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Sample records for virus hypervariable region

  1. Variability or conservation of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of the E2 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly heterogeneous in its primary sequence and is responsible for significant inter- and intra-individual variation of the infecting virus, which may represent an important pathogenetic mechanism leading to immune escape and persistent ...

  2. Hypervariable region 1 differentially impacts viability of hepatitis C virus strains of genotypes 1 to 6 and impairs virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Jensen, Tanja B; Meuleman, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein has been implicated in virus neutralization and persistence. We deleted HVR1 from JFH1-based HCV recombinants expressing Core/E1/E2/p7/NS2 of genotypes 1 to 6, previously found to grow efficiently in human hepatoma...... Huh7.5 cells. The 2a(ΔHVR1), 5a(ΔHVR1), and 6a(ΔHVR1) Core-NS2 recombinants retained viability in Huh7.5 cells, whereas 1a(ΔHVR1), 1b(ΔHVR1), 2b(ΔHVR1), 3a(ΔHVR1), and 4a(ΔHVR1) recombinants were severely attenuated. However, except for recombinant 4a(ΔHVR1), viruses eventually spread, and reverse...... genetics studies revealed adaptive envelope mutations that rescued the infectivity of 1a(ΔHVR1), 1b(ΔHVR1), 2b(ΔHVR1), and 3a(ΔHVR1) recombinants. Thus, HVR1 might have distinct functional roles for different HCV isolates. Ultracentrifugation studies showed that deletion of HVR1 did not alter HCV RNA...

  3. Hypervariable region 1 differentially impacts viability of hepatitis C virus strains of genotypes 1 to 6 and impairs virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, Jannick Cornelius; Jensen, Tanja Bertelsen; Meuleman, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein has been implicated in virus neutralization and persistence. We deleted HVR1 from JFH1-based HCV recombinants expressing Core/E1/E2/p7/NS2 of genotypes 1 to 6, previously found to grow efficiently in human hepatoma...... Huh7.5 cells. The 2a(¿HVR1), 5a(¿HVR1), and 6a(¿HVR1) Core-NS2 recombinants retained viability in Huh7.5 cells, whereas 1a(¿HVR1), 1b(¿HVR1), 2b(¿HVR1), 3a(¿HVR1), and 4a(¿HVR1) recombinants were severely attenuated. However, except for recombinant 4a(¿HVR1), viruses eventually spread, and reverse...... genetics studies revealed adaptive envelope mutations that rescued the infectivity of 1a(¿HVR1), 1b(¿HVR1), 2b(¿HVR1), and 3a(¿HVR1) recombinants. Thus, HVR1 might have distinct functional roles for different HCV isolates. Ultracentrifugation studies showed that deletion of HVR1 did not alter HCV RNA...

  4. Hypervariable Region 1 Shielding of Hepatitis C Virus Is a Main Contributor to Genotypic Differences in Neutralization Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Velazquez-Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2016-01-01

    There are 3-4 million new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections yearly. The extensive intergenotypic sequence diversity of envelope proteins E1 and E2 of HCV and shielding of important epitopes by hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of E2 are believed to be major hindrances to developing universally...... protective HCV vaccines. Using cultured viruses expressing the E1/E2 complex of isolates H77 (genotype 1a), J6 (2a), or S52 (3a), with and without HVR1, we tested HVR1-mediated neutralization occlusion in vitro against a panel of 12 well-characterized human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) targeting diverse E1......a, 2b, 3a, 5a, and 6a, although for all HMAbs, except AR4A, an outlier was observed. Finally, unique amino acid residues in HCV E2 could explain these outliers in the tested cases of AR5A and HC84.26. Conclusion: HVR1 adds complexity to HCV neutralization by shielding a diverse array of unexpectedly...

  5. Spatiotemporal Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterisation of Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses Based on the VP2 Hyper-Variable Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulahi Alfonso-Morales

    Full Text Available Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious and acute viral disease caused by the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV; it affects all major poultry producing areas of the world. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the global phylogeographic dynamics of IBDV strains to gain insight into viral population expansion as well as the emergence, spread and pattern of the geographical structure of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV strains.Sequences of the hyper-variable region of the VP2 (HVR-VP2 gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. All sequences were analysed by Bayesian phylogeographic analysis, implemented in the Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis Sampling Trees (BEAST, Bayesian Tip-association Significance testing (BaTS and Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics (SPREAD software packages. Selection pressure on the HVR-VP2 was also assessed. The phylogeographic association-trait analysis showed that viruses sampled from individual countries tend to cluster together, suggesting a geographic pattern for IBDV strains. Spatial analysis from this study revealed that strains carrying sequences that were linked to increased virulence of IBDV appeared in Iran in 1981 and spread to Western Europe (Belgium in 1987, Africa (Egypt around 1990, East Asia (China and Japan in 1993, the Caribbean Region (Cuba by 1995 and South America (Brazil around 2000. Selection pressure analysis showed that several codons in the HVR-VP2 region were under purifying selection.To our knowledge, this work is the first study applying the Bayesian phylogeographic reconstruction approach to analyse the emergence and spread of vvIBDV strains worldwide.

  6. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Anderson

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity.

  7. Deep sequencing of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 reveals no correlation between genetic heterogeneity and antiviral treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Kamila Caraballo; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Perlejewski, Karol; Laskus, Tomasz; Maroszek, Krzysztof; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Płoski, Rafał; Berak, Hanna; Horban, Andrzej; Radkowski, Marek

    2014-07-13

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) contained within envelope protein 2 (E2) gene is the most variable part of HCV genome and its translation product is a major target for the host immune response. Variability within HVR1 may facilitate evasion of the immune response and could affect treatment outcome. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of HVR1 heterogeneity employing sensitive ultra-deep sequencing, on the outcome of PEG-IFN-α (pegylated interferon α) and ribavirin treatment. HVR1 sequences were amplified from pretreatment serum samples of 25 patients infected with genotype 1b HCV (12 responders and 13 non-responders) and were subjected to pyrosequencing (GS Junior, 454/Roche). Reads were corrected for sequencing error using ShoRAH software, while population reconstruction was done using three different minimal variant frequency cut-offs of 1%, 2% and 5%. Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact tests. Complexity, Shannon entropy, nucleotide diversity per site, genetic distance and the number of genetic substitutions were not significantly different between responders and non-responders, when analyzing viral populations at any of the three frequencies (≥1%, ≥2% and ≥5%). When clonal sample was used to determine pyrosequencing error, 4% of reads were found to be incorrect and the most abundant variant was present at a frequency of 1.48%. Use of ShoRAH reduced the sequencing error to 1%, with the most abundant erroneous variant present at frequency of 0.5%. While deep sequencing revealed complex genetic heterogeneity of HVR1 in chronic hepatitis C patients, there was no correlation between treatment outcome and any of the analyzed quasispecies parameters.

  8. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this research were to study mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III and establish the degree of variation characteristic of a fragment. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a small circular genome located within the mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cell and a smaller 1.2 kb pair fragment, called the control ...

  9. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific PCR-RFLP markers and PCR primers for screening actinorhizal symbionts. Rajani Varghese Vineeta S Chauhan Arvind K Misra. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 437-442 ...

  10. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of genotype 1 avian hepatitis E virus: characterization of its pathogenicity in broiler breeders and demonstration of its utility in studying the role of the hypervariable region in virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Byung-Woo; Moon, Hyun-Woo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung-Il; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2015-05-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genotype 1 Korean avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) (pT11-aHEV-K) was constructed and its infectivity and pathogenicity were investigated in leghorn male hepatoma (LMH) chicken cells and broiler breeders. We demonstrated that capped RNA transcripts from the pT11-aHEV-K clone were translation competent when transfected into LMH cells and infectious when injected intrahepatically into the livers of chickens. Gross and microscopic pathological lesions underpinned the avian HEV infection and helped characterize its pathogenicity in broiler breeder chickens. The avian HEV genome contains a hypervariable region (HVR) in ORF1. To demonstrate the utility of the avian HEV infectious clone, several mutants with various deletions in and beyond the known HVR were derived from the pT11-aHEV-K clone. The HVR-deletion mutants were replication competent in LMH cells, although the deletion mutants extending beyond the known HVR were non-viable. By using the pT11-aHEV-K infectious clone as the backbone, an avian HEV luciferase reporter replicon and HVR-deletion mutant replicons were also generated. The luciferase assay results of the reporter replicon and its mutants support the data obtained from the infectious clone and its derived mutants. To further determine the effect of HVR deletion on virus replication, the capped RNA transcripts from the wild-type pT11-aHEV-K clone and its mutants were injected intrahepatically into chickens. The HVR-deletion mutants that were translation competent in LMH cells displayed in chickens an attenuation phenotype of avian HEV infectivity, suggesting that the avian HEV HVR is important in modulating the virus infectivity and pathogenicity. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1 polymorphism in Singapore Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Cheng-Yap; Chong, Michelle S M; Ng, Irene; Chia, Tet-Fatt

    2005-03-01

    Sequence polymorphisms of hypervariable region 1 were analyzed in 100 unrelated Singaporean Chinese. Ninety-five different haplotypes resulting from 113 variable sites were found between nucleotide positions 16045 and 16364. Single nucleotide polymorphism at nucleotide positions 16223, 16045, 16129, 16362 and 16189 was amongst the five highest frequencies observed in the sequences, whilst the most frequent haplotype was 16045-16223. Based on polymorphic sites observed at HV1, haplogroups A, F1a, M7b1, B5a and D4b were the most commonly observed clusters. The haplotype, nucleotide diversity and the average number of nucleotide differences were found to be 0.999, 0.028 and 9.082, respectively. The cytosine-stretch region located around nucleotide position 16189 was observed in 22% of this population sample. Transitions were found to be more predominant than transversions.

  12. Infectious genotype 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 5a, 6a and 7a hepatitis C virus lacking the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present inventors used the previously developed H77/JFH 1.sub.T27OOC,A4O8OT (1a/2a), J4/JFH .sub.1T2996C,A4827T,.DELTA.HVRI (1b/2a), J6/JFH .sub.1.DELTA.HVRI (2a/2a), J8/JFH 1.sub..DELTA.HVRI (2b/2a), S52/JFH 1.sub.T27i8G,.tau.7i6oc (3a/2a), SA13/JFH 1.sub.C34O5G,A3696G (5a/2a) and HK6a/JFH 1...... of the viruses identified mutations adapting H77/JFH 1.sub.T27OOC,A4O8OT,.DELTA.HVR1 (1a/2a), J8/JFH .sub.1.DELTA.HVR1 (2b/2a), S52/JFH 1.sub.T2718G,T716OC,.DELTA.HVR1 (3a/2a) and J4/JFH 1.sub.T2996C,A4827T,.DELTA.HVR1 (1b/2a) to the HVR1 deletion........sub.1389c,A1590G (6a/2a) constructs for the deletion of Hypervariable Region 1 (HVR1) to construct viable, JFH 1 (genotype 2a) based, genomes. The present inventors serially passaged the viruses in cell culture obtaining relatively high HCV RNA titers and infectivity titers. Sequence analysis...

  13. Applying antibody-sensitive hypervariable region 1-deleted hepatitis C virus to the study of escape pathways of neutralizing human monoclonal antibody AR5A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of end-stage liver diseases. With 3–4 million new HCV infections yearly, a vaccine is urgently needed. A better understanding of virus escape from neutralizing antibodies and their corresponding epitopes are important for this effort. However, for viral isolates with high antibody resistance, or antibodies with moderate potency, it remains challenging to induce escape mutations in vitro. Here, as proof-of-concept, we used antibody-sensitive HVR1-deleted (ΔHVR1) viruses to generate escape mutants for a human monoclonal antibody, AR5A, targeting a rare cross-genotype conserved epitope. By analyzing the genotype 1a envelope proteins (E1/E2) of recovered Core-NS2 recombinant H77/JFH1ΔHVR1 and performing reverse genetic studies we found that resistance to AR5A was caused by substitution L665W, also conferring resistance to the parental H77/JFH1. The mutation did not induce viral fitness loss, but abrogated AR5A binding to HCV particles and intracellular E1/E2 complexes. Culturing J6/JFH1ΔHVR1 (genotype 2a), for which fitness was decreased by L665W, with AR5A generated AR5A-resistant viruses with the substitutions I345V, L665S, and S680T, which we introduced into J6/JFH1 and J6/JFH1ΔHVR1. I345V increased fitness but had no effect on AR5A resistance. L665S impaired fitness and decreased AR5A sensitivity, while S680T combined with L665S compensated for fitness loss and decreased AR5A sensitivity even further. Interestingly, S680T alone had no fitness effect but sensitized the virus to AR5A. Of note, H77/JFH1L665S was non-viable. The resistance mutations did not affect cell-to-cell spread or E1/E2 interactions. Finally, introducing L665W, identified in genotype 1, into genotypes 2–6 parental and HVR1-deleted variants (not available for genotype 4a) we observed diverse effects on viral fitness and a universally pronounced reduction in AR5A sensitivity. Thus, we were able to take advantage of the neutralization-sensitive HVR1

  14. Applying antibody-sensitive hypervariable region 1-deleted hepatitis C virus to the study of escape pathways of neutralizing human monoclonal antibody AR5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velazquez-Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Law, Mansun; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    isolates with high antibody resistance, or antibodies with moderate potency, it remains challenging to induce escape mutations in vitro. Here, as proof-of-concept, we used antibody-sensitive HVR1-deleted (ΔHVR1) viruses to generate escape mutants for a human monoclonal antibody, AR5A, targeting a rare....... The mutation did not induce viral fitness loss, but abrogated AR5A binding to HCV particles and intracellular E1/E2 complexes. Culturing J6/JFH1ΔHVR1 (genotype 2a), for which fitness was decreased by L665W, with AR5A generated AR5A-resistant viruses with the substitutions I345V, L665S, and S680T, which we...... effect but sensitized the virus to AR5A. Of note, H77/JFH1L665S was non-viable. The resistance mutations did not affect cell-to-cell spread or E1/E2 interactions. Finally, introducing L665W, identified in genotype 1, into genotypes 2–6 parental and HVR1-deleted variants (not available for genotype 4a) we...

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Tibetan mastiffs based on mitochondrial hypervariable region I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhanjun; Chen, Huiling; Yang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Chengdong

    2017-03-01

    Recently, the number of Tibetan mastiffs, which is a precious germplasm resource and cultural heritage, is decreasing sharply. Therefore, the genetic diversity of Tibetan mastiffs needs to be studied to clarify its phylogenetics relationships and lay the foundation for resource protection, rational development and utilization of Tibetan mastiffs. We sequenced hypervariable region I of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 110 individuals from Tibet region and Gansu province. A total of 12 polymorphic sites were identified which defined eight haplotypes of which H4 and H8 were unique to Tibetan population with H8 being identified first. The haplotype diversity (Hd: 0.808), nucleotide diversity (Pi: 0.603%), the average number of nucleotide difference (K: 3.917) of Tibetan mastiffs from Gansu were higher than those from Tibet region (Hd: 0.794; Pi: 0.589%; K: 3.831), which revealed higher genetic diversity in Gansu. In terms of total population, the genetic variation was low. The median-joining network and phylogenetic tree based on the mtDNA hypervariable region I showed that Tibetan mastiffs originated from grey wolves, as the other domestic dogs and had different history of maternal origin. The mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests indicated that Tibetan mastiffs were in genetic equilibrium or in a population decline.

  16. A new database of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II sequences from 162 Japanese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, K; Parsons, T J; Yoshino, M; Holland, M M

    2002-04-01

    A database of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HV1) and region 2 (HV2) sequences of the mtDNA control region was established from 162 unrelated Japanese individuals. The random match probability and the genetic diversity for this database were 0.96% and 0.997, respectively. Length heteroplasmy in the C-stretch regions located around position 16189 in HVI and 310 in HV2 was observed in 37% and 38% of the samples, respectively. A strategy using internal sequencing primers was devised to obtain confirmed sequences in these length heteroplasmic individuals. This database, combined with other mtDNA sequence databases from the Japanese population, will permit the significance of mtDNA match results to be properly reported in mtDNA typing casework in Japan.

  17. Molecular characterization of two Bangladeshi infectious bursal disease virus isolates using the hypervariable sequence of VP2 as a genetic marker

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md Taohidul; Le, Thanh Hoa; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Islam, Md. Alimul

    2012-01-01

    Two Bangladeshi infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates collected in 2007, termed GB1 and GB3, were subjected to comparative sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Sequence analysis of a 474-bp hypervariable region in the VP2 gene revealed that among four major amino acid substitutions observed in the strains, two were unique to GB1 and GB3 (Ser217Leu and Ala270Thr) while one substitution was only found in GB1 (Asn299Ser). Among IBDVs from Bangladesh including GB1 and GB3, the rate of ...

  18. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) of Hypervariable Mitochondrial DNA Regions for Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Rocha, Alípio; de Amorim, Isis Salviano Soares; Simão, Tatiana de Almeida; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza; Garrido, Rodrigo Grazinoli; Mencalha, Andre Luiz

    2017-08-23

    Forensic strategies commonly are proceeding by analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, new additional strategies have been proposed for forensic science. Thus, this article standardized the high-resolution melting (HRM) of DNA for forensic analyzes. For HRM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from eight individuals were extracted from mucosa swabs by DNAzol reagent, samples were amplified by PCR and submitted to HRM analysis to identify differences in hypervariable (HV) regions I and II. To confirm HRM, all PCR products were DNA sequencing. The data suggest that is possible discriminate DNA from different samples by HRM curves. Also, uncommon dual-dissociation was identified in a single PCR product, increasing HRM analyzes by evaluation of melting peaks. Thus, HRM is accurate and useful to screening small differences in HVI and HVII regions from mtDNA and increase the efficiency of laboratory routines based on forensic genetics. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms minisequencing in hypervariable regions for screening of Thais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongngam, Punlop; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Bhoopat, Tanin; Sangthong, Padchanee

    2017-09-05

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis has displayed an important role and been considered as a powerful tool in various fields of forensic science applications. Nowadays, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on mtDNA have become additional DNA markers when conventional STR typing practically fails. mtDNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from the hypervariable region I (HVRI) and II (HVRII) is the standard method of mtDNA analysis. However, mtDNA sequencing is rather expensive, time consuming and technically complex. This study aims to develop the SNPs minisequencing for screening of Thai populations. For this purpose, sixteen SNPs that possess high discriminating power in hypervariable regions were selected. The DNA samples were obtained from 100 buccal swab samples of Thai healthy individuals. All DNA samples were extracted and were subsequently amplified by single duplex PCR technique. The duplex PCR products were genotyped by SNPs minisequencing. Based on 16 SNPs, a total of 63 haplotypes were observed of which 46 haplotypes were unique. The haplotype diversity, discriminating power and random match probability were calculated to be 0.9830, 0.9732 and 0.0268, respectively. The SNPs at 150, 199, 489, 16129, 16189, 16223, and 16304 were highly polymorphic in the studied population. Our results suggested that the SNPs minisequencing can be an alternative method of SNPs genotyping. This method can be used for an exclusion of a large number of mismatch samples and as a presumptive test prior to do confirmatory mtDNA sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypervariable region 1 deletion and required adaptive envelope mutations confer decreased dependency on scavenger receptor class B type I and low-density lipoprotein receptor for hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Ramirez, Santseharay

    2014-01-01

    -deleted viruses. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-specific HCV neutralization was similar for H77, J6, and S52 viruses with and without HVR1. In conclusion, HVR1 and HVR1-related adaptive envelope mutations appeared to be involved in LDLr and SR-BI dependency, respectively. Also, LDLr served Apo......) entry. We investigated receptor usage by antibody blocking and receptor silencing in Huh7.5 cells, followed by inoculation of parental and HVR1-deleted HCV recombinants. Compared to parental viruses, scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) dependency was decreased for H77(ΔHVR1/N476D/S733F), H77(N476D....../S733F), S52(ΔHVR1/A369V), and S52(A369V), but not for J6(ΔHVR1). Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) dependency was decreased for HVR1-deleted viruses, but not for H77(N476D/S733F) and S52(A369V). Soluble LDLr neutralization revealed strong inhibition of parental HCV but limited effect against HVR1...

  1. [Polymorphism of hypervariable region in D-loop of mitochondrial DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Y; Mukaida, M

    1999-06-01

    DNA sequences of PCR products from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 80 healthy Japanese volunteers (40 pairs, mother and child) were determined by the direct sequencing method for polymorphism. Thirty (15 pairs) of 80 samples analyzed showed a T-to-C transition at position 16189 (T16189C) of the C-stretch region in the hyper-variable region of mtDNA. For seven pairs randomly selected from the 15 T16189C pairs (C-stretch) and a single pair without the transition (non C-stretch), PCR products from the D-loop region were cloned and then sequenced. The repeat number of C in the C-stretch region was found to show heteroplasmy by sequencing multiples clones from each mtDNA. Statistical analyses of the distribution patterns of the repeat number revealed no significant differences between the mother and child in each lineage but significant differences between the lineages. The seven lineages could be then classified into four groups. The result of our data confirmed the existence of heteroplasmic polymorphism in the C-stretch region and the inheritance of the heteroplasmy from mother to child. Therefore, the analysis of heteroplasmy is applicable to individual identification.

  2. Length heteroplasmy in the first hypervariable segment of the human mtDNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, K E; Sykes, B C

    1995-08-01

    The first hypervariable segment of the human mtDNA control region contains a homopolymeric tract of cytosines between nt 16184 and 16193, interrupted at position 16189 by a thymine, according to the Cambridge reference sequence. A variant commonly found in population screening is a T-to-C transition at nt 16189, resulting in an uninterrupted homopolymeric tract. Direct sequencing of individuals with this variant produces a characteristic blurred sequence in nucleotides beyond the tract. Sequencing clones from these individuals revealed that this is caused by high levels of length heteroplasmy in the homopolymeric tract and low levels of length heteroplasmy in the four adenines following the tract. We have developed a rapid method involving densitometry of sequencing gels to quantify the relative proportions of different length variants present in an individual. We have used this to study the proportions of length variants in individuals from three twin pairs and two maternal lineages. While unrelated individuals usually have different proportions of length variants, all maternally related individuals studied have the same proportions, even if they are only distantly related. It is not obvious how identical heteroplasmic profiles are maintained in maternally related individuals, but some possible mechanisms are suggested.

  3. Variability or conservation of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mario U Mondelli1 Antonella Cerino1 Annalisa Meola2 Alfredo Nicosia2. Laboratori di Ricerca, Area Infettivologica and Dipartimento di Malattie Infettive, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, and University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia, Italy; Istituto di Ricerche di Biologia Molecolare, “P. Angeletti” Pomezia, Italy ...

  4. [Variation of human mitochondrial DNA: distribution of hot spots in hypervariable segment I of the major noncoding region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliarchuk, B A; Derenko, M V

    2001-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) samples belonging to fifteen phylogenetically related mtDNA types specific to the populations of Europe (H, V, J, T, U, K, I, W, and X) and Northern Asia (A, C, D, G, Y, and Z) were typed for sequence variation in hypervariable segment I (HVSI). The approach used allowed to distinguish several hypervariable sites at nucleotide positions 16093, 16129, 16189, 16311, and 16362. Identical mutations at these sites were found in 10-11 out of 15 mtDNA groups examined. Positions 16126, 16172, 16192, 16256, 16261, 16291, 16293, and 16298 appeared to be less variable, since parallel mutations at these sites were found in 6-8 European and Asian mtDNA groups. The examples of the effects of mutations in hypervariable positions at the major noncoding mtDNA region on the frequency of reverse mutations in other mtDNA regions are presented. It was shown that such effects of nucleotide context on the mutation rate could be observed in phylogenetic mtDNA networks such as cyclic structures like rhombs and cubes. Analogous structures in the networks could be seen also in the case of the appearance of recombinant mtDNA types resulted from homologous recombination between mtDNA molecules in heteroplasmic mixture. The problem of the effect of polynucleotide context on the intensity of mtDNA mutagenesis is discussed. Recombination processes along with site-directed mutagenesis caused by action of genetic factors (of nuclear genome) and/or of the environment are considered as possible mechanisms of mitochondrial genome evolution.

  5. Evolution of a hypervariable region of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene in humans and other hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, David H; Knight, Alec; Deininger, Prescott L

    2004-06-01

    Alu repeats in primates have been shown to evolve at a neutral mutation rate, as anticipated for non-coding autosomal loci. However, we have identified Alu elements within the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene that exhibited highly accelerated rates of evolution. In humans, a 100- and 25-fold increase in average divergence, for an upstream Alu (Alu U) and a downstream Alu (Alu D) respectively, was estimated based on sequence analysis among eight individuals of diverse ethnic backgrounds. None of these individuals demonstrated identical sequences within a 950 base region consisting of these two Alu elements. The hypervariability of this genetic region in the nuclear genome yields a potentially powerful tool for human population studies, forensics and paternity. Additionally, the mutation rate of Alu U among non-human hominoids was also accelerated, although to a lesser extent of roughly 3-fold that of other Alu elements. Sequence analysis of various Hominoidea species demonstrated its utility as a phylogenetic tool. The mechanism for the hypervariability in mutation rates is unclear, but may be accelerated as a result of Alu-mediated gene conversion in the human lineage.

  6. Subsurface metagenomes uncover a vast repertoire of hypervariable proteins encoded by genetic elements in uncultivated organisms and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B. G.; Burstein, D.; Castelle, C. J.; Banfield, J. F.; Valentine, D. L.; Miller, J. F.; Ghosh, P.; Handa, S.; Arambula, D.; Czornyj, E.; Thomas, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    Uncultivated microorganisms primarily account for the remarkable diversity harbored in subsurface environments and represent an expansive subset of the current Tree of Life. Recent metagenomic efforts to investigate subsurface biomes have unveiled an array of bacterial and archaeal candidate phyla, whose members have minimal genomes and an apparent host-dependent existence. Still, little is known about the adaptive strategies that mediate host interactions in these organisms or their viruses. Genomic features known as diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), which guide variability into targeted genes, were recently discovered in two single-cell genomes of uncultivated nanoarchaea, and independently in the genome of a marine virus from methane seep sediments. These prodigious drivers of protein hypervariability were first identified as the key force behind phage tail fiber diversification for binding different host receptors. Since their discovery, approximately 500 new DGRs have been found across a wide range of bacterial genomes representing various niches. We identified an unexpected 1136 distinct diversifiers from a single groundwater environment in reconstructed microbial genomes and genome fragments. The newly detected DGRs - predominantly linked to members of the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) - appear to target genes associated with cell-cell attachment, signaling, and transcription regulation. These findings suggest that targeted protein diversification may have an important role in regulating symbiotic or parasitic associations in groundwater microbiomes.

  7. The complementarity-determining region sequences in IgY antivenom hypervariable regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitirana da Rocha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity" (da Rocha et al., 2017 [1]. Complementarity-determining region (CDR sequences are variable antibody (Ab sequences that respond with specificity, duration and strength to identify and bind to antigen (Ag epitopes. B lymphocytes isolated from hens immunized with Bitis arietans (Ba and anti-Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt venoms and expressing high specificity, affinity and toxicity neutralizing antibody titers were used as DNA sources. The VLF1, CDR1, CDR2, VLR1 and CDR3 sequences were validated by BLASTp, and values corresponding to IgY VL and VH anti-Ba or anti-Cdt venoms were identified, registered [Gallus gallus IgY Fv Light chain (GU815099/Gallus gallus IgY Fv Heavy chain (GU815098] and used for molecular modeling of IgY scFv anti-Ba. The resulting CDR1, CDR2 and CDR3 sequences were combined to construct the three - dimensional structure of the Ab paratope.

  8. Hyper-variable regions in 18S rDNA of Strongyloides spp. as markers for species-specific diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Hayashida, Shotaro; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Four hyper-variable regions (HVR-I to -IV) found in 18S ribosomal DNA sequences were compared among 34 isolates of 15 species of the genus Strongyloides to evaluate their diagnostic value. HVR-I to -III were short, and plural species exhibit the same nucleotide arrangement. Meanwhile, HVR-IV had 23 to 39 nucleotides, showing species-specific arrangements, except Strongyloides ransomi and Strongyloides venezuelensis, which had the same nucleotide sequence in HVR-IV but were readily distinguished by the difference in HVR-I and -III. Isolates of Strongyloides stercoralis from humans of USA, Japan, and Philippines, chimpanzees, and dogs had an identical sequence in this region. Meanwhile, intraspecific polymorphism in HVR-IV nucleotide arrangement was observed among isolates of Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides callosciureus, presumably reflecting process of geographical dispersal and adaptation to the hosts.

  9. The hypervariable region of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein escapes antibody attack by antigenic variation and weak immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Waldemarsson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Sequence variation of antigenic proteins allows pathogens to evade antibody attack. The variable protein commonly includes a hypervariable region (HVR), which represents a key target for antibodies and is therefore predicted to be immunodominant. To understand the mechanism(s) of antibody evasion...

  10. A polymorphic and hypervariable locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the CBA/H mouse sex chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennelly, J.; Laval, S.; Wright, E.; Plumb, M. [MRC Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    We have identified a genomic locus (DXYH1) that is polymorphic and hypervariable within the CBA/H colony. Using a panel of C57BL/6 x Mus spretus backcross offspring, it was mapped to the distal end of the X chromosome. Pseudoautosomal inheritance was demonstrated through three generations of CBA/H x CBA/H and CBA/H x C57BL/6 crosses and confirmed through linkage to the Sxr locus in X/Y Sxr x 3H1 crosses. Meiotic recombination frequencies place DXYH1 {approximately}28% into the pseudoautosomal region from the boundary. The de novo generation of CBA/H variant DXYH1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms during spermatogenesis is suggestive of the germline instability associated with hypermutable human minisatellites. The absence of DXY1-related sequences in Mus spretus provides DNA sequence evidence to support the observed failure of X-Y pairing during meiosis and consequent hybrid infertility in C57BL/6 x Mus spretus male F1 offspring. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  11. 16S Classifier: A Tool for Fast and Accurate Taxonomic Classification of 16S rRNA Hypervariable Regions in Metagenomic Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nikhil; Sharma, Ashok K.; Agarwal, Piyush; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of microbial species in a metagenomic study is commonly assessed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. With the rapid developments in genome sequencing technologies, the focus has shifted towards the sequencing of hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene instead of full length gene sequencing. Therefore, 16S Classifier is developed using a machine learning method, Random Forest, for faster and accurate taxonomic classification of short hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA sequence. It displayed precision values of up to 0.91 on training datasets and the precision values of up to 0.98 on the test dataset. On real metagenomic datasets, it showed up to 99.7% accuracy at the phylum level and up to 99.0% accuracy at the genus level. 16S Classifier is available freely at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/16Sclassifier and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/16Sclassifier. PMID:25646627

  12. Analysis of mtDNA hypervariable region II for increasing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... Mitochondrial DNA is a useful genetic marker for answering evolutionary questions due to its high copy number, maternal mode of inheritance, and its high rate of evolution. The aims of this research were to study the mitochondria noncoding region by using the sanger sequencing technique and establish ...

  13. Analysis of mtDNA hypervariable region II for increasing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial DNA is a useful genetic marker for answering evolutionary questions due to its high copy number, maternal mode of inheritance, and its high rate of evolution. The aims of this research were to study the mitochondria noncoding region by using the sanger sequencing technique and establish the degree of ...

  14. A method for studying protistan diversity using massively parallel sequencing of V9 hypervariable regions of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A Amaral-Zettler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel pyrosequencing of amplicons from the V6 hypervariable regions of small-subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes is commonly used to assess diversity and richness in bacterial and archaeal populations. Recent advances in pyrosequencing technology provide read lengths of up to 240 nucleotides. Amplicon pyrosequencing can now be applied to longer variable regions of the SSU rRNA gene including the V9 region in eukaryotes.We present a protocol for the amplicon pyrosequencing of V9 regions for eukaryotic environmental samples for biodiversity inventories and species richness estimation. The International Census of Marine Microbes (ICoMM and the Microbial Inventory Research Across Diverse Aquatic Long Term Ecological Research Sites (MIRADA-LTERs projects are already employing this protocol for tag sequencing of eukaryotic samples in a wide diversity of both marine and freshwater environments.Massively parallel pyrosequencing of eukaryotic V9 hypervariable regions of SSU rRNA genes provides a means of estimating species richness from deeply-sampled populations and for discovering novel species from the environment.

  15. Evolutionary and functional implications of hypervariable loci within the skin virome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey D. Hannigan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Localized genomic variability is crucial for the ongoing conflicts between infectious microbes and their hosts. An understanding of evolutionary and adaptive patterns associated with genomic variability will help guide development of vaccines and antimicrobial agents. While most analyses of the human microbiome have focused on taxonomic classification and gene annotation, we investigated genomic variation of skin-associated viral communities. We evaluated patterns of viral genomic variation across 16 healthy human volunteers. Human papillomavirus (HPV and Staphylococcus phages contained 106 and 465 regions of diversification, or hypervariable loci, respectively. Propionibacterium phage genomes were minimally divergent and contained no hypervariable loci. Genes containing hypervariable loci were involved in functions including host tropism and immune evasion. HPV and Staphylococcus phage hypervariable loci were associated with purifying selection. Amino acid substitution patterns were virus dependent, as were predictions of their phenotypic effects. We identified diversity generating retroelements as one likely mechanism driving hypervariability. We validated these findings in an independently collected skin metagenomic sequence dataset, suggesting that these features of skin virome genomic variability are widespread. Our results highlight the genomic variation landscape of the skin virome and provide a foundation for better understanding community viral evolution and the functional implications of genomic diversification of skin viruses.

  16. Peptide-Based Vaccinology: Experimental and Computational Approaches to Target Hypervariable Viruses through the Fine Characterization of Protective Epitopes Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and the Identification of T-Cell-Activating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Castelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining immunogenic domains of viral proteins capable of eliciting a protective immune response is crucial in the development of novel epitope-based prophylactic strategies. This is particularly important for the selective targeting of conserved regions shared among hypervariable viruses. Studying postinfection and postimmunization sera, as well as cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, still represents the best approach to identify protective epitopes. In particular, a protective mAb directed against conserved regions can play a key role in immunogen design and in human therapy as well. Experimental approaches aiming to characterize protective mAb epitopes or to identify T-cell-activating peptides are often burdened by technical limitations and can require long time to be correctly addressed. Thus, in the last decade many epitope predictive algorithms have been developed. These algorithms are continually evolving, and their use to address the empirical research is widely increasing. Here, we review several strategies based on experimental techniques alone or addressed by in silico analysis that are frequently used to predict immunogens to be included in novel epitope-based vaccine approaches. We will list the main strategies aiming to design a new vaccine preparation conferring the protection of a neutralizing mAb combined with an effective cell-mediated response.

  17. A comparison of the crystal structures of eukaryotic and bacterial SSU ribosomal RNAs reveals common structural features in the hypervariable regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung C Lee

    Full Text Available While the majority of the ribosomal RNA structure is conserved in the three major domains of life--archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes, specific regions of the rRNA structure are unique to at least one of these three primary forms of life. In particular, the comparative secondary structure for the eukaryotic SSU rRNA contains several regions that are different from the analogous regions in the bacteria. Our detailed analysis of two recently determined eukaryotic 40S ribosomal crystal structures, Tetrahymena thermophila and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the comparison of these results with the bacterial Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal crystal structure: (1 revealed that the vast majority of the comparative structure model for the eukaryotic SSU rRNA is substantiated, including the secondary structure that is similar to both bacteria and archaea as well as specific for the eukaryotes, (2 resolved the secondary structure for regions of the eukaryotic SSU rRNA that were not determined with comparative methods, (3 identified eukaryotic helices that are equivalent to the bacterial helices in several of the hypervariable regions, (4 revealed that, while the coaxially stacked compound helix in the 540 region in the central domain maintains the constant length of 10 base pairs, its two constituent helices contain 5+5 bp rather than the 6+4 bp predicted with comparative analysis of archaeal and eukaryotic SSU rRNAs.

  18. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterisation of caecum and crop microbiota of Indian indigenous chicken targeting multiple hypervariable regions within 16S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S; Saxena, V K; Tomar, S; Sapcota, D; Gonmei, G

    2016-06-01

    A comparative analysis of caecum and crop microbiota of chick, grower and adult stages of Indian indigenous chickens was conducted to investigate the role of the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract, which play an important role in host performance, health and immunity. High-throughput Illumina sequencing was performed for V3, V4 and V4-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. M5RNA and M5NR databases under MG-RAST were used for metagenomic datasets annotation. In the crop, Firmicutes (~78%) and Proteobacteria (~16%) were the predominant phyla whereas in the caecum, Firmicutes (~50%), Bacteroidetes (~29%) and Actinobacteria (~10%) were predominant. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index suggested that sample richness and diversity increased as the chicken aged. For the first time, the presence of Lactobacillus species such as L. frumenti, L. antri, L. mucosae in the chicken crop along with Kineococcus radiotolerans, Desulfohalobium retbaense and L. jensenii in the caecum are reported. Many of these bacterial species have been found to be involved in immune response modulation and disease prevention in pigs and humans. The gut microbiome of the indigenous chicken was enriched with microbes having probiotic potential which might be essential for their adaptability.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of OVOL genes illustrates a conserved C2H2 zinc finger domain coupled by hypervariable unstructured regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Kumar

    Full Text Available OVO-like proteins (OVOL are members of the zinc finger protein family and serve as transcription factors to regulate gene expression in various differentiation processes. Recent studies have shown that OVOL genes are involved in epithelial development and differentiation in a wide variety of organisms; yet there is a lack of comprehensive studies that describe OVOL proteins from an evolutionary perspective. Using comparative genomic analysis, we traced three different OVOL genes (OVOL1-3 in vertebrates. One gene, OVOL3, was duplicated during a whole-genome-duplication event in fish, but only the copy (OVOL3b was retained. From early-branching metazoa to humans, we found that a core domain, comprising a tetrad of C2H2 zinc fingers, is conserved. By domain comparison of the OVOL proteins, we found that they evolved in different metazoan lineages by attaching intrinsically-disordered (ID segments of N/C-terminal extensions of 100 to 1000 amino acids to this conserved core. These ID regions originated independently across different animal lineages giving rise to different types of OVOL genes over the course of metazoan evolution. We illustrated the molecular evolution of metazoan OVOL genes over a period of 700 million years (MY. This study both extends our current understanding of the structure/function relationship of metazoan OVOL genes, and assembles a good platform for further characterization of OVOL genes from diverged organisms.

  1. The central, surface-exposed region of the flagellar hook protein FlgE of Campylobacter jejuni shows hypervariability among strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüneberg, E; Glenn-Calvo, E; Hartmann, M; Bär, W; Frosch, M

    1998-07-01

    In a previous study, we observed that monoclonal antibodies raised against the hook protein FlgE of Campylobacter jejuni LIO 36, isolate 5226, bound exclusively to this strain. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis for these binding specificities. The hook protein-encoding gene flgE of C. jejuni was cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The flgE genes of four additional C. jejuni strains were amplified by PCR and also sequenced. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed a high degree of variability in the central parts of the FlgE proteins among the strains, including variable and hypervariable domains. These findings may indicate a selective pressure of C. jejuni hosts, forcing the bacteria to generate variations in surface-exposed antigenic determinants.

  2. [The impact of conservative and hypervariable immunodominant epitopes in internal proteins of the influenza A virus on cytotoxic T-cell immune responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naikhin, A N; Losev, I V

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-cell immune response plays an important role in the prevention of influenza infection and reducing of the illness severity. The knowledge about mechanisms of the virus-specific CD8+ T-cell induction in humans is necessary for better understanding of influenza epidemiology and vaccine development. Due to application of new immunological and genetic methods in last years, considerable amount of.data became available in the literature about CD8+ T-cell immune responses to different influenza A viruses. This review summarizes these data. The main attention is paid to (i) heterosubtypic CTL responses to conservative immunodominant sites; (ii) mechanisms of viral escape from the virus-specific CTLs by means of evolutional escape-mutations; (iii) influence of the HLA haplotype on CD8+ T-cell immune responses. The importance of these data for immunology and vaccinology is discussed.

  3. Emergence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus deletion mutants: Correlation with the porcine antibody response to a hypervariable site in the ORF 3 structural glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Toft, P.

    2000-01-01

    reading frames, the same PRRSV genetic locus codes for the ORF 3 "RKASLSTS" sequence, and a previously described ORF 4 epitope (Meulenherg, J. J. M., Van Nieuwstadt, A. P,, Van Essen-Zandbergen, A., and Langeveld, J. P. M., 1997, J. Virol. 71, 6061-6067). Sequence analysis identified naturally occurring...... deletion mutants at this ORF 3/4 site. Phylogenetic analysis showed the presence of a highly accurate ORF 3 molecular clock, according to which deletion mutants and nondeleted viruses evolved at differing speeds. Furthermore, deletion mutants and nondeleted viruses evolved as separate lineages...

  4. Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Two Liquors of Soy Sauce Aroma as Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 Hypervariable Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Tang, Xiaoxin; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Ximin; Xu, Xiaorong

    2017-01-01

    Chinese liquor is one of the world's oldest distilled alcoholic beverages and an important commercial fermented product in China. The Chinese liquor fermentation process has three stages: making Daqu (the starter), stacking fermentation on the ground, and liquor fermentation in pits. We investigated the bacterial diversity of Maotai and Guotai Daqu and liquor fermentation using high-throughput sequencing of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 70,297 sequences were obtained from the Daqu samples and clustered into 17 phyla. The composition of the bacterial communities in the Daqu from these two soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors was the same, although some bacterial species changed in abundance. Between the Daqu and liquor fermentation samples, 12 bacterial phyla increased. The abundance of Lactobacillus and Pseudomonas increased in the liquor fermentation. This study has used high-throughput sequencing to provide new insights into the bacterial composition of the Chinese liquor Daqu and fermentation. Similarities in the distribution of bacteria in the soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors Daqu suggest that the abundance of bacteria might be generally concerned to other liquor. PMID:28337455

  5. Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Two Liquors of Soy Sauce Aroma as Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 Hypervariable Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Tang, Xiaoxin; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Ximin; Xu, Xiaorong; Yi, Yin

    2017-01-01

    Chinese liquor is one of the world's oldest distilled alcoholic beverages and an important commercial fermented product in China. The Chinese liquor fermentation process has three stages: making Daqu (the starter), stacking fermentation on the ground, and liquor fermentation in pits. We investigated the bacterial diversity of Maotai and Guotai Daqu and liquor fermentation using high-throughput sequencing of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 70,297 sequences were obtained from the Daqu samples and clustered into 17 phyla. The composition of the bacterial communities in the Daqu from these two soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors was the same, although some bacterial species changed in abundance. Between the Daqu and liquor fermentation samples, 12 bacterial phyla increased. The abundance of Lactobacillus and Pseudomonas increased in the liquor fermentation. This study has used high-throughput sequencing to provide new insights into the bacterial composition of the Chinese liquor Daqu and fermentation. Similarities in the distribution of bacteria in the soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors Daqu suggest that the abundance of bacteria might be generally concerned to other liquor.

  6. Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Two Liquors of Soy Sauce Aroma as Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 Hypervariable Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese liquor is one of the world’s oldest distilled alcoholic beverages and an important commercial fermented product in China. The Chinese liquor fermentation process has three stages: making Daqu (the starter, stacking fermentation on the ground, and liquor fermentation in pits. We investigated the bacterial diversity of Maotai and Guotai Daqu and liquor fermentation using high-throughput sequencing of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 70,297 sequences were obtained from the Daqu samples and clustered into 17 phyla. The composition of the bacterial communities in the Daqu from these two soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors was the same, although some bacterial species changed in abundance. Between the Daqu and liquor fermentation samples, 12 bacterial phyla increased. The abundance of Lactobacillus and Pseudomonas increased in the liquor fermentation. This study has used high-throughput sequencing to provide new insights into the bacterial composition of the Chinese liquor Daqu and fermentation. Similarities in the distribution of bacteria in the soy sauce aroma-style Chinese liquors Daqu suggest that the abundance of bacteria might be generally concerned to other liquor.

  7. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Lannergård, Jonas; Nilsson, Olof Rickard

    2013-01-01

    represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited...... to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed...

  8. The Campylobacter jejuni Oxidative Stress Regulator RrpB Is Associated with a Genomic Hypervariable Region and Altered Oxidative Stress Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Ozan; da Silva, Daiani T.; Mohammad, Banaz; Elmi, Abdi; Wren, Brendan W.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. Despite the microaerophilic nature of the bacterium, C. jejuni can survive the atmospheric oxygen conditions in the environment. Bacteria that can survive either within a host or in the environment like C. jejuni require variable responses to survive the stresses associated with exposure to different levels of reactive oxygen species. The MarR-type transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB have recently been shown to play a role in controlling both the C. jejuni oxidative and aerobic stress responses. Analysis of 3,746 C. jejuni and 486 C. coli genome sequences showed that whilst rrpA is present in over 99% of C. jejuni strains, the presence of rrpB is restricted and appears to correlate with specific MLST clonal complexes (predominantly ST-21 and ST-61). C. coli strains in contrast lack both rrpA and rrpB. In C. jejuni rrpB+ strains, the rrpB gene is located within a variable genomic region containing the IF subtype of the type I Restriction-Modification (hsd) system, whilst this variable genomic region in C. jejuni rrpB- strains contains the IAB subtype hsd system and not the rrpB gene. C. jejuni rrpB- strains exhibit greater resistance to peroxide and aerobic stress than C. jejuni rrpB+ strains. Inactivation of rrpA resulted in increased sensitivity to peroxide stress in rrpB+ strains, but not in rrpB- strains. Mutation of rrpA resulted in reduced killing of Galleria mellonella larvae and enhanced biofilm formation independent of rrpB status. The oxidative and aerobic stress responses of rrpB- and rrpB+ strains suggest adaptation of C. jejuni within different hosts and niches that can be linked to specific MLST clonal complexes. PMID:28082970

  9. The hypervariable amino-terminus of P1 protease modulates potyviral replication and host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pasin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The replication of many RNA viruses involves the translation of polyproteins, whose processing by endopeptidases is a critical step for the release of functional subunits. P1 is the first protease encoded in plant potyvirus genomes; once activated by an as-yet-unknown host factor, it acts in cis on its own C-terminal end, hydrolyzing the P1-HCPro junction. Earlier research suggests that P1 cooperates with HCPro to inhibit host RNA silencing defenses. Using Plum pox virus as a model, we show that although P1 does not have a major direct role in RNA silencing suppression, it can indeed modulate HCPro function by its self-cleavage activity. To study P1 protease regulation, we used bioinformatic analysis and in vitro activity experiments to map the core C-terminal catalytic domain. We present evidence that the hypervariable region that precedes the protease domain is predicted as intrinsically disordered, and that it behaves as a negative regulator of P1 proteolytic activity in in vitro cleavage assays. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic regulator is associated with greater symptom severity, induction of salicylate-dependent pathogenesis-related proteins, and reduced viral loads. We suggest that fine modulation of a viral protease activity has evolved to keep viral amplification below host-detrimental levels, and thus to maintain higher long-term replicative capacity.

  10. Inter and intra-host variability of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a hypervariable envelope coding domains followed for a 4-11 year of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection and highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sede, Mariano; Jones, Leandro Roberto; Moretti, Franco; Laufer, Natalia; Quarleri, Jorge

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) quasispecies in patients with HIV-1 coinfection is not fully understood. The HCV-1a quasispecies heterogeneity was analyzed at inter and intra-host levels along 7.6 years in 21 coinfected patients that showed different virological and immunological responses to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Two to nine serial samples were subjected to direct and clonal sequence analyses of the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2) gene. E2-based phylogenies, intra-host HCV evolution and evolutionary rates, as well as dynamics of the quasispecies heterogeneity parameters were evaluated. Bayesian coalescent phylogenies indicated complex evolutionary histories, revealing some viral lineages that persisted along the follow up and others that were detectable at a single or some sampling times, suggesting the occurrence of emergence-extinction cycles. HCV quasispecies underwent very rapid evolution in HAART-treated patients (~3.1 × 10(-2) sub/site/year) following the recovery of the host immunocompetence irrespectively of the virological response to HAART. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring microbial diversity and taxonomy using SSU rRNA hypervariable tag sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Huse

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel pyrosequencing of hypervariable regions from small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA genes can sample a microbial community two or three orders of magnitude more deeply per dollar and per hour than capillary sequencing of full-length SSU rRNA. As with full-length rRNA surveys, each sequence read is a tag surrogate for a single microbe. However, rather than assigning taxonomy by creating gene trees de novo that include all experimental sequences and certain reference taxa, we compare the hypervariable region tags to an extensive database of rRNA sequences and assign taxonomy based on the best match in a Global Alignment for Sequence Taxonomy (GAST process. The resulting taxonomic census provides information on both composition and diversity of the microbial community. To determine the effectiveness of using only hypervariable region tags for assessing microbial community membership, we compared the taxonomy assigned to the V3 and V6 hypervariable regions with the taxonomy assigned to full-length SSU rRNA sequences isolated from both the human gut and a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. The hypervariable region tags and full-length rRNA sequences provided equivalent taxonomy and measures of relative abundance of microbial communities, even for tags up to 15% divergent from their nearest reference match. The greater sampling depth per dollar afforded by massively parallel pyrosequencing reveals many more members of the "rare biosphere" than does capillary sequencing of the full-length gene. In addition, tag sequencing eliminates cloning bias and the sequences are short enough to be completely sequenced in a single read, maximizing the number of organisms sampled in a run while minimizing chimera formation. This technique allows the cost-effective exploration of changes in microbial community structure, including the rare biosphere, over space and time and can be applied immediately to initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project.

  12. The hepatitis C virus persistence: how to evade the immune system?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: CTL, Cytotoxic T lymphocytes; DCs, dendritic cells; HCV, hepatitis C virus; HVR1, hypervariable region 1;. IRES, internal ribsomal entry ... mechanisms would help design new therapeutic targets. [Pavio N and Lai M M C 2003 ... The IRES contains four stem-loops which recruit translation initiation factors ...

  13. Importance of purine and pyrimidine content of local nucleotide sequences (six bases long) for evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, H

    1991-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolves rapidly, and random base change is thought to act as a major factor in this evolution. However, segments of the viral genome differ in their variability: there is the highly variable env gene, particularly hypervariable regions located within env, and, in contrast, the conservative gag and pol genes. Computer analysis of the nucleotide sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates reveals that base substitution in this virus is nonrandom and affected by local nucleotide sequences. Certain local sequences 6 base pairs long are excessively frequent in the hypervariable regions. These sequences exhibit base-substitution hotspots at specific positions in their 6 bases. The hotspots tend to be nonsilent letters of codons in the hypervariable regions--thus leading to marked amino acid substitutions there. Conversely, in the conservative gag and pol genes the hotspots tend to be silent letters because of a difference in codon frame from the hypervariable regions. Furthermore, base substitutions in the local sequences that frequently appear in the conservative genes occurred at a low level, even within the variable env. Thus, despite the high variability of this virus, the conservative genes and their products could be conserved. These may be some of the strategies evolved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to allow for positive-selection pressures, such as the host immune system, and negative-selection pressures on the conservative gene products.

  14. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability are responsible for recognition of human C4b-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Sophia P Hirakis; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of...

  15. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J; Hirakis, Sophia P; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-09-05

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ∼90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant 'reading head' in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design.

  16. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-09-05

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M–C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design.

  17. Revisiting the phylogeny of Zoanthidea (Cnidaria: Anthozoa): Staggered alignment of hypervariable sequences improves species tree inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D

    2018-01-01

    The recent rapid proliferation of novel taxon identification in the Zoanthidea has been accompanied by a parallel propagation of gene trees as a tool of species discovery, but not a corresponding increase in our understanding of phylogeny. This disparity is caused by the trade-off between the capabilities of automated DNA sequence alignment and data content of genes applied to phylogenetic inference in this group. Conserved genes or segments are easily aligned across the order, but produce poorly resolved trees; hypervariable genes or segments contain the evolutionary signal necessary for resolution and robust support, but sequence alignment is daunting. Staggered alignments are a form of phylogeny-informed sequence alignment composed of a mosaic of local and universal regions that allow phylogenetic inference to be applied to all nucleotides from both hypervariable and conserved gene segments. Comparisons between species tree phylogenies inferred from all data (staggered alignment) and hypervariable-excluded data (standard alignment) demonstrate improved confidence and greater topological agreement with other sources of data for the complete-data tree. This novel phylogeny is the most comprehensive to date (in terms of taxa and data) and can serve as an expandable tool for evolutionary hypothesis testing in the Zoanthidea. Spanish language abstract available in Text S1. Translation by L. O. Swain, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, 60604, USA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regional aggressive root resorption caused by neuronal virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger; Strøm, Carsten; Worsaae, Nils

    2012-01-01

    occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One...... of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process...... stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface...

  19. Regional Aggressive Root Resorption Caused by Neuronal Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, root resorption can occur unexplainably. No clear distinction has been made between resorption located within specific regions and resorption occurring generally in the dentition. The purpose is to present cases with idiopathic (of unknown origin root resorption occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface against resorption. Therefore, the normal nerve pattern is important for diagnostics and for predicting the course of severe unexpected root resorption.

  20. Identification of Hepatitis C Virus Transmission Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Vazquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Ruíz-Pacheco, Juan Alberto; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a transmission event of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among injection drug users. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to assess the intrahost viral genetic variation. Deep amplicon sequencing of HCV hypervariable region 1 allowed for a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population. Establishment of the genetic relatedness between cases was accomplished by phylogenetic analysis. NGS is a powerful tool with applications in molecular epidemiology studies and outbreak investigations. PMID:22301026

  1. Identification of Hepatitis C Virus Transmission Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Vazquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Ruíz-Pacheco, Juan Alberto; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a transmission event of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among injection drug users. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to assess the intrahost viral genetic variation. Deep amplicon sequencing of HCV hypervariable region 1 allowed for a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population. Establishment of the genetic relatedness between cases was accomplished by phylogenetic analysis. NGS is a powerful tool with applications in molecular epidemiology studies and outbre...

  2. Forensic analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region HVII ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... Analyzer. New polymorphic positions 57, 63, 101, 469 and 482 are described that may be very important for forensic identification purpose in the future. This study shows the importance of the adoption of mitochondria in forensic medicine and criminal diagnosis and a private Iraqi society was discovered as.

  3. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... degradation; third, higher rate of evolution: DNA alterations (mutations) occur in a number of ... The result is that the rate of change, or evolutionary rate, of mitochondrial DNA is about five times greater .... example mass graves in mass disasters, there are newly discovered forensically validated methods ...

  4. Attenuation of monkeypox virus by deletion of genomic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera, Juan G.; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging pathogen from Africa that causes disease similar to smallpox. Two clades with different geographic distributions and virulence have been described. Here, we utilized bioinformatic tools to identify genomic regions in MPXV containing multiple virulence genes and explored their roles in pathogenicity; two selected regions were then deleted singularly or in combination. In vitro and in vivostudies indicated that these regions play a significant role in MPXV replication, tissue spread, and mortality in mice. Interestingly, while deletion of either region led to decreased virulence in mice, one region had no effect on in vitro replication. Deletion of both regions simultaneously also reduced cell culture replication and significantly increased the attenuation in vivo over either single deletion. Attenuated MPXV with genomic deletions present a safe and efficacious tool in the study of MPX pathogenesis and in the identification of genetic factors associated with virulence.

  5. Current situation, genetic relationship and control measures of infectious bronchitis virus variants circulating in African regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Khataby

    2016-08-01

    Three S1 gene hypervariable regions were studied and compared to the reference genotypes/serotypes that found emerging in African regions. This comparison was based on phylogenetic trees, nucleotide and amino-acid sequence analysis. It clearly appears that IBV variants reported in Africa, display a low genetic relationship between them and with the majority of the reference strains emerging in neighboring countries, except the case of variants from Libya and Egypt that show a high relatedness. Also the Massachusetts serotypes were the most prevalent co-circulating with both serotypes, Italy02 type in Morocco and Qx-like genotype in South part of the African continent. In order to control the IBV variants in African regions, an efficient vaccination strategy program should be implemented.

  6. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability are responsible for recognition of human C4b-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complex with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies targeting the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design. PMID:27595425

  7. Usutu virus persistence and West Nile virus inactivity in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Mattia; Bonilauri, Paolo; Bellini, Romeo; Albieri, Alessandro; Defilippo, Francesco; Tamba, Marco; Tassinari, Massimo; Gelati, Antonio; Cordioli, Paolo; Angelini, Paola; Dottori, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of West Nile virus and Usutu virus was detected in the Emilia-Romagna region in 2008 and 2009. To evaluate the extent of circulation of both viruses, environmental surveillance, based on bird and mosquito testing, was conducted in 2008 and gradually improved over the years. In February-March 2009-2011, 5,993 hibernating mosquitoes were manually sampled, out of which 80.1% were Culex pipiens; none tested positive for the viruses. From 2008 to 2011, 946,213 mosquitoes, sampled between May and October, were tested; 86.5% were Cx. pipiens. West Nile virus was detected in 32 Cx. pipiens pools, and Usutu virus was detected in 229 mosquito pools (217 Cx. pipiens, 10 Aedes albopictus, one Anopheles maculipennis s.l., and one Aedes caspius). From 2009 to 2011, of 4,546 birds collected, 42 tested positive for West Nile virus and 48 for Usutu virus. West Nile virus and Usutu virus showed different patterns of activity during the 2008-2011 surveillance period. West Nile virus was detected in 2008, 2009, and 2010, but not in 2011. Usutu virus, however, was continuously active throughout 2009, 2010, and 2011. The data strongly suggest that both viruses overwinter in the surveyed area rather than being continually reintroduced every season. The lack of hibernating mosquitoes testing positive for the viruses and the presence of positive birds sampled early in the season support the hypothesis that the viruses overwinter in birds rather than in mosquitoes. Herd immunity in key bird species could explain the decline of West Nile virus observed in 2011, while the persistence of Usutu virus may be explained by not yet identified reservoirs. Reported results are comparable with a peri-Mediterranean circulation of the West Nile virus lineage 1 related strain, which became undetectable in the environment after two to three years of obvious circulation.

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in the Maghreb region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Pineau, Pascal; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem with a worldwide prevalence of about 3% (around 170 million people). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is major concern in the Maghreb countries, Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia, but no detailed description of its epidemiology in the region is available. In the present review, a systematic search was undertaken covering HCV data available in peer-reviewed databases as well as institutional reports and regional conference meeting abstracts from the Maghreb countries. Reports written in English and French were included in this analysis. Estimates of national and regional prevalence of HCV infection (based on anti-HCV antibody) and of the size of patient populations were performed. In addition, the molecular features of the circulating viral strains in the region are discussed. A substantial proportion, 1.2-1.9% of the Maghreb inhabitants, have anti-HCV antibodies. Genotype 1b predominates among viral strains in all countries except in Libya, where genotype 4 is dominant as in neighboring Egypt. This epidemiological situation is of significant concern, and requires urgent, broad, and active intervention for the prevention and control of HCV. More specifically, the application of state-of-the-art hygiene procedures and rigorous controls in medical disciplines such as hemodialysis, transfusion, endoscopic procedures, and dentistry is necessary to reduce significantly the number of new infections in the region. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mutations in the S gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype D in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the 'a'-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to ...

  10. Diversification of West Nile virus in a subtropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mores Christopher N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile virus (WNV has spread across North, Central, and South America since its introduction in 1999. At the start of this spread, Florida was considered a potentially important area with regards to transmission due to its geographic, climatological, and demographic conditions. Curiously, the anticipated high levels of transmission or disease outbreaks have not been observed. As other studies have predicted that the lack of intense WNV transmission is not due to vector incompetence, we sought to evaluate the role of viral strain diversity in WNV transmission in Florida. Therefore, a phylogentic analysis was carried out on several isolates collected from three distinct locations in Florida. Results Contrasting with a positive control collected in Indian River County, Florida during 2003 that contains the original NY99 genotype with valanine at amino acid 159 of the envelope region, all of the isolates collected in 2005 contain the WN02 genotype composed of a substation with alanine at that position indicating the window of introduction of the WN02 genotype occurred between 2003 and 2005. From the eight isolates collected in Duval, Indian River, and Manatee Counties; there is also a silent nucleotide substitution that differentiates the isolates collected on the Atlantic side of the state compared to the isolate collected on the Gulf side, which groups closer to isolates from other locations near the Gulf. Conclusion As a whole, the Florida isolates contained numerous variable nucleotide and amino acid sites from the reference sequences, as well as each other; indicating greater nucleotide diversity within the Florida 2005 isolates than within other regions. Finally, a series of three amino acid substitutions surrounding a set of histidines located in the envelope coding region that hypothesized to play a role in conformational changes was found in the isolate collected in Indian River County, perhaps changing the

  11. Prevalence of honeybee viruses in different regions of China and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, G; Fondevila, N; Palacio, M A; Merke, J; Martinez, A; Camacho, B; Aignasse, A; Figini, E; Rodriguez, G; Lv, L; Liu, Z; Shi, W

    2016-12-01

    Honeybees are threatened by various pathogens and parasites. More than 18 viruses have been described in honeybees and many of them have been detected in China and Argentina. In China, both Apis cerana and Apis mellifera are raised. In Argentina, beekeepers raise different ecotypes of A. mellifera: European honeybees (in both temperate and subtropical regions) and Africanised honeybees (in subtropical areas only). A thorough study was carried out in both China and Argentina to analyse the current virus presence and distribution in different climatic zones and gather information on different bee species/subspecies. Adult honeybees were collected from apiaries in temperate and subtropical regions of China (including areas with exclusive populations of A. mellifera, areas where A. mellifera and A. cerana co-exist, and areas with exclusive populations of A. cerana) and Argentina. Six viruses, namely, deformed wing virus (DWV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), sacbrood virus (SBV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) were detected in China, both in A. cerana and in A. mellifera, while four viruses (DWV, BQCV, CBPV and ABPV) were present in Argentina. Interestingly, multiple infections were commonly found in China, with up to five different viruses co-circulating in some colonies without apparent abnormalities. In this study, no Chinese samples were positive for slow bee paralysis virus. The most prevalent viruses were BQCV (China) and DWV (Argentina). Kashmir bee virus was absent from samples analysed for both countries. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

  12. Epidemiology of La Crosse Virus Emergence, Appalachia Region, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Sharon; Agusto, Folashade; Calabrese, Justin M; Muturi, Ephantus J; Fagan, William F

    2016-11-01

    La Crosse encephalitis is a viral disease that has emerged in new locations across the Appalachian region of the United States. Conventional wisdom suggests that ongoing emergence of La Crosse virus (LACV) could stem from the invasive Asian tiger (Aedes albopictus) mosquito. Efforts to prove this, however, are complicated by the numerous transmission routes and species interactions involved in LACV dynamics. To analyze LACV transmission by Asian tiger mosquitoes, we constructed epidemiologic models. These models accurately predict empirical infection rates. They do not, however, support the hypothesis that Asian tiger mosquitoes are responsible for the recent emergence of LACV at new foci. Consequently, we conclude that other factors, including different invasive mosquitoes, changes in climate variables, or changes in wildlife densities, should be considered as alternative explanations for recent increases in La Crosse encephalitis.

  13. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey of Viruses Affecting Legume Crops in the Amhara and Oromia Regions of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bekele

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Field surveys were undertaken to identify the viral diseases affecting lentil, faba bean, chickpea, pea, fenugreek and grass pea in two regions of Ethiopia. The surveys were conducted in the regions of Amhara (Gonder and Gojam administrative zones and Oromia (Bale administrative zone during the 2003/2004 and 2004/2005 growing seasons, respectively. The survey covered 138 randomly selected fields (48 faba bean, 10 pea, 38 grass pea, 34 chickpea, 8 lentil in the Amhara region, and 51 legume fields (29 faba bean, 12 pea, 3 lentil, 5 fenugreek, 2 chickpea in the Oromia region. Virus disease incidence was determined by laboratory testing of 100–200 randomly-collected samples from each field against the antisera of 12 legume viruses. Of the 189 fields surveyed, 121 and 7 had, at the time of the survey, a virus disease incidence of 1% or less and more than 6%, respectively, based on visual inspection in the field; later laboratory testing showed that the number of fields in these two categories was in fact 99 and 56, respectively. Serological tests indicated that the most important viruses in the Amhara region were Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV, Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV, Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV and the luteoviruses [e.g. Beet western yellows virus (BWYV, Bean leaf roll virus (BLRV, Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV]. By contrast, only FBNYV and the luteoviruses were detected in the Oromia region. Other viruses, such as Broad bean mottle virus (BBMV and Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV, were rarely detected in the Amhara region. This is the first report in Ethiopia of natural infection of faba bean, pea and fenugreek with SbDV, of fenugreek with BWYV, and of grass pea with BYMV, PSbMV and BWYV, and it is also the first recorded instance of BBMV infecting legume crops in Ethiopia.

  15. Manipulating adenovirus hexon hypervariable loops dictates immune neutralisation and coagulation factor X-dependent cell interaction in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiangtao; Duffy, Margaret R; Deng, Lin; Dakin, Rachel S; Uil, Taco; Custers, Jerome; Kelly, Sharon M; McVey, John H; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2015-02-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens, mostly targeting ocular, gastrointestinal and respiratory cells, but in some cases infection disseminates, presenting in severe clinical outcomes. Upon dissemination and contact with blood, coagulation factor X (FX) interacts directly with the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) hexon. FX can act as a bridge to bind heparan sulphate proteoglycans, leading to substantial Ad5 hepatocyte uptake. FX "coating" also protects the virus from host IgM and complement-mediated neutralisation. However, the contribution of FX in determining Ad liver transduction whilst simultaneously shielding the virus from immune attack remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the FX protection mechanism is not conserved amongst Ad types, and identify the hexon hypervariable regions (HVR) of Ad5 as the capsid proteins targeted by this host defense pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we manipulate Ad5 HVR interactions to interrogate the interplay between viral cell transduction and immune neutralisation. We show that FX and inhibitory serum components can co-compete and virus neutralisation is influenced by both the location and extent of modifications to the Ad5 HVRs. We engineered Ad5-derived HVRs into the rare, native non FX-binding Ad26 to create Ad26.HVR5C. This enabled the virus to interact with FX at high affinity, as quantified by surface plasmon resonance, FX-mediated cell binding and transduction assays. Concomitantly, Ad26.HVR5C was also sensitised to immune attack in the absence of FX, a direct consequence of the engineered HVRs from Ad5. In both immune competent and deficient animals, Ad26.HVR5C hepatic gene transfer was mediated by FX following intravenous delivery. This study gives mechanistic insight into the pivotal role of the Ad5 HVRs in conferring sensitivity to virus neutralisation by IgM and classical complement-mediated attack. Furthermore, through this gain-of-function approach we demonstrate the dual functionality of

  16. Manipulating adenovirus hexon hypervariable loops dictates immune neutralisation and coagulation factor X-dependent cell interaction in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are common pathogens, mostly targeting ocular, gastrointestinal and respiratory cells, but in some cases infection disseminates, presenting in severe clinical outcomes. Upon dissemination and contact with blood, coagulation factor X (FX interacts directly with the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 hexon. FX can act as a bridge to bind heparan sulphate proteoglycans, leading to substantial Ad5 hepatocyte uptake. FX "coating" also protects the virus from host IgM and complement-mediated neutralisation. However, the contribution of FX in determining Ad liver transduction whilst simultaneously shielding the virus from immune attack remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the FX protection mechanism is not conserved amongst Ad types, and identify the hexon hypervariable regions (HVR of Ad5 as the capsid proteins targeted by this host defense pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we manipulate Ad5 HVR interactions to interrogate the interplay between viral cell transduction and immune neutralisation. We show that FX and inhibitory serum components can co-compete and virus neutralisation is influenced by both the location and extent of modifications to the Ad5 HVRs. We engineered Ad5-derived HVRs into the rare, native non FX-binding Ad26 to create Ad26.HVR5C. This enabled the virus to interact with FX at high affinity, as quantified by surface plasmon resonance, FX-mediated cell binding and transduction assays. Concomitantly, Ad26.HVR5C was also sensitised to immune attack in the absence of FX, a direct consequence of the engineered HVRs from Ad5. In both immune competent and deficient animals, Ad26.HVR5C hepatic gene transfer was mediated by FX following intravenous delivery. This study gives mechanistic insight into the pivotal role of the Ad5 HVRs in conferring sensitivity to virus neutralisation by IgM and classical complement-mediated attack. Furthermore, through this gain-of-function approach we demonstrate the dual

  17. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    Full Text Available Abstract JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  18. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  19. Regions identity between the genome of vertebrates and non-retroviral families of insect viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Gaowei; Li, Jinming

    2011-11-10

    The scope of our understanding of the evolutionary history between viruses and animals is limited. The fact that the recent availability of many complete insect virus genomes and vertebrate genomes as well as the ability to screen these sequences makes it possible to gain a new perspective insight into the evolutionary interaction between insect viruses and vertebrates. This study is to determine the possibility of existence of sequence identity between the genomes of insect viruses and vertebrates, attempt to explain this phenomenon in term of genetic mobile element, and try to investigate the evolutionary relationship between these short regions of identity among these species. Some of studied insect viruses contain variable numbers of short regions of sequence identity to the genomes of vertebrate with nucleotide sequence length from 28 bp to 124 bp. They are found to locate in multiple sites of the vertebrate genomes. The ontology of animal genes with identical regions involves in several processes including chromatin remodeling, regulation of apoptosis, signaling pathway, nerve system development and some enzyme-like catalysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that at least some short regions of sequence identity in the genomes of vertebrate are derived the ancestral of insect viruses. Short regions of sequence identity were found in the vertebrates and insect viruses. These sequences played an important role not only in the long-term evolution of vertebrates, but also in promotion of insect virus. This typical win-win strategy may come from natural selection.

  20. Analysis of complete genomic sequences of isolates of the Sweet potato feathery mottle virus strains C and EA: molecular evidence for two distinct potyvirus species and two P1 protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiveros, Milton; Quispe, Dora; Kreuze, Jan

    2010-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the isolate C1 of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) strain C and the 5' region of several other strains were determined and analyzed together with the sequences of isolates representing the EA, RC and O strains. This provided molecular evidence for the reclassification of SPFMV strains into two species and the occurrence of a complex recombinant isolate. Analysis also revealed a hypervariable domain in the P1 protein, which separates an N-terminal region unique to SPFMV and members of the ipomovirus species Sweet potato mild mottle virus from the C-terminal protease domain, which is conserved among all potyviruses.

  1. Global morphological analysis of marine viruses shows minimal regional variation and dominance of non-tailed viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jennifer R; Schenck, Ryan O; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Viruses influence oceanic ecosystems by causing mortality of microorganisms, altering nutrient and organic matter flux via lysis and auxiliary metabolic gene expression and changing the trajectory of microbial evolution through horizontal gene transfer. Limited host range and differing genetic potential of individual virus types mean that investigations into the types of viruses that exist in the ocean and their spatial distribution throughout the world's oceans are critical to understanding the global impacts of marine viruses. Here we evaluate viral morphological characteristics (morphotype, capsid diameter and tail length) using a quantitative transmission electron microscopy (qTEM) method across six of the world's oceans and seas sampled through the Tara Oceans Expedition. Extensive experimental validation of the qTEM method shows that neither sample preservation nor preparation significantly alters natural viral morphological characteristics. The global sampling analysis demonstrated that morphological characteristics did not vary consistently with depth (surface versus deep chlorophyll maximum waters) or oceanic region. Instead, temperature, salinity and oxygen concentration, but not chlorophyll a concentration, were more explanatory in evaluating differences in viral assemblage morphological characteristics. Surprisingly, given that the majority of cultivated bacterial viruses are tailed, non-tailed viruses appear to numerically dominate the upper oceans as they comprised 51–92% of the viral particles observed. Together, these results document global marine viral morphological characteristics, show that their minimal variability is more explained by environmental conditions than geography and suggest that non-tailed viruses might represent the most ecologically important targets for future research. PMID:23635867

  2. Characterization of the Interactome of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Reveals the Hyper Variable Region as a Binding Platform for Association with 14-3-3 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yihong; Wu, Weining; Gao, Jiming; Smith, Nikki; Burkard, Christine; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Minxia; Wang, Chengbao; Archibald, Alan; Digard, Paul; Zhou, En-Min; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-05-06

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry worldwide and hence global food security, exacerbated by a newly emerged highly pathogenic (HP-PRRSV) strain from China. PRRSV nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) is a multifunctional polypeptide with strain-dependent influences on pathogenicity. A number of discrete functional regions have been identified on the protein. Quantitative label free proteomics was used to identify cellular binding partners of nsp2 expressed by HP-PRRSV. This allowed the identification of potential cellular interacting partners and the discrimination of nonspecific interactions. The interactome data were further investigated and validated using biological replicates and also compared with nsp2 from a low pathogenic (LP) strain of PRRSV. Validation included both forward and reverse pulldowns and confocal microscopy. The data indicated that nsp2 interacted with a number of cellular proteins including 14-3-3, CD2AP, and other components of cellular aggresomes. The hyper-variable region of nsp2 protein was identified as a binding platform for association with 14-3-3 proteins.

  3. Selection pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives sequence evolution during acute infection with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Kimberly A; Netski, Dale M; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Cox, Andrea L; Ray, Stuart C

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent characterization of hepatitis C virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear to what extent immune pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives viral sequence evolution in vivo. This lack of understanding is particularly evident in acute infection, the phase when elimination or persistence of viral replication is determined and during which the importance of the humoral immune response has been largely discounted. We analyzed envelope glycoprotein sequence evolution and neutralization of sequential autologous hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles in 8 individuals throughout acute infection. Amino acid substitutions occurred throughout the envelope genes, primarily within the hypervariable region 1 of E2. When individualized pseudoparticles expressing sequential envelope sequences were used to measure neutralization by autologous sera, antibodies neutralizing earlier sequence variants were detected at earlier time points than antibodies neutralizing later variants, indicating clearance and evolution of viral variants in response to pressure from neutralizing antibodies. To demonstrate the effects of amino acid substitution on neutralization, site-directed mutagenesis of a pseudoparticle envelope sequence revealed amino acid substitutions in hypervariable region 1 that were responsible for a dramatic decrease in neutralization sensitivity over time. In addition, high-titer neutralizing antibodies peaked at the time of viral clearance in all spontaneous resolvers, whereas chronically evolving subjects displayed low-titer or absent neutralizing antibodies throughout early acute infection. These findings indicate that, during acute hepatitis C virus infection in vivo, virus-specific neutralizing antibodies drive sequence evolution and, in some individuals, play a role in determining the outcome of infection.

  4. Influence of the Leader protein coding region of foot-and-mouth disease virus on virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    2013-01-01

    resulted in a previously undetected accumulation of frameshift mutations within the ‘spacer’ region. These mutations block the inappropriate fusion of amino acid sequences to the amino-terminus of the capsid protein precursor. Modification, by site-directed mutagenesis, of the Lab initiation codon...... on the nature and extent of the residual Leader protein sequences and on the host cell system used. FMDVs precisely lacking Lb and with the Lab initiation codon modified may represent safer seed viruses for vaccine production....

  5. The molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes A and O from 1998 to 2004 in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Jörn; Parlak, Ü.; Özyörük, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) causes significant economic losses in Turkish livestock. We have analysed the genetic diversity of the 1D sequences, encoding the hypervariable surface protein VP1, of Turkish isolates of serotype A and O collected from 1998 to 2004 in order to obtain...... the region encoding the immuno-dominant GH-loop. Also a close relationship to Foot-and-Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) serotype A isolates obtained from outbreaks in Iraq and Iran were detected and a clustering of isolates collected during the same period of time were found. The analysis of the deduced amino...

  6. Amino Acid Changes in the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal Region Control Virus Neutralization Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Bradley

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most HIV-1 vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies that are active against highly sensitive (tier-1 viruses or rare cases of vaccine-matched neutralization-resistant (tier-2 viruses, but no vaccine has induced antibodies that can broadly neutralize heterologous tier-2 viruses. In this study, we isolated antibodies from an HIV-1-infected individual that targeted the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER that may have selected single-residue changes in viral variants in the MPER that resulted in neutralization sensitivity to antibodies targeting distal epitopes on the HIV-1 Env. Similarly, a single change in the MPER in a second virus from another infected-individual also conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity. These gp41 single-residue changes thus transformed tier-2 viruses into tier-1 viruses that were sensitive to vaccine-elicited tier-1 neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate that Env amino acid changes within the MPER bnAb epitope of naturally-selected escape viruses can increase neutralization sensitivity to multiple types of neutralizing antibodies, and underscore the critical importance of the MPER for maintaining the integrity of the tier-2 HIV-1 trimer.

  7. Viruses of freshwater finfish in the asian-pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, P K; Goodwin, A E

    2012-09-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in global demand for marine and freshwater fish to meet the protein needs of our expanding human population. However, due to the limited capacity of the wild-capture sector and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture, particularly freshwater aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. A large number of aquatic animal species are farmed in high density in freshwater, brackish and marine systems, where they are exposed to new environments and potentially new diseases. Further, environmental stress factors, the use of manufactured feeds, and prolific global trade has led to the emergence and spread of new diseases. Viral pathogens, established for decades or newly emerging as disease threats, are particularly challenging since there are few efficacious treatments. Vaccines have been developed for some viral fish pathogens in salmonids, but vaccines are not available for many of the viral pathogens important in Asia. Control and eradication programs are difficult because many viral infections remain latent until adverse environmental conditions, such as overcrowding or poor water quality, trigger the onset of disease. Here, we review the more significant viral pathogens of finfish in the Asia-Pacific including both those with a long history in Asian aquaculture and emerging pathogens including betanodaviruses and koi herpes virus that have caused massive losses in the freshwater aquaculture and ornamental fish industries.

  8. Trends in Hepatitis B Virus Seroprevalence in Black Sea Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... 2018 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer ‑ Medknow. Context: To determine new strategies for complete coverage of hepatitis B virus. (HBV) vaccination, every country needs to take into concern factors of infection transmission in its own region. Aims: The aim of this study ...

  9. Identifying gp85-regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus binding to B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Vega, Erika; Patino, Helena; Garcia, Javier; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Guzman, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-06-18

    Epstein-Barr virus lacking glycoprotein gp85 cannot infect B-cells and epithelial cells. The gp85 belongs to the molecular complex required for virus invasion of B-lymphocyte or epithelial cells. Moreover, there is evidence that gp85 is necessary for virus attachment to epithelial cells. Thirty-six peptides from the entire gp85-sequence were tested in epithelial and lymphoblastoid cell line binding assays to identify gp85-regions involved in virus-cell interaction. Five of these peptides presented high binding activity to Raji, Ramos, P3HR-1, and HeLa cells, but not to erythrocytes; Raji-cell affinity constants were between 80 and 140nM. Of these five peptides, 11435 ((181)TYKRVTEKGDEHVLSLVFGK(200)), 11436 ((201)TKDLPDLRGPFSYPSLTSAQ(220)), and 11438 ((241)YFVPNLKDMFSRAVTMTAAS(260)) bound to a 65kDa protein on Raji-cell surface. These peptides and antibodies induced by them (recognising live EBV-infected cells) inhibited Epstein-Barr virus interaction with cord blood lymphocytes. It is thus probable that gp85-regions defined by peptides 11435, 11436, and 11438 are involved in EBV invasion of B-lymphocytes.

  10. Prevalence of Influenza Viruses (Influenza Like Illness In Regional Laboratory Avian Influenza Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-12-01

    Design and Method: Data from patients examined in the regional laboratory of avian influenza Semarang from April 2009 until December 2010 was collected. Samples were obtained from Malang sentinel, Yogyakarta sentinel and Semarang sentinel. Samples were examined using PCR to detect influenza A, influenza B, and swine flu. Result: out 1367 patients tested, 279 patients (20.41% were from Yogyakarta sentinel, 619 patients (45.28% were from Malang sentinel, and 467 patients (34.16% were from Semarang sentinel. Flu A virus was detected in 117 patients (8.5%. Influenza B virus was found in 39 patients (2.8%. H1 virus was detected in 5 patients (0.36%. H3 virus was detected in 45 patients (3.29%. Swine flu virus was detected in 3 patients in Malang. Conclusion: The highest prevalence of flu A and flu B examined in avian influenza regional laboratory Semarang was from Semarang sentinel, followed by Yogyakarta sentinel and Malang (Sains Medika, 3(2:157-161.

  11. [Molecular characteristics of dengue virus outbreak in China-Myanmar border region, Yunnan province, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofang; Yang, Mingdong; Jiang, Jinyong; Li, Huachang; Zhu, Chongge; Gui, Qin; Bu, Liqun; Zhou, Hongning

    2016-03-01

    To understand the molecular characteristics of a dengue virus outbreak in China-Myanmar border region, Yunnan province, 2015 and provide etiological evidence for the disease control and prevention. Semi-nested RTPCR was conducted to detect the capsid premembrane (CprM) gene of RNA of dengue virus by using dengue virus NS1 positive serum samples collected in Mengdin township, Gengma county, Yunnan province in July, 2015. Some positive samples were then detected by using PCR with specific primers to amplify the full E gene. The positive PCR products were directly sequenced. Then sequences generated in this study were BLAST in NCBI website and aligned in Megalign in DNAstar program. Multiple sequence alignments were carried out by using Mega 5.05 software based on the sequences generated in this study and sequences downloaded from GenBank, including the representative strains from different countries and regions. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by using Neighbor-Joining tree methods with Mega 5.05 software. Twenty one of 25 local cases and 10 of 14 imported cases from Myanmar were positive for DENV-1. Eight serum samples were negative for dengue virus. A total of 13 strains with E gene (1485 bp), including 8 local strains and 5 imported strains, were sequenced, which shared 100% nucleotide sequence identities. Twelve strains with CprM gene (406 bp) from 9 local cases and 3 imported cases shared 100% nucleotide sequence identities. Phylogenetic analyses based on E gene showed that the new 13 strains clustered in genotype I of dengue virus and formed a distinct lineage. This outbreak was caused by genotype I of DENV-1, which had the closest phylogenetic relationships with dengue virus from neighboring Burma area. Comprehensive measures of prevention and control of dengue fever should be strengthened to prevent the spread of dengue virus.

  12. Mutational Analysis of Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Highlights Regions Required for Alpha-Dystroglycan Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciani, Marissa; Alston, Jacob T; Zhao, Guohui; Reynolds, Hayley; Ali, Afroze M; Xu, Brian; Brindley, Melinda A

    2017-09-15

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an enveloped RNA virus endemic to West Africa and responsible for severe cases of hemorrhagic fever. Virus entry is mediated by the glycoprotein complex consisting of a stable-signal peptide, a receptor-binding subunit, GP1, and a viral-host membrane fusion subunit, GP2. Several cellular receptors can interact with the GP1 subunit and mediate viral entry, including alpha-dystroglycan (αDG) and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1). In order to define the regions within GP1 that interact with the cellular receptors, we implemented insertional mutagenesis, carbohydrate shielding, and alanine scanning mutagenesis. Eighty GP constructs were engineered and evaluated for GP1-GP2 processing, surface expression, and the ability to mediate cell-to-cell fusion after low-pH exposure. To examine virus-to-cell entry, 49 constructs were incorporated onto vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudoparticles and transduction efficiencies were monitored in HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells that differentially produce the αDG cell surface receptor. Seven constructs retained efficient transduction in HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells yet poorly transduced HAP1 cells, suggesting that they are involved in αDG utilization. Residues H141, N146, F147, and Y150 cluster at the predicted central core of the trimeric interface and are important for GP-αDG interaction. Additionally, H92A-H93A, 150HA, 172HA, and 230HA displayed reduced transduction in both HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells, despite efficient cell-to-cell fusion activity. These mutations may interfere with interactions with the endosomal receptor LAMP1 or interfere at another stage in entry that is common to both cell lines. Insight gained from these data can aid in the development of more-effective entry inhibitors by blocking receptor interactions. IMPORTANCE Countries in which Lassa virus is endemic, such as Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia, usually experience a seasonal outbreak of the virus from December to March

  13. Partial Deletion of the L-Segment Intergenic Region Produces an Attenuated Machupo Virus that Protects Guinea Pigs Against Lethal Guanarito Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    1 Golden, J.W. et al. Machupo virus live-attenuated vaccine Partial deletion of the L -segment intergenic region produces an attenuated Machupo...had a 35 nucleotide deletion in the L -segment non-coding intergenic region. Contrary to Car91, Car68 produced a lethal infection in guinea pigs with...BACKGROUND Arenaviruses are enveloped ambisense single-stranded RNA viruses with two segments, small (S) and large ( L ), encoding a 10.7 Kb genome

  14. Preparedness for Zika virus testing in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Raynal C; Konings, Frank

    2016-01-01

    On 1 February 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that clusters of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders occurring in Zika virus (ZIKV)-affected areas constituted a public health emergency of international concern. Increased surveillance of the virus, including the requirement for laboratory confirmation of infection, was recommended. The WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific therefore initiated a rapid survey among national-level public health laboratories in 19 countries and areas to determine regional capacity for ZIKV detection. The survey indicated that 16/19 (84%) countries had capacity for molecular detection of ZIKV while others facilitated testing through referral. These results suggest that robust laboratory capacity is in place to support ZIKV surveillance in the Western Pacific Region.

  15. Preparedness for Zika virus testing in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynal C Squires

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available On 1 February 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO declared that clusters of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders occurring in Zika virus (ZIKV-affected areas constituted a public health emergency of international concern. Increased surveillance of the virus, including the requirement for laboratory confirmation of infection, was recommended. The WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific therefore initiated a rapid survey among national-level public health laboratories in 19 countries and areas to determine regional capacity for ZIKV detection. The survey indicated that 16/19 (84% countries had capacity for molecular detection of ZIKV while others facilitated testing through referral. These results suggest that robust laboratory capacity is in place to support ZIKV surveillance in the Western Pacific Region.

  16. Increased pathogenicity of rabies virus due to modification of a non-coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virojanapirom, Phatthamon; Yamada, Kentaro; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Nishizono, Akira; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-11-01

    Sub-passaging of QS-05, a street rabies virus (RABV) isolate, in non-neuronal cells resulted in a virus with higher pathogenicity, QS-BHK-P7. Four full-length cDNA plasmids were constructed and the corresponding recombinant viruses were recovered: rQS-05, rQS-BHK-P7 and rQS05-2475G/rQS-BHK-P7-2475A (made by switching of intergenic P-M between these two backbones). rQS-BHK-P7-2475 A virus had eight instead of seven adenosines in its poly(A) sequence. Interestingly, mutant viruses with 6 or 8 adenosines infected more neuroblastoma cells than their parental ones. Mice that were infected intracerebrally and intramuscularly with rQS05-2475G and rQS-BHK-P7 exhibited highest mortality. However, mice infected with rQS-BHK-P7-2475AA had the shortest survival time. This study demonstrates that modifications in the non-coding region may play a role in determining the virulence of RABV.

  17. Avian influenza virus (H11N9 in migratory shorebirds wintering in the Amazon Region, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen de Araujo

    Full Text Available Aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIV. Habitats in Brazil provide stopover and wintering sites for water birds that migrate between North and South America. The current study was conducted to elucidate the possibility of the transport of influenza A viruses by birds that migrate annually between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In total, 556 orotracheal/cloacal swab samples were collected for influenza A virus screening using real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR. The influenza A virus-positive samples were subjected to viral isolation. Four samples were positive for the influenza A matrix gene by rRT-PCR. From these samples, three viruses were isolated, sequenced and characterized. All positive samples originated from a single bird species, the ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres, that was caught in the Amazon region at Caeté Bay, Northeast Pará, at Ilha de Canelas. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation of H11N9 in the ruddy turnstone in South America.

  18. Avian Influenza Virus (H11N9) in Migratory Shorebirds Wintering in the Amazon Region, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Jansen; de Azevedo Júnior, Severino M.; Gaidet, Nicolas; Hurtado, Renata F.; Walker, David; Thomazelli, Luciano M.; Ometto, Tatiana; Seixas, Marina M. M.; Rodrigues, Roberta; Galindo, Daniele B.; da Silva, Adriana C. S.; Rodrigues, Arlinéa M. M.; Bomfim, Leonardo L.; Mota, Marcelo A.; Larrazábal, Maria E.; Branco, Joaquim O.; Serafini, Patricia; Neto, Isaac S.; Franks, John; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Durigon, Edison L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic birds are the natural reservoir for avian influenza viruses (AIV). Habitats in Brazil provide stopover and wintering sites for water birds that migrate between North and South America. The current study was conducted to elucidate the possibility of the transport of influenza A viruses by birds that migrate annually between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In total, 556 orotracheal/cloacal swab samples were collected for influenza A virus screening using real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). The influenza A virus-positive samples were subjected to viral isolation. Four samples were positive for the influenza A matrix gene by rRT-PCR. From these samples, three viruses were isolated, sequenced and characterized. All positive samples originated from a single bird species, the ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres), that was caught in the Amazon region at Caeté Bay, Northeast Pará, at Ilha de Canelas. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation of H11N9 in the ruddy turnstone in South America. PMID:25329399

  19. A novel multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Defang; Wang, Guihua; Huang, Libo; Zheng, Qiankun; Li, Chengui; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2017-12-04

    The hypervariable antigenicity and immunosuppressive features of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) has led to great challenges to develop effective vaccines. Epitope vaccine will be a perspective trend. Previously, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 (hr1) of ALV-J, N-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-C. BLAST analysis showed that the mutation of A, E, T and H in this epitope cover 79% of all ALV-J strains. Base on this data, we designed a multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine comprising the four mutation variants linked with glycine and serine. The recombinant multi-variant epitope gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The expressed protein of the variant multi-variant epitope gene can react with positive sera and monoclonal antibodies of ALV-J, while cannot react with ALV-J negative sera. The multi-variant epitope vaccine that conjugated Freund's adjuvant complete/incomplete showed high immunogenicity that reached the titer of 1:64,000 at 42 days post immunization and maintained the immune period for at least 126 days in SPF chickens. Further, we demonstrated that the antibody induced by the variant multi-variant ensemble epitope vaccine recognized and neutralized different ALV-J strains (NX0101, TA1, WS1, BZ1224 and BZ4). Protection experiment that was evaluated by clinical symptom, viral shedding, weight gain, gross and histopathology showed 100% chickens that inoculated the multi-epitope vaccine were well protected against ALV-J challenge. The result shows a promising multi-variant epitope ensemble vaccine against hypervariable viruses in animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  1. Molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtype C gp-120 regions potentially involved in virus adaptive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cenci

    Full Text Available The role of variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 in immune escape of HIV has been investigated. However, there is scant information on how conserved gp120 regions contribute to virus escaping. Here we have studied how molecular sequence characteristics of conserved C3, C4 and V3 regions of clade C HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in HIV entry and are target of the immune response, are modulated during the disease course. We found an increase of "shifting" putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGSs in the α2 helix (in C3 and in C4 and an increase of sites under positive selection pressure in the α2 helix during the chronic stage of disease. These sites are close to CD4 and to co-receptor binding sites. We also found a negative correlation between electric charges of C3 and V4 during the late stage of disease counteracted by a positive correlation of electric charges of α2 helix and V5 during the same stage. These data allow us to hypothesize possible mechanisms of virus escape involving constant and variable regions of gp120. In particular, new mutations, including new PNGSs occurring near the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites could potentially affect receptor binding affinity and shield the virus from the immune response.

  2. Circulation of bluetongue virus in goats in the Karamoja region of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A. Batten

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of bluetongue virus (BTV in indigenous goats from the Karamoja region of northern Uganda was investigated. A total of 300 goats were sampled (serum and whole blood from five districts within the Karamoja region. The samples were analysed for the presence of bluetongue (BT antibodies using a commercial Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and for the presence of BTV viral RNA by real-time Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, because BTV is an RNA virus. Of the 300 goats tested, 269 (90% were positive for BTV antibodies, indicating high levels of BTV circulation within the region. Out of the 150 whole blood samples tested for the presence of the virus by real-time RT-PCR, 84 (56% were positive for BTV RNA. This study, which is the first of its kind in Uganda, showed a high seroprevalence of BT antibodies and active circulation of BTV in a high proportion of goats in the Karamoja region.

  3. Circulation of bluetongue virus in goats in the Karamoja region of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah N. Mulabbi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of bluetongue virus (BTV in indigenous goats from the Karamoja region of northern Uganda was investigated. A total of 300 goats were sampled (serum and whole blood from five districts within the Karamoja region. The samples were analysed for the presence of bluetongue (BT antibodies using a commercial Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and for the presence of BTV viral RNA by real-time Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, because BTV is an RNA virus. Of the 300 goats tested, 269 (90% were positive for BTV antibodies, indicating high levels of BTV circulation within the region. Out of the 150 whole blood samples tested for the presence of the virus by real-time RT-PCR, 84 (56% were positive for BTV RNA. This study, which is the first of its kind in Uganda, showed a high seroprevalence of BT antibodies and active circulation of BTV in a high proportion of goats in the Karamoja region.

  4. Investigation of a Case of Genotype 5a Hepatitis C Virus Transmission in a French Hemodialysis Unit Using Epidemiologic Data and Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho-Glélé, L S; Giraudon, H; Astruc, K; Soltani, Z; Lefebvre, A; Pothier, P; Bour, J B; Manoha, C

    2016-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. A patient was recently found to be HCV seropositive during hemodialysis follow-up. OBJECTIVE To determine whether nosocomial transmission had occurred and which viral populations were transmitted. DESIGN HCV transmission case. SETTING A dialysis unit in a French hospital. METHODS Molecular and epidemiologic investigations were conducted to determine whether 2 cases were related. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were performed to determine the transmission pathway(s). RESULTS Sequence analyses of the NS5b region revealed a 5a genotype in the newly infected patient. Epidemiologic investigations suggested that a highly viremic genotype 5a HCV-infected patient who underwent dialysis in the same unit was the source of the infection. Phylogenetic analysis of NS5b and hypervariable region-1 sequences revealed a genetically related virus (>99.9% nucleotide identity). Deep sequencing of hypervariable region-1 indicated that HCV quasispecies were found in the source whereas a single hypervariable region-1 HCV variant was found in the newly infected patient, and that this was identical to the major variant identified in the source patient. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were performed to determine the transmission pathway(s). Nosocomial patient-to-patient transmission via healthcare workers' hands was the most likely explanation. In our dialysis unit, this unique incident led to the adjustment of infection control policy. CONCLUSIONS The data support transmission of a unique variant from a source with a high viral load and genetic diversity. This investigation also underlines the need to periodically evaluate prevention and control practices.

  5. Temporal changes of Japanese encephalitits virus in different brain regions of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection results in acute encephalitic illness. The affinity of JEV to different regions of brain and temporal changes in viral load have not been studied. This study was conducted to describe localization of JEV to different regions of the brain at different stages of disease in a rat model of Japanese encephalitis (JE. Methods: Twelve days old Wistar rats were inoculated intracerebrally with a dose of 3 x 10 6 pfu/ml of JEV. After 3, 6, 10 and 20 days post-inoculation, brains were dissected out and different regions of brain (cortex, striatum, thalamus and mid brain were taken. Motor deficit was assessed by the rota rod and JEV RNA copies were evaluated using real-time PCR assay. Results: There was a significant increase in motor deficit in rats inoculated with JEV compared to the controls. JEV RNA copies were present in all studied regions of the brain on days 3, 6 and 10 post-inoculation. Maximum number of JEV RNA copies were present in the mid brain on days 3 and 10 post-inoculation. JEV RNA copies were not detected in any of the brain regions on day 20. Interpretation & conclusions: This study reports JEV RNA load in different brain regions of rat with higher affinity of JEV virus to thalamus and mid brain compared to other regions.

  6. Modeling virus capsids and their protein binding -- the search for weak regions within the HIV capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Benson, Daryn E.; Gilbert, C. Michael

    2011-03-01

    Viruses remain a threat to the health of humans worldwide with 33 million infected with HIV. Viruses are ubiquitous, infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Each virus infects in its own unique manner making the problem seem intractable. However, some general physical steps apply to many viruses and the application of basic physical modeling can potentially have great impact. The aim of this theoretical study is to investigate the stability of the HIV viral capsid (protein shell). The structural shell can be compromised by physical probes such as pulsed laser light [1,2]. But, what are the weakest regions of the capsid so that we can begin to understand vulnerabilities of these deadly materials? The atomic structure of HIV capsids is not precisely known and we begin by describing our work to model the capsid structure. We have constructed three representative viral capsids of different CA protein number -- HIV-900, HIV-1260 and HIV-1740. The complexity of the assembly requires a course grained model to investigate protein interactions within the capsid which we will describe.

  7. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in vitro. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  8. Clustering of low usage codons in the translation initiation region of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-hua; Su, Jun-hong; Chen, Hao-tai; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Li-na; Ding, Yao-zhong; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2013-08-01

    The adaptation of the overall codon usage pattern of hepatitis C virus (HCV) to that of human is estimated by the synonymous codon usage value (RSCU). The synonymous codon usage biases for the translation initiation region (TIR) of this virus are also analyzed by calculation of usage fluctuation of each synonymous codon along the TIR (the first 30 codon sites of the whole coding sequence of HCV). As for the overall codon usage pattern of HCV, this virus has a significant tendency to delete the codons with CpG or TpA dinucleotides. Turning to the adaptation of the overall codon usage of HCV to that of human, over half part of codons has a similar usage pattern between this virus and human, suggesting that the host cellular environment of the overall codon usage pattern influences the formation of codon usage for HCV. In addition, there is no obvious phenomenon that the codons with relatively low energy tend to be highly selected in the TIR of HCV, suggesting that the synonymous codon usage patterns for the TIR of HCV might be not affected by the secondary structure of nucleotide sequence, however, the formation of synonymous codons usage in the TIR of HCV is influenced by the overall codon usage patterns of human to some degree. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of influenza A viruses (H3N2 circulating in Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyalska O. G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of influenza A(H3N2 viruses circulating in the Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season. To make comparison of the HA and NA genes sequences of the Zhytomyr region isolates with the HA and NA genes sequences of influenza viruses circulating in the world. Methods. Laboratory diagnosis was conducted by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. In this study the sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were carried out. Results. For the first time the genes of influenza A(H3N2 viruses isolated in the Zhytomyr region during 2013–2014 epidemic season, coding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase were compared with their orthologs. According to the results of this comparison the phylogenetic tree was constructed. Additionally, the amino acid substitutions of the influenza viruses circulating in Ukraine and worldwide were analyzed. Conclusions. The nucleotide sequences of the influenza A(H3N2 viruses genes HA and NA isolated in the Zhytomyr region were identified. Based on the nucleotide sequences of HA and NA we constructed the influenza virus phylogenetic tree demonstrating that the virus isolated in the Zhytomyr region was closely related to the Ukrainian isolate from Kharkov and in the world to the isolates from Germany, Romania, Italy.

  10. Chloroplast genome differences between Asian and American Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae and the origin of the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Tae Kim

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of complete chloroplast (cp DNA sequences within a species may provide clues to understand the population dynamics and colonization histories of plant species. Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae is a widely distributed fern species in northeastern Asia, Europe, and North America. The complete cp DNA sequences from Asian and American E. arvense individuals were compared in this study. The Asian E. arvense cp genome was 583 bp shorter than that of the American E. arvense. In total, 159 indels were observed between two individuals, most of which were concentrated on the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS in the large single-copy (LSC region of the cp genome. This IGS region held a series of 19 bp repeating units. The numbers of the 19 bp repeat unit were responsible for 78% of the total length difference between the two cp genomes. Furthermore, only other closely related species of Equisetum also show the hypervariable nature of the trnY-trnE IGS. By contrast, only a single indel was observed in the gene coding regions: the ycf1 gene showed 24 bp differences between the two continental individuals due to a single tandem-repeat indel. A total of 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were recorded between the two cp genomes. Of these, 52 SNPs (31.5% were distributed in coding regions, 13 SNPs (7.9% were in introns, and 100 SNPs (60.6% were in intergenic spacers (IGS. The overall difference between the Asian and American E. arvense cp genomes was 0.12%. Despite the relatively high genetic diversity between Asian and American E. arvense, the two populations are recognized as a single species based on their high morphological similarity. This indicated that the two regional populations have been in morphological stasis.

  11. [Disordered regions in C-domain structure of influenza virus M1 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, A L; Dobrov, E N; Fedorova, N V; Radiukhin, V A; Badun, G A; Arutiunian, A M; Bogacheva, E N; Baratova, L A

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus matrix M1 protein is one of the main structural components of the virion performing also many different functions in infected cell. X-ray analysis data with 2.08 angstrom resolution were obtained only for the N-terminal part of M1 protein molecule (residues 2-158) but not for its C-terminal domain (159-252). In the present work M1 protein of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus strain in acidic solution was investigated with the help of tritium bombardment. Tritium label incorporation into M1 protein domains preferentially labeled the C-domain and inter-domain loops. Analytical centrifugation and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated increased hydrodynamic parameters (diameter) that may be explained by low degree of M1 structural organization. Computational analysis of M1 protein by intrinsic disorder predictions methods also demonstrated the presence of unfolded regions mostly in the C-domain and inter-domain loops. It is suggested, that influenza virus M1 polyfunctionality in infected cell is determined by its tertiary structure plasticity which in its turn results from the presence of unstructured regions.

  12. Improving the accuracy of the structure prediction of the third hypervariable loop of the heavy chains of antibodies.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2014-06-13

    MOTIVATION: Antibodies are able to recognize a wide range of antigens through their complementary determining regions formed by six hypervariable loops. Predicting the 3D structure of these loops is essential for the analysis and reengineering of novel antibodies with enhanced affinity and specificity. The canonical structure model allows high accuracy prediction for five of the loops. The third loop of the heavy chain, H3, is the hardest to predict because of its diversity in structure, length and sequence composition. RESULTS: We describe a method, based on the Random Forest automatic learning technique, to select structural templates for H3 loops among a dataset of candidates. These can be used to predict the structure of the loop with a higher accuracy than that achieved by any of the presently available methods. The method also has the advantage of being extremely fast and returning a reliable estimate of the model quality. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The source code is freely available at http://www.biocomputing.it/H3Loopred/ .

  13. Co-occurrence of viruses and mosquitoes at the vectors' optimal climate range: An underestimated risk to temperate regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Marcus S C; Caminade, Cyril; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Sutton, Elizabeth R; Wardeh, Maya; Baylis, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses have been estimated to cause over 100 million cases of human disease annually. Many methodologies have been developed to help identify areas most at risk from transmission of these viruses. However, generally, these methodologies focus predominantly on the effects of climate on either the vectors or the pathogens they spread, and do not consider the dynamic interaction between the optimal conditions for both vector and virus. Here, we use a new approach that considers the complex interplay between the optimal temperature for virus transmission, and the optimal climate for the mosquito vectors. Using published geolocated data we identified temperature and rainfall ranges in which a number of mosquito vectors have been observed to co-occur with West Nile virus, dengue virus or chikungunya virus. We then investigated whether the optimal climate for co-occurrence of vector and virus varies between "warmer" and "cooler" adapted vectors for the same virus. We found that different mosquito vectors co-occur with the same virus at different temperatures, despite significant overlap in vector temperature ranges. Specifically, we found that co-occurrence correlates with the optimal climatic conditions for the respective vector; cooler-adapted mosquitoes tend to co-occur with the same virus in cooler conditions than their warmer-adapted counterparts. We conclude that mosquitoes appear to be most able to transmit virus in the mosquitoes' optimal climate range, and hypothesise that this may be due to proportionally over-extended vector longevity, and other increased fitness attributes, within this optimal range. These results suggest that the threat posed by vector-competent mosquito species indigenous to temperate regions may have been underestimated, whilst the threat arising from invasive tropical vectors moving to cooler temperate regions may be overestimated.

  14. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  15. Seroprevalence of West Nile virus in Saskatchewan's Five Hills Health Region, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Tara L; Anderson, Maureen E; Drebot, Michael A; Vooght, Mark T R; Findlater, A Ross; Curry, Phillip S; Campbell, C Alexia; Osei, William D

    2006-01-01

    The Five Hills Health Region of Saskatchewan reported the highest West Nile virus (WNV) case rates in the 2003 outbreak. A serologic and telephone survey was undertaken to assess the seroprevalence of the virus and the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of the residents. Respondents had to be at least 18 years of age, and residents of the Five Hills Health Region between July 1st and September 15th, 2003. Blood samples of respondents were tested at the National Microbiology Laboratory for flavivirus immunoglobulin using a WNV IgG ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization test. Descriptive analyses performed related to respondents' demographics, knowledge, attitudes, behaviours, and seropositivity. WNV infection risk was assessed using odds ratio. There were 619 questionnaire respondents, of whom 501 donated a blood sample. The seroprevalence of WNV in the Five Hills Health Region was 9.98% (95% CI 7.37-12.59%). Seropositivity of rural areas was 16.8% and urban was 3.2%. Most (97%) of participants thought WNV was an important health issue. Forty-eight percent of the participants used insect repellents containing DEET most of the time. There was good knowledge regarding WNV transmission and prevention of the spread of WNV. Rural compared to urban residents were six times more likely to be positive for WNV (OR=6.13, 95% CI 2.82-13.34). This is the highest seroprevalence rate of West Nile virus recorded in North America thus far. Many factors could have influenced this outbreak, such as eco-region, early prolonged hot weather, level of mosquito control programs, urban and rural community differences, and personal protective behaviours.

  16. Hepatitis A virus epidemiology in Turkey as universal childhood vaccination begins: seroprevalence and endemicity by region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiray, Tayfur; Köroğlu, Mehmet; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Özbek, Ahmet; Terzi, Hüseyin A; Altındiş, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive examination of current distribution of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) seroprevalence and endemicity in Turkey and the possible links between HAV endemicity and socioeconomic development. We performed a systematic search in online resources published between January 2000 and August 2015. The 22 provinces were able to be assigned a hepatitis A endemicity level based on this systematic review. The incidence rates for symptomatic hepatitis A infection are higher in the eastern part of Turkey than in the western and central region. These differences in socioeconomic indicators by region suggest the likelihood of lower seroprevalence rates in the western parts of the country and higher rates in the eastern region. Turkey's current policy of recommending hepatitis A immunization for all children without contraindications is an appropriate one and is likely to remain the best option for at least the next decade or two.

  17. Hepatitis A virus seroprevalence by age and world region, 1990 and 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Wiersma, Steven T

    2010-09-24

    To estimate current age-specific rates of immunity to hepatitis A virus (HAV) in world regions by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of published data. The estimation of the global burden of hepatitis A and policies for public health control are dependent on an understanding of the changing epidemiology of this viral infection. Age-specific IgG anti-HAV seroprevalence data from more than 500 published articles were pooled and used to fit estimated age-seroprevalence curves in 1990 and 2005 for each of 21 world regions (as defined by the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study). High-income regions (Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United States, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Singapore) have very low HAV endemicity levels and a high proportion of susceptible adults, low-income regions (sub-Saharan Africa and parts of South Asia) have high endemicity levels and almost no susceptible adolescents and adults, and most middle-income regions have a mix of intermediate and low endemicity levels. Anti-HAV prevalence estimates in this analysis suggest that middle-income regions in Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East currently have an intermediate or low level of endemicity. The countries in these regions may have an increasing burden of disease from hepatitis A, and may benefit from new or expanded vaccination programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Seroprevalence of caprine artritis-encephalitis virus in goats of Lima region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes M., Angel; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Rivera G., Hermelinda; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; Ramírez V., Mercy; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Cardozo Z., Imelda; Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Animal (SENASA), Lima; Manchego S., Alberto; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2015-01-01

    The seroprevalence of caprine artritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in four provinces of Lima Region, Peru was determined in 381 goat serum samples (325 females and 56 males) older than 12 months from 89 flocks reared under intensive (n=3), semiextensive (n=49) and transhumant (n=46) production systems. The detection of antibodies against CAEV was done by a competitive-inhibition ELISA test. The overall seroprevalence of CAEV was 0.26 ± 0.09% (1/381). The seropositive goat belonged to one flock ...

  19. Global morphological analysis of marine viruses shows minimal regional variation and dominance of non-tailed viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Brum, Jennifer R.; Ryan O Schenck; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses influence oceanic ecosystems by causing mortality of microorganisms, altering nutrient and organic matter flux via lysis and auxiliary metabolic gene expression and changing the trajectory of microbial evolution through horizontal gene transfer. Limited host range and differing genetic potential of individual virus types mean that investigations into the types of viruses that exist in the ocean and their spatial distribution throughout the world's oceans are critical to understanding ...

  20. Mutations within a conserved region of the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein that influence virus-receptor interactions and sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Simrat; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Gatherer, Derek; Owsianka, Ania M; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Zahid, Muhammad N; Rychłowska, Malgorzata; Foung, Steven K H; Baumert, Thomas F; Angus, Allan G N; Patel, Arvind H

    2010-06-01

    Cell culture-adaptive mutations within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 glycoprotein have been widely reported. We identify here a single mutation (N415D) in E2 that arose during long-term passaging of HCV strain JFH1-infected cells. This mutation was located within E2 residues 412 to 423, a highly conserved region that is recognized by several broadly neutralizing antibodies, including the mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) AP33. Introduction of N415D into the wild-type (WT) JFH1 genome increased the affinity of E2 to the CD81 receptor and made the virus less sensitive to neutralization by an antiserum to another essential entry factor, SR-BI. Unlike JFH1(WT), the JFH1(N415D) was not neutralized by AP33. In contrast, it was highly sensitive to neutralization by patient-derived antibodies, suggesting an increased availability of other neutralizing epitopes on the virus particle. We included in this analysis viruses carrying four other single mutations located within this conserved E2 region: T416A, N417S, and I422L were cell culture-adaptive mutations reported previously, while G418D was generated here by growing JFH1(WT) under MAb AP33 selective pressure. MAb AP33 neutralized JFH1(T416A) and JFH1(I422L) more efficiently than the WT virus, while neutralization of JFH1(N417S) and JFH1(G418D) was abrogated. The properties of all of these viruses in terms of receptor reactivity and neutralization by human antibodies were similar to JFH1(N415D), highlighting the importance of the E2 412-423 region in virus entry.

  1. Analysis of allelic variation of the apolipoprotein B hypervariable locus in the Bashkir and Komi populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khusnutdinova, E.K.; Khidiatova, I.M.; Rafikov, H.S. [Bashkir Scientific Center, Ufa (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Allelic variation of the hypervariable apolipoprotein B gene locus (APOB) in three groups of the Bashkir population and in the Komi population was analyzed. Among 219 individuals studied, 13 allelic variants were identified with a number of repeats ranging from 28 to 52. The frequency of alleles varied from 0.01 to 0.51 with the mean heterozygosity index being 0.66 in the Bashkir population and 0.74 in the Komi one. Considerable difference in the frequency distribution of the APOB loci genotypes between the Bashkir and Komi populations was observed, and the distribution patterns for Bashkirs from Abzelilovskii and Ilishevskii raions deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The genetic distance between the Bashkir and Komi populations calculated on the basis of allele frequencies at the hypervariable APOB gene locus corresponded to the expected degree similarity of the population studied. Thus, this locus can be recommended as an informative marker for studying the gene pool and genetic processes in the populations because of the high level of its polymorphism and the heterozygosity in the populations. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Analysis of mtDNA hypervariable region II for increasing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... positions G92C, C113G, C150G, T156A, C194G, C198G, G207C, G225C and G228C are described and may in future be suitable sources for identification purpose. The data obtained can be used to identify variable nucleotide positions characterized by frequent occurrence most promising for identification.

  3. Mapping codon usage of the translation initiation region in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou Yong-xi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respitatory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a recently emerged pathogen and severely affects swine populations worldwide. The replication of PRRSV is tightly controlled by viral gene expression and the codon usage of translation initiation region within each gene could potentially regulate the translation rate. Therefore, a better understanding of the codon usage pattern of the initiation translation region would shed light on the regulation of PRRSV gene expression. Results In this study, the codon usage in the translation initiation region and in the whole coding sequence was compared in PRRSV ORF1a and ORFs2-7. To investigate the potential role of codon usage in affecting the translation initiation rate, we established a codon usage model for PRRSV translation initiation region. We observed that some non-preferential codons are preferentially used in the translation initiation region in particular ORFs. Although some positions vary with codons, they intend to use codons with negative CUB. Furthermore, our model of codon usage showed that the conserved pattern of CUB is not directly consensus with the conserved sequence, but shaped under the translation selection. Conclusions The non-variation pattern with negative CUB in the PRRSV translation initiation region scanned by ribosomes is considered the rate-limiting step in the translation process.

  4. Potent influenza A virus entry inhibitors targeting a conserved region of hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dongguo; Luo, Yinzhu; Yang, Guang; Li, Fangfang; Xie, Xiangkun; Chen, Daiwei; He, Lifang; Wang, Jingyu; Ye, Chunfeng; Lu, Shengsheng; Lv, Lin; Liu, Shuwen; He, Jian

    2017-11-15

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) induce acute respiratory disease and cause significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. With the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains, new and effective anti-IAV drugs with different modes of action are urgently needed. In this study, by conjugating cholesterol to the N-terminus of the short peptide KKWK, a lipopeptide named S-KKWK was created. The anti-IAV test indicated that S-KKWK and its derivatives displayed potent antiviral activities against a broad variety of influenza A viral strains including oseltamivir-resistant strains and clinically relevant isolates with IC 50 values ranging from 0.7 to 3.0µM. An extensive mechanistic study showed that these peptides functioned as viral "entry blockers" by inhibiting the conformational rearrangements of HA2 subunit, thereby interrupting the fusion of virus-host cell membranes. Significantly, a computer-aided docking simulation and protein sequence alignment identified conserved residues in the stem region of HA2 as the possible binding site of S-KKWK, which may be employed as a potential drug target for designing anti-IAVs with a broad-spectrum of activity. By targeting this region, a potent anti-IAV agent was subsequently created. In addition, the anti-IAV activity of S-KKWK was assessed by experiments with influenza A virus-infected mice, in which S-KKWK reduced the mortality of infected animals and extended survival time significantly. Overall, in addition to providing a strategy for designing broad-spectrum anti-IAV agents, these results indicate that S-KKWK and its derivatives are prospective candidates for potent antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Absence of Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in buffaloes from Amazon and southeast region in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Cairo H S; Resende, Cláudia F; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Barbosa, José D; Fonseca, Antônio A; Leite, Rômulo C; Reis, Jenner K P

    2016-07-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is an infectious disease caused by Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is well described in bovines. The majority of infected animals are asymptomatic, one to five percent develop lymphoma and from 30 to 50% present a persistent lymphocytosis. The virus occurs naturally in cattle and experimentally in buffaloes, capybaras and rabbits. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffaloes has been attributed to BLV infection by some authors in India and Venezuela, but not confirmed by other studies and little information on natural BLV infection in buffaloes is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of BLV in a sub-sample of buffalo from Amazon and southeast regions in Brazil. Three hundred and fifteen serum samples were negative using commercial AGID and ELISA (ELISA-gp51) which detect anti-BLV glycoprotein gp51 antibodies. The same samples were also evaluated for antibodies to whole virus through a commercial ELISA (ELISA-BLV) in which 77 (24.44%) were found seropositive and two (0.63%) inconclusive. On the other hand, all animals were negative by PCR to BLV targeted to the env and tax genes. These results suggest that ELISA-BLV produces false positive results in buffalo serum (p<0.001). In addition, one buffalo lymphoma sample was negative in both PCR assays used in this study. BLV was not detected in buffaloes from the Amazon basin and the southeast region of Brazil. Serological tests, like ELISA-BLV, usually used for cattle may produce false-positive results for BLV in buffaloes and direct detection tests such as PCR should be chosen in these surveys. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffalo was not associated with BLV infection in the one case analyzed in this work and the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease should be clarified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Landscape attributes driving avian influenza virus circulation in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Guerrini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus has been studied throughout Southeast Asia, little is known on the spatial risk factors for avian influenza in Africa. In the present paper, we combined serological data from poultry and remotely sensed environmental factors in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar to explore for any association between avian influenza and landscape variables. Serological data from cross-sectional surveys carried out on poultry in 2008 and 2009 were examined together with a Landsat 7 satellite image analysed using supervised classification. The dominant landscape features in a 1-km buffer around farmhouses and distance to the closest water body were extracted. A total of 1,038 individual bird blood samples emanating from 241 flocks were analysed, and the association between avian influenza seroprevalence and these landcape variables was quantified using logistic regression models. No evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 avian influenza subtypes was found, suggesting that only low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI circulated. Three predominant land cover classes were identified around the poultry farms: grassland savannah, rice paddy fields and wetlands. A significant negative relationship was found between LPAI seroprevalence and distance to the closest body of water. We also found that LPAI seroprevalence was higher in farms characterised by predominant wetlands or rice landscapes than in those surrounded by dry savannah. Results from this study suggest that if highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus were introduced in Madagascar, the environmental conditions that prevail in Lake Alaotra region may allow the virus to spread and persist.

  7. Non-genotype-specific role of the hepatitis C virus 5' untranslated region in virus production and in inhibition by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M

    2011-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is structured into four domains (I-IV) with numerous genotype-specific nucleotides. It is unknown whether the polymorphisms confer genotype-specific functions to the 5'UTR. Using viable JFH1-based Core-NS2 recombinants, we developed...

  8. Glycoprotein I of herpes simplex virus type 1 contains a unique polymorphic tandem-repeated mucin region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Peter; Olofsson, Sigvard; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein I (gI) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains a tandem repeat (TR) region including the amino acids serine and threonine, residues that can be utilized for O-glycosylation. The length of this TR region was determined for 82 clinical HSV-1 isolates and the results revealed...

  9. Molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from the Northeastern Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, K K

    2010-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from the Darjeeling hills of the Northeastern Himalayan region of India were characterized by biological indexing, multiple molecular marker (MMM) analysis, heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) and sequence analysis. Variability was studied using the CP gene and a 5' ORF1a fragment of the CTV genome. HMA and sequence analysis of the 5' ORF1a fragment classified Darjeeling isolates into two groups, whereas CP gene analysis provided evidence for three different groups. Darjeeling CTV isolates shared nucleotide sequence identities of 89-97 and 91-92% in the 5' ORF1a fragment and CP gene, respectively, suggesting extensive diversity among CTV isolates from this Indian region.

  10. High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin E.; Jin, Li; Santibanez, Sabine; Shulga, Sergey V.; Aboudy, Yair; Demchyshyna, Irina V.; Djemileva, Sultana; Echevarria, Juan E.; Featherstone, David F.; Hukic, Mirsada; Johansen, Kari; Litwinska, Bogumila; Lopareva, Elena; Lupulescu, Emilia; Mentis, Andreas; Mihneva, Zefira; Mosquera, Maria M.; Muscat, Mark; Naumova, M.A.; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Nekrasova, Ljubov S.; Magurano, Fabio; Fortuna, Claudia; Rebelo de Andrade, Helena; Richard, Jean-Luc; Robo, Alma; Rota, Paul A.; Samoilovich, Elena O.; Sarv, Inna; Semeiko, Galina V.; Shugayev, Nazim; Utegenova, Elmira S.; van Binnendijk, Rob; Vinner, Lasse; Waku-Kouomou, Diane; Wild, T. Fabian; Brown, David W.G.; Mankertz, Annette; Muller, Claude P.; Mulders, Mick N.

    2008-01-01

    During 2005–2006, nine measles virus (MV) genotypes were identified throughout the World Health Organization European Region. All major epidemics were associated with genotypes D4, D6, and B3. Other genotypes (B2, D5, D8, D9, G2, and H1) were only found in limited numbers of cases after importation from other continents. The genetic diversity of endemic D6 strains was low; genotypes C2 and D7, circulating in Europe until recent years, were no longer identified. The transmission chains of several indigenous MV strains may thus have been interrupted by enhanced vaccination. However, multiple importations from Africa and Asia and virus introduction into highly mobile and unvaccinated communities caused a massive spread of D4 and B3 strains throughout much of the region. Thus, despite the reduction of endemic MV circulation, importation of MV from other continents caused prolonged circulation and large outbreaks after their introduction into unvaccinated and highly mobile communities. PMID:18258089

  11. Usutu Virus Antibodies in Blood Donors and Healthy Forestry Workers in the Lombardy Region, Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivalle, Elena; Sassera, Davide; Rovida, Francesca; Isernia, Paola; Fabbi, Massimo; Baldanti, Fausto; Marone, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Usutu virus (USUV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, is known to circulate at low prevalence in Northern Italy, and has been reported to cause overt infection. USUV was first reported in Europe in 2001, but a retrospective study showed that it has been present in Italy at least since 1996. Seroprevalence data for USUV antibodies in sera are being collected in different European countries, showing circulation at low prevalence in human populations. Interestingly, two consecutive studies in Northern Italy indicate a possible increase in the presence of the virus, from 0% to 0.23% seroprevalence in blood donors. In this study, antibodies against USUV were measured in 3 consecutive blood samples collected from October 2014 to December 2015 from 33 forestry workers in the Po river valley, while samples from 200 blood donors from the same geographical area were tested in parallel. Neutralizing and IgG antibodies were found in six forestry workers (18.1%) and in two blood donors (1%). Our results indicate that USUV circulation in the examined area, part of a highly populated region in Northern Italy, is higher than expected. Healthy subjects exhibit a higher prevalence than what was found in a previous report in an adjoining region (0.23%), while the population at risk shows a much higher prevalence value (18.1%).

  12. Model-informed risk assessment for Zika virus outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yue; Bi, Dehua; Xie, Guigang; Jin, Yuan; Huang, Yong; Lin, Baihan; An, Xiaoping; Tong, Yigang; Feng, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) has been recognized as a significant threat to global public health. The disease was present in large parts of the Americas, the Caribbean, and also the western Pacific area with southern Asia during 2015 and 2016. However, little is known about the factors affecting the transmission of ZIKV. We used Gradient Boosted Regression Tree models to investigate the effects of various potential explanatory variables on the spread of ZIKV, and used current with historical information from a range of sources to assess the risks of future ZIKV outbreaks. Our results indicated that the probability of ZIKV outbreaks increases with vapor pressure, the occurrence of Dengue virus, and population density but decreases as health expenditure, GDP, and numbers of travelers. The predictive results revealed the potential risk countries of ZIKV infection in the Asia-Pacific regions between October 2016 and January 2017. We believe that the high-risk conditions would continue in South Asia and Australia over this period. By integrating information on eco-environmental, social-economical, and ZIKV-related niche factors, this study estimated the probability for locally acquired mosquito-borne ZIKV infections in the Asia-Pacific region and improves the ability to forecast, and possibly even prevent, future outbreaks of ZIKV. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Mycoplasma hominis P120 membrane protein contains a 216 amino acid hypervariable domain that is recognized by the human humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1997-01-01

    domain. Based on restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the hypervariable domain the 18 isolates could be divided into four cases. Reactivity with both mAb 26.7D and pAb 121 confirmed these classes. The hypervariable, but not the constant, part of P120 was recognized by the human humoral immune...

  14. Relative Prevalence of Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Virus Species in Wine Grape-Growing Regions of California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhineet M Sharma

    Full Text Available Some diseases manifest as one characteristic set of symptoms to the host, but can be caused by multiple pathogens. Control treatments based on plant symptoms can make it difficult to effectively manage such diseases, as the biology of the underlying pathogens can vary. Grapevine leafroll disease affects grapes worldwide, and is associated with several viral species in the family Closteroviridae. Whereas some of the viruses associated with this disease are transmitted by insect vectors, others are only graft-transmissible. In three regions of California, we surveyed vineyards containing diseased vines and screened symptomatic plants for all known viral species associated with grapevine leafroll disease. Relative incidence of each virus species differed among the three regions regions, particularly in relation to species with known vectors compared with those only known to be graft-transmitted. In one region, the pathogen population was dominated by species not known to have an insect vector. In contrast, populations in the other surveyed regions were dominated by virus species that are vector-transmissible. Our survey did not detect viruses associated with grapevine leafroll disease at some sites with characteristic disease symptoms. This could be explained either by undescribed genetic diversity among these viruses that prevented detection with available molecular tools at the time the survey was performed, or a misidentification of visual symptoms that may have had other underlying causes. Based on the differences in relative prevalence of each virus species among regions and among vineyards within regions, we expect that region and site-specific management strategies are needed for effective disease control.

  15. Differentiation between Vaccinal and Iranian Virulent Isolates of Newcastle Disease Virus based on F Region Genotyping by HRM Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shahdad Dibazar; Nariman Sheikhi; Farhid Hemmatzadeh; Saeed Charkhkar; Seyed Ali Pourbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is investigate Differentiation Between Vaccinal and Iranian Virulent Isolates of Newcastle Disease Virus based on F Region Genotyping by HRM Analysis. Discrimination of circulating virulent strains of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) from low pathogenic and vaccine stains is the basis for implementation of strategies to control and eradication of that aims at the eradication of NDV in poultry. At the present study the applicability of Real time RT-PCR followed High-Reso...

  16. Lateral Organization of Influenza Virus Proteins in the Budozone Region of the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, George P; Lamb, Robert A

    2017-05-01

    between viral proteins in the plasma membrane. Some proteins, such as HA and M2, inherently cocluster within the membrane, although M2 is found mostly at the periphery of regions of HA, consistent with the proposed role of M2 in scission at the end of budding. The association between some pairs of influenza virus proteins, such as M2 and NP, appears to be brokered by additional influenza virus proteins, in this case M1. HA and NA, while raft associated, reside in distinct domains, reflecting their distributions in the viral membrane. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Estimating the burden of Japanese encephalitis virus and other encephalitides in countries of the mekong region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Tarantola

    Full Text Available Diverse aetiologies of viral and bacterial encephalitis are widely recognized as significant yet neglected public health issues in the Mekong region. A robust analysis of the corresponding health burden is lacking. We retrieved 75 articles on encephalitis in the region published in English or in French from 1965 through 2011. Review of available data demonstrated that they are sparse and often derived from hospital-based studies with significant recruitment bias. Almost half (35 of 75 of articles were on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV alone or associated with dengue. In the Western Pacific region the WHO reported 30,000-50,000 annual JEV cases (15,000 deaths between 1966 and 1996 and 4,633 cases (200 deaths in 2008, a decline likely related to the introduction of JEV vaccination in China, Vietnam, or Thailand since the 1980s. Data on dengue, scrub typhus and rabies encephalitis, among other aetiologies, are also reviewed and discussed. Countries of the Mekong region are undergoing profound demographic, economic and ecological change. As the epidemiological aspects of Japanese encephalitis (JE are transformed by vaccination in some countries, highly integrated expert collaborative research and objective data are needed to identify and prioritize the human health, animal health and economic burden due to JE and other pathogens associated with encephalitides.

  18. Estimating the Burden of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Other Encephalitides in Countries of the Mekong Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantola, Arnaud; Goutard, Flavie; Newton, Paul; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Lortholary, Olivier; Cappelle, Julien; Buchy, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Diverse aetiologies of viral and bacterial encephalitis are widely recognized as significant yet neglected public health issues in the Mekong region. A robust analysis of the corresponding health burden is lacking. We retrieved 75 articles on encephalitis in the region published in English or in French from 1965 through 2011. Review of available data demonstrated that they are sparse and often derived from hospital-based studies with significant recruitment bias. Almost half (35 of 75) of articles were on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) alone or associated with dengue. In the Western Pacific region the WHO reported 30,000–50,000 annual JEV cases (15,000 deaths) between 1966 and 1996 and 4,633 cases (200 deaths) in 2008, a decline likely related to the introduction of JEV vaccination in China, Vietnam, or Thailand since the 1980s. Data on dengue, scrub typhus and rabies encephalitis, among other aetiologies, are also reviewed and discussed. Countries of the Mekong region are undergoing profound demographic, economic and ecological change. As the epidemiological aspects of Japanese encephalitis (JE) are transformed by vaccination in some countries, highly integrated expert collaborative research and objective data are needed to identify and prioritize the human health, animal health and economic burden due to JE and other pathogens associated with encephalitides. PMID:24498443

  19. High Risk Human Papilloma Virus Genotypes in Kurdistan Region in Patients with Vaginal Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Nawfal R; Balatay, Amer A; Assafi, Mahde S; AlMufty, Tamara Abdulezel

    2016-01-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is considered as the major risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. This virus is of different genotypes and generally can be classified into high and low risk types. To determine the rate of high risk HPV genotypes in women with vaginal discharge and lower abdominal pain in Kurdistan region, Iraq. Cervical swabs were taken from 104 women. DNA was extracted and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to determine the presence of high risk genotypes. It was found that 13/104 (12.5%) of the samples were positive for high risk HPV genotypes. Amongst those who were positive, 4/13 (30.7%) were typed as genotype 16 and 7/13 (53.8%) showed mixed genotyping. On the other hand, genotypes 53 and 56 were found in only one sample each. High risk HPV genotypes are not uncommon and further community based study is needed to determine the prevalence of HPV and its genotypes and plan for prevention of infection.

  20. Cellular DDX3 regulates Japanese encephalitis virus replication by interacting with viral un-translated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Ge, Ling-ling; Li, Peng-peng; Wang, Yue; Dai, Juan-juan; Sun, Ming-xia; Huang, Li; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Hu, Xiao-chun; Ishag, Hassan; Mao, Xiang

    2014-01-20

    Japanese encephalitis virus is one of the most common causes for epidemic viral encephalitis in humans and animals. Herein we demonstrated that cellular helicase DDX3 is involved in JEV replication. DDX3 knockdown inhibits JEV replication. The helicase activity of DDX3 is crucial for JEV replication. GST-pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that DDX3 could interact with JEV non-structural proteins 3 and 5. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that DDX3 interacts and colocalizes with these viral proteins and viral RNA during the infection. We determined that DDX3 binds to JEV 5' and 3' un-translated regions. We used a JEV-replicon system to demonstrate that DDX3 positively regulates viral RNA translation, which might affect viral RNA replication at the late stage of virus infection. Collectively, we identified that DDX3 is necessary for JEV infection, suggesting that DDX3 might be a novel target to design new antiviral agents against JEV or other flavivirus infections. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Chikungunya virus: mutation in E1 gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rishi K; Tiwari, Sarika; Mishra, Virendra K; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-11-01

    Chikungunya virus is a mosquito-transmitted RNA virus and emerging as a pathogen that has a major public health impact because of the high morbidity including high fever, headache, rash, nausea, vomiting, myalgia, arthralgia with or without neurological manifestation or fulminant hepatitis. One hundred fifty-one patient samples were analyzed during the years 2006-2008, and compared conventional tests and CCRT-PCR (cell culture RT PCR). The conventional tests included ELISA, inoculation into C6/36 cell line and CPE were examined by PCR after RNA extraction. A total of 20/151 (13.2%), 8/151 (5.29%) and 7/151 (4.6%) samples were found to be positive by ELISA, cell culture and PCR, respectively. While 7/20 (35%) of the samples were positive by CCRT_PCR when ELISA 20 positive samples were detected. A total of 5/7 positive strains were sequenced in the E1 gene region. Remarkable changes (M269V, D284E, P294L, S295F, A316V, V322A, and C328W) were observed in the membrane fusion glycoprotein E1. These unique molecular features of the isolates with the continuing epidemic demonstrated high evolutionary potential and thereby indicating higher virulence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  3. Development of a Reverse Genetic System for Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus: Rescue of Recombinant Fluorescent Virus by Using Salmon Internal Transcribed Spacer Region 1 as a Novel Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Tambley, Carolina; Beltran, Carolina; Mascayano, Carolina; Sandoval, Nicolas; Olivares, Eduardo; Medina, Rafael A.; Spencer, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a serious disease of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by ISA virus (ISAV), belonging to the genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae. There is an urgent need to understand the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms of ISAV and to develop new vaccine approaches. Using a recombinant molecular biology approach, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetic system for ISAV, which includes the use of a novel fish promoter, the Atlantic salmon internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS-1). Salmon cells cotransfected with pSS-URG-based vectors expressing the eight viral RNA segments and four cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors that express the four proteins of the ISAV ribonucleoprotein complex allowed the generation of infectious recombinant ISAV (rISAV). We generated three recombinant viruses, wild-type rISAV901_09 and rISAVrS6-NotI-HPR containing a NotI restriction site and rISAVS6/EGFP-HPR harboring the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), both within the highly polymorphic region (HPR) of segment 6. All rescued viruses showed replication activity and cytopathic effect in Atlantic salmon kidney-infected cells. The fluorescent recombinant viruses also showed a characteristic cytopathic effect in salmon cells, and the viruses replicated to a titer of 6.5 × 105 PFU/ml, similar to that of the wild-type virus. This novel reverse genetics system offers a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of ISAV and to develop a new generation of ISAV vaccines to prevent and mitigate ISAV infection, which has had a profound effect on the salmon industry. PMID:25480750

  4. High prevalence of torque teno sus virus in China and genetic diversity of the 5' non-coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shao-Lun; Long, Jin-Xue; Wei, Wen-Kang; Chen, Qin-Ling; Luo, Man-Lin; Lv, Dian-Hong; Wu, Da-Cheng; Gao, Fei; Yuan, Shi-Shan; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Wei, Zu-Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Members of the family Anelloviridae are emerging circular DNA viruses infecting many species of vertebrates including pigs. To date, members of two distinct genera, Iotatorquevirus, including torque teno sus virus 1a and torque teno sus virus 1b (TTSuV1a and TTSuV1b), and Kappatorquevirus, including torque teno sus virus k2a and torque teno sus virus k2b (TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b), have been identified in domestic pigs and wild boars. The goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of these viruses based on 5' non-coding genes in Chinese swine herds experiencing clinical symptoms. One hundred eighty-five clinical samples from 11 different regions, collected during 2008-2009, were analyzed using a PCR method, and the results revealed a high TTSuV-positive rate of 78.9 % (146/185) in pigs. Moreover, we detected co-infection with multiple TTSuV strains in the same pig. Nucleotide sequencing results revealed greater genetic diversity within the genus Kappatorquevirus than within the genus Iotatorquevirus. In addition, TTSuVk2b, a novel virus discovered in New Zealand in 2012, was also identified in this study. In summary, the present work helps us obtain more knowledge about the epidemiology and genetic diversity of TTSuVs.

  5. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroma Nwanodi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  6. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV Neutralization: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J. Hosie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major obstacles that must be overcome in the design of effective lentiviral vaccines is the ability of lentiviruses to evolve in order to escape from neutralizing antibodies. The primary target for neutralizing antibodies is the highly variable viral envelope glycoprotein (Env, a glycoprotein that is essential for viral entry and comprises both variable and conserved regions. As a result of the complex trimeric nature of Env, there is steric hindrance of conserved epitopes required for receptor binding so that these are not accessible to antibodies. Instead, the humoral response is targeted towards decoy immunodominant epitopes on variable domains such as the third hypervariable loop (V3 of Env. For feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, as well as the related human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1, little is known about the factors that lead to the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies. In cats infected with FIV and patients infected with HIV-1, only rarely are plasma samples found that contain antibodies capable of neutralizing isolates from other clades. In this review we examine the neutralizing response to FIV, comparing and contrasting with the response to HIV. We ask whether broadly neutralizing antibodies are induced by FIV infection and discuss the comparative value of studies of neutralizing antibodies in FIV infection for the development of more effective vaccine strategies against lentiviral infections in general, including HIV-1.

  7. West nile virus infection in the Mesopotamia region, Syria border of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoç, Zehra Çağla; Tüzüner, Bora Mete; Ergonul, Onder; Pierro, Anna; Di Fonzo, Eugenio; Koruk, İbrahim; Sambri, Vittorio

    2013-10-01

    We described the serological prevalence of West Nile Virus (WNV) antibodies among the human population in a historical and strategic region of Turkey. A serologic survey was conducted based on suspected cases in April, 2009, in the Mesopotamia region of Turkey, in the villages that were located alongside the Zergan River. All the sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA (Euroimmune™), and the positive samples were tested by immunofluorescent assay (IFA; Euroimmune™). As confirmation, neutralizing antibodies against WNV were tested by microneutralization assay (MNTA). In total, 307 individuals were included. The MNTA test was found to be positive among 52 individuals out of 307 (17%). In multivariate analysis, age >50 [odds ratio (OR)=5.2, confidence interval (CI) 2.76-9.97, p<0.001) and being in an occupational risk group (OR=2.02, CI 1.02-4.04, p=0.044) were found to be the risk factors for WNV seropositivity with the MNTA test. The physicians in the region should be aware of the risk of WNV infection and should be alerted to detect the clinical cases.

  8. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Zika Virus Genome Highlights Regions Essential for RNA Replication and Restricted for Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin O; Sachs, David; Schwarz, Megan C; Palese, Peter; Evans, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The molecular constraints affecting Zika virus (ZIKV) evolution are not well understood. To investigate ZIKV genetic flexibility, we used transposon mutagenesis to add 15-nucleotide insertions throughout the ZIKV MR766 genome and subsequently deep sequenced the viable mutants. Few ZIKV insertion mutants replicated, which likely reflects a high degree of functional constraints on the genome. The NS1 gene exhibited distinct mutational tolerances at different stages of the screen. This result may define regions of the NS1 protein that are required for the different stages of the viral life cycle. The ZIKV structural genes showed the highest degree of insertional tolerance. Although the envelope (E) protein exhibited particular flexibility, the highly conserved envelope domain II (EDII) fusion loop of the E protein was intolerant of transposon insertions. The fusion loop is also a target of pan-flavivirus antibodies that are generated against other flaviviruses and neutralize a broad range of dengue virus and ZIKV isolates. The genetic restrictions identified within the epitopes in the EDII fusion loop likely explain the sequence and antigenic conservation of these regions in ZIKV and among multiple flaviviruses. Thus, our results provide insights into the genetic restrictions on ZIKV that may affect the evolution of this virus.IMPORTANCE Zika virus recently emerged as a significant human pathogen. Determining the genetic constraints on Zika virus is important for understanding the factors affecting viral evolution. We used a genome-wide transposon mutagenesis screen to identify where mutations were tolerated in replicating viruses. We found that the genetic regions involved in RNA replication were mostly intolerant of mutations. The genes coding for structural proteins were more permissive to mutations. Despite the flexibility observed in these regions, we found that epitopes bound by broadly reactive antibodies were genetically constrained. This finding may explain

  9. Molecular and biological characterization of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV, Pomovirus) isolates from potato-growing regions in Colombia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, José; Adams, Ian; Boonham, Neil

    2016-01-01

    samples were taken from the main potato-producing regions in Colombia and virus was recovered by planting Nicotiana benthamiana as bait plants. The complete genomes of five isolates were sequenced and three of the isolates were inoculated to four different indicator plants. Based on sequence comparisons...

  10. Dimerization and template switching in the 5 ' untranslated region between various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Berkhout, Ben; Kjems, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) particle contains two identical RNA strands, each corresponding to the entire genome. The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of each RNA strand contains extensive secondary and tertiary structures that are instrumental in different steps of the viral

  11. Transmissions of hepatitis C virus during the ancillary procedures for assisted conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesourd, F; Izopet, J; Mervan, C; Payen, J L; Sandres, K; Monrozies, X; Parinaud, J

    2000-05-01

    Since mother to child transmissions of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been reported to be low, teams involved in assisted reproductive technologies have accepted HCV positive patients into their programmes. We report in the present paper two cases of undoubted patient to patient HCV transmission while patients were attending for assisted conception. In both cases, HCV genotyping and sequencing of the first hypervariable region of the HCV genome provided molecular evidence for nosocomial transmission. Investigations made to elucidate the route of contamination have shown that the most likely route of contamination is through healthcare workers. Such nosocomial HCV infection has been reported in other healthcare situations, mainly in dialysis units, and physical proximity was also suspected to be at the origin of the infection. We conclude that assisted reproduction teams must be very prudent when including such patients in their programmes.

  12. [Polymorphism of CXCR4 coding region of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Chinese Han people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-xu; Wang, Fu-sheng; Hong, Wei-guo; Wang, Bo; Jin, Lei; Lei, Zhou-yun; Hou, Jing

    2003-06-01

    To study the polymorphism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor CXCR4 in Chinese Han ethnic group for AIDS prevention and treatment. Totally 48 individuals were enrolled into the study. CXCR4 (cDNA No-AF147204) was cloned by PCR amplification using 2 pairs of primers, then sequenced using sequencing primers. The results of the same sequencing primers were analyzed by DNAstar software to find and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. Totally 7 SNPs were found in the coding region of CXCR4, among them 3 were synonymous mutation (C-->T at loci 129, 426 and 968), 3 were missense mutation (C-->T at locus 38, A-->T at locus 90, and A-->C at locus 712) and 1 was stop mutation (C-->T at 106, which converted the codon for glutamic acid into stop codon). The polymorphism of CXCR4 coding region in Chinese Han is probably different from that of the other ethnic groups. Six of the 7 SNPs were discovered for the first time. Their influences on AIDS progression are worthy of studying.

  13. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Looker

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated.We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital.We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440-3878 million aged 0-49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%, with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67-212 million people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific.The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection.

  14. Immunogenicity of the Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine IXIARO in Children From a Japanese Encephalitis Virus-endemic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubischar, Katrin L; Kadlecek, Vera; Sablan, Jr Benjamin; Borja-Tabora, Charissa Fay; Gatchalian, Salvacion; Eder-Lingelbach, Susanne; Kiermayr, Sigrid; Spruth, Martin; Westritschnig, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a major public health concern in Asia and poses a small but potentially fatal threat to travelers from nonendemic countries, including children. No JE vaccine for pediatric use has been available in Europe and the United States. Age-stratified cohorts of children between 2 months and 17 years received 2 doses of Vero cell-derived inactivated JE virus vaccine (IXIARO; Valneva Austria GmbH, Vienna, Austria) administered 28 days apart [half adult dose); ≥3 years, 0.5 mL (full adult dose)]. Immunogenicity endpoints were seroconversion rate, 4-fold increase in JE neutralizing antibody titer and geometric mean titer assessed 56 days and 7 months after the first vaccination in 496 subjects of the intent-to-treat population. The immune response to JE virus at both time points was also analyzed according to prevaccination JE virus and dengue virus serostatus. At day 56, seroconversion was attained in ≥99.2% of subjects with age-appropriate dosing, 4-fold increases in titer were reported for 77.4%-100% in various age groups, and geometric mean titers ranged from 176 to 687, with younger children having the strongest immune response. At month 7, seroconversion was maintained in 85.5%-100% of subjects. Pre-existing JE virus immunity did not impact on immune response at day 56; however, it led to a better persistence of protective antibody titers at month 7. IXIARO is highly immunogenic at both doses tested in the pediatric population, leading to protective antibody titers at day 56 in >99% of subjects who received the age-appropriate dose.

  15. Phylogenetic study on the 5'-untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus is a pathogen of bovids associated with reproduction system, causing in infected animals a range of ailments, from abortion to congenital defects. In this article, the nucleotide structure of the 5'-untranslated region (5-UTR from 7 Iranian bovine diarrhoea virus (BVDV isolates was characterized and subjected to comparative analysis against a panel of BVDV isolates from different sources. To this end, a 288 bp-long stretch of the internal ribosome entry site was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR products subsequently cloned into PTZ57T vector and sequenced using T7 promoter primers. This resulted in detection of 3 new point mutations G→A and G→T in 2 isolates. When these findings were phylogenetically assessed, all the examined Iranian isolates were deemed to belong to the type1 of BVDV. Besides, 2 subtypes were identified among these isolates. In group A, a high level of similarity (99.2% between Iranian isolates with a cytopathic Australian strain of BVDV-1c was detected; while in group B, the 4 Iranian isolates proved to be very similar to NADL-like BVDV-1a strains. We believe that the surprisingly high level of similarity between group A Iranian isolates and their corresponding Australian strain is likely to be an indication of a shared common ancestor. If correct, the most likely explanation of this observation is the introduction of such strains from Australia to Iran, possibly through exportation of infected live animals or animal productions (e.g. semen and meat at some points in the past. Nevertheless, this hypothesis remains to be proved as further epidemiological work at genomic level is required to understand population of BVDV in Iran.

  16. Spatiotemporal Reconstruction of the Introduction of Hepatitis C Virus into Scotland and Its Subsequent Regional Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Anna L; Cameron, Iain Dugald; Wignall-Fleming, Elizabeth B; Biek, Roman; McLauchlan, John; Gunson, Rory N; Templeton, Kate; Tan, Harriet Mei-Lin; Leitch, E Carol McWilliam

    2015-11-01

    A more comprehensive understanding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission dynamics could facilitate public health initiatives to reduce the prevalence of HCV in people who inject drugs. We aimed to determine how HCV sequences entered and spread throughout Scotland and to identify transmission hot spots. A Scottish data set with embedded demographic data was created by sequencing the NS5B of 125 genotype 1a (Gt1a) samples and 166 Gt3a samples and analyzed alongside sequences from public databases. Applying Bayesian inference methods, we reconstructed the global origin and local spatiotemporal dissemination of HCV in Scotland. Scottish sequences mainly formed discrete clusters interspersed between sequences from the rest of the world; the most recent common ancestors of these clusters dated to 1942 to 1952 (Gt1a) and 1926 to 1942 (Gt3a), coincident with global diversification and distribution. Extant Scottish sequences originated in Edinburgh (Gt1a) and Glasgow (Gt3a) in the 1970s, but both genotypes spread from Glasgow to other regions. The dominant Gt1a strain differed between Edinburgh (cluster 2 [C2]), Glasgow (C3), and Aberdeen (C4), whereas significant Gt3a strain specificity occurred only in Aberdeen. Specific clusters initially formed separate transmission zones in Glasgow that subsequently overlapped, occasioning city-wide cocirculation. Transmission hot spots were detected with 45% of samples from patients residing in just 9 of Glasgow's 57 postcode districts. HCV was introduced into Scotland in the 1940s, concomitant with its worldwide dispersal likely arising from global-scale historical events. Cluster-specific transmission hubs were identified in Glasgow, the key Scottish city implicated in HCV dissemination. This fine-scale spatiotemporal reconstruction improves understanding of HCV transmission dynamics in Scotland. HCV is a major health burden and the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma. Public health needle exchange and "treatment as

  17. Identification of different lineages of measles virus strains circulating in Uttar Pradesh, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakya Akhalesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic analysis of measles viruses associated with recent cases and outbreaks has proven to bridge information gaps in routine outbreak investigations and has made a substantial contribution to measles control efforts by helping to identify the transmission pathways of the virus. Materials and methods The present study describes the genetic characterization of wild type measles viruses from Uttar Pradesh, India isolated between January 2008 and January 2011. In the study, 526 suspected measles cases from 15 outbreaks were investigated. Blood samples were collected from suspected measles outbreaks and tested for the presence of measles specific IgM; throat swab and urine samples were collected for virus isolation and RT-PCR. Genotyping of circulating measles viruses in Uttar Pradesh was performed by sequencing a 450-bp region encompassing the nucleoprotein hypervariable region and phylogenetic analysis. Results and conclusion Based on serological results, all the outbreaks were confirmed as measles. Thirty eight strains were obtained. Genetic analysis of circulating measles strains (n = 38 in Uttar Pradesh from 235 cases of laboratory-confirmed cases from 526 suspected measles cases between 2008 and 2011 showed that all viruses responsible for outbreaks were within clade D and all were genotype D8. Analysis of this region showed that it is highly divergent (up to 3.4% divergence in the nucleotide sequence and 4.1% divergence in the amino acid sequence between most distant strains. Considerable genetic heterogeneity was observed in the MV genotype D8 viruses in North India and underscores the need for continued surveillance and in particular increases in vaccination levels to decrease morbidity and mortality attributable to measles.

  18. Identification of different lineages of measles virus strains circulating in Uttar Pradesh, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Akhalesh Kumar; Shukla, Vibha; Maan, Harjeet Singh; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-10-16

    Genetic analysis of measles viruses associated with recent cases and outbreaks has proven to bridge information gaps in routine outbreak investigations and has made a substantial contribution to measles control efforts by helping to identify the transmission pathways of the virus. The present study describes the genetic characterization of wild type measles viruses from Uttar Pradesh, India isolated between January 2008 and January 2011. In the study, 526 suspected measles cases from 15 outbreaks were investigated. Blood samples were collected from suspected measles outbreaks and tested for the presence of measles specific IgM; throat swab and urine samples were collected for virus isolation and RT-PCR. Genotyping of circulating measles viruses in Uttar Pradesh was performed by sequencing a 450-bp region encompassing the nucleoprotein hypervariable region and phylogenetic analysis. Based on serological results, all the outbreaks were confirmed as measles. Thirty eight strains were obtained. Genetic analysis of circulating measles strains (n = 38) in Uttar Pradesh from 235 cases of laboratory-confirmed cases from 526 suspected measles cases between 2008 and 2011 showed that all viruses responsible for outbreaks were within clade D and all were genotype D8.Analysis of this region showed that it is highly divergent (up to 3.4% divergence in the nucleotide sequence and 4.1% divergence in the amino acid sequence between most distant strains). Considerable genetic heterogeneity was observed in the MV genotype D8 viruses in North India and underscores the need for continued surveillance and in particular increases in vaccination levels to decrease morbidity and mortality attributable to measles.

  19. Duck hepatitis B virus can tolerate insertion, deletion, and partial frameshift mutation in the distal pre-S region.

    OpenAIRE

    J.S. Li; Cova, L; Buckland, R.; Lambert, V; Deléage, G; Trépo, C

    1989-01-01

    In-frame and frameshift mutations were introduced into the pre-S region (1,212 base pairs) of duck hepatitis B virus. The in-frame mutants retained the inserted 12 nucleotides, while the frameshift mutants either reverted to wild type or exhibited a 10-nucleotide compensatory deletion downstream of the original mutation site. Thus, although duck hepatitis B virus has a compact and highly economical genome organization, it can replicate despite alterations of up to 9 amino acid codons in the p...

  20. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared...... with that of the wild-type vector. Thirty-two of 60 transduced proviruses analyzed harbored a primer binding site sequence matching a glutamine tRNA primer. Sequence analysis of the regions flanking the glutamine tRNA primer binding site revealed a distinct pattern of nucleotide differences from the Akv-based vector......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  1. SF2/ASF binding region within JC virus NCCR limits early gene transcription in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleri, Elena; Regan, Patrick; Dolei, Antonina; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret

    2013-05-14

    Patients undergoing immune modulatory therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and individuals with an impaired-immune system, most notably AIDS patients, are in the high risk group of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the white matter caused by human neurotropic polyomavirus, JC virus. It is now widely accepted that pathologic strains of JCV shows unique rearrangements consist of deletions and insertions within viral NCCR. While these kinds of rearrangements are related to viral tropism and pathology of the disease, their roles in molecular regulation of JCV gene expression and replication are unclear. We have previously identified SF2/ASF as a negative regulator of JCV gene expression in glial cells. This negative impact of SF2/ASF was dependent on its ability to bind a specific region mapped to the tandem repeat within viral promoter. In this report, functional role of SF2/ASF binding region in viral gene expression and replication was investigated by using deletion mutants of viral regulatory sequences. The second 98-base-pair tandem repeat on Mad1 strain was first mutated by deletion and named Mad1-(1X98). In addition to this mutant, the CR3 region which served the binding side for SF2/ASF was also mutated and named Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73). Both mutations were tested for SF2/ASF binding by ChIP assay. While SF2/ASF was associated with Mad1-WT and Mad1-(1X98), its interaction was completely abolished on Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) construct as expected. Surprisingly, reporter gene analysis of Mad1-(1X98) and Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) early promoter sequences showed two and three fold increase in promoter activities, respectively. The impact of "CR3" region on JCV propagation was also tested on the viral background. While replication of Mad1-(1X98) strain in glial cells was similar to Mad1-WT strain, propagation of Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) was less productive. Further analysis of the

  2. A novel borna disease virus vector system that stably expresses foreign proteins from an intercistronic noncoding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-12-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5' untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions.

  3. The link between mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment I heteroplasmy and ageing among genetically unrelated Latvians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Liana; Brakmanis, Andis; Ranka, Renate; Elferts, Didzis; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2011-07-01

    Various studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy tends to increase with age and that the observed frequency of heteroplasmy among populations mostly depends on the way it is measured. Therefore, we investigated age-related association on the presence of mtDNA heteroplasmy within the hypervariable segment 1 (HVS-I) in a selected study group. The study group consisted of 300 maternally unrelated Latvians ranging in age from 18 to over 90 years. To determine the optimal method for mtDNA heteroplasmy detection, three approaches were used: (i) SURVEYOR Mutation Detection Kit, (ii) sequencing and (iii) denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Among the studied individuals, 30.3% were found to be heteroplasmic. The distribution of heteroplasmy statistically significantly increased with individuals' age (17%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.095-0.244 in the 18-40 year age group vs. 39%; [CI] 0.294-0.487 in the >90 year age group). Heteroplasmy occurred in a total of 21 different positions within HVS-I, and was the most frequent at fast-mutated positions 16189, 16304 and 16311. The results indicate that heteroplasmy in HVS-I is relatively common and occurs in a broad spectrum of sites. The above is supported by evidence to eventual increase of the probability of heteroplasmy with age due to specific mitochondrial haplogroup background. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation rate in Velvet tobacco mottle virus varies between genomic region and virus variant but is not influenced by obligatory mirid transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, K; Collins, N C; Randles, J W

    2012-12-01

    Genomic mutation in plant viruses of cultivated plants is known to be influenced by virus, host and vector, but the factors influencing mutation in viruses of native plants in natural ecosystems are rarely studied. We have tested the effect of mode of transmission on mutation in Velvet tobacco mottle virus (VTMoV), a mirid-vectored sobemovirus associated with Nicotiana velutina, an Australian native xerophyte growing in a region isolated from anthropogenic influences. Two variants of VTMoV (K1 and R17) were passaged monthly in the alternative experimental plant host, N. clevelandii, for 2 years, either by mechanical inoculation or by transmission with the mirid Cyrtopeltis nicotianae. Sequence variations were scored after 24 passages in regions of the genome containing the open reading frames (ORFs) for the P1 and coat protein (CP). The mean mutation rate was 6.83 × 10(-4) nt/site year, but a higher overall rate was observed for the K1 (satellite -) than the R17 (satellite +) variant. The P1 ORF showed a higher frequency of non-synonymous mutations than the CP. No clear association was found between either mutation site or mutation rate and the mode of transmission, indicating that obligatory mirid transmission had not exerted a specific bottle-neck effect on sequence variation during the experimental time frame. Failure to detect any sequence motifs linked to vector transmission suggests that a specific capsid-stylet interaction is not required for transmission by mirids.

  5. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. AL-Saleh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011–2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia.

  6. Genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea viruses from the Galicia region of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, C; Yus, E; Eiras, C; Sanjuan, M L; Cerviño, M; Arnaiz, I; Diéguez, F J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and diversity of bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDVs) infecting cattle in Galicia (northwestern Spain). A total of 86 BVDV strains were typed in samples of serum from 79 persistently infected animals and 3 viraemic animals and of abomasal fluid from 4 fetuses. Samples came from 73 farms participating in a voluntary BVDV control programme. Typing was based on a 288-bp sequence from the 5' untranslated region amplified using primers 324 and 326. Of the 86 strains, 85 (98.8 per cent) belonged to species BVDV-1 and 1 (1.2 per cent) belonged to BVDV-2; 73 strains (84.9 per cent) were typed as BVDV-1b, 2 as BVDV-1e and 6 as BVDV-1d. One strain each was typed as belonging to 1a, 1h, 1k and 1l. The sole BVDV-2 strain was classified as 2a. These results identify BVDV-1b as the predominant species, and they indicate the presence of viral types not previously described anywhere in Spain. This is also the first report of BVDV-2 in Galicia and only the second report of BVDV-2 in Spain.

  7. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in the South Marmara Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Agca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important caustive agent of hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma both in our country and the world. Prognosis and response to treatment is related with the genotype of HCV which has six genotypes and over a hundred quasispecies. Knowing the HCV genotype is also important for epidemiological data. In this study we aimed to investigate the HCV genotypes of samples sent to Uludag University Hospital Microbiology Laboratory which is the reference centre in the South Marmara Region. Material and Method: This study was done retrospectively to analyse the HCV patients%u2019 sera sent to our laboratory between July 2010and December 2012 for HCV genotyping. Artus HCV QS-RGQ PCR kit (Qiagene,Hilden, Germany was used in Rotor-Gene Q (Qiagene, Hilden Germany for detection of HCV RNA. HCV RNA positive samples of patients%u2019 sera were were used for genotyping by the Linear Array HCV genotyping test (Roche, NJ, USA.Results: 214 (92.6 % of total 231 patients included in the study were genotype 1, one (0.4 % was genotype 2, nine (3.9 % were genotype 3 and, seven (3.4 % were found genotype 4. Three of genotype 3 patients were of foreign nationality, two were born abroad and one of the genotype 4 patients were born abroad. Discussion: Concordant with our country data the most frequent genotype was 1, genotype 2 was seen in patients especially related with foreign countries and genotype 4 was seen rare. The importance of genotype 1, which is seen more frequent in our country and region is; resistance to antiviral treatment and prolonged treatment duration in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  8. Simple protocol for population (Sanger sequencing for Zika virus genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bastos Cabral

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A number of Zika virus (ZIKV sequences were obtained using Next-generation sequencing (NGS, a methodology widely applied in genetic diversity studies and virome discovery. However Sanger method is still a robust, affordable, rapid and specific tool to obtain valuable sequences. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to develop a simple and robust Sanger sequencing protocol targeting ZIKV relevant genetic regions, as envelope protein and nonstructural protein 5 (NS5. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV strains obtained using the present protocol and their comparison with previously published NGS sequences were also carried out. METHODS Six Vero cells isolates from serum and one urine sample were available to develop the procedure. Primer sets were designed in order to conduct a nested RT-PCR and a Sanger sequencing protocols. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. FINDINGS Seven complete ZIKV envelope protein (1,571 kb and six partial NS5 (0,798 Kb were obtained using the protocol, with no amplification of NS5 gene from urine sample. Two NS5 sequences presented ambiguities at positions 495 and 196. Nucleotide analysis of a Sanger sequence and consensus sequence of previously NGS study revealed 100% identity. ZIKV strains described here clustered within the Asian lineage. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The present study provided a simple and low-cost Sanger protocol to sequence relevant genes of the ZIKV genome. The identity of Sanger generated sequences with published consensus NGS support the use of Sanger method for ZIKV population studies. The regions evaluated were able to provide robust phylogenetic signals and may be used to conduct molecular epidemiological studies and monitor viral evolution.

  9. Simple protocol for population (Sanger) sequencing for Zika virus genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Gabriela Bastos; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Souza, Renato Pereira de; Cunha, Mariana Sequetin; Luchs, Adriana; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Brígido, Luís Fernando de Macedo

    2018-01-01

    A number of Zika virus (ZIKV) sequences were obtained using Next-generation sequencing (NGS), a methodology widely applied in genetic diversity studies and virome discovery. However Sanger method is still a robust, affordable, rapid and specific tool to obtain valuable sequences. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and robust Sanger sequencing protocol targeting ZIKV relevant genetic regions, as envelope protein and nonstructural protein 5 (NS5). In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV strains obtained using the present protocol and their comparison with previously published NGS sequences were also carried out. Six Vero cells isolates from serum and one urine sample were available to develop the procedure. Primer sets were designed in order to conduct a nested RT-PCR and a Sanger sequencing protocols. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Seven complete ZIKV envelope protein (1,571 kb) and six partial NS5 (0,798 Kb) were obtained using the protocol, with no amplification of NS5 gene from urine sample. Two NS5 sequences presented ambiguities at positions 495 and 196. Nucleotide analysis of a Sanger sequence and consensus sequence of previously NGS study revealed 100% identity. ZIKV strains described here clustered within the Asian lineage. The present study provided a simple and low-cost Sanger protocol to sequence relevant genes of the ZIKV genome. The identity of Sanger generated sequences with published consensus NGS support the use of Sanger method for ZIKV population studies. The regions evaluated were able to provide robust phylogenetic signals and may be used to conduct molecular epidemiological studies and monitor viral evolution.

  10. Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region: Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Daniel L.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Freuling, Conrad M.; Marston, Denise A.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Goharrriz, Hooman; Wise, Emma; Breed, Andrew C.; Saturday, Greg; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Zilahi, Erika; Al-Kobaisi, Muhannad F.; Nowotny, Norbert; Mueller, Thomas; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East is a culturally and politically diverse region at the gateway between Europe, Africa and Asia. Spatial dynamics of the fatal zoonotic disease rabies among countries of the Middle East and surrounding regions is poorly understood. An improved understanding of virus distribution is necessary to direct control methods. Previous studies have suggested regular trans-boundary movement, but have been unable to infer direction. Here we address these issues, by investigating the evolution of 183 rabies virus isolates collected from over 20 countries between 1972 and 2014. We have undertaken a discrete phylogeographic analysis on a subset of 139 samples to infer where and when movements of rabies have occurred. We provide evidence for four genetically distinct clades with separate origins currently circulating in the Middle East and surrounding countries. Introductions of these viruses have been followed by regular and multidirectional trans-boundary movements in some parts of the region, but relative isolation in others. There is evidence for minimal regular incursion of rabies from Central and Eastern Asia. These data support current initiatives for regional collaboration that are essential for rabies elimination. PMID:25811659

  11. Complex epidemiology of a zoonotic disease in a culturally diverse region: phylogeography of rabies virus in the Middle East.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Horton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Middle East is a culturally and politically diverse region at the gateway between Europe, Africa and Asia. Spatial dynamics of the fatal zoonotic disease rabies among countries of the Middle East and surrounding regions is poorly understood. An improved understanding of virus distribution is necessary to direct control methods. Previous studies have suggested regular trans-boundary movement, but have been unable to infer direction. Here we address these issues, by investigating the evolution of 183 rabies virus isolates collected from over 20 countries between 1972 and 2014. We have undertaken a discrete phylogeographic analysis on a subset of 139 samples to infer where and when movements of rabies have occurred. We provide evidence for four genetically distinct clades with separate origins currently circulating in the Middle East and surrounding countries. Introductions of these viruses have been followed by regular and multidirectional trans-boundary movements in some parts of the region, but relative isolation in others. There is evidence for minimal regular incursion of rabies from Central and Eastern Asia. These data support current initiatives for regional collaboration that are essential for rabies elimination.

  12. An outbreak of West Nile Virus infection in the region of Monastir, Tunisia, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabi, Samira; Gaaloul, Imed; Mastouri, Maha; Hassine, Mohsen; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2014-01-01

    Background A West Nile (WN) fever epidemic occurred in the region of Monastir, Tunisia, between August and October 2003. Aim of the study We attempt to describe the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and outcome of patients with confirmed West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Methods Three groups of specimens were prepared. One was made up of serum only (n  =  43), the other of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) only (n  =  30), and the third group was made up of both (n  =  40). These specimens were obtained from 113 patients. A serological diagnosis and evidence of WNV genome by nested reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR) and TaqMan reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were carried out. Results Thirty-eight cases (33.6%) were serologically positive. Results of nRT-PCR showed a total of 10 positive cases of WNV (8.8%) detected in group 1 (n  =  1/43), group 2 (n  =  5/30), and group 3 (n  =  4/40) whereas the PCR TaqMan showed 18 positive samples (15.9%) found in group 1 (n  =  3/43), group 2 (n  =  9/30), and group 3 (n  =  6/40). All TaqMan PCR positive cases were nRT-PCR positive. In addition, four serologically probable cases were confirmed by TaqMan PCR. The attempts to isolate WNV by cell culture were unsuccessful. Considering the results of TaqMan assay and the serological diagnosis, WNV infection was confirmed in a total of 42 patients. The main clinical presentations were meningoencephalitis (40%), febrile disease (95%), and meningitis (36%). Eight patients (19%) died. The highest case-fatality rates occurred among patients aged ≧55 years. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates of WNV were closely related to the Tunisian strain 1997 (PAH001) and the Israeli one (Is-98). Conclusions West Nile virus is a reemerging global pathogen that remains an important public health challenge in the next decade. PMID:24766339

  13. West Nile virus encodes a microRNA-like small RNA in the 3' untranslated region which up-regulates GATA4 mRNA and facilitates virus replication in mosquito cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, M.; Torres, S.; Schnettler, E.; Funk, A.; Grundhoff, A.; Pijlman, G.P.; Khromykh, A.A.; Asgari, S.

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) belongs to a group of medically important single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses causing deadly disease outbreaks around the world. The 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the flavivirus genome, in particular the terminal 3' stem–loop (3'SL) fulfils multiple functions in

  14. Serological evidence of widespread West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus infection in native domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in Kuttanad region, Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Mishra, Niranjan; Khetan, Rohit Kumar; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2016-10-01

    Birds can act as reservoirs of West Nile virus (WNV) with a key role in its epidemiology. WNV lineage 1 associated fatal cases of human encephalitis in 2011 and acute flaccid paralysis in 2013 were reported in Alappuzha district, Kerala, India. But no information is available on WNV circulation in domestic ducks, which are abundant, cohabit with humans and occupy wetlands and water bodies in the region. To determine the extent of WNV infection, we investigated 209 sera, 250 oral and 350 cloacal swab samples from local Chara and Chemballi domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var domesticus) in the districts of Alappuzha, Kottayam, Kollam and Pathanamthitta collected during January and March 2015. The serum samples were tested for WNV antibodies first by a competition ELISA and then by a micro virus neutralization test (micro-VNT), while oral and cloacal swabs were subjected to WNV real-time RT-PCR. Ninety five ducks showed evidence of flavivirus antibodies by ELISA. End point neutralizing antibody titre against WNV and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) revealed WNV specific antibodies in 24 (11.5%) ducks in 3 districts, JEV specific antibodies in 21 (10%) ducks in 2 districts and flavivirus specific antibodies in 19 (9%) ducks. However, no WNV genomic RNA could be detected. The results of this study demonstrate evidence of widespread WNV and JEV infection in domestic ducks in Kuttanad region, Kerala with a higher seroprevalence to WNV than JEV. Additionally, it highlights the utility of domestic ducks as a surveillance tool to detect WNV/JEV circulation in a region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Rabies Virus N-coding Region in Lithuanian Rabies Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainius Zienius

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies infection among wild and domestic animals constitutes a well-known problem in Lithuania, but only one dog rabies virus isolate sequence (1992 from Lithuania was used in the European rabies virus phylogenetic analysis. The objective of this work was to determine nucleoprotein (N gene sequences and genetically characterize the rabies virus isolates in order to learn which virus group (biotype is circulating in reservoir species in Lithuania. Classical rabies virus isolate nucleoprotein (N gene sequences from different parts of Lithuania were found to be closely related to each other and demonstrated nucleotide identity from 97.7 to 100% and could be placed in one lineage with 100% bootstrap support. All 12 sequences of raccoon dogs, red foxes, dogs and marten rabies viruses exhibited 97.7 - 99.0% identity to previously published sequences from Eastern parts of Poland, Estonia, Finland, and the North-Eastern part of Russia. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Lithuanian strains belong to the North East Europe (NEE group of rabies virus.

  16. The global spread of Zika virus: is public and media concern justified in regions currently unaffected?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gyawali, Narayan; Bradbury, Richard S; Taylor-Robinson, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus, an Aedes mosquito-borne flavivirus, is fast becoming a worldwide public health concern following its suspected association with over 4000 recent cases of microcephaly among newborn infants in Brazil...

  17. [Hepatitis C virus genotypes in a province of western Black-Sea region, Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Elif; Ogedey, Esra Deniz; Külah, Canan; Beğendik Cömert, Füsun

    2010-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the significant causes of hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma all throughout the world. There are six genotypes and more than 50 subtypes of HCV. HCV genotyping is of crucial importance in the determination of the treatment protocols and the follow-up of the clinical course since treatment success is low and the duration of treatment is longer in HCV genotype 1 infected cases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the HCV genotype profiles of the patients with chronic hepatitis C in Zonguldak, providing the first data about HCV genotypes from western Black-Sea region, Turkey. The HCV genotypes of 44 patients (26 female, 18 male; age range: 29-89 years, mean age: 60.05 ± 10.81 years) with positive anti-HCV antibody and HCV-RNA results, admitted to the hospital between May 2007 and July 2009, were retrospectively evaluated and included in the study. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels of the patients were between 8-160 IU/L (mean 63.99 ± 37.15 IU/L) and the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were between 17-160 IU/L (mean 62.77 ± 36.75 IU/L). HCV antibody was determined by ELISA method (Abbott Laboratories, USA), and HCV-RNA was determined by two commercial real-time polymerase chain reaction systems [Cobas Taqman (Roche Diagnostic, USA) and Rotor-Gene 6000 (Corbett Research, USA)]. The genotyping was performed by a reverse hybridization based method, Versant® HCV Genotype Assay (LiPA) 2.0 (Bayer Health Care, Belgium). HCV genotypes could not be determined for 5 (11.4%) patients since HCV-RNA levels were low. Genotyping could be performed for 39 (88.6%) patients and 38 (97.4%) had genotype 1b and one (2.6%) patient had genotype 1a. In conclusion, in concordance with the other studies conducted in our country, genotype 1b was found to be the most prevalent genotype in patients from our region.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of infectious bursal disease virus in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Kasanga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequences of the VP2 hypervariable region (VP2-HVR of 10 infectious bursal disease viruses detected in indigenous and exotic chickens in Zambia from 2004 to 2005 were determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the viruses diverged into two genotypes and belonged to the African very virulent types (VV1 and VV2. In the phylogenetic tree, strains in one genotype clustered in a distinct group and were closely related to some strains isolated in western Africa (VV1, with nucleotide similarities of 95.7%– 96.5%. Strains in the other genotype were clustered within the eastern African VV type (VV2, with nucleotide similarities of 97.3%– 98.5%. Both genotypes were distributed in the southern parts of Zambia and had a unique conserved amino acid substitution at 300 (E→A in addition to the putative virulence marker at positions 222(A, 242(I, 256(I, 294(I and 299(S. These findings represent the first documentation of the existence of the African VV-IBDV variants in both indigenous and exotic chickens in Zambia.

  19. Local and Regional Spatial Analysis of Plant Virus Disease Epidemics with Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Nelson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in personal computer hardware and the rapid development of spatial analysis software that is user-friendly on PC's has provided remarkable new tools for the analysts of plant diseases, particularly ecologically complex virus diseases. Due to the complexity of the disease cycle of the animal-vectored plant virus, these diseases present the most interesting challenges for the application of spatial analysis technology. While traditional quantitative analysis of plant diseases concentrated on within-field spatial analysis, often involving rather arcane mathematical descriptions of pattern, the new spatial analysis tools are most useful at the dimension where many disease epidemics occur, the regional level. The output of many of the programs used in spatial analysis is a highly visual picture of a disease epidemic which has a strong intuitive appeal to managers of agricultural enterprises. Applications by us, thus far, have included tomato, pepper and cotton virus diseases in Arizona. Mexico, California and Pakistan. In addition, this technology has been applied by us to Phytophthora infestans in potato and tomato. Aspergillus flavus in cotton, and regional insect problems of tomato and cotton.

  20. Genetic clustering of Borna disease virus natural animal isolates, laboratory and vaccine strains strongly reflects their regional geographical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Dürrwald, Ralf; Herzog, Sibylle; Ehrensperger, Felix; Lussy, Helga; Nowotny, Norbert

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed insights into the genetic evolution and variability of Borna disease virus (BDV). Phylogenetic analyses were performed on field viruses originating from naturally infected animals, the BDV vaccine strain 'Dessau', four widely used laboratory strains and the novel BDV subtype No/98. Four regions of the BDV genome were analysed: the complete p40, p10 and p24 genes and the 5'-untranslated region of the X/P transcript. BDV isolates from the same geographical area exhibited a clearly higher degree of identity to each other than to BDV isolates from other regions, independent of host species and year of isolation. Five different clusters could be established within endemic areas, corresponding to the geographical regions from which the viruses originated: (i) a Swiss, Austrian and Liechtenstein Rhine valley group, related closely to the geographically bordering Baden-Wurttemberg and Bavaria II group (ii) in the western part of Germany; (iii) a third group, called Bavaria I group, limited in occurrence to Bavaria; (iv) a southern Saxony-Anhalt and bordering northern Saxony group, bound to the territories of these federal states in the eastern part of Germany; and (v) a mixed group, consisting of samples from different areas of Germany; however, these were mainly from the federal states of Thuringia and Lower Saxony. The laboratory strains and the vaccine strain clustered within these groups according to their geographical origins. All field and laboratory strains, as well as the vaccine strain, clearly segregated from the recently described and highly divergent BDV strain No/98, which originated from an area in Austria where Borna disease is not endemic.

  1. Molecular detection of infectious bronchitis virus and it is relation with avian influenza virus (H9 and Mycoplasma gallisepticum from different geographical regions in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Al-Dabhawe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, Avian influenza virus (AIV and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG have been recognized as the most important pathogens in poultry cause acute respiratory infection and serous economic problems in Iraq and many other countries all over the world. This study was conducted to investigate the distribution of these diseases in commercial chicken flocks in different geographical region in middle part of Iraq by using qPCR. Tracheal swabs and tissue specimens from trachea, lung and kidney were taken from 38 different cases from commercial broiler chicken flocks in (Najaf, Hilla, Muthana and Theqaar governorates in the period from November 2010 to June 2011, all these flocks were showed respiratory symptoms and mortality about 20-90%. The results showed that 92.1% of samples collected from these flocks were infected with IBV, 20% of samples were infected with IB alone and 45.71% of samples with IB combined with both GM and AIV subtype H9 and 25.71% of samples were positive to both IBV and AIV(H9. No samples were positive to AIV (H9 or MG alone. Because of importance of respiratory diseases as a most common conditions noted in commercial flocks in Iraq and no previous study detecting this pathogens by molecular techniques, this study come to detect and confirm the diagnosis of this pathogens by qPCR as new technique used in this field in Iraq.

  2. The Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Genetic Region on Phylogenetic Clustering Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoury, François M. J.; Jacka, Brendan; Bartlett, Sofia; Bull, Rowena A.; Wong, Arthur; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Poon, Art F.; Matthews, Gail V.; Grebely, Jason; Dore, Gregory J.; Applegate, Tanya L.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing is important for understanding the molecular epidemiology and viral evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To date, there is little standardisation among sequencing protocols, in-part due to the high genetic diversity that is observed within HCV. This study aimed to develop a

  3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 protein regions that specifically bind to HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier Eduardo; Puentes, Alvaro; Súarez, Jorge; López, Ramses; Vera, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Guzman, Fanny; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-02-01

    Identify hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences in E1 and E2 protein binding to HepG2. Synthetic 20-mer long, ten-residue overlapped peptides, from E1 and E2 proteins, were tested in HepG2 or Raji cell-binding assays. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay for high activity binding peptides (HABPs). Receptors for HepG2 cell were determined by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. Twelve HABPs were found in HCV genotype 1a, allowing six hepatocyte-binding sequences (HBSs) to be defined: two peptide-binding regions in E1 HABPs 4913 (YQVRNSTGLYHVTNDCPNSS) and 4918 (MTPTVATRDGKLPATQLRRHY). Four hepatocyte-binding regions were defined in E2: region-I, peptide 4931 (ETHVTGGSAGHTVSGFVSLLY); region-II, 4937-4939 (HHKFNSSGCPERLASCRPLTDFDQGWGPISYANGSGPDQR); region-III, 4943-4945 (PVYCFTPSPVVVGTTDRSGAPTYSWGENDTDVFVLNNTR) and region-IV, 4949-4952 (CGAPPCVIGGAGNNTLHCPTDCFRKHPDATYSRCGSGPWITPRCLVDYPY). The underlined sequences are most relevant in the binding process. HABPs 4913 and 4938 also bind to CD81 positive Raji cells. Region-II 4938 HABPs bind to 50 and 60kDa HepG2 cell membrane surface proteins. Six HVRs to the HepG2 were identified. Some HABPs have been previously found to be antigenic and immunogenic. HABPs, 4918 (from E1), 4938, 4949, 4950, 4951 and 4952 (from E2) have not been previously recognised. These HABPs could be relevant to HCV invasion of hepatocytes.

  4. PENGKLONAN DAN PERUNUTAN NUKLEOTIDA GEN SELUBUNG PROTEIN DAN 3’UTR (untranslated region PEANUT STRIPE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasriadi Mat Akin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cloning and sequencing of coat protein gene and 3’UTR (untranslated region of peanut stripe virus. The cDNA of 3' terminal of peanut stripe virus genomic RNA was cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was ligated with plasmid vector pGEM-T Easy and transformed to competent cells of Escherichia coli. The 3' terminal of PstV genomic RNA contained 1195 nucleotides (nts.  The region included the nucleotide sequences of NIb (nuclear inclusion body (129 nts, CP gene (coat protein gene (861 nts, and 3'UTR (untranslated region (205 nts. The nucleotide sequence of a CP gene contained one long uninterrupted open reading frame (ORF without a start codon, which ended a UAG stop codon. The 287 amino acid residues of PStV coat protein were predicted from the CP gene.  The amino acid was analyzed for the presence of consensus polyprotein cleavage site for maturation of potyvirus polyprotein.  A putative cleavage site was found at position 43 (Q/S following the Valine (V residue at -4 position.  This isolate of PstV can be expected to be aphid transmissible because the coat protein contained a DAG triplet at position 53-55.

  5. Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of honey bee viruses in the Biobío Region of Chile and their association with other honey bee pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodríguez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Different episodes of mortalities of honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies have been associated with the presence of honey bee pathogens. Since the Biobío Region has among the highest number of apiaries in Chile, the aim of the present study was to identify viruses in the Region affecting honey bees, evaluate their relation to other pathogens, and conduct a phylogenetic analysis. Pupae and adult bees were collected from 60 apiaries of Apis mellifera L. in the Biobío Region over 2 yr. RNA viruses were detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR, and Acarapis woodi, Nosema spp., and Varroa destructor via PCR. Three viruses were detected: Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV, Black queen cell virus (BQCV and Deformed wing virus (DWV in 2%, 10%, and 42% of the apiaries, respectively. No statistical correlation was observed between the presence of the different viruses, V. destructor, A. woodi, and the two Nosema species, and the bee development stages. One year after the first sampling, DWV and BQCV were detected mainly in foraging adult bee samples. Three percent of the apiaries were infected with N. apis and 18% with N. ceranae, 5% were positive for V. destructor, while A. woodi was not detected. PCR products were sequenced and compared to the Genbank database. Chilean sequences of ABPV, BQCV, and DWV showed high percentages of similarity to other isolates in South America.

  6. Efficient replication and expression of murine leukemia virus with major deletions in the enhancer region of U3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K.; Lovmand, S.; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    1992-01-01

    The effect of deletions within the enhancer region in the U3 part of the LTR derived from the murine retrovirus Akv was studied. The deletions were stably transmitted through normal virus replication as shown by sequence analysis of cloned polymerase chain reaction product of the cDNA copy...... of the viral RNA. Genetic tagging of the retrovirus with lacO facilitated the analysis. Among the individual mutated LTRs an over 100-fold difference in a transient expression assay was previously detected. This difference was not revealed in studies of viral replication in cell culture, where the expression...

  7. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary.

  8. AgDscam, a hypervariable immunoglobulin domain-containing receptor of the Anopheles gambiae innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuemei Dong

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the insect innate immune system is dependent on a limited number of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs capable of interacting with pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Here we report a novel role of an alternatively spliced hypervariable immunoglobulin domain-encoding gene, Dscam, in generating a broad range of PRRs implicated in immune defense in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The mosquito Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule gene, AgDscam, has a complex genome organization with 101 exons that can produce over 31,000 potential alternative splice forms with different combinations of adhesive domains and interaction specificities. AgDscam responds to infection by producing pathogen challenge-specific splice form repertoires. Transient silencing of AgDscam compromises the mosquito's resistance to infections with bacteria and the malaria parasite Plasmodium. AgDscam is mediating phagocytosis of bacteria with which it can associate and defend against in a splice form-specific manner. AgDscam is a hypervariable PRR of the A. gambiae innate immune system.

  9. The 131-amino-acid repeat region of the essential 39-kilodalton core protein of fowlpox virus FP9, equivalent to vaccinia virus A4L protein, is nonessential and highly immunogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, D; Green, P; Smith, T; Czerny, C P; Skinner, M A

    1998-01-01

    The immunodominant, 39,000-molecular weight core protein (39K protein) of fowlpox virus (FP9 strain), equivalent to the vaccinia virus A4L gene product, contains highly charged domains at each end of the protein and multiple copies of a 12-amino-acid serine-rich repeat sequence in the middle of the protein. Similar repeats were also detected in other fowlpox virus strains, suggesting that they might confer a selective advantage to the virus. The molloscum contagiosum virus homolog (MC107L) also contains repeats, unlike the vaccinia virus protein. The number of repeats in the fowlpox virus protein does not seem to be crucial, since some strains have a different number of repeats, as shown by the difference in the size of the protein in these strains. The repeat region could be deleted, indicating that it is not essential for replication in vitro. It was not possible to delete the entire 39K protein, indicating that it was essential (transcriptional control signals for the flanking genes were left intact). The repeat region is partly responsible for the immunodominance of the protein, but the C-terminal part of the protein also contains highly antigenic linear epitopes. A role for the 39K protein in immune system modulation is discussed.

  10. Virological evaluation of avian influenza virus persistence in natural and anthropic ecosystems of Western Siberia (Novosibirsk Region, summer 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A De Marco

    Full Text Available Wild aquatic birds, reservoir of low-pathogenicity (LP avian influenza viruses (AIVs, congregate in huge numbers in Western Siberia wetlands, where major intra- and inter-continental bird flyways overlap. In 2005 and 2006, highly pathogenic (HP AIV H5N1 epizootics affected wild and domestic birds in the Novosibirsk Region. In 2012, we evaluated AIV persistence in Siberian natural and anthropic ecosystems.In Novosibirsk Region, 166 wild birds ecologically linked to aquatic environments and 152 domestic waterfowl were examined for AIV isolation in embryonating chicken eggs. Biological samples were obtained by integrating the conventional cloacal swab collection with the harvesting of samples from birds' plumage. Haemagglutinating allantoic fluids were further characterized by serological and molecular methods. In August-September 2012, 17 AIVs, including three H3N8, eight H4N6, two H4N?, one H2N?, one H?N2, and two unsubtyped LPAIVs, were isolated from 15 wild ducks. Whereas comparable proportions of wild Anseriformes (n.118 tested virus isolation (VI-positive from cloaca and feathers (5.9% vs 8.5% were detected, the overall prevalence of virus isolation, obtained from both sampling methods, was 2.4 times higher than that calculated on results from cloacal swab examination only (14.4% vs 5.9%. Unlike previously described in this area, the H4N6 antigenic subtype was found to be the prevalent one in 2012. Both cloacal and feather samples collected from domestic waterfowl tested VI-negative.We found lack of evidence for the H5N1 HPAIV circulation, explainable by the poor environmental fitness of HPAIVs in natural ecosystems. Our LPAIV isolation data emphasise the importance of Siberia wetlands in influenza A virus ecology, providing evidence of changes in circulation dynamics of HN antigenic subtypes harboured in wild bird reservoirs. Further studies of isolates, based on bioinformatic approaches to virus molecular evolution and phylogenesis, will be

  11. Virological Evaluation of Avian Influenza Virus Persistence in Natural and Anthropic Ecosystems of Western Siberia (Novosibirsk Region, Summer 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Maria A.; Delogu, Mauro; Sivay, Mariya; Sharshov, Kirill; Yurlov, Alexander; Cotti, Claudia; Shestopalov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild aquatic birds, reservoir of low-pathogenicity (LP) avian influenza viruses (AIVs), congregate in huge numbers in Western Siberia wetlands, where major intra- and inter-continental bird flyways overlap. In 2005 and 2006, highly pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N1 epizootics affected wild and domestic birds in the Novosibirsk Region. In 2012, we evaluated AIV persistence in Siberian natural and anthropic ecosystems. Methodology/Principal Findings In Novosibirsk Region, 166 wild birds ecologically linked to aquatic environments and 152 domestic waterfowl were examined for AIV isolation in embryonating chicken eggs. Biological samples were obtained by integrating the conventional cloacal swab collection with the harvesting of samples from birds' plumage. Haemagglutinating allantoic fluids were further characterized by serological and molecular methods. In August-September 2012, 17 AIVs, including three H3N8, eight H4N6, two H4N?, one H2N?, one H?N2, and two unsubtyped LPAIVs, were isolated from 15 wild ducks. Whereas comparable proportions of wild Anseriformes (n.118) tested virus isolation (VI)-positive from cloaca and feathers (5.9% vs 8.5%) were detected, the overall prevalence of virus isolation, obtained from both sampling methods, was 2.4 times higher than that calculated on results from cloacal swab examination only (14.4% vs 5.9%). Unlike previously described in this area, the H4N6 antigenic subtype was found to be the prevalent one in 2012. Both cloacal and feather samples collected from domestic waterfowl tested VI-negative. Conclusion/Significance We found lack of evidence for the H5N1 HPAIV circulation, explainable by the poor environmental fitness of HPAIVs in natural ecosystems. Our LPAIV isolation data emphasise the importance of Siberia wetlands in influenza A virus ecology, providing evidence of changes in circulation dynamics of HN antigenic subtypes harboured in wild bird reservoirs. Further studies of isolates, based on bioinformatic approaches

  12. Analyzing Population Genetics Using the Mitochondrial Control Region and Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takumi; Phillips, Bonnie; Latourelle, Sandra M.; Elwess, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    The 14-base pair hypervariable region in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Asian populations, specifically Japanese and Chinese students at Plattsburgh State University, was examined. Previous research on this 14-base pair region showed it to be susceptible to mutations and as a result indicated direct correlation with specific ethnic populations.…

  13. Emergence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in the North American Great Lakes region is associated with low viral genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, T.M.; Batts, W.N.; Faisal, M.; Bowser, P.; Casey, J.W.; Phillips, K.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a fish rhabdovirus that causes disease in a broad range of marine and freshwater hosts. The known geographic range includes the Northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and recently it has invaded the Great Lakes region of North Ame­rica. The goal of this work was to characterize genetic diversity of Great Lakes VHSV isolates at the early stage of this viral emergence by comparing a partial glycoprotein (G) gene sequence (669 nt) of 108 isolates collected from 2003 to 2009 from 31 species and at 37 sites. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all isolates fell into sub-lineage IVb within the major VHSV genetic group IV. Among these 108 isolates, genetic diversity was low, with a maximum of 1.05% within the 669 nt region. There were 11 unique sequences, designated vcG001 to vcG011. Two dominant sequence types, vcG001 and vcG002, accounted for 90% (97 of 108) of the isolates. The vcG001 isolates were most widespread. We saw no apparent association of sequence type with host or year of isolation, but we did note a spatial pattern, in which vcG002 isolates were more prevalent in the easternmost sub-regions, including inland New York state and the St. Lawrence Seaway. Different sequence types were found among isolates from single disease outbreaks, and mixtures of types were evident within 2 isolates from ­individual fish. Overall, the genetic diversity of VHSV in the Great Lakes region was found to be extremely low, consistent with an introduction of a new virus into a geographic region with ­previously naïve host populations.

  14. Characterization of regionally associated feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Danielle M; Lee, Justin S; Lewis, Jesse S; Bevins, Sarah N; Carver, Scott; Sweanor, Linda L; McBride, Roy; McBride, Caleb; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) classically infects felid species with highly divergent species-specific FIVs. However, recent studies have detected an FIV strain infecting both bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in California and Florida. To further investigate this observation, we evaluated FIV from bobcats in Florida (n=25) and Colorado (n=80) between 2008 and 2011. Partial viral sequences from five Florida bobcats cluster with previously published sequences from Florida panthers. We did not detect FIV in Colorado bobcats.

  15. Distribution of Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV in the Sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Islands and Characterization of Two New Luteovirus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Svanella-Dumas

    Full Text Available A systematic search for viral infection was performed in the isolated Kerguelen Islands, using a range of polyvalent genus-specific PCR assays. Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV was detected in both introduced and native grasses such as Poa cookii. The geographical distribution of BYDV and its prevalence in P. cookii were analyzed using samples collected from various sites of the archipelago. We estimate the average prevalence of BYDV to be 24.9% in P. cookii, with significant variability between sites. BYDV genetic diversity was assessed using sequence information from two genomic regions: the P3 open reading frame (ORF (encoding the coat protein and the hypervariable P6 ORF region. The phylogenetic analysis in the P3 region showed that BYDV sequences segregate into three major lineages, the most frequent of which (Ker-I cluster showed close homology with BYDV-PAV-I isolates and had very low intra-lineage diversity (0.6%. A similarly low diversity was also recorded in the hypervariable P6 region, suggesting that Ker-I isolates derive from the recent introduction of BYDV-PAV-I. Divergence time estimation suggests that BYDV-PAV-I was likely introduced in the Kerguelen environment at the same time frame as its aphid vector, Rhopalosiphum padi, whose distribution shows good overlap with that of BYDV-Ker-I. The two other lineages show more than 22% amino acid divergence in the P3 region with other known species in the BYDV species complex, indicating that they represent distinct BYDV species. Using species-specific amplification primers, the distribution of these novel species was analyzed. The high prevalence of BYDV on native Poaceae and the presence of the vector R. padi, raises the question of its impact on the vulnerable plant communities of this remote ecosystem.

  16. Conserved immunogenic region of a major core protein (p24) of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koito, A; Hattori, T; Matsushita, S; Maeda, Y; Nozaki, C; Sagawa, K; Takatsuki, K

    1988-12-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb), VAK 4, has been known to specifically react with a major core protein (p24) as well as with its precursor (p55-57) and intermediate precursor (p40) of human immunodeficiency virus strain IIIB (HTLV-IIIB). Radioimmunoprecipitation assays revealed that VAK 4 MoAb precipitated a major core protein and its precursors from a variety of strains of HIV and also from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), although the molecular weights of the precursor proteins in each viral strain were slightly different. A protein synthesized by transfected Escherichia coli containing amino acid sequences corresponding to residues 121-436 of the HTLV-IIIB gag gene was reactive with VAK 4 MoAb, but the protein carrying only residues 121-309 was not reactive, suggesting that the epitope recognized by VAK 4 MoAb resides at the carboxyl terminus of p24 protein. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that patient sera containing anticore protein antibody inhibited the binding of VAK 4 to HTLV-IIIB. These findings suggested that VAK 4 MoAb recognized an immunogenic and conserved epitope belonging to a major core protein of HIV-related viruses.

  17. Diversity and Plasticity of the Intracellular Plant Pathogen and Insect Symbiont “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” as Revealed by Hypervariable Prophage Genes with Intragenic Tandem Repeats ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Hoffman, Michele T.; Li, Wenbin; Fan, Guocheng; Liu, Bo; Lin, Hong; Duan, Yongping

    2011-01-01

    “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” is a psyllid-transmitted, phloem-limited alphaproteobacterium and the most prevalent species of “Ca. Liberibacter” associated with a devastating worldwide citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB). Two related and hypervariable genes (hyvI and hyvII) were identified in the prophage regions of the Psy62 “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” genome. Sequence analyses of the hyvI and hyvII genes in 35 “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” DNA isolates collected globally revealed that the hyvI gene contains up to 12 nearly identical tandem repeats (NITRs, 132 bp) and 4 partial repeats, while hyvII contains up to 2 NITRs and 4 partial repeats and shares homology with hyvI. Frequent deletions or insertions of these repeats within the hyvI and hyvII genes were observed, none of which disrupted the open reading frames. Sequence conservation within the individual repeats but an extensive variation in repeat numbers, rearrangement, and the sequences flanking the repeat region indicate the diversity and plasticity of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” bacterial populations in the world. These differences were found not only in samples of distinct geographical origins but also in samples from a single origin and even from a single “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected sample. This is the first evidence of different “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” populations coexisting in a single HLB-affected sample. The Florida “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” isolates contain both hyvI and hyvII, while all other global “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” isolates contain either one or the other. Interclade assignments of the putative HyvI and HyvII proteins from Florida isolates with other global isolates in phylogenetic trees imply multiple “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” populations in the world and a multisource introduction of the “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” bacterium into Florida. PMID:21784907

  18. Molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses circulating in two rabies endemic provinces of Laos, 2011-2012: regional diversity in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kamruddin; Phommachanh, Phouvong; Vorachith, Phengphet; Matsumoto, Takashi; Lamaningao, Pheophet; Mori, Daisuke; Takaki, Minako; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Khambounheuang, Bounkhouang; Nishizono, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Although rabies is endemic in Laos, genetic characterization of the viruses in this country is limited. There are growing concerns that development in the region may have increased transport of dog through Laos for regional dog meat consumption, and that this may cause spillover of the viruses from dogs brought here from other countries. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the current rabies situation and the genetic characteristics of rabies viruses currently circulating in Laos. We determined the rate of rabies-positive samples by analyzing data from animal samples submitted to the Lao Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry's National Animal Health Centre rabies laboratory from 2004 through 2011. Twenty-three rabies-positive samples were used for viral genetic characterization. Full genome sequencing was performed on two rabies viruses. Rabies-positive samples increased substantially from 40.5% in 2004 to 60.2% in 2009 and continued at this level during the study period. More than 99% of the samples were from dogs, followed by cats and monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that three rabies virus lineages belonging to the Southeast Asian cluster are currently circulating in Laos; these are closely related to viruses from Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Lineages of the circulating Laos rabies viruses diverged from common ancestors as recently as 44.2 years and as much as 55.3 years ago, indicating periodic virus invasions. There is an increasing trend of rabies in Laotian animals. Similar to other rabies-endemic countries, dogs are the main viral reservoir. Three viral lineages closely related to viruses from neighboring countries are currently circulating in Laos. Data provide evidence of periodic historic exchanges of the viruses with neighboring countries, but no recent invasion.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Rabies Viruses Circulating in Two Rabies Endemic Provinces of Laos, 2011–2012: Regional Diversity in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kamruddin; Phommachanh, Phouvong; Vorachith, Phengphet; Matsumoto, Takashi; Lamaningao, Pheophet; Mori, Daisuke; Takaki, Minako; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Khambounheuang, Bounkhouang; Nishizono, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Background Although rabies is endemic in Laos, genetic characterization of the viruses in this country is limited. There are growing concerns that development in the region may have increased transport of dog through Laos for regional dog meat consumption, and that this may cause spillover of the viruses from dogs brought here from other countries. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the current rabies situation and the genetic characteristics of rabies viruses currently circulating in Laos. Methods We determined the rate of rabies-positive samples by analyzing data from animal samples submitted to the Lao Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry’s National Animal Health Centre rabies laboratory from 2004 through 2011. Twenty-three rabies-positive samples were used for viral genetic characterization. Full genome sequencing was performed on two rabies viruses. Results Rabies-positive samples increased substantially from 40.5% in 2004 to 60.2% in 2009 and continued at this level during the study period. More than 99% of the samples were from dogs, followed by cats and monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that three rabies virus lineages belonging to the Southeast Asian cluster are currently circulating in Laos; these are closely related to viruses from Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Lineages of the circulating Laos rabies viruses diverged from common ancestors as recently as 44.2 years and as much as 55.3 years ago, indicating periodic virus invasions. Conclusion There is an increasing trend of rabies in Laotian animals. Similar to other rabies-endemic countries, dogs are the main viral reservoir. Three viral lineages closely related to viruses from neighboring countries are currently circulating in Laos. Data provide evidence of periodic historic exchanges of the viruses with neighboring countries, but no recent invasion. PMID:25825907

  20. Molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses circulating in two rabies endemic provinces of Laos, 2011-2012: regional diversity in Southeast Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamruddin Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although rabies is endemic in Laos, genetic characterization of the viruses in this country is limited. There are growing concerns that development in the region may have increased transport of dog through Laos for regional dog meat consumption, and that this may cause spillover of the viruses from dogs brought here from other countries. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the current rabies situation and the genetic characteristics of rabies viruses currently circulating in Laos.We determined the rate of rabies-positive samples by analyzing data from animal samples submitted to the Lao Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry's National Animal Health Centre rabies laboratory from 2004 through 2011. Twenty-three rabies-positive samples were used for viral genetic characterization. Full genome sequencing was performed on two rabies viruses.Rabies-positive samples increased substantially from 40.5% in 2004 to 60.2% in 2009 and continued at this level during the study period. More than 99% of the samples were from dogs, followed by cats and monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that three rabies virus lineages belonging to the Southeast Asian cluster are currently circulating in Laos; these are closely related to viruses from Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Lineages of the circulating Laos rabies viruses diverged from common ancestors as recently as 44.2 years and as much as 55.3 years ago, indicating periodic virus invasions.There is an increasing trend of rabies in Laotian animals. Similar to other rabies-endemic countries, dogs are the main viral reservoir. Three viral lineages closely related to viruses from neighboring countries are currently circulating in Laos. Data provide evidence of periodic historic exchanges of the viruses with neighboring countries, but no recent invasion.

  1. The West Nile Virus outbreak in Israel (2000) from a new perspective: the regional impact of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Shlomit

    2006-02-01

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreak in Israel in 2000 appeared after medical and climatic warning signs. Re-analysis of the epidemic from a new viewpoint, the regional impact of global warming, especially the worsening in the summers' heat conditions, is presented. The disease appeared averagely at a lag of 3-9 weeks (strongest correlation = lag of 7 weeks). The minimum temperature was found as the most important climatic factor that encourages the disease earlier appearance. Extreme heat is more significant than high air humidity for increasing WNV cases. An early extreme rise in the summer temperature could be a good indicator of increased vector populations. While 93.5% of cases were in the metropolitan areas, the disease was not reported in the sub-arid regions. The outbreak development was comparable to the cases from Romania (1996) and NYC (1999). Each of those epidemics appeared after a long heatwave.

  2. Structures and Polymorphic Interactions of Two Heptad-Repeat Regions of the SARS Virus S2 Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Yong, W.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Entry of SARS coronavirus into its target cell requires large-scale structural transitions in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein in order to induce fusion of the virus and cell membranes. Here we describe the identification and crystal structures of four distinct a-helical domains derived from the highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions of the S2 fusion subunit. The four domains are an antiparallel four-stranded coiled coil, a parallel trimeric coiled coil, a four-helix bundle, and a six-helix bundle that is likely the final fusogenic form of the protein. When considered together, the structural and thermodynamic features of the four domains suggest a possible mechanism whereby the HR regions, initially sequestered in the native S glycoprotein spike, are released and refold sequentially to promote membrane fusion. Our results provide a structural framework for understanding the control of membrane fusion and should guide efforts to intervene in the SARS coronavirus entry process.

  3. Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild migratory waterfowl in a region of high poultry production, Delmarva, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Diann J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Hindman, Larry J.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Ottinger, Christopher A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Driscoll, Cindy P.; Nagel, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Migratory waterfowl are natural reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and may contribute to the long-distance dispersal of these pathogens as well as spillover into domestic bird populations. Surveillance for AIVs is critical to assessing risks for potential spread of these viruses among wild and domestic bird populations. The Delmarva Peninsula on the east coast of the United States is both a key convergence point for migratory Atlantic waterfowl populations and a region with high poultry production (>4,700 poultry meat facilities). Sampling of key migratory waterfowl species occurred at 20 locations throughout the Delmarva Peninsula in fall and winter of 2013–14. Samples were collected from 400 hunter-harvested or live-caught birds via cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs. Fourteen of the 400 (3.5%) birds sampled tested positive for the AIV matrix gene using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, all from five dabbling duck species. Further characterization of the 14 viral isolates identified two hemagglutinin (H3 and H4) and four neuraminidase (N2, N6, N8, and N9) subtypes, which were consistent with isolates reported in the Influenza Research Database for this region. Three of 14 isolates contained multiple HA or NA subtypes. This study adds to the limited baseline information available for AIVs in migratory waterfowl populations on the Delmarva Peninsula, particularly prior to the highly pathogenic AIV A(H5N8) and A(H5N2) introductions to the United States in late 2014.

  4. Health surveillance and response on a regional scale: a preliminary study of the Zika virus fever case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Flávia Thedim Costa

    2017-07-01

    Although awareness of the Zika virus has existed since the 1950s, only recently has it attracted the interest of the international community. In 2015 and 2016, the virus spread throughout Brazil and suspicions on the possible relation between parallel increases in neurological disorders and the infection arose. By November 2015, this concern had developed into a National Public Health Emergency. On February 1, 2016, WHO formally declared its suspicion that this was a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), and sent a response in accordance with International Health Regulations (2005). Zika is present in almost all South American countries, and PAHO/WHO, Unasur, and Mercosur are developing responsive actions to the epidemic. The aim of this article is to present a critical analysis of the regional South American and Brazilian responses of February through September 2016, in respect of this PHEIC announcement, utilizing qualitative methodologies via bibliographical examination and document analysis. In this context, the PAHO/WHO played a prominent role as compared with the other organizations. Moreover, the political environment of the region also played a major role in the instability of both Mercosur and Unasur, which could impact the capacity and effectiveness of the response.

  5. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Antigens in Paraffin-embedded Liver Specimens from the Amazon Region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetti SRR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic viscerotomy of paraffin-preserved old specimens, collected in the period from 1934 to 1967, were analyzed by immunohistochemical assays to detect hepatitis B, hepatitis D, dengue and yellow fever virus antigens. The material belongs to the Yellow Fever Collection, Department of Pathology, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and the cases were diagnosed at that time according to clinical aspects and histopathological findings reporting viral hepatitis, yellow fever, focal necrosis and hepatic atrophy. From the 79 specimens, 69 were collected at the Labrea Region and the other 10 in different other localities in the Amazon Region. The five micra thick histological slices were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg by immunoperoxidase technique. An immunofluorescence assay was applied to the detection of hepatitis D, yellow fever and dengue virus antigens. Nine (11.4% histological samples were HBsAg reactive and 5 (6.3% were HBcAg reactive. The oldest reactive sample was from 1934. Viral antigens related to the other pathologies were not detected in this study. Our results confirm that the methodology described may be used to elucidate the aetiology of hepatitis diseases even after a long time of conservation of the specimens.

  6. Inherent dynamics within the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus protease are localized to the same region as substrate interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Capodagli, Glenn; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Holliday, Michael; Isern, Nancy G.; Zhang, Fengli; Pegan, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is one of several lethal viruses that encodes for a viral ovarian tumor domain (vOTU), which serves to cleave and remove multiple proteins involved in cellular signaling such as ubiquitin (Ub) and interferon stimulated gene produce 15 (ISG15). Such manipulation of the host cell machinery serves to downregulate the host response and, therefore, complete characterization of these proteases is important. While several structures of the CCHFV vOTU protease have been solved, both free and bound to Ub and ISG15, few structural differences have been found and little insight has been gained as to the dynamic plasticity of this protease. Therefore, we have used NMR relaxation experiments to probe the dynamics of CCHV vOTU, both alone and in complex with Ub, thereby discovering a highly dynamic protease that exhibits conformational exchange within the same regions found to engage its Ub substrate. These experiments reveal a structural plasticity around the N-terminal regions of CCHV vOTU, which are unique to vOTUs, and provide a rationale for engaging multiple substrates with the same binding site.

  7. Hepatitis C virus transmission bottlenecks analyzed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gary P; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Quince, Chris; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in infected patients produces large and diverse viral populations, which give rise to drug-resistant and immune escape variants. Here, we analyzed HCV populations during transmission and diversification in longitudinal and cross-sectional samples using 454/Roche pyrosequencing, in total analyzing 174,185 sequence reads. To sample diversity, four locations in the HCV genome were analyzed, ranging from high diversity (the envelope hypervariable region 1 [HVR1]) to almost no diversity (the 5' untranslated region [UTR]). For three longitudinal samples for which early time points were available, we found that only 1 to 4 viral variants were present, suggesting that productive infection was initiated by a very small number of HCV particles. Sequence diversity accumulated subsequently, with the 5' UTR showing almost no diversification while the envelope HVR1 showed >100 variants in some subjects. Calculation of the transmission probability for only a single variant, taking into account the measured population structure within patients, confirmed initial infection by one or a few viral particles. These findings provide the most detailed sequence-based analysis of HCV transmission bottlenecks to date. The analytical methods described here are broadly applicable to studies of viral diversity using deep sequencing.

  8. Potential for Zika virus introduction and transmission in resource-limited countries in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Brady, Oliver J; Kraemer, Moritz U G; German, Matthew; Creatore, Maria I; Brent, Shannon; Watts, Alexander G; Hay, Simon I; Kulkarni, Manisha A; Brownstein, John S; Khan, Kamran

    2016-11-01

    As the epidemic of Zika virus expands in the Americas, countries across Africa and the Asia-Pacific region are becoming increasingly susceptible to the importation and possible local spread of the virus. To support public health readiness, we aim to identify regions and times where the potential health, economic, and social effects from Zika virus are greatest, focusing on resource-limited countries in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. Our model combined transportation network analysis, ecological modelling of mosquito occurrences, and vector competence for flavivirus transmission, using data from the International Air Transport Association, entomological observations from Zika's primary vector species, and climate conditions using WorldClim. We overlaid monthly flows of airline travellers arriving to Africa and the Asia-Pacific region from areas of the Americas suitable for year-round transmission of Zika virus with monthly maps of climatic suitability for mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus within Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. An estimated 2·6 billion people live in areas of Africa and the Asia-Pacific region where the presence of competent mosquito vectors and suitable climatic conditions could support local transmission of Zika virus. Countries with large volumes of travellers arriving from Zika virus-affected areas of the Americas and large populations at risk of mosquito-borne Zika virus infection include India (67 422 travellers arriving per year; 1·2 billion residents in potential Zika transmission areas), China (238 415 travellers; 242 million residents), Indonesia (13 865 travellers; 197 million residents), Philippines (35 635 travellers; 70 million residents), and Thailand (29 241 travellers; 59 million residents). Many countries across Africa and the Asia-Pacific region are vulnerable to Zika virus. Strategic use of available health and human resources is essential to prevent or mitigate the health, economic, and social

  9. The C-terminal 18 Amino Acid Region of Dengue Virus NS5 Regulates its Subcellular Localization and Contains a Conserved Arginine Residue Essential for Infectious Virus Production.

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    Moon Y F Tay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus NS5 is the most highly conserved amongst the viral non-structural proteins and is responsible for capping, methylation and replication of the flavivirus RNA genome. Interactions of NS5 with host proteins also modulate host immune responses. Although replication occurs in the cytoplasm, an unusual characteristic of DENV2 NS5 is that it localizes to the nucleus during infection with no clear role in replication or pathogenesis. We examined NS5 of DENV1 and 2, which exhibit the most prominent difference in nuclear localization, employing a combination of functional and structural analyses. Extensive gene swapping between DENV1 and 2 NS5 identified that the C-terminal 18 residues (Cter18 alone was sufficient to direct the protein to the cytoplasm or nucleus, respectively. The low micromolar binding affinity between NS5 Cter18 and the nuclear import receptor importin-alpha (Impα, allowed their molecular complex to be purified, crystallised and visualized at 2.2 Å resolution using x-ray crystallography. Structure-guided mutational analysis of this region in GFP-NS5 clones of DENV1 or 2 and in a DENV2 infectious clone reveal residues important for NS5 subcellular localization. Notably, the trans conformation adopted by Pro-884 allows proper presentation for binding Impα and mutating this proline to Thr, as present in DENV1 NS5, results in mislocalizaion of NS5 to the cytoplasm without compromising virus fitness. In contrast, a single mutation to alanine at NS5 position R888, a residue conserved in all flaviviruses, resulted in a completely non-viable virus, and the R888K mutation led to a severely attenuated phentoype, even though NS5 was located in the nucleus. R888 forms a hydrogen bond with Y838 that is also conserved in all flaviviruses. Our data suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for NS5 Cter18, possibly in RNA interactions that are critical for replication, that is independent of its role in subcellular localization.

  10. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral recombination occurs frequently during reverse transcription of the dimeric RNA genome. By a forced recombination approach based on the transduction of Akv murine leukemia virus vectors harboring a primer binding site knockout mutation and the entire 5' untranslated region, we studied...... facilitate template switching. We discuss the putative role of the dimerization domain in the overall structure of the reverse-transcribed RNA dimer and note that related mechanisms of template switching may be found in remote RNA viruses....

  11. Evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis C virus antibody detection using a recombinant protein derived from the core region of hepatitis C virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes EPA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA for hepatitis C virus antibody detection (anti-HCV, using just one antigen. Anti-HCV EIA was designed to detect anti-HCV IgG using on the solid-phase a recombinant C22 antigen localized at the N-terminal end of the core region of HCV genome, produced by BioMérieux. The serum samples diluted in phosphate buffer saline were added to wells coated with the C22, and incubated. After washings, the wells were loaded with conjugated anti-IgG, and read in a microtiter plate reader (492 nm. Serum samples of 145 patients were divided in two groups: a control group of 39 patients with non-C hepatitis (10 acute hepatitis A, 10 acute hepatitis B, 9 chronic hepatitis B, and 10 autoimmune hepatitis and a study group consisting of 106 patients with chronic HCV hepatitis. In the study group all patients had anti-HCV detected by a commercially available EIA (Abbott®, specific for HCV structural and nonstructural polypeptides, alanine aminotransferase elevation or positive serum HCV-RNA detected by nested-PCR. They also had a liver biopsy compatible with chronic hepatitis. The test was positive in 101 of the 106 (95% sera from patients in the study group and negative in 38 of the 39 (97% sera from those in the control group, showing an accuracy of 96%. According to these results, our EIA could be used to detect anti-HCV in the serum of patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

  12. Capsid Antibodies to Different Adeno-Associated Virus Serotypes Bind Common Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurda, Brittney L.; DiMattia, Michael A.; Miller, Edward B.; Bennett, Antonette; McKenna, Robert; Weichert, Wendy S.; Nelson, Christian D.; Chen, Wei-jun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Chiorini, John A.; Zolotutkhin, Sergei; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Baker, Timothy S.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between viruses and the host antibody immune response are critical in the development and control of disease, and antibodies are also known to interfere with the efficacy of viral vector-based gene delivery. The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) being developed as vectors for corrective human gene delivery have shown promise in clinical trials, but preexisting antibodies are detrimental to successful outcomes. However, the antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids remain poorly characterized. Cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction were used to define the locations of epitopes to which monoclonal fragment antibodies (Fabs) against AAV1, AAV2, AAV5, and AAV6 bind. Pseudoatomic modeling showed that, in each serotype, Fabs bound to a limited number of sites near the protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes of the T=1 icosahedral capsids. For the closely related AAV1 and AAV6, a common Fab exhibited substoichiometric binding, with one Fab bound, on average, between two of the three protrusions as a consequence of steric crowding. The other AAV Fabs saturated the capsid and bound to the walls of all 60 protrusions, with the footprint for the AAV5 antibody extending toward the 5-fold axis. The angle of incidence for each bound Fab on the AAVs varied and resulted in significant differences in how much of each viral capsid surface was occluded beyond the Fab footprints. The AAV-antibody interactions showed a common set of footprints that overlapped some known receptor-binding sites and transduction determinants, thus suggesting potential mechanisms for virus neutralization by the antibodies. PMID:23760240

  13. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  14. Improved detection of Zika virus RNA in human and animal specimens by a novel, highly sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assay targeting the 5'-untranslated region of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Tee, Kah-Meng; Zhu, Zheng; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Tsang, Terance Gi-Wai; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Sridhar, Siddharth; Yin, Feifei; Hung, Ivan Fan-Ngai; Chau, Sandy Ka-Yee; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-05-01

    We developed and evaluated five novel real-time RT-PCR assays targeting conserved regions in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), envelope (E'), non-structural protein 2A (NS2A), NS5 and 3'-UTR of the ZIKV genome. The ZIKV-5'-UTR assay exhibited the lowest in vitro limit of detection (5-10 RNA copies/reaction and 3.0 × 10-1 plaque-forming units/ml). Compared to the modified version of a widely adopted RT-PCR assay targeting the ZIKV-E gene, the ZIKV-5'-UTR assay showed better sensitivity in human clinical specimens, and representative mouse specimens, including many organs which are known to be involved in human ZIKV infection but difficult to obtain in clinical settings. The ZIKV-5'-UTR assay detected ZIKV RNA in 84/84 (100.0%) ZIKV-E'-positive and an additional 30/296 (10.1%, P ZIKV-E'-negative mouse specimens. The higher sensitivity of the ZIKV-5'-UTR assay was most significant in kidney and testis/epididymis specimens (P ZIKV-5'-UTR assay and dengue virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, hepatitis C virus and Chikungunya virus. The highly sensitive and specific ZIKV-5'-UTR assay may help to improve the laboratory diagnosis of ZIKV infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evolution of naturally occurring 5'non-coding region variants of Hepatitis C virus in human populations of the South American region

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    García-Aguirre Laura

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been the subject of intense research and clinical investigation as its major role in human disease has emerged. Previous and recent studies have suggested a diversification of type 1 HCV in the South American region. The degree of genetic variation among HCV strains circulating in Bolivia and Colombia is currently unknown. In order to get insight into these matters, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5' non-coding region (5'NCR sequences from strains isolated in Bolivia, Colombia and Uruguay, as well as available comparable sequences of HCV strains isolated in South America. Methods Phylogenetic tree analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method under a matrix of genetic distances established under the Kimura-two parameter model. Signature pattern analysis, which identifies particular sites in nucleic acid alignments of variable sequences that are distinctly representative relative to a background set, was performed using the method of Korber & Myers, as implemented in the VESPA program. Prediction of RNA secondary structures was done by the method of Zuker & Turner, as implemented in the mfold program. Results Phylogenetic tree analysis of HCV strains isolated in the South American region revealed the presence of a distinct genetic lineage inside genotype 1. Signature pattern analysis revealed that the presence of this lineage is consistent with the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of HCV strains isolated in South America. Comparisons of these results with the ones found for Europe or North America revealed that this sequence signature is characteristic of the South American region. Conclusion Phylogentic analysis revealed the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of type 1 HCV strains isolated in South America. This signature is frequent enough in type 1 HCV populations circulating South America to be detected in a phylogenetic tree analysis as a distinct

  16. Potential distribution of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus in the Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E.; Kurath, Gael; Escobar-Dodero, Joaquim; Craft, Meggan E.; Phelps, Nicholas B.D.

    2017-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb has been responsible for large-scale fish mortality events in the Great Lakes of North America. Anticipating the areas of potential VHSV occurrence is key to designing epidemiological surveillance and disease prevention strategies in the Great Lakes basin. We explored the environmental features that could shape the distribution of VHSV, based on remote sensing and climate data via ecological niche modelling. Variables included temperature measured during the day and night, precipitation, vegetation, bathymetry, solar radiation and topographic wetness. VHSV occurrences were obtained from available reports of virus confirmation in laboratory facilities. We fit a Maxent model using VHSV-IVb reports and environmental variables under different parameterizations to identify the best model to determine potential VHSV occurrence based on environmental suitability. VHSV reports were generated from both passive and active surveillance. VHSV occurrences were most abundant near shore sites. We were, however, able to capture the environmental signature of VHSV based on the environmental variables employed in our model, allowing us to identify patterns of VHSV potential occurrence. Our findings suggest that VHSV is not at an ecological equilibrium and more areas could be affected, including areas not in close geographic proximity to past VHSV reports.

  17. Identification of three gp350/220 regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus invasion of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Lopez, Ramses; Patiño, Helena; Rosas, Jaiver E; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-10-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) invasion of B-lymphocytes involves EBV gp350/220 binding to B-lymphocyte CR2. The anti-gp350 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-72A1 Fab inhibits this binding and therefore blocks EBV invasion of target cells. However, gp350/220 regions interacting with mAb 72A1 and involved in EBV invasion of target cells have not yet been identified. This work reports three gp350/220 regions, defined by peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences, that are involved in EBV binding to B-lymphocytes. Peptides 11382, 11389, and 11416 bound to CR2(+) but not to CR2(-) cells, inhibited EBV invasion of cord blood lymphocytes (CBLs), were recognized by mAb 72A1, and inhibited mAb 72A1 binding to EBV. Peptides 11382 and 11416 binding to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) induced interleukin-6 protein synthesis in these cells, this phenomenon being inhibited by mAb 72A1. The same behavior has been reported for gp350/220 binding to PBLs. Anti-peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 antibodies inhibited EBV binding and EBV invasion of PBLs and CBLs. Peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences presented homology with the C3dg regions coming into contact with CR2 (C3dg and gp350 bound to similar CR2 regions). These peptides could be used in designing strategies against EBV infection.

  18. Detection of Laem-Singh virus in cultured Penaeus monodon shrimp from several sites in the Indo-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittidilokratna, Nusra; Dangtip, Sirintip; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Babu, Ravi; Pradeep, Balakrishnan; Mohan, C V; Gudkovs, Nicholas; Walker, Peter J

    2009-04-27

    Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus that was recently identified in Penaeus monodon shrimp in Thailand displaying signs of slow growth syndrome. A total of 326 shrimp collected between 1998 and 2007 from countries in the Indo-Pacific region were tested by RT-PCR for evidence of LSNV infection. The samples comprised batches of whole postlarvae, and lymphoid organ, gill, muscle or pleopod tissue of juvenile, subadult and adult shrimp. LSNV was not detected in 96 P. monodon, P. japonicus or P. merguiensis from Australia or 16 P. monodon from Fiji, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Mozambique. There was no evidence of LSNV infection in 73 healthy juvenile P. vannamei collected during 2006 from ponds at 9 locations in Thailand. However, LNSV was detected in each of 6 healthy P. monodon tested from Malaysia and Indonesia, 2 of 6 healthy P. monodon tested from Vietnam and 39 of 40 P. monodon collected from slow-growth ponds in Thailand. A survey of 81 P. monodon collected in 2007 from Andhra Pradesh, India, indicated 56.8% prevalence of LSNV infection but no clear association with disease or slow growth. Phylogenetic analysis of PCR amplicons obtained from samples from India, Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand indicated that nucleotide sequence variation was very low (>98% identity) and there was no clustering of viruses according to site of isolation or the health status of the shrimp. The data suggests that LSNV exists as a single genetic lineage and occurs commonly in healthy P. monodon in parts of Asia.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in the Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2008-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered by many nations and international organizations to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish (Office International des Epizooties 2007). For several decades following its initial characterization in the 1950s, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe where it was regarded as an endemic pathogen of freshwater fish that was especially problematic for farmed rainbow trout, an introduced species (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that VHSV was present among many species of marine and anadromous fishes in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans where it has been associated with substantial mortality among both wild and cultured fish (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005).

  20. Prevalence of Citrus tristeza virus in Mandarin of Sikkim Himalayan Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Kundan; Rahman, H; Kalita, H; Pandey, Brijesh; Monika, N

    2010-10-01

    The assessment of Citrus tristeza virus incidence in mandarin of Sikkim, involving sampling techniques, was estimated by DAS-ELISA. Mandarin orchards had high CTV incidence (46.32%), however, differential prevalence with regard to age of plant and location was observed. The CTV prevalence was relatively high in older orchards (51.01%) than that of younger ones (40.80%). Under all the plant age groups, south district had the highest CTV incidence (52.50%) and east district had the lowest (37.71%). The spatial distribution of CTV in plants indicates high concentration in twig followed by leaf tissue, however, stem had relatively less concentration. High aphid infestation was observed in all mandarin growing groves with the maximum in south district and minimum in east district. Taxoptera citricida was the predominating aphid species followed by T. aurantii, however, Aphis spp population was significantly less. Aphid infestation and CTV prevalence were positively and significantly correlated.

  1. VARIATION OF NON-CODING REGION AND CODING REGION OF 5’-TERMINAL CRNA OF POLYMERASE BASIC 1 OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS SUBTYPE H5N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of the Non-Coding Region (NCR and Coding Region (CR of 5’-terminal cRNA of thepolymerase basic 1 (PB1 gene as a major factor for the species adaptation of avian influenza virussubtype H5N1 (AIV H5N1 has been analysed. The information could be a virological signal for theemergence of a new strain with pandemic potential. Total RNA from twenty six (26 avian influenzasubtype H5N1 isolates were amplified using reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCRwith a universal forward primer for influenza virus and specifically designed backward primers. Fifteen(15 PB1 gene fragments could be amplified. RT-PCR products were sequenced and analyzed using Mega4software. The length of NCR of PB1 gene was found to be 24 bases and mostly shows conserved sequence,with an exception of Dk/Badung/2006 isolate which has C-7T substitution. A/T composition of PB1 NCRwas 54,2%, while the Dk/Badung/2006 isolate was 58,3%. Species and geographical specificity could not befound in the genetic distance, the amino acid polymorphism, as well as the phylogenetic analysis of t

  2. Dual Roles of the Hemagglutinin Segment-Specific Noncoding Nucleotides in the Extended Duplex Region of the Influenza A Virus RNA Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Li, Jinghua; Zhao, Lili; Cao, Mengmeng; Deng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    We recently reported that the segment-specific noncoding regions (NCRs) of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments are subtype specific, varying significantly in sequence and length at both the 3' and 5' ends. Interestingly, we found that nucleotides CC at positions 13 and 14 at the 3' end and GUG at positions 14 to 16 at the 5' end (termed 14' and 16' to distinguish them from 3' positions) are absolutely conserved among all HA subtype-specific NCRs. These HA segment-specific NCR nucleotides are located in the extended duplex region of the viral RNA promoter. In order to understand the significance of these highly conserved HA segment-specific NCR nucleotides in the virus life cycle, we performed extensive mutagenesis on the HA segment-specific NCR nucleotides and studied their functional significance in regulating influenza A virus replication in the context of the HA segment with both RNP reconstitution and virus infection systems. We found that the base pairing of the 3'-end 13 position with the 5'-end 14' position ((3')13-(5')14') position is critical for RNA promoter activity while the identity of the base pair is critical in determining HA segment packaging. Moreover, the identity of the residue at the 3'-end 14 position is functionally more important in regulating virus genome packaging than in regulating viral RNA synthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the HA segment-specific NCR nucleotides in the extended duplex region of the promoter not only form part of the promoter but also play a key role in controlling virus selective genome packaging. The segment-specific complementary nucleotides (13 to 15 in the 3' end and 14' to 16' in the 5' end) in the extended duplex region of the influenza virus RNA promoter vary significantly among different segments and have rarely been studied. Here, we performed mutagenesis analysis of the highly conserved HA segment-specific nucleotides in the extended duplex region and examined their

  3. Epifluorescent direct counts of bacteria and viruses from topsoil of various desert dust storm regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Lyles, Mark; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W.

    2013-01-01

    Topsoil from arid regions is the main source of dust clouds that move through the earth's atmosphere, and microbial communities within these soils can survive long-range dispersion. Microbial abundance and chemical composition were analyzed in topsoil from various desert regions. Statistical analyses showed that microbial direct counts were strongly positively correlated with calcium concentrations and negatively correlated with silicon concentrations. While variance between deserts was expected, it was interesting to note differences between sample sites within a given desert region, illustrating the 'patchy' nature of microbial communities in desert environments.

  4. First molecular detection of Aichi virus in sewage and shellfish samples in the Monastir region of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdiri-Loulizi, K; Hassine, M; Aouni, Z; Gharbi-Khelifi, H; Sakly, N; Chouchane, S; Guédiche, M N; Pothier, P; Aouni, M; Ambert-Balay, K

    2010-09-01

    The aims of our investigations were (1) to look for Aichi virus in environmental samples and (2) to compare the Aichi virus strains in both clinical and environmental samples in order to evaluate the role of environmental contamination as a possible vehicle for viral transmission. Aichi virus was detected in 15 (6%) sewage samples and in 4 (6.6%) shellfish samples. Aichi virus was identified for the first time in water samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed several clusters that occurred sequentially in time, suggesting some parallelism in the evolution of environmental and human strains. Aichi virus present in sewage reflects the viruses circulating in the community.

  5. Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

    2012-03-01

    The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma.

  6. Trends in Hepatitis B Virus Seroprevalence in Black Sea Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    HBV) vaccination, every country needs to take into concern factors of infection transmission in its own region. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of hepatitis B among all age groups in northern ...

  7. In Silico Design and Experimental Validation of siRNAs Targeting Conserved Regions of Multiple Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; Kim, TaeKyu; Kamar, Mona A; Min, Saehong; Hassan, Nafisa M; El-Ahwany, Eman; Kim, Heeyoung; Zada, Suher; Amer, Marwa; Windisch, Marc P

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific degradation of targeted RNA and thus provides a tremendous opportunity for development of oligonucleotide-based drugs. Here, we report on the design and validation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting highly conserved regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. To aim for therapeutic applications by optimizing the RNAi efficacy and reducing potential side effects, we considered different factors such as target RNA variations, thermodynamics and accessibility of the siRNA and target RNA, and off-target effects. This aim was achieved using an in silico design and selection protocol complemented by an automated MysiRNA-Designer pipeline. The protocol included the design and filtration of siRNAs targeting highly conserved and accessible regions within the HCV internal ribosome entry site, and adjacent core sequences of the viral genome with high-ranking efficacy scores. Off-target analysis excluded siRNAs with potential binding to human mRNAs. Under this strict selection process, two siRNAs (HCV353 and HCV258) were selected based on their predicted high specificity and potency. These siRNAs were tested for antiviral efficacy in HCV genotype 1 and 2 replicon cell lines. Both in silico-designed siRNAs efficiently inhibited HCV RNA replication, even at low concentrations and for short exposure times (24h); they also exceeded the antiviral potencies of reference siRNAs targeting HCV. Furthermore, HCV353 and HCV258 siRNAs also inhibited replication of patient-derived HCV genotype 4 isolates in infected Huh-7 cells. Prolonged treatment of HCV replicon cells with HCV353 did not result in the appearance of escape mutant viruses. Taken together, these results reveal the accuracy and strength of our integrated siRNA design and selection protocols. These protocols could be used to design highly potent and specific RNAi-based therapeutic oligonucleotide

  8. Cooperativity in virus neutralization by human monoclonal antibodies to two adjacent regions located at the amino terminus of hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhenyong; Wang, Wenyan; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine development is defining conserved epitopes that induce protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. An envelope glycoprotein (E2) segment located at amino acids (aa) 412 to 423 contains highly conserved neutralizing epitopes. While...

  9. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  10. Serological markers and risk factors related to hepatitis B virus in dentists in the Central West region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Enilza Maria Mendonça; Tiplle, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; de Paiva Silva, Eliane; de Paula Cardoso, Divina das Dores

    2008-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been considered the major occupational risk agent for dentists. The Central West region of Brazil is considered an intermediate endemic pattern area, but currently there is no information about the HBV prevalence in dentists of Goiânia, Goiás. This study aimed at the detection of the HBV infection rate and risk factors for dentists of Goiânia and the comparison of the obtained data with the general population and other groups. A randomized sample of 680 professionals participated in this study. All dentists gave written consent for the procedure and filled out a questionnaire about risk factors. The HBV serological markers were analyzed using ELISA test and the presence of anti-HBc was observed in 41 (6.0%) of the dentists. None of them was HBsAg positive. Significant relationships with HBV positivity were observed with gender, the time working as a dentist and the use of incomplete personal protective equipment (PPE). The HBV prevalence found in this group of dentists was lower than the endemic pattern of the general population, other health care workers of the region and the dentists from other regions in Brazil. These results may indicate a positive impact of vaccination considering the high adherence of the dentists to the immunization program (98.4%). Finally, the use of complete PPE by the majority as well as other standard precautions recommended for health care workers could be responsible for the low HBV seroprevalence. PMID:24031211

  11. [Evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence in mothers of newborns from 8 autonomous regions (Spain), 1996-2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisdedos, Teresa; Díez, Mercedes; Díaz, Asunción; Muñoz, Lourdes; García, Alfredo

    2008-09-06

    To asses the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence evolution of newborns' mothers. Unlinked anonymous study of HIV antibodies in blood spots for congenital metabolic disorders detection in newborns, from 1996 to 2005; in Baleares, Canarias, Castilla-La Mancha, Castilla y León, Galicia, Melilla and Murcia Regions, including Valencia from 2003 on. HIV-antibodies screening was performed through ELISA and results were confirmed using immunoblot. Global prevalence rates were stable through the period in the 7 initially enrolled regions, near to 1 per thousand; however, during the first 5-year period the prevalence tended to increase (p Baleares and Valencia showed the highest rates, although Baleares showed a declining trend. Canarias is the only region that displays an increasing trend. HIV prevalence in newborns' mothers remained steady during the 10-year period, but after a phase of significant increase the tendency has reverted. Data presented in this paper show the importance of monitoring HIV prevalence among women who give birth, and emphasise the need of improving antenatal prophylaxis programmes to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

  12. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus isolated from acute gastroenteritis patients in the Seoul region of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S-H; Kim, E-J; Lee, J-H; Choi, S-S; Kim, M-S; Jung, S-S; Han, G-Y; Yun, H-S; Chun, D-S; Oh, S-S; Kim, H-S

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a major public health problem throughout the world. As a result of declining HAV endemic in Korea, an increasing number of children and adolescents have become susceptible to HAV infection. HAV is related with sanitation conditions of the environment and is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, either through person-to-person contact or by contaminated water and food. The present study has been carried out to determine the phylogenetic analysis and circulating patterns of HAV strains detected from hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the Seoul region of Korea. In total, 2,782 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with AGE collected in October 2006 to September 2007 in Seoul were tested for HAV. A pair comparison of the nucleic acid sequence of a 159-bp base region at the putative VP1/2A junction of 85 Seoul isolates revealed that the most common HAV strain circulating in the region during 2006-2007 was subgenotype IA. HAV phylogenetic studies can provide important information on the genetic characteristics of HAV from AGE patients who may subsequently become the source of infection in Korea.

  13. Different Regions of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Are Required for Enhancement of bZip-Mediated Transactivation versus Transrepression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabas, Sangeeta; Andrisani, Ourania M.

    2000-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X protein (pX) interacts directly with the bZip transactivator CREB and the bZip repressors ICERIIγ and ATF3, increasing their DNA-binding affinity in vitro and their transcriptional efficacy in vivo. However, the mechanism of bZip-pX interaction and of the pX-mediated increase in the bZip transcriptional efficacy remains to be understood. In this study with deletion mutants of pX, we delineated a 67-amino-acid region spanning residues 49 to 115 required for direct CREB, ATF3, and ICER IIγ interaction in vitro and in vivo and increased bZip/CRE binding in vitro. Transient transfections of the pX deletion mutants in AML12 hepatocytes demonstrate that pX49–115 is as effective as the full-length pX in enhancing the ATF3- and ICERIIγ-mediated transrepression. However, this pX region is inactive in increasing the transactivation efficacy of CREB; additional amino acid residues present in pX49–140 are required to mediate the increased transactivation efficacy of CREB in vivo. This requirement for different regions of pX in affecting CREB transactivation suggests that amino acid residues 115 to 140 integrate additional events in effecting pX-mediated transactivation, such as concomitant interactions with select components of the basal transcriptional apparatus. PMID:10590094

  14. Pan-genotypic treatment regimens for hepatitis C virus: Advantages and disadvantages in high- and low-income regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hézode, C

    2017-02-01

    During the last 5 years, the availability of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents has revolutionized the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Compared with interferon/ribavirin-the previous standard of care-DAA combination regimens offer improved sustained virological response (SVR) rates, shorter treatment durations of 8-24 weeks, convenient once-daily single-tablet formulations and more favourable tolerability profiles. HCV treatment is complex, and the choice of therapy must consider a complex range of factors, including baseline viral load, fibrosis stage, the HCV genotype and subgenotype, and the presence of resistance-associated substitutions at baseline. Globally, HCV genotype 1 predominates, and there are extensive data and various treatment options available for this genotype. Genotypes 2-6 are prevalent and may even predominate in different geographical regions, reflecting diverse factors including human migration patterns and unsafe use of injection drugs and blood products. Such factors are themselves influenced by socio-economic factors, and poor regions often have the greatest unmet need for effective HCV therapies. The latest pan-genotypic DAA combination regimens provide the potential to eradicate HCV around the globe, regardless of genotype, hence minimizing the need for virological testing services, which often are unavailable in poorer regions. Economics inevitably remain a barrier to access, and extensive cooperation will be required between clinical organisations and pharmaceutical manufacturers to agree appropriate pricing policies, especially in poorer economic regions. This review considers key data and treatment guidelines for DAA therapies, including pan-genotypic combination regimens, in the context of regional differences in HCV genotype and socio-economic factors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Antibody Epitopes Identified in Critical Regions of Dengue Virus Nonstructural 1 Protein in Mouse Vaccination and Natural Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Tomer; Beatty, P Robert; MacMillen, Zachary; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva

    2017-05-15

    Dengue is a global public health problem and is caused by four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV1-4). A major challenge in dengue vaccine development is that cross-reactive anti-DENV Abs can be protective or potentially increase disease via Ab-dependent enhancement. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has long been considered a vaccine candidate as it avoids Ab-dependent enhancement. In this study, we evaluated survival to challenge in a lethal DENV vascular leak model in mice immunized with NS1 combined with aluminum and magnesium hydroxide, monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax, or Sigma adjuvant system+CpG DNA, compared with mice infected with a sublethal dose of DENV2 and mice immunized with OVA (negative control). We characterized Ab responses to DENV1, 2, and 3 NS1 using an Ag microarray tiled with 20-mer peptides overlapping by 15 aa and identified five regions of DENV NS1 with significant levels of Ab reactivity in the NS1 + monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax group. Additionally, we profiled the Ab responses to NS1 of humans naturally infected with DENV2 or DENV3 in serum samples from Nicaragua collected at acute, convalescent, and 12-mo timepoints. One region in the wing domain of NS1 was immunodominant in both mouse vaccination and human infection studies, and two regions were identified only in NS1-immunized mice; thus, vaccination can generate Abs to regions that are not targeted in natural infection and could provide additional protection against lethal DENV infection. Overall, we identified a small number of immunodominant regions, which were in functionally important locations on the DENV NS1 protein and are potential correlates of protection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Molecular genotyping of duck hepatitis A viruses (DHAV) in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Le, Xuyen Thi Kim; Do, Roan Thi; Hoang, Chau Thi Minh; Nguyen, Khue Thi; Le, Thanh Hoa

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic characteristics and molecular genotyping of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) isolated in Vietnam during 2009-2013. Thirty duckling livers from outbreaks between 2009 and 2013 in seven provinces were collected and identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then, VP1 genes of eleven positive samples and two attenuated vaccine strains were sequenced and analyzed. Genotypic and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the 13 Vietnamese isolates were classified into two genotypes, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The rate of identity and homology was 91%-100% between the 10 Vietnamese and 26 global strains of DHAV-3, and 92%-100% between 3 Vietnamese and 16 strains of DHAV-1. Between the DHAV-3 and DHAV-1 strains, the divergence reached 30%. At the C-terminal of VP1 for the different strains, a hypervariable region was observed, and notably, six of the Vietnamese DHAV-3 strains in this study showed four consistent differences (at positions T184M, Q200H, K207N, and K214R) within this group that were distinct from all other DHAV-3 strains. This is the first report of molecular characterization of DHAVs in Vietnam. At least two genotypes were identified, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, with diversified clades within and between genotypes. DHAV-3 seemed to be dominant in Vietnam.

  17. SEQUENCE COMPARISON OF THE CENTRAL REGION OF THE GLYCOPROTEIN GENE OF NEUTRALIZABLE, NON-NEUTRALIZABLE, AND SERIALLY PASSED ISOLATES OF VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA VIRUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, P. E. V.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Higman, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The region of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glycoprotein gene coding for amino acids 142 to 357 was sequenced and compared among 6 isolates of the virus from rainbow trout in Denmark, Isolates were selected that were strongly neutralized by polyclonal and monoclonal antisera......, not neutralized by antisera, or that represented more than 500 serial passages in cell cultures. The overall diversity within this region of the glycoprotein was 5.4% at the nucleotide level and 6.9% at the amino acid level. Most of the variation was in the portion of the protein from amino acids 210 to 290 where...... substitutions were found in 13 of the 80 amino adds (16%). In contrast, the central portion of the glycoprotein of the Fl reference strain of the virus was remarkably stable during 510 passes in cell culture, accumulating only a single amino acid substitution. Differences between the neutralizable and non...

  18. Challenges to the development of vaccines to hepatitis C virus that elicit neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Edelgard Drummer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite 20 years of research, a vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has not been developed. A vaccine to prevent HCV will need to induce broadly reactive immunity able to prevent infection by the 7 genetically and antigenically distinct genotypes circulating world-wide. Hepatitis C virus encodes two surface exposed glycoproteins, E1 and E2 that function as a heterodimer to mediate viral entry. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs to both E1 and E2 have been described with the major NAb target being E2. The function of E2 is to attach virions to host cells via cell surface receptors that include, but is not limited to, the tetraspanin CD81 and scavenger receptor B class I. However, E2 has developed a number of immune evasion strategies to limit the effectiveness of the NAb response and possibly limit the ability of the immune system to generate potent NAbs in natural infection. Hypervariable regions that shield the underlying core domain, subdominant neutralization epitopes and glycan shielding combine to make E2 a difficult target for the immune system. This review summarizes recent information on the role of neutralizing antibodies to prevent HCV infection, the targets of the neutralizing antibody response and structural information on glycoprotein E2 in complex with neutralizing antibodies. This new information should provide a framework for the rational design of new vaccine candidates that elicit highly potent broadly reactive NAbs to prevent HCV infection.

  19. Evidence of viral replication in circulating dendritic cells during hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadège; Fatmi, Ahmed; De Ledinghen, Victor; Penin, François; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Bain, Christine

    2003-06-15

    The existence of extrahepatic sites of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication has been proposed as a mechanism responsible for the poor antiviral immune response found in chronic infection. Dendritic cells (DCs), as unique antigen-presenting cells able to induce a primary immune response, are prime targets of persistent viruses. From 24 blood samples obtained from HCV-seropositive patients, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) were purified. HCV genomic sequences were specifically detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in 6 of 24 PBDC pellets, and replicative-strand RNA also was found in 3 of 24 cell purifications. Analysis of the HCV quasi-species distribution in the PBDC population of 1 patient showed the presence of a dominant variant different from that found in plasma with respect to the primary amino-acid sequence and physicochemical profile of the hypervariable region 1 of glycoprotein E2. These data strongly suggest that PBDCs constitute a reservoir in which HCV replication takes place during natural infection.

  20. The early days of pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection in the central region of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Duque

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first case of pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection was diagnosed in the central region of Portugal on June 16, 2009, in a woman infected in Canada. Methods: The aim of our study was, first to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of all the patients with clinical manifestations included in the definition of a case for investigation with samples submitted to diagnosis of the pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection, in the central region of Portugal; second, to assess the precision of the case definition of case for investigation considered in the study according to the presence or the absence of fever at the moment of clinical observation. We reviewed the medical records of all the patients presenting with Influenza like-illness classified as a case for investigation and the first cases of patients infected with the new pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus, diagnosed in the central region of Portugal during the pandemic period between June and August, 2009, were analyzed. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR testing was used to confirm the pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection. Data collection was performed using a standardized paper format in agreement with the General Health Directorate. Results and discussion: Pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection was confirmed in 255 patients. Overall, median age was 23 years and 42.7% were included in the category of 20 to 29 years. Confirmed infection in patients with less than 2 years or greater than 50 years was a rare event. The first cases were imported from Europe, namely France, Spain and England. In a second phase, pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection was acquired in the south of Portugal (Algarve. The incidence rate for pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection was 10.7 per 100,000 persons and was different according to the district. It was higher in the district of Coimbra and Guarda where the main roads are connecting to Europe. The median calculated incubation

  1. Avian influenza virus wild bird surveillance in the Azov and Black Sea regions of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Azov and Black Sea basins are transcontinental migration routes of wild birds from Northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa and Southwest Asia. These regions constitute an area of transit, stops during migration, and nesting of many migratory bird species with a very high level of ...

  2. A new method for imputing country-level estimates of hepatitis A virus endemicity levels in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Taha; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Nguyen, Tim; Wiktor, Stefan Z

    2014-10-21

    Few country-level estimates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) seroprevlance are available for the 23 countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMRO) of the World Health Organization. We used a three-stage approach to assign an HAV endemicity level to each country in North Africa and the Middle East based on the age at midpoint of population immunity. First, we conducted a systematic review to identify all age-seroprevalence studies conducted within the past 10 years. Second, for countries without first-stage evidence we searched for incidence data and older seroprevalence data. Third, for countries with no hepatitis A data, we estimated HAV endemicity based on socioeconomic and water indicators. This three-stage method allowed us to estimate country-specific endemicity levels for every country in EMRO even though first-stage evidence was only available for nine countries and for three countries only third-stage evidence was available. The region has a heterogeneous hepatitis A risk profile, with 13 countries having very high endemicity (an age at midpoint of population immunity in early childhood), three having high endemicity (late childhood), and seven having intermediate endemicity (early adulthood). The three-stage estimation approach enables the creation of a complete country-level map of HAV risk in EMRO. Given the heterogeneity of HAV endemicity levels in the region and the likelihood of transitions to lower incidence rates and greater adult susceptibility in the near future, enhanced surveillance for hepatitis A would strengthen decisions about vaccination policy in the region. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Molecular analysis of the 3’ terminal region of Onion yellow dwarf virus from onion in southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana MANGLLI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV is an economically important pathogen causing severe disease in garlic, onion and other Allium crops. Eleven isolates of OYDV, all from onion originating from Calabria, southern Italy, were genetically analyzed. An OYDV onion isolate from Sudan was also included in this study. The 3’ terminal region of about 2.5 kb of the twelve isolates were sequenced and the sequences comprising a part of the nuclear inclusion a (NIa-Pro, the complete nuclear inclusion b (NIb and coat protein (CP genes and the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR, were compared to each other and to corresponding sequences of other OYDV isolates from different countries and Allium hosts. The within-population nucleotide identity of the Italian OYDV onion isolates was very high (more than 99.3%, whereas nucleotide identity between them and OYDV onion isolates from Germany was 94%, Argentina 92% and Sudan 87%. Recombination analysis among the complete 3’ terminal sequences showed putative recombination breakpoints in the NIb region of the Argentine isolate, with the minor parent related to the Sudanese isolate. Comparison between OYDV isolates from onion and isolates from garlic produced identities of 77-78% for the complete nucleotide region. When the 3’ terminal nucleotide sequence and the complete NIb protein were analyzed, the phylogenetic analysis generated rooted trees with high bootstrap values (100%, showing a genetic grouping into two well separated clades distinctive for onion and garlic isolates of OYDV. Phylogenetic analysis of CP protein and 3’UTR showed lower bootstrap separation values and no distinct sub-grouping of the OYDV isolates from the two major Allium species.

  4. Detection and characterisation of Plum pox virus (PPV isolates from Eastern Slovakia revealed the presence of three main viral strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Július Rozák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plum pox virus (PPV, the agent responsible for Sharka disease, is the most important viral pathogen of stone fruit trees world-wide, having an endemic status in Slovakia. To increase knowledge of PPV diversity in Slovakia, a set of 11 isolates, originated from the eastern part of the country, was characterised. The isolates were chip-budded from their original Prunus hosts to the susceptible GF305 indicators, exhibiting the symptoms of variable severity. A genomic region encompassing the partial NIb and the hypervariable 5´terminal region of the CP gene was amplified from all 11 isolates in RT-PCR and directly sequenced. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the grouping of the 11 Slovak isolates into 3 distinct clusters, representing the PPV-M (2 isolates, D (7 isolates and Rec strains (2 isolates. The strain affiliation of isolates was further confirmed by strain-specific RT-PCR, using which the presence of additional mixed infection by minor PPV variants was detected in 2 samples. The results further contribute to the understanding of PPV diversity in Slovakia and confirm the specificity and sensitivity of molecular approaches used for the virus strain determination.

  5. Molecular epidemiological study of Arctic rabies virus isolates from Greenland and comparison with isolates from throughout the Arctic and Baltic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansfield, K.L.; Racloz, V.; McElhinney, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report a Molecular epidemiological study of rabies in Arctic Countries by comparing a panel of novel Greenland isolates to a larger cohort of viral sequences from both Arctic and Baltic regions. Rabies Virus isolates originating from wildlife (Arctic/red foxes, raccoon-dogs and reindeer), from...... sequences from the Arctic and Arctic-like viruses, which were distinct from rabies isolates originating ill the Baltic region of Europe, the Steppes in Russia and from North America. The Arctic-like group consist of isolates from India, Pakistan, southeast Siberia and Japan. The Arctic group...... in northeast Siberia and Alaska. Arctic 2b isolates represent a biotype, which is dispersed throughout the Arctic region. The broad distribution of rabies in the Arctic regions including Greenland, Canada and Alaska provides evidence for the movement of rabies across borders....

  6. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Oanh, D.T.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most

  7. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the

  8. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian influenza viruses from wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea region of Ukraine (2006-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2006 to 2012 in a region of Ukraine known as being intercontinental (North-South and East-West) flyways. A total of 6,281 samples were collected from wild birds representing 27 families and 11 orders. From these samples, 69 ...

  9. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea Region of Ukraine (2001–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2001 to 2012 in the Azov - Black Sea region of the Ukraine, considered part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and southwest Asia. A total of 6281 sam...

  10. Spatio-temporal patterns of distribution of West Nile virus vectors in eastern Piedmont Region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisanzio Donal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile Virus (WNV transmission in Italy was first reported in 1998 as an equine outbreak near the swamps of Padule di Fucecchio, Tuscany. No other cases were identified during the following decade until 2008, when horse and human outbreaks were reported in Emilia Romagna, North Italy. Since then, WNV outbreaks have occurred annually, spreading from their initial northern foci throughout the country. Following the outbreak in 1998 the Italian public health authority defined a surveillance plan to detect WNV circulation in birds, horses and mosquitoes. By applying spatial statistical analysis (spatial point pattern analysis and models (Bayesian GLMM models to a longitudinal dataset on the abundance of the three putative WNV vectors [Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas 1771, Culex pipiens (Linnaeus 1758 and Culex modestus (Ficalbi 1890] in eastern Piedmont, we quantified their abundance and distribution in space and time and generated prediction maps outlining the areas with the highest vector productivity and potential for WNV introduction and amplification. Results The highest abundance and significant spatial clusters of Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus were in proximity to rice fields, and for Cx. pipiens, in proximity to highly populated urban areas. The GLMM model showed the importance of weather conditions and environmental factors in predicting mosquito abundance. Distance from the preferential breeding sites and elevation were negatively associated with the number of collected mosquitoes. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI was positively correlated with mosquito abundance in rice fields (Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus. Based on the best models, we developed prediction maps for the year 2010 outlining the areas where high abundance of vectors could favour the introduction and amplification of WNV. Conclusions Our findings provide useful information for surveillance activities aiming to identify locations where the

  11. Seroepidemiological study of bovine respiratory viruses (BRSV, BoHV-1, PI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3) in dairy cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Edris; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Noaman, Vahid; Bahriari, Masumeh; Morovati, Hasan; Hatami, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory diseases in calves are responsible for major economic losses in both beef and dairy production. Several viruses, such as bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (BPI-3V), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and bovine adenoviruses (BAV), are detected in most clinical cases with respiratory signs. The aim of this study is to define seroprevalences of five major viral causes of bovine respiratory infections in cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province). The population targeted was 642 dairy cows (Holstein-Friesian) from 25 farms. Samples of blood serum from female cattle were examined. Sera were tested by commercial ELISA kits to detect antibody against BRSV, BoHV-1, BPI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3. The results were analyzed by Chi-square test. In the present study, seroprevalences of BRSV, BoHV-1, PI3V, BVDV, and BAV-3 were 51.1%, 72%, 84.4%, 49.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. The present study shows that infections of bovine respiratory viruses are very common in cattle in Esfahan.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine MHC region of Japanese Black cattle are associated with bovine leukemia virus proviral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Sasaki, Shinji; Meripet, Polat; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Aida, Yoko

    2017-04-04

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma that has spread worldwide and causes serious problems for the cattle industry. The BLV proviral load, which represents the BLV genome integrated into host genome, is a useful index for estimating disease progression and transmission risk. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BLV proviral load in Japanese Black cattle. The study examined 93 cattle with a high proviral load and 266 with a low proviral load. Three SNPs showed a significant association with proviral load. One SNP was detected in the CNTN3 gene on chromosome 22, and two (which were not in linkage disequilibrium) were detected in the bovine major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 23. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex region affect proviral load. This is the first report to detect SNPs associated with BLV proviral load in Japanese Black cattle using whole genome association study, and understanding host factors may provide important clues for controlling the spread of BLV in Japanese Black cattle.

  13. A high-resolution linkage map of the citrus tristeza virus resistance gene region in Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, D Q; Federici, C T; Roose, M L

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was evaluated in 554 progeny of 10 populations derived from Poncirus trifoliata. A dominant gene (Ctv) controlled CTV resistance in P. trifoliata. Twenty-one dominant PCR-based DNA markers were identified as linked to Ctv by bulked segregant analysis. Of the 11 closest markers to Ctv, only 2 segregated in all populations. Ten of these markers were cloned and sequenced, and codominant RFLP markers were developed. Seven RFLP markers were then evaluated in 10 populations. Marker orders were consistent in all linkage maps based on data of single populations or on combined data of populations with similar segregation patterns. In a consensus map, the six closest marker loci spanned 5.3 cM of the Ctv region. Z16 cosegregated with Ctv. C19 and AD08 flanked Ctv at distances of 0.5 and 0.8 cM, respectively. These 3 markers were present as single copies in the Poncirus genome, and could be used directly for bacterial artificial chromosome library screening to initiate a walk toward Ctv. BLAST searches of the GenBank database revealed high sequence similarities between 2 markers and known plant disease resistance genes, indicating that a resistance gene cluster exists in the Ctv region in P. trifoliata. PMID:9755216

  14. Characterization of viruses associated with garlic plants propagated from different reproductive tissues from Italy and other geographic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo PARRANO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Garlic is an important crop cultivated worldwide and several different viruses have been associated with propagative material. Garlic is propagated from bulbs and/or from vegetative topsets of the inflorescences known as bulbils. The effects of the geographic origin and the type of the propagative material on the phylogenetic relationships and genetic variability of the coat protein genes of four allium viruses are presented here. Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV, Leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV, Garlic virus X (GVX, and Garlic common latent virus (GCLV were detected in single and mixed infections in plants grown either from bulbils and/or bulbs originating from Italy, China, Argentina, and the U.S.A. OYDV and LYSV fell into five and three well supported clades respectively whereas isolates of GVX and GCLV all clustered into one well-supported clade each. Some of the OYDV and LYSV clades presented evidence of host tissue selection while some phylogenetic structuring based on the geographic origin or host was also observed for some virus clades. Unique haplotypes and novel coat protein amino acid sequence patterns were identified for all viruses. An OYDV coat protein amino acid signature unique to Chenopodium quinoa, an uncommon host of the virus, was of particular interest. The type of propagative material affected the population dynamics of all of the viruses. The virus populations in plants propagated from bulbs were more diverse than in plants propagated from bulbils.

  15. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  16. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Non Coding Control Region of BK Virus Using Nested-PCR Sequencing Method in Renal Graft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Emami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Polyomaviruses (BK is a comprehensive infection with more than of 80% prevalence in the world. One of the most important reasons of BK virus nephropathy is in the renal transplant recipients and rejection of transplanted tissue between them. Non Coding region of this virus play a regulatory role in replication and amplification of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic patterns of this area in renal graft at Namazi Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In the present experimental study, 380 renal allograft serums were collected. DNAs of 129 eligible samples were extracted and evaluated using a virus genome. The presence of the virus was determined by qualitative and sequencing. Of these, 129 samples were tested for the presence of virus according to the condition study, using quantitative, qualitative genomic amplification and sequencing. Results: The study showed symptoms of nephropathy, 76 (58.9% of them were males and 46 (35.7% were females with the mean age 38.0±.089 years of age. In general, 46 patients (35.7% percent were positive for BK Polyomaviruses. After comparing the genomic sequence with applications of molecular they were categorized in three groups and then recorded in gene bank. Conclusion: About 35% of renal transplant recipients with high creatinine levels were positive for the presence of BK virus. Non-coding region of respondents in the sample survey revealed that among patients with the most common genotypes were rearranged the entire transplant patients were observed at this tranplant center. Examination of these sequences indicated that this rearrangments had a specific pattern, different from the standard strain of archaea type.

  17. The 5BSL3.2 Functional RNA Domain Connects Distant Regions in the Hepatitis C Virus Genome

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    Cristina Romero-López

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Viral genomes are complexly folded entities that carry all the information required for the infective cycle. The nucleotide sequence of the RNA virus genome encodes proteins and functional information contained in discrete, highly conserved structural units. These so-called functional RNA domains play essential roles in the progression of infection, which requires their preservation from one generation to the next. Numerous functional RNA domains exist in the genome of the hepatitis C virus (HCV. Among them, the 5BSL3.2 domain in the cis-acting replication element (CRE at the 3′ end of the viral open reading frame has become of particular interest given its role in HCV RNA replication and as a regulator of viral protein synthesis. These functionalities are achieved via the establishment of a complex network of long-distance RNA–RNA contacts involving (at least as known to date the highly conserved 3′X tail, the apical loop of domain IIId in the internal ribosome entry site, and/or the so-called Alt region upstream of the CRE. Changing contacts promotes the execution of different stages of the viral cycle. The 5BSL3.2 domain thus operates at the core of a system that governs the progression of HCV infection. This review summarizes our knowledge of the long-range RNA–RNA interaction network in the HCV genome, with special attention paid to the structural and functional consequences derived from the establishment of different contacts. The potential implications of such interactions in switching between the different stages of the viral cycle are discussed.

  18. Analysis of the epitope structure of Plum pox virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candresse, Thierry; Saenz, Pilar; García, Juan Antonio; Boscia, Donato; Navratil, Milan; Gorris, Maria Teresa; Cambra, Mariano

    2011-05-01

    Typing of the particular Plum pox virus (PPV) strain responsible in an outbreak has important practical implications and is frequently performed using strain-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Analysis in Western blots of the reactivity of 24 MAbs to a 112-amino-acid N-terminal fragment of the PPV coat protein (CP) expressed in Escherichia coli showed that 21 of the 24 MAbs recognized linear or denaturation-insensitive epitopes. A series of eight C-truncated CP fragments allowed the mapping of the epitopes recognized by the MAbs. In all, 14 of them reacted to the N-terminal hypervariable region, defining a minimum of six epitopes, while 7 reacted to the beginning of the core region, defining a minimum of three epitopes. Sequence comparisons allowed the more precise positioning of regions recognized by several MAbs, including those recognized by the 5B-IVIA universal MAb (amino acids 94 to 100) and by the 4DG5 and 4DG11 D serogroup-specific MAbs (amino acids 43 to 64). A similar approach coupled with infectious cDNA clone mutagenesis showed that a V74T mutation in the N-terminus of the CP abolished the binding of the M serogroup-specific AL MAb. Taken together, these results provide a detailed positioning of the epitopes recognized by the most widely used PPV detection and typing MAbs.

  19. Sequence analysis of the ORF 7 region of transmissible gastroenteritis viruses isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2008-02-01

    Three (KT2, 133, and DAE) transmissible gastroenteritis viruses (TGEVs) were isolated from pigs suspected of having TGE in Korea. One, KT2 (KT2-L), was passaged 128 times (KT2-H) in swine testicular cells. The open reading frame 7 (ORF 7) gene from each of the four TGEVs (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133, and DAE), which is located at the 3' end of the TGEV genome, was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amplified PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and compared with published sequences of non-Korean TGEV strains. Differences in replication and cytopathic effect (CPE) between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains in swine testicular cells were investigated. Korean TGEV field strains had 94.8-99.6% nucleotide and 92.1-98.7% amino acid sequence similarity with each other, and 87.8-100.0% nucleotide and 84.2-100.0% amino acid sequence similarity with non-Korean TGEV strains. Compared to the original KT2-L strain, the KT2-H strain differed by 2.2 and 3.9% in nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Specifically, the KT2-H had six nucleotide and two amino acid deletions compared to the original KT2-L strain. In phylogenetic analysis of the ORF 7 gene, Korean TGEV strains were clustered into two groups. One group (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133) was related to TGEV strains isolated in Japan. Another Korean TGEV isolate (DAE) was related to a strain from China and one from the USA. The Korean TGEV isolates appear to have evolved from a separate lineage of TGEV strain. Differences in growth rate and CPE between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains were discovered in swine testicular cells (STCs). The KT2-H strain exhibited a higher replication rate than KT2-L and produced a CPE distinctly different from that of the KT2-L strain.

  20. Proximity to mosquito breeding habitat and Ross River virus risk in the Peel region of Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Andrew; Neville, Peter J; Lindsay, Michael D A

    2015-02-01

    It is intuitive that vector-borne disease exposure risk is related to proximity to sources of vector breeding, but this aspect rarely receives empirical testing. The population of Western Australia (WA) is increasing rapidly, with many new residential developments proposed in close proximity to mosquito breeding habitat. However, potential mosquito-borne disease risks for future residents are given little consideration by planning authorities. The Peel region is one of the fastest growing regions in WA and regularly experiences a large number of cases of the mosquito-borne Ross River virus (RRV) disease with epidemics occuring in the region every few years. A spatial analysis of RRV disease data in the Peel region was undertaken to determine the risk associated with proximity to a mosquito breeding habitat. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software was used to create buffers between 1 and 6 km from the breeding habitat. The number of cases per 1000 dwellings in each buffer was calculated between 2002/03 to 2011/12 for years with >100 cases across all buffers (n=5) in addition to the cumulative rate over the entire period in each buffer. Residents living within 1 km of a mosquito breeding habitat had a significantly higher rate of RRV disease compared to the background rate across the Peel region in all individual years investigated. The cumulative data over the 10-year study period showed that residents in the 1- and 2-km buffers had a significantly higher rate, whereas those living between 3 and 6 km away did not. This study demonstrates an increased mosquito-borne disease risk associated with living in close proximity to a mosquito breeding habitat in a rapidly expanding region of WA and highlights the importance of considering mosquito-borne disease risks when planning authorities assess new residential development applications. Known mosquito breeding wetlands should be incorporated into land use planning scheme maps to ensure that they are accurately

  1. Next-generation genotyping of hypervariable loci in many individuals of a non-model species: technical and theoretical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Kathleen E; McGinnis, Gwendolyn J; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Drea, Christine M

    2016-03-08

    Across species, diversity at the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is critical to disease resistance and population health; however, use of MHC diversity to quantify the genetic health of populations has been hampered by the extreme variation found in MHC genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology generates sufficient data to genotype even the most diverse species, but workflows for distinguishing artifacts from alleles are still under development. We used NGS to evaluate the MHC diversity of over 300 captive and wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta: Primates: Mammalia). We modified a published workflow to address errors that arise from deep sequencing individuals and tested for evidence of selection at the most diverse MHC genes. In addition to evaluating the accuracy of 454 Titanium and Ion Torrent PGM for genotyping large populations at hypervariable genes, we suggested modifications to improve current methods of allele calling. Using these modifications, we genotyped 302 out of 319 individuals, obtaining an average sequencing depth of over 1000 reads per amplicon. We identified 55 MHC-DRB alleles, 51 of which were previously undescribed, and provide the first sequences of five additional MHC genes: DOA, DOB, DPA, DQA, and DRA. The additional five MHC genes had one or two alleles each with little sequence variation; however, the 55 MHC-DRB alleles showed a high dN/dS ratio and trans-species polymorphism, indicating a history of positive selection. Because each individual possessed 1-7 MHC-DRB alleles, we suggest that ring-tailed lemurs have four, putatively functional, MHC-DRB copies. In the future, accurate genotyping methods for NGS data will be critical to assessing genetic variation in non-model species. We recommend that future NGS studies increase the proportion of replicated samples, both within and across platforms, particularly for hypervariable genes like the MHC. Quantifying MHC diversity within non-model species is the first step to

  2. New Hypervariable SSR Markers for Diversity Analysis, Hybrid Purity Testing and Trait Mapping in Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohra, Abhishek; Jha, Rintu; Pandey, Gaurav; Patil, Prakash G; Saxena, Rachit K; Singh, Indra P; Singh, D; Mishra, R K; Mishra, Ankita; Singh, F; Varshney, Rajeev K; Singh, N P

    2017-01-01

    Draft genome sequence in pigeonpea offers unprecedented opportunities for genomics assisted crop improvement via enabling access to genome-wide genetic markers. In the present study, 421 hypervariable simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the pigeonpea genome were screened on a panel of eight pigeonpea genotypes yielding marker validation and polymorphism percentages of 95.24 and 54.11%, respectively. The SSR marker assay uncovered a total of 570 alleles with three as an average number of alleles per marker. Similarly, the mean values for gene diversity and PIC were 0.44 and 0.37, respectively. The number of polymorphic markers ranged from 39 to 89 for different parental combinations. Further, 60 of these SSRs were assayed on 94 genotypes, and model based clustering using STRUCTURE resulted in the identification of the two subpopulations (K = 2). This remained in close agreement with the clustering patterns inferred from genetic distance (GD)-based approaches i.e., dendrogram, factorial and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). The AMOVA accounted majority of the genetic variation within groups (89%) in comparison to the variation existing between the groups (11%). A subset of these markers was implicated for hybrid purity testing. We also demonstrated utility of these SSR markers in trait mapping through association and bi-parental linkage analyses. The general linear (GLM) and mixed linear (MLM) models both detected a single SSR marker (CcGM03681) with R(2) = 16.4 as associated with the resistance to Fusarium wilt variant 2. Similarly, by using SSR data in a segregating backcross population, the corresponding restorer-of-fertility (Rf) locus was putatively mapped at 39 cM with the marker CcGM08896. However, The marker-trait associations (MTAs) detected here represent a very preliminary type and hence demand deeper investigations for conclusive evidence. Given their ability to reveal polymorphism in simple agarose gels, the hypervariable SSRs are valuable

  3. Phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of genotype C hepatitis B virus with TCC at codon 15 of the precore region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen; Tse, Chi-Hang; Ng, Eddie Yuen-Tok; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Lee, Kin-Hong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Sung, Joseph Jao-Yiu

    2006-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) with T-1856 of the precore region is always associated with C-1858 (i.e., TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858), and it is reported only in genotype C HBV isolates. We aimed to investigate the phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of HBV isolates bearing TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. We have previously reported on the presence of two major subgroups in genotype C HBV, namely, HBV genotype Cs (Southeast Asia) and HBV genotype Ce (Far East). We have designed a novel 5' nuclease technology based on the nucleotide polymorphism (C or A) at nucleotide 2733 to differentiate the two genotype C HBV subgroups. The mutations at the basal core promoter and precore regions were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 214 genotype C HBV-infected patients, 31% had TCC, 37% had CCC, 3% had CTC, and 29% had CCT at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. All except one HBV strain with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 belonged to subgroup Cs, which has been reported only in Hong Kong; Guangzhou, China; and Vietnam. HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 was associated with the G1898A mutation (64%). Patients infected with HBV harboring TCC had more liver cirrhosis than those infected with HBV harboring CCC (18% versus 5%; P = 0.008), and more of the patients infected with HBV harboring TCC were positive for HBeAg (58% versus 36%; P = 0.01) and had higher median alanine aminotransferase levels (65 IU/liter versus 49 IU/liter; P = 0.006); but similar proportions of patients infected with HBV harboring TCC and those infected with HBV harboring CCT had liver cirrhosis (18% versus 13%; P = 0.43). In summary, we report that HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 of the precore region might represent a specific HBV strain associated with more aggressive liver disease than other genotype C HBV strains.

  4. Identification of minimal sequences of the Rhopalosiphum padi virus 5' untranslated region required for internal initiation of protein synthesis in mammalian, plant and insect translation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Belsham, Graham; Roberts, Lisa O.

    2007-01-01

    Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV) is a member of the family Dicistroviridae. The genomes of viruses in this family contain two open reading frames, each preceded by distinct internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements. The RhPV 5' IRES is functional in mammalian, insect and plant translation systems...... (rabbit reticulocyte lysate), plant (wheatgerm extract) and insect (Sf21 cells) translation systems have now been defined. A fragment (nt 426–579) from the 3' portion of the 5' UTR can direct translation in each of these translation systems. In addition, a distinct region (nt 300–429) is also active. Thus...

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to bluetongue virus in large ruminants of Marathwada region of Maharashtra state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Raut

    Full Text Available Aim: Seroprevalence study of BT antibodies in large ruminants of Marathwada region of Maharashtra state. Materials and Methods: A total of 246 serum samples of Cattle and Buffalo were screened for qualitative analysis of the BTV antibodies using a commercial competitive ELISA (cELISA kit. Results: The results showed an overall percentage of BTV positive cattle and buffalo serum samples were 89.80% and 80% respectively. The results based upon the serum samples showing optical density values more than 50 per cent of the mean of negative control were taken as positive for presence of BTV antibodies. A high percentage of cattle showed BTV antibodies in places Parbhani (92.53%, Nanded (86% and Aurangabad (81.81%. The percentage of BTV antibodies in buffaloes was 70%, 100%, 100% and 87.5% respectively in Parbhani, Nanded, Aurangabad and Hingoli. Conclusion: BTV antibodies were widely prevalent in cattle & buffaloes of Marathwada region and cELISA were found to be sensitive and effective for screening of BTV group specific antibodies. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 416-418

  6. Introduction of Exogenous Epitopes in the Variable Regions of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein: Effect on Viral Infectivity and the Neutralization Phenotype▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Aaron; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is equally susceptible to neutralization by a given antibody when the epitope of this antibody is introduced at different positions within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). To this end, we introduced two exogenous “epitope tags” at different locations within three major Env regions in two distinct HIV-1 isolates. We examined how the introduction of the exogenous epitopes affects Env expression, Env incorporation into virions, Env fusogenic potential, and viral susceptibility to neutralization. Our data indicate that even within the same Env region, the exact positioning of the epitope impacts the susceptibility of the virus to neutralization by the antibody that binds to that epitope. Our data also indicate that even if the same epitope is introduced in the exact same position on two different Envs, its exposure and, as a result, the neutralization susceptibility of the virus, can be very different. In contrast to the findings of previous studies conducted with HIV-1 isolates other than those used here, but in agreement with results obtained with simian immunodeficiency virus, we observed that tagging of the fourth variable region of Env (V4) did not result in neutralization by the anti-tag antibodies. Our data indicate that epitopes in V4 are not properly exposed within the functional HIV-1 trimeric Env spike, suggesting that V4 may not be a good target for vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies. PMID:19494007

  7. Introduction of exogenous epitopes in the variable regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein: effect on viral infectivity and the neutralization phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Aaron; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2009-08-01

    In this study we examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is equally susceptible to neutralization by a given antibody when the epitope of this antibody is introduced at different positions within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). To this end, we introduced two exogenous "epitope tags" at different locations within three major Env regions in two distinct HIV-1 isolates. We examined how the introduction of the exogenous epitopes affects Env expression, Env incorporation into virions, Env fusogenic potential, and viral susceptibility to neutralization. Our data indicate that even within the same Env region, the exact positioning of the epitope impacts the susceptibility of the virus to neutralization by the antibody that binds to that epitope. Our data also indicate that even if the same epitope is introduced in the exact same position on two different Envs, its exposure and, as a result, the neutralization susceptibility of the virus, can be very different. In contrast to the findings of previous studies conducted with HIV-1 isolates other than those used here, but in agreement with results obtained with simian immunodeficiency virus, we observed that tagging of the fourth variable region of Env (V4) did not result in neutralization by the anti-tag antibodies. Our data indicate that epitopes in V4 are not properly exposed within the functional HIV-1 trimeric Env spike, suggesting that V4 may not be a good target for vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies.

  8. In Silico Design and Experimental Validation of siRNAs Targeting Conserved Regions of Multiple Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes.

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    Mahmoud ElHefnawi

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific degradation of targeted RNA and thus provides a tremendous opportunity for development of oligonucleotide-based drugs. Here, we report on the design and validation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting highly conserved regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV genome. To aim for therapeutic applications by optimizing the RNAi efficacy and reducing potential side effects, we considered different factors such as target RNA variations, thermodynamics and accessibility of the siRNA and target RNA, and off-target effects. This aim was achieved using an in silico design and selection protocol complemented by an automated MysiRNA-Designer pipeline. The protocol included the design and filtration of siRNAs targeting highly conserved and accessible regions within the HCV internal ribosome entry site, and adjacent core sequences of the viral genome with high-ranking efficacy scores. Off-target analysis excluded siRNAs with potential binding to human mRNAs. Under this strict selection process, two siRNAs (HCV353 and HCV258 were selected based on their predicted high specificity and potency. These siRNAs were tested for antiviral efficacy in HCV genotype 1 and 2 replicon cell lines. Both in silico-designed siRNAs efficiently inhibited HCV RNA replication, even at low concentrations and for short exposure times (24h; they also exceeded the antiviral potencies of reference siRNAs targeting HCV. Furthermore, HCV353 and HCV258 siRNAs also inhibited replication of patient-derived HCV genotype 4 isolates in infected Huh-7 cells. Prolonged treatment of HCV replicon cells with HCV353 did not result in the appearance of escape mutant viruses. Taken together, these results reveal the accuracy and strength of our integrated siRNA design and selection protocols. These protocols could be used to design highly potent and specific RNAi-based therapeutic

  9. Identifying Hendra virus diversity in pteropid bats.

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    Ina Smith

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV causes a zoonotic disease with high mortality that is transmitted to humans from bats of the genus Pteropus (flying foxes via an intermediary equine host. Factors promoting spillover from bats to horses are uncertain at this time, but plausibly encompass host and/or agent and/or environmental factors. There is a lack of HeV sequence information derived from the natural bat host, as previously sequences have only been obtained from horses or humans following spillover events. In order to obtain an insight into possible variants of HeV circulating in flying foxes, collection of urine was undertaken in multiple flying fox roosts in Queensland, Australia. HeV was found to be geographically widespread in flying foxes with a number of HeV variants circulating at the one time at multiple locations, while at times the same variant was found circulating at disparate locations. Sequence diversity within variants allowed differentiation on the basis of nucleotide changes, and hypervariable regions in the genome were identified that could be used to differentiate circulating variants. Further, during the study, HeV was isolated from the urine of flying foxes on four occasions from three different locations. The data indicates that spillover events do not correlate with particular HeV isolates, suggesting that host and/or environmental factors are the primary determinants of bat-horse spillover. Thus future spillover events are likely to occur, and there is an on-going need for effective risk management strategies for both human and animal health.

  10. Identification and characterisation of a hyper-variable apoplastic effector gene family of the potato cyst nematodes.

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    Sebastian Eves-van den Akker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes are obligate biotrophs that modify host root tissues, using a suite of effector proteins to create and maintain a feeding site that is their sole source of nutrition. Using assumptions about the characteristics of genes involved in plant-nematode biotrophic interactions to inform the identification strategy, we provide a description and characterisation of a novel group of hyper-variable extracellular effectors termed HYP, from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. HYP effectors comprise a large gene family, with a modular structure, and have unparalleled diversity between individuals of the same population: no two nematodes tested had the same genetic complement of HYP effectors. Individuals vary in the number, size, and type of effector subfamilies. HYP effectors are expressed throughout the biotrophic stages in large secretory cells associated with the amphids of parasitic stage nematodes as confirmed by in situ hybridisation. The encoded proteins are secreted into the host roots where they are detectable by immunochemistry in the apoplasm, between the anterior end of the nematode and the feeding site. We have identified HYP effectors in three genera of plant parasitic nematodes capable of infecting a broad range of mono- and dicotyledon crop species. In planta RNAi targeted to all members of the effector family causes a reduction in successful parasitism.

  11. A hypervariable STR polymorphism in the CFI gene: southern origin of East Asian-specific group H alleles.

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    Yuasa, Isao; Jin, Feng; Harihara, Shinji; Matsusue, Aya; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Akane, Atsushi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya; Chattopadhyay, Prasanta K

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of four populations revealed that a hypervariable short tandem repeat (iSTR) in intron 7 of the human complement factor I (CFI) gene on chromosome 4q was unique, with 17 possible East Asian-specific group H alleles observed at relatively high frequencies. To develop a deeper anthropological and forensic understanding of iSTR, 1161 additional individuals from 11 Asian populations were investigated. Group H alleles of iSTR and c.1217A allele of a SNP in exon 11 of the CFI gene were associated with each other and were almost entirely confined to East Asian populations. Han Chinese in Changsha, southern China, showed the highest frequency for East Asian-specific group H alleles (0.201) among 15 populations. Group H alleles were observed to decrease gradually from south to north in 11 East Asian populations. This expansion of group H alleles provides evidence that southern China and Southeast Asia are a hotspot of Asian diversity and a genetic reservoir of Asians after they entered East Asia. The expected heterozygosity values of iSTR ranged from 0.927 in Thais to 0.874 in Oroqens, higher than those of an STR in the fibrinogen alpha chain (FGA) gene on chromosome 4q. Thus, iSTR is a useful marker for anthropological and forensic genetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for the co-circulation of dengue virus type 3 genotypes III and V in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics

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    Meri Bordignon Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The reintroduction of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 in Brazil in 2000 and its subsequent spread throughout the country was associated with genotype III viruses, the only DENV-3 genotype isolated in Brazil prior to 2002. We report here the co-circulation of two different DENV-3 genotypes in patients living in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics. Complete genomic sequences of viral RNA were determined from these epidemics, and viruses belonging to genotypes V (Southeast Asia/South Pacific and III were identified. This recent co-circulation of different DENV-3 genotypes in South America may have implications for pathological and epidemiological dynamics.

  13. Identification of a new region in the vesicular stomatitis virus L polymerase protein which is essential for mRNA cap methylation.

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    Grdzelishvili, Valery Z; Smallwood, Sherin; Tower, Dallas; Hall, Richard L; Hunt, D Margaret; Moyer, Sue A

    2006-07-05

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L polymerase protein possesses two methyltransferase (MTase) activities, which catalyze the methylation of viral mRNA cap structures at the guanine-N7 and 2'-O-adenosine positions. To identify L sequences required for the MTase activities, we analyzed a host range (hr) and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of VSV, hr8, which was defective in mRNA cap methylation. Sequencing hr8 identified five amino acid substitutions, all residing in the L protein. Recombinant VSV were generated with each of the identified L mutations, and the presence of a single G1481R substitution in L, located between conserved domains V and VI, was sufficient to produce a dramatic reduction (about 90%) in overall mRNA methylation. Cap analysis showed residual guanine-N7 methylation and reduced 2'-O-adenosine methylation, identical to that of the original hr8 virus. When recombinant viruses were tested for virus growth under conditions that were permissive and nonpermissive for the hr8 mutant, the same single L mutation, G1481R, was solely responsible for both the hr and ts phenotypes. A spontaneous suppressor mutant of the rG1481R virus that restored both growth on nonpermissive cells and cap methylation was identified and mapped to a single change, L1450I, in L. Site-directed mutagenesis of the region between domains V and VI, amino acids 1419-1672 of L, followed by the rescue of recombinant viruses identified five additional virus mutants, K1468A, R1478A/D1479A, G1481A, G1481N, and G1672A, that were all hr and defective in mRNA cap methylation. Thus, in addition to the previously characterized domain VI [Grdzelishvili, V.Z., Smallwood, S., Tower, D., Hall, R.L., Hunt, D.M., Moyer, S.A., 2005. A single amino acid change in the L-polymerase protein of vesicular stomatitis virus completely abolishes viral mRNA cap methylation. J. Virol. 79, 7327-7337; Li, J., Fontaine-Rodriguez, E.C., Whelan, S.P., 2005. Amino acid residues within conserved domain VI of the

  14. Complete genome of a Puumala virus strain from Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Drewes, Stephan; Weber de Melo, Vanessa; Schlegel, Mathias; Freise, Jona; Groschup, Martin H; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2015-04-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is one of the predominant hantavirus species in Europe causing mild to moderate cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Parts of Lower Saxony in north-western Germany are endemic for PUUV infections. In this study, the complete PUUV genome sequence of a bank vole-derived tissue sample from the 2007 outbreak was determined by a combined primer-walking and RNA ligation strategy. The S, M and L genome segments were 1,828, 3,680 and 6,550 nucleotides in length, respectively. Sliding-window analyses of the nucleotide sequences of all available complete PUUV genomes indicated a non-homogenous distribution of variability with hypervariable regions located at the 3'-ends of the S and M segments. The overall similarity of the coding genome regions to the other PUUV strains ranged between 80.1 and 84.7 % at the level of the nucleotide sequence and between 89.5 and 98.1 % for the deduced amino acid sequences. In comparison to the phylogenetic trees of the complete coding sequences, trees based on partial segments revealed a general drop in phylogenetic support and a lower resolution. The Astrup strain S and M segment sequences showed the highest similarity to sequences of strains from geographically close sites in the Osnabrück Hills region. In conclusion, a primer-walking-mediated strategy resulted in the determination of the first complete nucleotide sequence of a PUUV strain from Central Europe. Different levels of variability along the genome provide the opportunity to choose regions for analyses according to the particular research question, e.g., large-scale phylogenetics or within-host evolution.

  15. Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Maria Franca; Monno, Rosa; Ballini, Andrea; Mirgaldi, Rosanna; Dipalma, Gianna; Pettini, Francesco; Cristallo, Vincenzo; Inchingolo, Francesco; Foti, Caterina; de Vito, Danila

    2015-01-01

    Since human papillomavirus (HPV) is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy). HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR) and low risk (LR). The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%), HPV 31 (16%) HPV 6 (9%), HPV 58 and 66 (7%), followed by HPV 33 (6%), HPV 18 and 56 (4%), HPV 70 and 45 (3%), HPV 53 and 11 (2%). Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high- risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia

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    Maria Franca Coscia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Since human papillomavirus (HPV is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. AIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy. METHODS. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR and low risk (LR. RESULTS. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%, HPV 31 (16% HPV 6 (9%, HPV 58 and 66 (7%, followed by HPV 33 (6%, HPV 18 and 56 (4%, HPV 70 and 45 (3%, HPV 53 and 11 (2%. Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high-risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. CONCLUSIONS. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  17. Identification of genomic regions of the herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) with helper activity for avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H J; Schüller, S; Monreal, G; Lindenmaier, W

    1993-03-01

    Herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) is a potent helper for the defective parvovirus avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV). To study the helper mechanism at the molecular level, we established a complete cosmid library of HVT DNA in a set of seven overlapping clones and transiently cotransfected secondary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells with AAAV DNA and recombinant cosmids (cBL) (individual as well as in different combinations). Using an AAAV-specific indirect immunofluorescence assay, we identified four regions on the HVT genome, represented by cBL267, cBL27, cBL33, and cBL34, which express helper functions for AAAV. As demonstrated by infection studies with extracts from cotransfected CEF cells, cBL267 promotes productive AAAV growth, while the helper effect induced by cBL27, cBL33, and cBL34 is limited to the synthesis of noninfectious AAAV antigen. In view of the data presented, possible HVT-specific helper mechanisms for AAAV are discussed.

  18. Identification of Rhopalosiphum Padi Virus 5′ Untranslated Region Sequences Required for Cryptic Promoter Activity and Internal Ribosome Entry

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    Ming-Kun Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The 579-nucleotide 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR of the Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV possesses a cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES activity that functions in insect, mammalian, and plant-derived in vitro translation systems, and six TAAG motifs within the DNA fragment encoding the RhPV 5′UTR were previously found to confer the RhPV 5′UTR with late promoter activity in baculovirus. In the present study, various truncated RhPV 5′UTR sequences were produced, and among them, a fragment of 110 bp ranging from nucleotides 309 to 418 was identified to be the shortest fragment responsible for the late promoter activity in baculovirus infected Sf21 cells. This 110 bp fragment contains a TAAG tandem repeat that retains more than 60% of the late promoter activity of the full length RhPV 5′UTR sequence. Further, IRES activity remained unchanged in all truncated RhPV 5′UTR constructs. Taken together, this novel 110 bp fragment having late promoter activity in baculovirus as well as IRES activity in mammalian cell, renders it a useful tool for the development of a “shuttle” bi-cistronic baculovirus gene expression and/or delivery vector.

  19. Identification of Rhopalosiphum Padi Virus 5′ Untranslated Region Sequences Required for Cryptic Promoter Activity and Internal Ribosome Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jie-Zue; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The 579-nucleotide 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV) possesses a cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity that functions in insect, mammalian, and plant-derived in vitro translation systems, and six TAAG motifs within the DNA fragment encoding the RhPV 5′UTR were previously found to confer the RhPV 5′UTR with late promoter activity in baculovirus. In the present study, various truncated RhPV 5′UTR sequences were produced, and among them, a fragment of 110 bp ranging from nucleotides 309 to 418 was identified to be the shortest fragment responsible for the late promoter activity in baculovirus infected Sf21 cells. This 110 bp fragment contains a TAAG tandem repeat that retains more than 60% of the late promoter activity of the full length RhPV 5′UTR sequence. Further, IRES activity remained unchanged in all truncated RhPV 5′UTR constructs. Taken together, this novel 110 bp fragment having late promoter activity in baculovirus as well as IRES activity in mammalian cell, renders it a useful tool for the development of a “shuttle” bi-cistronic baculovirus gene expression and/or delivery vector. PMID:26184188

  20. Identification of Rhopalosiphum Padi Virus 5' Untranslated Region Sequences Required for Cryptic Promoter Activity and Internal Ribosome Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jie-Zue; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2015-07-15

    The 579-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV) possesses a cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity that functions in insect, mammalian, and plant-derived in vitro translation systems, and six TAAG motifs within the DNA fragment encoding the RhPV 5'UTR were previously found to confer the RhPV 5'UTR with late promoter activity in baculovirus. In the present study, various truncated RhPV 5'UTR sequences were produced, and among them, a fragment of 110 bp ranging from nucleotides 309 to 418 was identified to be the shortest fragment responsible for the late promoter activity in baculovirus infected Sf21 cells. This 110 bp fragment contains a TAAG tandem repeat that retains more than 60% of the late promoter activity of the full length RhPV 5'UTR sequence. Further, IRES activity remained unchanged in all truncated RhPV 5'UTR constructs. Taken together, this novel 110 bp fragment having late promoter activity in baculovirus as well as IRES activity in mammalian cell, renders it a useful tool for the development of a "shuttle" bi-cistronic baculovirus gene expression and/or delivery vector.

  1. Spreading of hepatitis C virus subtypes 1a and 1b through the central region of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culasso, Andrés Carlos Alberto; Farías, Adrián; Di Lello, Federico Alejandro; Golemba, Marcelo Darío; Ré, Viviana; Barbini, Luciana; Campos, Rodolfo

    2014-08-01

    The recent history of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtypes 1a and 1b in the central region of Argentina is hypothesized by phylogeographic reconstruction using coalescent based Bayesian analyses. Direct partial E2 sequences from HCV 1a and 1b infected patients attending different health-care centers of the country were analyzed. The inferred date of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) for HCV-1a was: 1962 (between 1943 and 1977) and for HCV-1b was earlier: 1929 (between 1895 and 1953). Diverse ancestral populations were inferred from both subtypes in Córdoba and in Buenos Aires cities and after that, HCV spread within and between larger cities and to other smaller cities. The analyses suggested that HCV-1b was dispersed first and it is currently in a stationary phase whereas HCV-1a was dispersed latter and it is still in a growth phase. Finally, as it was observed in the developed countries, while the transmission of HCV-1b appears to have been somehow prevented, the HCV-1a may still represent a concern in the public health. Further work should be carried out to address their current transmission rate (and its main transmission route) in the Argentinean population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regional brain structural dysmorphology in human immunodeficiency virus infection: effects of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, alcoholism, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Kemper, Carol A; Deresinski, Stanley; Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and alcoholism each carries liability for disruption of brain structure and function integrity. Despite considerable prevalence of HIV-alcoholism comorbidity, few studies examined the potentially heightened burden of disease comorbidity. Participants were 342 men and women: 110 alcoholics, 59 with HIV infection, 65 with HIV infection and alcoholism, and 108 healthy control subjects. This design enabled examination of independent and combined effects of HIV infection and alcoholism along with other factors (acquired immune deficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining events, hepatitis C infection, age) on regional brain volumes derived from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Brain volumes, expressed as Z scores corrected for intracranial volume and age, were measured in 20 tissue and 5 ventricular and sulcal regions. The most profound and consistent volume deficits occurred with alcohol use disorders, notable in the cortical mantle, insular and anterior cingulate cortices, thalamus, corpus callosum, and frontal sulci. The HIV-only group had smaller thalamic and larger frontal sulcal volumes than control subjects. HIV disease-related factors associated with greater volume abnormalities included CD4 cell count nadir, clinical staging, history of AIDS-defining events, infection age, and current age. Longer sobriety and less lifetime alcohol consumption were predictive of attenuated brain volume abnormalities in both alcohol groups. Having HIV infection with alcoholism and AIDS had an especially poor outcome on brain structures. That longer periods of sobriety and less lifetime alcohol consumption were predictive of attenuated brain volume abnormalities encourages the inclusion of alcohol recovery efforts in HIV/AIDS therapeutic settings. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Narrowing down the apricot Plum pox virus resistance locus and comparative analysis with the peach genome syntenic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Ruiz, Elsa María; Soriano, José Miguel; Romero, Carlos; Zhebentyayeva, Tetyana; Terol, Javier; Zuriaga, Elena; Llácer, Gerardo; Abbott, Albert Glenn; Badenes, María Luisa

    2011-08-01

    Sharka disease, caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV), is one of the main limiting factors for stone fruit crops worldwide. Only a few resistance sources have been found in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.), and most studies have located a major PPV resistance locus (PPVres) on linkage group 1 (LG1). However, the mapping accuracy was not sufficiently reliable and PPVres was predicted within a low confidence interval. In this study, we have constructed two high-density simple sequence repeat (SSR) improved maps with 0.70 and 0.68 markers/cm, corresponding to LG1 of 'Lito' and 'Goldrich' PPV-resistant cultivars, respectively. Using these maps, and excluding genotype-phenotype incongruent individuals, a new binary trait locus (BTL) analysis for PPV resistance was performed, narrowing down the PPVres support intervals to 7.3 and 5.9 cm in 'Lito' and 'Goldrich', respectively. Subsequently, 71 overlapping oligonucleotides (overgo) probes were hybridized against an apricot bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, identifying 870 single BACs from which 340 were anchored onto a map region of approximately 30-40 cm encompassing PPVres. Partial BAC contigs assigned to the two allelic haplotypes (resistant/susceptible) of the PPVres locus were built by high-information content fingerprinting (HICF). In addition, a total of 300 BAC-derived sequences were obtained, and 257 showed significant homology with the peach genome scaffold_1 corresponding to LG1. According to the peach syntenic genome sequence, PPVres was predicted within a region of 2.16 Mb in which a few candidate resistance genes were identified. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. [Prospective regional study of an epidemic of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, M; Cornet, B; Milou, C; Gouyon, J B

    2002-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to identify risk factors associated with admission in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) among infants hospitalized for treatment of RSV induced bronchiolitis. This study was population-based and was conducted in Burgundy, a French region with 1,800,000 inhabitants where passive immunoprophylaxis for RSV bronchiolitis was not set up at the time of the study. From December 1st 1999 to April 30th 2000, 484 infants were hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis in Burgundy: 19.6% were born prematurely (gestational age [GA] below 37 weeks) and at admission, 68.3% had a postnatal age below six months (mean = 5 +/- 5.9 months; median value = 3 months). The duration of hospitalization was 7.3 +/- 12.4 days (median value = 6 days). Among the 484 infants, 31 (6.4%) needed admission in PICU, eight needed mechanical ventilation (1.7%) and one died (0.2%). Univariate analysis identified anamnestic risk factors associated with admission in PICU: prematurity; low birth weight; past history of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS); mechanical ventilation for RDS treatment; bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and congenital heart disease. Multivariate analysis identified three independent factors associated with an increased risk for admission in PICU: GA below 32 weeks; RDS and congenital heart disease. This study suggests that population at risk for severe RSV bronchiolitis with PICU admission should include all very preterm infants with RDS whatever the outcome of RDS (with or without BPD). These epidemiological data could be helpful to set up indications for passive immunoprophylaxis of RSV induced bronchiolitis.

  5. Non-detection of Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus in a region of high gastric cancer risk indicates a lack of a role for these viruses in gastric carcinomas

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    Xiao-yan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric mucosa tissue was collected from patients with gastroduodenal diseases in a region of norrteastern China showing a high risk of gastric cancer incidence. The presence of EBV and HPV were assayed to investigate the relationship between gastric carcinomas and virus infection. Neither EBV nor HPV DNA was detected in tissue from the patients. The role of EBV and HPV in gastric cancer is not well understood and still needs to be clarified.

  6. Analysis of the RdRp, intergenic and structural polyprotein regions, and the complete genome sequence of Kashmir bee virus from infected honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Kim, Young-Ha; Kim, Nam-Hee; Jung, Ha-Na; Thao, Le Thi Bich; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Nguyen, Lien Thi Kim; Jung, Suk-Chan; Kang, Seung-Won

    2014-08-01

    Kashmir bee virus (KBV) is one of the most common viral infections in honeybees. In this study, a phylogenetic analysis was performed using nine partial nucleotide sequences of RdRp and the structural polyprotein regions of South Korean KBV genotypes, as well as nine previously reported KBV genotypes from various countries and two closely related genotypes of Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV). The Korean KBV genotypes were highly conserved with 94-99 % shared identity, but they also shared 88-95 % identity with genotypes from various countries, and they formed a separate KBV cluster in the phylogenetic tree. The complete genome sequence of Korean KBV was also determined and aligned with previously reported complete reference genome sequences of KBV, IAPV, and ABPV to compare different genomic regions. The complete Korean KBV genome shared 93, 79, and 71 % similarity with the complete reference genomes of KBV, IAPV, and ABPV, respectively. The Korean KBV was highly conserved relative to the reference KBV genomes in the intergenic and 3' untranslated region (UTR), but it had a highly variable 5' UTR, whereas there was little divergence in the helicase and 3C-protease of the nonstructural protein, and the external domains of the structural polyprotein region. Thus, genetic recombination and geographical distance may explain the genomic variations between the Korean and reference KBV genotypes.

  7. Preferential Targeting of Conserved Gag Regions after Vaccination with a Heterologous DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost HIV-1 Vaccine Regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Asli; Podola, Lilli; Mann, Philipp; Missanga, Marco; Haule, Antelmo; Sudi, Lwitiho; Nilsson, Charlotta; Kaluwa, Bahati; Lueer, Cornelia; Mwakatima, Maria; Munseri, Patricia J; Maboko, Leonard; Robb, Merlin L; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Kijak, Gustavo; Marovich, Mary; McCormack, Sheena; Joseph, Sarah; Lyamuya, Eligius; Wahren, Britta; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Hoelscher, Michael; Bakari, Muhammad; Kroidl, Arne; Geldmacher, Christof

    2017-09-15

    Prime-boost vaccination strategies against HIV-1 often include multiple variants for a given immunogen for better coverage of the extensive viral diversity. To study the immunologic effects of this approach, we characterized breadth, phenotype, function, and specificity of Gag-specific T cells induced by a DNA-prime modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-boost vaccination strategy, which uses mismatched Gag immunogens in the TamoVac 01 phase IIa trial. Healthy Tanzanian volunteers received three injections of the DNA-SMI vaccine encoding a subtype B and AB-recombinant Gagp37 and two vaccinations with MVA-CMDR encoding subtype A Gagp55 Gag-specific T-cell responses were studied in 42 vaccinees using fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After the first MVA-CMDR boost, vaccine-induced gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) Gag-specific T-cell responses were dominated by CD4+ T cells (P viruses. While including multiple variants for a given immunogen in prime-boost vaccination strategies is one approach that aims to improve coverage for global virus variants, the immunologic consequences of this strategy have been poorly defined so far. It is unclear whether inclusion of multiple variants in prime-boost vaccination strategies improves recognition of variant viruses by T cells and by which mechanisms this would be achieved, either by improved cross-recognition of multiple variants for a given antigenic region or through preferential targeting of antigenic regions more conserved between prime and boost. Engineering vaccines to induce adaptive immune responses that preferentially target conserved antigenic regions of viral vulnerability might facilitate better immune control after preventive and therapeutic vaccination for HIV and for other variable viruses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Comprehensive Virus Detection Using Next Generation Sequencing in Grapevine Vascular Tissues of Plants Obtained from the Wine Regions of Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive next generation sequencing virus detection was used to detect the whole spectrum of viruses and viroids in selected grapevines from the Czech Republic. The novel NGS approach was based on sequencing libraries of small RNA isolated from grapevine vascular tissues. Eight previously partially-characterized grapevines of diverse varieties were selected and subjected to analysis: Chardonnay, Laurot, Guzal Kara, and rootstock Kober 125AA from the Moravia wine-producing region; plus Müller-Thurgau and Pinot Noir from the Bohemia wine-producing region, both in the Czech Republic. Using next generation sequencing of small RNA, the presence of 8 viruses and 2 viroids were detected in a set of eight grapevines; therefore, confirming the high effectiveness of the technique in plant virology and producing results supporting previous data on multiple infected grapevines in Czech vineyards. Among the pathogens detected, the Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 were recorded in the Czech Republic for the first time. PMID:27959951

  9. Epidemiology of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus in Goiás, central Brazil: re-evaluation based on G-L intergenic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shinji; Itou, Takuya; Carvalho, Adolorata Ab; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2010-11-08

    Vampire bat related rabies harms both livestock industry and public health sector in central Brazil. The geographical distributions of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus variants are delimited by mountain chains. These findings were elucidated by analyzing a high conserved nucleoprotein gene. This study aims to elucidate the detailed epidemiological characters of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus by phylogenetic methods based on 619-nt sequence including unconserved G-L intergenic region. The vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus isolates divided into 8 phylogenetic lineages in the previous nucleoprotein gene analysis were divided into 10 phylogenetic lineages with significant bootstrap values. The distributions of most variants were reconfirmed to be delimited by mountain chains. Furthermore, variants in undulating areas have narrow distributions and are apparently separated by mountain ridges. This study demonstrates that the 619-nt sequence including G-L intergenic region is more useful for a state-level phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus than the partial nucleoprotein gene, and simultaneously that the distribution of vampire bat-transmitted RABV variants tends to be separated not only by mountain chains but also by mountain ridges, thus suggesting that the diversity of vampire bat-transmitted RABV variants was delimited by geographical undulations.

  10. Epidemiology of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus in Goiás, central Brazil: re-evaluation based on G-L intergenic region

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    Ito Fumio H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vampire bat related rabies harms both livestock industry and public health sector in central Brazil. The geographical distributions of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus variants are delimited by mountain chains. These findings were elucidated by analyzing a high conserved nucleoprotein gene. This study aims to elucidate the detailed epidemiological characters of vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus by phylogenetic methods based on 619-nt sequence including unconserved G-L intergenic region. Findings The vampire bat-transmitted rabies virus isolates divided into 8 phylogenetic lineages in the previous nucleoprotein gene analysis were divided into 10 phylogenetic lineages with significant bootstrap values. The distributions of most variants were reconfirmed to be delimited by mountain chains. Furthermore, variants in undulating areas have narrow distributions and are apparently separated by mountain ridges. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the 619-nt sequence including G-L intergenic region is more useful for a state-level phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus than the partial nucleoprotein gene, and simultaneously that the distribution of vampire bat-transmitted RABV variants tends to be separated not only by mountain chains but also by mountain ridges, thus suggesting that the diversity of vampire bat-transmitted RABV variants was delimited by geographical undulations.

  11. Comprehensive Virus Detection Using Next Generation Sequencing in Grapevine Vascular Tissues of Plants Obtained from the Wine Regions of Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic.

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    Aleš Eichmeier

    Full Text Available Comprehensive next generation sequencing virus detection was used to detect the whole spectrum of viruses and viroids in selected grapevines from the Czech Republic. The novel NGS approach was based on sequencing libraries of small RNA isolated from grapevine vascular tissues. Eight previously partially-characterized grapevines of diverse varieties were selected and subjected to analysis: Chardonnay, Laurot, Guzal Kara, and rootstock Kober 125AA from the Moravia wine-producing region; plus Müller-Thurgau and Pinot Noir from the Bohemia wine-producing region, both in the Czech Republic. Using next generation sequencing of small RNA, the presence of 8 viruses and 2 viroids were detected in a set of eight grapevines; therefore, confirming the high effectiveness of the technique in plant virology and producing results supporting previous data on multiple infected grapevines in Czech vineyards. Among the pathogens detected, the Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 were recorded in the Czech Republic for the first time.

  12. Genetic divergence of hepatitis C virus: the role of HIV-related immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netski, Dale M; Mao, Qing; Ray, Stuart C; Klein, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that HIV-related immunosuppression alters the host-hepatitis C virus (HCV) interaction, resulting in fewer amino acid-changing substitutions in HCV viral variants. Higher HCV RNA levels in persons coinfected with HIV compared with HCV infection alone suggest increased viral replication. If this increase is dependent on decreased immune selective pressure, then a reduced rate of nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid replacements (nonsynonymous changes, dN) would be expected. We investigated HCV envelope sequences over time in 79 persons with chronic HCV infection who were HIV negative (group 1) or HIV positive with (group 3) or without (group 2) severe immunodeficiency. We amplified a 1026-nt region of the HCV genome, which encodes a portion of the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2, including hypervariable region-1 for direct sequence analysis. The overall divergence between paired sequences, dS, dN, and dN/dS, all showed no significant differences among the 3 groups. By measuring nucleotide substitutions in HCV sequences over time, we found no significant differences in the genetic divergence between HCV-monoinfected control subjects and HIV/HCV-coinfected subjects with various levels of immunodeficiency as measured by CD4+ T-cell counts.

  13. HIV antigen incorporation within adenovirus hexon hypervariable 2 for a novel HIV vaccine approach.

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    Qiana L Matthews

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviral (Ad vectors have been used for a variety of vaccine applications including cancer and infectious diseases. Traditionally, Ad-based vaccines are designed to express antigens through transgene expression of a given antigen. However, in some cases these conventional Ad-based vaccines have had sub-optimal clinical results. These sub-optimal results are attributed in part to pre-existing Ad serotype 5 (Ad5 immunity. In order to circumvent the need for antigen expression via transgene incorporation, the "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy has been developed and used for Ad-based vaccine development in the context of a few diseases. This strategy embodies the incorporation of antigenic peptides within the capsid structure of viral vectors. The major capsid protein hexon has been utilized for these capsid incorporation strategies due to hexon's natural role in the generation of anti-Ad immune response and its numerical representation within the Ad virion. Using this strategy, we have developed the means to incorporate heterologous peptide epitopes specifically within the major surface-exposed domains of the Ad capsid protein hexon. Our study herein focuses on generation of multivalent vaccine vectors presenting HIV antigens within the Ad capsid protein hexon, as well as expressing an HIV antigen as a transgene. These novel vectors utilize HVR2 as an incorporation site for a twenty-four amino acid region of the HIV membrane proximal ectodomain region (MPER, derived from HIV glycoprotein gp41 (gp41. Our study herein illustrates that our multivalent anti-HIV vectors elicit a cellular anti-HIV response. Furthermore, vaccinations with these vectors, which present HIV antigens at HVR2, elicit a HIV epitope-specific humoral immune response.

  14. Epidemiological pattern of classical Borna disease and regional genetic clustering of Borna disease viruses point towards the existence of to-date unknown endemic reservoir host populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrwald, Ralf; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Muluneh, Aemero; Herzog, Sibylle; Nowotny, Norbert

    2006-03-01

    Classical Borna disease (cBD), a non-purulent encephalitis of solipeds and sheep, is endemic in certain areas of central Europe. The etiologic agent is Borna disease virus (BDV), thus far the only member of the family Bornaviridae. Based on epidemiological patterns of cBD and recent phylogenetic findings this review hypothesizes the possible existence of yet unknown BDV reservoir host populations, and analyzes critically BDVs from outside endemic regions.

  15. The First Investigation of West Nile Virus in Horses Using Real Time RT-PCR in Middle Black Sea Region in Turkey

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    Zafer Yazici

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: West Nile Virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause fatal infection in mammals in­cluding humans, dogs, horses, birds and reptiles. Although West Nile Virus is an asymptomatic infection, especially it can cause neurologic disorders in humans and horses. The aim of this study was to the investigate virological pres­ence of WNV in horses in the Black Sea Region of Turkey using real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR.Methods: Totally, 120 horse sera were collected equally from 4 provinces in Middle Black Sea Region of Turkey and investigated for WNV presence by Taqman based rRT-PCR.Results: WNV nucleic acid was not detected in any horse serum sample.Conclusion: Although obtained result indicated no evidence of WNV–RNA in horses, Black Sea Region of Turkey is one of the suitable places for the WNV infection. For this reason, our research will continue for the determination of the viruses in vectors and susceptible animals such as horses, dogs, etc

  16. FULL-LENGTH PEPTIDE ASSAY OF ANTIGENIC PROFILE OF ENVELOPE PROTEINS FROM SIBERIAN ISOLATES OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS

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    A. A. Grazhdantseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic profiles of envelope glycoproteins of hepatitis C virus presented by three genotypes 1b, 2a/2c and 3a, which are most widespread in the territory of Russia and, in particular, in Novosibirsk, were studied using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides. It was shown that highly immunogenic peptide epitopes of Е1 and Е2 proteins common for all HCV genotypes, are located in amino acid positions 250-260, 315-325 (Е1 protein, 390-400 (hypervariable region 1, 430-440, and 680-690 (Е2 protein. The greatest inter-genotypic differences were recorded in positions 280-290, 410-430 and 520-540. A novel antigenic determinant was detected in the region of aa 280-290 of the Е1 protein which was typical only for HCV 2a/2c genotype. A broad variation in the boundaries for the most epitopes suggests a high variability of the Е1 and Е2 viral proteins; however, a similar repertoire of antibodies induced by different HCV genotypes indicates to an opportunity of designing a new generation of cross-reactive HCV vaccines based on mapping of the E1 and E2 antigenic regions.

  17. Association Between Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection and Regional Adipose Tissue Volume in HIV-Infected Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Phyllis C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Gripshover, Barbara; Overton, E. Turner; Rimland, David; Kotler, Don

    2011-01-01

    Objective Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is reported to be associated with a higher prevalence of lipodystrophy than HIV infection alone. We examine the association between HCV and adipose tissue volume in HIV-infected men and women. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected subjects from the study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection. MRI measured regional adipose tissue volume. Detectable HCV RNA defined HCV infection. Results Twenty percent of 792 men and 26% of 329 women were HIV/HCV-coinfected. HIV/HCV-coinfected and HIV-monoinfected women had similar amounts of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in the leg, lower trunk, upper trunk, and arm and similar amounts of visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Similar findings were seen in men, except in the leg and VAT. After adjustment, HCV infection remained associated with more leg fat in men (12.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 25.3; P = 0.043). Among those on stavudine, HIV-monoinfected men had less leg fat (−7% effect per year of stavudine use, 95% CI: −9 to −5; P < 0.001); a weaker association was seen in HIV/HCV-coinfected men (−2% effect, 95% CI: −7 to 3; P = 0.45). Indinavir was associated with less leg fat (−4% in HIV-monoinfected men, 95% CI: −6 to −1; P = 0.002; −5% in HIV/HCV-coinfected men, 95% CI: −11 to 2; P = 0.14). Conclusions Our findings suggest that HIV/HCV coinfection is not associated with less SAT in men and women. HCV infection seems to mitigate the loss of leg fat seen in HIV-infected men on stavudine. PMID:17356466

  18. Targeting antibody responses to the membrane proximal external region of the envelope glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus.

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    Donatien Kamdem Toukam

    Full Text Available Although human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1 infection induces strong antibody responses to the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env only a few of these antibodies possess the capacity to neutralize a broad range of strains. The induction of such antibodies represents an important goal in the development of a preventive vaccine against the infection. Among the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies discovered so far, three (2F5, Z13 and 4E10 target the short and hidden membrane proximal external region (MPER of the gp41 transmembrane protein. Antibody responses to MPER are rarely observed in HIV-infected individuals or after immunization with Env immunogens. To initiate antibody responses to MPER in its membrane-embedded native conformation, we generated expression plasmids encoding the membrane-anchored ectodomain of gp41 with N-terminal deletions of various sizes. Following transfection of these plasmids, the MPER domains are displayed on the cell surface and incorporated into HIV virus like particles (VLP. Transfected cells displaying MPER mutants bound as efficiently to both 2F5 and 4E10 as cells transfected with a plasmid encoding full-length Env. Mice immunized with VLPs containing the MPER mutants produced MPER-specific antibodies, the levels of which could be increased by the trimerization of the displayed proteins as well as by a DNA prime-VLP boost immunization strategy. Although 2F5 competed for binding to MPER with antibodies in sera of some of the immunized mice, neutralizing activity could not be detected. Whether this is due to inefficient binding of the induced antibodies to MPER in the context of wild type Env or whether the overall MPER-specific antibody response induced by the MPER display mutants is too low to reveal neutralizing activity, remains to be determined.

  19. Improvement of Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Liver Transduction Efficacy by Regional Administration in Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, Nerea; Salas, David; Paramo, Maria; Hommel, Mirja; Sier-Ferreira, Valerie; Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben; Prieto, Jesus; Bilbao, Jose I; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2017-06-01

    The liver is a central organ in metabolism and can be affected by numerous inherited metabolic disorders. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for such diseases. AAVs have been demonstrated to be safe, and resulted in high and long-term expression in preclinical and clinical studies. However, there are still some concerns regarding the expression levels that can be achieved and the percentage of hepatocytes that can be transduced. Because of the cell-autonomous nature of most metabolic liver disorders, a high percentage of hepatocytes needs to be corrected in order to achieve a therapeutic effect. The goal of our work was to improve transduction efficacy of the liver by conveying the vector directly to hepatic tissue. Interventional radiology procedures were used to administer an AAV5 vector expressing a secreted form of human embryonic alkaline phosphatase (hSEAP) under the control of a liver-specific promoter to a clinically relevant animal model, Macaca fascicularis. Balloon occlusion of the regional hepatic venous flow was performed while injecting the vector either into the hepatic artery (HA) or, against flow, via the suprahepatic vein (SHV). In both cases the vector was injected into the right hepatic lobules, and the two routes were compared with conventional intravenous administration. Higher hSEAP levels were obtained when the vector was administered via SHV or HA than after intravenous injection. Furthermore, higher expression levels correlated with a higher number of vector genomes in the injected lobules. In conclusion, direct administration of AAV vectors via the hepatic blood flow with simultaneous balloon occlusion of the hepatic outflow increases liver transduction efficacy in comparison with systemic delivery and can be further improved in bigger animals or humans, where it would be technically feasible to inject the vector into the hepatic vasculature in the generality of lobules.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of a novel hypervariable immunoglobulin domain-containing receptor Dscam in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Yu, Ai-Qing; Li, Xue-Jie; Zhu, You-Ting; Jin, Xing-Kun; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) mediates innate immunity against pathogens in arthropods. Here, a novel Dscam from red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (CqDscam) was isolated. The CqDscam protein contains one signal peptide, ten immunoglobulin domains, six fibronectin type III domains, one transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail. CqDscam phylogenetically clustered with other invertebrate Dscams. Variable regions of CqDscam in N-terminal halves of Ig2 and Ig3 domains, complete Ig7 domain and TM domain can be reshuffled after transcription to produce a deluge of >37,620 potential alternative splice forms. CqDscam was detected in all tissues tested and abundantly expressed in immune system and nerve system. Upon lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and b-1, 3-glucans (Glu) challenged, the expression of CqDscam was up-regulated, while no response in expression occurred after injection with peptidoglycans (PG). Membrane-bound and secreted types of CqDscam were separated on the protein level, and were both extensively induced post LPS challenge. Membrane-bound CqDscam protein was not detected in the serum, but localized to the hemocyte surface by immuno-localization assay. In the antimicrobial assays, the recombinant LPS-induced isoform of CqDscam protein displayed bacterial binding and growth inhibitory activities, especially with Escherichia coli. These results suggested that CqDscam, as one of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), involved in innate immune recognition and defense mechanisms in C. quadricarinatus, possibly through alternative splicing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus based on two hypervariable effector genes in Thailand.

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    Thamrongjet Puttamuk

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB, also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' (Las being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1, 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2, and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions.

  2. Systematics of the hypervariable Moraea tripetala complex (Iridaceae: Iridoideae of the southern African winter rainfall zone

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    P. Goldblatt

    2012-12-01

    the interior Cape flora region, and late-flowering subsp. jacquiniana from the Cape Peninsula and surrounding mountains.

  3. Comparative and population genomic landscape of Phellinus noxius: A hypervariable fungus causing root rot in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chia-Lin; Lee, Tracy J; Akiba, Mitsuteru; Lee, Hsin-Han; Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Liu, Dang; Ke, Huei-Mien; Yokoi, Toshiro; Roa, Marylette B; Lu, Mei-Yeh J; Chang, Ya-Yun; Ann, Pao-Jen; Tsai, Jyh-Nong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Tzean, Shean-Shong; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Sahashi, Norio; Liou, Ruey-Fen; Kikuchi, Taisei; Tsai, Isheng J

    2017-11-01

    The order Hymenochaetales of white rot fungi contain some of the most aggressive wood decayers causing tree deaths around the world. Despite their ecological importance and the impact of diseases they cause, little is known about the evolution and transmission patterns of these pathogens. Here, we sequenced and undertook comparative genomic analyses of Hymenochaetales genomes using brown root rot fungus Phellinus noxius, wood-decomposing fungus Phellinus lamaensis, laminated root rot fungus Phellinus sulphurascens and trunk pathogen Porodaedalea pini. Many gene families of lignin-degrading enzymes were identified from these fungi, reflecting their ability as white rot fungi. Comparing against distant fungi highlighted the expansion of 1,3-beta-glucan synthases in P. noxius, which may account for its fast-growing attribute. We identified 13 linkage groups conserved within Agaricomycetes, suggesting the evolution of stable karyotypes. We determined that P. noxius has a bipolar heterothallic mating system, with unusual highly expanded ~60 kb A locus as a result of accumulating gene transposition. We investigated the population genomics of 60 P. noxius isolates across multiple islands of the Asia Pacific region. Whole-genome sequencing showed this multinucleate species contains abundant poly-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms with atypical allele frequencies. Different patterns of intra-isolate polymorphism reflect mono-/heterokaryotic states which are both prevalent in nature. We have shown two genetically separated lineages with one spanning across many islands despite the geographical barriers. Both populations possess extraordinary genetic diversity and show contrasting evolutionary scenarios. These results provide a framework to further investigate the genetic basis underlying the fitness and virulence of white rot fungi. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus, hepatitis A virus and enterovirus in water samples collected from different region of Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tahir; Arshad, Najma; Adnan, Fazal; Sadaf Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar; Shahid, Muhammad Talha; Zahoor, Usman; Afzal, Muhammad S; Anjum, Sadia

    2016-12-23

    Viral gastroenteritis and other water-borne diseases are the most neglected areas of research in Pakistan. To determine the quality of water, 4 enteric viruses were studied from different localities of Peshawar, Pakistan. The study validates the viral detection method for Rotavirus (RV), Human adenovirus (HAdV), Enterovirus (EV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV), directly from water sources of rural areas of Peshawar, KPK, Pakistan. Overall, 95 five water samples were tested; among them, 9.47% were positive for RV, 38.94% for HAdV, 48.42% for EV and 12.63% for HAV. The presence of these viruses in water was directly correlated with meteorological data. High prevalence of EV and HAdV was detected frequently in the wet season from May - September, which can be the potential cause of spreading of gastroenteritis in the population. Environmental surveillance is an additional tool to evaluate the epidemiology of enteric viruses circulating in a given community.

  5. Shortening the unstructured, interdomain region of the non-structural protein NS1 of an avian H1N1 influenza virus increases its replication and pathogenicity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Sascha; Soubieux, Denis; Marty, Hélène; Esnault, Evelyne; Hoffmann, Thomas W; Chandenier, Margaux; Lion, Adrien; Kut, Emmanuel; Quéré, Pascale; Larcher, Thibaut; Ledevin, Mireille; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia; Marc, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Currently circulating H5N1 influenza viruses have undergone a complex evolution since the appearance of their progenitor A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 in 1996. After the eradication of the H5N1 viruses that emerged in Hong Kong in 1997 (HK/97 viruses), new genotypes of H5N1 viruses emerged in the same region in 2000 that were more pathogenic for both chickens and mice than HK/97 viruses. These, as well as virtually all highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses since 2000, harbour a deletion of aa 80-84 in the unstructured region of the non-structural (NS) protein NS1 linking its RNA-binding domain to its effector domain. NS segments harbouring this mutation have since been found in non-H5N1 viruses and we asked whether this 5 aa deletion could have a general effect not limited to the NS1 of H5N1 viruses. We genetically engineered this deletion in the NS segment of a duck-origin avian H1N1 virus, and compared the in vivo and in vitro properties of the WT and NSdel8084 viruses. In experimentally infected chickens, the NSdel8084 virus showed both an increased replication potential and an increased pathogenicity. This in vivo phenotype was correlated with a higher replicative efficiency in vitro, both in embryonated eggs and in a chicken lung epithelial cell line. Our data demonstrated that the increased replicative potential conferred by this small deletion was a general feature not restricted to NS1 from H5N1 viruses and suggested that viruses acquiring this mutation may be selected positively in the future. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. Sequence Analysis of a 282-Kilobase Region Surrounding the Citrus Tristeza Virus Resistance Gene (Ctv) Locus in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Nan; Ye, Xin-Rong; Molina, Joe; Roose, Mikeal L.; Mirkov, T. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the major virus pathogen causing significant economic damage to citrus worldwide, and a single dominant gene, Ctv, provides broad spectrum resistance to CTV in Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. Ctv was physically mapped to a 282-kb region using a P. trifoliata bacterial artificial chromosome library. This region was completely sequenced to about 8× coverage using a shotgun sequencing strategy and primer walking for gap closure. Sequence analysis predicts 22 putative genes, two mutator-like transposons and eight retrotransposons. This sequence analysis also revealed some interesting features of this region of the P. trifoliata genome: a disease resistance gene cluster with seven members and eight retrotransposons clustered in a 125-kb gene-poor region. Comparative sequence analysis suggests that six genes in the Ctv region have significant sequence similarity with their orthologs in bacterial artificial chromosome clones F7H2 and F21T11 from Arabidopsis chromosome I. However, the analysis of gene colinearity between P. trifoliata and Arabidopsis indicates that Arabidopsis genome sequence information may be of limited use for positional gene cloning in P. trifoliata and citrus. Analysis of candidate genes for Ctv is also discussed. PMID:12586873

  7. Mapping a region of hepatitis C virus E2 that is responsible for escape from neutralizing antibodies and a core CD81-binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Krey, Thomas; Rey, Felix A; Foung, Steven K H

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between broadly neutralizing antibodies and their epitopes provides a basis for the rational design of a preventive hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. CBH-2, HC-11, and HC-1 are representatives of antibodies to overlapping epitopes on E2 that mediate neutralization by blocking virus binding to CD81. To obtain insights into escape mechanisms, infectious cell culture virus, 2a HCVcc, was propagated under increasing concentrations of a neutralizing antibody to isolate escape mutants. Three escape patterns were observed with these antibodies. First, CBH-2 escape mutants that contained mutations at D431G or A439E, which did not compromise viral fitness, were isolated. Second, under the selective pressure of HC-11, escape mutations progressed from a single L438F substitution at a low antibody concentration to double substitutions, L438F and N434D or L438F and T435A, at higher antibody concentrations. Escape from HC-11 was associated with a loss of viral fitness. An HCV pseudoparticle (HCVpp) containing the L438F mutation bound to CD81 half as efficiently as did wild-type (wt) HCVpp. Third, for HC-1, the antibody at a critical concentration completely suppressed viral replication and generated no escape mutants. Epitope mapping revealed contact residues for CBH-2 and HC-11 in two regions of the E2 glycoprotein, amino acids (aa) 425 to 443 and aa 529 to 535. Interestingly, contact residues for HC-1 were identified only in the region encompassing aa 529 to 535 and not in aa 425 to 443. Taken together, these findings point to a region of variability, aa 425 to 443, that is responsible primarily for viral escape from neutralization, with or without compromising viral fitness. Moreover, the region aa 529 to 535 is a core CD81 binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

  8. The C-terminal region of the non-structural protein 2B from Hepatitis A Virus demonstrates lipid-specific viroporin-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ashutosh; Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Kamalika; Nain, Anshu; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-10-01

    Viroporins are virally encoded, membrane-active proteins, which enhance viral replication and assist in egress of viruses from host cells. The 2B proteins in the picornaviridae family are known to have viroporin-like properties, and play critical roles during virus replication. The 2B protein of Hepatitis A Virus (2B), an unusual picornavirus, is somewhat dissimilar from its analogues in several respects. HAV 2B is approximately 2.5 times the length of other 2B proteins, and does not disrupt calcium homeostasis or glycoprotein trafficking. Additionally, its membrane penetrating properties are not yet clearly established. Here we show that the membrane interacting activity of HAV 2B is localized in its C-terminal region, which contains an alpha-helical hairpin motif. We show that this region is capable of forming small pores in membranes and demonstrates lipid specific activity, which partially rationalizes the intracellular localization of full-length 2B. Using a combination of biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulation studies, we also show that HAV 2B demonstrates a marked propensity to dimerize in a crowded environment, and probably interacts with membranes in a multimeric form, a hallmark of other picornavirus viroporins. In sum, our study clearly establishes HAV 2B as a bona fide viroporin in the picornaviridae family.

  9. Ninety-Nine Is Not Enough: Molecular Characterization of Inhibitor-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Mutants with Insertions in the Flap Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koiek, Milan; Saskova, Klara Grantz; Rezaova, Pavlina; Brynda, Jii; van Maarseveen, Noortje M.; De Jong, Dorien; Boucher, Charles A.; Kagan, Ron M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Konvalinka, Jan (Quest); (Charles U); (Utrecht)

    2008-07-21

    While the selection of amino acid insertions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a known mechanism of resistance against RT inhibitors, very few reports on the selection of insertions in the protease (PR) coding region have been published. It is still unclear whether these insertions impact protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and/or viral replication capacity. We show that the prevalence of insertions, especially between amino acids 30 to 41 of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) PR, has increased in recent years. We identified amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 of the PR of HIV-1-infected patients who had undergone prolonged treatment with PIs, and we characterized the contribution of these insertions to viral resistance. We prepared the corresponding mutated, recombinant PR variants with or without insertions at positions 33 and 35 and characterized them in terms of enzyme kinetics and crystal structures. We also engineered the corresponding recombinant viruses and analyzed the PR susceptibility and replication capacity by recombinant virus assay. Both in vitro methods confirmed that the amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 contribute to the viral resistance to most of the tested PIs. The structural analysis revealed local structural rearrangements in the flap region and in the substrate binding pockets. The enlargement of the PR substrate binding site together with impaired flap dynamics could account for the weaker inhibitor binding by the insertion mutants. Amino acid insertions in the vicinity of the binding cleft therefore represent a novel mechanism of HIV resistance development.

  10. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds in the Azov-Black Sea Region of Ukraine (2001-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Spackman, Erica; Smith, Diane; Rula, Oleksandr; Muzyka, Nataliia; Stegniy, Borys

    2016-05-01

    Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2001 to 2012 in the Azov - Black Sea region of the Ukraine, considered part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and southwest Asia. A total of 6281 samples were collected from wild birds representing 27 families and eight orders for virus isolation. From these samples, 69 AIVs belonging to 15 of the 16 known hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and seven of nine known neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were isolated. No H14, N5, or N9 subtypes were identified. In total, nine H6, eight H1, nine H5, seven H7, six H11, six H4, five H3, five H10, four H8, three H2, three H9, one H12, one H13, one H15, and one H16 HA subtypes were isolated. As for the NA subtypes, twelve N2, nine N6, eight N8, seven N7, six N3, four N4, and one undetermined were isolated. There were 27 HA and NA antigen combinations. All isolates were low pathogenic AIV except for eight highly pathogenic (HP) AIVs that were isolated during the H5N1 HPAI outbreaks of 2006-08. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes revealed epidemiological connections between the Azov-Black Sea regions and Europe, Russia, Mongolia, and Southeast Asia. H1, H2, H3, H7, H8, H6, H9, and H13 AIV subtypes were closely related to European, Russian, Mongolian, and Georgian AIV isolates. H10, H11, and H12 AIV subtypes were epidemiologically linked to viruses from Europe and Southeast Asia. Serology conducted on serum and egg yolk samples also demonstrated previous exposure of many wild bird species to different AIVs. Our results demonstrate the great genetic diversity of AIVs in wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea region as well as the importance of this region for monitoring and studying the ecology of influenza viruses. This information furthers our understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild bird species.

  11. HPV and EBV Infections in Neck Metastases from Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Another Virus-Related Neoplastic Disease in the Head and Neck Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussu, Francesco; Sali, Michela; Gallus, Roberto; Petrone, Gianluigi; Autorino, Rosa; Santangelo, Rosaria; Pandolfini, Manlio; Miccichè, Francesco; Delogu, Giovanni; Almadori, Giovanni; Galli, Jacopo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rindi, Guido; Tommasino, Massimo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 1-9 % of all head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are neck metastases from clinically undetectable primary tumors. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are proven carcinogenic factors that are associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of these viruses in neck metastases from unknown primary squamous cell carcinoma. We evaluated fresh samples from a consecutive series of 22 neck dissections for metastases from unknown primary squamous cell carcinoma obtained between 2010 and 2012 at a single institution. The samples were tested for the presence of HPV E6 and E7 mRNA and EBV DNA. Oncogenic viral infections were detected in 12 cases (54 % total; 2 HPV18, 5 HPV16, 2 EBV infection, and 3 EBV/HPV16 coinfections). The most frequent primarily involved neck level in our series was IIA (70 %), which had the highest prevalence of viral infection (66 %). We did not find any other significant correlations between virus detection and clinicopathologic parameters or prognosis. Neck metastasis from unknown primary squamous cell carcinoma could be another virus-related malignancy in the head and neck region, along with nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal carcinoma. An evaluation of the impact of viral infection on patient prognosis and sensitivities to different treatment modalities could modify our prognostic assessments and treatment planning. Furthermore, virus detection would have a decisive impact on diagnostic/decisional algorithms, especially if detection methods are implemented on cytologic samples (e.g., thin prep).

  12. Occurrence and genetic variability of Kemerovo virus in Ixodes ticks from different regions of Western Siberia, Russia and Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachev, Sergey E; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Babkin, Igor V; Livanova, Natalia N; Livanov, Stanislav G; Panov, Victor V; Yakimenko, Valeriy V; Tantsev, Alexey K; Taranenko, Dmitrii E; Tikunova, Nina V

    2017-01-01

    Kemerovo virus (KEMV), a member of the Reoviridae family, Orbivirus genus, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks and can cause aseptic meningitis and meningoencephalitis. Recently, this virus was observed in certain provinces of European part of Russia, Ural, and Western and Eastern Siberia. However, the occurrence and genetic diversity of KEMV in Western Siberia remain poorly studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the prevalence and genetic variability of KEMV in Ixodes ticks from Western Siberia. A total of 1958 Ixodes persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi ticks and their hybrids from Novosibirsk and Omsk provinces, Altai Republic (Russia) and East Kazakhstan province (Kazakhstan) were analyzed for the presence of KEMV and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) RNA. It was observed that the KEMV distribution area in Western Siberia was wider than originally thought and included Northern and Northeastern Altai in addition to the Omsk and Novosibirsk provinces. For the first time, this virus was found in Kazakhstan. The occurrence of KEMV was statistically lower than TBEV in most locations in Western Siberia. KEMV was found both in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi ticks and in their hybrids. Notably, KEMV variants observed in the 2010s were genetically different from those isolated in the 1960s, which indicated the ongoing process of evolution of the Kemerovo virus group. Moreover, the possibility of reassortment for KEMV was demonstrated for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in universal influenza virus vaccine design and antibody mediated therapies based on conserved regions of the hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter; Steel, John

    2015-01-01

    The threat of novel influenza viruses emerging into the human population from animal reservoirs, as well as the short duration of protection conferred by licensed vaccines against human seasonal strains has spurred research efforts to improve upon current vaccines and develop novel therapeutics against influenza viruses. In recent years these efforts have resulted in the identification of novel, highly conserved epitopes for neutralizing antibodies on the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein, which are present in both the stalk and globular head domains of the molecule. The existence of such epitopes may allow for generation of novel therapeutic antibodies, in addition to serving as attractive targets of novel vaccine design. The aims of developing improved vaccines include eliciting broader protection from drifted strains, inducing long-lived immunity against seasonal strains, and allowing for the rational design of vaccines that can be stockpiled for use as pre-pandemic vaccines. In addition, an increased focus on influenza virus vaccine research has prompted an improved understanding of how the immune system responds to influenza virus infection.

  14. Differentiation of Plum pox virus isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and low-stringency single specific primer PCR analysis of HC-Pro genome region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiou, S; Safárová, D; Navrátil, M

    2009-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and low-stringency single specific primer (LSSP)-PCR were assessed for suitability and reliability in genotyping of Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates. Examined PPV isolates included 16 PPV-D, 12 PPV-M, and 14 PPV-Rec isolates collected in Czech Republic. The analysis was performed on the helper component protease (HC-Pro) region of the PPV genome. SSCP and LSSP-PCR allowed the differentiation of PPV strain, but SSCP was not able to distinguish isolates within the same strain. The individual genotyping of each PPV isolate was obtained by LSSP-PCR. Nevertheless, both SSCP and LSSP-PCR techniques are suitable for preliminary screening of genetic variability of plant RNA viruses.

  15. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diverse amino acid changes at specific positions in the N-terminal region of the coat protein allow Plum pox virus to adapt to new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Alberto; Maliogka, Varvara I; Pérez, José de Jesús; Salvador, Beatriz; León, David San; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV)-D and PPV-R are two isolates from strain D of PPV that differ in host specificity. Previous analyses of chimeras originating from PPV-R and PPV-D suggested that the N terminus of the coat protein (CP) includes host-specific pathogenicity determinants. Here, these determinants were mapped precisely by analyzing the infectivity in herbaceous and woody species of chimeras containing a fragment of the 3' region of PPV-D (including the region coding for the CP) in a PPV-R backbone. These chimeras were not infectious in Prunus persica, but systemically infected Nicotiana clevelandii and N. benthamiana when specific amino acids were modified or deleted in a short 30-amino-acid region of the N terminus of the CP. Most of these mutations did not reduce PPV fitness in Prunus spp. although others impaired systemic infection in this host. We propose a model in which the N terminus of the CP, highly relevant for virus systemic movement, is targeted by a host defense mechanism in Nicotiana spp. Mutations in this short region allow PPV to overcome the defense response in this host but can compromise the efficiency of PPV systemic movement in other hosts such as Prunus spp.

  17. Chimeric virus-like particles containing a conserved region of the G protein in combination with a single peptide of the M2 protein confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Chai, Feng; Tan, Yiluo; Huo, Chunling; Pan, Zishu

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine composed of the conserved antigenic epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the chimeric RSV VLPs HBcΔ-tG and HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 were generated based on the truncated hepatitis B virus core protein (HBcΔ). HBcΔ-tG consisted of HBcΔ, the conserved region (aa 144-204) of the RSV G protein. HBcΔ-tG was combined with a single peptide (aa 82-90) of the M2 protein to generate HBcΔ-tG/M282-90. Immunization of mice with the HBcΔ-tG or HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs elicited RSV-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody production and conferred protection against RSV infection. Compared with HBcΔ-tG, HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 induced decreased Th2 cytokine production (IL-4 and IL-5), increased Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2), and increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibodies, thereby relieving pulmonary pathology upon subsequent RSV infection. Our results demonstrated that chimeric HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs represented an effective RSV subunit vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction between hexon and L4-100K determines virus rescue and growth of hexon-chimeric recombinant Ad5 vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingyi; Dong, Jianing; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Baoming; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-03-03

    The immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vectors has been shown to be suppressed by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) directed primarily against hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs). Preexisting immunity can be circumvented by replacing HVRs of rAd5 hexon with those derived from alternate adenovirus serotypes. However, chimeric modification of rAd5 hexon HVRs tends to cause low packaging efficiency or low proliferation of rAd5 vectors, but the related mechanism remains unclear. In this study, several Ad5-based vectors with precise replacement of HVRs with those derived from Ad37 and Ad43 were generated. We first observed that a HVR-exchanged rAd5 vector displayed a higher efficacy of the recombinant virus rescue and growth improvement compared with the rAd5 vector, although most hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors constructed by us and other groups have proven to be nonviable or growth defective. We therefore evaluated the structural stability of the chimeric hexons and their interactions with the L4-100K chaperone. We showed that the viability of hexon-chimeric Ad5 vectors was not attributed to the structural stability of the chimeric hexon, but rather to the hexon maturation which was assisted by L4-100K. Our results suggested that the intricate interaction between hexon and L4-100K would determine the virus rescue and proliferation efficiency of hexon-chimeric rAd5 vectors.

  19. Comparison of Nucleotide Sequence of P2C Region in Diabetogenic and Non-Diabetogenic Coxsackie Virus B5 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Cheng-Chong; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Ke, Guan-Ming; Tung, Yi-Ching; Cheng, Jeng-Yin; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chao, Mei-Chyn

    2004-01-01

    Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK) is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5) isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C ...

  20. Variety of genotypes of a HCV virus and outcomes of chronic hepatitis C: results 5 summer supervision in the territory of the Kirov region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Baramzina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the epidemiological situation in respect of chronic hepatitis C in the Russian Federation and the Kirov region for the period 1998–2012 yy. The data on the characteristics and frequency of outcomes of chronic hepatitis C, according to the 5-year observation of patients Kirov branch of viral hepatitis infectious diseases hospital. The results of genotyping HCV-virus in 730 patients with chronic hepatitis C in the dynamics from 2006–2010, and in comparison with other regions of Russia. Dominant in the region are the genotypes 1b and 3a, minor – 2 and 1a. During the analyzed period, there was a trend to a decrease in the proportion of genotypes 1b and 1a, and increase the proportion of subtype 3a and 2.

  1. Sequence analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 gene and promoter region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Gratama, J W; Munch, M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variations in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) gene have been described in a Chinese nasopharyngeal carcinoma-derived isolate (CAO), and in viral isolates from various EBV-associated tumors. It has been suggested that these genetic changes, which...

  2. Preferential retention of the E6 and E7 regions of the human papilloma virus type 18 genome by human sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, C C; Yang, F P; Lai, Y M

    1996-10-01

    To determine if sperm cells differentially take up or retain different regions of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 18 genome. A descriptive clinical study. A major medical center affiliated with a medical college. Twenty-three randomly selected patients who attended Fertility Clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Semen specimens were obtained from volunteered patients who attended fertility clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of various regions of HPV type 18 genome in sperm cells was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Among 23 sperm specimens that were positive for HPV type 18 DNA by polymerase chain reaction, the upstream regulatory region, E6, E7, E1, and L1 regions or open region frames were detected in 4 (17%), 7 (30%), 19 (83%), 5 (22%), and 1 (4%) specimens, respectively. The differential display of the presence of various regions of the HPV type 18 genome was not the result of different amplification and detection efficiencies of these DNA fragments. These results suggest that the oncogenic portion of HPV DNA is present in spermatozoa. Furthermore, the E6 and E7 regions of the viral genome preferentially were taken up and/or retained by the human sperm cells.

  3. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4 epitope mutations in the pre-core/core region of hepatitis B virus in chronic hepatitis B carriers in Northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Sareh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Nazari, Amineh; Moradi, Abdolvahab

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vulnerable to many various mutations. Those within epitopes recognized by sensitized T cells may influence the re-emergence of the virus. This study was designed to investigate the mutation in immune epitope regions of HBV pre-core/core among chronic HBV patients of Golestan province, Northeast Iran. In 120 chronic HBV carriers, HBV DNA was extracted from blood plasma samples and PCR was done using specific primers. Direct sequencing and alignment of the pre-core/core region were applied using reference sequence from Gene Bank database (Accession Number AB033559). The study showed 27 inferred amino acid substitutions, 9 of which (33.3%) were in CD4 and 2 (7.4%) in cytotoxic T lymphocytes' (CTL) epitopes and 16 other mutations (59.2%) were observed in other regions. CTL escape mutations were not commonly observed in pre-core/core sequences of chronic HBV carriers in the locale of study. It can be concluded that most of the inferred amino acid substitutions occur in different immune epitopes other than CTL and CD4.

  4. Hepatitis E virus in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa region: an awareness of an infectious threat to blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazbek, Soha; Kreidieh, Khalil; Ramia, Sami

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is mainly transmitted through contaminated water supplies which make the virus endemic in developing countries including countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Recent reports suggest potential risk of HEV transmission via blood transfusion. Related articles on HEV were collected by searching through the 25 countries of the MENA region using Pubmed and Medline within the past 14 years: January 2000-August 2014. One hundred articles were extracted, of which 25 were not eligible. The articles discussed the seroprevalence of HEV and HEV markers in 12 countries. Eight articles provided data on HEV in blood donors. The seroprevalence of HEV in the general MENA population ranged from 2.0 to 37.5% and was higher in males than in females. Prevalence increased with age, but exposure seems to be in early life. In the MENA region, the role of HEV as an infectious threat to blood safety is under-investigated. More data are needed to quantify the risk of transmission and to assess clinical outcomes. This requires, at least, surveillance screening of donors and recipients for HEV markers using sensitive and specific serological tests. At the present time, serious consideration should be given to selective screening for certain groups of patients (e.g., immunocompromised, pregnant women and others) who commonly require blood transfusion and are at high risk of hepatic failure or chronicity from HEV infection.

  5. Retention of a recombinant GFP protein expressed by the yellow fever 17D virus in the E/NS1 intergenic region in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Freitas Trindade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The flaviviral envelope proteins, E protein and precursor membrane protein, are mainly associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER through two transmembrane (TM domains that are exposed to the luminal face of this compartment. Their retention is associated with the viral assembly process. ER-retrieval motifs were mapped at the carboxy terminus of these envelope proteins. A recombinant yellow fever (YF 17D virus expressing the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP with the stem-anchor (SA region of E protein fused to its carboxy terminus was subjected to distinct genetic mutations in the SA sequence to investigate their effect on ER retention. Initially, we introduced progressive deletions of the stem elements (H1, CS and H2. In a second set of mutants, the effect of a length increase for the first TM anchor region was evaluated either by replacing it with the longer TM of human LAMP-1 or by the insertion of the VALLLVA sequence into its carboxy terminus. We did not detect any effect on the GFP localisation in the cell, which remained associated with the ER. Further studies should be undertaken to elucidate the causes of the ER retention of recombinant proteins expressed at the intergenic E/NS1 region of the YF 17D virus polyprotein.

  6. Meteorological conditions and land cover as predictors for the prevalence of Bluetongue virus in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Qin, Hongyu; Xiao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbin

    2017-03-01

    Bluetongue is a major disease of economic importance that affects ruminants worldwide. It is transmitted by species of Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). The Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region is one of the main pastoral areas for farmed sheep in Mainland China and, because of its large area, represents an ideal candidate region for the study of Bluetongue virus (BTV) distribution and prevalence characteristics. The present study conducted a detailed investigation into the spatial patterns of BTV transmission in sheep in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and assessed the inter-relationships between meteorological factors, land cover and the transmission of the virus was conducted. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the determination of BTV infection in the surveyed animals. Between June 2013 and February 2015, 6199 sheep were subjected to virus detection and 2199 sheep (35.47%) were determined to be positive for BTV. Subsequently, a maximum entropy model (MaxEnt) was used to investigate the relationship between land cover, meteorological factors and the prevalence of BTV infection. Jackknife analysis revealed that the mean monthly temperature, rainfall and average wind speed were associated with the occurrence of BTV infection and that BTV infection positivity was significantly higher among animals from districts with a high percentage of grassland and forest area. Our findings indicate that meteorological factors and land cover may be important variables affecting transmission of BTV and should be taken into account in the development of future surveillance programmes for BTV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6% in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. CONCLUSION: A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in

  8. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2, 4, and 5 vectors: Transduction of variant cell types and regions in the mammalian central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Beverly L.; Stein, Colleen S.; Heth, Jason A.; Martins, Inês; Kotin, Robert M; Derksen, Todd A.; Zabner, Joseph; Ghodsi, Abdi; Chiorini, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors based on serotype 2 (rAAV2) can direct transgene expression in the central nervous system (CNS), but it is not known how other rAAV serotypes perform as CNS gene transfer vectors. Serotypes 4 and 5 are distinct from rAAV2 and from each other in their capsid regions, suggesting that they may direct binding and entry into different cell types. In this study, we examined the tropisms and transduction efficiencies of β-galactosidase-encoding vectors made...

  9. A Viral mRNA Motif at the 3′-Untranslated Region that Confers Translatability in a Cell-Specific Manner. Implications for Virus Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs contain several motifs that participate in the regulation of their translation. We have discovered a motif at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of viral mRNAs, constituted by three repeated sequences, which is involved in the translation of both SINV genomic and subgenomic mRNAs in insect, but not in mammalian cells. These data illustrate for the first time that an element present at the 3′-UTR confers translatability to mRNAs from an animal virus in a cell-specific manner. Sequences located at the beginning of the 5′-UTR may also regulate SINV subgenomic mRNA translation in both cell lines in a context of infection. Moreover, a replicon derived from Sleeping disease virus, an alphavirus that have no known arthropod vector for transmission, is much more efficient in insect cells when the repeated sequences from SINV are inserted at its 3′-UTR, due to the enhanced translatability of its mRNAs. Thus, these findings provide a clue to understand, at the molecular level, the evolution of alphaviruses and their host range. PMID:26755446

  10. A Viral mRNA Motif at the 3'-Untranslated Region that Confers Translatability in a Cell-Specific Manner. Implications for Virus Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-12

    Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs contain several motifs that participate in the regulation of their translation. We have discovered a motif at the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of viral mRNAs, constituted by three repeated sequences, which is involved in the translation of both SINV genomic and subgenomic mRNAs in insect, but not in mammalian cells. These data illustrate for the first time that an element present at the 3'-UTR confers translatability to mRNAs from an animal virus in a cell-specific manner. Sequences located at the beginning of the 5'-UTR may also regulate SINV subgenomic mRNA translation in both cell lines in a context of infection. Moreover, a replicon derived from Sleeping disease virus, an alphavirus that have no known arthropod vector for transmission, is much more efficient in insect cells when the repeated sequences from SINV are inserted at its 3'-UTR, due to the enhanced translatability of its mRNAs. Thus, these findings provide a clue to understand, at the molecular level, the evolution of alphaviruses and their host range.

  11. An internal ribosomal entry signal in the rat VL30 region of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus leader and its use in dicistronic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlioz, C; Torrent, C; Darlix, J L

    1995-10-01

    The genetic organization of the 5' genomic RNA domain of the highly oncogenic Harvey murine sarcoma virus appears to be unusual in that a multifunctional untranslated leader precedes the v-ras oncogene. This 5' leader is 1,076 nucleotides in length and is formed of independent regions involved in key steps of the viral life cycle: (i) the Moloney murine leukemia virus 5' repeat, untranslated 5' region, and primer binding site sequences necessary for the first steps of proviral DNA synthesis, (ii) the virus-like 30S (VL30)-derived sequence containing a functional dimerization-packaging signal (E/DLS) directing viral RNA dimerization and packaging into MLV virions, and (iii) an Alu-like sequence preceding the 5' untranslated sequence of v-rasH which contains the initiation codon of the p21ras oncoprotein. These functional features, the unusual length of this leader (1,076 nucleotides), and the presence of stable secondary structures between the cap and the v-ras initiation codon might well cause a premature stop of the scanning ribosomes and thus inhibit v-ras translation. In order to understand how Harvey murine sarcoma virus achieves a high level of expression of the ras oncogene, we asked whether the rat VL30 sequence, 5' to v-ras, could contribute to an efficient synthesis of the ras oncoprotein. The implications of the VL30 sequence in the translation initiation of Ha-ras were investigated in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system and in murine cells. Results show that the rat VL30 sequence allows a cap-independent translation of a downstream reporter gene both in vitro and in murine cells. Additional experiments performed with dicistronic neo.VL30.lacZ mRNAs indicate that the 5' VL30 sequence (positions 380 to 794) contains an internal ribosomal entry signal. This finding led us to construct a new dicistronic retroviral vector with which the rat VL30 sequence was able to direct the efficient expression of a 3' cistron and packaging of recombinant dicistronic RNA

  12. The experience of West Nile virus integrated surveillance system in the Emilia-Romagna region: five years of implementation, Italy, 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, R; Calzolari, M; Mattivi, A; Tamba, M; Angelini, P; Bonilauri, P; Albieri, A; Cagarelli, R; Carrieri, M; Dottori, M; Finarelli, A C; Gaibani, P; Landini, M P; Natalini, S; Pascarelli, N; Rossini, G; Velati, C; Vocale, C; Bedeschi, E

    2014-11-06

    Predicting West Nile virus (WNV) circulation and the risk of WNV epidemics is difficult due to complex interactions of multiple factors involved. Surveillance systems that timely detect virus activity in targeted areas, and allow evidence-based risk assessments may therefore be necessary. Since 2009, a system integrating environmental (mosquitoes and birds) and human surveillance has been implemented and progressively improved in the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy. The objective is to increase knowledge of WNV circulation and to reduce the probability of virus transmission via blood, tissue and organ donation. As of 2013, the system has shown highly satisfactory results in terms of early detection capacity (the environmental surveillance component allowed detection of WNV circulation 3–4 weeks before human cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) occurred), sensitivity (capacity to detect virus circulation even at the enzootic level) and area specificity (capacity to indicate the spatial distribution of the risk for WNND). Strong correlations were observed between the vector index values and the number of human WNND cases registered at the province level. Taking into consideration two scenarios of surveillance, the first with environmental surveillance and the second without, the total costs for the period from 2009 to 2013 were reduced when environmental surveillance was considered (EUR 2.093 million for the first scenario vs EUR 2.560 million for the second). Environmental surveillance helped to reduce costs by enabling a more targeted blood unit testing strategy. The inclusion of environmental surveillance also increased the efficiency of detecting infected blood units and further allowed evidence-based adoption of preventative public health measures.

  13. Analysis of the complete genome sequence and capsid region of black queen cell viruses from infected honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Choe, Se Eun; Kweon, Chang Hee; Yoo, Mi Sun; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Yoon, Byoung-Su; Nguyen, Lien Thi Kim; Nguyen, Thuy Thi Dieu; Quyen, Dong Van; Jung, Suk-Chan; Chang, Ki-Yoon; Kang, Seung Won

    2013-08-01

    Black queen cell virus (BQCV) infection is one of the most common viral infections in honeybees (Apis mellifera). A phylogenetic tree was constructed for 19 partial nucleotide sequences for the capsid region of South Korean BQCV, which were also compared with 10 previously reported BQCV sequences derived from different countries. The Korean BQCV genomes were highly conserved and showed 97-100% identity. They also showed 92-99% similarity with other country genotypes and showed no significant clustering in the phylogenetic tree. In order to investigate this phenomenon in more detail, the complete genome sequence of the Korean BQCV strain was determined and aligned with those from a South African reference strain and European genotypes, Poland4-6 and Hungary10. A phylogenetic tree was then constructed. The Korean BQCV strain showed a high level of similarity (92%) with Hungary10, but low similarity (86%) with the South African reference genotype. Comparison of the Korean and other sequences across different genome regions revealed that the 5'-UTR, the intergenic region, and the capsid regions of the BQCV genome were highly conserved. ORF1 (a non-structural protein coding region) was more variable than ORF2 (a structural protein coding region). The 5'-proximal third of ORF1 was particularly variable and contained several insertions/deletions. This phenomenon may be explained by intra-molecular recombination between the Korean and other BQCV genotypes; this appeared to have happened more with the South African reference strain than with the European genotypes.

  14. Culex pipiens, an experimental efficient vector of West Nile and Rift Valley fever viruses in the Maghreb region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 10(7.8) and 10(8.5) plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14-21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology.

  15. Culex pipiens, an experimental efficient vector of West Nile and Rift Valley fever viruses in the Maghreb region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadila Amraoui

    Full Text Available West Nile fever (WNF and Rift Valley fever (RVF are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 10(7.8 and 10(8.5 plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14-21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology.

  16. Roles of the Coding and Noncoding Regions of Rift Valley Fever Virus RNA Genome Segments in Viral RNA Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Shin; Terasaki, Kaori; Narayanan, Krishna; Makino, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the RNA elements involved in the packaging of Rift Valley fever virus RNA genome segments, L, M, and S. The 5′-terminal 25 nucleotides of each RNA segment were equally competent for RNA packaging and carried an RNA packaging signal, which overlapped with the RNA replication signal. Only the deletion mutants of L RNA, but not full-length L RNA, were efficiently packaged, implying the possible requirement of RNA compaction for L RNA packaging.

  17. The Central Conserved Region (CCR) of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Protein Modulates Host miRNA Expression and Alters the Cellular Response to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infects respiratory epithelial cells and deregulates host gene expression by many mechanisms including expression of RSV G protein (RSV G). RSV G protein encodes a central conserved region (CCR) containing a CX3C motif that functions as a fractalkine mimic. Disruption of the CX3C motif (a.a. 182–186) located in the CCR of the G protein has been shown to affect G protein function in vitro and the severity of RSV disease pathogenesis in vivo. We show that infection of polarized Calu3 respiratory cells with recombinant RSV having point mutations in Cys173 and 176 (C173/176S) (rA2-GC12), or Cys186 (C186S) (rA2-GC4) is associated with a decline in the integrity of polarized Calu-3 cultures and decreased virus production. This is accompanied with downregulation of miRNAs let-7f and miR-24 and upregulation of interferon lambda (IFNλ), a primary antiviral cytokine for RSV in rA2-GC12/rA2-GC4 infected cells. These results suggest that residues in the cysteine noose region of RSV G protein can modulate IFN λ expression accompanied by downregulation of miRNAs, and are important for RSV G protein function and targeting. PMID:28671606

  18. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Long Terminal Repeat 5' Region from Patients with Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Myelopathy and Asymptomatic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Filipe Ferreira de Almeida; de Oliveira, Tulio; Giovanetti, Marta; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patients by deep sequencing the human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) region in order to determine if minor and/or major mutations in this promoter region might be associated with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP)/human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy (HAM) outcome or proviral load or HTLV-1 expression. This study is a cross-sectional analyze of 29 HTLV-1-infected patients with TSP/HAM or asymptomatic carriers. Proviral DNA from those subjects was submitted to a nested PCR for the HTLV-1 LTR5' region. The HTLV-1 LTR5' purified products were submitted to deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent sequencing technology (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA). We found that samples with low proviral load showed more detected minor mutations than the samples with high proviral load. Mutations in 136 positions were found over the 520-bp analyzed fragment of HTLV-1 LTR5' with at least 1% frequency. Eleven mutations were present in the previously determined major transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and in more than one patient, indicating that there might be a differential HTLV-1 expression comparing individuals or in comparing different cells from the same individual. Three mutations were statistically significant using the Fisher nonparametric test between the groups but were not present in previously determined TFBS (G126C/T, G306C, and C479T). Those mutations that were not present in previously determined TFBS were statistically significant in this study and were most frequent in patients with low proviral load or in asymptomatic carriers. Although those mutations were not present in previously determined TFBS, one of those mutations (G306C/A) was present in an Sp-1 binding site determined by in silico analysis, and its presence abrogated the site for Sp-1 binding and created a new possible ATF binding site.

  19. Evidence against Extracellular Exposure of a Highly Immunogenic Region in the C-Terminal Domain of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Transmembrane Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postler, Thomas S.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Yuste, Eloísa

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called “Kennedy epitope,” that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we show analogous, robust antibody responses in simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques to a region of SIVmac239 envelope located in the C-terminal domain, which in the conventional model should be inside the cell. Sera from SIV-infected rhesus macaques consistently reacted with overlapping oligopeptides corresponding to a region located within the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by the generally accepted model, at intensities comparable to those observed for immunodominant areas of the surface component gp120. Rabbit serum raised against this highly immunogenic region (HIR) reacted with SIV envelope in cell surface-staining experiments, as did monoclonal anti-HIR antibodies isolated from an SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque. However, control experiments demonstrated that this surface staining could be explained in whole or in part by the release of envelope protein from expressing cells into the supernatant and the subsequent attachment to the surfaces of cells in the culture. Serum and monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIR failed to neutralize even the highly neutralization-sensitive strain SIVmac316. Furthermore, a potential N-linked glycosylation site located close to the HIR and postulated to be outside the cell in the alternate model was not glycosylated. An artificially introduced glycosylation site within the HIR was also not utilized for glycosylation. Together, these data support the conventional model of SIV envelope as a type Ia

  20. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Tran Thi Tuyet; Zwart, Mark P; Phuong, Nguyen T; Oanh, Dang T H; de Jong, Mart C M; Vlak, Just M

    2012-06-13

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most variable. Here we examined the nature of these 2 indel regions in 313 WSSV-infected Penaeus monodon shrimp collected between 2006 and 2009 from 76 aquaculture ponds in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. In the Indel-I region, 2 WSSV genotypes with deletions of either 5950 or 6031 bp in length compared with that of a reference strain from Thailand (WSSV-TH-96-II) were detected. In the Indel-II region, 4 WSSV genotypes with deletions of 8539, 10970, 11049 or 11866 bp in length compared with that of a reference strain from Taiwan (WSSV-TW) were detected, and the 8539 and 10970 bp genotypes predominated. Indel-II variants with longer deletions were found to correlate statistically with WSSV-diseased shrimp originating from more intensive farming systems. Like Indel-I lengths, Indel-II lengths also varied based on the Mekong Delta province from which farmed shrimp were collected.

  1. Comparison of nucleotide sequence of p2C region in diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic Coxsacie virus B5 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Chong; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Ke, Guan-Ming; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chao, Mei-Chyn; Cheng, Jeng-Yin; Chen, Bai-Hsiun

    2004-11-01

    Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK) is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5) isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C protein gene (p2C) in 24 CVB5 isolates (4 diabetogenic, 18 non-diabetogenic and 2 prototype). We found 0.3-10% nucleotide differences. In the four isolates from type 1 DM patients, there was only 2.4-3.4% nucleotide difference, and there was only 1.7-7.1% nucleotide difference between type 1 DM isolates and non-diabetogenic isolates. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence between prototype virus and 22 CVB5 isolates revealed 18.4-24.1% difference. Twenty-one CVB5 isolates from type 1 DM and non-type 1 DM patients contained the PEVKEK sequence, as shown by the p2C nucleotide sequence. Our data showed that the viral p2C sequence with homology with GAD is highly conserved in CVB5 isolates. There was no difference between diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic CVB5 isolates. All four type 1 DM patients had at least one of the genetic susceptibility alleles HLA-DR, DQA1, DQB1. Other genetic and autoimmune factors such as HLA genetic susceptibility and GAD may also play important roles in the pathogenesis in type 1 DM.

  2. Comparison of Nucleotide Sequence of P2C Region in Diabetogenic and Non-Diabetogenic Coxsackie Virus B5 Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chong Chou

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5 isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C protein gene (p2C in 24 CVB5 isolates (4 diabetogenic, 18 non-diabetogenic and 2 prototype. We found 0.3-10% nucleotide differences. In the four isolates from type 1 DM patients, there was only 2.4-3.4% nucleotide difference, and there was only 1.7-7.1% nucleotide difference between type 1 DM isolates and non-diabetogenic isolates. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence between prototype virus and 22 CVB5 isolates revealed 18.4-24.1% difference. Twenty-one CVB5 isolates from type 1 DM and non-type 1 DM patients contained the PEVKEK sequence, as shown by the p2C nucleotide sequence. Our data showed that the viral p2C sequence with homology with GAD is highly conserved in CVB5 isolates. There was no difference between diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic CVB5 isolates. All four type 1 DM patients had at least one of the genetic susceptibility alleles HLA-DR, DQA1, DQB1. Other genetic and autoimmune factors such as HLA genetic susceptibility and GAD may also play important roles in the pathogenesis in type 1 DM.

  3. Report of the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP)--an investigation of the hypervariable STR loci ACTBP2, APOAI1 and D11S554 and the compound loci D12S391 and D1S1656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; d'Aloja, E; Dupuy, B

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of three collaborative exercises which continues the EDNAP theme to explore whether uniformity of DNA profiling results could be achieved between European laboratories using STRs. In an earlier exercise, complex hypervariable AAAG-repeat STR loci were investigated...

  4. An A14U Substitution in the 3' Noncoding Region of the M Segment of Viral RNA Supports Replication of Influenza Virus with an NS1 Deletion by Modulating Alternative Splicing of M Segment mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Wang, Pui; Song, Wenjun; Lau, Siu-Ying; Liu, Siwen; Huang, Xiaofeng; Mok, Bobo Wing-Yee; Liu, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yixin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Chen, Honglin

    2015-10-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus has multiple functions and is a determinant of virulence. Influenza viruses with NS1 deletions (DelNS1 influenza viruses) are a useful tool for studying virus replication and can serve as effective live attenuated vaccines, but deletion of NS1 severely diminishes virus replication, hampering functional studies and vaccine production. We found that WSN-DelNS1 viruses passaged in cells consistently adapted to gain an A14U substitution in the 3' noncoding region of the M segment of viral RNA (vRNA) which restored replicative ability. DelNS1-M-A14U viruses cannot inhibit interferon expression in virus infected-cells, providing an essential model for studying virus replication in the absence of the NS1 protein. Characterization of DelNS1-M-A14U virus showed that the lack of NS1 has no apparent effect on expression of other viral proteins, with the exception of M mRNAs. Expression of the M transcripts, M1, M2, mRNA3, and mRNA4, is regulated by alternative splicing. The A14U substitution changes the splicing donor site consensus sequence of mRNA3, altering expression of M transcripts, with M2 expression significantly increased and mRNA3 markedly suppressed in DelNS1-M-A14U, but not DelNS1-M-WT, virus-infected cells. Further analysis revealed that the A14U substitution also affects promoter function during replication of the viral genome. The M-A14U mutation increases M vRNA synthesis in DelNS1 virus infection and enhances alternative splicing of M2 mRNA in the absence of other viral proteins. The findings demonstrate that NS1 is directly involved in influenza virus replication through modulation of alternative splicing of M transcripts and provide strategic information important to construction of vaccine strains with NS1 deletions. Nonstructural protein (NS1) of influenza virus has multiple functions. Besides its role in antagonizing host antiviral activity, NS1 is also believed to be involved in regulating virus replication, but

  5. Serological evidence for Saint Louis encephalitis virus in free-ranging New World monkeys and horses within the upper Paraná River basin region, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walfrido Kühl Svoboda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV primarily occurs in the Americas and produces disease predominantly in humans. This study investigated the serological presence of SLEV in nonhuman primates and horses from southern Brazil. Methods From June 2004 to December 2005, sera from 133 monkeys (Alouatta caraya, n=43; Sapajus nigritus, n=64; Sapajus cay, n=26 trap-captured at the Paraná River basin region and 23 blood samples from farm horses were obtained and used for the serological detection of a panel of 19 arboviruses. All samples were analyzed in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay; positive monkey samples were confirmed in a mouse neutralization test (MNT. Additionally, all blood samples were inoculated into C6/36 cell culture for viral isolation. Results Positive seroreactivity was only observed for SLEV. A prevalence of SLEV antibodies in sera was detected in Alouatta caraya (11.6%; 5/43, Sapajus nigritus (12.5%; 8/64, and S. cay (30.8%; 8/26 monkeys with the HI assay. Of the monkeys, 2.3% (1/42 of A. caraya, 6.3% 94/64 of S. nigritus, and 15.4% (4/26 of S. cay were positive for SLEV in the MNT. Additionally, SLEV antibodies were detected by HI in 39.1% (9/23 of the horses evaluated in this study. Arboviruses were not isolated from any blood sample. Conclusions These results confirmed the presence of SLEV in nonhuman primates and horses from southern Brazil. These findings most likely represent the first detection of this virus in nonhuman primates beyond the Amazon region. The detection of SLEV in animals within a geographical region distant from the Amazon basin suggests that there may be widespread and undiagnosed dissemination of this disease in Brazil.

  6. Human rabies transmitted by vampire bats: antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from the Amazon region (Brazil and Ecuador).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Juliana Galera; Carnieli, Pedro; Durymanova, Ekaterina A; Fahl, Willian de Oliveira; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Macedo, Carla Isabel; da Rosa, Elizabeth Salbe Travassos; Mantilla, Anibal; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    Since 2004, the main transmitter of human rabies in Latin America has been the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). Based on the nucleoprotein of the rabies virus (RV), we analyzed antigenic and genetic profiles of isolates from 29 samples taken from humans living in different areas of the Amazon region. Two isolates were from Ecuador and 27 from the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil, which were obtained during outbreaks in various municipalities in the states of Pará and Maranhão in the years 2004 and 2005. The partial N gene (nt 104-1477) of the 29 isolates was sequenced, and the sequences were used to build a neighbor-joining tree with the Kimura-2 parameter model. All 29 human RV isolates were identified as belonging to antigenic variant 3 (AgV3) and were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster, which was divided into two subclusters (A and B), subcluster A in turn being divided into four genetic groups (A1, A2, A3 and A4). Genetic and molecular markers characterizing these genetic lineages were also identified. The results of this study show that the isolates belong to the same rabies cycle as that of the vampire bat D. rotundus. However, the division of clusters within the lineage associated with D. rotundus shows that different genetic sublineages of the virus were circulating in the Amazon region during the study period. Our findings suggest that there are phylogeographic differences between isolates obtained over a short period. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of hepatitis E virus in wild boars of rural and urban regions in Germany and whole genome characterization of an endemic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielke, Anika; Sachs, Katja; Lierz, Michael; Appel, Bernd; Jansen, Andreas; Johne, Reimar

    2009-05-14

    Hepatitis E is an increasingly diagnosed human disease in Central Europe. Besides domestic pigs, in which hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is highly prevalent, wild boars have been identified as a possible source of human infection. In order to assess the distribution of HEV in the wild boar population of Germany, we tested liver samples originating from different geographical regions for the presence of the HEV genome and compared the detected sequences to animal and human HEV strains. A total of 148 wild boar liver samples were tested using real-time RT-PCR resulting in an average HEV detection rate of 14.9% (95% CI 9.6-21.6). HEV was detected in all age classes and all geographical regions. However, the prevalence of HEV infection was significantly higher in rural as compared to urban regions (p wild boars in the federal state of Brandenburg was determined. It belongs to genotype 3i and shows 97.9% nucleotide sequence identity to a partial sequence derived from a human hepatitis E patient from Germany. The results indicate that wild boars have to be considered as a reservoir for HEV in Germany and that a risk of HEV transmission to humans is present in rural as well as urban regions.

  8. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor.

  9. Structural insights into the evolution of a sexy protein: novel topology and restricted backbone flexibility in a hypervariable pheromone from the red-legged salamander, Plethodon shermani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, Damien B; Bowen, Kathleen E; Doty, Kari A; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lane, Andrew N; Feldhoff, Pamela W; Feldhoff, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    In response to pervasive sexual selection, protein sex pheromones often display rapid mutation and accelerated evolution of corresponding gene sequences. For proteins, the general dogma is that structure is maintained even as sequence or function may rapidly change. This phenomenon is well exemplified by the three-finger protein (TFP) superfamily: a diverse class of vertebrate proteins co-opted for many biological functions - such as components of snake venoms, regulators of the complement system, and coordinators of amphibian limb regeneration. All of the >200 structurally characterized TFPs adopt the namesake "three-finger" topology. In male red-legged salamanders, the TFP pheromone Plethodontid Modulating Factor (PMF) is a hypervariable protein such that, through extensive gene duplication and pervasive sexual selection, individual male salamanders express more than 30 unique isoforms. However, it remained unclear how this accelerated evolution affected the protein structure of PMF. Using LC/MS-MS and multidimensional NMR, we report the 3D structure of the most abundant PMF isoform, PMF-G. The high resolution structural ensemble revealed a highly modified TFP structure, including a unique disulfide bonding pattern and loss of secondary structure, that define a novel protein topology with greater backbone flexibility in the third peptide finger. Sequence comparison, models of molecular evolution, and homology modeling together support that this flexible third finger is the most rapidly evolving segment of PMF. Combined with PMF sequence hypervariability, this structural flexibility may enhance the plasticity of PMF as a chemical signal by permitting potentially thousands of structural conformers. We propose that the flexible third finger plays a critical role in PMF:receptor interactions. As female receptors co-evolve, this flexibility may allow PMF to still bind its receptor(s) without the immediate need for complementary mutations. Consequently, this unique

  10. Structural insights into the evolution of a sexy protein: novel topology and restricted backbone flexibility in a hypervariable pheromone from the red-legged salamander, Plethodon shermani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien B Wilburn

    Full Text Available In response to pervasive sexual selection, protein sex pheromones often display rapid mutation and accelerated evolution of corresponding gene sequences. For proteins, the general dogma is that structure is maintained even as sequence or function may rapidly change. This phenomenon is well exemplified by the three-finger protein (TFP superfamily: a diverse class of vertebrate proteins co-opted for many biological functions - such as components of snake venoms, regulators of the complement system, and coordinators of amphibian limb regeneration. All of the >200 structurally characterized TFPs adopt the namesake "three-finger" topology. In male red-legged salamanders, the TFP pheromone Plethodontid Modulating Factor (PMF is a hypervariable protein such that, through extensive gene duplication and pervasive sexual selection, individual male salamanders express more than 30 unique isoforms. However, it remained unclear how this accelerated evolution affected the protein structure of PMF. Using LC/MS-MS and multidimensional NMR, we report the 3D structure of the most abundant PMF isoform, PMF-G. The high resolution structural ensemble revealed a highly modified TFP structure, including a unique disulfide bonding pattern and loss of secondary structure, that define a novel protein topology with greater backbone flexibility in the third peptide finger. Sequence comparison, models of molecular evolution, and homology modeling together support that this flexible third finger is the most rapidly evolving segment of PMF. Combined with PMF sequence hypervariability, this structural flexibility may enhance the plasticity of PMF as a chemical signal by permitting potentially thousands of structural conformers. We propose that the flexible third finger plays a critical role in PMF:receptor interactions. As female receptors co-evolve, this flexibility may allow PMF to still bind its receptor(s without the immediate need for complementary mutations. Consequently

  11. A computational approach identifies two regions of Hepatitis C Virus E1 protein as interacting domains involved in viral fusion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Sawaf Gamal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E1 protein of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV can be dissected into two distinct hydrophobic regions: a central domain containing an hypothetical fusion peptide (FP, and a C-terminal domain (CT comprising two segments, a pre-anchor and a trans-membrane (TM region. In the currently accepted model of the viral fusion process, the FP and the TM regions are considered to be closely juxtaposed in the post-fusion structure and their physical interaction cannot be excluded. In the present study, we took advantage of the natural sequence variability present among HCV strains to test, by purely sequence-based computational tools, the hypothesis that in this virus the fusion process involves the physical interaction of the FP and CT regions of E1. Results Two computational approaches were applied. The first one is based on the co-evolution paradigm of interacting peptides and consequently on the correlation between the distance matrices generated by the sequence alignment method applied to FP and CT primary structures, respectively. In spite of the relatively low random genetic drift between genotypes, co-evolution analysis of sequences from five HCV genotypes revealed a greater correlation between the FP and CT domains than respect to a control HCV sequence from Core protein, so giving a clear, albeit still inconclusive, support to the physical interaction hypothesis. The second approach relies upon a non-linear signal analysis method widely used in protein science called Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA. This method allows for a direct comparison of domains for the presence of common hydrophobicity patterns, on which the physical interaction is based upon. RQA greatly strengthened the reliability of the hypothesis by the scoring of a lot of cross-recurrences between FP and CT peptides hydrophobicity patterning largely outnumbering chance expectations and pointing to putative interaction sites. Intriguingly, mutations in the CT

  12. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition: N-Terminal Region of M-MuLV Integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Rongjin [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Aiyer, Sriram [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Cote, Marie L. [Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Xiao, Rong [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Jiang, Mei [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Acton, Thomas B. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Roth, Monica J. [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854

    2017-02-03

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1–44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45–105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1–105 (NTR1–105) and 8–105 (NTR8–105) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1–105 packs as a dimer and NTR8–105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn2+ binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn2+ binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647–656.

  13. A possible correlation between the host genetic background in the epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus in the Amazon region of Brazil

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    A. K. C. R. Santos

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon region of Brazil is an area of great interest because of the large distribution of hepatitis B virus in specific Western areas. Seven urban communities and 24 Indian groups were visited in a total of 4,244 persons. Each individual was interviewed in order to obtain demographic and familial information. Whole blood was collected for serology and genetic determinations. Eleven genetic markers and three HBV markers were tested. Among the most relevant results it was possible to show that (i there was a large variation of previous exposure to HBV in both urban and non-urban groups ranging from 0 to 59.2%; (ii there was a different pattern of epidemiological distribution of HBV that was present even among a same linguistic Indian group, with mixed patterns of correlation between HBsAg and anti-HBs and (iii the prevalence of HBV markers (HBsAg and anti-HBs were significantly higher (P=0.0001 among the Indian population (18.8% than the urban groups (12.5%. Its possible that the host genetic background could influence and modulate the replication of the virus in order to generate HB carrier state.

  14. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

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    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  15. Molecular cloning and recombinant expression of the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region from a brazilian white spot syndrome virus isolate

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    Patricia Braunig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fragment of the VP28 coding sequence from a Brazilian WSSV isolate (BrVP28 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 pLysS strain in order to produce the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression resulted in a protein of about 21 kDa, which was purified under denaturing conditions, resulting in a final highly purified BrVP28 preparation. The recombinant protein obtained can be used in several biotechnology applications, such as the production of monoclonal antibodies which could be used in the development of diagnostic tools as well as in the studies on the characterization of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV isolated in Brazil.

  16. Virus like particle based strategy to elicit HIV-protective antibodies to the alpha-helic regions of gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastori, C; Tudor, D; Diomede, L; Drillet, A S; Jegerlehner, A; Röhn, T A; Bomsel, M; Lopalco, L

    Natural antibodies to gp41 inhibit HIV-1 replication through the recognition of two different regions, corresponding to the leucine zipper motif in the HR1 alpha-helix and to another motif within HR2 region, hosting 2F5 and 4E10 epitope. This study aimed at reproducing such protective responses through VLP vaccination. Six regions covering the alpha-helical regions of gp41 were conjugated to the surface of AP205 phage-based VLPs. Once administered in mice via systemic or mucosal route, these immunogens elicited high titers of gp41-specific IgG. Immunogenicity and HIV infectivity reduction were obtained either with HR2 regions or with peptides where aminoacid strings were added to either the C-terminus or N-terminus of core epitope in HR1 region. Antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity was induced by one of the HR2 epitopes only. These results may have relevant implications for the development of new vaccinal approaches against HIV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The pathogenicity determinant of Citrus tristeza virus causing the seedling yellows syndrome maps at the 3'-terminal region of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiach-Marti, Maria R; Robertson, Cecile; Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Belliure, Belén; Garnsey, Stephen M; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of some isolates of CTV is the ability to induce seedling yellows (SY) in sour orange, lemon and grapefruit seedlings. In Florida, the decline isolate of CTV, T36, induces SY, whereas a widely distributed mild isolate, T30, does not. To delimit the viral sequences associated with the SY syndrome, we created a number of T36/T30 hybrids by substituting T30 sequences into different regions of the 3' half of the genome of an infectious cDNA of T36. Eleven T36/T30 hybrids replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts. Five of these hybrids formed viable virions that were mechanically transmitted to Citrus macrophylla, a permissive host for CTV. All induced systemic infections, similar to that of the parental T36 clone. Tissues from these C. macrophylla source plants were then used to graft inoculate sour orange and grapefruit seedlings. Inoculation with three of the T30/T36 hybrid constructs induced SY symptoms identical to those of T36; however, two hybrids with T30 substitutions in the p23-3' nontranslated region (NTR) (nucleotides 18 394-19 296) failed to induce SY. Sour orange seedlings infected with a recombinant non-SY p23-3' NTR hybrid also remained symptomless when challenged with the parental virus (T36), demonstrating the potential feasibility of using engineered constructs of CTV to mitigate disease.

  18. Evolution of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid coding (P1) region on a timescale of three decades in an endemic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswajit; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pande, Veena; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Sanyal, Aniket

    2016-07-01

    Three decades-long (1977-2013) evolutionary trend of the capsid coding (P1) region of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A isolated in India was analysed. The exclusive presence of genotype 18 since 2001 and the dominance of the VP3(59)-deletion group of genotype 18 was evident in the recent years. Clade 18c was found to be currently the only active one among the three clades (18a, 18b and 18c) identified in the deletion group. The rate of evolution of the Indian isolates at the capsid region was found to be 4.96×10(-3)substitutions/site/year. The timescale analysis predicted the most recent common ancestor to have existed during 1962 for Indian FMDV serotype A and around 1998 for the deletion group. The evolutionary pattern of serotype A in India appears to be homogeneous as no spatial or temporal structure was observed. Bayesian skyline plots indicate a sharp decline in the effective number of infections after 2008, which might be a result of mass vaccination or inherent loss of virus fitness. Analyses of variability at 38 known antigenically critical positions in a countrywide longitudinal data set suggested that the substitutions neither followed any specific trend nor remained fixed for a long period since frequent reversions and convergence was noticed. A maximum of 6 different amino acid residues was seen in the gene pool at any antigenically critical site over the decades, suggesting a limited combination of residues being responsible for the observed antigenic variation. Evidence of positive selection at some of the antigenically critical residues and the structurally proximal positions suggest a possible role of pre-existing immunity in the host population in driving evolution. The VP1 C-terminus neither revealed variability nor positive selection, suggesting the possibility that this stretch does not contribute to the antigenic variation and adaptation under immune selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional differences in the management and outcome of kidney transplantation in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: A 3-year retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristelli, Marina P; Cofán, Federico; Tedesco-Silva, Helio; Trullàs, Joan Carles; Santos, Daniel Wagner C L; Manzardo, Christian; Agüero, Fernando; Moreno, Asunción; Oppenheimer, Federico; Diekmann, Fritz; Medina-Pestana, Jose O; Miro, Jose Maria

    2017-08-01

    In the developed world, kidney transplantation (KT) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is well established. Developing countries concentrate 90% of the people living with HIV, but their experience is underreported. Regional differences may affect outcomes. We compared the 3-year outcomes of patients with HIV infection receiving a KT in two different countries, in terms of incomes and development. This was an observational, retrospective, double-center study, including all HIV-infected patients >18 years old undergoing KT. Between 2005 and 2015, 54 KTs were performed (39 in a Brazilian center, and 15 in a Spanish center). Brazilians had less hepatitis C virus co-infection (5% vs 27%, P=.024). Median cold ischemia time was higher in Brazil (25 vs 18 hours, P=.001). Biopsy-proven acute rejection (AR) was higher in Brazil (33% vs 13%, P=.187), as were the number of AR episodes (22 vs 4, P=.063). Patient survival at 3 years was 91.3% in Brazil and 100% in Spain; P=.663. All three cases of death in Brazil were a result of bacterial infections within the first year post transplant. At 3 years, survival free from immunosuppressive changes was lower in Brazil (56% vs 90.9%, P=.036). Raltegravir-based treatment to avoid interaction with calcineurin inhibitor was more prevalent in Spain (80% vs 3%; P<.001). HIV infection remained under control in all patients, with undetectable viral load and no opportunistic infections. Important regional differences exist in the demographics and management of immunosuppression and antiretroviral therapy. These details may influence AR and infectious complications. Non-AIDS infections leading to early mortality in Brazil deserve special attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Biosurveillance of avian influenza and Newcastle disease viruses in the Barda region of Azerbaijan using real time RT-PCR and hemagglutination inhibition

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    Shalala eZeynalova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Azerbaijan State Veterinary Control Service (SVCS has conducted active serological surveillance for avian influenza (AI in poultry since 2006, when the first outbreak of AI H5N1 occurred in Azerbaijan. Samples are collected from September to May annually and tested using a hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay to detect antibodies against H5 AI viruses. HI testing is also performed for Newcastle disease virus (NDV upon request, but since this method cannot distinguish between natural infections and immune responses to vaccination, all positive results require follow-up epidemiological investigations. Furthermore, blood collection for the surveillance program is time-intensive and can be stressful to birds. In order to improve the national surveillance program, alternative sampling and testing methodologies were applied among a population of birds in the Barda region and compared with results of the national surveillance program. Tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected instead of blood. Rather than testing individual samples, RNA was pooled to conserve resources and time, and pools were tested by real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR. Environmental sampling at a live bird market was also introduced as another surveillance mechanism. A total of 1,030 swabs were collected, comprising tracheal and cloacal samples from 441 birds and 148 environmental surface samples from farms or the live bird market. During the same time, 3,890 blood samples were collected nationally for the surveillance program; 400 of these samples originated in the Barda region. Birds sampled for rRT-PCR were likely different than those tested as part of national surveillance. All swab samples tested negative by rRT-PCR for both AI and NDV. All blood samples tested negative for H5 by HI, while 6.2% of all samples and 5% of the Barda samples tested positive for exposure to NDV. Follow-up investigations found that positive samples were from birds vaccinated in the

  1. Surveillance of Arthropod-Borne Viruses and Their Vectors in the Mediterranean and Black Sea Regions Within the MediLabSecure Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failloux, Anna-Bella; Bouattour, Ali; Faraj, Chafika; Gunay, Filiz; Haddad, Nabil; Harrat, Zoubir; Jancheska, Elizabeta; Kanani, Khalil; Kenawy, Mohamed Amin; Kota, Majlinda; Pajovic, Igor; Paronyan, Lusine; Petric, Dusan; Sarih, Mhammed; Sawalha, Samir; Shaibi, Taher; Sherifi, Kurtesh; Sulesco, Tatiana; Velo, Enkelejda; Gaayeb, Lobna; Victoir, Kathleen; Robert, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Arboviruses, viruses transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and fleas are a significant threat to public health because of their epidemic and zoonotic potential. The geographical distribution of mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile (WN), Rift Valley fever (RVF), Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika has expanded over the last decades. Countries of the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions are not spared. Outbreaks of WN are repeatedly reported in the Mediterranean basin. Human cases of RVF were reported at the southern borders of the Maghreb region. For this reason, establishing the basis for the research to understand the potential for the future emergence of these and other arboviruses and their expansion into new geographic areas became a public health priority. In this context, the European network "MediLabSecure" gathering laboratories in 19 non-EU countries from the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions seeks to improve the surveillance (of animals, humans, and vectors) by reinforcing capacity building and harmonizing national surveillance systems to address this important human and veterinary health issue. The aim of this review is to give an exhaustive overview of arboviruses and their vectors in the region. The data presented underline the importance of surveillance in the implementation of more adapted control strategies to combat vector-borne diseases. Partner laboratories within the MediLabSecure network present a wide range of infrastructures and have benefited from different training programs. Although reporting of arboviral presence is not carried out in a systematic manner, the expansion of the area where arboviruses are present cannot be disputed. This reinforces the need for increasing surveillance capacity building in this region to prevent future emergences.

  2. Mutation analysis of hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase region among untreated chronically infected patients in Ahvaz city (South-West of Iran

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    M Hamidi-Fard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been revealed that mutations can occur spontaneously and naturally in HBV reverse transcriptase (RT region among untreated patients. These HBV mutants pre-exist as minor viral population in naive patients and can emerge as major viral population, conferring drug resistance and treatment failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate and identify prevalent mutations of RT region of hepatitis B virus genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB untreated with antiviral drugs in South-West of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 cases with CHB who did not receive the treatment of lamivudine and any other antivirus drugs within the last one year were randomly chosen. After sample collection and HBV DNA extraction, RT region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Then PCR products were sequenced and HBV RT region mutations and amino acid changes were analyzed either manually or using web-based programs, on the basis of comparison of the obtained sequences with a set of HBV reference sequences. Results: A total of 23 (51.1% mutations and amino acid changes were detected in studied 45 untreated patients. Of these, 3 (6.6% patients had primary resistance mutation (rtM204I, rtA181T and rtA181S and 20 (44.4% patients had secondary resistance mutations. Conclusion: High prevalence of mutations was found in HBV RT region of untreated patients. Most of these mutations were associated with resistance to adefovir and one patient had primary resistance mutation to lamivudine. Awareness of these resistance patterns might help in the antiviral therapy and for predicting clinical outcomes.

  3. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Aris; Ermawati, Ratna; Wati, Vera; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Wijayanti, Nastiti

    2016-01-01

    Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2) encoding gene of AE virus (AEV) from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/µl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with sample code 499/4/12. The sensitivity rate of RT-PCR is to amplify

  4. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

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    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

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    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C

  6. Avian influenza virus wild bird surveillance in the Azov and Black Sea regions of Ukraine (2010-2011)

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    The Azov and Black Sea basins are part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from Northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa and Southwest Asia. These regions constitute an area of transit, stops during migration, and nesting for many different bird species. From September ...

  7. Interaction Research on the Antiviral Molecule Dufulin Targeting on Southern Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus P9-1 Nonstructural Protein

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    Zhenchao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV causes severe harm to rice production. Unfortunately, studies on effective antiviral drugs against SRBSDV and interaction mechanism of antiviral molecule targeting on SRBSDV have not been reported. This study found dufulin (DFL, an ideal anti-SRBSDV molecule, and investigated the interactions of DFL targeting on the nonstructural protein P9-1. The biological sequence information and bonding characterization of DFL to four kinds of P9-1 protein were described with fluorescence titration (FT and microscale thermophoresis (MST assays. The sequence analysis indicated that P9-1 had highly-conserved C- and N-terminal amino acid residues and a hypervariable region that differed from 131 aa to 160 aa. Consequently, wild-type (WT-His-P9-1, 23 C-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔC23-His-P9-1, 6 N-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔN6-His-P9-1, and Ser138 site-directed (MU-138-His-P9-1 mutant proteins were expressed. The FT and MST assay results indicated that DFL bounded to WT-His-P9-1 with micromole affinity and the 23 C-terminal amino acids were the potential targeting site. This system, which combines a complete sequence analysis, mutant protein expression, and binding action evaluating system, could further advance the understanding of the interaction abilities between antiviral drugs and their targets.

  8. Neuropathologic features of Aleutian disease in farmed mink in Ireland and molecular characterization of Aleutian mink disease virus detected in brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, Hanne; Daly, Paul; McElroy, Maire C; Sammin, Donal J; Bassett, Hugh F; Callanan, John J

    2010-01-01

    A neuropathologic survey was conducted on mink brains from the 5 licensed mink farms in Ireland. The survey was part of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy surveillance study. Aleutian disease (AD) was present on 4 of the 5 farms (80%). Neuropathologic features of nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis were common in mink from the 4 affected farms but were absent in the mink from the fifth farm, which was free of AD. The meningoencephalitis was characterized by infiltrates of lymphocytes and plasma cells, which were present in meninges, perivascular spaces, and the brain parenchyma. Fibrinoid necrotizing arteritis was seen in 11 mink brains, all of which were obtained from a single farm. Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) sequences for the capsid protein VP2 were obtained from brain samples from all affected farms. Although containing previously unreported amino acid residues, similarities with European and North American isolates were observed in the hypervariable regions within VP2, suggesting Irish AMDV is related to those isolates. The predicted amino acid residues, suspected of conferring pathogenicity at certain positions of the VP2 sequence, were present in the viral nucleic acid sequences.

  9. Associations between responses to interferon therapy and genetic variation in interleukin-28B and the core region of hepatitis C virus genotype 3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keiichi; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of interleukin-28B (IL-28B) and mutations in the core region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b have been associated with response to interferon (IFN) therapy. However, whether this IL-28B SNP affects responses to INF therapy for HCV genotype 3a is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate whether this IL-28B SNP (rs8099917) and specific missense mutations in the HCV core region affect the response to IFN therapy for HCV genotype 3a. Patients (n = 19; median age 44.5) infected with HCV genotype 3a who received IFN therapy were studied. Of the 19 patients, 12 (63.1%) achieved sustained virological response. Of those 12 patients, 11 had the TT genotype (11/16; 68.7%), and one had the TG genotype (1/3; 33.3%). The difference in the sustained virological response rate between IL-28B genotype groups was not significant (P = 0.5232). HCV core region was well conserved; however, polymorphisms at position 72 were identified. Of the 19 HCV samples; 15 carried a glutamic acid at position 72, and these were defined as E type; the others (4/19) were defined as non-E type. Notably, there was a significant difference in the sustained virological response rate between E type and non-E-type; 12 of the 15 patients with E-type achieved sustained virological response, but none of the four patients with non-E-type achieved sustained virological response (P = 0.009). A glutamic acid at position 72 in the core region of HCV genotype 3a was associated with a good response to IFN therapy. J. Med. Virol. 87:1361-1367, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Flexibility between the protease and helicase domains of the dengue virus NS3 protein conferred by the linker region and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dahai; Wei, Na; Doan, Danny N; Paradkar, Prasad N; Chong, Yuwen; Davidson, Andrew D; Kotaka, Masayo; Lescar, Julien; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2010-06-11

    The dengue virus (DENV) NS3 protein is essential for viral polyprotein processing and RNA replication. It contains an N-terminal serine protease region (residues 1-168) joined to an RNA helicase (residues 180-618) by an 11-amino acid linker (169-179). The structure at 3.15 A of the soluble NS3 protein from DENV4 covalently attached to 18 residues of the NS2B cofactor region (NS2B(18)NS3) revealed an elongated molecule with the protease domain abutting subdomains I and II of the helicase (Luo, D., Xu, T., Hunke, C., Grüber, G., Vasudevan, S. G., and Lescar, J. (2008) J. Virol. 82, 173-183). Unexpectedly, using similar crystal growth conditions, we observed an alternative conformation where the protease domain has rotated by approximately 161 degrees with respect to the helicase domain. We report this new crystal structure bound to ADP-Mn(2+) refined to a resolution of 2.2 A. The biological significance for interdomain flexibility conferred by the linker region was probed by either inserting a Gly residue between Glu(173) and Pro(174) or replacing Pro(174) with a Gly residue. Both mutations resulted in significantly lower ATPase and helicase activities. We next increased flexibility in the linker by introducing a Pro(176) to Gly mutation in a DENV2 replicon system. A 70% reduction in luciferase reporter signal and a similar reduction in the level of viral RNA synthesis were observed. Our results indicate that the linker region has evolved to an optimum length to confer flexibility to the NS3 protein that is required both for polyprotein processing and RNA replication.

  11. Intracellular trafficking of bio-nanocapsule-liposome complex: Identification of fusogenic activity in the pre-S1 region of hepatitis B virus surface antigen L protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somiya, Masaharu; Sasaki, Yasuo; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Liu, Qiushi; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés Daniel; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2015-08-28

    Bio-nanocapsules (BNCs) are a hollow nanoparticle consisting of about 100-nm liposome (LP) embedding about 110 molecules of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) L protein as a transmembrane protein. Owing to the human hepatocyte-recognizing domains on the N-terminal region (pre-S1 region), BNCs have recently been shown to attach and enter into human hepatic cells using the early infection mechanism of HBV. Since BNCs could form a complex with an LP containing various drugs and genes, BNC-LP complexes have been used as a human hepatic cell-specific drug and gene-delivery system in vitro and in vivo. However, the role of BNCs in cell entry and intracellular trafficking of payloads in BNC-LP complexes has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that low pH-dependent fusogenic activity resides in the N-terminal part of pre-S1 region (NPLGFFPDHQLDPAFG), of which the first FF residues are essential for the activity, and which facilitates membrane fusion between LPs in vitro. Moreover, BNC-LP complexes can bind human hepatic cells specifically, enter into the cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and release their payloads mostly into the cytoplasm. Taken together, the BNC portion of BNC-LP complexes can induce membrane fusion between LPs and endosomal membranes under low pH conditions, and thereby facilitate the endosomal escape of payloads. Furthermore, the fusogenic domain of the pre-S1 region of HBsAg L protein may play a pivotal role in the intracellular trafficking of not only BNC-LP complexes but also of HBV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-scale sequence analysis of hemagglutinin of influenza A virus identifies conserved regions suitable for targeting an anti-viral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahini, Leepakshi; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Agarwal, Ritu

    2010-02-17

    Influenza A viral surface protein, hemagglutinin, is the major target of neutralizing antibody response and hence a main constituent of all vaccine formulations. But due to its marked evolutionary variability, vaccines have to be reformulated so as to include the hemagglutinin protein from the emerging new viral strain. With the constant fear of a pandemic, there is critical need for the development of anti-viral strategies that can provide wider protection against any Influenza A pathogen. An anti-viral approach that is directed against the conserved regions of the hemaggutinin protein has a potential to protect against any current and new Influenza A virus and provide a solution to this ever-present threat to public health. Influenza A human hemagglutinin protein sequences available in the NCBI database, corresponding to H1, H2, H3 and H5 subtypes, were used to identify highly invariable regions of the protein. Nine such regions were identified and analyzed for structural properties like surface exposure, hydrophilicity and residue type to evaluate their suitability for targeting an anti-peptide antibody/anti-viral response. This study has identified nine conserved regions in the hemagglutinin protein, five of which have the structural characteristics suitable for an anti-viral/anti-peptide response. This is a critical step in the design of efficient anti-peptide antibodies as novel anti-viral agents against any Influenza A pathogen. In addition, these anti-peptide antibodies will provide broadly cross-reactive immunological reagents and aid the rapid development of vaccines against new and emerging Influenza A strains.

  13. The risk of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission: hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg prevalence estimates for all world regions

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    Ott Jördis J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HBeAg presence in childbearing-age women is a major determinant of perinatal hepatitis B virus (HBV transmission. The risk of developing chronic HBV infection and liver disease is highest at young age. Our aim was to assess perinatal HBV transmission risk by means of estimating age- and region-specific HBeAg prevalence. Methods Based on observed HBeAg seroprevalence data obtained from a systematic literature review, we modeled HBeAg prevalence using an empirical Bayesian hierarchical model. Age- and region-specific estimates were generated for 1990 and 2005. Results Globally, highest HBeAg prevalence of over 50 % was found in 0–9 years old girls. At reproductive age, HBeAg prevalence was 20-50 %. Prevalence was highest in young females in East Asia in 1990 (78 %, the infection was less common in Sub-Saharan and North Africa. Regional differences in prevalence were smaller in 2005. There was an overall decrease in HBeAg between 1990 and 2005, which was strongest among girls in Oceania (23.3 % decline, South and South-East Asia (14 % decline. However, in these regions, prevalence remained high at 67 % among young females in 2005. Smaller decreases were observed in women at reproductive age, at which 24-32 % of all HBsAg-positive women were HBeAg-positive in 2005, with lowest prevalence in Southern Sub-Saharan Africa and highest prevalence in Oceania and South-East Asia. Conclusions HBeAg estimates are crucial for understanding the epidemiology of HBV and for prioritizing implementation of WHO`s prevention recommendations for all infants to receive the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine within 24 hours of birth. Results will have importance as access to treatment for chronic HBV infection is expanded.

  14. A 38 nt region and its flanking sequences within gag of Friend murine leukemia virus are crucial for splicing at the correct 5' and 3' splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinaga, Akihito; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the Friend murine leukemia virus (Fr-MLV) contains a 5' splice site (5'ss) located at 205 nt and a 3'ss located at 5489 nt. In our previous studies, it was shown that if the HindIII-BglII (879-1904 bp) fragment within gag is deleted from the proA8m1 vector, which carries the entire Fr-MLV sequence, then cryptic splicing of env-mRNA occurs. Here, attempts were made to identify the genomic segment(s) in this region that is/are essential to correct splicing. First, vectors with a serially truncated HindIII-BglII fragment were constructed. The vector, in which a 38 bp fragment (1612-1649 bp) is deleted or reversed in proA8m1, only produced splice variants. It was found that a 38 nt region within gag contains important elements that positively regulate splicing at the correct splice sites. Further analyses of a series of vectors carrying the 38 bp fragment and its flanking sequences showed that a region (1183-1611 nt) upstream of the 38 nt fragment also contains sequences that positively or negatively influence splicing at the correct splice sites. The SphI-NdeI (5140-5400 bp) fragment just upstream of the 3'ss was deleted from vectors that carried the 38 bp fragment and its flanking sequences, which yielded correctly spliced mRNA; interestingly, these deleted vectors showed cryptic splicing. These findings suggest that the 5140-5400 nt region located just upstream of the 3'ss is required for the splicing function of the 38 nt fragment and its flanking sequences. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The impact of social factors on human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus co-infection in a minority region of Si-chuan, the People's Republic of China: a population-based survey and testing study.

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    Caiting Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV studies have been performed in Liangshan, most were focused only on HIV infection and based on a sampling survey. In order to fully understand HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV prevalence and related risk factors in this region, this study implemented in 2009, included a survey, physical examination, HIV and HCV test in two towns. METHODS: All residents in two towns of the Butuo county were provided a physical examination and blood tests for HIV and HCV, and then followed by an interview for questionnaire. RESULTS: In total, 10,104 residents (92.4% were enrolled and 9,179 blood samples were collected for HIV and HCV testing, 6,072 were from individuals >14 years old. The rates of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV co-infection were 11.4%, 14.0%, and 7.7%, respectively for >14-year-old residents. The 25-34 yr age group had the highest prevalence of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV co-infections, reaching 24.4%, 26.2% and 16.0%, respectively. Overall, males had a much higher prevalence of all infections than females (HIV: 16.3% vs. 6.8%, HCV: 24.6% vs. 3.9%, HIV/HCV co-infected: 14.7% vs. 1.1%, respectively; P = 0.000. Approximately half of intravenous drug users tested positive for HIV (48.7% and 68.4% tested positive for HCV. Logistic regression analysis showed that five factors were significantly associated with HIV and HCV infection: gender (odds ratio [OR]  = 5.8, education (OR = 2.29; occupation (student as reference; farmer: OR = 5.02, migrant worker: OR = 6.12; drug abuse (OR = 18.0; and multiple sexual partners (OR = 2.92. Knowledge of HIV was not associated with infection. CONCLUSION: HIV and HCV prevalence in the Liangshan region is very serious and drug use, multiple sexual partners, and low education levels were the three main risk factors. The government should focus on improving education and personal health awareness while enhancing drug control programs.

  16. A study of the hematological profile of human immunodeficiency virus positive patients in coastal South Indian region

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    Debarshi Saha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In India, approximately 6 million populations are affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Anemia and leukopenia, especially thrombocytopenia is seen commonly in HIV infections. Low CD4+ count and increased viral load are some of the factors associated with increased risk of thrombocytopenia. We analyzed the hematological profile in a group of 150 HIV infected patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective and prospective study of medical records of 150 HIV positive patients at Clinical Pathology laboratory at our institution was done between August 1 st and October 15 th, 2011 using nonrandom sampling. Hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit, red cell indices, total leukocyte and differential count, CD4+ and platelet count were noted. Results: Of the 150 patients, 40 (26.67% were below age 10 and 98 (65.33% in 21-50 years age group. Eighty-six (57.33% were females. Hundred patients had anemia (Hb <12 g/dl of which 58% were microcytic hypochromic (MCHC. Eighteen patients had leukopenia along with anemia. Total number of patients with low CD4 count (<200/μL was 32 (21.33% and all had hematological abnormalities, mostly anemias with few leukopenia and thrombocytopenias. All patients with pancytopenia had low CD4+ counts. Total number of patients with thrombocytopenia (<1.5 lacs/dl was 20 (13.33%. Four patients (2.67% had pancytopenia. Conclusions: MCHC anemia is the most common morphological variant of anemia. Leukopenia was found to be consistently associated with anemia. Thus, anemia and to a greater extent leukopenia are bad prognostic indicators of disease. Pancytopenia may herald a low CD4+ count.

  17. Lymph node tuberculosis in patients from regions with varying burdens of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenbergh, Philippe; Maitrepierre, Isabelle; Simoneau, Guy; Raskine, Laurent; Magnier, Jean-Dominique; Sanson-Le-Pors, Marie-José; Bergmann, Jean-François; Sellier, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Few large cohorts of patients with lymph node tuberculosis (LNTB) have been reported in developed countries. To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of LNTB in patients living in France but born and raised in geographic areas with varying burdens of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A retrospective study of all patients with bacteriologically-proven LNTB assessed in a French hospital from March 1996 through April 2005. The analysis included 92 patients. HIV coinfected patients had a higher risk than those without HIV of presenting with disseminated TB and systemic symptoms and of hospitalization. Lymph node diagnostic procedures had a high yield when samples were cultured. About 25% of patients had an abnormal chest radiograph, and most of them were positive for acid-fast bacilli on sputum smears or for Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. Treatment was generally prescribed for a longer duration than that recommended by international guidelines. One quarter of the patients developed a paradoxical reaction. A high proportion of our patients were classified as nonadherent and 20% defaulted or were lost to follow-up. Most of the differences in the clinical presentation among patients from various geographic areas were driven by the epidemiology of TB and HIV in the countries of origin. LNTB is frequently a clinical sign of disseminated disease, and culture for M. tuberculosis from LN or other sites is crucial for diagnosis. Adopting the strategy of Directly Observed Treatment, Short course (DOTS) might reduce the rates of nonadherence and default. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A relationship between dengue virus serotype and the clinical severity in paediatric patients from Gondokusuman region, Yogyakarta between 1995 and 1999

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    Sri Poeranto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Dengue infection occurs almost all over subtropical and tropical countries. Dengue pathogenesis explaining its clinical manifestations is still unclear. Indonesia is a country with several hyperendemic regions. The study was aimed to investigate the incidence rate, sero-epidemiology, and the relationship between the serotype and the clinical severity of dengue viral infection in paediatric patients from Gondokusuman, Yogyakarta. Material and methods: It was an epidemiological research with prospective observational design reviewing febrile paediatric patients involved in “A Prospective Sero-epidemiology Study on Dengue Children Infection in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 1995–1999 cohort study.” Febrile paediatric patients were diagnosed for dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, or dengue shock syndrome based on World Health Organization 1997 criteria. Serological diagnosis was performed using PRNT and serotype identification was performed by viral culture isolation and RT-PCR. Results: Laboratory data (PRNT, ELISA, RT-PCR and Isolation showed that there were 220 children (130 males and 90 females from 509 febrile patients among 2,149 paediatric subjects who were infected with dengue virus. Based on serotype identification, the following dengue virus serotype distributions were identified: DEN-1 26.81%, DEN-2 23.18%, DEN-3 22.72%, DEN-4 8.63%, and unidentified 18.63%. Clinical severities observed were as follows: dengue fever 78.6%, dengue haemorrhagic fever 18.2%, and dengue shock syndrome 3.2%. In the case of primary infection, only DEN-3 could cause severe clinical manifestations. Conclusions: Gondokusuman region in Yogyakarta could be classified as a hyperendemic region between 1995 and 1999, with the highest risk of severe clinical manifestations shown for DEN-3 during both, primary and secondary infection.

  19. Promoter activity associated with the intergenic regions of banana bunchy top virus DNA-1 to -6 in transgenic tobacco and banana cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, B; Beetham, P R; Becker, D K; Harding, R M; Dale, J L

    1998-10-01

    Promoter regions associated with each of the six ssDNA components of banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) have been characterized. DNA segments incorporating the intergenic regions of BBTV DNA-1 to -6 were isolated and fused to the uidA (beta-glucuronidase) reporter gene to assess promoter activity. In tobacco cell suspensions, the BBTV DNA-2 and -6 promoters generated levels of GUS expression 2-fold greater and similar to the 800 bp CaMV 35S promoter, respectively. Deletion analysis of the BBTV DNA-6 promoter suggested all the necessary promoter elements required for strong expression were located within 239 nucleotides upstream of the translational start codon. In transgenic tobacco plants, the BBTV-derived promoters generally provided a weak, tissue-specific GUS expression pattern restricted to phloem-associated cells. However, in callus derived from tobacco leaf tissue, GUS expression directed by the BBTV DNA-6 promoter was strong and, in some lines, comparable to the CaMV 35S promoter. Detectable promoter activity associated with the BBTV promoters in banana embryogenic cells was only observed using a sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Promoters derived from BBTV DNA-4 and -5 generated the highest levels of transient activity, which were greater than that of the maize ubi-1 promoter. In transgenic banana plants, the activity of the BBTV DNA-6 promoter was restricted to the phloem of leaves and roots, stomata and root meristems.

  20. Mapping regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB) important for fusion function with gH/gL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Aileen E.; Reimer, Jessica J.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Glycoproteins gB and gH/gL are required for entry of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into cells, but the role of each glycoprotein and how they function together to mediate fusion is unclear. Analysis of the functional homology of gB from the closely related primate gammaherpesvirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus (Rh-LCV), showed that EBV gB could not complement Rh gB due to a species-specific dependence between gB and gL. To map domains of gB required for this interaction, we constructed a panel of EBV/Rh gB chimeric proteins. Analysis showed that insertion of Rh gB from residues 456-807 restored fusion function of EBV gB with Rh gH/gL, suggesting this region of gB is important for interaction with gH/gL. Split YFP bimolecular complementation (BiFC) provided evidence of an interaction between EBV gB and gH/gL. Together, our results suggest the importance of a gB-gH/gL interaction in EBV-mediated fusion with B cells requiring the region of EBV gB from 456-807. PMID:21376360

  1. A systematic review of Hepatitis C virus treatment uptake among people who inject drugs in the European Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Maticic, Mojca

    2014-01-01

    if they presented original research findings about hepatitis C treatment uptake levels among people who reported injecting drugs currently or formerly, as well as those who reported using drugs currently or formerly (mode of consumption not specified). Treatment uptake data were extracted if uptake was measurable......BACKGROUND: Fifteen million adults in the World Health Organization European Region are estimated to have active hepatitis C infection. Intravenous drug use is a major hepatitis C transmission route in this region, and people who inject drugs (PWID) constitute a high-risk and high......-prevalence population. A systematic review was conducted to assess levels of hepatitis C treatment uptake among PWID in Europe. METHODS: Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE were carried out for articles in any language published between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012. Articles were included in the review...

  2. The 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 mRNA Enables Cap-Independent Translation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Eduardo; Landry, Dori M.; Cáceres, C. Joaquín; Pino, Karla; Rossi, Federico; Navarrete, Camilo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex human retrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia and of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The mRNA of some complex retroviruses, including the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV), can initiate translation using a canonical cap-dependent mechanism or through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, we present strong evidence showing that like HIV-1 and SIV, the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA harbors an IRES. Cap-independent translational activity was evaluated and demonstrated using dual luciferase bicistronic mRNAs in rabbit reticulocyte lysate, in mammalian cell culture, and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Characterization of the HTLV-1 IRES shows that its activity is dependent on the ribosomal protein S25 (RPS25) and that its function is highly sensitive to the drug edeine. Together, these findings suggest that the 5′UTR of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA enables internal recruitment of the eukaryotic translation initiation complex. However, the recognition of the initiation codon requires ribosome scanning. These results suggest that, after internal recruitment by the HTLV-1 IRES, a scanning step takes place for the 40S ribosomal subunit to be positioned at the translation initiation codon. IMPORTANCE The mechanism by which retroviral mRNAs recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit internally is not understood. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of translation initiation used by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The results show that the HTLV-1 mRNA can initiate translation via a noncanonical mechanism mediated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). This study also provides evidence showing the involvement of cellular proteins in HTLV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation. Together, the data presented in this report significantly contribute to the understanding of HTLV-1 gene

  3. Prevalence, infectivity and correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women in a rural district of the Far North Region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Ndoula, Shalom Tchokfe; Bigna, Jean Joel R; Jingi, Ahmadou M; Fokom-Domgue, Joël

    2015-05-02

    Epidemiological data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among pregnant women in Cameroon are very scarce, especially in the rural milieu. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with HBV infection, and the infectivity of rural pregnant women in the Far North Region of Cameroon. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three rural health facilities of the Guidiguis health district between December 2013 and March 2014. We consecutively recruited 325 pregnant women attending antenatal consultations. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data and factors associated with HBV infection. The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were determined using commercial test strips. Regression analyses were used to assess correlates of HBV infection. The mean age was 24.4 (SD5.6) years. Most women were married (97.2%) and housewives (96.4%), with less than secondary education level (80%). Only 4 women (1.2%) had been vaccinated against HBV. Thirty-three women (10.2%) were HBsAg-positive, of whom 4 (12.1%) were positive to HBeAg. The prevalence of HIV infection was 2.5% (8/325). Overall, 5 (1.5%) women were co-infected with HIV and HBV. Independent correlates of HBV infection included history of blood transfusion (adjusted odd ratio 12.59, 95% CI 1.46-108.89; p = 0.021) and concurrent infection by HIV (adjusted odd ratio 22.53, 95% CI 4.76-106.71; p pregnant women in this rural milieu is high. History of blood transfusion and HIV infection are highly associated with HBV infection. The relative low rate of women positive to both HBsAg and HBeAg suggests that perinatal transmission of HBV might not be the prevailing mode of HBV transmission in this area.

  4. Taxonomic and epidemiological aspects of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus 2 species through the observation of the secondary structures in the 5' genomic untranslated region

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    Massimo Giangaspero

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 2 (BVDV-2 strains demonstrated in cattle, sheep and adventitious contaminants of biological products were evaluated by the palindromic nucleotide substitutions (PNS method at the three variable loci (V1, V2 and V3 in the 5’ untranslated region (UTR, to determine their taxonomic status. Variation in conserved genomic sequences was used as a parameter for the epidemiological evaluation of the species in relation to geographic distribution, animal host and virulence. Four genotypes were identified within the species. Taxonomic segregation corresponded to geographic distribution of genotype variants. Genotype 2a was distributed worldwide and was also the only genotype that was circulating in sheep and cattle. Genotypes 2b, 2c and 2d were restricted to South America. Genotypes 2a and 2d were related to the contamination of biological products. Genetic variation could be related to the spread of BVDV-2 species variants in different geographic areas. Chronologically, the species emerged in North America in 1978 and spread to the United Kingdom and Japan, continental Europe, South America and New Zealand. Correlation between clinical features related with isolation of BVDV-2 strains and genetic variation indicated that subgenotype 1, variant 4 of genotype 2a, was related to a haemorrhagic syndrome. These observations suggest that the evaluation of genomic secondary structures, by identifying markers for expression of virus biological activities and species evolutionary history, may be a useful tool for the epidemiological evaluation of BVDV-2 species and possibly of other species of the genus Pestivirus.

  5. The Central, Surface-Exposed Region of the Flagellar Hook Protein FlgE of Campylobacter jejuni Shows Hypervariability among Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Lüneberg, Edeltraud; Glenn-Calvo, Eduardo; Hartmann, Maike; Bär, Werner; Frosch, Matthias

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study, we observed that monoclonal antibodies raised against the hook protein FlgE of Campylobacter jejuni LIO 36, isolate 5226, bound exclusively to this strain. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis for these binding specificities. The hook protein-encoding gene flgE of C. jejuni was cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The flgE genes of four additional C. jejuni strains were amplified by PCR and also sequenced. Comparison of the deduced amino acid se...

  6. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ras1p and chimaeric constructs of Ras proteins reveals the hypervariable region and farnesylation as critical elements in the adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crechet, JB; Cool, RH; Jacquet, E; Lallemand, JY

    2003-01-01

    Ras1p and Ras2p, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are GTP-binding proteins that are essential elements in the signaling cascade leading to the activation of adenylyl cyclase. To overcome proteolytic activities that have hampered biochemical studies of Ras1p so far, its gene was genetically modified

  7. Low frequency of mutations in the core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus in anti-HBe positive Brazilian carriers

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    Niel Christian

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the core promoter and precore regions of the hepatitis B virus (HBV genome, notably the double substitution (AGG to TGA at nt positions 1762-1764 in the core promoter, and the precore stop codon mutation G to A at nt 1896, can often explain the anti-HBe phenotype in chronic carriers. However, the A1896 mutation is restricted to HBV isolates that have T at nt 1858. The double substitution at positions 1762-1764 has been described to occur preferentially in patients infected with strains showing C instead of T at nt 1858. Results HBV DNAs from 29 anti-HBe Brazilian samples were characterized by nucleotide sequencing of PCR products from precore region. Among them, 18 isolates presented C at nt 1858 (mostly genotype A strains. The 11 remaining isolates (genotypes D and F had T1858. The stop codon mutation at nt 1896 was found in seven isolates (24% of the total and 63% of the isolates that had T1858. The frequency of the double substitution at positions 1762-1764 was surprisingly low (20% among C1858 isolates. An association between A1896 and TGA 1762-1764 mutations was observed among genotype D isolates: these showed either none of the two mutations or both. Furthermore, strains mutated at positions 1896 and/or 1762-1764 also presented an elevated number of other, less common substitutions in the core promoter and precore regions. Conclusions The data reported here are not in accordance with some reports from other parts of the world. In half of the isolates, none of the mutations previously described could explain the anti-HBe phenotype.

  8. A retrospective case-control study of hepatitis C virus infection and oral lichen planus in Japan: association study with mutations in the core and NS5A region of hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Japanese patients with oral lichen planus and identify the impact of amino acid (aa) substitutions in the HCV core region and IFN-sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) associated with lichen planus. Methods In this retrospective study, 59 patients (group 1-A) with oral lichen planus among 226 consecutive patients who visited our hospital and 85 individuals (group 1-B, controls) with normal oral mucosa were investigated for the presence of liver disease and HCV infection. Risk factors for the presence of oral lichen planus were assessed by logistic regression analysis. We compared aa substitutions in the HCV core region (70 and/or 91) and ISDR of NS5A of 12 patients with oral lichen planus (group 2-A) and 7 patients who did not have oral lichen planus (group 2-B) among patients (high viral loads, genotype 1b) who received interferon (IFN) therapy in group1-A. Results The prevalence of anti-HCV and HCV RNA was 67.80% (40/59) and 59.32% (35/59), respectively, in group 1-A and 31.76% (27/85) and 16.47% (14/85), respectively, in group 1-B. The prevalence of anti-HCV (P lichen planus. The adjusted odds ratios for these three factors were 6.58, 3.53 and 2.58, respectively, and each was statistically significant. No significant differences in viral factors, such as aa substitutions in the core region and ISDR of NS5A, were detected between the two groups (groups 2-A and -B). Conclusion We observed a high prevalence of HCV infection in patients with oral lichen planus. Longstanding HCV infection, hypoalbuminemia, and smoking were significant risk factors for the presence of oral lichen planus in patients. It is advisable for Japanese patients with lichen planus to be tested for HCV infection during medical examination. PMID:22490000

  9. [The primary role of central region of HC-pro of potato Y potyvirus in synergism of plant viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, R F; Li, W M; Wang, H Y; Guo, M; Peng, X X

    2001-05-01

    Five deleted mutants of HC-Pro gene of Chinese isolate of potato Y potyvirus (PVY-C) were obtained by PCR mutation, and their plant expression vectors were constructed. They were transformed into tobacco K326 (Nicotina tabacum cv. K326) mediated by Agrobacterium. PCR and Southern blot analysis revealed that PVY-C HC-Pro gene and its deleted mutants were integrated into tobacco genome, and Western blot analysis showed that they were all expressed in transgenic tobacco plants. Furthermore, infection test demonstrated that the central region of PVY-C HC-Pro can mediate synergism of PVY-C/cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) and PVY-C/potato X potexvirus (PVX), identifying that it is functional domain in synergism.

  10. Biological and immunological characterization of recombinant Yellow Fever 17D Viruses expressing a Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigote Surface Protein-2 CD8+ T cell epitope at two distinct regions of the genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaldo Myrna C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The attenuated Yellow fever (YF 17D vaccine virus is one of the safest and most effective viral vaccines administered to humans, in which it elicits a polyvalent immune response. Herein, we used the YF 17D backbone to express a Trypanosoma cruzi CD8+ T cell epitope from the Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (ASP-2 to provide further evidence for the potential of this virus to express foreign epitopes. The TEWETGQI CD8+ T cell epitope was cloned and expressed based on two different genomic insertion sites: in the fg loop of the viral Envelope protein and the protease cleavage site between the NS2B and NS3. We investigated whether the site of expression had any influence on immunogenicity of this model epitope. Results Recombinant viruses replicated similarly to vaccine virus YF 17D in cell culture and remained genetically stable after several serial passages in Vero cells. Immunogenicity studies revealed that both recombinant viruses elicited neutralizing antibodies to the YF virus as well as generated an antigen-specific gamma interferon mediated T-cell response in immunized mice. The recombinant viruses displayed a more attenuated phenotype than the YF 17DD vaccine counterpart in mice. Vaccination of a mouse lineage highly susceptible to infection by T. cruzi with a homologous prime-boost regimen of recombinant YF viruses elicited TEWETGQI specific CD8+ T cells which might be correlated with a delay in mouse mortality after a challenge with a lethal dose of T. cruzi. Conclusions We conclude that the YF 17D platform is useful to express T. cruzi (Protozoan antigens at different functional regions of its genome with minimal reduction of vector fitness. In addition, the model T. cruzi epitope expressed at different regions of the YF 17D genome elicited a similar T cell-based immune response, suggesting that both expression sites are useful. However, the epitope as such is not protective and it remains to be seen whether expression

  11. Feline leukemia virus outbreak in the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus): high-throughput sequencing of envelope variable region A and experimental transmission.

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    Geret, C P; Cattori, V; Meli, M L; Riond, B; Martínez, F; López, G; Vargas, A; Simón, M A; López-Bao, J V; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2011-05-01

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species. During winter/spring 2006/7, a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) outbreak of unexpected virulence killed about 2/3 of the infected Iberian lynxes. All FeLV-positive animals were co-infected with feline hemoplasmas. To further characterize the Iberian lynx FeLV strain and evaluate its potential virulence, the FeLV envelope gene variable region A (VRA) mutant spectrum was analyzed using the Roche 454 sequencing technology, and an in vivo transmission study of lynx blood to specified-pathogen-free cats was performed. VRA mutations indicated weak apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme and catalytic polypeptide-like cytidine deaminase (APOBEC) restriction of FeLV replication, and variants characteristic of aggressive FeLV strains, such as FeLV-C or FeLV-A/61C, were not detected. Cats exposed to FeLV/Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum-positive lynx blood did not show a particularly severe outcome of infection. The results underscore the special susceptibility of Iberian lynxes to infectious diseases.

  12. Differential regulation of hepatitis B virus core protein expression and genome replication by a small upstream open reading frame and naturally occurring mutations in the precore region.

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    Zong, Li; Qin, Yanli; Jia, Haodi; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Jiming; Wands, Jack R; Tong, Shuping; Li, Jisu

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcribes two subsets of 3.5-kb RNAs: precore RNA for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression, and pregenomic RNA for core and P protein translation as well as genome replication. HBeAg expression could be prevented by mutations in the precore region, while an upstream open reading frame (uORF) has been proposed as a negative regulator of core protein translation. We employed replication competent HBV DNA constructs and transient transfection experiments in Huh7 cells to verify the uORF effect and to explore the alternative function of precore RNA. Optimized Kozak sequence for the uORF or extra ATG codons as present in some HBV genotypes reduced core protein expression. G1896A nonsense mutation promoted more efficient core protein expression than mutated precore ATG, while a +1 frameshift mutation was ineffective. In conclusion, various HBeAg-negative precore mutations and mutations affecting uORF differentially regulate core protein expression and genome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus by the CRISPR/Cas9 system via targeting the conserved regions of the viral genome.

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    Liu, Xing; Hao, Ruidong; Chen, Shuliang; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a global health threat as chronic HBV infection may lead to liver cirrhosis or cancer. Current antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues can inhibit the replication of HBV, but do not disrupt the already existing HBV covalently closed circular DNA. The newly developed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a powerful tool to target cellular genome DNA for gene editing. In order to investigate the possibility of using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to disrupt the HBV DNA templates, we designed eight guide RNAs (gRNAs) that targeted the conserved regions of different HBV genotypes, which could significantly inhibit HBV replication both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the HBV-specific gRNA/Cas9 system could inhibit the replication of HBV of different genotypes in cells, and the viral DNA was significantly reduced by a single gRNA/Cas9 system and cleared by a combination of different gRNA/Cas9 systems.

  14. Increased Mitochondrial Genetic Diversity in Persons Infected With Hepatitis C VirusSummary

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    David S. Campo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The host genetic environment contributes significantly to the outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and therapy response, but little is known about any effects of HCV infection on the host beyond any changes related to adaptive immune responses. HCV persistence is associated strongly with mitochondrial dysfunction, with liver mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic diversity linked to disease progression. Methods: We evaluated the genetic diversity of 2 mtDNA genomic regions (hypervariable segments 1 and 2 obtained from sera of 116 persons using next-generation sequencing. Results: Results were as follows: (1 the average diversity among cases with seronegative acute HCV infection was 4.2 times higher than among uninfected controls; (2 the diversity level among cases with chronic HCV infection was 96.1 times higher than among uninfected controls; and (3 the diversity was 23.1 times higher among chronic than acute cases. In 2 patients who were followed up during combined interferon and ribavirin therapy, mtDNA nucleotide diversity decreased dramatically after the completion of therapy in both patients: by 100% in patient A after 54 days and by 70.51% in patient B after 76 days. Conclusions: HCV infection strongly affects mtDNA genetic diversity. A rapid decrease in mtDNA genetic diversity observed after therapy-induced HCV clearance suggests that the effect is reversible, emphasizing dynamic genetic relationships between HCV and mitochondria. The level of mtDNA nucleotide diversity can be used to discriminate recent from past infections, which should facilitate the detection of recent transmission events and thus help identify modes of transmission. Keywords: Disease Biomarkers, mtDNA, Noninvasive

  15. Molecular Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Philippines, 2012-2013.

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    Rungnapa Malasao

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. We performed molecular analysis of HRSV among infants and children with clinical diagnosis of severe pneumonia in four study sites in the Philippines, including Biliran, Leyte, Palawan, and Metro Manila from June 2012 to July 2013. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and screened for HRSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Positive samples were tested by conventional PCR and sequenced for the second hypervariable region (2nd HVR of the G gene. Among a total of 1,505 samples, 423 samples were positive for HRSV (28.1%, of which 305 (72.1% and 118 (27.9% were identified as HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. Two genotypes of HRSV-A, NA1 and ON1, were identified during the study period. The novel ON1 genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in 2nd HVR of the G gene increased rapidly and finally became the predominant genotype in 2013 with an evolutionary rate higher than the NA1 genotype. Moreover, in the ON1 genotype, we found positive selection at amino acid position 274 (p<0.05 and massive O- and N-glycosylation in the 2nd HVR of the G gene. Among HRSV-B, BA9 was the predominant genotype circulating in the Philippines. However, two sporadic cases of GB2 genotype were found, which might share a common ancestor with other Asian strains. These findings suggest that HRSV is an important cause of severe acute respiratory infection among children in the Philippines and revealed the emergence and subsequent predominance of the ON1 genotype and the sporadic detection of the GB2 genotype. Both genotypes were detected for the first time in the Philippines.

  16. Genotype 1 hepatitis C virus envelope features that determine antiviral response assessed through optimal covariance networks.

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    John M Murray

    Full Text Available The poor response to the combined antiviral therapy of pegylated alfa-interferon and ribavarin for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection may be linked to mutations in the viral envelope gene E1E2 (env, which can result in escape from the immune response and higher efficacy of viral entry. Mutations that result in failure of therapy most likely require compensatory mutations to achieve sufficient change in envelope structure and function. Compensatory mutations were investigated by determining positions in the E1E2 gene where amino acids (aa covaried across groups of individuals. We assessed networks of covarying positions in E1E2 sequences that differentiated sustained virological response (SVR from non-response (NR in 43 genotype 1a (17 SVR, and 49 genotype 1b (25 SVR chronically HCV-infected individuals. Binary integer programming over covariance networks was used to extract aa combinations that differed between response groups. Genotype 1a E1E2 sequences exhibited higher degrees of covariance and clustered into 3 main groups while 1b sequences exhibited no clustering. Between 5 and 9 aa pairs were required to separate SVR from NR in each genotype. aa in hypervariable region 1 were 6 times more likely than chance to occur in the optimal networks. The pair 531-626 (EI appeared frequently in the optimal networks and was present in 6 of 9 NR in one of the 1a clusters. The most frequent pairs representing SVR were 431-481 (EE, 500-522 (QA in 1a, and 407-434 (AQ in 1b. Optimal networks based on covarying aa pairs in HCV envelope can indicate features that are associated with failure or success to antiviral therapy.

  17. Evaluation of the genetic diversity of Plum pox virus in a single plum tree.

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    Predajňa, Lukáš; Šubr, Zdeno; Candresse, Thierry; Glasa, Miroslav

    2012-07-01

    Genetic diversity of Plum pox virus (PPV) and its distribution within a single perennial woody host (plum, Prunus domestica) has been evaluated. A plum tree was triply infected by chip-budding with PPV-M, PPV-D and PPV-Rec isolates in 2003 and left to develop untreated under open field conditions. In September 2010 leaf and fruit samples were collected from different parts of the tree canopy. A 745-bp NIb-CP fragment of PPV genome, containing the hypervariable region encoding the CP N-terminal end was amplified by RT-PCR from each sample and directly sequenced to determine the dominant sequence. In parallel, the PCR products were cloned and a total of 105 individual clones were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that after 7 years of infection, only PPV-M was still detectable in the tree and that the two other isolates (PPV-Rec and PPV-D) had been displaced. Despite the fact that the analysis targeted a relatively short portion of the genome, a substantial amount of intra-isolate variability was observed for PPV-M. A total of 51 different haplotypes could be identified from the 105 individual sequences, two of which were largely dominant. However, no clear-cut structuration of the viral population by the tree architecture could be highlighted although the results obtained suggest the possibility of intra-leaf/fruit differentiation of the viral population. Comparison of the consensus sequence with the original source isolate showed no difference, suggesting within-plant stability of this original isolate under open field conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in first-time blood donors in the southwestern region of Goiás, central Brazil

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    Giulena Rosa Leite Cardoso dos Anjos

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in populations from inner cities, especially in Central Brazil. Thus the objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HBV infection, and to analyze the factors associated with HBV infection, in a population of first-time blood donors in the southwestern region of Goiás, Central Brazil. METHODS: A total of 984 individuals were interviewed and gave blood samples to detect serological markers of HBV (HBsAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: An overall prevalence of 6.9% was found for HBV, with constituent prevalence rates of 3.6% and 11.6%, in subjects classified as fit and unfit to donate blood according the epidemiological screening, respectively. Only three individuals were positive for anti-HBs alone, suggesting previous vaccination against HBV. The variables of prior blood transfusion (OR = 2.3, tattoo/piercing (OR = 2.1, illicit drug use (OR = 2.3, sex with a partner with hepatitis (OR = 14.7, and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR = 2.9 were independently associated with HBV-positivity. These data suggested a low endemicity of hepatitis B in the studied population. CONCLUSION: The findings of low hepatitis B immunization coverage and the association of hepatitis B with risky behavior highlight that there is a need to intensify hepatitis B prevention programs in the southwest region of Goiás.

  19. Analysis of recombinant Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates from Serbia confirms genetic homogeneity and supports a regional origin for the PPV-Rec subgroup.

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    Glasa, M; Paunovic, S; Jevremovic, D; Myrta, A; Pittnerová, S; Candresse, T

    2005-10-01

    The recent observation of the frequent occurrence of natural recombinant Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates has led to the identification of a distinct PPV subgroup, named PPV-Rec. The diversity, origin and geographical spread of the recombinant PPV isolates belonging to this subgroup remain, however, relatively poorly known. In an effort to further our understanding of these isolates, eight PPV isolates from Serbia, the country from which the first such recombinant (PPV-o6) originated, were characterized. Depending on the genomic region targeted by different typing assays, seven of the eight isolates tested presented discrepancies in their typing behavior. Sequence analysis of the (Cter)NIb-(Nter)CP region confirmed the recombinant nature of these seven isolates which all presented an identical recombination breakpoint identical to previously characterized PPV-Rec isolates. Biological indexing and immunoblot analysis provided indications that asymptomatic infection of the GF305 peach indicator and migration of the coat protein as a double-band in immunoblots may represent conserved and discriminating properties of PPV-Rec isolates. The genetic diversity of PPV-Rec isolates from former Yugoslavia (Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina) was estimated to be twice as large as that of the PPV-Rec isolates obtained from all other countries to date (Albania, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Germany, Hungary and Slovakia). These last results are consistent with the hypothesis that former Yugoslavia is the center of dispersion of PPV-Rec. Taken together, the results presented here provide further evidence for the wide distribution and temporal genetic stability of these natural PPV recombinant isolates and provide for the first time a possible scenario for their dispersion throughout central and eastern Europe.

  20. High prevalence of IgG antibodies to Ebola virus in the Efé pygmy population in the Watsa region, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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    Mulangu, Sabue; Borchert, Matthias; Paweska, Janusz; Tshomba, Antoine; Afounde, Afongenda; Kulidri, Amayo; Swanepoel, Robert; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2016-06-10

    Factors related to the natural transmission of Ebola virus (EBOV) to humans are still not well defined. Results of previous sero-prevalence studies suggest that circulation of EBOV in human population is common in sub-Saharan Africa. The Efé pygmies living in Democratic Republic of the Congo are known to be exposed to potential risk factors of EBOV infection such as bush meat hunting, entry into caves, and contact with bats. We studied the pygmy population of Watsa region to determine seroprevalence to EBOV infection and possible risks factors. Volunteer participants (N = 300) aged 10 years or above were interviewed about behavior that may constitute risk factors for transmission of EBOV, including exposures to rats, bats, monkeys and entry into caves. Samples of venous blood were collected and tested for IgG antibody against EBOV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The χ2-test and Fisher's exact test were used for the comparison of proportions and the Student's t-test to compare means. The association between age group and anti-EBOV IgG prevalence was analysed by a nonparametric test for trend. The prevalence of anti-EBOV IgG was 18.7 % overall and increased significantly with age (p = 0.023). No association was observed with exposure to risk factors (contacts with rats, bats, monkeys, or entry into caves). The seroprevalence of IgG antibody to EBOV in pygmies in Watsa region is among the highest ever reported, but it remains unclear which exposures might lead to this high infection rate calling for further ecological and behavioural studies.

  1. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic

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    Dennis Maletich Junqueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3 loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08 and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08. Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  2. Detection of the B"-GWGR variant in the southernmost region of Brazil: unveiling the complexity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B epidemic.

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    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; Medeiros, Rúbia Marília de; Leite, Thaysse Cristina Neiva Ferreira; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Gräf, Tiago; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2013-09-01

    Typical human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) sequences present a GPGR signature at the tip of the variable region 3 (V3) loop; however, unusual motifs harbouring a GWGR signature have also been isolated. Although epidemiological studies have detected this variant in approximately 17-50% of the total infections in Brazil, the prevalence of B"-GWGR in the southernmost region of Brazil is not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate the C2-V3 molecular diversity of the HIV-1B epidemic in southernmost Brazil. HIV-1 seropositive patients were ana-lysed at two distinct time points in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS98 and RS08) and at one time point in the state of Santa Catarina (SC08). Phylogenetic analysis classified 46 individuals in the RS98 group as HIV-1B and their molecular signatures were as follows: 26% B"-GWGR, 54% B-GPGR and 20% other motifs. In the RS08 group, HIV-1B was present in 32 samples: 22% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 19% other motifs. In the SC08 group, 32 HIV-1B samples were found: 28% B"-GWGR, 59% B-GPGR and 13% other motifs. No association could be established between the HIV-1B V3 signatures and exposure categories in the HIV-1B epidemic in RS. However, B-GPGR seemed to be related to heterosexual individuals in the SC08 group. Our results suggest that the established B"-GWGR epidemics in both cities have similar patterns, which is likely due to their geographical proximity and cultural relationship.

  3. The mitogenic function of hepatitis B virus X protein resides within amino acids 51 to 140 and is modulated by N- and C-terminal regulatory regions.

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    Li, Huajie; Chi, Chia-Yi; Lee, Sook; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2006-11-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (pX) is implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis by an unknown mechanism. pX variants encoded by HBV genomes found integrated in genomic DNA from liver tumors of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) generally lack amino acids 134 to 154. Since deregulation of mitogenic pathways is linked to oncogenic transformation, herein we define the pX region required for mitogenic pathway activation. A series of pX deletions was used to construct tetracycline-regulated pX-expressing cell lines. The activation of the mitogenic pathways by these pX deletions expressed in the constructed cell lines was measured by transient transreporter assays, effects on endogenous cyclin A expression, and apoptosis. Conditional expression of pX51-140 in AML12 clone 4 cell line activates the mitogenic pathways, induces endogenous cyclin A expression, and sensitizes cells to apoptosis, similar to wild-type (WT) pX. By contrast, pX1-115 is inactive, supporting the idea that amino acids 116 to 140 are required for mitogenic pathway activation. Moreover, this pX deletion analysis demonstrates that WT pX function is modulated by two regions spanning amino acids 1 to 78 and 141 to 154. The N-terminal X1-78, expressed via a retroviral vector in WT pX-expressing 4pX-1 cells, coimmunoprecipitates with WT pX, indicating this pX region participates in protein-protein interactions leading to pX oligomerization. Interestingly, pX1-78 interferes with WT pX in mediating mitogenic pathway activation, endogenous gene expression, and apoptosis. The C-terminal pX region spanning amino acids 141 to 154 decreases pX stability, determined by pulse-chase studies of WT pX and pX1-140, suggesting that increased stability of naturally occurring pX variants lacking amino acids 134 to 154 may play a role in HCC development.

  4. Comparative Genomic Analysis for Genetic Variation in Sacbrood Virus of Apis cerana and Apis mellifera Honeybees From Different Regions of Vietnam.

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    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Thu, Ha Thi; Yoo, Mi Sun; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Reddy, Bheemireddy Anjana; Lien, Nguyen Thi Kim; Trang, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Duong, Bui Thi Thuy; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kang, Seung-Won; Quyen, Dong Van

    2017-09-01

    Sacbrood virus (SBV) is one of the most common viral infections of honeybees. The entire genome sequence for nine SBV infecting honeybees, Apis cerana and Apis mellifera, in Vietnam, namely AcSBV-Viet1, AcSBV-Viet2, AcSBV-Viet3, AmSBV-Viet4, AcSBV-Viet5, AmSBV-Viet6, AcSBV-Viet7, AcSBV-Viet8, and AcSBV-Viet9, was determined. These sequences were aligned with seven previously reported complete genome sequences of SBV from other countries, and various genomic regions were compared. The Vietnamese SBVs (VN-SBVs) shared 91-99% identity with each other, and shared 89-94% identity with strains from other countries. The open reading frames (ORFs) of the VN-SBV genomes differed greatly from those of SBVs from other countries, especially in their VP1 sequences. The AmSBV-Viet6 and AcSBV-Viet9 genome encodes 17 more amino acids within this region than the other VN-SBVs. In a phylogenetic analysis, the strains AmSBV-Viet4, AcSBV-Viet2, and AcSBV-Viet3 were clustered in group with AmSBV-UK, AmSBV-Kor21, and AmSBV-Kor19 strains. Whereas, the strains AmSBV-Viet6 and AcSBV-Viet7 clustered separately with the AcSBV strains from Korea and AcSBV-VietSBM2. And the strains AcSBV-Viet8, AcSBV-Viet1, AcSBV-Viet5, and AcSBV-Viet9 clustered with the AcSBV-India, AcSBV-Kor and AcSBV-VietSBM2. In a Simplot graph, the VN-SBVs diverged stronger in their ORF regions than in their 5' or 3' untranslated regions. The VN-SBVs possess genetic characteristics which are more similar to the Asian AcSBV strains than to AmSBV-UK strain. Taken together, our data indicate that host specificity, geographic distance, and viral cross-infections between different bee species may explain the genetic diversity among the VN-SBVs in A. cerana and A. mellifera and other SBV strains. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis for Genetic Variation in Sacbrood Virus of Apis cerana and Apis mellifera Honeybees From Different Regions of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Thu, Ha Thi; Yoo, Mi Sun; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Reddy, Bheemireddy Anjana; Lien, Nguyen Thi Kim; Trang, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Duong, Bui Thi Thuy; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kang, Seung-Won

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sacbrood virus (SBV) is one of the most common viral infections of honeybees. The entire genome sequence for nine SBV infecting honeybees, Apis cerana and Apis mellifera, in Vietnam, namely AcSBV-Viet1, AcSBV-Viet2, AcSBV-Viet3, AmSBV-Viet4, AcSBV-Viet5, AmSBV-Viet6, AcSBV-Viet7, AcSBV-Viet8, and AcSBV-Viet9, was determined. These sequences were aligned with seven previously reported complete genome sequences of SBV from other countries, and various genomic regions were compared. The Vietnamese SBVs (VN-SBVs) shared 91–99% identity with each other, and shared 89–94% identity with strains from other countries. The open reading frames (ORFs) of the VN-SBV genomes differed greatly from those of SBVs from other countries, especially in their VP1 sequences. The AmSBV-Viet6 and AcSBV-Viet9 genome encodes 17 more amino acids within this region than the other VN-SBVs. In a phylogenetic analysis, the strains AmSBV-Viet4, AcSBV-Viet2, and AcSBV-Viet3 were clustered in group with AmSBV-UK, AmSBV-Kor21, and AmSBV-Kor19 strains. Whereas, the strains AmSBV-Viet6 and AcSBV-Viet7 clustered separately with the AcSBV strains from Korea and AcSBV-VietSBM2. And the strains AcSBV-Viet8, AcSBV-Viet1, AcSBV-Viet5, and AcSBV-Viet9 clustered with the AcSBV-India, AcSBV-Kor and AcSBV-VietSBM2. In a Simplot graph, the VN-SBVs diverged stronger in their ORF regions than in their 5′ or 3′ untranslated regions. The VN-SBVs possess genetic characteristics which are more similar to the Asian AcSBV strains than to AmSBV-UK strain. Taken together, our data indicate that host specificity, geographic distance, and viral cross-infections between different bee species may explain the genetic diversity among the VN-SBVs in A. cerana and A. mellifera and other SBV strains.

  6. Hepatitis B virus markers among teenagers in the Araguaia region, Central Brazil: assessment of prevalence and vaccination coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Laura Valdiane Luz; da Silva, Marcondes Alves Barbosa; Calçada, Cristiane de Oliveira Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Silvia Raquel Brandão; Souto, Francisco José Dutra

    2011-07-18

    The Brazilian hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination program for neonates was implemented in 1998 and broadened to include young people up to 20 years of age in 2001. However, HBV coverage of teenagers has not been systematically assessed in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed to estimate the magnitude of HBV infection and vaccine coverage among adolescent students regularly enrolled in the public schools of Barra do Garças, a city located in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. A representative sample was randomly obtained and participants were interviewed and had blood samples collected to test for HBV markers. The sample was composed of 576 subjects, 51% of which were females. The average age was 15, with the group ranging from 12 to 20 years of age. There were 29 anti-HBc reactive participants (5.0%). Four out of 29 were HBsAg positive (0.7%). Anti-HBs alone (vaccinated profile) showed in 323 (56.1%) students and 224 (38.9%) were negative for all HBV markers. Increasing age was associated with HBV exposure in a χ(2) for trend analysis (p=0.004). The prevalence of anti-HBs alone decreased as the subjects' age increased. Multivariate analysis showed independent association between HBV infection and the start of sexual activity. Another associated variable was the fact that the some students were enrolled in two low-income neighborhood schools. Our findings classify this area as low endemic for HBV and suggest that there is a progressive decrease in the spread of HBV in the region due to the introduction of universal vaccination of neonates. Approximately half of the adolescents 15 years or older were not immunized, which raises a concern in terms of the need to increase the vaccination rate for this segment of the population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Analysis of Individuals from a Dengue-Endemic Region Helps Define the Footprint and Repertoire of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus 3 Type-Specific Epitopes

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    Daniela V. Andrade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to 4 cause dengue, a major public health problem worldwide. Individuals exposed to primary DENV infections develop serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, including strongly neutralizing antibodies targeting quaternary epitopes. To date, no studies have measured the levels and kinetics of serum antibodies directed to such epitopes among populations in regions where dengue is endemic. Here, we use a recombinant DENV4 (rDENV4/3-M14 displaying a major DENV3 type-specific quaternary epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody 5J7 to measure the proportion, magnitude, and kinetics of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody responses targeting this epitope. Primary DENV3 sera from 30 individuals in a dengue hospital-based study in Nicaragua were studied 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-infection, alongside samples collected annually 1 to 4 years post-primary DENV3 infection from 10 individuals in a cohort study in Nicaragua. We found substantial individual variation in the proportion of DENV3 type-specific neutralizing antibody titers attributed to the 5J7 epitope (range, 0 to 100%, with the mean significantly increasing from 22.6% to 41.4% from 3 to 18 months. We extended the transplanted DENV3 5J7 epitope on the virion (rDENV4/3-M16, resulting in increased recognition in several individuals, helping define the footprint of the epitope. However, 37% and 13% of the subjects still showed little to no recognition of the 5J7 epitope at 3 and 18 months, respectively, indicating that one or more additional DENV3 type-specific epitopes exist. Overall, this study demonstrates how DENV-immune plasma from populations from areas of endemicity, when coupled with structurally guided recombinant viruses, can help characterize the epitope-specific neutralizing antibody response in natural DENV infections, with direct implications for design and evaluation of dengue vaccines.

  8. The clinical significance of nucleotide G1613A and C1653T mutations in the core promoter region of hepatitis B virus

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    Peng-yu HUANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genome G1613A and C1653T mutations on disease progression, viral replication capacity, and transcription activity of HBV core promoter (CP. Methods  A total of 258 patients were enrolled in the present study, including 65 patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB, 120 with chronic hepatitis B (CHB, and 73 with acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF. Serum HBV DNA was extracted from patients, and full-length HBV genome was amplified by PCR. The incidences of G1613A, C1653T and G1613A+C1653T in different groups were compared, and through functional experiments, the impact of mutants and wild-type virus on viral replication capacity and CP transcription activity was assessed. Results  Genotype B, C and D were the three detected genotypes in 285 patients, with detection rates of 22.2%, 76.2% and 1.6%, respectively. The incidences of G1613A, C1653T and G1613A+C1653T mutations increased with the disease exacerbation, and they were 13.70%, 31.80% and 45.20% in AHB patients (P<0.01, 2.30%, 16.30% and 27.40% in CHB patients (P<0.01, and 2.29%, 12.07% and 23.29% in ACLF patients (P<0.05. Compare with wild-type strain, the G1613A mutant strain of HBV increased the viral replication capacity by 6%, reduced HBsAg level and core promoter activity by 15% and 16.2%, and reduced HBeAg to undetectable level; the C1653T mutant strain increased the viral replication capacity, HBsAg level, and core promoter activity by 10%, 55% and 17.1%, respectively, and the HBeAg level was comparable to that of wild-type strain; the G1613A+C1653T mutant strain increased viral replication capacity, HBsAg level and HBeAg level by 7%, 66% and 227%, respectively, while it had no influence on core promoter activity. Conclusion The G1613A and C1653T mutation in CP region may increase HBV replication capacity and alter CP activity and HBV antigens expression, the doublet mutation of G1613A+C1653T shows synergic effect on these

  9. Immunization of rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from a highly conserved β-sheet epitope region underneath the receptor binding site of influenza A virus

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    Ideno S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoji Ideno,1,3 Kaoru Sakai,1 Mikihiro Yunoki,2–4 Ritsuko Kubota-Koketsu,3,5 Yuji Inoue,3 Shota Nakamura,6 Teruo Yasunaga,6 Yoshinobu Okuno,5 Kazuyoshi Ikuta3 1Infectious Pathogen Research Section, Central Research Laboratory, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Kobe, Japan; 2Research and Development Promotion Section, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Veterinary Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan; 5Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa, Japan; 6Department of Genome Informatics, Genome Information Research Center, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Background: There is increasing concern about the speed with which health care providers can administer prophylaxis and treatment in an influenza pandemic. Generally, it takes several months to manufacture an influenza vaccine by propagation of the virus in chicken eggs or cultured cells. Newer, faster protocols for the production of vaccines that induce broad-spectrum immunity are therefore highly desirable. We previously developed human monoclonal antibody B-1 that shows broadly neutralizing activity against influenza A virus H3N2. B-1 recognizes an epitope region that includes an antiparallel β-sheet structure underneath the receptor binding site of influenza hemagglutinin (HA. In this study, the efficacy of a synthetic peptide vaccine derived from this epitope region against influenza A was evaluated. Materials and methods: Two peptides were synthesized, the upper and lower peptides. These peptides comprise amino acid residues 167–187 and 225–241, respectively, of the B-1 epitope region of HA, which is involved in

  10. NS2B-3 proteinase-mediated processing in the yellow fever virus structural region: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, S M; Nestorowicz, A; McCourt, D W; Rice, C M

    1994-06-01

    Several of the cleavages required to generate the mature nonstructural proteins from the flaviviral polyprotein are known to be mediated by a complex consisting of NS2B and a serine proteinase domain located in the N-terminal one-third of NS3. These cleavages typically occur after two basic residues followed by a short side chain residue. Cleavage at a similar dibasic site in the structural region is believed to produce the C terminus of the virion capsid protein. To study this cleavage, we developed a cell-free trans cleavage assay for yellow fever virus (YF)-specific proteolytic activity by using a substrate spanning the C protein dibasic site. Cleavage at the predicted site was observed when the substrate was incubated with detergent-solubilized lysates from YF-infected BHK cells. NS2B and the NS3 proteinase domain were the only YF-specific proteins required for this cleavage. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that the YF-specific proteolytic activity was membrane associated and that activity could be detected only after detergent solubilization. Previous cell-free studies led to a hypothesis that processing in the C-prM region involves (i) translation of C followed by translocation and core glycosylation of prM by using an internal signal sequence, (ii) signalase cleavage to produce a membrane-anchored form of the C protein (anchC) and the N terminus of prM, and (iii) NS2B-3-mediated cleavage at the anchC dibasic site to produce the C terminus of the virion C protein. However, the results of in vivo transient-expression studies do not support this temporal cleavage order. Rather, expression of a YF polyprotein extending from C through the N-terminal one-third of NS3 revealed that C-prM processing, but not translocation, was dependent on an active NS2B-3 proteinase. This suggests that signalase-mediated cleavage in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum may be dependent on prior cleavage at the anchC dibasic site. Possible pathways for processing in the C

  11. Conventional and phenomics characterization provides insight into the diversity and relationships of hypervariable scarlet (Solanum aethiopicum L. and gboma (S. macrocarpon L. eggplant complexes

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    Mariola ePlazas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scarlet (Solanum aethiopicum and gboma (S. macrocarpon eggplants are major vegetable crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Together with their respective wild ancestors (S. anguivi and S. dasyphyllum and intermediate cultivated-wild forms they constitute the so-called scarlet and gboma eggplant complexes. We used conventional descriptors and the high-throughput phenomics tool Tomato Analyzer for characterizing 63 accessions of the scarlet eggplant complex, including the four S. aethiopicum cultivar groups (Aculeatum, Gilo, Kumba, and Shum, Intermediate S. aethiopicum-S. anguivi forms, and S. anguivi, and 12 cultivated and wild accessions of the gboma eggplant complex. A large diversity was found between both complexes, showing that they are very well differentiated from each other. Within the scarlet eggplant complex, many significant differences were also found among cultivar groups, but more differences were found for fruit traits evaluated with Tomato Analyzer than with conventional descriptors. In particular, Tomato Analyzer phenomics characterization was useful for distinguishing small fruited groups (Shum, Intermediate, and S. anguivi, as well as groups for which few or no significant differences were observed for plant traits. Multivariate principal components analysis (PCA separated well all groups, except the Intermediate group which plotted between S. anguivi and small fruited S. aethiopicum accessions. For the gboma eggplant complex, S. dasyphyllum was clearly distinguished from S. macrocarpon and an important diversity was found in the latter. The results have shown that both complexes are hypervariable and have provided insight into their diversity and relationships. The information obtained has important implications for the conservation and management of genetic resources as well as for the selection and breeding of both scarlet and gboma eggplants.

  12. Serotype Diversity of Foot-and-Mouth-Disease Virus in Livestock without History of Vaccination in the Far North Region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludi, A; Ahmed, Z; Pomeroy, L W; Pauszek, S J; Smoliga, G R; Moritz, M; Dickmu, S; Abdoulkadiri, S; Arzt, J; Garabed, R; Rodriguez, L L

    2016-02-01

    Little information is available about the natural cycle of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the absence of control measures such as vaccination. Cameroon presents a unique opportunity for epidemiological studies because FMD vaccination is not practiced. We carried out a prospective study including serological, antigenic and genetic aspects of FMD virus (FMDV) infections among different livestock production systems in the Far North of Cameroon to gain insight into the natural ecology of the virus. We found serological evidence of FMDV infection in over 75% of the animals sampled with no significant differences of prevalence observed among the sampled groups (i.e. market, sedentary, transboundary trade and mobile). We also found antibodies reactive to five of the seven FMDV serotypes (A, O, SAT1, SAT2 and SAT3) among the animals sampled. Finally, we were able to genetically characterize viruses obtained from clinical and subclinical FMD infections in Cameroon. Serotype O viruses grouped into two topotypes (West and East Africa). SAT2 viruses grouped with viruses from Central and Northern Africa, notably within the sublineage causing the large epidemic in Northern Africa in 2012, suggesting a common origin for these viruses. This research will guide future interventions for the control of FMD such as improved diagnostics, guidance for vaccine formulation and epidemiological understanding in support of the progressive control of FMD in Cameroon. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Vaccine-induced Human Antibodies Specific for the Third Variable Region of HIV-1 gp120 Impose Immune Pressure on Infecting Viruses

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    Susan Zolla-Pazner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the role of V3-specific IgG antibodies (Abs in the RV144 clinical HIV vaccine trial, which reduced HIV-1 infection by 31.2%, the anti-V3 Ab response was assessed. Vaccinees' V3 Abs were highly cross-reactive with cyclic V3 peptides (cV3s from diverse virus subtypes. Sieve analysis of CRF01_AE breakthrough viruses from 43 vaccine- and 66 placebo-recipients demonstrated an estimated vaccine efficacy of 85% against viruses with amino acids mismatching the vaccine at V3 site 317 (p = 0.004 and 52% against viruses matching the vaccine at V3 site 307 (p = 0.004. This analysis was supported by data showing that vaccinees' plasma Abs were less reactive with I307 when replaced with residues found more often in vaccinees' breakthrough viruses. Simultaneously, viruses with mutations at F317 were less infectious, possibly due to the contribution of F317 to optimal formation of the V3 hydrophobic core. These data suggest that RV144-induced V3-specific Abs imposed immune pressure on infecting viruses and inform efforts to design an HIV vaccine.

  14. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  15. Motherhood and Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Female Sex Workers in the Mexico-US Border Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Argentina E; Reed, Elizabeth; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Boyce, Sabrina; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Silverman, Jay G

    2017-08-01

    Globally, female sex workers (FSWs) have been identified as a high-risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, as women of reproductive age, FSWs also have children. Few studies have investigated if financial responsibilities associated with motherhood increase women's vulnerability to HIV and STIs among FSWs. From March 2013 to March 2014, 603 FSWs aged ≥18 years were recruited from Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) to participate in a study assessing HIV/STI risk environments. Findings from logistic regression models indicate that FSWs who reported motherhood were more likely to report (in the past 30 days): a higher client volume (>30 clients) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-2.87) and always using alcohol right before or during sex with clients in the past 30 days (AOR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.19-2.61). In contrast, they were more likely to report consistent condom use for vaginal or anal sex with clients (AOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-2.55), less likely to report using drugs right before or during sex with clients (AOR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.26-0.56) and less likely to have tested positive for STIs at baseline (AOR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.91). These results provide a glimpse of the complex relationship between motherhood and women who are sex workers. Understanding the convergence of motherhood and sex work and how this can influence a woman's decision when engaging in sex work and affect her health is essential to designing effective programs addressing reduce risk for HIV and STIs among FSWs in this region and elsewhere.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy: an objective definition based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived regional fat ratios in a South Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Hesarghatta Shyamasunder; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Rupali, Priscilla; Thomas, Nihal

    2012-01-01

    To develop an objective definition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy by using regional fat mass ratios and to assess the utility of anthropometric and skinfold measurements in the initial screening for lipodystrophy. Male patients between 25 and 50 years old with proven HIV infection (highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART]-naïve subjects and those receiving successful HAART) were studied and compared with body mass index (BMI)-matched HIV-negative control subjects. Anthropometric variables, body composition, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry findings, and metabolic variables were compared among the 3 study groups and between those patients with and those without lipodystrophy. Trunk fat/lower limb fat mass ratio >2.28 identified 54.3% of patients with HIV receiving HAART as having lipodystrophy and had the highest odds ratio for predicting metabolic syndrome. The "clinical diagnosis of lipodystrophy" and the "clinical scoring system" had too many false-positive and false-negative results. Triceps skinfold thickness (SFT)/BMI ratio ≤0.49 and abdominal SFT/triceps SFT ratio >1.385 have good sensitivity but poor specificity in identifying lipodystrophy. In comparison with HAART-naïve patients with HIV, those receiving HAART had significantly higher insulin resistance, and a significantly greater proportion had impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia. Among patients receiving HAART, those with lipodystrophy had a greater degree of insulin resistance, higher triglyceride levels, and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The trunk fat/lower limb fat mass ratio in BMI-matched normal subjects can be used to derive cutoff values to define lipodystrophy objectively in HIV-infected patients. Defining lipodystrophy in this way is better than other methods of identifying those patients with increased cardiovascular risk. Triceps SFT/BMI and abdominal SFT/triceps SFT ratios may be useful as screening tools in resource

  17. Molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses circulating in two rabies endemic provinces of Laos, 2011-2012: regional diversity in Southeast Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed, Kamruddin; Phommachanh, Phouvong; Vorachith, Phengphet; Matsumoto, Takashi; Lamaningao, Pheophet; Mori, Daisuke; Takaki, Minako; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Khambounheuang, Bounkhouang; Nishizono, Akira

    2015-01-01

    ... from dogs brought here from other countries. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the current rabies situation and the genetic characteristics of rabies viruses currently circulating in Laos...

  18. A novel assay for detecting the mutation of nucleotide 1758-1777 deletion in core promoter region of hepatitis B virus

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    Xue-yuan NIAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  Nucleotide (nt 1758-1777 deletion in core promoter (CP region of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been suggested to be associated with disease progression. However, the complicated and less sensitive assay for it limited its use in clinic. The present study was aimed at setting a novel assay for its detection using single-tube nested PCR amplification and real-time PCR melting curve analysis. Methods  The PCR primers were designed through analysis of HBV genomic sequences in GenBank, and detection conditions were optimized. HBV CP region from 340 serum samples of chronic hepatitis B patients were amplified and directly sequenced, and fifty samples were randomly selected for cloning and sequencing for analysis of nt 1758-1777 deletion. The wild-type and deletion-type plasmids were extracted from mono-cloning samples. Positive standard of melting curve analysis was set up in light of the results of PCR amplification of two standard plasmids and cloning samples. The new method of assay was used in 340 samples, and the data were verified by the results of pyrosequencing. Results  Sixteen (4.7% samples were positive for the deletion by direct sequencing, and no less than 15% samples in standard plasmids and cloning sequencing showed sequence deletion. The melting temperature (Tm of deletion-type plasmid and cloning samples containing ≥15% proportion of the deletion sequence was ≥88.3℃, which was determined as positive standard of the novel assay. Forty-seven (13.8% samples were detected positive for nt 1758-1777 deletion by the novel assay. Among them, deletion ratio was ≥1.0% in 38 samples and <1.0% in 9 samples by pyrosequencing, respectively. The deletion ratio was all <1.0% in 15 negative control samples. The deletion ratio of 1.0% was taken as positive cutoff by pyrosequencing, the novel assay had 80.9% positive consistency and 100% negative consistency, with a Kappa value of 0.671. Conclusions Comparing with direct

  19. Safety and tolerability of conserved region vaccines vectored by plasmid DNA, simian adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus ankara administered to human immunodeficiency virus type 1-uninfected adults in a randomized, single-blind phase I trial.

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    Emma-Jo Hayton

    Full Text Available HIV-1 vaccine development has advanced slowly due to viral antigenic diversity, poor immunogenicity and recently, safety concerns associated with human adenovirus serotype-5 vectors. To tackle HIV-1 variation, we designed a unique T-cell immunogen HIVconsv from functionally conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, which were presented to the immune system using a heterologous prime-boost combination of plasmid DNA, a non-replicating simian (chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdV-63 and a non-replicating poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara. A block-randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled phase I trial HIV-CORE 002 administered for the first time candidate HIV-1- vaccines or placebo to 32 healthy HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, UK and elicited high frequencies of HIV-1-specific T cells capable of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in vitro. Here, detail safety and tolerability of these vaccines are reported.Local and systemic reactogenicity data were collected using structured interviews and study-specific diary cards. Data on all other adverse events were collected using open questions. Serum neutralizing antibody titres to ChAdV-63 were determined before and after vaccination.Two volunteers withdrew for vaccine-unrelated reasons. No vaccine-related serious adverse events or reactions occurred during 190 person-months of follow-up. Local and systemic events after vaccination occurred in 27/32 individuals and most were mild (severity grade 1 and predominantly transient (<48 hours. Myalgia and flu-like symptoms were more strongly associated with MVA than ChAdV63 or DNA vectors and more common in vaccine recipients than in placebo. There were no intercurrent HIV-1 infections during follow-up. 2/24 volunteers had low ChAdV-63-neutralizing titres at baseline and 7 increased their titres to over 200 with a median (range of 633 (231-1533 post-vaccination, which is of no safety concern.These data demonstrate safety and good tolerability of the pSG2

  20. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in Monte Negro in the Brazilian western Amazon region Soroprevalência de hepatite B e hepatite C em Monte Negro, Rondônia, Região Amazônica Ocidental Brasileira

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    Marcelo El Khouri

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study was carried out in Monte Negro (state of Rondônia, a village in the Brazilian western Amazon region, where a University of São Paulo Medical School program for medical student training in rural assistance took place. It aimed to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, to investigate risk factors for infection, and to evaluate the State immunization program against hepatitis B virus in the region. METHODS: The study is a cross-sectional seroprevalence survey, comprising 267 volunteers who answered a comprehensive questionnaire and had blood samples collected, which were analyzed in São Paulo for the presence of antibodies against hepatitis B virus (Hbs Ag, anti-Hbs, and anti-Hbc and hepatitis C virus using commercial kits. Data were stored in a specific data bank, and the association between seropositivity and potential risk factors was analyzed by means of uni-, bi-, and multi-variate analysis, considering ±5%. RESULTS: The seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus was 61.79% and of hepatitis C virus was 0.38%. Statistical analysis on the data bank showed that the prevalence of hepatitis B virus rose significantly with age, especially after adolescence. Infection was higher in those coming from outside the state of Rondônia. Exposure to vaccination against hepatitis B virus was higher in younger individuals and in those who were born in Rondônia. CONCLUSION: Monte Negro is a highly endemic region for hepatitis B virus but not for hepatitis C virus. Our results also provide indirect evidence indicating a significant improvement in the immunization program in Rondônia in recent years.OBJETIVOS: O presente estudo foi realizado em Monte Negro, Rondônia, Amazônia Oriental, onde um projeto de acadêmicos de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo promoveu assistência médica à população rural. O objetivo foi determinar a soroprevalência de Hepatite B e Hepatite C, investigar os fatores de risco

  1. Variantes moleculares en el gen L1 del virus del papiloma humano tipo 16, y regiones de la proteína L1 probablemente involucradas en la interacción virus-célula epitelial

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    María Mercedes Bravo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available

    La infección con virus del papiloma humano de alto riesgo es considerada como el principal factor de riesgo en el desarrollo del cáncer de cuello uterino. Entre los HPV de alto riesgo, el tipo 16 es el más frecuente tanto en mujeres con citología normal, como en mujeres con lesiones premalignas y en cáncer invasivo. Se ha demostrado la existencia de variaciones en la secuencia del genoma de HPV16, estos polimorfismos se han agrupado en cinco ramas filogenéticas denominadas según su distribución geográfica: Europeas (E, Asiaticas-Americanas (AA, Asiáticas (As, Africanas (Af y Norteamericanas (NA; determinadas por sustituciones nucleotídicas en los genes E6, L1 y L2 y la región larga de control.

    Varios estudios han sugerido que las variantes no Europeas son más agresivas que las Europeas, esto puede ser el reflejo de una interacción diferente con el huésped y por tanto implicar diferencias en el resultado final de la infección (mayor persistencia o mayor oncogenicidad.

    Particularmente se ha demostrado que las variaciones en la secuencia de aminoácidos de la proteína L1, la proteína principal de la cápside viral, pueden modificar las epítopes neutralizantes del virus afectando la efectividad de la respuesta inmune, también estas variaciones pueden afectar la capacidad de ensamble de las cápsides y la afinidad por receptores a nivel epitelial.

    El propósito de este estudio fue identificar las variaciones moleculares del gen L1 de HPV16 en aislamientos provenientes de cepillados cervicales de mujeres colombianas con citología normal y con cáncer de cuello uterino, con el fin de analizar si existen variaciones que alteren las regiones

  2. Molecular analysis of Hepatitis B virus sub-genotypes and incidence of preS1/preS2 region mutations in HBV-infected Egyptian patients from Mansoura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafy, Mohammed; Elgaml, Abdelaziz; El-Mesery, Mohamed; Elegezy, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major causes of viral hepatitis worldwide. Despite the prevalence of HBV infection in Egypt, few studies have focused on sub-genotyping of the virus. Moreover, no studies are available regarding the mutational analysis of the preS1/preS2 region of the viral genome, or its impact on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in Egypt. In this study, we have analyzed the sub-genotypes and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV present in HBV-infected patients, from Mansoura city (located in the center of Nile Delta region of Egypt), via partial sequencing of this specific region. Moreover, we have investigated the impact of these mutations on HCC development by measuring serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level and abdominal ultrasound examination of the HBV-infected patients. According to our results, all samples were genotype D in which sub-genotype D1 was predominant. In addition, the results revealed mutations in the preS1/preS2 region, which could result in either immature preS1 protein or completely inhibit the translation of the preS2 protein. However, there was no incidence of HCC development in patients infected with mutated HBV in the preS1/preS2 region. In summary, for the first time our work has proved the predominance of sub-genotype D1 among HBV-infected Egyptian patients in Mansoura city, Nile Delta region, Egypt, and incidence of mutations in the preS1/preS2 region of HBV genome. This current study opens up research opportunities to discuss the impact of HBV mutations on the development of HCC in Egypt. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Phylogenetic characterization of circulating Dengue and Alkhumra Hemorrhagic Fever viruses in western Saudi Arabia and lack of evidence of Zika virus in the region: A retrospective study, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saeed, Moneerah S; El-Kafrawy, Sherif A; Farraj, Suha A; Al-Subhi, Tagreed L; Othman, Norah A; Alsultan, Arwa; Ben Helaby, Huda G; Alshawdari, Mustafa M; Hassan, Ahmed M; Charrel, Remi N; Azhar, Esam I; Hashem, Anwar M

    2017-08-01

    Flaviviruses represent a global public health concern. They consist of ∼70 viruses with almost half of them causing human diseases with unspecified febrile illnesses. Cities in western Saudi Arabia are endemic for viruses (DENV) with sporadic infections due to Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV). They also represent a major destination for travelers coming for annual religious pilgrimages (Hajj and Umrah) from all over the world. However, whether other flaviviruses are circulating is not known because of the limited number of surveillance studies. Here, we retrospectively screened 690 samples for flaviviruses in samples from patients with unexplained febrile illnesses between 2010 and 2015 in western Saudi Arabia using a pan-flaviviruses RT-PCR assay. Despite Zika virus RNA was not detected, this study confirms circulation and/or sporadic spread of DENV-2, DENV-3, and AHFV, higher prevalence of DENV-2, and a role for visitors from DENV endemic countries in DENV importation into the Kingdom. Further analysis also showed very low genetic diversity of AHFV confirming its slow microevolution. Accordingly, continuous and prospective surveillance for flaviviruses using such assay are warranted in Saudi Arabia which receives millions of Muslims annually to implement effective control measures in light of the global widespread and outbreaks of several flaviviruses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mutational analysis of the resolution sequence of vaccinia virus DNA: essential sequence consists of two separate AT-rich regions highly conserved among poxviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchlinsky, M

    1990-01-01

    In replicative forms of vaccinia virus DNA, the unit genomes are connected by palindromic junction fragments that are resolved into mature viral genomes with hairpin termini. Bacterial plasmids containing the junction fragment for vaccinia virus or Shope fibroma virus were converted into linear minichromosomes of vector sequence flanked by poxvirus hairpin loops after transfection into infected cells. Analysis of a series of symmetrical deletion mutations demonstrated that in vaccinia virus the presence of the DNA sequence ATTTAGTGTCTAGAAAAAAA on both sides of the apical segment of the concatemer junction is crucial for resolution. To determine the precise architecture of the resolution site, a series of site-directed mutations within this tract of nucleotides were made and the relative contribution of each nucleotide to the efficaciousness of resolution was determined. The nucleotide sequence necessary for the resolution of the vaccinia virus concatemer junction, (A/T)TTT(A/G)N7-9AAAAAAA, is highly conserved among poxviruses and found proximal to the hairpin loop in the genomes of members of the Leporipoxvirus, Avipoxvirus, and Capripoxvirus genera. Images PMID:2398534

  5. Characterization of the patterns of polymorphism in a [open quotes]cryptic repeat[close quotes] reveals a novel type of hypervariable sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.P.; Schmeling, P.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Alternating purine and pyrimidine repeats (RY(i)) are an abundant source of polymorphism. The subset with long tandem repeats of GT or AC (GT(i)) have been studied extensively, but cryptic RY(i) (i.e., no single tandem repeat predominates) have received little attention. The factor IX gene has a polymorphic cryptic RY(i) of 142-216 bp. Previously, there were four known polymorphic alleles, of the form AB, A[sub 2]B, A[sub 2]B[sub 2], and A[sub 3]B[sub 2], where A = (GT)(AC)[sub 3](AT)[sub 3](GT)(AT)[sub 4] and B = A with an additional 3' AT dinucleotide. To further characterize this locus, the authors examined more than 1,700 additional human chromosomes and determined the sequences of the homologous sites in orangutans and chimpanzees. The novel alleles found in humans expand the repertoire of A/B alleles to A[sub 0-4]B[sub 1] and A[sub 1-3]B[sub 2]. The A[sub n]B[sub 2] series are abundant in Caucasians but are absent in blacks and Asians. Conversely, the A[sub 0]B[sub 1] allele is common in blacks but is not found in more than 1,700 Caucasian chromosomes. The data are compatible with a model in which recombination is more frequent than polymerase slippage at this locus. In orangutans, the RY(i) is present, but the sequence is markedly different. An A/B-type of pattern was discerned in which B differs from A by an additional six (AT) dinucleotides at the 3' end. In chimpanzees, the size of the RY(i) locus was greatly expanded, and the sequence showed a novel pattern of hypervariability in which there are many tandem repeats of the form (GT)[sub n](AC)[sub 0](AT)[sub p](GT)[sub q](AT)[sub s], where n, o, p, q, and s are different integers. The sequences of the factor IX intron 1 cryptic RY(i) in three primates provide perspective on the range of possible patterns of polymorphism. Analysis of the patterns suggests how the RY(i) can be conserved during evolution, while the precise sequence varies. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Stability, orientation and position preference of the stem region (residues 689-703 in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV envelope glycoprotein E2: a molecular dynamics study [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/14q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmad Akbar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Envelope glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV play an important role in the virus assembly and initial entry into host cells. Conserved charged residues of the E2 transmembrane (TM domain were shown to be responsible for the heterodimerization with envelope glycoprotein E1. Despite intensive research on both envelope glycoproteins, the structural information is still not fully understood. Recent findings have revealed that the stem (ST region of E2 also functions in the initial stage of the viral life cycle. We have previously shown the effect of the conserved charged residues on the TM helix monomer of E2. Here, we extended the model of the TM domain by adding the adjacent ST segment. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were performed for the E2 amphiphilic segment of the ST region connected to the putative TM domain (residues 683-746. Structural conformation and behavior are studied and compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-derived segment of E2 (2KQZ.pdb. We observed that the central helix of the ST region (residues 689 - 703 remained stable as a helix in-plane to the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the TM domain appeared to provide minimal contribution to the structural stability of the amphipathic region. This study also provides insight into the orientation and positional preferences of the ST segment with respect to the membrane lipid-water interface.

  7. A Japanese encephalitis virus genotype 5 molecular clone is highly neuropathogenic in a mouse model: impact of the structural protein region on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains can be separated into 5 genotypes (g1 to g5) based on sequence similarity. JEV g5 strains have been rarely isolated and are poorly characterized. We report here the full characterization of a g5 virus generated using a cDNA-based technology and its comparison with a widely studied g3 strain. We did not observe any major differences between those viruses when their infectious cycles were studied in various cell lines in vitro. Interestingly, the JEV g5 strain was highly pathogenic when inoculated to BALB/c mice, which are known to be largely resistant to JEV g3 infection. The study of chimeric viruses between JEV g3 and g5 showed that there was a poor viral clearance of viruses that express JEV g5 structural proteins in BALB/c mice blood, which correlated with viral invasion of the central nervous system and encephalitis. In addition, using an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, we were able to show that JEV g5 does not have an enhanced capacity for entering the central nervous system, compared to JEV g3. Overall, in addition to providing a first characterization of the understudied JEV g5, our work highlights the importance of sustaining an early viremia in the development of JEV encephalitis. Genotype 5 viruses are genetically and serologically distinct from other JEV genotypes and can been associated with human encephalitis, which warrants the need for their characterization. In this study, we characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a JEV g5 strain and showed that it was more neuropathogenic in a mouse model than a well-characterized JEV g3 strain. The enhanced virulence of JEV g5 was associated with poor viral clearance but not with enhanced crossing of the blood-brain barrier, thus providing new insights into JEV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus DNA in Blood Samples Stored on FTA Cards from Asymptomatic Pigs in Mbeya Region, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, U. C.; Johansen, M. V.; Ngowi, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether blood samples collected onto FTA® cards could be used in combination with real-time PCR for the detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in samples from resource-poor settings under the assumption that asymptomatically (sub-clinically) infected ...

  9. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015: a systematic review and modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Polack, Fernando P.; Balsells, Evelyn; Acácio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Nicol, Mark P.; Nokes, D. James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on RSV has yielded substantial new data from developing countries. With a considerabl...

  10. High antiviral effect of TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites targeted to conservative regions of (−RNA and (+RNA of influenza A virus in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya S. Levina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of new antiviral drugs based on nucleic acids is under scrutiny. An important problem in this aspect is to find the most vulnerable conservative regions in the viral genome as targets for the action of these agents. Another challenge is the development of an efficient system for their delivery into cells. To solve this problem, we proposed a TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposite consisting of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and polylysine (PL-containing oligonucleotides.Results: The TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites bearing the DNA fragments targeted to different conservative regions of (−RNA and (+RNA of segment 5 of influenza A virus (IAV were studied for their antiviral activity in MDCK cells infected with the H1N1, H5N1, and H3N2 virus subtypes. Within the negative strand of each of the studied strains, the efficiency of DNA fragments increased in the direction of its 3’-end. Thus, the DNA fragment aimed at the 3’-noncoding region of (−RNA was the most efficient and inhibited the reproduction of different IAV subtypes by 3–4 orders of magnitude. Although to a lesser extent, the DNA fragments targeted at the AUG region of (+RNA and the corresponding region of (−RNA were also active. For all studied viral subtypes, the nanocomposites bearing the DNA fragments targeted to (−RNA appeared to be more efficient than those containing fragments aimed at the corresponding (+RNA regions.Conclusion: The proposed TiO2·PL–DNA nanocomposites can be successfully used for highly efficient and site-specific inhibition of influenza A virus of different subtypes. Some patterns of localization of the most vulnerable regions in IAV segment 5 for the action of DNA-based drugs were found. The (−RNA strand of IAV segment 5 appeared to be more sensitive as compared to (+RNA.

  11. The 5'-terminal region of the Aichi virus genome encodes cis-acting replication elements required for positive- and negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-06-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5' end) formed at the 5' end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5'-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5'-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5'-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5'-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5' end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3' end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5' end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis.

  12. The 5′-Terminal Region of the Aichi Virus Genome Encodes cis-Acting Replication Elements Required for Positive- and Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-01-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5′ end) formed at the 5′ end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5′-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5′-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5′-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5′-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5′ end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3′ end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5′ end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis. PMID:15890931

  13. Marek's disease virus protein kinase gene identified within the short unique region of the viral genome is not essential for viral replication in cell culture and vaccine-induced immunity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, M; Urakawa, T; Hirayama, Y; Miki, N; Yamamoto, M; Zhu, G S; Hirai, K

    1993-07-01

    The open reading frame (ORF) of 1206 bp within the short unique region (Us) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) shows significant homology with the herpes simplex virus type 1 US3 gene encoding protein kinase (PK). The lacZ gene of Escherichia coli was inserted within the ORF, designated MDV1-US3, of MDV1 K544 strain DNA by homologous recombination. The plaque-purified recombinant MDV1 stably expressed the beta-galactosidase encoded by the inserted lacZ gene in infected cells and replicated well as the parental K544 strain. Antibodies against both MDV1 antigen and beta-galactosidase were detected in the sera of chickens immunized with recombinant MDV1. Chickens vaccinated with the recombinant MDV1 were protected from challenge with virulent MDV1. The MDV1 US3 gene expressed by a baculovirus vector encoded a 44-kDa protein. Mouse antisera against the 44-kDa protein reacted with two proteins of 44 and 45 kDa in extracts of cells infected with MDV1 but not with MDV types 2 or 3. The PK activity was detected in immune complexes of the anti-44-kDa sera with extracts of cells infected with MDV1 but not with the recombinant MDV1. Thus, PK encoded from the MDV1-US3 is not essential for virus replication in cell culture and vaccine-induced immunity.

  14. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015: a systematic review and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Simoes, Eric A F; Madhi, Shabir A; Gessner, Bradford D; Polack, Fernando P; Balsells, Evelyn; Acacio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Ali, Asad; Antonio, Martin; Awasthi, Shally; Awori, Juliet O; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Baggett, Henry C; Baillie, Vicky L; Balmaseda, Angel; Barahona, Alfredo; Basnet, Sudha; Bassat, Quique; Basualdo, Wilma; Bigogo, Godfrey; Bont, Louis; Breiman, Robert F; Brooks, W Abdullah; Broor, Shobha; Bruce, Nigel; Bruden, Dana; Buchy, Philippe; Campbell, Stuart; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Chadha, Mandeep; Chipeta, James; Chou, Monidarin; Clara, Wilfrido; Cohen, Cheryl; de Cuellar, Elizabeth; Dang, Duc-Anh; Dash-Yandag, Budragchaagiin; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Dherani, Mukesh; Eap, Tekchheng; Ebruke, Bernard E; Echavarria, Marcela; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Feikin, Daniel R; Feng, Luzhao; Gentile, Angela; Gordon, Aubree; Goswami, Doli; Goyet, Sophie; Groome, Michelle; Halasa, Natasha; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Homaira, Nusrat; Howie, Stephen R C; Jara, Jorge; Jroundi, Imane; Kartasasmita, Cissy B; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Kotloff, Karen L; Krishnan, Anand; Libster, Romina; Lopez, Olga; Lucero, Marilla G; Lucion, Florencia; Lupisan, Socorro P; Marcone, Debora N; McCracken, John P; Mejia, Mario; Moisi, Jennifer C; Montgomery, Joel M; Moore, David P; Moraleda, Cinta; Moyes, Jocelyn; Munywoki, Patrick; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Nicol, Mark P; Nokes, D James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; Oshitani, Histoshi; Pandey, Nitin; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Phillips, Lia N; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Rasmussen, Zeba A; Rath, Barbara A; Robinson, Annick; Romero, Candice; Russomando, Graciela; Salimi, Vahid; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Scheltema, Nienke; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Scott, J Anthony G; Seidenberg, Phil; Shen, Kunling; Singleton, Rosalyn; Sotomayor, Viviana; Strand, Tor A; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sylla, Mariam; Tapia, Milagritos D; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thomas, Elizabeth D; Tokarz, Rafal; Turner, Claudia; Venter, Marietjie; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Wang, Jianwei; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Yu, Hongjie; Zar, Heather J; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-09-02

    We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on RSV has yielded substantial new data from developing countries. With a considerably expanded dataset from a large international collaboration, we aimed to estimate the global incidence, hospital admission rate, and mortality from RSV-ALRI episodes in young children in 2015. We estimated the incidence and hospital admission rate of RSV-associated ALRI (RSV-ALRI) in children younger than 5 years stratified by age and World Bank income regions from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2016, and unpublished data from 76 high quality population-based studies. We estimated the RSV-ALRI incidence for 132 developing countries using a risk factor-based model and 2015 population estimates. We estimated the in-hospital RSV-ALRI mortality by combining in-hospital case fatality ratios with hospital admission estimates from hospital-based (published and unpublished) studies. We also estimated overall RSV-ALRI mortality by identifying studies reporting monthly data for ALRI mortality in the community and RSV activity. We estimated that globally in 2015, 33·1 million (uncertainty range [UR] 21·6-50·3) episodes of RSV-ALRI, resulted in about 3·2 million (2·7-3·8) hospital admissions, and 59 600 (48 000-74 500) in-hospital deaths in children younger than 5 years. In children younger than 6 months, 1·4 million (UR 1·2-1·7) hospital admissions, and 27 300 (UR 20 700-36 200) in-hospital deaths were due to RSV-ALRI. We also estimated that the overall RSV-ALRI mortality could be as high as 118 200 (UR 94 600-149 400). Incidence and mortality varied substantially from year to year in any given population. Globally, RSV is a common cause

  15. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  16. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  17. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  18. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  19. Chikungunya Virus: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya Virus: What you need to know Chikungunya (pronunciation: \\chik-en-gun-ye) is: ŠŠ A virus spread through Aedes species mosquito bites. Aedes mosquitoes also spread dengue and Zika viruses. ŠŠ A risk to anyone traveling to a region ...

  20. Hepatitis C virus and GBV-C virus prevalence among patients with B-cell lymphoma in different European regions: a case-control study of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi Guidicelli, Sabrina; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Falcone, Umberto; Conconi, Annarita; Christinat, Alexandre; Rodriguez-Abreu, Delvys; Grisanti, Salvatore; Lobetti-Bodoni, Chiara; Piffaretti, Jean Claude; Johnson, Peter W; Mombelli, Giorgio; Cerny, Andreas; Montserrat, Emili; Cavalli, Franco; Zucca, Emanuele

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with some B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B cell-NHLs). Patients with HCV infection frequently show co-infections with GB virus C (GBV-C, formerly known as hepatitis G virus), and some studies have suggested a higher incidence of GBV-C infection in patients with B cell-NHLs. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the association between HCV and/or GBV-C infection and B cell-NHLs in different geographic areas. One hundred thirty-seven lymphoma cases and 125 non-lymphoma matched controls were enrolled in an international case-control study conducted in Switzerland (Bellinzona), Spain (Barcelona) and England (Southampton) on samples collected from 2001 to 2002. In Bellinzona (41 cases and 81 controls), the overall prevalence of HCV was 3.3% (4.9% in NHLs), and the overall prevalence of GBV-C was 24% (22% in NHLs). In Barcelona (46 cases and 44 controls), the prevalence of HCV was 10% (8.7% in NHLs) and the prevalence of GBV-C 20% (13% in NHLs). There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of both infections between patients with NHL and controls. In Southampton, 50 NHL cases were analysed, none of them was found to be HCV-positive; therefore, no control group was analysed and GBV-C analysis was not performed, too. Both in Bellinzona and in Barcelona, the seropositivity rate was significantly lower for HCV than for GBV-C, suggesting that their transmission can be independent. The incidence of HCV was significantly higher in Barcelona than that in Bellinzona. This study confirmed the existence of marked geographic differences in the prevalence of HCV in NHL but cannot provide any significant evidence for an association between HCV and/or GBV-C and B-cell NHLs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation of Mutations in the NS Region of Lineage 2 West Nile Virus Associated with Neuroinvasiveness in a Mammalian Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Lim, Stephanie M; Dencső, László; Bányai, Krisztián; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E E; Bakonyi, Tamás; Bálint, Ádám

    2016-02-19

    West Nile virus (WNV) strains may differ significantly in neuroinvasiveness in vertebrate hosts. In contrast to genetic lineage 1 WNVs, molecular determinants of pathogenic lineage 2 strains have not been experimentally confirmed so far. A full-length infectious clone of a neurovirulent WNV lineage 2 strain (578/10; Central Europe) was generated and amino acid substitutions that have been shown to attenuate lineage 1 WNVs were introduced into the nonstructural proteins (NS1 (P250L), NS2A (A30P), NS3 (P249H) NS4B (P38G, C102S, E249G)). The mouse neuroinvasive phenotype of each mutant virus was examined following intraperitoneal inoculation of C57BL/6 mice. Only the NS1-P250L mutation was associated with a significant attenuation of virulence in mice compared to the wild-type. Multiplication kinetics in cell culture revealed significantly lower infectious virus titres for the NS1 mutant compared to the wild-type, as well as significantly lower amounts of positive and negative stranded RNA.

  2. In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation of Mutations in the NS Region of Lineage 2 West Nile Virus Associated with Neuroinvasiveness in a Mammalian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Szentpáli-Gavallér

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV strains may differ significantly in neuroinvasiveness in vertebrate hosts. In contrast to genetic lineage 1 WNVs, molecular determinants of pathogenic lineage 2 strains have not been experimentally confirmed so far. A full-length infectious clone of a neurovirulent WNV lineage 2 strain (578/10; Central Europe was generated and amino acid substitutions that have been shown to attenuate lineage 1 WNVs were introduced into the nonstructural proteins (NS1 (P250L, NS2A (A30P, NS3 (P249H NS4B (P38G, C102S, E249G. The mouse neuroinvasive phenotype of each mutant virus was examined following intraperitoneal inoculation of C57BL/6 mice. Only the NS1-P250L mutation was associated with a significant attenuation of virulence in mice compared to the wild-type. Multiplication kinetics in cell culture revealed significantly lower infectious virus titres for the NS1 mutant compared to the wild-type, as well as significantly lower amounts of positive and negative stranded RNA.

  3. Newcastle disease virus infection in sparrows (Passer domesticus, Linneaus, 1758 captured in poultry farms of the agreste region of the State of Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JSA Silva

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir competence for the Newcastle Disease virus (NDV was evaluated in sparrows (Passer domesticus, Linnaeus 1758 captured on a commercial poultry farm and a chicken hatchery in the State of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. A total number of 103 birds collected from a poultry farm (24/103 and a chicken hatchery (79/103 were examined. Hemagglutination inhibition tests, isolation, and viral characterization were performed in all samples collected from each bird. Titers ranging from 1:2 to 1:64 were detectable in 10.68% of sparrows, but positive serology and viral isolation were obtained only from sparrows captured at the hatchery. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by anti-avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1 serum, and this sample showed an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICOI of 0.21, which is similar to the B1 stock vaccine (0.20 used for vaccination in those farms. Therefore, it was concluded that the sparrows were infected by stock vaccine virus, and that these birds could be a reservoir for NDV. However, additional studies involving sequencing of the virus genome of stock vaccine must be carried out.

  4. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Virus in Two Italian Regions during 2010–2015: The Experience of Sicily and Liguria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Tramuto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular epidemiology of influenza B virus remained poorly studied in Italy, despite representing a major contributor to seasonal epidemics. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin gene sequences of 197 influenza B strains circulating in both Southern (Sicily and Northern (Liguria Italy between 2010 and 2015. Upper respiratory tract specimens of patients displaying symptoms of influenza-like illness were screened by real-time RT-PCR assay for the presence of influenza B virus. PCR-positive influenza B samples were further analyzed by sequencing. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees were constructed and the amino-acid alignments were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed clusters in B/Victoria clade 1A/1B (n = 29, 14.7%, and B/Yamagata clades 2 (n = 112, 56.8% and 3 (n = 56, 28.4%. Both influenza B lineages were found to co-circulate during the study period, although a lineage swap from B/Victoria to B/Yamagata occurred in Italy between January 2011 and January 2013. The most represented amino-acid substitutions were N116K in the 120-loop (83.9% of B/Yamagata clade 3 strains and I146V in the 150-loop (89.6% of B/Victoria clade 1 strains. D197N in 190-helix was found in almost all viruses collected. Our findings provide further evidence to support the adoption of quadrivalent influenza vaccines in our country.

  5. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argüello-Astorga Gerardo R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in

  6. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado; Johnson, Warren D.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical...

  7. Molecular epidemiology of measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, P A; Featherstone, D A; Bellini, W J

    2009-01-01

    Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses provides a means to study the transmission pathways of the virus and is an essential component of laboratory-based surveillance. Laboratory-based surveillance for measles and rubella, including genetic characterization of wild-type viruses, is performed throughout the world by the WHO Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network, which serves 166 countries in all WHO regions. In particular, the genetic data can help confirm the sources of virus or suggest a source for unknown-source cases as well as to establish links, or lack thereof, between various cases and outbreaks. Virologic surveillance has helped to document the interruption of transmission of endemic measles in some regions. Thus, molecular characterization of measles viruses has provided a valuable tool for measuring the effectiveness of measles control programs, and virologic surveillance needs to be expanded in all areas of the world and conducted during all phases of measles control.

  8. Seroprevalence for hepatitis E virus (HEV infection among volunteer blood donors of the Regional Blood Bank of Londrina, State of Paraná , Brazil Soroprevalência da infecção pelo virus da hepatite E (VHE em candidatos a doadores de sangue voluntários do Hemocentro Regional de Londrina, Londrina, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Bortoliero

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was carried out among 996 volunteer blood donors enrolled from May 1999 to December 1999 to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV infection among volunteer blood donors of the Regional Blood Bank of Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil, and to evaluate whether the rate of seroprevalence of IgG anti-HEV antibodies is associated with sociodemographic variables and with seropositivity for hepatitis A virus (HAV infection. All participants answered the questionnaire regarding the sociodemographic characterisitcs. Serum samples were tested for IgG antibodies to HEV (anti-HEV by an enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA. All serum samples positive for anti-HEV IgG and 237 serum samples negative for anti-HEV were also assayed for IgG anti-HAV antibodies by ELISA. Anti-HEV IgG was confirmed in 23/996 samples, resulting in a seroprevalence of 2.3% for HEV infection, similar to previous results obtained in developed countries. No significant association was found between the presence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies and the sociodemographic variables including gender, age, educational level, rural or urban areas, source of water, and sewer system (p > 0.05. Also, no association with seropositivity for anti-HAV IgG antibodies was observed (p > 0.05. Although this study revealed a low seroprevalence of HEV infection in the population evaluated, the results showed that this virus is circulating among the population from Londrina, South Brazil, and point out the need of further studies to define the clinical and epidemiological importance of HEV infection and to identify additional risk factors involved in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this infection in this population.Os objetivos do estudo foram determinar a soroprevalência da infecção pelo vírus da hepatite E (VHE em candidatos a doadores de sangue voluntários do Hemocentro Regional de Londrina, Paraná, e avaliar se essa soroprevalência está associada com vari

  9. Cucumber vein yellowing virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of CVYV and the disease it causes....

  10. Squash vein yellowing virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of SqVYV and the disease it causes....

  11. Highly conserved regions in Ebola virus RNA dependent RNA polymerase may be act as a universal novel peptide vaccine target: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Sharmin, Tahmina; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin; Hasan, Md Anayet

    2015-12-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is such kind of virus which is responsible for 23,825 cases and 9675 deaths worldwide only in 2014 and with an average diseases fatality rate between 25 % and 90 %. Although, medical technology has tried to handle the problems, there is no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics or vaccines available for the prevention, post exposure, or treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD). In the present study, we used the immunoinformatics approach to design a potential epitope-based vaccine against the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-L of EBOV. BioEdit v7.2.3 sequence alignment editor, Jalview v2 and CLC Sequence Viewer v7.0.2 were used for the initial sequence analysis for securing the conservancy from the sequences. Later the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB-AR) was used for the identification of T-cell and B-cellepitopes associated with type I and II major histocompatibility complex molecules analysis. Finally, the population coverage analysis was employed. The core epitope "FRYEFTAPF" was found to be the most potential one, with 100 % conservancy among all the strains of EBOV. It also interacted with both type I and II major histocompatibility complex molecules and is considered as nonallergenic in nature. Finally, with impressive cumulative population coverage of 99.87 % for the both MHC-I and MHC-II class throughout the world population was found for the proposed epitope. To end, the projected peptide gave us a solid stand to propose for vaccine consideration and that might be experimented for its potency in eliciting immunity through humoral and cell mediated immune responses in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Systems biology analysis of hepatitis C virus infection reveals the role of copy number increases in regions of chromosome 1q in hepatocellular carcinoma metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsemman, Ibrahim; Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide healthcare problem; however, traditional treatment methods have failed to cure all patients, and HCV has developed resistance to new drugs. Systems biology-based analyses could play an important role in the holistic analysis of the impact of HCV...... 1q, had increased copy numbers in the cancer samples relative to the normal samples. Finally, we confirmed our predictions with the results of metabolomics studies and proposed that inhibiting the identified targets has the potential to provide an effective treatment strategy for HCV...

  13. Influence of respiratory syncytial virus strain differences on pathogenesis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, José A; Moore, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies have provided convincing evidence of antigenic and sequence variability among respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) isolates. Circulating viruses have been classified into two antigenic groups (A and B) that correlate with well-delineated genetic groups. Most sequence and antigenic differences (both inter- and intra-groups) accumulate in two hypervariable segments of the G-protein gene. Sequences of the G gene have been used for phylogenetic analyses. These studies have shown a worldwide distribution of RSV strains with both local and global replacement of dominant viruses with time. Although data are still limited, there is evidence that strain variation may contribute to differences in pathogenicity. In addition, there is some but limited evidence that RSV variation may be, at least partially, immune (antibody) driven. However, there is the paradox in RSV that, in contrast to other viruses (e.g., influenza viruses) the epitopes recognized by the most effective RSV-neutralizing antibodies are highly conserved. In contrast, antibodies that recognize strain-specific epitopes are poorly neutralizing. It is likely that this apparent contradiction is due to the lack of a comprehensive knowledge of the duration and specificities of the human antibody response against RSV antigens. Since there are some data supporting a group- (or clade-) specific antibody response after a primary infection in humans, it may be wise to consider the incorporation of strains representative of groups A and B (or their antigens) in future RSV vaccine development.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1 recombination: the Uc-DR1 region is required for high-level a-sequence-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutch, R E; Zemelman, B V; Lehman, I R

    1994-01-01

    The a sequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 are believed to be the cis sites for inversion events that generate four isomeric forms of the viral genome. Using an assay that measures deletion of a beta-galactosidase gene positioned between two directly repeated sequences in plasmids transiently maintained in Vero cells, we had found that the a sequence is more recombinogenic than another sequence of similar size. To investigate the basis for the enhanced recombination mediated by the a sequence, we examined plasmids containing direct repeats of approximately 350 bp from a variety of sources and with a wide range of G+C content. We observed that all of these plasmids show similar recombination frequencies (3 to 4%) in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells. However, recombination between directly repeated a sequences occurs at twice this frequency (6 to 10%). In addition, we find that insertion of a cleavage site for an a-sequence-specific endonuclease into the repeated sequences does not appreciably increase the frequency of recombination, indicating that the presence of endonuclease cleavage sites within the a sequence does not account for its recombinogenicity. Finally, by replacing segments of the a sequence with DNA fragments of similar length, we have determined that only the 95-bp Uc-DR1 segment is indispensable for high-level a-sequence-mediated recombination. Images PMID:8189511

  15. Cellular DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX6 modulates interaction of miR-122 with the 5' untranslated region of hepatitis C virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegel, Jason M; Henderson, Eric; Cox, Erica M; Bonenfant, Gaston; Netzband, Rachel; Kahn, Samantha; Eager, Rachel; Pager, Cara T

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subverts the cellular DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX6 to promote virus infection. Using polysome gradient analysis and the subgenomic HCV Renilla reporter replicon genome, we determined that DDX6 does not affect HCV translation. Rather expression of the subgenomic HCV Renilla luciferase reporter at late times, as well as labeling of newly synthesized viral RNA with 4-thiouridine showed that DDX6 modulates replication. Because DDX6 is an effector protein of the microRNA pathway, we also investigated its role in miR-122-directed HCV gene expression. Similar to sequestering miR-122, depletion of DDX6 modulated HCV RNA stability. Interestingly, miR-122-HCV RNA interaction assays with mutant HCV genomes sites and compensatory exogenous miR-122 showed that DDX6 affects the function of miR-122 at one particular binding site. We propose that DDX6 facilitates the miR-122 interaction with HCV 5' UTR, which is necessary for stabilizing the viral genome and the switch between translation and replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Refinement of the Citrus tristeza virus resistance gene (Ctv) positional map in Poncirus trifoliata and generation of transgenic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plant lines with candidate resistance genes in this region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mamta

    2006-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a major pathogen of Citrus. A single dominant gene Ctv present in the trifoliate relative of Citrus, Poncirus trifoliata confers broad spectrum resistance against CTV. Refinement of genetic maps has delimited this gene to a 121 kb region, comprising of ten candidate Ctv resistance genes. The ten candidate genes were individually cloned in Agrobacterium based binary vector and transformed into three CTV susceptible grapefruit varieties. Two of the candidate R-genes, R-2 and R-3 are exclusively expressed in transgenic plants and in Poncirus trifoliata, while five other genes are also expressed in non-transformed Citrus controls. Northern blotting with a CTV derived probe for assessment of infection in virus inoculated plants over a span of three growth periods, each comprising of six to eight weeks, indicates either an absence of initiation of infection or it's slow spread in R-2 plant lines or an initial appearance of infection and it's subsequent obliteration in some R-1 and R-4 plant lines. Limited genome walk up- and downstream form R-1 gene, based on it's 100% sequence identity between Poncirus and Citrus, indicates promoter identity of 92% between the two varieties. Further upstream and downstream sequencing indicates the presence of an O-methyl transferase and a Copia like gene respectively in Citrus instead of the amino acid transporter like gene upstream and a sugar transporter like gene downstream in Poncirus. The possibility of recombinations in the resistance locus of Citrus and the need for consistent monitoring for virus infection and gene expression in the transgenic Citrus trees is discussed.

  17. Evaluation of surrogate markers for human immunodeficiency virus infection among blood donors at the blood bank of "Hospital Universitário Regional Norte do Paraná", Londrina, PR, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiche Edna Maria Vissoci

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the usefulness of the anti-HBc, hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV, human T cell lymphotropic virus I and II antibodies (anti-HTLV I/II, serologic tests for syphilis, and surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg as surrogate markers for the risk for HIV infection in 80,284 serum samples from blood donors from the Blood Bank of "Hospital Universitário Regional Norte do Paraná", Londrina, Paraná State, Brazil, analyzed from July 1994 to April 2001. Among 39 blood donors with positive serology for HIV, 12 (30.8% were anti-HBc positive, 10 (25.6% for anti-HCV, 1 (2.6% for anti-HTLV I/I, 1 (2.6% was positive for syphilis, and 1 (2.6% for HBsAg. Among the donors with negative serology for HIV, these markers were detected in 8,407 (10.5%, 441 (0.5%, 189 (0.2%, 464 (0.6%, and 473 (0.6% samples, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001 for anti-HBc and anti-HCV. Although the predictive positive value for these surrogate markers were low for HIV infection, the results confirmed the anti-HBc and anti-HCV as useful surrogate markers for HIV infection thus reinforcing the maintenance of them in the screening for blood donors contributing to the prevention of the small number of cases in which HIV is still transmitted by transfusion.

  18. Attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated RNAi targeted to conserved regions against foot-and-mouth disease virus in guinea pigs and swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wei; Jin, Hong; Jiang, Chengda; Yan, Weiyao; Liu, Mingqiu; Chen, Jiulian; Zuo, Xiaoping; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, specific sequences within three genes (3D, VP4 and 2B) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome were determined to be effective RNAi targets. These sequences are highly conserved among different serotype viruses based on sequence analysis. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-expressing plasmids (p3D-NT19, p3D-NT56, pVP4-NT19, pVP4-NT65 and p2B-NT25) were constructed to express siRNA targeting 3D, VP4 and 2B, respectively. The antiviral potential of these siRNA for various FMDV isolates was investigated in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells and suckling mice. The results show that these siRNA inhibited virus yield 10- to 300-fold for different FMDV isolates of serotype O and serotype Asia I at 48 h post infection in BHK-21 cells compared to control cells. In suckling mice, p3D-NT56 and p2B-NT25 delayed the death of mice. Twenty percent to 40% of the animals that received a single siRNA dose survived 5 days post infection with serotype O or serotype Asia I. We used an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis (C500) vaccine strain, to carry the plasmid that expresses siRNA directed against the polymerase gene 3D (p3D-NT56) of FMDV. We used guinea pigs to evaluate the inhibitory effects of recombinant S. cho (p3D-NT56/S. cho) on FMDV infection. The results show that 80% of guinea pigs inoculated with 10(9) CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho and challenged 36 h later with 50 ID(50) of homologous FMDV were protected. We also measured the antiviral activity of p3D-NT56/S. cho in swine. The results indicate that 100% of the animals treated with 5 x 10(9) CFU of p3D-NT56/S. cho were protected in 9 days. INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010.

  19. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  20. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  1. Epidemiology of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family known to cause mild clinical symptoms similar to those of dengue and chikungunya. Zika is transmitted by different species of Aedes mosquitoes. Nonhuman primates and possibly rodents play a role as reservoirs. Direct interhuman transmission has also been reported. Human cases have been reported in Africa and Asia, Easter Island, the insular Pacific region, and Brazil. Its clinical profile is that of a dengue-like febrile illness, but recently associated Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly have appeared. There is neither a vaccine nor prophylactic medications available to prevent Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of hepatitis C virus recombinants with chimeric E1/E2 envelope proteins and identification of single amino acids in the E2 stem region important for entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas H R; Scheel, Troels K H; Ramirez, Santseharay

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play a key role in host cell entry and represent important targets for vaccine and drug development. Here, we characterized HCV recombinants with chimeric E1/E2 complexes in vitro. Using genotype 1a/2a JFH1-based recombinants expressing 1a...... core-NS2, we exchanged E2 with functional isolate sequences of genotypes 1a (alternative isolate), 1b, and 2a. While the 1a-E2 exchange did not impact virus viability, the 2a-E2 recombinant was nonviable. After E2 exchange from three 1b isolates, long delays were observed before spread of infection....... For recovered 1b-E2 recombinants, single E2 stem region amino acid changes were identified at residues 706, 707, and 710. In reverse genetic studies, these mutations increased infectivity titers by ~100-fold, apparently without influencing particle stability or cell binding although introducing slight decrease...

  3. Amino acid substitutions in the heptad repeat A and C regions of the F protein responsible for neurovirulence of measles virus Osaka-1 strain from a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayata, Minoru; Tanaka, Miyuu; Kameoka, Kazuo; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makoto; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Ogura, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is the causative agent of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). We previously reported that the F gene of the SSPE Osaka-2 strain is the major determinant of MV neurovirulence. Because the sites and extents of mutations differ among SSPE strains, it is necessary to determine the mutations responsible for the SSPE-specific phenotypes of individual viral strain. In this study, recombinant viruses containing the envelope-associated genes from the SSPE Osaka-1 strain were generated in the IC323 wild-type MV background. Hamsters inoculated with MV containing the H gene of the Osaka-1 strain displayed hyperactivity and seizures, but usually recovered and survived. Hamsters inoculated with MV containing the F gene of the Osaka-1 strain displayed severe neurologic signs and died. Amino acid substitutions in the heptad repeat A and C regions of the F protein, including a methionine-to-valine substitution at amino acid 94, play major roles in neurovirulence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Contains Linear B Cell Epitopes in the N- and C-Terminal Regions that are Dependent on an Intact C-Terminus for Antibody Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Y. H