wentworth, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches that enable the generation of recombinant influenza A viruses entirely from plasmids are invaluable for studies on virus replication, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, or transmission. Furthermore, influenza virus reverse genetics is now critical for the development of new vaccines for this human and animal pathogen. Periodically, influenza gene segments are unstable within plasmids in bacteria. The PB2 gene segment of a highly pathogenic avian H5 influenza virus A/Turk...

  9. A review of Nipah and Hendra viruses with an historical aside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Thomas G; Rota, Paul A; Rollin, Pierre E

    2011-12-01

    The emergence of Hendra and Nipah viruses in the 1990s has been followed by the further emergence of these viruses in the tropical Old World. The history and current knowledge of the disease, the viruses and their epidemiology is reviewed in this article. A historical aside summarizes the role that Dr. Brian W.J. Mahy played at critical junctures in the early stories of these viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomarker discovery from the top down: protein biomarkers for efficient virus transmission by insects (Homoptera: Aphididae) discovered by coupling genetics and 2-D DIGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellow dwarf viruses cause the most economically important virus diseases of cereal crops worldwide and are vectored by aphids. The identification of vector proteins mediating virus transmission is critical to develop sustainable virus management practices and to understand viral strategies for cir...

  11. Disruption of M-T5, a novel myxoma virus gene member of poxvirus host range superfamily, results in dramatic attenuation of myxomatosis in infected European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, K; Lee, S F; Barry, M; Boshkov, L; McFadden, G

    1996-07-01

    Myxoma virus is a pathogenic poxvirus that induces a lethal myxomatosis disease profile in European rabbits, which is characterized by fulminating lesions at the primary site of inoculation, rapid dissemination to secondary internal organs and peripheral external sites, and supervening gram-negative bacterial infection. Here we describe the role of a novel myxoma virus protein encoded by the M-T5 open reading frame during pathogenesis. The myxoma virus M-T5 protein possesses no significant sequence homology to nonviral proteins but is a member of a larger poxviral superfamily designated host range proteins. An M-T5- mutant virus was constructed by disruption of both copies of the M-T5 gene followed by insertion of the selectable marker p7.5Ecogpt. Although the M-T5- deletion mutant replicated with wild-type kinetics in rabbit fibroblasts, infection of a rabbit CD4+ T-cell line (RL5) with the myxoma virus M-T5- mutant virus resulted in the rapid and complete cessation of both host and viral protein synthesis, accompanied by the manifestation of all the classical features of programmed cell death. Infection of primary rabbit peripheral mononuclear cells with the myxoma virus M-T5-mutant virus resulted in the apoptotic death of nonadherent lymphocytes but not adherent monocytes. Within the European rabbit, disruption of the M-T5 open reading frame caused a dramatic attenuation of the rapidly lethal myxomatosis infection, and none of the infected rabbits displayed any of the characteristic features of myxomatosis. The two most significant histological observations in rabbits infected with the M-T5-mutant virus were (i) the lack of progression of the infection past the primary site of inoculation, coupled with the establishment of a rapid and effective inflammatory reaction, and (ii) the inability of the virus to initiate a cellular reaction within secondary immune organs. We conclude that M-T5 functions as a critical virulence factor by allowing productive infection of

  12. MENGENAL HANTA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wijayanti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS.

  13. CD40 ligand is pivotal to efficient control of virus replication in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1998-01-01

    + cells and B cells. Our results reveal that the primary activation, clonal expansion, and differentiation of CD8+ T cells does not require expression of CD40L. However, lack of expression results in rapid impairment of CTL responsiveness and failure to permanently control virus replication. This happens...... not only in mice infected with the rapidly spreading virus strain but also at a late stage in mice infected with the strain of more limited potential for spreading. In the latter mice, virus replication is initially controlled very efficiently, but high levels of virus can be detected in the blood...... were infected with one of two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus differing markedly in their capacity to spread in the host. Infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is initially controlled primarily by CD8+ effector cells, whereas long-term immune surveillance also depends upon CD4...

  14. What Is Critical in Critical Language Awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Males, Terry

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the question of what is critical in critical language awareness by drawing on Hans Georg Gadamer's development of the dialectic of experience, historically effected consciousness, and the dialectic of question and answer. The openness found to characterize these three events initiates the space of distance by which the critical instance…

  15. Viral Pathogen Detection by Metagenomics and Pan-Viral Group Polymerase Chain Reaction in Children With Pneumonia Lacking Identifiable Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaberg, Robert; Queen, Krista; Simmon, Keith; Tardif, Keith; Stockmann, Chris; Flygare, Steven; Kennedy, Brett; Voelkerding, Karl; Bramley, Anna; Zhang, Jing; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew T; Tong, Suxiang; Ampofo, Krow

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of pediatric hospitalization. Pathogen identification fails in approximately 20% of children but is critical for optimal treatment and prevention of hospital-acquired infections. We used two broad-spectrum detection strategies to identify pathogens in test-negative children with CAP and asymptomatic controls. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs from 70 children <5 years with CAP of unknown etiology and 90 asymptomatic controls were tested by next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) and pan viral group (PVG) PCR for 19 viral families. Association of viruses with CAP was assessed by adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals controlling for season and age group. RNA-seq/PVG PCR detected previously missed, putative pathogens in 34% of patients. Putative viral pathogens included human parainfluenza virus 4 (aOR 9.3, P = .12), human bocavirus (aOR 9.1, P < .01), Coxsackieviruses (aOR 5.1, P = .09), rhinovirus A (aOR 3.5, P = .34), and rhinovirus C (aOR 2.9, P = .57). RNA-seq was more sensitive for RNA viruses whereas PVG PCR detected more DNA viruses. RNA-seq and PVG PCR identified additional viruses, some known to be pathogenic, in NP/OP specimens from one-third of children hospitalized with CAP without a previously identified etiology. Both broad-range methods could be useful tools in future epidemiologic and diagnostic studies.

  16. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  17. Epstein–Barr virus glycoprotein gM can interact with the cellular protein p32 and knockdown of p32 impairs virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changotra, Harish; Turk, Susan M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Artigues, Antonio [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Thakur, Nagendra; Gore, Mindy; Muggeridge, Martin I. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M., E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The Epstein–Barr virus glycoprotein complex gMgN has been implicated in assembly and release of fully enveloped virus, although the precise role that it plays has not been elucidated. We report here that the long predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required for complex formation and that it interacts with the cellular protein p32, which has been reported to be involved in nuclear egress of human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus. Although redistribution of p32 and colocalization with gM was not observed in virus infected cells, knockdown of p32 expression by siRNA or lentivirus-delivered shRNA recapitulated the phenotype of a virus lacking expression of gNgM. A proportion of virus released from cells sedimented with characteristics of virus lacking an intact envelope and there was an increase in virus trapped in nuclear condensed chromatin. The observations suggest the possibility that p32 may also be involved in nuclear egress of Epstein–Barr virus. - Highlights: • The predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required to complex with gN. • Cellular p32 can interact with the predicted cytoplasmic tail of EBV gM. • Knockdown of p32 recapitulates the phenotype of virus lacking the gNgM complex.

  18. Lamp1 Increases the Efficiency of Lassa Virus Infection by Promoting Fusion in Less Acidic Endosomal Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulseberg, Christine E; Fénéant, Lucie; Szymańska, Katarzyna M; White, Judith M

    2018-01-02

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an arenavirus whose entry into host cells is mediated by a glycoprotein complex (GPC) comprised of a receptor binding subunit, GP1, a fusogenic transmembrane subunit, GP2, and a stable signal peptide. After receptor-mediated internalization, arenaviruses converge in the endocytic pathway, where they are thought to undergo low-pH-triggered, GPC-mediated fusion with a late endosome membrane. A unique feature of LASV entry is a pH-dependent switch from a primary cell surface receptor (α-dystroglycan) to an endosomal receptor, lysosomal-associated membrane protein (Lamp1). Despite evidence that the interaction between LASV GP1 and Lamp1 is critical, the function of Lamp1 in promoting LASV infection remains poorly characterized. Here we used wild-type (WT) and Lamp1 knockout (KO) cells to show that Lamp1 increases the efficiency of, but is not absolutely required for, LASV entry and infection. We then used cell-cell and pseudovirus-cell surface fusion assays to demonstrate that LASV GPC-mediated fusion occurs at a significantly higher pH when Lamp1 is present compared to when Lamp1 is missing. Correspondingly, we found that LASV entry occurs through less acidic endosomes in WT (Lamp1-positive) versus Lamp1 KO cells. We propose that, by elevating the pH threshold for fusion, Lamp1 allows LASV particles to exit the endocytic pathway before they encounter an increasingly acidic and harsh proteolytic environment, which could inactivate a significant percentage of incoming viruses. In this manner Lamp1 increases the overall efficiency of LASV entry and infection. IMPORTANCE Lassa virus is the most clinically important member of the Arenaviridae , a family that includes six additional biosafety level 4 (BSL4) hemorrhagic fever viruses. The lack of specific antiviral therapies for Lassa fever drives an urgent need to identify druggable targets, and interventions that block infection at the entry stage are particularly attractive. Lassa virus is only the

  19. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  20. Virus evolution during chronic hepatitis B virus infection as revealed by ultradeep sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leandro R; Sede, Mariano; Manrique, Julieta M; Quarleri, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    Despite chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (CHB) being a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, HBV evolution during CHB is not fully understood. Recent studies have indicated that virus diversity progressively increases along the course of CHB and that some virus mutations correlate with severe liver conditions such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Using ultradeep sequencing (UDS) data from an intrafamilial case, we detected such mutations at low frequencies among three immunotolerant patients and at high frequencies in an inactive carrier. Furthermore, our analyses indicated that the HBV population from the seroconverter patient underwent many genetic changes in response to virus clearance. Together, these data indicate a potential use of UDS for developing non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring disease changes over time or in response to specific therapies. In addition, our analyses revealed that virus clearance seemed not to require the virus effective population size to decline. A detailed genetic analysis of the viral lineages arising during and after the clearance suggested that mutations at or close to critical elements of the core promoter (enhancer II, epsilon encapsidation signal, TA2, TA3 and direct repeat 1-hormone response element) might be responsible for a sustained replication. This hypothesis requires the decline in virus load to be explained by constant clearance of virus-producing hepatocytes, consistent with the sustained progress towards serious liver conditions experienced by many CHB patients.

  1. The Discovery, Distribution, and Evolution of Viruses Associated with Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Claire L; Waldron, Fergal M; Robertson, Shaun; Crowson, Daisy; Ferrari, Giada; Quintana, Juan F; Brouqui, Jean-Michel; Bayne, Elizabeth H; Longdon, Ben; Buck, Amy H; Lazzaro, Brian P; Akorli, Jewelna; Haddrill, Penelope R; Obbard, Darren J

    2015-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a valuable invertebrate model for viral infection and antiviral immunity, and is a focus for studies of insect-virus coevolution. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify more than 20 previously undetected RNA viruses and a DNA virus associated with wild D. melanogaster. These viruses not only include distant relatives of known insect pathogens but also novel groups of insect-infecting viruses. By sequencing virus-derived small RNAs, we show that the viruses represent active infections of Drosophila. We find that the RNA viruses differ in the number and properties of their small RNAs, and we detect both siRNAs and a novel miRNA from the DNA virus. Analysis of small RNAs also allows us to identify putative viral sequences that lack detectable sequence similarity to known viruses. By surveying >2,000 individually collected wild adult Drosophila we show that more than 30% of D. melanogaster carry a detectable virus, and more than 6% carry multiple viruses. However, despite a high prevalence of the Wolbachia endosymbiont--which is known to be protective against virus infections in Drosophila--we were unable to detect any relationship between the presence of Wolbachia and the presence of any virus. Using publicly available RNA-seq datasets, we show that the community of viruses in Drosophila laboratories is very different from that seen in the wild, but that some of the newly discovered viruses are nevertheless widespread in laboratory lines and are ubiquitous in cell culture. By sequencing viruses from individual wild-collected flies we show that some viruses are shared between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Our results provide an essential evolutionary and ecological context for host-virus interaction in Drosophila, and the newly reported viral sequences will help develop D. melanogaster further as a model for molecular and evolutionary virus research.

  2. Online social networks—Paradise of computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    Online social network services have attracted more and more users in recent years. So the security of social networks becomes a critical problem. In this paper, we propose a virus propagation model based on the application network of Facebook, which is the most popular among these social network service providers. We also study the virus propagation with an email virus model and compare the behaviors of a virus spreading on Facebook with the original email network. It is found that Facebook provides the same chance for a virus spreading while it gives a platform for application developers. And a virus will spread faster in the Facebook network if users of Facebook spend more time on it.

  3. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  4. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  5. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  6. Lack of association of glycated haemoglobin with blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan African communities. However, lack of longitudinal data in these regions prevents adequate analysis of the link between measures of glycaemia and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, we examined the relationships of fasting glucose ...

  7. Population dynamics model for plasmid bearing and plasmid lacking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Population dynamics model for plasmid bearing and plasmid lacking cells for streptokinase production in continuous flow stirred tank bioreactor. Pavan Kumar, Sanjoy Ghosh*. Computational Bioprocess Engineering Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, ...

  8. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  9. Single-virus genomics reveals hidden cosmopolitan and abundant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, Francisco; Fornas, Oscar; Lluesma Gomez, Monica; Bolduc, Benjamin; de la Cruz Peña, Maria Jose; Martínez, Joaquín Martínez; Anton, Josefa; Gasol, Josep M.; Rosselli, Riccardo; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Acinas, Silvia G.; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Microbes drive ecosystems under constraints imposed by viruses. However, a lack of virus genome information hinders our ability to answer fundamental, biological questions concerning microbial communities. Here we apply single-virus genomics (SVGs) to assess whether portions of marine viral communities are missed by current techniques. The majority of the here-identified 44 viral single-amplified genomes (vSAGs) are more abundant in global ocean virome data sets than published metagenome-assembled viral genomes or isolates. This indicates that vSAGs likely best represent the dsDNA viral populations dominating the oceans. Species-specific recruitment patterns and virome simulation data suggest that vSAGs are highly microdiverse and that microdiversity hinders the metagenomic assembly, which could explain why their genomes have not been identified before. Altogether, SVGs enable the discovery of some of the likely most abundant and ecologically relevant marine viral species, such as vSAG 37-F6, which were overlooked by other methodologies. PMID:28643787

  10. Defense Infrastructure: Military Services Lack Reliable Data on Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Military Services Lack Reliable Data on Historic Properties GAO-01-437 Form SF298 Citation Data Report Date ("DD MON YYYY") 00APR2001 Report Type...N/A Dates Covered (from... to) ("DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle DEFENSE INFRASTRUCTURE Military Services Lack Reliable Data on Historic Properties...Defense. The military services do not have complete and reliable data on the number of their historic properties. None of the services have a

  11. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  12. Lack of Innate Interferon Responses during SARS Coronavirus Infection in a Vaccination and Reinfection Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Mark J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Leon, Alberto J.; Cameron, Cheryl M.; Ran, Longsi; Xu, Luoling; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Danesh, Ali; Fang, Yuan; Li, Qianjun; Anderson, Austin; Couch, Ronald C.; Paquette, Stephane G.; Fomukong, Ndingsa G.; Kistner, Otfried; Lauchart, Manfred; Rowe, Thomas; Harrod, Kevin S.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Kelvin, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In terms of its highly pathogenic nature, there remains a significant need to further define the immune pathology of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, as well as identify correlates of immunity to help develop vaccines for severe coronaviral infections. Here we use a SARS-CoV infection-reinfection ferret model and a functional genomics approach to gain insight into SARS immunopathogenesis and to identify correlates of immune protection during SARS-CoV-challenge in ferrets previously infected with SARS-CoV or immunized with a SARS virus vaccine. We identified gene expression signatures in the lungs of ferrets associated with primary immune responses to SARS-CoV infection and in ferrets that received an identical second inoculum. Acute SARS-CoV infection prompted coordinated innate immune responses that were dominated by antiviral IFN response gene (IRG) expression. Reinfected ferrets, however, lacked the integrated expression of IRGs that was prevalent during acute infection. The expression of specific IRGs was also absent upon challenge in ferrets immunized with an inactivated, Al(OH)3-adjuvanted whole virus SARS vaccine candidate that protected them against SARS-CoV infection in the lungs. Lack of IFN-mediated immune enhancement in infected ferrets that were previously inoculated with, or vaccinated against, SARS-CoV revealed 9 IRG correlates of protective immunity. This data provides insight into the molecular pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and SARS-like-CoV infections and is an important resource for the development of CoV antiviral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:23029269

  13. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  14. Sleep neurobiology and critical care illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouot, Xavier; Quentin, Solene

    2015-07-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) environment is not propitious for restoring sleep and many studies have reported that critically ill patients have severe sleep disruptions. However, sleep alterations in critically ill patients are specific and differ significantly from those in ambulatory patients. Polysomnographic patterns of normal sleep are frequently lacking in critically ill patients and the neurobiology of sleep is important to consider regarding alternative methods to quantify sleep in the ICU. This article discusses elements of sleep neurobiology affecting the specificity of sleep patterns and sleep alterations in patients admitted to the ICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent advances on Ebola virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Waheed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2014–2015 Ebola epidemic in West Africa was the largest of its kind, with more than 11 000 deaths and 28 637 cases. The epidemic mobilized a coalition of countries from US to China, European Union, and African countries. The international community was not prepared to face this unprecedented epidemic. Numbers of research groups are working to find a potent vaccine against Ebola. Ebola virus has the ability to dodge the immune system either by blocking interferon production or by glycoprotein-based immune diversion. Individuals who survived from the Ebola virus are facing different health issues after the infection. The rate of miscarriage is also high in Ebola survivors while there are variable reports of the presence of Ebola virus in semen of Ebola survivors. There are many asymptomatic Ebola patients under consideration. West African countries lack the basic healthcare system, for which the actual number of deaths by the Ebola outbreak are much more than the deaths caused by the direct viral infection. The hospitals were empty due to fear and death of nurses and doctors. Millions of children missed the vaccine against measles. Hundreds of thousands of people could not get food. The Ebola epidemic also affected the mental health of people living in endemic countries. The families affected by Ebola are facing discrimination in the society. There is a dire need to adopt United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, which stresses to prepare ourselves to face any national or global health risk.

  16. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lindemann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems.

  17. Computer aided epitope design as a peptide vaccine component against Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Ar-Rafi Md; Imtiaz, Syed Hassan; Zerin, Tasnim; Rahman, Tania; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2017-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an arena virus causing hemorrhagic fever and it is endemic in several regions of West Africa. The disease-causing virus records high mortality rate in endemic regions due to lack of appropriate treatment and prevention strategies. Therefore, it is of interest to design and develop viable vaccine components against the virus. We used the Lassa virus envelope glyco-proteins as a vaccine target to identify linear peptides as potential epitopes with immunogenic properties by computer aided epitope prediction tools. We report a T-cell epitope 'LLGTFTWTL' and a B-cell epitope 'AELKCFGNTAVAKCNE' with predicted potential immunogenicity for further in vivo and in vitro consideration.

  18. Oral immunization and protection of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine.

    OpenAIRE

    Rupprecht, C. E.; Wiktor, T. J.; Johnston, D H; Hamir, A. N.; Dietzschold, B; Wunner, W. H.; Glickman, L T; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Animal rabies control has been frustrated by the existence of multiple wildlife reservoirs and the lack of efficacious oral vaccines. In this investigation, raccoons fed a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus in a sponge bait developed rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (0.6-54.0 units) and resisted street rabies virus infection 28 and 205 days after feeding. Additional raccoons immunized by oral infusion with attenuated antigenic variants of rabies virus strains CVS-11 and ERA fail...

  19. Systematic identification of anti-interferon function on hepatitis C virus genome reveals p7 as an immune evasion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hangfei; Chu, Virginia; Wu, Nicholas C; Chen, Zugen; Truong, Shawna; Brar, Gurpreet; Su, Sheng-Yao; Du, Yushen; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Olson, C Anders; Chen, Shu-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2017-02-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes mechanisms to evade the multilayered antiviral actions of the host immune system. Great progress has been made in elucidating the strategies HCV employs to down-regulate interferon (IFN) production, impede IFN signaling transduction, and impair IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, there is a limited understanding of the mechanisms governing how viral proteins counteract the antiviral functions of downstream IFN effectors due to the lack of an efficient approach to identify such interactions systematically. To study the mechanisms by which HCV antagonizes the IFN responses, we have developed a high-throughput profiling platform that enables mapping of HCV sequences critical for anti-IFN function at high resolution. Genome-wide profiling performed with a 15-nt insertion mutant library of HCV showed that mutations in the p7 region conferred high levels of IFN sensitivity, which could be alleviated by the expression of WT p7 protein. This finding suggests that p7 protein of HCV has an immune evasion function. By screening a liver-specific ISG library, we identified that IFI6-16 significantly inhibits the replication of p7 mutant viruses without affecting WT virus replication. In contrast, knockout of IFI6-16 reversed the IFN hypersensitivity of p7 mutant virus. In addition, p7 was found to be coimmunoprecipitated with IFI6-16 and to counteract the function of IFI6-16 by depolarizing the mitochondria potential. Our data suggest that p7 is a critical immune evasion protein that suppresses the antiviral IFN function by counteracting the function of IFI6-16.

  20. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse

  1. Critical friends and collaborative partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Jandér

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Critical friends: a method for peer feedback The Critical Friend-method has been used in various educational settings to facilitate the process of continuous improvement in teaching. The aim of this study was to implement Critical Friends, and to find out if this method could be used for feedback on teaching as part of a librarians' professional development. The project was carried out within the Library Unit of the Faculty of Medicine at Lund University, Sweden, in collaboration with the faculty's Centre for Teaching and Learning. Seven librarians and an educational consultant from the Centre for Teaching and Learning participated; the educational consultant played an essential role in supervising and structuring the project and the evaluation process, preparing readings as well as being an active participant. The participants worked in pairs; the performance of one teacher and the associated classroom activities were observed by the critical friend, and then evaluated and discussed. Evaluation and results After two preparatory group meetings, a final meeting was held where all pairs reported what they had done and how they perceived the critical friend process. The experiences of the participating librarians were explored using a questionnaire. The questionnaire was analyzed using content analysis by one librarian and the educational consultant independently. The results suggested that use of the critical friend method could have a positive impact by achieving the following: strengthening shared values concerning teaching issues; promoting self-reflection on teaching; facilitating communication with colleagues; and reducing the sense of 'loneliness‘ in teaching. The difficulties in the implementation were lack of time and competing duties. It was perceived as an advantage to work in close partnership with the faculty's educational consultants, who were familiar with the organization.

  2. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  3. Criticizing the Schools, Then and Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Levin

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Schools in many countries are facing intense and elevated levels of criticism, with much debate over whether the criticism is merited. Much of the criticism embodies a view that things used to be better years ago, when schools were not prey to the many defects they are alleged to show today. Recollections of the past may hide a mixed reality. In this article, criticisms of education from 1957 are compared with contemporary criticisms. Some issues have remained important across forty years, while a few new issues have emerged. Criticisms of forty years ago centered on the dominance of "professional educationists," progressivism, the life adjustment movement, the waning "spirit of competition," lax discipline, the lack of emphasis on classical and modern foreign languages, avoidance of science and math, the neglect of gifted children, the lack of training of children in moral and spiritual values, and low academic standards. Today's debates introduce the alleged test score declines, poor performance on international achievement comparisons, the supposed enormous increase in funding without positive results, the problem of high dropout rates, and the need to connect schooling and work. In addition, modern critics point to economic concerns, whether in terms of funding for education or in regard to the contribution of schooling to economic development.

  4. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  5. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  6. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  7. Virus Assembly and Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    We use two techniques to look at three-dimensional virus structure: electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography. Figure 1 is a gallery of virus particles whose structures Timothy Baker, one of my former colleagues at Purdue University, used cryoEM to determine. It illustrates the variety of sizes of icosahedral virus particles. The largest virus particle on this slide is the Herpes simplex virus, around 1200Å in diameter; the smallest we examined was around 250Å in diameter. Viruses bear their genomic information either as positive-sense DNA and RNA, double-strand DNA, double-strand RNA, or negative-strand RNA. Viruses utilize the various structure and function "tactics" seen throughout cell biology to replicate at high levels. Many of the biological principles that we consider general were in fact discovered in the context of viruses ...

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  9. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  10. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  12. West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an infectious disease that first appeared in the United States in 1999. Infected mosquitoes ... and usually go away on their own. If West Nile virus enters the brain, however, it can be life- ...

  13. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  14. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy ...

  15. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  16. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  17. A desktop 3D printer in safety-critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Tórur Biskopstø; Schoeberl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    It is desirable to bring Java technology to safety-critical systems. To this end The Open Group has created the safety-critical Java specification, which will allow Java applications, written according to the specification, to be certifiable in accordance with safety-critical standards. Although...... there exist several safety-critical Java framework implementations, there is a lack of safety-critical use cases implemented according to the specification. In this paper we present a 3D printer and its safety-critical Java level 1 implementation as a use case. With basis in the implementation we evaluate...

  18. ER stress, autophagy, and RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rong eJheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a general term for representing the pathway by which various stimuli affect ER functions. ER stress induces the evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR, which compromises the stimulus and then determines whether the cell survives or dies. In recent years, ongoing research has suggested that these pathways may be linked to the autophagic response, which plays a key role in the cell’s response to various stressors. Autophagy performs a self-digestion function, and its activation protects cells against certain pathogens. However, the link between the UPR and autophagy may be more complicated. These two systems may act dependently, or the induction of one system may interfere with the other. Experimental studies have found that different viruses modulate these mechanisms to allow them to escape the host immune response or, worse, to exploit the host’s defense to their advantage; thus, this topic is a critical area in antiviral research. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about how RNA viruses, including influenza virus, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus 71, Japanese encephalitis virus, hepatitis C virus, and dengue virus, regulate these processes. We also discuss recent discoveries and how these will produce novel strategies for antiviral treatment.

  19. Functional Analysis of Glycosylation of Zika Virus Envelope Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Camila R. Fontes-Garfias; Chao Shan; Huanle Luo; Muruato, Antonio E.; Medeiros, Daniele B.A.; Elizabeth Mays; Xuping Xie; Jing Zou; Roundy, Christopher M; Maki Wakamiya; Rossi, Shannan L.; Tian Wang; Weaver, Scott C.; Pei-Yong Shi

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Zika virus (ZIKV) infection causes devastating congenital abnormities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The ZIKV envelope (E) protein is responsible for viral entry and represents a major determinant for viral pathogenesis. Like other flaviviruses, the ZIKV E protein is glycosylated at amino acid N154. To study the function of E glycosylation, we generated a recombinant N154Q ZIKV that lacks the E glycosylation and analyzed the mutant virus in mammalian and mosquito hosts. In mouse models...

  20. Identification of the structural basis of thermal lability of a virus provides a rationale for improved vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rincón, V.; Rodriguez-Huete, A.; Lopez-Arguello, S.; Ibarra-Molero, B.; Sanchez-Ruiz, J.M.; Harmsen, M.M.; Mateu, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Virus stability and dynamics play critical roles during infection. Some viruses, including foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), are surprisingly prone to thermal dissociation outside the cell. The structural bases and functional implications of this distinctive trait were essentially unknown. This

  1. A lack of material resources causes harsher moral judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitesa, Marko; Thau, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    In the research presented here, we tested the idea that a lack of material resources (e.g., low income) causes people to make harsher moral judgments because a lack of material resources is associated with a lower ability to cope with the effects of others' harmful behavior. Consistent with this idea, results from a large cross-cultural survey (Study 1) showed that both a chronic (due to low income) and a situational (due to inflation) lack of material resources were associated with harsher moral judgments. The effect of inflation was stronger for low-income individuals, whom inflation renders relatively more vulnerable. In a follow-up experiment (Study 2), we manipulated whether participants perceived themselves as lacking material resources by employing different anchors on the scale they used to report their income. The manipulation led participants in the material-resources-lacking condition to make harsher judgments of harmful, but not of nonharmful, transgressions, and this effect was explained by a sense of vulnerability. Alternative explanations were excluded. These results demonstrate a functional and contextually situated nature of moral psychology.

  2. A novel borna disease virus vector system that stably expresses foreign proteins from an intercistronic noncoding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-12-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5' untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions.

  3. A Novel Borna Disease Virus Vector System That Stably Expresses Foreign Proteins from an Intercistronic Noncoding Region▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5′ untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions. PMID:21937656

  4. Ebola Virus Disease – Global Scenario & Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rezwanur Rahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease (EVD, caused by one of the Ebola virus strains is an acute, serious illness which is often fatal when untreated. EVD, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease. It first appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.1,2 On March 23, 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO was notified of an outbreak of EVD in Guinea. On August 8, WHO declared the epidemic to be a ‘Public health emergency of international concern’.3 The current 2014 outbreak in West Africa is the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak.1 It is to be noticed that the most severely affected countries, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have very weak health systems, lacking human and infrastructural resources and these countries recently emerged from long periods of conflict and instability.1 The virus family Filoviridae includes three genera: Cuevavirus, Marburgvirus, and Ebolavirus. Till date five species have been identified: Zaire, Bundibugyo, Sudan, Reston and Taï Forest. The recent outbreak belongs to the Zaire species which is the most lethal one, with an average case fatality rate of 78%.1,4 Till 6 December 2014, total 17,834 suspected cases and 6,678 deaths had been reported; however, WHO has said that these numbers may be vastly underestimated.5 The natural reservoir for Ebola has yet to be confirmed; however, fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the most likely candidate species.1,2,6 Ebola can be transmitted to human through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as fruit bats, chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, etc. Ebola then spreads through human-to-human transmission via direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes with the blood, secretions, organs or

  5. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  6. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus CellBinding to Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike K. S. van Duijl-Richter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  7. Concomitant lack of MMP9 and uPA disturbs physiological tissue remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Nielsen, Boye S; Almholt, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    -type plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation is critical to accomplish normal gestation in mice. Gestation was also affected by simultaneous lack of MMP9 and the uPA receptor (uPAR). Interestingly, uPA-deficiency additionally exacerbated the effect of MMP9-deficiency on bone growth......PAR, when MMP9 is absent. Notably, compensatory upregulation of uPA activity was seen in wounds from MMP9-deficient mice. Taken together, these studies reveal essential functional dependency between MMP9 and uPA during gestation and tissue repair....

  8. Thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodríguez Núñez, A; Fonte, M; Faustino, E V S

    2015-01-01

    ...), data on its incidence and effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis are lacking. To describe the use of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal, and to compare the results with international data...

  9. The relationship between the critical thinking skills and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    participants experience with English academic language proficiency, and that they lack ..... dispositions and behaviours and the relationship of culture to all of these aspects. In order .... Jordanian TEFL graduate students' use of critical thinking.

  10. An Envelope-Modified Tetravalent Dengue Virus-Like-Particle Vaccine Has Implications for Flavivirus Vaccine Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Akane; Ngwe Tun, Mya Myat; Moi, Meng Ling; Sakurai, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Momoko; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Morita, Kouichi; Akahata, Wataru

    2017-12-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) infect 50 to 100 million people each year. The spread of DENV-associated infections is one of the most serious public health problems worldwide, as there is no widely available vaccine or specific therapeutic for DENV infections. To address this, we developed a novel tetravalent dengue vaccine by utilizing virus-like particles (VLPs). We created recombinant DENV1 to -4 (DENV1-4) VLPs by coexpressing precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins, with an F108A mutation in the fusion loop structure of E to increase the production of VLPs in mammalian cells. Immunization with DENV1-4 VLPs as individual, monovalent vaccines elicited strong neutralization activity against each DENV serotype in mice. For use as a tetravalent vaccine, DENV1-4 VLPs elicited high levels of neutralization activity against all four serotypes simultaneously. The neutralization antibody responses induced by the VLPs were significantly higher than those with DNA or recombinant E protein immunization. Moreover, antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) was not observed against any serotype at a 1:10 serum dilution. We also demonstrated that the Zika virus (ZIKV) VLP production level was enhanced by introducing the same F108A mutation into the ZIKV envelope protein. Taken together, these results suggest that our strategy for DENV VLP production is applicable to other flavivirus VLP vaccine development, due to the similarity in viral structures, and they describe the promising development of an effective tetravalent vaccine against the prevalent flavivirus.IMPORTANCE Dengue virus poses one of the most serious public health problems worldwide, and the incidence of diseases caused by the virus has increased dramatically. Despite decades of effort, there is no effective treatment against dengue. A safe and potent vaccine against dengue is still needed. We developed a novel tetravalent dengue vaccine by using virus-like particles (VLPs), which are noninfectious because they lack

  11. Immunology of Bats and Their Viruses: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Schountz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoir hosts of several high-impact viruses that cause significant human diseases, including Nipah virus, Marburg virus and rabies virus. They also harbor many other viruses that are thought to have caused disease in humans after spillover into intermediate hosts, including SARS and MERS coronaviruses. As is usual with reservoir hosts, these viruses apparently cause little or no pathology in bats. Despite the importance of bats as reservoir hosts of zoonotic and potentially zoonotic agents, virtually nothing is known about the host/virus relationships; principally because few colonies of bats are available for experimental infections, a lack of reagents, methods and expertise for studying bat antiviral responses and immunology, and the difficulty of conducting meaningful field work. These challenges can be addressed, in part, with new technologies that are species-independent that can provide insight into the interactions of bats and viruses, which should clarify how the viruses persist in nature, and what risk factors might facilitate transmission to humans and livestock.

  12. Hendra virus infection dynamics in Australian fruit bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Hume; de Jong, Carol; Melville, Deb; Smith, Craig; Smith, Ina; Broos, Alice; Kung, Yu Hsin Nina; McLaughlin, Amanda; Zeddeman, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Hendra virus is a recently emerged zoonotic agent in Australia. Since first described in 1994, the virus has spilled from its wildlife reservoir (pteropid fruit bats, or 'flying foxes') on multiple occasions causing equine and human fatalities. We undertook a three-year longitudinal study to detect virus in the urine of free-living flying foxes (a putative route of excretion) to investigate Hendra virus infection dynamics. Pooled urine samples collected off plastic sheets placed beneath roosting flying foxes were screened for Hendra virus genome by quantitative RT-PCR, using a set of primers and probe derived from the matrix protein gene. A total of 1672 pooled urine samples from 67 sampling events was collected and tested between 1 July 2008 and 30 June 2011, with 25% of sampling events and 2.5% of urine samples yielding detections. The proportion of positive samples was statistically associated with year and location. The findings indicate that Hendra virus excretion occurs periodically rather than continuously, and in geographically disparate flying fox populations in the state of Queensland. The lack of any detection in the Northern Territory suggests prevalence may vary across the range of flying foxes in Australia. Finally, our findings suggest that flying foxes can excrete virus at any time of year, and that the apparent seasonal clustering of Hendra virus incidents in horses and associated humans (70% have occurred June to October) reflects factors other than the presence of virus. Identification of these factors will strengthen risk minimization strategies for horses and ultimately humans.

  13. Viral nanoparticles, noble metal decorated viruses and their nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Ignác

    2015-08-01

    Virus-based nanotechnology has generated interest in a number of applications due to the specificity of virus interaction with inorganic and organic nanoparticles. A well-defined structure of virus due to its multifunctional proteinaceous shell (capsid) surrounding genomic material is a promising approach to obtain nanostructured materials. Viruses hold great promise in assembling and interconnecting novel nanosized components, allowing to develop organized nanoparticle assemblies. Due to their size, monodispersity, and variety of chemical groups available for modification, they make a good scaffold for molecular assembly into nanoscale devices. Virus based nanocomposites are useful as an engineering material for the construction of smart nanoobjects because of their ability to associate into desired structures including a number of morphologies. Viruses exhibit the characteristics of an ideal template for the formation of nanoconjugates with noble metal nanoparticles. These bioinspired systems form monodispersed units that are highly amenable through genetic and chemical modifications. As nanoscale assemblies, viruses have sophisticated yet highly ordered structural features, which, in many cases, have been carefully characterized by modern structural biological methods. Plant viruses are increasingly being used for nanobiotechnology purposes because of their relative structural and chemical stability, ease of production, multifunctionality and lack of toxicity and pathogenicity in animals or humans. The multifunctional viruses interact with nanoparticles and other functional additives to the generation of bioconjugates with different properties – possible antiviral and antibacterial activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative study of minimal fresh gas flow used in Lack-Plus and Lack's circuit in spontaneously breathing anesthetized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerapongpakdee, Sunchai; Sathitkarnmanee, Thepakorn; Tribuddharat, Sirirat; Sucher, Siwalai; Thananun, Maneerat; Nonlhaopol, Duangthida

    2016-01-01

    The Lack's circuit is a co-axial Mapleson A breathing system commonly used in spontaneously breathing anesthetized adults but still requires high fresh gas flow (FGF). The Lack-Plus circuit was invented with the advantage of lower FGF requirement. The authors compared the Lack-Plus and Lack's circuit for the minimal FGF requirement with no rebreathing in spontaneously breathing anesthetized adults. This was a randomized crossover study. We enrolled 24 adult patients undergoing supine elective surgery, with a body mass index ≤30 kg/m 2 and an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II. They were randomly allocated to group 1 (LP-L) starting with Lack-Plus then switching to Lack's circuit or group 2 (L-LP) (with the reverse pattern). After induction and intubation, anesthesia was maintained with 50% N 2 O/O 2 and desflurane (4%-6%) plus fentanyl titration to maintain an optimal respiratory rate between 10 and 16/min. Starting with the first circuit, all the patients were spontaneously breathing with a FGF of 4 L/min for 10 min, gradually decreased by 0.5 L/min every 5 min until FGF was 2.5 L/min. End-tidal CO 2 , inspired minimum CO 2 (ImCO 2 ), mean arterial pressure, and oxygen saturation were recorded until rebreathing (ImCO 2 >0 mmHg) occurred. The alternate anesthesia breathing circuit was used and the measurements were repeated. The respective minimal FGF at the point of rebreathing for the Lack-Plus and Lack's circuit was 2.7±0.8 and 3.3±0.5 L/min, respectively, p <0.001. At an FGF of 2.5 L/min, the respective ImCO 2 was 1.5±2.0 and 4.2±2.6 mmHg, respectively, p <0.001. The Lack-Plus circuit can be used safely and effectively, and it requires less FGF than Lack's circuit in spontaneously breathing anesthetized adults.

  15. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  16. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  17. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  18. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  19. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  20. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  1. Freeze-drying of live virus vaccines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L J J; Daoussi, R; Vervaet, C; Remon, J-P; De Beer, T R M

    2015-10-13

    Freeze-drying is the preferred method for stabilizing live, attenuated virus vaccines. After decades of research on several aspects of the process like the stabilization and destabilization mechanisms of the live, attenuated viruses during freeze-drying, the optimal formulation components and process settings are still matter of research. The molecular complexity of live, attenuated viruses, the multiple destabilization pathways and the lack of analytical techniques allowing the measurement of physicochemical changes in the antigen's structure during and after freeze-drying mean that they form a particular lyophilization challenge. The purpose of this review is to overview the available information on the development of the freeze-drying process of live, attenuated virus vaccines, herewith focusing on the freezing and drying stresses the viruses can undergo during processing as well as on the mechanisms and strategies (formulation and process) that are used to stabilize them during freeze-drying. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  3. Nonadherence is Associated with Lack of HIV-Related Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrehave, Charlotte; Rasmussen, Dlama Nggida; Hønge, Bo Langhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor treatment adherence is a main barrier for effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally. HIV-related knowledge may affect understanding and utilization of HIV medical information, hence limited health literacy is a known barrier to treatment adherence. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cro...... effects, food insecurity, and simply forgetting. Lack of HIV-related knowledge about ART and HIV may be a barrier to nonadherence.......% skipped their medicine during weekends. The most frequent reasons for not taking medicine were simply forgetting, side effects, lack of food, and being too ill to attend the clinic. Nonadherent patients had a lower level of HIV-related knowledge. CONCLUSION: Main barriers for nonadherence were side...

  4. Impaired intestinal proglucagon processing in mice lacking prohormone convertase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugleholdt, Randi; Zhu, Xiaorong; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2003-01-01

    The neuroendocrine prohormone convertases 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2) are expressed in endocrine intestinal L cells and pancreatic A cells, respectively, and colocalize with proglucagon in secretory granules. Mice lacking PC2 have multiple endocrinopathies and cannot process proglucagon to mature...... glucagon in the pancreas. Disruption of PC1 results in dwarfism and also multiple neuroendocrine peptide processing defects. This study compares the pancreatic and intestinal processing of proglucagon in mice lacking PC1 expression with that in age-matched wild-type controls. Because proglucagon was found...

  5. Parallel evaluation of broad virus detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrof, Jens; Berting, Andreas; Kreil, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The testing for adventitious viruses is of critical importance during development and production of biological products. The recent emergence and ongoing development of broad virus detection methods calls for an evaluation of whether these methods can appropriately be implemented into current adventitious agent testing procedures. To assess the suitability of several broad virus detection methods, a comparative experimental study was conducted: four virus preparations, which were spiked at two different concentrations each into two different cell culture media, were sent to four investigators in a blinded fashion for analysis with broad virus detection methods such as polymerase chain reaction-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS), microarray, and two approaches utilizing massively parallel sequencing. The results that were reported by the investigators revealed that all methods were able to identify the majority of samples correctly (mean 83%), with a surprisingly narrow range among the methods, that is, between 72% (PCR-ESI/MS) and 95% (microarray). In addition to the correct results, a variety of unexpected assignments were reported for a minority of samples, again with little variation regarding the methods used (range 20-45%), while false negatives were reported for 0-25% of the samples. Regarding assay sensitivity, the viruses were detected by all methods included in this study at concentrations of about 4-5 log10 quantitative PCR copies/mL, and probably with higher sensitivity in some cases. In summary, the broad virus detection methods investigated were shown to be suitable even for detection of relatively low virus concentrations. However, there is also some potential for the production of false-positive as well as false-negative assignments, which indicates the requirement for further improvements before these methods can be considered for routine use. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  6. Interferon-lambda contributes to innate immunity of mice against influenza A virus but not against hepatotropic viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Mordstein

    Full Text Available Virus-infected cells secrete a broad range of interferon (IFN subtypes which in turn trigger the synthesis of antiviral factors that confer host resistance. IFN-alpha, IFN-beta and other type I IFNs signal through a common universally expressed cell surface receptor, whereas IFN-lambda uses a distinct receptor complex for signaling that is not present on all cell types. Since type I IFN receptor-deficient mice (IFNAR1(0/0 exhibit greatly increased susceptibility to various viral diseases, it remained unclear to which degree IFN-lambda might contribute to innate immunity. To address this issue we performed influenza A virus infections of mice which carry functional alleles of the influenza virus resistance gene Mx1 and which, therefore, develop a more complete innate immune response to influenza viruses than standard laboratory mice. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of IFN-lambda readily induced the antiviral factor Mx1 in mouse lungs and efficiently protected IFNAR1(0/0 mice from lethal influenza virus infection. By contrast, intraperitoneal application of IFN-lambda failed to induce Mx1 in the liver of IFNAR1(0/0 mice and did not protect against hepatotropic virus infections. Mice lacking functional IFN-lambda receptors were only slightly more susceptible to influenza virus than wild-type mice. However, mice lacking functional receptors for both IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-lambda were hypersensitive and even failed to restrict usually non-pathogenic influenza virus mutants lacking the IFN-antagonistic factor NS1. Interestingly, the double-knockout mice were not more susceptible against hepatotropic viruses than IFNAR1(0/0 mice. From these results we conclude that IFN-lambda contributes to inborn resistance against viral pathogens infecting the lung but not the liver.

  7. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  8. Molecular Mechanism for LAMP1 Recognition by Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Cohen, Nadav; Israeli, Hadar; Diskin, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Lassa virus is a notorious human pathogen that infects many thousands of people each year in West Africa, causing severe viral hemorrhagic fevers and significant mortality. The surface glycoprotein of Lassa virus mediates receptor recognition through its GP1 subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of GP1 from Lassa virus, which is the first representative GP1 structure for Old World arenaviruses. We identify a unique triad of histidines that forms a binding site for LAMP1, a known lysosomal protein recently discovered to be a critical receptor for internalized Lassa virus at acidic pH. We demonstrate that mutation of this histidine triad, which is highly conserved among Old World arenaviruses, impairs LAMP1 recognition. Our biochemical and structural data further suggest that GP1 from Lassa virus may undergo irreversible conformational changes that could serve as an immunological decoy mechanism. Together with a variable region that we identify on the surface of GP1, those could be two distinct mechanisms that Lassa virus utilizes to avoid antibody-based immune response. Structural data at atomic resolution for viral proteins is key for understanding their function at the molecular level and can facilitate novel avenues for combating viral infections. Here we used X-ray protein crystallography to decipher the crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain (GP1) from Lassa virus. This is a pathogenic virus that causes significant illness and mortality in West Africa. This structure reveals the overall architecture of GP1 domains from the group of viruses known as the Old World arenaviruses. Using this structural information, we elucidated the mechanisms for pH switch and binding of Lassa virus to LAMP1, a recently identified host receptor that is critical for successful infection. Lastly, our structural analysis suggests two novel immune evasion mechanisms that Lassa virus may utilize to escape antibody-based immune response. Copyright © 2015, American

  9. Lack of delta waves and sleep disturbances during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice lacking alpha1G-subunit of T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungryun; Kim, Daesoo; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2004-12-28

    T-type calcium channels have been implicated as a pacemaker for brain rhythms during sleep but their contribution to behavioral states of sleep has been relatively uncertain. Here, we found that mice lacking alpha1(G) T-type Ca(2+) channels showed a loss of the thalamic delta (1-4 Hz) waves and a reduction of sleep spindles (7-14 Hz), whereas slow (sleep. Analysis of sleep disturbances, as defined by the occurrence of brief awakening (BA) episodes during NREM sleep, revealed that mutant mice exhibited a higher incidence of BAs of >16 sec compared with the wild-type, whereas no difference was seen in BAs of sleep spindles from cortically generated slow waves. These results also suggest that the alpha1(G)-subunit of T-type calcium channels plays a critical role in the genesis of thalamocortical oscillations and contributes to the modulation of sleep states and the transition between NREM sleep and wake states.

  10. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of Reston Ebola Virus VP35 Interferon Inhibitory Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Daisy W.; Shabman, Reed S.; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Wang, Tianjiao; Mühlberger, Elke; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Sinai); (BU-M); (Iowa State); (UTSMC)

    2010-09-21

    Ebolaviruses are causative agents of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the filoviruses characterized thus far, Reston Ebola virus (REBOV) is the only Ebola virus that is nonpathogenic to humans despite the fact that REBOV can cause lethal disease in nonhuman primates. Previous studies also suggest that REBOV is less effective at inhibiting host innate immune responses than Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) or Marburg virus. Virally encoded VP35 protein is critical for immune suppression, but an understanding of the relative contributions of VP35 proteins from REBOV and other filoviruses is currently lacking. In order to address this question, we characterized the REBOV VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) using structural, biochemical, and virological studies. These studies reveal differences in double-stranded RNA binding and interferon inhibition between the two species. These observed differences are likely due to increased stability and loss of flexibility in REBOV VP35 IID, as demonstrated by thermal shift stability assays. Consistent with this finding, the 1.71-{angstrom} crystal structure of REBOV VP35 IID reveals that it is highly similar to that of ZEBOV VP35 IID, with an overall backbone r.m.s.d. of 0.64 {angstrom}, but contains an additional helical element at the linker between the two subdomains of VP35 IID. Mutations near the linker, including swapping sequences between REBOV and ZEBOV, reveal that the linker sequence has limited tolerance for variability. Together with the previously solved ligand-free and double-stranded-RNA-bound forms of ZEBOV VP35 IID structures, our current studies on REBOV VP35 IID reinforce the importance of VP35 in immune suppression. Functional differences observed between REBOV and ZEBOV VP35 proteins may contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, but these are unlikely to be the major determinant. However, the high level of similarity in structure and the low tolerance for sequence

  12. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  13. Structural Determinants of Criticality in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eValverde

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behaviour in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organisation can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system towards criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  14. Similarities and differences in conceptualizing critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the core similarities and differences in conceptualizing critical thinking. The framework of analysis refers to conceptions of leading critical thinking theorists: Ennis, Siegel, Paul, McPeck and Lipman. Two key questions are in the focus of consideration: which are the defining characteristics of critical thinking, distinguishing it from other types of thinking, and what are its constituents. The nature of identified differences has lead to a dilemma whether critical thinking skills are generalized or domain specific, as well as to the question regarding the role of noncognitive critical thinking dispositions. We also discuss the relation between the dominant approach founded in informal logic and epistemological conceptions that expanded the meaning of critical thinking by elaborating its reflective, dialectical and dialogical dimensions. The prevailing view that emphasizes the pragmatic purpose of critical thinking is contrasted with the competing Endeavour to base and justify its purpose in the concept of emancipatory rationality. The analysis outcomes suggest that, in spite of the lack of a consistent theoretical framework, competing conceptions do share some core principles, especially with respect to the distinctive features of critical thinking. However, there are deep and intrinsic differences regarding the nature of critical thinking standards and constituents, which can probably be attributed to complex and multidiscoursive nature of the concept itself. .

  15. Leader as critical thinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Judith A

    2002-01-01

    A leader possess the critical-thinking knowledge and skills that provide the framework from which complex problem solving evolves. This article explores the leader as critical thinker, including a progressive plan for integrating critical-thinking concepts and associated teaching strategies into the RN to BSN and graduate curricula. To improve the critical thinking of nurses, educators must emphasize the cognitive and disposition aspects of critical thinking; promote active and sequential learning; role model critical thinking; design practical that focus on leadership and critical thinking; and conduct valid and consistent evaluations. The acquisition and application of critical thinking and problem-solving skills are progressive and refined through life-long learning and experience. This expertise begins with a sound knowledge base of the critical thinking composite and problem-solving strategies.

  16. Reactivation of latent viruses after treatment with biological therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asthana AK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Anil Kumar Asthana,1 John Samuel Lubel2,31Department of Gastroenterology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, 2Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Eastern Health, 3Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaAbstract: Biological therapies are used extensively for malignant (eg, lymphoma and autoimmune (eg, rheumatoid arthritis conditions. These agents include anti-tumor necrosis factor antagonists, such as infliximab, and B-cell-depleting therapies, such as rituximab. In the past decade, there has been an explosion in the types and numbers of agents being used. One of the known risks with these agents is infection. In particular, there is increasing awareness regarding latent virus reactivation. This occurs when a latent virus is reactivated into its active replicative phase as a result of an internal or external trigger, such as immunosuppression. It is challenging, however, to quantitatively attribute the risk of reactivation to biological therapy alone because the underlying malignant or autoimmune condition could also be a contributing factor. There is well documented evidence regarding the reactivation of viruses such as hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus with drugs such as rituximab. Long-term data are lacking; such data are essential to guide risk stratification and chemoprophylaxis. Universally accepted viral screening guidelines prior to commencement of immunosuppression are lacking. As an example, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have published recommendations regarding hepatitis B virus screening prior to commencing immunosuppression, but this action has not translated into universally accepted guidelines. Some of the other relevant viruses involved include cytomegalovirus, hepatitis C virus, varicella zoster virus, Epstein–Barr virus, and other members of the herpes family. This article reviews the current literature on the risk of latent viral reactivation with biological

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  18. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  19. Primuline Derivatives That Mimic RNA to Stimulate Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase-catalyzed ATP Hydrolysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Noreena L.; Shadrick, William R.; Mukherjee, Sourav; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Frick, David N.

    2013-01-01

    ATP hydrolysis fuels the ability of helicases and related proteins to translocate on nucleic acids and separate base pairs. As a consequence, nucleic acid binding stimulates the rate at which a helicase catalyzes ATP hydrolysis. In this study, we searched a library of small molecule helicase inhibitors for compounds that stimulate ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase, which is an important antiviral drug target. Two compounds were found that stimulate HCV helicase-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis, both of which are amide derivatives synthesized from the main component of the yellow dye primuline. Both compounds possess a terminal pyridine moiety, which was critical for stimulation. Analogs lacking a terminal pyridine inhibited HCV helicase catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other HCV helicase inhibitors, the stimulatory compounds differentiate between helicases isolated from various HCV genotypes and related viruses. The compounds only stimulated ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by NS3 purified from HCV genotype 1b. They inhibited helicases from other HCV genotypes (e.g. 1a and 2a) or related flaviviruses (e.g. Dengue virus). The stimulatory compounds interacted with HCV helicase in the absence of ATP with dissociation constants of about 2 μm. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that the stimulatory compounds bind in the HCV helicase RNA-binding cleft near key residues Arg-393, Glu-493, and Ser-231. PMID:23703611

  20. Lack of pre-antiretroviral care and competition from traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) to initiate ART very late. Lack of family support tripled the risk of initiating ART very late (AOR 3.3, 95% CI: 1.6-6.6). Conclusion: Policy makers should prevent ARV stock-outs though effective ARV procurement and supply chain management.

  1. Bordetella pertussis Strain Lacking Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Margaret M; Sen, Kathryn; Weigand, Michael R; Skoff, Tami H; Cunningham, Victoria A; Halse, Tanya A; Tondella, M Lucia

    2016-02-01

    A Bordetella pertussis strain lacking 2 acellular vaccine immunogens, pertussis toxin and pertactin, was isolated from an unvaccinated infant in New York State in 2013. Comparison with a French strain that was pertussis toxin-deficient, pertactin wild-type showed that the strains carry the same 28-kb deletion in similar genomes.

  2. Lack of association of glycated haemoglobin with blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Original Research: Lack of association of glycated haemoglobin with blood pressure and subclinical atherosclerosis. 148 ..... A-HP meds: anti-hypertensive medication, β: beta, DPB: diastolic blood pressure, GGT: gamma glutamyl transferase, HDL: high-density lipoprotein, M: men, PP: pulse pressure, SBP:.

  3. Protection from obesity in mice lacking the VLDL receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, J.R.; Tacken, P.J.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Dijk, K.W. van; Havekes, L.M.; Jong, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been reported that mice lacking the VLDL receptor (VLDLR-/-) exhibit normal plasma lipid levels and a modest decrease in adipose tissue mass. In the present study, the effect of VLDLR deficiency on profound weight gain was studied in mice. Obesity was induced either by feeding of a

  4. Siim Nestor soovitab : lack of Eoins / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    Väikefirma Seksound annab sel nädalavahetusel välja Viljandi indiebändi Lack of Eoins esikplaadi "Echo Group" (plaadiesitlused 11. dets. Tallinnas Von Krahlis ja 12. dets. Tartus Genialistide klubis, esinevad ka Ans. Andur ja Popidiot, plaate keerutavad Hannes Praks ja Taavi Laatsit)

  5. Media lacking nrmen fluid for enumeration of rumen bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rumen population, cellulolytic bacteria, amylolytic bacteria. Introduction. Media containing rumen fluid are unsuitable as niche- simulating media because their composition cannot be ade- quately and repeatably defined. A semi-defined culture medium for enumerating rumen bacteria is described. This medium lacks rumen ...

  6. Lack of peaceful resolution with Israel: economic cost for Palestinians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.C. de Boer (Paul)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe propose to estimate the economic cost for Palestine and for Palestinian residents due to the lack of peaceful resolution with Israel. Thereto we make use of the consensus estimates of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank (WB) of real growth rates of economic

  7. Special Relativity in Week One: 4) Lack of Simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    This is our final article on teaching special relativity in the first week of an introductory physics course. One of the profound changes in our view of the world was Einstein's discovery of the lack of simultaneity. He illustrated this result with a thought experiment in which we observe a railroad car passing by us. We see the two ends of the…

  8. Political Anger: The Basis for Contemporary Lack of Civility in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Political Anger: The Basis for Contemporary Lack of Civility in Nigerian Politics. ... Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research ... This paper argued that high stakes in politics, limited avenues for ventilating anger, the tendency to focus on majority ethnic groups while leaving the minority, conflict of interest and personality ...

  9. The evolution of culture (or the lack thereof): mapping the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAGHAVENDRA GADAGKAR

    2017-07-17

    Jul 17, 2017 ... Abstract. This short essay is based on a lecture that I gave at short notice on a subject in which I am by no means an expert. The combination of lack of expertise and time for preparation, created an unexpectedly unique opportunity for thinking outside the box. I decided not to try to read up (as there was no ...

  10. Lack of Emphasis on Nutrition in Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Suanne

    The need and concern for the apparent lack of nutrition education provided in training programs for physicians was the impetus for begining a 10-session nutrition lecture series program. The program was developed and implemented in a large teaching medical center hospital and given to 16 third-year medical students. The program's purpose was to…

  11. The Role of Innate Immunity in Conditioning Mosquito Susceptibility to West Nile Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek N. Prasad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses represent an emerging threat to human and livestock health globally. In particular, those transmitted by mosquitoes present the greatest challenges to disease control efforts. An understanding of the molecular basis for mosquito innate immunity to arbovirus infection is therefore critical to investigations regarding arbovirus evolution, virus-vector ecology, and mosquito vector competence. In this review, we discuss the current state of understanding regarding mosquito innate immunity to West Nile virus. We draw from the literature with respect to other virus-vector pairings to attempt to draw inferences to gaps in our knowledge about West Nile virus and relevant vectors.

  12. The role of innate immunity in conditioning mosquito susceptibility to West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Abhishek N; Brackney, Doug E; Ebel, Gregory D

    2013-12-13

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) represent an emerging threat to human and livestock health globally. In particular, those transmitted by mosquitoes present the greatest challenges to disease control efforts. An understanding of the molecular basis for mosquito innate immunity to arbovirus infection is therefore critical to investigations regarding arbovirus evolution, virus-vector ecology, and mosquito vector competence. In this review, we discuss the current state of understanding regarding mosquito innate immunity to West Nile virus. We draw from the literature with respect to other virus-vector pairings to attempt to draw inferences to gaps in our knowledge about West Nile virus and relevant vectors.

  13. Conflicting selective forces affect T cell receptor contacts in an immunodominant human immunodeficiency virus epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Learn, Gerald H

    2006-01-01

    variant(s) prevailed in the virus population. The pathways notably influenced the amount of plasma virus, as patients with efficient CTL selection had lower plasma viral loads than did patients without efficient selection. Thus, viral escape from CTL responses does not necessarily correlate with disease......Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are critical for the control of human immunodeficiency virus, but containment of virus replication can be undermined by mutations in CTL epitopes that lead to virus escape. We analyzed the evolution in vivo of an immunodominant, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope and found...

  14. Dengue virus purification and sample preparation for cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joanne L; Lok, Shee Mei

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a valuable tool used to study the structures of icosahedral viruses without having to resort to crystallization. During the last few decades, significant progress has been made where virus structures previously resolved only to low resolution have now breached the sub-nanometer threshold. Critical to such excellent results are the acquisition of highly purified virus samples and well-frozen samples in vitreous ice. With the virus particles locked in their native conformations, cryo-EM together with single-particle analysis can then be deployed to study the structures of the viruses in their fully hydrated states.

  15. Could the Ebola Virus Matrix Protein VP40 be a Drug Target?

    OpenAIRE

    Stahelin, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Filoviruses are filamentous lipid enveloped viruses and include Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg, which are morphologically identical but antigenically distinct. These viruses can be very deadly with outbreaks of EBOV having clinical fatality as high as 90%. In 2012 there were two separate Ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda that resulted in 25 and 4 fatalities, respectively. The lack of preventive vaccines and FDA approved therapeutics has struck fear that the Ebola virus ...

  16. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Collection of Viable Aerosolized Influenza Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses in a Student Health Care Center through Water-Based Condensation Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Maohua; Bonny, Tania S; Loeb, Julia; Jiang, Xiao; Lednicky, John A; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Hering, Susanne; Fan, Z Hugh; Wu, Chang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and significance of aerosol transmission of respiratory viruses are still controversial, for the major reasons that virus aerosols are inefficiently collected by commonly used air samplers and that the collected viruses are inactivated by the collection method. Without knowledge of virus viability, infection risk analyses lack accuracy. This pilot study was performed to (i) determine whether infectious (viable) respiratory viruses in aerosols could be collected from air in a real world environment by the viable virus aerosol sampler (VIVAS), (ii) compare and contrast the efficacy of the standard bioaerosol sampler, the BioSampler, with that of the VIVAS for the collection of airborne viruses in a real world environment, and (iii) gain insights for the use of the VIVAS for respiratory virus sampling. The VIVAS operates via a water vapor condensation process to enlarge aerosolized virus particles to facilitate their capture. A variety of viable human respiratory viruses, including influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses and influenza B viruses, were collected by the VIVAS located at least 2 m from seated patients, during a late-onset 2016 influenza virus outbreak. Whereas the BioSampler when operated following our optimized parameters also collected virus aerosols, it was nevertheless overall less successful based on a lower frequency of virus isolation in most cases. This side-by-side comparison highlights some limitations of past studies based on impingement-based sampling, which may have generated false-negative results due to either poor collection efficiency and/or virus inactivation due to the collection process. IMPORTANCE The significance of virus aerosols in the natural transmission of respiratory diseases has been a contentious issue, primarily because it is difficult to collect or sample virus aerosols using currently available air sampling devices. We tested a new air sampler based on water vapor condensation for efficient sampling of viable

  18. The Regulation of Autophagy by Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a dreadful pathogen of animals and humans, causing widespread infection and severe morbidity and mortality. It is essential to characterize the influenza A virus-host interaction and develop efficient counter measures against the viral infection. Autophagy is known as a catabolic process for the recycling of the cytoplasmic macromolecules. Recently, it has been shown that autophagy is a critical mechanism underlying the interaction between influenza A virus and its host. Autophagy can be induced by the infection with influenza A virus, which is considered as a necessary process for the viral proliferation, including the accumulation of viral elements during the replication of influenza A virus. On the other hand, influenza A virus can inhibit the autophagic formation via interaction with the autophagy-related genes (Atg and signaling pathways. In addition, autophagy is involved in the influenza virus-regulated cell deaths, leading to significant changes in host apoptosis. Interestingly, the high pathogenic strains of influenza A virus, such as H5N1, stimulate autophagic cell death and appear to interplay with the autophagy in distinct ways as compared with low pathogenic strains. This review discusses the regulation of autophagy, an influenza A virus driven process.

  19. Evolution of mutational robustness in an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Montville

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutational (genetic robustness is phenotypic constancy in the face of mutational changes to the genome. Robustness is critical to the understanding of evolution because phenotypically expressed genetic variation is the fuel of natural selection. Nonetheless, the evidence for adaptive evolution of mutational robustness in biological populations is controversial. Robustness should be selectively favored when mutation rates are high, a common feature of RNA viruses. However, selection for robustness may be relaxed under virus co-infection because complementation between virus genotypes can buffer mutational effects. We therefore hypothesized that selection for genetic robustness in viruses will be weakened with increasing frequency of co-infection. To test this idea, we used populations of RNA phage phi6 that were experimentally evolved at low and high levels of co-infection and subjected lineages of these viruses to mutation accumulation through population bottlenecking. The data demonstrate that viruses evolved under high co-infection show relatively greater mean magnitude and variance in the fitness changes generated by addition of random mutations, confirming our hypothesis that they experience weakened selection for robustness. Our study further suggests that co-infection of host cells may be advantageous to RNA viruses only in the short term. In addition, we observed higher mutation frequencies in the more robust viruses, indicating that evolution of robustness might foster less-accurate genome replication in RNA viruses.

  20. Critical thinking: Not all that critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Dietrick Price

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical Thinking basically says to be suspicious of everything, except the fad known as Critical Thinking. It is perhaps best understood as a new and watered-down version of an earlier fad called Deconstruction. That was just a fancy word for debunking. After you strip away all the high-minded rhetoric, Critical Thinking is typically used to tell students that they should not trust conventional wisdom, tradition, religion, parents, and all that irrelevant, old-fashioned stuff. Critical Thinking, somewhat surprisingly, also turns out to be highly contemptuous of facts and knowledge. The formulation in public schools goes like this: children must learn how to think, not what to think. WHAT is, of course, all the academic content and scholarly knowledge that schools used to teach.

  1. 50-plus years of fungal viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabrial, Said A., E-mail: saghab00@email.uky.edu [Plant Pathology Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Castón, José R. [Department of Structure of Macromolecules, Centro Nacional Biotecnologıa/CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Jiang, Daohong [State Key Lab of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China); Nibert, Max L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Mycoviruses are widespread in all major taxa of fungi. They are transmitted intracellularly during cell division, sporogenesis, and/or cell-to-cell fusion (hyphal anastomosis), and thus their life cycles generally lack an extracellular phase. Their natural host ranges are limited to individuals within the same or closely related vegetative compatibility groups, although recent advances have established expanded experimental host ranges for some mycoviruses. Most known mycoviruses have dsRNA genomes packaged in isometric particles, but an increasing number of positive- or negative-strand ssRNA and ssDNA viruses have been isolated and characterized. Although many mycoviruses do not have marked effects on their hosts, those that reduce the virulence of their phytopathogenic fungal hosts are of considerable interest for development of novel biocontrol strategies. Mycoviruses that infect endophytic fungi and those that encode killer toxins are also of special interest. Structural analyses of mycoviruses have promoted better understanding of virus assembly, function, and evolution. - Highlights: • Historical perspective of fungal virus research. • Description, classification and diversity of fungal virus families. • Structural features of fungal virus particles. • Hypovirulence and exploitation of mycoviruses in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi.

  2. Physician use of updated anti-virus software in a tertiary Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Busy schedule, 40(33.9%) and lack of credit card 39(33.1%) were perceived barriers to updating antivirus software. The use of regularly updated anti-virus software is sub-optimal among physicians implying vulnerability to computer viruses. Physicians should be careful with flash drives and should avoid being victims of the ...

  3. Comprehensive analysis of varicella-zoster virus proteins using a new monoclonal antibody collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Roviš (Tihana Lenac); S.M. Bailer (Susanne); V.R. Pothineni (Venkata R); W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner ); H. Šimić (Hrvoje); M. Babić (Marina); K. Miklić (Karmela); S. Malić (Suzana); M.C. Verweij; M. Baiker (Martin); O. Gonzalez (Orland); A. Brunn (Albrecht von); R. Zimmer; K. Früh (Klaus); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); S. Jonjic (Stipan); J. Haasb (Jürgeni)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractVaricella-zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of chickenpox and shingles. Due to the virus's restricted host and cell typetropism and the lack of tools for VZV proteomics, it is one of the least-characterized human herpesviruses. We generated 251monoclonal antibodies (MAbs)

  4. Putting the Critical Back in Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    interpreted their roles and priorities while still remaining true to the law of the land and national supremacy as demanded by the supremacy clause in...anonymous online survey to capture the perceptions and views of critical infrastructure professionals across the nation. The survey included an evaluation...resilience, tragedy of the commons, self -organized criticality, defense industrial base 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 233 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  5. Virus, Oncolytic Virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Currently, PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. In this review study, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. GB virus C/hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV): still looking for a disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathar, M; Soni, P; York, D

    2000-10-01

    GB Virus C and Hepatitis G Virus (GBV-C/HGV) are positive, single-stranded flaviviruses. GBV-C and HGV are independent isolates of the same virus. Transmission via the blood-borne route is the commonest mode, although vertical and sexual transmission is well documented. GBV-C/HGV is distributed globally; its prevalence in the general population is 10 fold higher in African countries than in non-African countries. High prevalences of GBV-C/HGV have been found in subjects with frequent parenteral exposure and in groups at high risk of exposure to blood and blood products. The clinical significance of human infection with GBV-C/HGV is currently unclear. The virus can establish both acute and chronic infection and appears to be sensitive to interferon. Only some 12-15% of chronic Non-A, B, C hepatitis cases are infected with GBV-C/HGV. A direct association with liver pathology is still lacking and it is not yet clear as to whether GBV-C/HGV is indeed a hepatotropic virus. Current evidence suggests that the spectrum of association of GBV-C/HGV infection with extrahepatic diseases ranges from haematalogical diseases, aplastic anaemia, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive idiopathic thrombocytopenia and thalassemia, through to common variable immune deficiency and cryoglobunemia.

  7. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  8. Furthering critical institutionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleaver, Frances; Koning, De Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI) is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It

  9. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  10. Smallpox virus plaque phenotypes: genetic, geographical and case fatality relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Victoria A; Karem, Kevin L; Smith, Scott K; Hughes, Christine M; Damon, Inger K

    2009-04-01

    Smallpox (infection with Orthopoxvirus variola) remains a feared illness more than 25 years after its eradication. Historically, case-fatality rates (CFRs) varied between outbreaks (<1 to approximately 40 %), the reasons for which are incompletely understood. The extracellular enveloped virus (EEV) form of orthopoxvirus progeny is hypothesized to disseminate infection. Investigations with the closely related Orthopoxvirus vaccinia have associated increased comet formation (EEV production) with increased mouse mortality (pathogenicity). Other vaccinia virus genetic manipulations which affect EEV production inconsistently support this association. However, antisera against vaccinia virus envelope protect mice from lethal challenge, further supporting a critical role for EEV in pathogenicity. Here, we show that the increased comet formation phenotypes of a diverse collection of variola viruses associate with strain phylogeny and geographical origin, but not with increased outbreak-related CFRs; within clades, there may be an association of plaque size with CFR. The mechanisms for variola virus pathogenicity probably involves multiple host and pathogen factors.

  11. Influenza Virus Induces Apoptosis via BAD-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P.; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A.; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors...

  12. Reimagining Critical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Jevdet; Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Critical Theory, a model of theorizing in the field of the political sociology of education. We argue for a "reimagined" Critical Theory to herald an empowering, liberatory education that fosters curiosity and critical thinking, and a means for successful bottom-up, top-down political engagement. We present arguments…

  13. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  14. Extending Critical Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicer, André; Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In this article we extend the debate about critical performativity. We begin by outlining the basic tenets of critical performativity and how this has been applied in the study of management and organization. We then address recent critiques of critical performance. We note these arguments suffer...

  15. Creating a Critical Thinker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2014-01-01

    A college education is expected to improve students' critical thinking skills. Keeping students active in class--through writing activities and class discussion--has been shown to help students think critically. In this article, creative hands-on activities, which are common in engineering courses, are shown to improve students' critical thinking…

  16. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  17. Biology, etiology, and control of virus diseases of banana and plantain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Lava; Selvarajan, Ramasamy; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Chabannes, Matthieu; Hanna, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.), produced in 10.3 million ha in the tropics, are among the world's top 10 food crops. They are vegetatively propagated using suckers or tissue culture plants and grown almost as perennial plantations. These are prone to the accumulation of pests and pathogens, especially viruses which contribute to yield reduction and are also barriers to the international exchange of germplasm. The most economically important viruses of banana and plantain are Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), a complex of banana streak viruses (BSVs) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV). BBTV is known to cause the most serious economic losses in the "Old World," contributing to a yield reduction of up to 100% and responsible for a dramatic reduction in cropping area. The BSVs exist as episomal and endogenous forms are known to be worldwide in distribution. In India and the Philippines, BBrMV is known to be economically important but recently the virus was discovered in Colombia and Costa Rica, thus signaling its spread into the "New World." Banana and plantain are also known to be susceptible to five other viruses of minor significance, such as Abaca mosaic virus, Abaca bunchy top virus, Banana mild mosaic virus, Banana virus X, and Cucumber mosaic virus. Studies over the past 100 years have contributed to important knowledge on disease biology, distribution, and spread. Research during the last 25 years have led to a better understanding of the virus-vector-host interactions, virus diversity, disease etiology, and epidemiology. In addition, new diagnostic tools were developed which were used for surveillance and the certification of planting material. Due to a lack of durable host resistance in the Musa spp., phytosanitary measures and the use of virus-free planting material are the major methods of virus control. The state of knowledge on BBTV, BBrMV, and BSVs, and other minor viruses, disease spread, and control are summarized in this review. © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  18. A Critical Analysis of the Conceptualisation of "Coaching Philosophy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushion, Christopher; Partington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to critically review existing literature relating to, and critically analyse current conceptualisations of, "coaching philosophy." The review reveals a bewildering approach to definitions, terms and frameworks that have limited explanation and reveal a lack of conceptual clarity. It is argued that rather than…

  19. Obstetric critical care services in South Africa | Buga | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half of all global maternal deaths occur in Africa. A large percentage of these deaths are preventable, and lack of access to adequate critical care facilities is a contributing factor. There are limited published data on the clinical and management challenges presented by the critically ill obstetric patient admitted to ...

  20. Gut dysfunction in the critically ill − mechanisms and clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The difficulty in clinical practice has been the lack of an objective or unified definition or understanding of what gastrointestinal dysfunction in the critically ill means. Additionally, gut problems in ICU may often be fairly occult and challenging to classify by degree. Critical illnessassociated gut dysfunction is implicated in ...

  1. Lack of data drives uncertainty in PCB health risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliano, Vincent James

    2016-02-01

    Health risk assessments generally involve many extrapolations: for example, from animals to humans or from high doses to lower doses. Health risk assessments for PCBs involve all the usual uncertainties, plus additional uncertainties due to the nature of PCBs as a dynamic, complex mixture. Environmental processes alter PCB mixtures after release into the environment, so that people are exposed to mixtures that might not resemble the mixtures where there are toxicity data. This paper discusses the evolution of understanding in assessments of the cancer and noncancer effects of PCBs. It identifies where a lack of data in the past contributed to significant uncertainty and where new data subsequently altered the prevailing understanding of the toxicity of PCB mixtures, either qualitatively or quantitatively. Finally, the paper identifies some uncertainties remaining for current PCB health assessments, particularly those that result from a lack of data on exposure through nursing or on effects from inhalation of PCBs.

  2. On lack-of-knowledge theory in structural mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louf, François; Enjalbert, Paul; Ladevèze, Pierre; Romeuf, Thierry

    2010-07-01

    Today, the validation of complex structural models - i.e. the assessment of their quality compared to an experimental reference - remains a major issue. Strictly speaking, the validation problem consists in comparing the response of the numerical model (whether deterministic or stochastic) with complete reality. A first answer to this problem, using Lack-Of-Knowledge (LOK) theory, was introduced at LMT-Cachan. This theory is an attempt to "model the unknown" by taking all the sources of uncertainties, including modeling errors, into account through the concept of basic LOKs. In this article, we introduce basic LOKs associated with both the amplitudes and directions of excitations. These basic LOKs are propagated rigorously throughout the mechanical model in order to determine intervals (with stochastic bounds) within which lies a given quantity of interest (stress or displacement). Then, we introduce a strategy for the reduction of lack of knowledge, which we illustrate through an academic example.

  3. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Leonard; Zhang, Karen; Bonawitz, Tristan; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Waring, Richard; Balciunas, Darius

    2016-11-28

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type function.

  4. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Burg; Karen Zhang; Tristan Bonawitz; Viktorija Grajevskaja; Gianfranco Bellipanni; Richard Waring; Darius Balciunas

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type ...

  5. The evolution of culture (or the lack thereof): mapping the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-17

    Jul 17, 2017 ... This short essay is based on a lecture that I gave at short notice on a subject in which I am by no means an expert. The combination of lack of expertise and time for preparation, created an unexpectedly unique opportunity for thinking outside the box. I decided not to try to read up (as there was no time in ...

  6. LACK OF VITAMIN B12 AFTER ROUX Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    OpenAIRE

    Reginaldo, Greise Janaina; Silva, Alice Freitas da

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health issue, with several factors as its cause. It may be related to several co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus II, systemic arterial pressure, dyslipidemia, cancer and others. Current research verified aspects of bariatric surgery with special focus on alterations caused by the lack of vitamin B12. The bibliographical review evaluated scientific papers, particularly recent ones, to obtain data on the theme. Obesity is defined as a disease characterized by the accum...

  7. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  8. REPROBATION AND LACK OF INTEREST IN MECHATRONICS ENGINEERING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Humberto Guzmán Valdivia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineering education in mechatronics is an attractive field of research because it is a new multidisciplinary career. However, a potential problem is the reprobation rate. In the period from January to April 2012 at the Universidad Politécnica de Zacatecas a 53% regular students of a total of 197 were registered. To find the causes of this problem, a survey was conducted to determine the causes of reprobation, lack of motivation and interest to a population of 96 students, of which 40 were the first training cycle, 32 the second and 24 the third. The surveys yielded three main results. The first indicates that the lack of interest is proportional to the time spent in college. The second shows that the reprobation rate is linked to the laziness and the excess of courses. And the last shows a lack of motivation and low expectations of student due to the monotony of the theoretical courses. In conclusion, more research is needed to have a motivated student in an engineering career in mechatronics.

  9. The subjetivacion of the lack: between Lacan and Hegel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Souyris Oportot

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops a reflection concerning the figure of the subjectivation and the statute of the lack  in relation to Jacques Lacan y Hegel's thought . The analysis will be addressed from a philosophical approach as and with a psychoanalytic perspective, to show the need to understand the subjectivity, not already as a "work" of duel, but ligature to the loss and the split. The idea is that the above mentioned significances make possible deconstruir and to rethink the duel in lack, that he structures to the subject in an experience "escripturaire" (escriptural and, for the same thing, of dispossession. So that the figure of the subjetivación "in" lack  will allow to grant an important place to the non-place while I spread where the unthinkable thing and the "Autre" registers.  Once exposed this, the reflection will focus on the tragic exigences behind experience “escripturaire” expressed in the image of Antigone

  10. Vector competence of Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes for Zika virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany L. Dodson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus is a newly emergent mosquito-borne flavivirus that has caused recent large outbreaks in the new world, leading to dramatic increases in serious disease pathology including Guillain-Barre syndrome, newborn microcephaly, and infant brain damage. Although Aedes mosquitoes are thought to be the primary mosquito species driving infection, the virus has been isolated from dozens of mosquito species, including Culex and Anopheles species, and we lack a thorough understanding of which mosquito species to target for vector control. We exposed Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to blood meals supplemented with two Zika virus strains. Mosquito bodies, legs, and saliva were collected five, seven, and 14 days post blood meal and tested for infectious virus by plaque assay. Regardless of titer, virus strain, or timepoint, Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were refractory to Zika virus infection. We conclude that Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes likely do not contribute significantly to Zika virus transmission to humans. However, future studies should continue to explore the potential for other novel potential vectors to transmit the virus.

  11. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformul...

  12. How RNA viruses maintain their genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, John N; Fearns, Rachel

    2010-06-01

    RNA genomes are vulnerable to corruption by a range of activities, including inaccurate replication by the error-prone replicase, damage from environmental factors, and attack by nucleases and other RNA-modifying enzymes that comprise the cellular intrinsic or innate immune response. Damage to coding regions and loss of critical cis-acting signals inevitably impair genome fitness; as a consequence, RNA viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to protect their genome integrity. These include mechanisms to promote replicase fidelity, recombination activities that allow exchange of sequences between different RNA templates, and mechanisms to repair the genome termini. In this article, we review examples of these processes from a range of RNA viruses to showcase the diverse approaches that viruses have evolved to maintain their genome sequence integrity, focusing first on mechanisms that viruses use to protect their entire genome, and then concentrating on mechanisms that allow protection of the genome termini, which are especially vulnerable. In addition, we discuss examples in which it might be beneficial for a virus to 'lose' its genomic termini and reduce its replication efficiency.

  13. Defining critical thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Abbie

    2014-05-01

    Nursing education has long struggled to define critical thinking and explain how the process of critical thinking fits into the context of nursing. Despite this long time struggle, nurses and nurse educators continue to strive to foster critical thinking skills in nursing students as intuitively most nurses believe that critical thinking is necessary to function competently in the workplace. This article explores the most recent work of Dr. Stephen Brookfield and ties the concepts which are explored in Brookfield's work to nursing practice. Brookfield identifies that learners understand the meaning of critical thinking the best when the process is first demonstrated. Role modeling is a method educators can use to demonstrate critical thinking and is a strategy which nurses often use in the clinical area to train and mentor new nursing staff. Although it is not a new strategy in nursing education, it is a valuable strategy to engage learners in critical thinking activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. PMID:26385895

  15. Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein gM can interact with the cellular protein p32 and knockdown of p32 impairs virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changotra, Harish; Turk, Susan M; Artigues, Antonio; Thakur, Nagendra; Gore, Mindy; Muggeridge, Martin I; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2016-02-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein complex gMgN has been implicated in assembly and release of fully enveloped virus, although the precise role that it plays has not been elucidated. We report here that the long predicted cytoplasmic tail of gM is not required for complex formation and that it interacts with the cellular protein p32, which has been reported to be involved in nuclear egress of human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus. Although redistribution of p32 and colocalization with gM was not observed in virus infected cells, knockdown of p32 expression by siRNA or lentivirus-delivered shRNA recapitulated the phenotype of a virus lacking expression of gNgM. A proportion of virus released from cells sedimented with characteristics of virus lacking an intact envelope and there was an increase in virus trapped in nuclear condensed chromatin. The observations suggest the possibility that p32 may also be involved in nuclear egress of Epstein-Barr virus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. From Critical Theory to Critical Hermeneutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øjvind Larsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From their beginning in the 1930s, critical theory and the Frankfurt school had their focus on a critique of disturbed social relations in western society dominated by totalitarian political regimes like Stalinism, Fascism, Nazism, and by capitalism as an oppressive and destructive economic system and culture. Now, 80 years later, this has all become history and thus it is time to leave the concept of critical theory behind us, and instead bring the concept of critique to a broader theoretical framework like hermeneutics. This allows the possibility of retaining the theoretical intentions of the old Frankfurt school and at the same time there will be no boundaries by specific dominant theoretical perspectives. In this paper, such a framework for a critical hermeneutics is discussed on the basis of Weber’s, Gadamer’s, and Habermas’ theories on hermeneutics within the social sciences.

  17. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  18. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  19. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  20. Attenuation and Restoration of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Mutant Lacking 2′-O-Methyltransferase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Josset, Laurence; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Scobey, Trevor; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Katze, Michael G.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2014-01-01

    The sudden emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002 and, more recently, Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) underscores the importance of understanding critical aspects of CoV infection and pathogenesis. Despite significant insights into CoV cross-species transmission, replication, and virus-host interactions, successful therapeutic options for CoVs do not yet exist. Recent identification of SARS-CoV NSP16 as a viral 2′-O-methyltransferase (...