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Sample records for virus encoding gm-csf

  1. Replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding GM-CSF as a vector system for rapid and facile generation of autologous human tumor cell vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; Glazenburg, KL; van Veen, ML; Kraak, MMJ; Hospers, GAP; Storkel, S; de Vries, EGE; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the production of recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding murine or human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the capacity of these vectors to transduce murine and human tumor cells ex vivo. High-titer stocks (up to 3 x 10(9) particles/ml) of

  2. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

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    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  3. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

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    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  4. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

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    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chimeric rabies virus-like particles containing membrane-anchored GM-CSF enhances the immune response against rabies virus.

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    Kang, Hongtao; Qi, Yinglin; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-03-11

    Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP), which containing glycoprotein (G) and matrix protein (M) of rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs) were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M). The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  6. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

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    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  7. Incorporation of GM-CSF or CD40L Enhances the Immunogenicity of Hantaan Virus-Like Particles

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    Cheng, Lin-Feng; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Yu, Lan; Ye, Wei; Liu, Zi-Yu; Ying, Qi-Kang; Wu, Xing-An; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective Hantaan virus (HTNV) vaccine is highly desirable because HTNV causes an acute and often fatal disease (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). Since the immunity of the inactivated vaccine is weak and the safety is poor, HTNV virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive and safe alternative. These particles lack the viral genome but are perceived by the immune system as virus particles. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this enhancement, we generated chimeric HTNV VLPs containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity in vitro. The immunization of mice with chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L induced stronger humoral immune responses and cellular immune responses compared to the HTNV VLPs and Chinese commercial inactivated hantavirus vaccine. Chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L also protected mice from an HTNV challenge. Altogether, our results suggest that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into HTNV VLPs can be a potential approach for the control and prevention of HFRS. PMID:28066721

  8. Functional paralysis of GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells productively infected with ectromelia virus.

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    Lidia Szulc-Dąbrowska

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV is an orthopoxvirus responsible for mousepox, a lethal disease of certain strains of mice that is similar to smallpox in humans, caused by variola virus (VARV. ECTV, similar to VARV, exhibits a narrow host range and has co-evolved with its natural host. Consequently, ECTV employs sophisticated and host-specific strategies to control the immune cells that are important for induction of antiviral immune response. In the present study we investigated the influence of ECTV infection on immune functions of murine GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM, comprised of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs and macrophages. Our results showed for the first time that ECTV is able to replicate productively in GM-BM and severely impaired their innate and adaptive immune functions. Infected GM-BM exhibited dramatic changes in morphology and increased apoptosis during the late stages of infection. Moreover, GM-BM cells were unable to uptake and process antigen, reach full maturity and mount a proinflammatory response. Inhibition of cytokine/chemokine response may result from the alteration of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, IRF3 and IRF7 transcription factors and down-regulation of many genes involved in TLR, RLR, NLR and type I IFN signaling pathways. Consequently, GM-BM show inability to stimulate proliferation of purified allogeneic CD4+ T cells in a primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that ECTV induces immunosuppressive mechanisms in GM-BM leading to their functional paralysis, thus compromising their ability to initiate downstream T-cell activation events.

  9. Recombinant rabies viruses expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are effective vaccines for both intramuscular and oral immunizations.

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    Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Li, Zhenguang; Chai, Qingqing; Yang, Yang; Leyson, Christina M; Wu, Wenxue; Cui, Min; Fu, Zhen F

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recombinant rabies viruses (rRABV) expressing chemokines or cytokines (including GM-CSF) could enhance the immunogenicity by recruiting and/or activating dendritic cells (DC). In this study, bacterial flagellin was cloned into the RABV genome and recombinant virus LBNSE-Flagellin was rescued. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-Flagellin with recombinant virus expressing GMCSF (LBNSE-GMCSF), mice were immunized with each of these rRABVs by intramuscular (i.m.) or oral route. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. The i.m.-immunized mice were bled at three weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with 50 LD50 challenge virus standard (CVS-24). Orally immunized mice were boosted after three weeks and then bled and challenged one week after the booster immunization. It was found that both LBNSE-GMCSF and LBNSE-Flagellin recruited/activated more DCs and B cells in the periphery, stimulated higher levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected more mice against challenge infection than the parent virus LBNSE in both the i.m. and the orally immunized groups. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RABV expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are more immunogenic than the parent virus in both i.m. and oral immunizations.

  10. GM-CSF overexpression after influenza a virus infection prevents mortality and moderates M1-like airway monocyte/macrophage polarization.

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    Halstead, E Scott; Umstead, Todd M; Davies, Michael L; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Silveyra, Patricia; Howyrlak, Judie; Yang, Linlin; Guo, Weichao; Hu, Sanmei; Hewage, Eranda Kurundu; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2018-01-05

    Influenza A viruses cause life-threatening pneumonia and lung injury in the lower respiratory tract. Application of high GM-CSF levels prior to infection has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality from pathogenic influenza infection in mice, but the mechanisms of protection and treatment efficacy have not been established. Mice were infected intranasally with influenza A virus (PR8 strain). Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF were induced in the airways using the double transgenic GM-CSF (DTGM) or littermate control mice starting on 3 days post-infection (dpi). Assessment of respiratory mechanical parameters was performed using the flexiVent rodent ventilator. RNA sequence analysis was performed on FACS-sorted airway macrophage subsets at 8 dpi. Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF conferred a survival benefit, arrested the deterioration of lung mechanics, and reduced the abundance of protein exudates in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid to near baseline levels. Transcriptome analysis, and subsequent validation ELISA assays, revealed that excess GM-CSF re-directs macrophages from an "M1-like" to a more "M2-like" activation state as revealed by alterations in the ratios of CXCL9 and CCL17 in BAL fluid, respectively. Ingenuity pathway analysis predicted that GM-CSF surplus during IAV infection elicits expression of anti-inflammatory mediators and moderates M1 macrophage pro-inflammatory signaling by Type II interferon (IFN-γ). Our data indicate that application of high levels of GM-CSF in the lung after influenza A virus infection alters pathogenic "M1-like" macrophage inflammation. These results indicate a possible therapeutic strategy for respiratory virus-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury.

  11. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF.

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    Klimp, A H; van der Vaart, E; Lansink, P O; Withoff, S; de Vries, E G; Scherphof, G L; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-02-01

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) on intraperitoneal recruitment and activation of cells. Finally, the therapeutic effect of SFV-GM-CSF treatment on an i.p. growing ovarian tumor was determined. Intraperitoneal injections of recombinant SFV particles encoding the reporter protein luciferase resulted in a high level of luciferase activity in cells of the peritoneal lining and tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity. Low levels of luciferase activity were found in liver, spleen and lungs. Injection of SFV-GM-CSF particles resulted in a slight increase in the number of peritoneal macrophages and in a significant increase in the number of neutrophils. In contrast to multiple i.p. injections with commercially available recombinant GM-CSF, i.p. injected SFV-GM-CSF particles activated the macrophages to tumor cytotoxicity. Although treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SFV-GM-CSF particles did not result in prolonged survival, tumor growth was inhibited for 2 weeks. Our findings indicate that macrophage-activating cytokines expressed by the efficient and safe recombinant SFV system when administered i.p. may provide an immunotherapeutic treatment modality additional to current chemotherapeutic treatment of intraperitoneally growing cancers.

  12. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

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    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  13. A DNA vaccine encoding mutated HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen and GM-CSF and B7.1

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    Wang H

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available He Wang,1 Jiyun Yu,2 Li Li1 1Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is a predominant cause of cervical cancer, and HPV58 is the third most common virus detected in the patients with cervical cancer in Asia. E6 and E7 are the viral oncogenes which are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated tumor cells and can be used as target antigens for related immunotherapy. In this study, we modified the HPV58 E6 and E7 oncogenes to eliminate their oncogenic potential and constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine that coexpresses the sig-HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen in addition to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and B7.1 as molecular adjuvants (PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB for the treatment of HPV58 (+ cancer. Methods: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB recombinant DNA vaccine was constructed to express a fusion protein containing a signal peptide, a modified HPV58 mE6E7 gene, and human IgG Fc and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchoring sequences using the modified DNA vaccine vector PVAX1-IRES-GM/B7.1 that coexpresses GM-CSF, and B7.1. C57BL/6 mice were challenged by HPV58 E6E7-expressing B16-HPV58 E6E7 cells, followed by immunization by PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB vaccine on days 7, 14, 21 after tumor challenge. The cellular immune responses in immunized mice were assessed by measuring IFN-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation by HPV58 E6E7-GST protein and the lysis of B16-HPV58 E6E7 target cells by splenocytes after restimulation with HPV58 E6E7-GST protein. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated by monitoring the growth of the tumor. Results: PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB elicited varying levels of IFN-lsgdB58onn T-cell immune responses and lysis of target cell in mice in response to the

  14. GM-CSF DNA: an adjuvant for higher avidity IgG, rectal IgA, and increased protection against the acute phase of a SHIV-89.6P challenge by a DNA/MVA immunodeficiency virus vaccine.

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    Lai, Lilin; Vödrös, Dalma; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Robert L; Akerstrom, Vicki L; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Yu, Tianwei; Kannanganat, Sunil; Ofielu, Lazarus; Villinger, Francois; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao; Robinson, Harriet L

    2007-12-05

    Single intradermal or intramuscular inoculations of GM-CSF DNA with the DNA prime for a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-89.6 vaccine, which consists of DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boosting, increased protection of both the blood and intestines against the acute phase of an intrarectal SHIV-89.6P challenge. GM-CSF appeared to contribute to protection by enhancing two antibody responses: the avidity maturation of anti-Env IgG in blood (p=oranti-viral IgA in rectal secretions (p<0.01). The avidity of anti-Env IgG showed strong correlations with protection both pre and post challenge. Animals with the highest avidity anti-Env Ab had 1000-fold reductions in peak viremia over those with the lowest avidity anti-Env Ab. The enhanced IgA response was associated with the best protection, but did not achieve significance.

  15. Targeting GM-CSF in inflammatory diseases.

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    Wicks, Ian P; Roberts, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a growth factor first identified as an inducer of differentiation and proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages derived from haematopoietic progenitor cells. Later studies have shown that GM-CSF is involved in a wide range of biological processes in both innate and adaptive immunity, with its production being tightly linked to the response to danger signals. Given that the functions of GM-CSF span multiple tissues and biological processes, this cytokine has shown potential as a new and important therapeutic target in several autoimmune and inflammatory disorders - particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. Indeed, GM-CSF was one of the first cytokines detected in human synovial fluid from inflamed joints. Therapies that target GM-CSF or its receptor have been tested in preclinical studies with promising results, further supporting the potential of targeting the GM-CSF pathway. In this Review, we discuss our expanding view of the biology of GM-CSF, outline what has been learnt about GM-CSF from studies of animal models and human diseases, and summarize the results of early phase clinical trials evaluating GM-CSF antagonism in inflammatory disorders.

  16. Vaccination with a plasmid DNA encoding HER-2/neu together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma: a pilot clinical trial

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    Knutson Keith L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin treatment of breast cancer patients significantly improves their clinical outcome. Vaccination is an attractive alternative approach to provide HER-2/neu (Her2-specific antibodies and may in addition concomitantly stimulate Her2-reactive T-cells. Here we report the first administration of a Her2-plasmid DNA (pDNA vaccine in humans. Patients and Methods The vaccine, encoding a full-length signaling-deficient version of the oncogene Her2, was administered together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with metastatic Her2-expressing breast carcinoma who were also treated with trastuzumab. Six of eight enrolled patients completed all three vaccine cycles. In the remaining two patients treatment was discontinued after one vaccine cycle due to rapid tumor progression or disease-related complications. The primary objective was the evaluation of safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimen. As a secondary objective, treatment-induced Her2-specific immunity was monitored by measuring antibody production as well as T-cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to Her2-derived antigens. Results No clinical manifestations of acute toxicity, autoimmunity or cardiotoxicity were observed after administration of Her2-pDNA in combination with GM-CSF, IL-2 and trastuzumab. No specific T-cell proliferation following in vitro stimulation of freshly isolated PBMC with recombinant human Her2 protein was induced by the vaccination. Immediately after all three cycles of vaccination no or even decreased CD4+ T-cell responses towards Her2-derived peptide epitopes were observed, but a significant increase of MHC class II restricted T-cell responses to Her2 was detected at long term follow-up. Since concurrent trastuzumab therapy was permitted, λ-subclass specific ELISAs were performed to specifically measure endogenous antibody production without interference by trastuzumab. Her2-pDNA vaccination

  17. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

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    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  18. Recent progress in GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

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    Yan, Wan-Lun; Shen, Kuan-Yin; Tien, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Yu-An; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2017-03-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a growing field. GM-CSF, a potent cytokine promoting the differentiation of myeloid cells, can also be used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to elicit antitumor immunity. Additionally, GM-CSF is essential for the differentiation of dendritic cells, which are responsible for processing and presenting tumor antigens for the priming of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Some strategies have been developed for GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy in clinical practice: GM-CSF monotherapy, GM-CSF-secreting cancer cell vaccines, GM-CSF-fused tumor-associated antigen protein-based vaccines, GM-CSF-based DNA vaccines and GM-CSF combination therapy. GM-CSF also contributes to the regulation of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. This review provides recommendations regarding GM-CSF-based cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Pulmonary epithelial cell expression of GM-CSF corrects the alveolar proteinosis in GM-CSF-deficient mice.

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    J. A. Huffman; Hull, W M; Dranoff, G; Mulligan, R C; Whitsett, J A

    1996-01-01

    Mutation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene by homologous recombination caused alveolar proteinosis in mice. To further discern the role of GM-CSF in surfactant homeostasis, the synthesis of GM-CSF was directed to the respiratory epithelium of GM-CSF-hull mutant mice (GM-/-) with a chimeric gene expressing GM-CSF under the control of the promoter from the human surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene. Transgenic mice bearing the SP-C-GM-CSF construct (SP-C-GM+) wer...

  20. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) targets myeloid leukocytes in the uterus during the post-mating inflammatory response in mice.

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    Robertson, S A; O'Connell, A C; Hudson, S N; Seamark, R F

    2000-03-01

    Factors in seminal plasma elicit a surge of GM-CSF expression in uterine epithelial cells after mating in mice. This study investigates the nature of the endometrial cell populations targeted by epithelial GM-CSF. In quantitative RT-PCR studies, expression of the alpha-subunit of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSF-R) parallelled GM-CSF expression, being maximal during the 48 h period after mating and declining thereafter. Expression of mRNA encoding beta-common chain (AIC2B) also increased after mating and remained high until the time of embryo implantation on day 4 of pregnancy. Cells expressing GM-CSF receptors were identified in sections of uterus on the day after mating using 125I-GM-CSF, and were located predominantly in the endometrial stroma subjacent to the luminal epithelium, co-localising with abundant populations of myeloid leukocytes. Cells expressing GM-CSF receptor were identified as macrophages, granulocytes and putative dendritic cells by flow cytometric analysis using lineage and receptor subunit specific antibodies. Recombinant GM-CSF injected into the uterine lumen of ovariectomised mice was found to elicit a dose-dependant accumulation of macrophages and granulocytes in the endometrium, in a pattern of distribution comparable to that seen in uteri after natural mating. Together, these data indicate a role for epithelial cell-derived GM-CSF in mediating the recruitment and potentially in modifying the behaviour of uterine leukocytes during the post-mating inflammatory response in mice.

  1. GM-CSF as a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases.

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    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been known as a hematopoietic growth factor and immune modulator. Recent studies revealed that GM-CSF also had pro-inflammatory functions and contributed to the pathogenicity of Th17 cells in the development of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. GM-CSF inhibition in some animal models of autoimmune diseases showed significant beneficial effects. Therefore, several agents targeting GM-CSF are being developed and are expected to be a useful strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Particularly, in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, GM-CSF inhibition showed rapid and significant efficacy with no serious side effects. This article summarizes recent findings of GM-CSF and information of clinical trials targeting GM-CSF in autoimmune diseases.

  2. GM-CSF modulates pulmonary resistance to influenza A infection

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    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Murthy, Aditi; Davis, Jeremy; Florence, Jon Matthew; Kurdowska, Anna; Krupa, Agnieszka; Tichelaar, Jay W.; White, Mitchell R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Kobzik, Lester; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial or other pulmonary cells secrete GM-CSF that regulates surfactant catabolism and mucosal host defense through its capacity to modulate the maturation and activation of alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF enhances expression of scavenger receptors MARCO and SR-A. The alveolar macrophage SP-R210 receptor binds the surfactant collectin SP-A mediating clearance of respiratory pathogens. The current study determined the effects of epithelial-derived GM-CSF in host resistance to influenza A pneumonia. The results demonstrate that GM-CSF enhanced resistance to infection with 1.9 × 104 ffc of the mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 strain, as indicated by significant differences in mortality and mean survival of GM-CSF-deficient (GM−/−) mice compared to GM−/− mice in which GM-CSF is expressed at increased levels. Protective effects of GM-CSF were observed both in mice with constitutive and inducible GM-CSF expression under the control of the pulmonary-specific SFTPC or SCGB1A1 promoters, respectively. Mice that continuously secrete high levels of GM-CSF developed desquamative interstitial pneumonia that impaired long-term recovery from influenza. Conditional expression of optimal GM-CSF levels at the time of infection, however, resulted in alveolar macrophage proliferation and focal lymphocytic inflammation of distal airways. GM-CSF enhanced alveolar macrophage activity as indicated by increased expression of SP-R210 and CD11c. Infection of mice lacking the GM-CSF-regulated SR-A and MARCO receptors revealed that MARCO decreases resistance to influenza in association with increased levels of SP-R210 in MARCO−/− alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, GM-CSF enhances early host resistance to influenza. Targeting of MARCO may reinforce GM-CSF-mediated host defense against pathogenic influenza. PMID:21925209

  3. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  4. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A; Allan, Lenka L; Jackson, Linda M; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel L; Waddell, Thomas K; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A; Schrader, John W

    2013-05-07

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain.

  5. TNFalpha and GM-CSF-induced activation of the CAEV promoter is independent of AP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian G; Hötzel, Isidro; Jasmer, Douglas P; Davis, William C; Knowles, Donald

    2006-08-15

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus transcription is under the control of the viral promoter within the long terminal repeat. Previous studies with the closely related maedi visna lentivirus have indicated that viral transcription is dependent upon the AP-1 transcription factor. Other studies have indicated a potential role for the cytokines TNFalpha and GM-CSF in CAEV pathogenesis by increasing viral loads in infected tissues. The hypotheses that AP-1 transcription factors are necessary for transcriptional activation of the CAEV promoter and that CAEV transcriptional activation results from treatment with the cytokines GM-CSF and TNFalpha were tested with a stably transduced U937 cell line. Here, we found that TNFalpha and GM-CSF activated CAEV transcription in U937 cells. However, this activation effect was not blocked by SP600125, an inhibitor of Jun N-terminal kinase. SP600125 effectively prevented Jun phosphorylation in cells subsequently treated with cytokines. The cytokines TNFalpha and GM-CSF therefore activate CAEV transcription, and this effect occurs independently of AP-1. A set of progressive deletion mutants was utilized to show that TNFalpha-induced expression depends on an element or elements within the U3 70-bp repeat.

  6. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbusch, Matthias; Kuate, Seraphin; Tippler, Bettina; Gerlach, Nicole; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf; Uberla, Klaus

    2008-04-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA) were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expression of the antigen and the cytokine were tested in parallel. In vitro, the GM-CSF ovalbumin fusion protein (GM-OVA) led to the better stimulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by antigen-presenting cells than OVA and GM-CSF given as two separate proteins. However, prime-boost immunizations of mice with DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines encoding GM-OVA suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses to OVA. OVA-specific IgG2a antibody levels were also reduced, while the IgG1 antibody response was enhanced. Suppression of CD8+ T cell responses by GM-OVA vaccines was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. In contrast, the coexpression of GM-CSF and antigens in DNA prime adenoviral boost immunizations led to a striking expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells without the induction of autoantibodies. The induction of autoantibodies suggests a general note of caution regarding the use of highly immunogenic viral vector vaccines encoding fusion proteins between antigens and host proteins. In contrast, the expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells after immunizations with bicistronic vectors further support a potential application of GM-CSF as an adjuvant for heterologous prime-boost regimens with genetic vaccines. Since DNA prime adenoviral vector boost regimenes are presently considered as one of the most efficient ways to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice, non-human primates and humans, further enhancement of this response by GM-CSF is a striking observation.

  7. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Nicole

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expression of the antigen and the cytokine were tested in parallel. Results In vitro, the GM-CSF ovalbumin fusion protein (GM-OVA led to the better stimulation of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by antigen-presenting cells than OVA and GM-CSF given as two separate proteins. However, prime-boost immunizations of mice with DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines encoding GM-OVA suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses to OVA. OVA-specific IgG2a antibody levels were also reduced, while the IgG1 antibody response was enhanced. Suppression of CD8+ T cell responses by GM-OVA vaccines was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. In contrast, the coexpression of GM-CSF and antigens in DNA prime adenoviral boost immunizations led to a striking expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells without the induction of autoantibodies. Conclusion The induction of autoantibodies suggests a general note of caution regarding the use of highly immunogenic viral vector vaccines encoding fusion proteins between antigens and host proteins. In contrast, the expansion of polyfunctional OVA-specific CD8+ T cells after immunizations with bicistronic vectors further support a potential application of GM-CSF as an adjuvant for heterologous prime-boost regimens with genetic vaccines. Since DNA prime adenoviral vector boost regimenes are presently considered as one of the most efficient ways to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice, non-human primates and humans, further

  8. Anti-tumour research of recombinant BCG using BZLF1 and hGM-CSF fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Li, Yun-Qing; Yang, Chun-Qing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Cheng, Baohua; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2017-03-14

    The random primer Oligo(dT) 15 was used in RT-PCR to obtain cDNA from the human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene BZLF1. Then, the sequence splicing overlap extension method was used to obtain a GCBF fusion gene containing a linker sequence that encoded the polypeptide (Gly 4 Ser) 3 . The GCBF fusion gene was inserted into pMV261, which was then transformed into competent E. coli DH5 alpha cells, and positive cells were selected based on kanamycin resistance on LB plates. The recombinant plasmid pMVBZLF1 was extracted from E. coli, and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) was transformed into competent cells. According to the RT-PCR results, the target genes hGM-CSF and BZLF1 were 461bp and 788bp in size, which was in agreement with the expected values. Construction of the recombinant plasmid by double enzyme digestion, amplification, sequencing and Western blotting confirmed that the GCBF fusion gene (1204bp) was correctly inserted into pMV261, successfully transformed into BCG competent cells, and properly expressed. After mice were injected with rBCG (recombinant BCG), antibody levels were detected using ELISA, and spleen cells were obtained and the killing rates of specific CTLs by rBCG were detected using a CTL assay kit. Then, the influence of rBCG on tumour cells was analysed in C57BL/6 mice. We found that rBCG-secreting cytokines hybridized with hGM-CSF and BZLF1 antibodies and that the rBCG vaccine stimulated antibody production in C57BL/6 mice. The specific cytotoxic effects of the spleen cells from the rBCG group on EB virus-positive tumour cells was significantly different from the cytotoxic effects of the control group cells (P<0.01). CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes were detected in the tumour tissues of the rBCG group mice by flow cytometry, indicating that CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes infiltrated into the tumour tissue in the mice. Morphological observations of the tumour sections from

  9. GM-CSF: a role in immune and inflammatory reactions in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2010-12-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that promotes myeloid cell development and maturation, and dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. Growing evidence supports the notion that GM-CSF has a major role in some inflammatory and autoimmune reactions and in the host's response to pulmonary infection, but few studies have addressed its functions and importance in the GI tract. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of GM-CSF can result in clinical improvement in patients with Crohn's disease. Mice deficient in GM-CSF (GM-CSF(-/-) ) developed more severe intestinal and systemic infection after an enteric infection, and more severe colitis in response to enteric exposure to dextran sodium sulfate. Both the severity of infection and colitis were largely prevented by GM-CSF administration. Such studies indicate that GM-CSF has an important role in the regulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory responses.

  10. TRAF6 is required for the GM-CSF-induced JNK, p38 and Akt activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwu; Zhou, Chenchen; Huo, Jiang; Ni, Yanli; Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Cheng; Jing, Bin; Xiao, Fengjun; Chen, Wenxia; Li, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Luo

    2015-06-01

    JNK, p38 and Akt signalings have been shown to be activated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and are pivotal for GM-CSF-mediated survival, proliferation and differentiation of macrophages and their progenitors. However, the detailed mechanism of how these signalings is activated by GM-CSF is not fully elucidated. We report here that E3 ligase TRAF6 is required for the GM-CSF-induced activation of JNK, p38 and Akt. GM-CSF triggers autoubiquitination of TRAF6 and TRAF6 knocked down results in impaired activation of JNK and p38 signaling. TRAF6 is also required for GM-CSF-induced ubiquitination and activation of Akt. These findings reveal novel roles of TRAF6 in GM-CSF signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion. PMID:23634280

  12. Suppressive Effects on the Immune Response and Protective Immunity to a JEV DNA Vaccine by Co-administration of a GM-CSF-Expressing Plasmid in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Wu, Jiangman; Zhu, Junping; Li, Jieqiong; Wang, Juan; Chen, Yanlei; An, Jing

    2012-01-01

    As a potential cytokine adjuvant of DNA vaccines, granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has received considerable attention due to its essential role in the recruitment of antigen-presenting cells, differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells. However, in our recent study of a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) DNA vaccine, co-inoculation of a GM-CSF plasmid dramatically suppressed the specific IgG response and resulted in decreased protection against JEV challenge. It is known that GM-CSF has been used in clinic to treat neutropenia for repopulating myeloid cells, and as an adjuvant in vaccine studies; it has shown various effects on the immune response. Therefore, in this study, we characterized the suppressive effects on the immune response to a JEV DNA vaccine by the co-administration of the GM-CSF-expressing plasmid and clarified the underlying mechanisms of the suppression in mice. Our results demonstrated that co-immunization with GM-CSF caused a substantial dampening of the vaccine-induced antibody responses. The suppressive effect was dose- and timing-dependent and likely related to the immunogenicity of the antigen. The suppression was associated with the induction of immature dendritic cells and the expansion of regulatory T cells but not myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Collectively, our findings not only provide valuable information for the application of GM-CSF in clinic and using as a vaccine adjuvant but also offer further insight into the understanding of the complex roles of GM-CSF. PMID:22493704

  13. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  14. A novel subunit vaccine co-expressing GM-CSF and PCV2b Cap protein enhances protective immunity against porcine circovirus type 2 in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Qian, Ping; Peng, Bo; Shi, Lin; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-05-15

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes porcine circovirus-associated disease. Capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is the principal immunogenic protein that induces neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. GM-CSF is an immune adjuvant that enhances responses to vaccines. In this study, recombinant baculoviruses Ac-Cap and Ac-Cap-GM-CSF expressing the Cap protein alone and co-expressing the Cap protein and porcine GM-CSF, respectively, were constructed successfully. The target proteins were analyzed by western blotting and IFA. Further, these proteins were confirmed by electron microscopy, which showed that Cap proteins could self-assemble into virus-like particles having diameters of 17-25nm. Animal experiments showed that pigs immunized with Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies than pigs immunized with the Cap subunit vaccine and a commercial vaccine (Ingelvac CircoFLEX; PGM-CSF subunit vaccine showed significantly higher average daily weight gain after wild-type PCV2 challenge than pigs receiving the other three vaccines (PGM-CSF was a powerful immunoadjuvant for PCV2 subunit vaccines because it enhanced humoral immune response and improved immune protection against PCV2 infection in pigs. Thus, the novel Cap-GM-CSF subunit vaccine has the potential to be used as an effective and safe vaccine candidate against PCV2 infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GM-CSF and GM-CSF receptor have regulatory role in transforming rat mesenteric mesothelial cells into macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sándor; Zsiros, Viktória; Dóczi, Nikolett; Szabó, Arnold; Biczó, Ádám; Kiss, Anna L

    2016-10-01

    During peritonitis, mesothelial cells assume macrophage characteristics, expressing macrophage markers, indicating that they might differentiate into macrophage-like cells. Twenty-five male rats were used for in vivo experiments. For in vitro experiments, a primary mesentery culture model was developed. The mesothelial cell to macrophage-like cell transition was followed by studying ED1 expression. In vitro primary mesenteric culture was treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 1 ng/ml). Blocking internalization of receptor-ligand complex, Dynasore (80 µM) was used. Acute peritonitis was induced by Freund's adjuvant's (1 ml) intraperitoneal injection. Immunohistochemistry: GM-CSF in vitro treatment resulted in a prominent ED1 expression in transformed mesothelial cells. Blocking the internalization, ED1 expression could not be detected. GM-CSF receptor (both α and β) was expressed in mesothelial cells in vitro (even if the GM-CSF was not present) and in vivo. Inflammation resulted in an increasing GM-CSF and GM-CSF-receptor level in the lysate of mesothelial cells. Mesothelial cells can differentiate into macrophage-like cells, and GM-CSF, produced by the mesothelial cells, has probably an autocrine regulatory role in this transition. Our results provide new data about the plasticity of mesothelial cell and support the idea that during inflammation macrophages can derive from non-hematopoietic sources as well.

  16. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A+GM-CSF+ double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF+CD4+ cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF+ and IL-17A+GM-CSF+ double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  17. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Peter T; Yager, Eric J; Lynch, Debbie T; Narendran, Amithi; Stagnar, Cristy; Franchini, Anthony M; Fuller, James T; White, Phil A; Nyuandi, Julia; Wiley, Clayton A; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Fuller, Deborah H

    2010-06-08

    The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99) HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun) was analyzed in rhesus macaques. Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine. These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  18. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques.Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine.These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  19. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. PMID:23600834

  20. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, D. E. A.; Cohen, E. S.; Gerlag, D. M.; Campbell, J.; Woods, J.; Davis, N.; van Nieuwenhuijze, A.; Lewis, A.; Heasmen, S.; McCourt, M.; Corkill, D.; Dodd, A.; Elvin, J.; Statache, G.; Wicks, I. P.; Anderson, I. K.; Nash, A.; Sleeman, M. A.; Tak, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue

  1. GM-CSF has disparate roles during intranasal and intradermal Francisella tularensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Sherry L; Bosio, Catharine M; De Pascalis, Roberto; Elkins, Karen L

    2016-12-01

    Our laboratory has employed in vitro and in vivo mouse models based on Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS)-induced protection to elucidate immune correlates for intracellular bacteria. Among the effectors found was GM-CSF, a pleiotropic cytokine that is integral to the development and proliferation of myeloid cells, including alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF has roles in resistance to primary murine infection with several intracellular pathogens, but its role during Francisella infection is unknown. Francisella is an intracellular pathogen that infects lungs after inhalation, primarily invading alveolar macrophages. Here we show that GM-CSF has route-dependent roles during primary infection of mice with LVS. GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF KO) mice were slightly more susceptible than wild type to intradermal infection, but had increased resistance to intranasal infection. Similarly, these mice had increased resistance to pulmonary infection with virulent F. tularensis (SchuS4). LVS-vaccinated GM-CSF KO mice had normal adaptive immune responses, as measured by T cell activities after LVS intradermal or intranasal vaccination, and survived lethal secondary LVS challenge. GM-CSF KO mice also had robust humoral responses, producing elevated levels of serum antibodies following LVS vaccination compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our data demonstrates that the absence of GM-CSF improves resistance to pulmonary, but not intradermal, infection with Francisella. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. GM-CSF promotes migration of human monocytes across the blood brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Kooij, Gijs; Heijnen, Priscilla D A M; Breur, Marjolein; Peferoen, Laura A N; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Infiltration of monocytes into the CNS is crucial for disease onset and progression. Animal studies indicate that granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may play an essential role in this process, possibly by acting on the migratory capacities of myeloid cells across the blood-brain barrier. This study describes the effect of GM-CSF on human monocytes, macrophages, and microglia. Furthermore, the expression of GM-CSF and its receptor was investigated in the CNS under healthy and pathological conditions. We show that GM-CSF enhances monocyte migration across human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells in vitro. Next, immunohistochemical analysis on human brain tissues revealed that GM-CSF is highly expressed by microglia and macrophages in MS lesions. The GM-CSF receptor is expressed by neurons in the rim of combined gray/white matter lesions and astrocytes. Finally, the effect of GM-CSF on human macrophages was determined, revealing an intermediate activation status, with a phenotype similar to that observed in active MS lesions. Together our data indicate that GM-CSF is a powerful stimulator of monocyte migration, and is abundantly present in the inflamed CNS where it may act as an activator of macrophages and microglia. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. GM-CSF Enhances Macrophage Glycolytic Activity In Vitro and Improves Detection of Inflammation In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parmanand; González-Ramos, Silvia; Mojena, Marina; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Emami, Hamed; Swanson, Jeffrey; Morss, Alex; Fayad, Zahi A; Rudd, James H F; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paz-García, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    (18)F-FDG accumulates in glycolytically active tissues and is known to concentrate in tissues that are rich in activated macrophages. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a clinically used cytokine, increases macrophage glycolysis and deoxyglucose uptake in vitro and acutely enhances (18)F-FDG uptake within inflamed tissues such as atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. In vitro experiments were conducted on human macrophages whereby inflammatory activation and uptake of radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose was assessed before and after GM-CSF exposure. In vivo studies were performed on mice and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the effect of GM-CSF on (18)F-FDG uptake in normal versus inflamed arteries, using PET. Incubation of human macrophages with GM-CSF resulted in increased glycolysis and increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake (P GM-CSF administration resulted in a 70% and 73% increase (P GM-CSF substantially augments glycolytic flux in vitro (via a mechanism dependent on ubiquitous type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and tumor necrosis factor-α) and increases (18)F-FDG uptake within inflamed atheroma in vivo. These findings demonstrate that GM-CSF can be used to enhance detection of inflammation. Further studies should explore the role of GM-CSF stimulation to enhance the detection of inflammatory foci in other disease states. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. GM-CSF Induces Inflammatory Macrophages by Regulating Glycolysis and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Gu, Gyo Jung; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Na, Juri; Woo, Jin Sun; Cho, Joo Youn; Youn, Hyewon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-11-15

    GM-CSF induces proinflammatory macrophages, but the underlying mechanisms have not been studied thus far. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of how GM-CSF induces inflammatory macrophages. First, we observed that GM-CSF increased the extent of LPS-induced acute glycolysis in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. This directly correlates with an inflammatory phenotype because glycolysis inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose abolished GM-CSF-mediated increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70 synthesis upon LPS stimulation. Increased glycolytic capacity is due to de novo synthesis of glucose transporter (GLUT)-1, -3, and -4, as well as c-myc. Meanwhile, GM-CSF increased 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Inhibition of acute glycolysis or 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase abrogated the inflammatory effects of GM-CSF priming in macrophages. Finally, mice with inflamed colons exposed to dextran sodium sulfate containing GLUT-1high macrophages led to massive uptake of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, but GM-CSF neutralization reduced the positron-emission tomography signal in the intestine and also decreased GLUT-1 expression in colonic macrophages. Collectively, our results reveal glycolysis and lipid metabolism created by GM-CSF as the underlying metabolic constructs for the function of inflammatory macrophages. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies.

  6. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  7. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Canato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+ T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  8. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-12-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  9. The infarcted myocardium solicits GM-CSF for the detrimental oversupply of inflammatory leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Atsushi; Choi, Jennifer L; He, Shun; Fenn, Ashley M; Nairz, Manfred; Rattik, Sara; McAlpine, Cameron S; Mindur, John E; Chan, Christopher T; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Stone, James R; Becher, Burkhard; Swirski, Filip K

    2017-11-06

    Myocardial infarction (MI) elicits massive inflammatory leukocyte recruitment to the heart. Here, we hypothesized that excessive leukocyte invasion leads to heart failure and death during acute myocardial ischemia. We found that shortly and transiently after onset of ischemia, human and mouse cardiac fibroblasts produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that acts locally and distally to generate and recruit inflammatory and proteolytic cells. In the heart, fibroblast-derived GM-CSF alerts its neighboring myeloid cells to attract neutrophils and monocytes. The growth factor also reaches the bone marrow, where it stimulates a distinct myeloid-biased progenitor subset. Consequently, hearts of mice deficient in either GM-CSF or its receptor recruit fewer leukocytes and function relatively well, whereas mice producing GM-CSF can succumb from left ventricular rupture, a complication mitigated by anti-GM-CSF therapy. These results identify GM-CSF as both a key contributor to the pathogenesis of MI and a potential therapeutic target, bolstering the idea that GM-CSF is a major orchestrator of the leukocyte supply chain during inflammation. © 2017 Anzai et al.

  10. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα+ myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GM-CSF is not essential for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis but promotes brain-targeted disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Emily R; Goverman, Joan M

    2017-04-06

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been used as an animal model of multiple sclerosis to identify pathogenic cytokines that could be therapeutic targets. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is the only cytokine reported to be essential for EAE. We investigated the role of GM-CSF in EAE in C3HeB/FeJ mice that uniquely exhibit extensive brain and spinal cord inflammation. Unexpectedly, GM-CSF-deficient C3HeB/FeJ mice were fully susceptible to EAE because IL-17 activity compensated for the loss of GM-CSF during induction of spinal cord-targeted disease. In contrast, both GM-CSF and IL-17 were needed to fully overcome the inhibitory influence of IFN-γ on the induction of inflammation in the brain. Both GM-CSF and IL-17 independently promoted neutrophil accumulation in the brain, which was essential for brain-targeted disease. These results identify a GM-CSF/IL-17/IFN-γ axis that regulates inflammation in the central nervous system and suggest that a combination of cytokine-neutralizing therapies may be needed to dampen central nervous system autoimmunity.

  12. GM-CSF: From Growth Factor to Central Mediator of Tissue Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Burkhard; Tugues, Sonia; Greter, Melanie

    2016-11-15

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was initially classified as a hematopoietic growth factor. However, unlike its close relatives macrophage CSF (M-CSF) and granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), the majority of myeloid cells do not require GM-CSF for steady-state myelopoiesis. Instead, in inflammation, GM-CSF serves as a communication conduit between tissue-invading lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Even though lymphocytes are in all likelihood the instigators of chronic inflammatory disease, GM-CSF-activated phagocytes are well equipped to cause tissue damage. The pivotal role of GM-CSF at the T cell:myeloid cell interface might shift our attention toward studying the function of the myeloid compartment in immunopathology. Targeting specifically the crosstalk between T cells and myeloid cells through GM-CSF holds promise for the development of therapeutics to combat chronic tissue inflammation. Here, we will review some of the major discoveries of the recent past, which indicate that GM-CSF is so much more than its name suggests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. GM-CSF in murine psoriasiform dermatitis: Redundant and pathogenic roles uncovered by antibody-induced neutralization and genetic deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tatjana; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard; Sadik, Christian D; Böhm, Beate; Burkhardt, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic, Th17-derived cytokine thought to critically contribute to the pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies that block GM-CSF activity is associated with favorable therapeutic effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We evaluated the role of GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic interference in psoriasis using a combined pharmacologic and genetic approach and the mouse model of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis (IMQPD). Neutralization of murine GM-CSF by an anti-GM-CSF antibody ameliorated IMQPD. In contrast, genetic deficiency in GM-CSF did not alter the course of IMQPD, suggesting the existence of mechanisms compensating for chronic, but not acute, absence of GM-CSF. Further investigation uncovered an alternative pathogenic pathway for IMQPD in the absence of GM-CSF characterized by an expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cell population and release of IFNα and IL-22. This pathway was not activated in wild-type mice during short-term anti-GM-CSF treatment. Our investigations support the potential value of GM-CSF as a therapeutic target in psoriatic disease. The discovery of an alternative pathogenic pathway for psoriasiform dermatitis in the permanent absence of GM-CSF, however, suggests the need for monitoring during therapeutic use of long-term GM-CSF blockade.

  14. Mechanisms of GM-CSF increase by diesel exhaust particles in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, S; Bonvallot, V; Fournier, T; Baeza-Squiban, A; Aubier, M; Marano, F

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) stimulates human airway epithelial cells to secrete the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-8, interleukin-1beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) involved in allergic diseases. In the present paper, we studied the mechanisms underlying the increase in GM-CSF release elicited by DEPs using the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. RT-PCR analysis has shown an increase in GM-CSF mRNA levels after DEP treatments. Comparison of the effects of DEPs, extracted DEPs, or extracts of DEPs has shown that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and not to the metals present on the DEP surface because the metal chelator desferrioxamine had no inhibitory effect. Furthermore, radical scavengers inhibited the DEP-induced GM-CSF release, showing involvement of reactive oxygen species in this response. Moreover genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, abrogated the effects of DEPs on GM-CSF release, whereas protein kinase (PK) C, PKA, cyclooxygenase, or lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. PD-98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase, diminished the effects of DEPs, whereas SB-203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, had a lower effect, and DEPs did actually increase the active, phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase as shown by Western blotting. In addition, cytochalasin D, which inhibits the phagocytosis of DEPs, reduced the increase in GM-CSF release after DEP treatment. Together, these data suggest that the increase in GM-CSF release is mainly due to the adsorbed organic compounds and that the effect of native DEPs requires endocytosis of the particles. Reactive oxygen species and tyrosine kinase(s) may be involved in the DEP-triggered signaling of the GM-CSF response.

  15. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  16. Differential binding of IL-3 and GM-CSF to human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M J; Moss, J; Dottore, M; Park, L S; Vadas, M A; Lopez, A F

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes respond to IL-3 and GM-CSF with a similar range of functional activities, and at similar cytokine concentrations. We have recently shown, however, that the rate of monocyte activation is greater in response to GM-CSF than to IL-3. In order to understand the basis of this phenomenon we investigated the interaction of IL-3 and GM-CSF with their surface receptors by means of kinetic binding experiments. 125I-GM-CSF showed very rapid association to monocytes at 37 degrees C, with a half-time of only 40 sec. The pattern of binding with this ligand was complex, with a decline in overall cell-associated radioactivity after 2 min of incubation. In contrast, 125I-IL-3 showed slower association, with a half-time at 37 degrees C of 2.5 min. The different rates of association correlated well with the different rates of cell activation induced by the two cytokines. On the other hand, rates of internalisation were similar for the two cytokines, with half-times of 14-15 min. Competition binding experiments performed under high affinity conditions showed that IL-3 and GM-CSF cross-competed for binding on the surface of monocytes. In contrast, under low affinity conditions IL-3 did not compete for 125I-GM-CSF binding while GM-CSF was a strong competitor of 125I-IL-3 binding. In quantitative inhibition experiments GM-CSF showed inhibitory effects on low affinity 125I-IL-3 binding at lower concentrations than those needed with unlabelled IL-3. It is suggested that current models of IL-3/GM-CSF receptor interactions need to be revised in order to accommodate the unique pattern of competition on human monocytes presented here.

  17. Granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly enhances articular cartilage repair potential by microfracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, M-D; Choi, B H; Kim, Y J; Kim, M S; Min, B-H

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be used to increase the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in blood clots formed by microfracture arthroplasty (MFX) and whether it can improve the therapeutic outcome for cartilage repair. Thirty-six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) GM-CSF, (3) MFX, and (4) GM-CSF + MFX. GM-CSF was administrated intravenously (IV) at 10 μg/kg body weight 20 min before the MFX surgery. The repaired tissues were retrieved and examined by histological observation, quantitative assessment, and biochemical assays at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of MSCs was measured in the blood clots by the colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. The kinetic profile and distribution of GM-CSF in vivo was also evaluated by near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. In the histological observations and chemical assays examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the MFX after GM-CSF administration showed better cartilage repair than the one without GM-CSF. The CFU-F assay showed a significantly larger amount of MSCs present in the blood clots of the GM-CSF + MFX group than in the blood clots of the other groups. The blood concentration of GM-CSF peaked at 10 min and decreased back to almost the initial level after a couple of hours. GM-CSF was distributed in many organs including the bone marrow but was not observed clearly in the joint cavity. Intravenous administration of GM-CSF together with MFX could be a promising therapeutic protocol to enhance the repair of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A neuroprotective function for the hematopoietic protein granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Krüger, Carola; Pitzer, Claudia; Weber, Daniela; Laage, Rico; Gassler, Nikolaus; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Mier, Walter; Kirsch, Friederike; Dittgen, Tanjew; Bach, Alfred; Sommer, Clemens; Schneider, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the myeloid lineage, which was cloned more than 20 years ago...

  19. Local Delivery of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) Generates Systemic Antitumor Immune Responses Enhanced by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesta, Achim K; Cooke, Keegan; Piasecki, Julia; Mitchell, Petia; Rottman, James B; Fitzgerald, Karen; Zhan, Jinghui; Yang, Becky; Le, Tiep; Belmontes, Brian; Ikotun, Oluwatayo F; Merriam, Kim; Glaus, Charles; Ganley, Kenneth; Cordover, David H; Boden, Andrea M; Ponce, Rafael; Beers, Courtney; Beltran, Pedro J

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Talimogene laherparepvec, a new oncolytic immunotherapy, has been recently approved for the treatment of melanoma. Using a murine version of the virus, we characterized local and systemic antitumor immune responses driving efficacy in murine syngeneic models.Experimental Design: The activity of talimogene laherparepvec was characterized against melanoma cell lines using an in vitro viability assay. Efficacy of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) (talimogene laherparepvec with the mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transgene) alone or in combination with checkpoint blockade was characterized in A20 and CT-26 contralateral murine tumor models. CD8(+) depletion, adoptive T-cell transfers, and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assays were used to study the mechanism of action (MOA) of systemic immune responses.Results: Treatment with OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) cured all injected A20 tumors and half of contralateral tumors. Viral presence was limited to injected tumors and was not responsible for systemic efficacy. A significant increase in T cells (CD3(+)/CD8(+)) was observed in injected and contralateral tumors at 168 hours. Ex vivo analyses showed these cytotoxic T lymphocytes were tumor-specific. Increased neutrophils, monocytes, and chemokines were observed in injected tumors only. Importantly, depletion of CD8(+) T cells abolished all systemic efficacy and significantly decreased local efficacy. In addition, immune cell transfer from OncoVEX(mGM-CSF)-cured mice significantly protected from tumor challenge. Finally, combination of OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) and checkpoint blockade resulted in increased tumor-specific CD8(+) anti-AH1 T cells and systemic efficacy.Conclusions: The data support a dual MOA for OncoVEX(mGM-CSF) that involves direct oncolysis of injected tumors and activation of a CD8(+)-dependent systemic response that clears injected and contralateral tumors when combined with checkpoint inhibition. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6190-202. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American

  20. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  1. Rab27a regulates GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Catz, Sergio D

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil secretory proteins are mediators of systemic inflammation in infection, trauma, and cancer. In response to specific inflammatory mediators, neutrophil granules are mobilized and cargo proteins released to modulate the microenvironment of inflammatory sites and tumors. In particular, GM-CSF, a cytokine secreted by several immune, nonimmune, and tumor cells, regulates neutrophil priming and exocytosis. Whereas a comprehensive understanding of this process is necessary to design appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies, the molecular effectors regulating GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis are currently unknown. With the use of neutrophils deficient in the small GTPase Rab27a or its effector Munc13-4, we show that although both of these secretory factors control matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) exocytosis in response to GM-CSF, their involvement in exocytosis after GM-CSF priming is very different. Whereas GM-CSF priming-induced exocytosis is abolished in the absence of Rab27a for all secondary stimuli tested, including TLR7, TLR9, and formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1) ligands, cells lacking Munc13-4 showed a significant exocytic response to GM-CSF priming. The mobilization of CD11b was independent of both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in GM-CSF-primed cells unless the cells were stimulated with nucleic acid-sensing TLR ligand, thus highlighting a role for both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in endocytic TLR maturation. Finally, the observation that the absence of Rab27a expression impairs the exocytosis of MMP-9 and MPO under both primed and unprimed conditions suggests that Rab27a is a possible target for intervention in inflammatory processes in which GM-CSF-dependent neutrophil priming is involved. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

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    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  3. Incorporating the use of GM-CSF in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical activity of GM-CSF in combination with standard dose rituximab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The rationale for exploring this combination is provided by the ability of GM-CSF to increase surface expression of CD20 in CLL cells and potentially render them a better target for rituximab. GM-CSF also enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against CLL cells. The combination of GM-CSF and rituximab was evaluated as initial treatment in elderly patients with indication for treatment and in patients at high risk for progression identified by elevated beta(2) microglobulin. This combination was also evaluated in patients with recurrent CLL. On the basis of the results of 118 patients, we observed an overall response rate of 65 and 9% complete remission and these results compare favourably with the results obtained with rituximab single agent. This combination was well tolerated with the most common toxicity consisting in mild GM-CSF injection site erythema. On the basis of this experience, we are currently evaluating the use of GM-CSF in combination with the chemoimmunotherapy regimen fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab.

  4. GM-CSF primes cardiac inflammation in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease

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    McKenzie, Brent S.

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric heart disease in developed countries. KD patients develop cardiac inflammation, characterized by an early infiltrate of neutrophils and monocytes that precipitates coronary arteritis. Although the early inflammatory processes are linked to cardiac pathology, the factors that regulate cardiac inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the heart remain obscure. In this study, using a mouse model of KD (induced by a cell wall Candida albicans water-soluble fraction [CAWS]), we identify an essential role for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in orchestrating these events. GM-CSF is rapidly produced by cardiac fibroblasts after CAWS challenge, precipitating cardiac inflammation. Mechanistically, GM-CSF acts upon the local macrophage compartment, driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, whereas therapeutically, GM-CSF blockade markedly reduces cardiac disease. Our findings describe a novel role for GM-CSF as an essential initiating cytokine in cardiac inflammation and implicate GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in KD. PMID:27595596

  5. Biological Effects of Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Antibody Formation in Patients Treated With GM-CSF (Sargramostim) as Adjuvant Therapy of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, Lynn E; Cao, Huynh; Piironen, Timo; Whiteside, Theresa L; Weber, Robert W; Cruickshank, Scott

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients receiving prolonged therapy with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy of melanoma and the impact of these antibodies on biological effects. Fifty-three patients with high-risk melanoma that had been surgically excised were treated with GM-CSF, 125 μg/m daily for 14 days every 28 days for 1 year after surgical resection of disease. Serum samples for antibodies to GM-CSF were measured before treatment and on study days 155 and 351. Blood draws for testing biological effects were keyed to GM-CSF administration: days 0 (before), 15 (after 14 d on GM-CSF), 29 (after 14 d off GM-CSF), 155, and 351 (after 14 d on GM-CSF in the sixth and 13th cycle of treatment). Of 53 patients enrolled, 43 were evaluable for the development of anti-GM-CSF antibodies. Of these, 93% developed binding antibodies and 42% developed both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The increase in the white blood cell count, percent eosinophils, or neopterin levels engendered by GM-CSF administration was abrogated or markedly decreased in patients with neutralizing antibodies but not in patients who developed only binding antibodies. Ninety-three percent of patients with melanoma treated with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy develop antibodies to GM-CSF. In those with neutralizing antibodies, a diminution of the biological effects of GM-CSF was observed. The development of neutralizing antibodies might also abrogate the potential clinical benefit of this treatment and should be considered in the design of future clinical trials.

  6. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor does not increase the potency or efficacy of a foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine Fator estimulante de colônias de granu-lócitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF não aumenta a eficácia ou potência da vacina de subunidades da febre aftosa em suínos

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    Luizinho Caron

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is one of the most feared diseases of livestock worldwide. Vaccination has been a very effective weapon in controlling the disease, however a number of concerns with the current vaccine including the inability of approved diagnostic tests to reliably distinguish vaccinated from infected animals and the need for high containment facilities for vaccine production, have limited its use during outbreaks in countries previously free of the disease. A number of FMD vaccine candidates have been tested and a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector containing the FMDV capsid (P1-2A and 3C protease coding regions has been shown to completely protect pigs against challenge with the homologous virus (FMDV A12 and A24. An Ad5-P1-2A+3C vaccine for FMDV O1 Campos (Ad5-O1C, however, only induced a low FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response in swine potency tests. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has been successfully used to stimulate the immune response in vaccine formulations against a number of diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and B. To attempt to improve the FMDV-specific immune response induced by Ad5-O1C, we inoculated swine with Ad5-O1C and an Ad5 vector containing the gene for porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF. However, in the conditions used in this trial, pGM-CSF did not improve the immune response to Ad5-O1C and adversely affected the level of protection of swine challenged with homologous FMDV.A febre aftosa é uma das doenças mais temidas nos rebanhos em todo o mundo. A vacinação tem sido uma arma eficiente no controle da doença, no entanto há preocupações com as vacinas atualmente utilizadas incluindo a necessidade de instalações de alta segurança para a produção dessas vacinas e a falta de um teste de diagnóstico aprovado que faça distinção precisa entre animais vacinados dos infectados. Várias vacinas têm sido testadas contra a febre aftosa e uma dessas

  7. Expression of GM-CSF in T Cells Is Increased in Multiple Sclerosis and Suppressed by IFN-β Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Javad; Ciric, Bogoljub; Imitola, Jaime; Gonnella, Patricia; Hwang, Daniel; Mahajan, Kedar; Mari, Elisabeth R; Safavi, Farinaz; Leist, Thomas P; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the CNS. Studies in animal models of MS have shown that GM-CSF produced by T cells is necessary for the development of autoimmune CNS inflammation. This suggests that GM-CSF may have a pathogenic role in MS as well, and a clinical trial testing its blockade is ongoing. However, there have been few reports on GM-CSF production by T cells in MS. The objective of this study was to characterize GM-CSF production by T cells of MS patients and to determine the effect of IFN-β therapy on its production. GM-CSF production by peripheral blood (PB) T cells and the effects of IFN-β were characterized in samples of untreated and IFN-β-treated MS patients versus healthy subjects. GM-CSF production by T cells in MS brain lesions was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Untreated MS patients had significantly greater numbers of GM-CSF(+)CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in PB compared with healthy controls and IFN-β-treated MS patients. IFN-β significantly suppressed GM-CSF production by T cells in vitro. A number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in MS brain lesions expressed GM-CSF. Elevated GM-CSF production by PB T cells in MS is indicative of aberrant hyperactivation of the immune system. Given its essential role in animal models, abundant GM-CSF production at the sites of CNS inflammation suggests that GM-CSF contributes to MS pathogenesis. Our findings also reveal a potential mechanism of IFN-β therapy, namely suppression of GM-CSF production. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

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    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  9. Coexpression of GM-CSF and antigen in DNA prime-adenoviral vector boost immunization enhances polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, whereas expression of GM-CSF antigen fusion protein induces autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Tenbusch, Matthias; Kuate, Seraphin; Tippler, Bettina; Gerlach, Nicole; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf; Überla, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown promising results as a cytokine adjuvant for antiviral vaccines and in various models of tumor gene therapy. To explore whether the targeting of antigens to GM-CSF receptors on antigen-presenting cells enhances antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, fusion proteins of GM-CSF and ovalbumin (OVA) were expressed by DNA and adenoviral vector vaccines. In addition, bicistronic vectors allowing independent expre...

  10. GM-CSF as a target in inflammatory/autoimmune disease: current evidence and future therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John A

    2015-04-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be viewed as a pro-inflammatory cytokine rather than as a key regulator of steady state and systemic myelopoiesis. Key aspects of GM-CSF biology need to be clarified such as pro-survival vs activation/differentiation function, its cellular sources, its responsive cell populations, its downstream mediators/pathways, and when GM-CSF is relevant. Striking effects of GM-CSF depletion/deletion in some pre-clinical autoimmune/inflammation models have been reported. Systemic effects of administered GM-CSF are not necessarily informative about its local blockade in disease. Recent clinical RA trials, particularly Phase II trials with mavrilimumab (anti-GM-CSFRα Ab), show rapid and impressive efficacy with no significant adverse effects. Larger and longer trials targeting GM-CSF are needed and with careful monitoring of unwanted side effects. This review summarizes the most recent information on these topics.

  11. T Cell Production of GM-CSF Protects the Host during Experimental Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Richard T

    2017-12-12

    Although classically associated with myelopoiesis, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is increasingly recognized as being important for tuberculosis (TB) resistance. GM-CSF is expressed by nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic lineages following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is necessary to restrict M. tuberculosis growth in experimental models. Until the recent study by Rothchild et al. (mBio 8:e01514-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01514-17), it was unknown whether GM-CSF-producing T cells contribute to TB resistance. Rothchild et al. identify which conventional and nonconventional T cell subsets produce GM-CSF during experimental TB, establish their protective nature using a variety of approaches, and provide a mechanistic basis for their ability to restrict M. tuberculosis growth. This commentary discusses the significance of these findings to basic and applied TB research. As translated to human disease, these findings suggest vaccine-mediated expansion of GM-CSF-producing T cells could be an effective prophylactic or therapeutic TB strategy. Copyright © 2017 Robinson.

  12. GM-CSF: An Immune Modulatory Cytokine that can Suppress Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Alharshawi, Khaled; Kumar, Prabhakaran; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2015-01-01

    GM-CSF was originally identified as a colony stimulating factor (CSF) because of its ability to induce granulocyte and macrophage populations from precursor cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that GM-CSF is also an immune-modulatory cytokine, capable of affecting not only the phenotype of myeloid lineage cells, but also T-cell activation through various myeloid intermediaries. This property has been implicated in the sustenance of several autoimmune diseases like arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, several studies using animal models have shown that GM-CSF is also capable of suppressing many autoimmune diseases like Crohn's disease, Type-1 diabetes, Myasthenia gravis and experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Knockout mouse studies have suggested that the role of GM-CSF in maintaining granulocyte and macrophage populations in the physiological steady state is largely redundant. Instead, its immune-modulatory role plays a significant role in the development or resolution of autoimmune diseases. This is mediated either through the differentiation of precursor cells into specialized non-steady state granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, or through the modulation of the phenotype of mature myeloid cells. Thus, outside of myelopoiesis, GM-CSF has a profound role in regulating the immune response and maintaining immunological tolerance. PMID:26113402

  13. A novel subset of helper T cells promotes immune responses by secreting GM-CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Roberts, A I; Liu, C; Ren, G; Xu, G; Zhang, L; Devadas, S; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Helper T cells are crucial for maintaining proper immune responses. Yet, they have an undefined relationship with one of the most potent immune stimulatory cytokines, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). By depleting major cytokines during the differentiation of CD4+ T cells in vitro, we derived cells that were found to produce large amounts of GM-CSF, but little of the cytokines produced by other helper T subsets. By their secretion of GM-CSF, this novel subset of helper T cells (which we have termed ThGM cells) promoted the production of cytokines by other T-cell subtypes, including type 1 helper T cell (Th1), type 2 helper T cell (Th2), type 1 cytotoxic T cell (Tc1), type 2 cytotoxic T cell (Tc2), and naive T cells, as evidenced by the fact that antibody neutralization of GM-CSF abolished this effect. ThGM cells were found to be highly prone to activation-induced cell death (AICD). Inhibitors of TRAIL or granzymes could not block AICD in ThGM cells, whereas inhibition of FasL/Fas interaction partially rescued ThGM cells from AICD. Thus, ThGM cells are a novel subpopulation of T helper cells that produce abundant GM-CSF, exhibit exquisite susceptibility to apoptosis, and therefore play a pivotal role in the regulation of the early stages of immune responses. PMID:24076588

  14. GM-CSF produced by nonhematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2013-02-15

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, as well as dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn's disease in humans and colitis in murine models has mainly been considered to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF-deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type mice, caused marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF(-/-) mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Nonhematopoietic cells, and not myeloid cells, produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury, as revealed by bone marrow chimera and dendritic cell-depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell-produced GM-CSF has a novel nonredundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium.

  15. GM-CSF production by CD4+ T cells in MS patients: regulation by regulatory T cells and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelen, E; Muris, A-H; Damoiseaux, J; Knippenberg, S; Broens, K; Smolders, J; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Hupperts, R; Thewissen, M

    2015-03-15

    Data from animal models of MS suggest that GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cells are pathogenic cells. Therefore, GM-CSF production by CD4(+)T cells of MS patients and their susceptibility to regulatory mechanisms were investigated. Intracellular flowcytometry was performed to determine the GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction in PBMC and CSF of MS patients and controls. The effect of regulatory T cells (Tregs) on GM-CSF production by CD4(+)T cells was studied in MS patients using a proliferation-suppression assay. Finally, GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction and GM-CSF protein levels in supernatant were assessed in anti-CD3-stimulated CD4(+)T cell cultures derived from healthy controls and MS patients, in the presence or absence of the active vitamin D metabolite calcitriol. The GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fraction in the peripheral blood did not differ between controls and MS patients. This T cell population could also be detected in the CSF of both subjects with MS as well as subjects with another diagnosis. In the CSF, it comprised a significant fraction of the T cell population. Upon in vitro stimulation of PBMC with anti-CD3 antibody, no differences were observed in GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell frequencies. GM-CSF secretion was susceptible to regulation by Treg and vitamin D. Suppression of GM-CSF secretion by vitamin D was reduced in MS patients. Our study showed no elevation in GM-CSF(+)CD4(+)T cell fractions in MS patients compared to controls. Furthermore, GM-CSF secretion was prone to regulation by Treg and vitamin D, the latter being less effective in MS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrasting effects of hyperoxia on GM-CSF gene transcription in alveolar epithelial cells and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Anne; Baker, Jessica A; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Paine, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for normal pulmonary innate immunity and for functional maturation of alveolar macrophages. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF in the lung and express this growth factor constitutively, whereas most other cells, including T cells, express GM-CSF following inflammatory stimulation. AEC expression of GM-CSF is suppressed by oxidative stress, at least in part through induction of microRNA leading to increased mRNA turnover. In this report, we compare and contrast the effect of hyperoxia on transcriptional aspects of gene regulation of GM-CSF in lung epithelia and T cells of human and mouse origin. Similar to primary murine AEC, human H820 cells that express multiple characteristics of normal alveolar epithelial cells express GM-CSF constitutively, with decreased expression and increased mRNA turnover following exposure to hyperoxia. In contrast, hyperoxia induces augmented GM-CSF expression in human and murine activated T cells, in association with enhanced GM-CSF mRNA stability. Alveolar epithelial cells demonstrate constitutive transcription, with the proximal promoter in an open configuration in normoxia, without change in hyperoxia. Conversely, in both human and murine T cells, hyperoxia increased GM-CSF gene transcription. The proximal promoter was in a closed configuration in unstimulated T cells but became accessible upon activation and still more accessible in activated T cells exposed to hyperoxia. These fundamental differences in molecular regulation of GM-CSF expression highlight the distinctive niche of alveolar epithelial cell expression of GM-CSF and offer insights into the biology of GM-CSF in the setting of acute lung injury. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  17. Response to Treatment with TNFα Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Associated with High Levels of GM-CSF and GM-CSF+ T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Jonas; Clanchy, Felix I; Taher, Taher E; Al-Bogami, Mohammed M; Muhammad, Hawzheen A; Alzabin, Saba; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S; Williams, Richard O; Mageed, Rizgar A

    2017-10-01

    Biologic TNFα inhibitors are a mainstay treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refractory to other treatment options. However, many patients either do not respond or relapse after initially responding to these agents. This study was carried out to identify biomarkers that can distinguish responder from non-responder patients before the initiation of treatment. The level of cytokines in plasma and those produced by ex vivo T cells, B cells and monocytes in 97 RA patients treated with biologic TNFα inhibitors was measured before treatment and after 1 and 3 months of treatment by multiplex analyses. The frequency of T cell subsets and intracellular cytokines were determined by flow cytometry. The results reveal that pre-treatment, T cells from patients who went on to respond to treatment with biologic anti-TNFα agents produced significantly more GM-CSF than non-responder patients. Furthermore, immune cells from responder patients produced higher levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6. Cytokine profiling in the blood of patients confirmed the association between high levels of GM-CSF and responsiveness to biologic anti-TNFα agents. Thus, high blood levels of GM-CSF pre-treatment had a positive predictive value of 87.5% (61.6 to 98.5% at 95% CI) in treated RA patients. The study also shows that cells from most anti-TNFα responder patients in the current cohort produced higher levels of GM-CSF and TNFα pre-treatment than non-responder patients. Findings from the current study and our previous observations that non-responsiveness to anti-TNFα is associated with high IL-17 levels suggest that the disease in responder and non-responder RA patients is likely to be driven/sustained by different inflammatory pathways. The use of biomarker signatures of distinct pro-inflammatory pathways could lead to evidence-based prescription of the most appropriate biological therapies for different RA patients.

  18. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Analysis of a Short-term Model of β-Glucans-Trained Immunity Highlights the Accessory Contribution of GM-CSF in Priming Mouse Macrophages Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walachowski, Sarah; Tabouret, Guillaume; Fabre, Marion; Foucras, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    β-Glucans (BGs) are glucose polymers present in the fungal cell wall (CW) and, as such, are recognized by innate immune cells as microbial-associated pattern through Dectin-1 receptor. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans or its CW-derived β(1,3) (1,6)-glucans to increase human monocytes cytokine secretion upon secondary stimulation, a phenomenon now referred as immune training. This ability of monocytes programming confers BGs an undeniable immunotherapeutic potential. Our objective was to determine whether BGs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a non-pathogenic yeast, are endowed with such a property. For this purpose, we have developed a short-term training model based on lipopolysaccharide re-stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages primed with S. cerevisiae BGs. Through a transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that BGs induced a specific gene expression signature involving the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway as in human monocytes. Moreover, we showed that over-expression of Csf2 (that encodes for GM-CSF) was a Dectin-1-dependent feature of BG-induced priming of macrophages. Further experiments confirmed that GM-CSF up-regulated Dectin-1 cell surface expression and amplified macrophages response along BG-mediated training. However, the blockade of GM-CSFR demonstrated that GM-CSF was not primarily required for BG-induced training of macrophages although it can substantially improve it. In addition, we found that mouse macrophages trained with BGs upregulated their expression of the four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (Fhl2) in a Dectin-1-dependent manner. Consistently, we observed that intracellular levels of FHL2 increased after stimulation of macrophages with BGs. In conclusion, our experiments provide new insights on GM-CSF contribution to the training of cells from the monocytic lineage and highlights FHL2 as a possible regulator of BG-associated signaling.

  20. Molecular Analysis of a Short-term Model of β-Glucans-Trained Immunity Highlights the Accessory Contribution of GM-CSF in Priming Mouse Macrophages Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Walachowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available β-Glucans (BGs are glucose polymers present in the fungal cell wall (CW and, as such, are recognized by innate immune cells as microbial-associated pattern through Dectin-1 receptor. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans or its CW-derived β(1,3 (1,6-glucans to increase human monocytes cytokine secretion upon secondary stimulation, a phenomenon now referred as immune training. This ability of monocytes programming confers BGs an undeniable immunotherapeutic potential. Our objective was to determine whether BGs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a non-pathogenic yeast, are endowed with such a property. For this purpose, we have developed a short-term training model based on lipopolysaccharide re-stimulation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages primed with S. cerevisiae BGs. Through a transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that BGs induced a specific gene expression signature involving the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway as in human monocytes. Moreover, we showed that over-expression of Csf2 (that encodes for GM-CSF was a Dectin-1-dependent feature of BG-induced priming of macrophages. Further experiments confirmed that GM-CSF up-regulated Dectin-1 cell surface expression and amplified macrophages response along BG-mediated training. However, the blockade of GM-CSFR demonstrated that GM-CSF was not primarily required for BG-induced training of macrophages although it can substantially improve it. In addition, we found that mouse macrophages trained with BGs upregulated their expression of the four and a half LIM-only protein 2 (Fhl2 in a Dectin-1-dependent manner. Consistently, we observed that intracellular levels of FHL2 increased after stimulation of macrophages with BGs. In conclusion, our experiments provide new insights on GM-CSF contribution to the training of cells from the monocytic lineage and highlights FHL2 as a possible regulator of BG-associated signaling.

  1. GM-CSF neutralisation suppresses inflammation and protects cartilage in acute streptococcal cell wall arthritis of mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plater-Zyberk, C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Hepp, J.; Baeuerle, P.A.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenic involvement of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in arthritis has been put forward. We have investigated the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF neutralisation in the streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis model in mice. In this model, the pathogenic

  2. Persistent STAT5 phosphorylation and epigenetic dysregulation of GM-CSF and PGS2/COX2 expression in Type 1 diabetic human monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrigan

    Full Text Available STAT5 proteins are adaptor proteins for histone acetylation enzymes. Histone acetylation at promoter and enhancer chromosomal regions opens the chromatin and allows access of transcription enzymes to specific genes in rapid response cell signals, such as in inflammation. Histone acetylation-mediated gene regulation is involved in expression of 2 key inflammatory response genes: CSF2, encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and PTGS2, encoding prostaglandin synthase 2/cyclooxygenase 2 (PGS2/COX2. Prolonged CSF2 expression, high GM-CSF production, and GM-CSF activation of PTGS2 gene expression all are seen in type 1 diabetes (T1D monocytes. Persistent phosphorylation activation of monocyte STAT5 (STAT5Ptyr is also found in individuals with or at-risk for T1D. To examine whether elevated T1D monocyte STAT5Ptyr may be associated with aberrant inflammatory gene expression in T1D, blood monocytes from non-autoimmune controls and T1D patients were analyzed by flow cytometry for STAT5Ptyr activation, and by chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP analyses for STAT5Ptyr's ability to bind at CSF2 and PTGS2 regulatory sites in association with histone acetylation. In unstimulated monocytes, STAT5Ptyr was elevated in 59.65% of T1D, but only 2.44% of control subjects (p<0.0001. Increased STAT5Ptyr correlated with T1D disease duration (p = 0.0030, r(2 = 0.0784. Unstimulated (p = 0.140 and GM-CSF-stimulated (p = 0.0485 T1D monocytes, had greater STAT5Ptyr binding to epigenetic regulatory sites upstream of CSF2 than control monocytes. Increased STAT5Ptyr binding in T1D monocytes was concurrent with binding at these sites of STAT6Ptyr (p = 0.0283, CBP/P300 histone acetylase, acetylated histones H3, SMRT/NCoR histone deacetylase (p = 0.0040, and RNA Polymerase II (p = 0.0040. Our study indicates that in T1D monocytes, STAT5Ptyr activation is significantly higher and that STAT5Ptyr is found bound to CSF2 promoter and PTGS2 enhancer regions

  3. Inhibitory mechanism of Korean Red Ginseng on GM-CSF expression in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Chung

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, we found that treatment with SKRG decreased the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK in UVB-irradiated SP-1 keratinocytes and subsequently inhibited the expression of GM-CSF. Furthermore, we identified ginsenoside-Rh3 as the active saponin in Korean Red Ginseng.

  4. Clinical role of GM-CSF in neutrophil recovery in relation to health care parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, LS; DeVries, EGE; UylDeGroot, CA; Vellenga, E

    Recombinant human growth factors, particularly granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have been only available for a few years. Since their introduction they have affected the management of drug-induced neutropenia, the use of dose intensive chemotherapy regimens and in the

  5. GM-CSF producing autoreactive CD4+ T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Jan; Gavrisan, Anita; Kuehn, Denise; Reinhardt, Julia; Heinrich, Melanie; Hippich, Markus; Eugster, Anne; Ockert, Christian; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-12-08

    The phenotype of autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes is described as Th1, Th17 and/or Th21, but is largely uncharacterized. We combined multi-parameter cytokine profiling and proliferation, and identified GM-CSF producing cells as a component of the response to beta cell autoantigens proinsulin and GAD65. Overall cytokine profiles of CD4+ T cell were not altered in type 1 diabetes. In contrast, patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes had increased frequencies of proinsulin-responsive CD4+CD45RA- T cells producing GM-CSF (p=0.002), IFNγ (p=0.004), IL-17A (p=0.008), IL-21 (p=0.011), and IL-22 (p=0.007), and GAD65-responsive CD4+CD45RA- T cells producing IL-21 (p=0.039). CD4+ T cells with a GM-CSF+IFNγ-IL-17A-IL-21-IL-22- phenotype were increased in patients for responses to both proinsulin (p=0.006) and GAD65 (p=0.037). GM-CSF producing T cells are a novel phenotype in the repertoire of T helper cells in type 1 diabetes and consolidate a Th1/Th17 pro-inflammatory pathogenesis in the disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. GM-CSF promotes migration of human monocytes across the blood brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, D.Y.S.; Kooij, G.; Heijnen, P.D.A.M.; Breur, M.; Peferoen, L.A.N.; van der Valk, P.; de Vries, H.E.; Amor, S.; Dijkstra, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Infiltration of monocytes into the CNS is crucial for disease onset and progression. Animal studies indicate that granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may play an

  7. Anticipated administration of GM-CSF in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkisi, M. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Erkurt, E.; Tunali, C. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Adana (Turkey); Zeren, H. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Pathology, Adana (Turkey); Kocabas, A. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Chest Diseases, Adana (Turkey); Burgut, R. [Cukurova University Medical School, Dept. of Biostatistics, Adana (Turkey)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the kinetic response of the human marrow myeloid progenitor cells to the short term use of GM-CSF and its impact on the therapeutic activity of this three-drug cisplatinum containing regimen in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixty patients with stage 3-B and 4 NSCLC were randomised to receive GM-CSF for 3 days, five days prior to the onset of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy regimen consisted of Mitomycin-C: 6 mg/m{sup 2} on day one, Ifosfamide: 2000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, Mesna: 2000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, Cisplatinum: 30 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 3, and was repeated every 4 weeks. All the patients received 30-50 Gy of radiotherapy to the primary and/or metastatic sites. Chemotherapy cycles and overall survival (p=0.000). Administration of GM-CSF was an independent prognostic parameter in locally advanced and metastatic disease (p=0.041). In the GM-CSF receiving arm more courses could be given (117 versus 99, p=0.0415), and less courses were postponed (6 versus 22). In this arm, the mean of granulocyte nadir was higher (p=0.033) and mean time to granulocyte recovery became shorter (p=0.001) as the number of chemotherapy cycles increased. It was concluded that, dose intensification with GM-CSF prophylaxis is benefical in increasing the treatment tolerability by decreasing the intensity of granulocytopenia as well as providing rapid recovery.

  8. Superiority of intramuscular route and full length glycoprotein D for DNA vaccination against herpes simplex 2. Enhancement of protection by the co-delivery of the GM-CSF gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fló, J; Beatriz Perez, A; Tisminetzky, S; Baralle, F

    2000-08-01

    Immunization with naked DNA has been analyzed in two critical variables: the site of injection and the cellular compartment to which the coded protein is directed. The gene for the full length of the glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV-2 under the control of the citomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was injected via the intradermal (i.d.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) routes in mice. Immunization in the quadricep muscle was superior to the intradermal immunization in the footpads. A stronger activation of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in the spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLN) was induced, resulting in a more efficient protection against an intravaginal challenge. In order to analyze the effect of the cellular localizations of the coded protein, the DNA for the truncated form of the gD (DeltagD) was injected via the i.m. route. Immunization with a vector encoding for DeltagD resulted in higher antibody levels in serum and vaginal washes than immunization with the gene for the full length gD. However, immunization with the DeltagD DNA elicited a much weaker cell-mediated immune response and was inferior to gD DNA in providing protection against a lethal intravaginal challenge with HSV. Co-injection of an expression cassette for the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increased both the humoral and cell-mediated immune response with both gD and DeltagD. A strong activation of IL-4-secreting cells was observed in the spleen and DLN together with an increase in the number of IFN-gamma-secreting cells. In addition, a reduction in the vaginal virus titers after an intravaginal challenge was observed in mice co-injected with the GM-CSF gene as compared to those immunized with pCDNAgD only.

  9. NADPH oxidase NOX2 mediates TLR2/6-dependent release of GM-CSF from endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Oberoi, Raghav; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Pretzer, Silke; Luchtefeld, Maren; Schieffer, Bernhard; Grote, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    NADPH oxidase-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) from immune cells are well known to be important for pathogen killing in response to TLR ligands. Here, we investigated a new aspect of NADPH oxidase in the TLR2/6-induced release of the immunologically relevant GM-CSF by endothelial cells. Stimulation of human endothelial cells with TLR2/6 agonist, MALP-2 (macrophage-activating lipopeptide of 2 kDa), induced NADPH oxidase activation and ROS formation. Inhibition by ROS scavengers and NADPH oxidase inhibitors blocked MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. NADPH oxidase activators or ROS donors alone did not result in GM-CSF secretion; however, additional superoxide supply augmented MALP-2-induced GM-CSF secretion and restored GM-CSF levels after NADPH oxidase inhibition. MALP-2-dependent NF-ĸB activation was suppressed by NADPH oxidase inhibition, and inhibition of NF-κB completely blunted MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. Vascular explants from mice that were deficient for the NADPH oxidase subunit p47 phox showed diminished intimal superoxide production and GM-CSF release after ex vivo stimulation with MALP-2. Moreover, an increase in circulating progenitor cells after MALP-2 injection was completely abolished in p47phox-knockout mice. Finally, MALP-2 stimulation increased mRNA expression of the major subunit NADPH oxidase, (Nox)2, in endothelial cells, and Nox2 inhibition prevented MALP-2-induced GM-CSF release. Our findings identify a Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase as a crucial regulator of the immunologic important growth factor GM-CSF after TLR2/6 stimulation in endothelial cells.-Schuett, J., Schuett, H., Oberoi, R., Koch, A.-K., Pretzer, S., Luchtefeld, M., Schieffer, B., Grote, K. NADPH oxidase NOX2 mediates TLR2/6-dependent release of GM-CSF from endothelial cells. © FASEB.

  10. Recombinant GM-CSF/IL-3 fusion protein: its effect on in vitro human megakaryocytopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Briddell, R A; Cooper, R J; Brandt, J E; Hoffman, R

    1992-05-01

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of a genetically engineered recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin 3 (IL-3) fusion protein (FP) as a means of delivering cytokine combinations to megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor cells was performed, utilizing a serum-depleted clonal assay system and a long-term bone marrow culture system. The effects of the FP, alone and in combination with a variety of other cytokines, on the primitive MK progenitor cell, the megakaryocyte burst-forming unit (BFU-MK), and the more differentiated megakaryocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-MK) were assessed. Subpopulations of bone marrow cells (CD34+ DR- for BFU-MK and CD34+ DR+ for CFU-MK) served as sources of these two classes of MK progenitor cells. The FP was equivalent to a combination of optimal concentrations of GM-CSF and IL-3 in promoting both the number and size of BFU-MK-derived colonies. The GM-CSF/IL-3 combination, however, promoted the formation of far greater CFU-MK-derived colonies than did the FP alone. The size of MK colonies formed in the presence of the FP or GM-CSF/IL-3 was similar. The ability of the FP to stimulate BFU-MK- but not CFU-MK-derived colony formation was also further augmented by the addition of interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). The addition of c-kit ligand (KL) increased both FP-stimulated CFU-MK- and BFU-MK-derived colony numbers but only BFU-MK-derived colony size. In addition, the FP alone sustained long-term megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro to a level equivalent to that of the GM-CSF/IL-3 combination and was superior in this regard to either GM-CSF or IL-3 alone. These data indicate that FP is capable of supporting various stages of human megakaryocytopoiesis. We conclude that such genetically engineered molecules as the FP may prove to be effective means of pharmacologically delivering the biological effects of specific cytokine combinations.

  11. A novel therapeutic vaccine of GM-CSF/TNFalpha surface-modified RM-1 cells against the orthotopic prostatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weihua; He, Qiushan; Hu, Zhiming; Chen, Zhong; Qifeng, Mao; Zhichun, Song; Zhihui, Qu; Xiaoxia, Nie; Li, Jinlong; Gao, Jimin

    2010-07-12

    A novel therapeutic vaccine against prostate cancer was developed by simultaneous immobilization of streptavidin-tagged bioactive GM-CSF and TNFalpha on the biotinylated surface of 30% ethanol-fixed RM-1 prostatic cancer cells. This study showed that the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-doubly surface-modified vaccine significantly extended the survival in the orthotopic model of RM-1 prostate cancer, and was superior to single GM-CSF- or TNFalpha-surface-modified vaccine. Moreover, the splenocytes from the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice showed the most potent cytotoxicity on RM-1 cells and the highest production of RM-1-specific IFNgamma. In addition, more CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrated into the tumor sites in the GM-CSF/TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice than in the GM-CSF- or TNFalpha-vaccine-treated mice. Therefore, our study demonstrated that the efficacy of RM-1 prostate cancer cell vaccine could be improved by conjugating both GM-CSF and TNFalpha simultaneously on the surface of cancer cells, and that this modification thus has a potential translational significance.

  12. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  13. Serum levels of GM-CSF 20 years after sulfur mustard exposure: Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Sara; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Yaraee, Roya; Salimi, Hassan; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Shams, Jalaleddin; Ghasemi, Hassan; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Moin, Athar; Sharifnia, Zarin; Soroush, Mohammad R; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is highly toxic for various organs. The eyes, skin, respiratory tract, as well hematopoietic and immune systems are the main organs affected by SM. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a potent cytokine that plays an important role in the hematopoietic and immune system. The aim of this study was to determine the serum levels of GM-CSF and its relation to blood cell count and other inflammatory cytokines 20 years after SM exposure. The association of GM-CSF with the clinical severity of pulmonary, ophthalmic and dermatologic complications has also been studied. In this historical cohort study named as Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS), 369 SM exposed male participants and 125 unexposed volunteers were studied. The serum concentrations of cytokines were measured by ELISA technique. The severity of clinical complications was graded according to the criteria verified by the Medical Committee of the Foundation of Martyr and Veterans Affairs. The serum levels of GM-CSF in the SM exposed group did not display any significant differences with the control group. Median of GM-CSF was 7.33 and 9.39 pg/ml in the SM exposed group and the controls respectively. There was a positive correlation between the serum levels of GM-CSF and the percent of eosinophils only in the exposed group. Moreover, positive correlations were found between circulating levels of GM-CSF with IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6. This correlation was not observed between GM-CSF and IL-8 in both study groups. The serum levels of GM-CSF did not show any significant association with clinical complications.

  14. GM-CSF upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis reverses cognitive impairment and amyloidosis in Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Tim D; Bennett, Steven P; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients' usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA's protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in RA, on the pathology and behavior of transgenic AD mice. 5 microg bolus injections of macrophage, granulocyte, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF) were administered unilaterally into the hippocampus of aged cognitively-impaired AD mice and the resulting amyloid load reductions determined one week later, using the artificial cerebrospinal fluid-injected contralateral sides as controls. G-CSF and more significantly, GM-CSF reduced amyloidosis throughout the treated brain hemisphere one week following bolus administration to AD mice. 20 daily subcutaneous injections of 5 microg of GM-CSF (the most amyloid-reducing CSF in the bolus experiment) were administered to balanced cohorts of AD mice after assessment in a battery of cognitive tests. Reductions in amyloid load and improvements in cognitive function were assessed. Subcutaneous GM-CSF administration significantly reduced brain amyloidosis and completely reversed the cognitive impairment, while increasing hippocampal synaptic area and microglial density. These findings, along with two decades of accrued safety data using Leukine, recombinant human GMCSF, in elderly leukopenic patients, suggest that Leukine should be tested as a treatment to reverse cerebral amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment in AD.

  15. The reconstitution of immunocompetence by GM-CSF or IFN[gamma] after pharmacological suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Kühnle, Simone

    2000-01-01

    While immunosuppression is required to prevent graft rejection in transplantation, it increases the risk of infection. We investigated in mice immunosuppressed by different immunosuppressives (cyclosporin A, dexamethasone, tacrolimus and sirolimus), whether the innate immune system can be reactivated by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interferon-gamma (IFNg). Both study drugs reconstituted the suppressed macrophage response ex vivo and in vivo, while the IL-2 and ...

  16. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, D E A; Cohen, E S; Gerlag, D M; Campbell, J; Woods, J; Davis, N; van Nieuwenhuijze, A; Lewis, A; Heasmen, S; McCourt, M; Corkill, D; Dodd, A; Elvin, J; Statache, G; Wicks, I P; Anderson, I K; Nash, A; Sleeman, M A; Tak, P P

    2015-10-01

    Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue and investigated the effects of anti-GM-CSFRα antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo in a preclinical model of RA. We compared GM-CSFRα expression on macrophages positive for CD68 or CD163 on synovial biopsy samples from patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to disease controls. In addition, we studied the effects of CAM-3003, an anti-GM-CSFR antibody in a collagen induced arthritis model of RA in DBA/1 mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of CAM-3003 was studied in naïve CD1(ICR) mice (see online supplement) and used to interpret the results of the pharmacodynamic studies in BALB/c mice. GM-CSFRα was expressed by CD68 positive and CD163 positive macrophages in the synovium, and there was a significant increase in GM-CSFRα positive cells in patients in patients with RA as well as patients with PsA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. In the collagen induced arthritis model there was a dose dependent reduction of clinical arthritis scores and the number of F4/80 positive macrophages in the inflamed synovium after CAM-3003 treatment. In BALB/c mice CAM-3003 inhibited recombinant GM-CSF mediated margination of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils. The findings support the ongoing development of therapies aimed at interfering with GM-CSF or its receptor in various forms of arthritis, such as RA and PsA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. PI3-kinase activation by GM-CSF in endothelium is upstream of Jak/Stat pathway: role of alphaGMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Pedraza, Alicia; Golde, David W

    2005-11-18

    GM-CSF has been identified as a growth factor for endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the role of PI3-kinase pathway in mediating GM-CSF induced angiogenesis. GM-CSF induced tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as examined using Matrigel assay, was inhibited by specific inhibitors of PI3-kinase, wortmannin, and LY294002. The regulatory subunit of PI3-kinase (p85) interacted with alphaGMR via its C-SH2 domain in a GM-CSF-dependent fashion with concomitant phosphorylation of p85 and activation of PI3-kinase pathway. p85 binding site on the alphaGMR was essential to induce GM-CSF receptor-dependent Stat activation. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3-kinase activity also abrogated GM-CSF induced Stat activation. These studies underscore the significance of the GM-CSF mediated PI3-kinase activation and its role in angiogenesis.

  18. Reduced BMPR2 expression induces GM-CSF translation and macrophage recruitment in humans and mice to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hirofumi; Saito, Toshie; Nickel, Nils P.; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Chan, Roshelle; Haghighat, Leila; Fuchs, Gabriele; Januszyk, Michael; Cao, Aiqin; Lai, Ying-Ju; Perez, Vinicio de Jesus; Kim, Yu-Mee; Wang, Lingli; Chen, Pin-I; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Mitani, Yoshihide; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Sarnow, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH [IPAH]) is an insidious and potentially fatal disease linked to a mutation or reduced expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2). Because intravascular inflammatory cells are recruited in IPAH pathogenesis, we hypothesized that reduced BMPR2 enhances production of the potent chemokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in response to an inflammatory perturbation. When human pulmonary artery (PA) endothelial cells deficient in BMPR2 were stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a twofold increase in GM-CSF was observed and related to enhanced messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. The mechanism was associated with disruption of stress granule formation. Specifically, loss of BMPR2 induced prolonged phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in response to TNF, and this increased GADD34–PP1 phosphatase activity, dephosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF2α), and derepressing GM-CSF mRNA translation. Lungs from IPAH patients versus unused donor controls revealed heightened PA expression of GM-CSF co-distributing with increased TNF and expanded populations of hematopoietic and endothelial GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα)–positive cells. Moreover, a 3-wk infusion of GM-CSF in mice increased hypoxia-induced PAH, in association with increased perivascular macrophages and muscularized distal arteries, whereas blockade of GM-CSF repressed these features. Thus, reduced BMPR2 can subvert a stress granule response, heighten GM-CSF mRNA translation, increase inflammatory cell recruitment, and exacerbate PAH. PMID:24446489

  19. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Llop-Guevara

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM, we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway.

  20. Interaction of RNA-binding protein HuR and miR-466i regulates GM-CSF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Adamiak, William; Huang, Ganlei; Atasoy, Ulus; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Yu, Shiguang

    2017-12-08

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) produced by T helper 17 (Th17) cells plays an essential role in autoimmune diseases. Transcriptional regulation of Th17 cell differentiation has been extensively studied, but post-transcriptional regulation of Th17 cell differentiation has remained less well characterized. The RNA-binding protein HuR functions to promote the stability of target mRNAs via binding the AU-rich elements of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, IL-17 and TNF-α. However, whether HuR regulates GM-CSF expression in Th17 cells has not been fully investigated. Here we showed that HuR conditional knockout (KO) Th17 cells have decreased GM-CSF mRNA in comparison with wild-type (WT) Th17 cells, and that HuR binds directly to GM-CSF mRNA 3'UTR. Interestingly, HuR deficiency increased the levels of certain microRNA expression in Th17 cells; for example, miR-466i functioned to mediate GM-CSF and IL-17 mRNA decay, which was confirmed by in vitro luciferase assay. Furthermore, we found that HuR promoted Mxi1 expression to inhibit certain miRNA expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that interaction of HuR and miR-466i orchestrates GM-CSF expression in Th17 cells.

  1. Age predicts cytokine kinetics and innate immune cell activation following intranasal delivery of IFNγ and GM-CSF in a mouse model of RSV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Katherine M; Resetar, Erin; Orend, Jacob; Anderson, Kacey; Empey, Kerry M

    2017-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children and is further associated with increased healthcare utilization and cost of care in the first years of life. Severe RSV disease during infancy has also been linked to the later development of allergic asthma, yet there remains no licensed RSV vaccine or effective treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that disease severity and development of allergic asthma are associated with differences in cytokine production. As a result, stimulation of the innate host immune response with immune potentiators is gaining attention for their prospective application in populations with limited immune responses to antigenic stimuli or against pathogens for which vaccines do not exist. Specifically, macrophage-activating cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNγ) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are commercially available immune potentiators used to prevent infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease and febrile neutropenia, respectively. Moreover, an increasing number of reports describe the protective function of IFNγ and GM-CSF as vaccine adjuvants. Although a positive correlation between cytokine production and age has previously been reported, little is known about age-dependent cytokine metabolism or immune activating responses in infant compared to adult lungs. Here we use a non-compartmental pharmacokinetic model in naïve and RSV-infected infant and adult BALB/c mice to determine the effect of age on IFNγ and GM-CSF elimination and innate cell activation following intranasal delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of low dose GM-CSF on microglial inflammatory profiles to diverse pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kielian Tammy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well appreciated that obtaining sufficient numbers of primary microglia for in vitro experiments has always been a challenge for scientists studying the biological properties of these cells. Supplementing culture medium with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF partially alleviates this problem by increasing microglial yield. However, GM-CSF has also been reported to transition microglia into a dendritic cell (DC-like phenotype and consequently, affect their immune properties. Methods Although the concentration of GM-CSF used in our protocol for mouse microglial expansion (0.5 ng/ml is at least 10-fold less compared to doses reported to affect microglial maturation and function (≥ 5 ng/ml, in this study we compared the responses of microglia derived from mixed glial cultures propagated in the presence/absence of low dose GM-CSF to establish whether this growth factor significantly altered the immune properties of microglia to diverse bacterial stimuli. These stimuli included the gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and its cell wall product peptidoglycan (PGN, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist; the TLR3 ligand polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C, a synthetic mimic of viral double-stranded RNA; lipopolysaccharide (LPS a TLR4 agonist; and the TLR9 ligand CpG oligonucleotide (CpG-ODN, a synthetic form of bacteria/viral DNA. Results Interestingly, the relative numbers of microglia recovered from mixed glial cultures following the initial harvest were not influenced by GM-CSF. However, following the second and third collections of the same mixed cultures, the yield of microglia from GM-CSF-supplemented flasks was increased two-fold. Despite the ability of GM-CSF to expand microglial numbers, cells propagated in the presence/absence of GM-CSF demonstrated roughly equivalent responses following S. aureus and PGN stimulation. Specifically, the induction of tumor necrosis factor

  3. The relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 regulates lung epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Christian E; Schlingmann, Barbara; Dorsainvil White, StevenClaude; Ward, Christina; Fan, Xian; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Lung barrier dysfunction is a cardinal feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of ARDS two- to fourfold, induces transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, which increases epithelial permeability and impairs granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent barrier integrity in experimental models. We hypothesized that the relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling regulates lung epithelial barrier function. GM-CSF and TGF-β1 were tested separately and simultaneously for their effects on lung epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. TGF-β1 alone caused an ∼ 25% decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, and was associated with projections perpendicular to tight junctions ("spikes") containing claudin-18 that colocalized with F-actin. In contrast, GM-CSF treatment induced an ∼ 20% increase in TER, decreased paracellular flux, and showed decreased colocalization of spike-associated claudin-18 with F-actin. When simultaneously administered to lung epithelial cells, GM-CSF antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial barrier function in cultured cells. Given this, GM-CSF and TGF-β1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and correlated with markers for pulmonary edema and patient outcome. In patient BAL fluid, protein markers of lung barrier dysfunction, serum α2-macroglobulin, and IgM levels were increased at lower ratios of GM-CSF/TGF-β1. Critically, patients who survived had significantly higher GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratios than nonsurviving patients. This study provides experimental and clinical evidence that the relative balance between GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling is a key regulator of lung epithelial barrier function. The GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratio in BAL fluid may provide a concentration-independent biomarker that can predict patient outcomes in ARDS. Copyright © 2015 the American

  4. Expression of GM-CSF in T cells is increased in multiple sclerosis and suppressed by IFN-β therapy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Javad; Ciric, Bogoljub; Imitola, Jaime; Gonnella, Patricia; Hwang, Daniel; Mahajan, Kedar; Mari, Elisabeth R.; Safavi, Farinaz; Leist, Thomas P.; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Studies in animal models of MS have shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) produced by T cells is necessary for development of autoimmune CNS inflammation. This suggests that GM-CSF may have a pathogenic role in MS as well, and a clinical trial testing its blockade is ongoing. However, there have been few reports on GM-CSF production by T cells in MS. The objective of this study was to characterize GM-CSF production by T cells of MS patients, and to determine the effect of interferon-beta (IFN-β) therapy on its production. GM-CSF production by peripheral blood (PB) T cells and the effects of IFN-β were characterized in samples of untreated and IFN-β-treated MS patients vs. healthy subjects. GM-CSF production by T cells in MS brain lesions was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Untreated MS patients had significantly greater numbers of GM-CSF+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PB compared to healthy controls and IFN-β-treated MS patients. IFN-β significantly suppressed GM-CSF production by T cells in vitro. A number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in MS brain lesions expressed GM-CSF. Elevated GM-CSF production by PB T cells in MS is indicative of aberrant hyperactivation of the immune system. Given its essential role in animal models, abundant GM-CSF production at the sites of CNS inflammation suggests that GM-CSF contributes to MS pathogenesis. Our findings also reveal a potential mechanism of IFN-β therapy, namely suppression of GM-CSF production. PMID:25917097

  5. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Surgery and Dept. of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Petruk, K.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2002-08-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ({sup 51}Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  6. Molecular basis of in vitro affinity maturation and functional evolution of a neutralizing anti-human GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylenstein, Roy; Weinfurtner, Daniel; Härtle, Stefan; Strohner, Ralf; Böttcher, Jark; Augustin, Martin; Ostendorp, Ralf; Steidl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray structure analysis of 4 antibody Fab fragments, each in complex with human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was performed to investigate the changes at the protein-protein binding interface during the course of in vitro affinity maturation by phage display selection. The parental antibody MOR03929 was compared to its derivatives MOR04252 (CDR-H2 optimized), MOR04302 (CDR-L3 optimized) and MOR04357 (CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 optimized). All antibodies bind to a conformational epitope that can be divided into 3 sub-epitopes. Specifically, MOR04357 binds to a region close to the GM-CSF N-terminus (residues 11-24), a short second sub-epitope (residues 83-89) and a third at the C-terminus (residues 112-123). Modifications introduced during affinity maturation in CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 led to the establishment of additional hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts, respectively, providing a rationale for the observed improvement in binding affinity and neutralization potency. Once GM-CSF is complexed to the antibodies, modeling predicts a sterical clash with GM-CSF binding to GM-CSF receptor α and β chain. This predicted mutually exclusive binding was confirmed by a GM-CSF receptor α chain ligand binding inhibition assay. Finally, high throughput sequencing of clones obtained after affinity maturation phage display pannings revealed highly selected consensus sequences for CDR-H2 as well for CDR-L3, which are in accordance with the sequence of the highest affinity antibody MOR04357. The resolved crystal structures highlight the criticality of these strongly selected residues for high affinity interaction with GM-CSF.

  7. GM-CSF Grown Bone Marrow Derived Cells Are Composed of Phenotypically Different Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Jung, Daun; Gu, Gyo Jeong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a role in inducing emergency hematopoiesis upon exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Although GM-CSF generated murine bone marrow derived cells have been widely used as macrophages or dendritic cells in research, the exact characteristics of each cell population have not yet been defined. Here we discriminated GM-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs) from dendritic cells (GM-BMDCs) in several criteria. After C57BL/6J mice bone marrow cell culture for 7 days with GM-CSF supplementation, two main populations were observed in the attached cells based on MHCII and F4/80 marker expressions. GM-BMMs had MHCIIlowF4/80high as well as CD11c+CD11bhighCD80-CD64+MerTK+ phenotypes. In contrast, GM-BMDCs had MHCIIhighF4/80low and CD11chighCD8α- CD11b+CD80+CD64-MerTKlow phenotypes. Interestingly, the GM-BMM population increased but GM-BMDCs decreased in a GM-CSF dose-dependent manner. Functionally, GM-BMMs showed extremely high phagocytic abilities and produced higher IL-10 upon LPS stimulation. GM-BMDCs, however, could not phagocytose as well, but were efficient at producing TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-6 as well as inducing T cell proliferation. Finally, whole transcriptome analysis revealed that GM-BMMs and GM-BMDCs are overlap with in vivo resident macrophages and dendritic cells, respectively. Taken together, our study shows the heterogeneicity of GM-CSF derived cell populations, and specifically characterizes GM-CSF derived macrophages compared to dendritic cells.

  8. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  9. GM-CSF Ameliorates Micro-vascular Barrier Integrity via Pericytes Derived Ang-1 in Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2018-01-12

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, post-injury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be re-established for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of micro-vascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of micro-vascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and micro-vascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans-blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining micro-vascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and micro-vascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of micro-vascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  10. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dysregulation of the Cytokine GM-CSF Induces Spontaneous Phagocyte Invasion and Immunopathology in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, Sabine; Komuczki, Juliana; Hermann, Mario; Pelczar, Pawel; Mair, Florian; Schreiner, Bettina; Becher, Burkhard

    2017-02-21

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are influenced by dysregulation of cytokines. Among them, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is crucial for the pathogenic function of T cells in preclinical models of autoimmunity. To study the impact of dysregulated GM-CSF expression in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse line allowing the induction of GM-CSF expression in mature, peripheral helper T (Th) cells. Antigen-independent GM-CSF release led to the invasion of inflammatory myeloid cells into the central nervous system (CNS), which was accompanied by the spontaneous development of severe neurological deficits. CNS-invading phagocytes produced reactive oxygen species and exhibited a distinct genetic signature compared to myeloid cells invading other organs. We propose that the CNS is particularly vulnerable to the attack of monocyte-derived phagocytes and that the effector functions of GM-CSF-expanded myeloid cells are in turn guided by the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  13. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  14. TGF-β Affects the Differentiation of Human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T Cells in an Activation- and Sodium-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éliás, Szabolcs; Schmidt, Angelika; Kannan, Venkateshan; Andersson, John; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, the environmental cues promoting differentiation of GM-CSF producing T cells are unclear. Herein, we performed a broad experimental screening of cytokines and data-driven analysis assessing their ability to induce human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T cells and their subpopulations. TGF-β was discovered to induce GM-CSF production independently of proliferation and IL-2 signaling including STAT5. In contrast, IL-6 and IL-23 decreased GM-CSF production. On the population level, GM-CSF induction was highly correlated with expression of FOXP3 across cytokine stimulations but not with that of IL-17. However, on single-cell level GM-CSF and IFN-γ expression were most correlated, independently of the cytokine environment. Importantly, under low sodium conditions in the medium or upon stimulation with plate-bound instead of bead-bound anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, the effects of TGF-β on GM-CSF, but not on FOXP3, were reversed. Our analysis indicates a novel role for TGF-β in generating GM-CSF+ subsets of human CD4+ T cells. These results are important for understanding of autoimmune disease and therapeutic considerations.

  15. Pleural innate response activator B cells protect against pneumonia via a GM-CSF-IgM axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Georg F; Chousterman, Benjamin G; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S; Theurl, Igor; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Quach, Tam D; Ali, Muhammad; Chen, John W; Rothstein, Thomas L; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2014-06-02

    Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality worldwide and a serious problem in critical care medicine, but the immunophysiological processes that confer either protection or morbidity are not completely understood. We show that in response to lung infection, B1a B cells migrate from the pleural space to the lung parenchyma to secrete polyreactive emergency immunoglobulin M (IgM). The process requires innate response activator (IRA) B cells, a transitional B1a-derived inflammatory subset which controls IgM production via autocrine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. The strategic location of these cells, coupled with the capacity to produce GM-CSF-dependent IgM, ensures effective early frontline defense against bacteria invading the lungs. The study describes a previously unrecognized GM-CSF-IgM axis and positions IRA B cells as orchestrators of protective IgM immunity. © 2014 Weber et al.

  16. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Lansink, PO; Withoff, S; de Vries, EGE; Scherphof, GL; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine

  17. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wells, Greg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Barna, Barbara P. [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Malur, Achut G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Thomassen, Mary Jane, E-mail: thomassenm@ecu.edu [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  18. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  19. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  20. CCR2 defines in vivo development and homing of IL-23-driven GM-CSF-producing Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; McKenzie, Duncan R; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C; Mack, Matthias; Pombal, Diana R; Seillet, Cyrill; Dubois, Bénédicte; Liston, Adrian; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Mark J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2015-10-29

    IL-17-producing helper T (Th17) cells are critical for host defense against extracellular pathogens but also drive numerous autoimmune diseases. Th17 cells that differ in their inflammatory potential have been described including IL-10-producing Th17 cells that are weak inducers of inflammation and highly inflammatory, IL-23-driven, GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells. However, their distinct developmental requirements, functions and trafficking mechanisms in vivo remain poorly understood. Here we identify a temporally regulated IL-23-dependent switch from CCR6 to CCR2 usage by developing Th17 cells that is critical for pathogenic Th17 cell-driven inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This switch defines a unique in vivo cell surface signature (CCR6(-)CCR2(+)) of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells in EAE and experimental persistent extracellular bacterial infection, and in humans. Using this signature, we identify an IL-23/IL-1/IFNγ/TNFα/T-bet/Eomesodermin-driven circuit driving GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cell formation in vivo. Thus, our data identify a unique cell surface signature, trafficking mechanism and T-cell intrinsic regulators of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells.

  1. Distinct changes in pulmonary surfactant homeostasis in common beta-chain-and GM-CSF-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, JA; Ikegami, M; Robb, L; Begley, CG; Ross, G; Whitsett, JA

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is caused by inactivation of either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or GM receptor common beta-chain (beta(c)) genes in mice [GM(-/-), beta(c)(-/-)], demonstrating a critical role of GM-CSF signaling in surfactant homeostasis. To

  2. An alternative flow cytometry strategy for peripheral blood dendritic cell enumeration in the setting of repetitive GM-CSF dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Rita S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enumeration of circulating peripheral blood dendritic cells (DCs is complicated by the absence of a unique cell surface marker expressed on all DC subsets and by the use of various biological adjuvants to modulate the DC compartment, including granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF. Common methods employ a cocktail of antibodies, typically including anti-CD14, to define a lineage negative, MHC class II positive, putative DC population. Reported flow cytometry protocols include highly variable gating strategies and DC identification criteria. Increasing appreciation of DC pleiomorphism, GM-CSF biology, and recognition of CD14 expression in some DC subsets led us to consider an alternative lineage cocktail to improve identification of the circulating DC pool. Methods Standard whole blood staining with appropriate fluorochrome conjugated antibodies to MHC class II and either standard CD14 containing, or an alternate CD66acde containing, lineage cocktail was performed on samples obtained from normal donors and breast cancer patients before and after administration of dose-dense, cytotoxic chemotherapy with daily GM-CSF hematopoetic growth factor support. Putative DCs were enumerated by standard flow cytometry. Data set differences were evaluated using two tailed Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Cellular morphology was examined in cell-sorted populations from post GM-CSF samples. Results Use of either antibody cocktail defined comparably sized lineage negative, MHC class II positive populations in normal donors and at baseline in cancer patients. However, selection of lineage negative subsets with increasing MHC class II expression levels yielded larger putative DC populations identified with the alternate cocktail. Both cocktails yielded highly reproducible data. Use of the alternate cocktail: 1 yielded a putative DC population, post GM-CSF that was more homogenous and consistent with DCs, 2 resulted

  3. GM-CSF increases LPS-induced production of proinflammatory mediators via upregulation of TLR4 and CD14 in murine microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli Bijay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia are resident macrophage-like cells in the central nervous system (CNS and cause innate immune responses via the LPS receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and CD14, in a variety of neuroinflammatory disorders including bacterial infection, Alzheimer’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF activates microglia and induces inflammatory responses via binding to GM-CSF receptor complex composed of two different subunit GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα and common β chain (βc. GM-CSF has been shown to be associated with neuroinflammatory responses in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanisms how GM-CSF promotes neuroinflammation still remain unclear. Methods Microglia were stimulated with 20 ng/ml GM-CSF and the levels of TLR4 and CD14 expression were evaluated by RT-PCR and flowcytometry. LPS binding was analyzed by flowcytometry. GM-CSF receptor complex was analyzed by immunocytechemistry. The levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of GM-CSF-stimulated microglia and NF-κB nuclear translocation were determined by ELISA. Production of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess method. The levels of p-ERK1/2, ERK1/2, p-p38 and p38 were assessed by Western blotting. Statistically significant differences between experimental groups were determined by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Results GM-CSF receptor complex was expressed in microglia. GM-CSF enhanced TLR4 and CD14 expressions in microglia and subsequent LPS-binding to the cell surface. In addition, GM-CSF priming increased LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NO by microglia. GM-CSF upregulated the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-p38, suggesting that induction of TLR4 and CD14 expression by GM-CSF was mediated through ERK1/2 and p38, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that GM-CSF

  4. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  5. IFN regulatory factor 8 represses GM-CSF expression in T cells to affect myeloid cell lineage differentiation.

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    Paschall, Amy V; Zhang, Ruihua; Qi, Chen-Feng; Bardhan, Kankana; Peng, Liang; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Merad, Miriam; McGaha, Tracy; Zhou, Gang; Mellor, Andrew; Abrams, Scott I; Morse, Herbert C; Ozato, Keiko; Xiong, Huabao; Liu, Kebin

    2015-03-01

    During hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cells constantly differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages via a distinct differentiation program that is tightly controlled by myeloid lineage-specific transcription factors. Mice with a null mutation of IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) accumulate CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells that phenotypically and functionally resemble tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), indicating an essential role of IRF8 in myeloid cell lineage differentiation. However, IRF8 is expressed in various types of immune cells, and whether IRF8 functions intrinsically or extrinsically in regulation of myeloid cell lineage differentiation is not fully understood. In this study, we report an intriguing finding that, although IRF8-deficient mice exhibit deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and resultant accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) MDSCs, surprisingly, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in myeloid cells exhibit no abnormal myeloid cell lineage differentiation. Instead, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in T cells exhibited deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and MDSC accumulation. We further demonstrated that IRF8-deficient T cells exhibit elevated GM-CSF expression and secretion. Treatment of mice with GM-CSF increased MDSC accumulation, and adoptive transfer of IRF8-deficient T cells, but not GM-CSF-deficient T cells, increased MDSC accumulation in the recipient chimeric mice. Moreover, overexpression of IRF8 decreased GM-CSF expression in T cells. Our data determine that, in addition to its intrinsic function as an apoptosis regulator in myeloid cells, IRF8 also acts extrinsically to repress GM-CSF expression in T cells to control myeloid cell lineage differentiation, revealing a novel mechanism that the adaptive immune component of the immune system regulates the innate immune cell myelopoiesis in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates the actions of EPO and GM-CSF and coordinates with TGF-β in erythropoiesis.

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    Chang, Hua-Ching; Huang, Duen-Yi; Wu, Mai-Szu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Tzeng, Shiang-Jong; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2017-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and GM-CSF are involved in erythropoiesis, while TGF-β inhibits proliferation but potentiates differentiation of erythroblasts. Since Syk inhibitor may induce anemia side effect in clinic, here we investigated the role of Syk in the biological actions of EPO and GM-CSF in erythropoiesis. In human erythroleukemia cell line TF-1, Syk inhibitor R406 exerts an enhancement effect with TGF-β to decrease cell viability, either in the absence or presence of EPO or GM-CSF. Such effect of R406 results from the reduced cell cycle progression and increased cell apoptosis. Notably, unlike Syk, Src family kinases are not involved in the viability control of TF-1 cells. Signaling studies showed that Syk is required for STAT5 and ERK activation induced by EPO, and Akt and ERK activation induced by GM-CSF. Nevertheless, R406 does not change the Smad2/3 signal caused by TGF-β, and TGF-β neither affects above signal pathways of EPO and GM-CSF. Of note, Syk is constitutively associated with EPOR in plasma membrane and can bind to STAT5 at active status upon EPO stimulation. Furthermore, EPO-induced hemoglobin γ expression was reduced by R406. In BFU-E and CFU-E colony formation assays in Syk-deficient erythroid progenitor cells, we confirmed the essential role of Syk in erythropoiesis mediated by EPO. Taken together, Syk is a novel upstream signaling molecule of EPOR, and contributes to erythroblast proliferation, survival and differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adipose Progenitor Cell Secretion of GM-CSF and MMP9 Promotes a Stromal and Immunological Microenvironment That Supports Breast Cancer Progression.

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    Reggiani, Francesca; Labanca, Valentina; Mancuso, Patrizia; Rabascio, Cristina; Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Manconi, Andrea; Bertolini, Francesco

    2017-09-15

    A cell population with progenitor-like phenotype (CD45-CD34+) resident in human white adipose tissue (WAT) is known to promote the progression of local and metastatic breast cancer and angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified two proteins that were significantly upregulated in WAT-derived progenitors after coculture with breast cancer: granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9). These proteins were released by WAT progenitors in xenograft and transgenic breast cancer models. GM-CSF was identified as an upstream modulator. Breast cancer-derived GM-CSF induced GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors, and GM-CSF knockdown in breast cancer cells neutralized the protumorigenic activity of WAT progenitors in preclinical models. GM-CSF neutralization in diet-induced obese mice significantly reduced immunosuppression, intratumor vascularization, and local and metastatic breast cancer progression. Similarly, MMP9 inhibition reduced neoplastic angiogenesis and significantly decreased local and metastatic tumor growth. Combined GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition synergistically reduced angiogenesis and tumor progression. High-dose metformin inhibited GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors in in vitro and xenograft models. In obese syngeneic mice, metformin treatment mimicked the effects observed with GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition, suggesting these proteins as new targets for metformin. These findings support the hypothesis that GM-CSF and MMP9 promote the protumorigenic effect of WAT progenitors on local and metastatic breast cancer. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5169-82. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Critical analysis of an oncolytic herpesvirus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor for the treatment of malignant melanoma.

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    Hughes, Tasha; Coffin, Robert S; Lilley, Caroline E; Ponce, Rafael; Kaufman, Howard L

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively lyse tumor cells with minimal damage to normal cells are a new area of therapeutic development in oncology. An attenuated herpesvirus encoding the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), known as talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), has been identified as an attractive oncolytic virus for cancer therapy based on preclinical tumor studies and results from early-phase clinical trials and a large randomized Phase III study in melanoma. In this review, we discuss the basic biology of T-VEC, describe the role of GM-CSF as an immune adjuvant, summarize the preclinical data, and report the outcomes of published clinical trials using T-VEC. The emerging data suggest that T-VEC is a safe and potentially effective antitumor therapy in malignant melanoma and represents the first oncolytic virus to demonstrate therapeutic activity against human cancer in a randomized, controlled Phase III study.

  9. Action of granulopoiesis-stimulating cytokines rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and rmGM-CSF on murine haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Weiterová, L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new data to the knowledge of mechanisms by which recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) enhance the numbers of colonies growing from hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in the murine bone marrow. The in vitro technique for cultivating GM-CFC from normal bone marrow cells was used. For evaluation of stimulatory actions of the drugs studied, the factors themselves or sera of mice given these factors were added to the cultures. The factors or the sera were present in the cultures either as the only potentially stimulatory agents or acted jointly with a suboptimum concentration of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rmIL-3). It was found that both rhG-CSF and rmGM-CSF stimulate the proliferation of GM-CFC by a combination of direct mechanisms (direct actions on the target cells) and indirect effects (effects mediated through the induction of other cytokines and/or growth factors in the murine organism). The rhGM-CSF exhibited somewhat weaker in vitro effects in comparison with the other two factors and only indirect effects were noted. Additional in vivo experiments documented that, in spite of differences in mechanisms of action of the individual drugs studied on murine bone marrow cells in vitro, equal in vivo doses of the factors induce quantitatively similar effects on the production of GM-CFC in vivo.

  10. Randomized phase 1b trial of MOR103, a human antibody to GM-CSF, in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Cris S.; Asher, Aliya; Fryze, Waldemar; Kozubski, Wojciech; Wagner, Frank; Aram, Jehan; Tanasescu, Radu; Korolkiewicz, Roman P.; Dirnberger-Hertweck, Maren; Steidl, Stefan; Libretto, Susan E.; Sprenger, Till; Radue, Ernst W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of the recombinant human monoclonal antibody MOR103 to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with clinical or MRI activity. Methods: In this 20-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1b dose-escalation trial (registration number NCT01517282), adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) received an IV infu...

  11. Blockade of GM-CSF pathway induced sustained suppression of myeloid and T cell activities in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Guo, Xiang; Higgs, Brandon W; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Wu, Yuling; Karsdal, Morten A; Kuziora, Michael; Godwood, Alex; Close, David; Ryan, Patricia C; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2018-01-01

    Targeting the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) pathway holds great potential in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Mavrilimumab, a human monoclonal GM-CSF receptor-α antibody, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in RA. Our current study aimed to elucidate mechanisms of action and identify peripheral biomarkers associated with therapeutic responses of GM-CSF antagonism in RA. A 24-week placebo (PBO)-controlled trial was conducted in 305 RA patients who received mavrilimumab (30, 100 or 150 mg) or PBO once every 2 weeks. Serum biomarkers and whole blood gene expression profiles were measured by protein immunoassay and whole genome microarray. Mavrilimumab treatment induced significant down-regulation of type IV collagen formation marker (P4NP 7S), macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22), IL-2 receptor α and IL-6 compared with PBO. Both early and sustained reduction of P4NP 7S was associated with clinical response to 150 mg mavrilimumab treatment. Gene expression analyses demonstrated reduced expression of transcripts enriched in macrophage and IL-22/IL-17 signalling pathways after GM-CSF blockade therapy. Myeloid and T cell-associated transcripts were suppressed in mavrilimumab-treated ACR20 responders but not non-responders. While CCL22 and IL-6 down-regulation may reflect a direct effect of GM-CSFR blockade on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators by myeloid cells, the suppression of IL-2 receptor α and IL-17/IL-22 associated transcripts suggests an indirect suppressive effect of mavrilimumab on T cell activation. Our results demonstrated association of peripheral biomarker changes with therapeutic response to mavrilimumab in RA patients. The sustained efficacy of mavrilimumab in RA may result from both direct effects on myeloid cells and indirect effects on T cell activation after GM-CSFR blockade.

  12. GM-CSF Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity on Endothelial Cells Derived from Chronic Venous Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tisato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty patients affected by chronic venous disease (CVD in tertiary venous network and/or saphenous vein were analyzed before surgical ablation by echo-color-doppler for the hemodynamic parameters reflux time (RT and resistance index (RI, a negative and a positive prognostic factor, respectively. RT and RI were next correlated with relevant in vitro parameters of venous endothelial cells (VEC obtained from surgical specimens, such as cell migration in response to serum gradient, proliferation index, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 expression, as well as cytokines release. Of interest, ICAM-1 expression in patient-derived VEC cultures correlated positively with RT and negatively with RI. Moreover, RT showed a positive correlation with the baseline osteoprotegerin (OPG expression by VEC and an inverse correlation with VEC proliferation index. On the other hand, RI correlated positively with TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL expression. Among the cytokines released by VEC, GM-CSF showed a positive correlation with VEC proliferation and TRAIL expression and a negative correlation with OPG, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Since in vitro recombinant GM-CSF induced VEC proliferation and counteracted the induction of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and OPG upon exposure to TNF-α, our data suggest an anti-inflammatory activity of GM-CSF on venous endothelial cells.

  13. In Lysinuric Protein Intolerance system y+L activity is defective in monocytes and in GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Francesca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the recessive aminoaciduria Lysinuric Protein Intolerance (LPI, mutations of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 impair system y+L transport activity for cationic amino acids. A severe complication of LPI is a form of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP, in which alveolar spaces are filled with lipoproteinaceous material because of the impaired surfactant clearance by resident macrophages. The pathogenesis of LPI-associated PAP remains still obscure. The present study investigates for the first time the expression and function of y+LAT1 in monocytes and macrophages isolated from a patient affected by LPI-associated PAP. A comparison with mesenchymal cells from the same subject has been also performed. Methods Monocytes from peripheral blood were isolated from a 21-year-old patient with LPI. Alveolar macrophages and fibroblastic-like mesenchymal cells were obtained from a whole lung lavage (WLL performed on the same patient. System y+L activity was determined measuring the 1-min uptake of [3H]-arginine under discriminating conditions. Gene expression was evaluated through qRT-PCR. Results We have found that: 1 system y+L activity is markedly lowered in monocytes and alveolar macrophages from the LPI patient, because of the prevailing expression of SLC7A7/y+LAT1 in these cells; 2 on the contrary, fibroblasts isolated from the same patient do not display the transport defect due to compensation by the SLC7A6/y+LAT2 isoform; 3 in both normal and LPI monocytes, GM-CSF induces the expression of SLC7A7, suggesting that the gene is a target of the cytokine; 4 GM-CSF-induced differentiation of LPI monocytes is comparable to that of normal cells, demonstrating that GM-CSF signalling is unaltered; 5 general and respiratory conditions of the patient, along with PAP-associated parameters, markedly improved after GM-CSF therapy through aerosolization. Conclusions Monocytes and macrophages, but not fibroblasts, derived from a LPI patient clearly display the

  14. GM-CSF produced by non-hematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa1,2

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    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S.; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, and dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn’s disease in humans and colitis in murine models has been considered mainly to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF−/−) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type (WT) mice resulted in marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF−/− mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Non-hematopoietic cells and not myeloid cells produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury as revealed by bone marrow chimera and DC depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell produced GM-CSF has a novel non-redundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium. PMID:23325885

  15. LOCAL GM-CSF DEPENDENT DIFFERENTIATION AND ACTIVATION OF PULMONARY DENDRITIC CELLS AND MACROPHAGES PROTECTS AGAINST PROGRESSIVE CRYPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION IN MICE1

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    Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Neal, Lori M.; Murdock, Benjamin J.; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Dils, Anthony J.; Olszewski, Michal A.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acquired deficiency in granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are susceptible to infections with Cryptococcus (C.) neoformans and other opportunistic fungi. We previously showed that GM-CSF protects against progressive fungal disease using a murine model of cryptococcal lung infection. To better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which GM-CSF enhances anti-fungal host defenses, we investigated temporal and spatial relationships between myeloid and lymphoid immune responses in GM+/+ and GM−/− mice infected with a moderately-virulent encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (strain 52D). Our data demonstrate that GM-CSF deficiency led to a reduction in: 1) total lung leukocyte recruitment; 2) Th2 and Th17 responses; 3) total numbers of CD11b+ dendritic cells (DC), and CD11b− and CD11b+ macrophages (Mϕ); 4) DC and Mϕ activation; and 5) localization of DC and Mϕ to the microanatomic sites of alveolar infection. In contrast, GM-CSF deficiency resulted in increased accumulation of DC and Mϕ precursors, namely Ly-6Chigh monocytes, in the blood and lungs of infected mice. Collectively, these results show that GM-CSF promotes the local differentiation, accumulation, activation, and alveolar localization of lung DC and macrophages in mice with cryptococcal lung infection. These findings identify GM-CSF as central to the protective immune response that prevents progressive fungal disease and thus shed new light on the increased susceptibility to these infections observed in patients with acquired GM-CSF deficiency. PMID:26755822

  16. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

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    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2017-10-26

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγpos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. GM-CSF Promotes Chronic Disability in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Altering the Composition of Central Nervous System-Infiltrating Cells, but Is Dispensable for Disease Induction.

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    Duncker, Patrick C; Stoolman, Joshua S; Huber, Amanda K; Segal, Benjamin M

    2017-12-29

    GM-CSF has been portrayed as a critical cytokine in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and, ostensibly, in multiple sclerosis. C57BL/6 mice deficient in GM-CSF are resistant to EAE induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 The mechanism of action of GM-CSF in EAE is poorly understood. In this study, we show that GM-CSF augments the accumulation of MOG35-55-specific T cells in the skin draining lymph nodes of primed mice, but it is not required for the development of encephalitogenic T cells. Abrogation of GM-CSF receptor signaling in adoptive transfer recipients of MOG35-55-specific T cells did not alter the incidence of EAE or the trajectory of its initial clinical course, but it limited the extent of chronic CNS tissue damage and neurologic disability. The attenuated clinical course was associated with a relative dearth of MOG35-55-specific T cells, myeloid dendritic cells, and neutrophils, as well as an abundance of B cells, within CNS infiltrates. Our data indicate that GM-CSF drives chronic tissue damage and disability in EAE via pleiotropic pathways, but it is dispensable during early lesion formation and the onset of neurologic deficits. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade enhances the efficacy of SA-GM-CSF surface-modified tumor vaccine in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xinji; Li, Jinlong; Zhao, Hongfan; Mo, Lijun; Shi, Xianghua; Hu, Zhiming; Gao, Jimin; Tan, Wanlong

    2017-10-10

    Program death receptor-1 (PD-1)/program death ligand 1 (PD-L1) signaling plays an important role in tumor adaptive immune resistance. The streptavidin-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (SA-GM-CSF) surface-modified tumor cells vaccine developed through our novel protein-anchor technology could significantly promote the activation of dendritic cells. Although GM-CSF vaccine could significantly increase the number of tumor-specific CD8+T-cells, the majority of these CD8+T-cells expressed PD-1. Moreover, GM-CSF vaccine up-regulated the PD-L1 expression of tumor cells, resulting in immune resistance. Adding PD-1/PD-L1 blockade to GM-CSF vaccine therapy could significantly increase the population of CD4+ T, CD8+ T and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T but not CD4+ Foxp3+ T-cells and induced the highest production of IFN-γ. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade could effectively rescue the tumor-specific T lymphocytes generated by the GM-CSF vaccine, resulting in consistent tumor rejection. Taken together, PD-1/PD-L1 blockade combined with SA-GM-CSF-modified vaccine could effectively induce a strong specific antitumor immune response against prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intranasal exposure of mice to house dust mite elicits allergic airway inflammation via a GM-CSF-mediated mechanism.

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    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Wattie, Jennifer; Inman, Mark D; Goncharova, Susanna; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Jordana, Manel

    2004-11-15

    It is now well established that passive exposure to inhaled OVA leads to a state of immunological tolerance. Therefore, to elicit allergic sensitization, researchers have been compelled to devise alternative strategies, such as the systemic delivery of OVA in the context of powerful adjuvants, which are alien to the way humans are exposed and sensitized to allergens. The objectives of these studies were to investigate immune-inflammatory responses to intranasal delivery of a purified house dust mite (HDM) extract and to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this process. HDM was delivered to BALB/c mice daily for 10 days. After the last exposure, mice were killed, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, and samples were obtained. Expression/production of Th2-associated molecules in the lymph nodes, lung, and spleen were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Using this exposure protocol, exposure to HDM alone generated Th2 sensitization based on the expression/production of Th2 effector molecules and airway eosinophilic inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated expansion and activation of APCs in the lung and an influx of activated Th2 effector cells. Moreover, this inflammation was accompanied by airways hyper-responsiveness and a robust memory-driven immune response. Finally, administration of anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing Abs markedly reduced immune-inflammatory responses in both lung and spleen. Thus, intranasal delivery of HDM results in Th2 sensitization and airway eosinophilic inflammation that appear to be mediated, at least in part, by endogenous GM-CSF production.

  20. Establishment of Self-Renewable GM-CSF-Dependent Immature Macrophages In Vitro from Murine Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sachiko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Nishio, Naomi; Thanasegaran, Suganya; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in the innate immune system. Macrophages are thought to originate from hematopoietic precursors or the yolk sac. Here, we describe the in vitro establishment of self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs) from murine bone marrow (BM). GM-IMs grow continuously in vitro in conditioned medium containing GM-CSF. The immunophenotype of GM-IMs is F4/80high CD11bhigh CD11clow Ly6Clow. By comparing gene expression in GM-IMs and BM dendritic cells, we found that GM-IMs expressed lower levels of chemokines, cytokines and their receptors. GM-IMs are round in shape, attach loosely to non-coated culture dishes and have a marked phagocytic capacity. These results indicate that GM-IMs are macrophage precursor cells. Following stimulation with LPS, monocyte-like GM-IMs converted to flat macrophage-like cells that tightly adhered to non-coated culture dishes and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. These results indicated that GM-IMs differentiated to M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages. This was confirmed by stimulation of GM-IMs with IFNγ, an inducer of M1 markers. GM-IMs showed enhanced expression of M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and Retnla following stimulation by Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. When GM-IMs were injected into mice at sites of wounding, wound repair was enhanced. These results indicate that GM-IMs can differentiate to M2 macrophages. When GM-IMs were injected into clodronate-treated mice, they induced resident macrophage proliferation by producing M-CSF. In conclusion we have established self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages in vitro from murine BM, which differentiate to M1 or M2 macrophages. PMID:24124601

  1. GM-CSF Inhibits c-Kit and SCF Expression by Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

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    Barroeta Seijas, Amairelys Belen; Simonetti, Sonia; Vitale, Sara; Runci, Daniele; Quinci, Angela Caterina; Soriani, Alessandra; Criscuoli, Mattia; Filippi, Irene; Naldini, Antonella; Sacchetti, Federico Maria; Tarantino, Umberto; Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Santoni, Angela; Di Rosa, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand of c-kit, is a key cytokine for hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic precursors express c-kit, whereas differentiated cells of hematopoietic lineage are negative for this receptor, with the exception of NK cells, mast cells, and a few others. While it has long been recognized that dendritic cells (DCs) can express c-kit, several questions remain concerning the SCF/c-kit axis in DCs. This is particularly relevant for DCs found in those organs wherein SCF is highly expressed, including the bone marrow (BM). We characterized c-kit expression by conventional DCs (cDCs) from BM and demonstrated a higher proportion of c-kit+ cells among type 1 cDC subsets (cDC1s) than type 2 cDC subsets (cDC2s) in both humans and mice, whereas similar levels of c-kit expression were observed in cDC1s and cDC2s from mouse spleen. To further study c-kit regulation, DCs were generated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from mouse BM, a widely used protocol. CD11c+ cells were purified from pooled non-adherent and slightly adherent cells collected after 7 days of culture, thus obtaining highly purified BM-derived DCs (BMdDCs). BMdDCs contained a small fraction of c-kit+ cells, and by replating them for 2 days with GM-CSF, we obtained a homogeneous population of c-kit+ CD40hi MHCIIhi cells. Not only did BMdDCs express c-kit but they also produced SCF, and both were striking upregulated if GM-CSF was omitted after replating. Furthermore, a small but significant reduction in BMdDC survival was observed upon SCF silencing. Incubation of BMdDCs with SCF did not modulate antigen presentation ability of these cells, nor it did regulate their membrane expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We conclude that the SCF/c-kit-mediated prosurvival circuit may have been overlooked because of the prominent use of GM-CSF in DC cultures in vitro, including those human DC cultures destined for the clinics. We speculate that DCs more prominently rely

  2. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity

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    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity. PMID:28138327

  3. GM-CSF Induces Cyclin D1 Expression and Proliferation of Endothelial Progenitor Cells via PI3K and MAPK Signaling

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    Chaolin Qiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, which can be isolated from the bone marrow or the peripheral blood, have generated interest because of their capacity to migrate to sites of vascularization and endothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells in a process termed neovasculogenesis. EPCs are therefore possible regenerative tools for the treatment of vascular diseases and potential targets for the inhibition of angiogenesis during tumor development. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF on the acceleration of EPC proliferation and colony formation. Methods: EPCs were isolated, identified and cultured in the presence of GM-CSF. The effect of GM-CSF on endothelial cell colony formation and proliferation was examine by colony formation assay and MTT assay, separately. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were detected by western bloting. JAK/Stat, PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling were analyzed. Results: GM-CSF accelerated the G1/S phase transition in EPCs by upregulating the expression of cyclins D1 and E. The GM-CSF induced increase in the levels of cyclin D1 and the subsequent phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb protein activated E2F-1, resulting in the upregulation of the transcription of cyclin E. Furthermore, the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle progression by GM-CSF was mediated by the PI3K/Akt, JNK and ERK signaling pathways through the phosphorylation of GSK3β or the activation of AP-1 transcription factors. Conclusion: Our findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effect of GM-CSF on the modulation of cell cycle progression in EPCs, which is important considering their role in vascular repair and their therapeutic potential in several diseases.

  4. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

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    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  5. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  6. In vivo kinetics of sup 111 Indium-labelled autologous granulocytes following i. v. administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

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    Hovgaard, D.; Mortensen, B.T.; Nissen, N.I. (Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Schifter, S.; Raboel, A. (Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1992-01-01

    Administration of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) induces an immediate transient granulocytopenia of 1-3 hours' duration. In order to explore this phenomenon, granulocytes were labelled with {sup 111}Indium and the effect on the kinetics of granulocytes after administration of rhGM-CSF was studied in 10 previously untreated patients with malignant lymphoma. For both types and doses of rhGM-CSF, a significant and dramatic accumulation of the {sup 111}Indium-labelled granulocytes was observed in the lung within a few minutes after i.v. injection of rhGM-CSF. The accumulation of radioactivity coincided with the pronounced and transient granulocytopenia in peripheral blood. The {sup 111}Indium-labelled granulocytes later reappeared in the peripheral blood, indicating reversible pulmonary vascular margination of the granulocytes. Half-life of labelled granulocytes after reappearance was comparable to half-life values under normal conditions. The transient accumulation of granulocytes in the pulmonary vessels seems not to be of clinical importance in the management of patients, but it may to some degree explain previously described side-effects, such as transient hypoxemia (''first-dose'' reaction) following administration of rhGM-CSF. (au).

  7. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

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    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  8. Immune Correlates of GM-CSF and Melanoma Peptide Vaccination in a Randomized Trial for the Adjuvant Therapy of Resected High-Risk Melanoma (E4697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Lisa H; Zhao, Fengmin; Lee, Sandra; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Margolin, Kim A; White, Richard L; Atkins, Michael B; Cohen, Gary I; Whiteside, Theresa L; Kirkwood, John M; Lawson, David H

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: E4697 was a multicenter intergroup randomized placebo-controlled phase III trial of adjuvant GM-CSF and/or a multiepitope melanoma peptide vaccine for patients with completely resected, high-risk stage III/IV melanoma.Experimental Design: A total of 815 patients were enrolled from December 1999 to October 2006 into this six-arm study. GM-CSF was chosen to promote the numbers and functions of dendritic cells (DC). The melanoma antigen peptide vaccine (Tyrosinase368-376 (370D), gp100209-217 (210M), MART-127-35) in montanide was designed to promote melanoma-specific CD8+ T-cell responses.Results: Although the overall RFS and OS were not significantly improved with the vaccine or GM-CSF when compared with placebo, immunomodulatory effects were observed in peripheral blood and served as important correlates to this therapeutic study. Peripheral blood was examined to evaluate the impact of GM-CSF and/or the peptide vaccine on peripheral blood immunity and to investigate potential predictive or prognostic biomarkers. A total of 11.3% of unvaccinated patients and 27.1% of vaccinated patients developed peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. HLA-A2+ patients who had any peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell response at day +43 tended to have poorer OS in univariate analysis. Patients receiving GM-CSF had significant reduction in percentages of circulating myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) at day +43. In a subset of patients who received GM-CSF, circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) were also modulated. The majority of patients developed anti-GM-CSF Nabs, which correlated with improved RFS and OS.Conclusions: The assessment of cellular and humoral responses identified counterintuitive immune system changes correlating with clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 23(17); 5034-43. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Fed-batch fermentation of GM-CSF-producing glycoengineered Pichia pastoris under controlled specific growth rate

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    Haustraete Jurgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast expression systems with altered N-glycosylation are now available to produce glycoproteins with homogenous, defined N-glycans. However, data on the behaviour of these strains in high cell density cultivation are scarce. Results Here, we report on cultivations under controlled specific growth rate of a GlycoSwitch-Man5 Pichia pastoris strain producing Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF at high levels (hundreds of milligrams per liter. We demonstrate that homogenous Man5GlcNAc2 N-glycosylation of the secreted proteins is achieved at all specific growth rates tested. Conclusions Together, these data illustrate that the GlycoSwitch-Man5 P. pastoris is a robust production strain for homogenously N-glycosylated proteins.

  10. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; Van Zundert, Gydo C P; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2016-01-01

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize

  11. Immunotherapy with concurrent subcutaneous GM-CSF, low-dose IL-2 and IFN-alpha in patients with progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verra, N.; Jansen, R.; Groenewegen, G.; Mallo, H.; Kersten, M. J.; Bex, A.; Vyth-Dreese, F. A.; Sein, J.; van de Kasteele, W.; Nooijen, W. J.; de Waal, M.; Horenblas, S.; de Gast, G. C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine toxicity, efficacy and immunologic effects of concurrent subcutaneous injections of low-dose interleukin-2 (LD-IL-2), granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-alpha 2b (IFNalpha) in progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Temozolomide followed by combined immunotherapy with GM-CSF, low-dose IL2 and IFN alpha in patients with metastatic melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gast, G. C.; Batchelor, D.; Kersten, M. J.; Vyth-Dreese, F. A.; Sein, J.; van de Kasteele, W. F.; Nooijen, W. J.; Nieweg, O. E.; de Waal, M. A.; Boogerd, W.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the toxicity and efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ) p.o. followed by subcutaneous (s.c.) low-dose interleukin-2 (IL2), granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-alpha 2b (IFN alpha) in patients with metastatic melanoma. A total of 74

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is released by female mouse bladder urothelial cells and expressed by the urothelium as an early response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Ming; Alvarez-Lugo, Lery; Chen, Gang; Chai, Toby C

    2017-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo response of primary mouse bladder urothelial cells (mBUC) and bladder urothelium to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), focusing on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. Female C57BL/6 mBUC were exposed for 12 hr to differing concentrations of LPS (100 ng/ml to 10 µg/ml). mBUC were also exposed to a single dose of LPS (1 µg/ml) for 3, 6, 12 hr. Neutralizing GM-CSF antibody (0.1 μg/ml) was used block GM-CSF activity in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed, whereby, LPS (1 mg/ml) was instilled intravesically and left to dwell for 30 min followed by harvest of bladder urothelium 3 to 18 hr later. ELISA measured GM-CSF. qPCR quantitated mRNA for GM-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA for GM-CSF, GM-CSFRα, and β in bladder tissues. Immunohistofluorescence and Western blots for GM-CSFRα were performed on bladder tissues. LPS induced a dose-dependent release of GM-CSF by mBUC. Mouse bladder urothelium did not express GM-CSF mRNA at baseline, but expressed GM-CSF mRNA 3 hr after in vivo LPS exposure, with GM-CSF mRNA expression disappearing 18 hr later. GM-CSFRα expression was confirmed in bladder urothelium. GM-CSF neutralizing antibody significantly diminished LPS-induced increases of VEGF and COX-2 mRNA expression. Urothelium and mBUC secreted GM-CSF as an early response to LPS. GM-CSF mediated downstream expression of VEGF and COX-2. Urothelial GM-CSF may function as a signaling mediator for both inflammation and pain transduction. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1020-1025, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

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    Li, Yan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Ohms, Stephen J. [ACRF Biomolecular Resource Facility, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Shannon, Frances M. [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); The University of Canberra, ACT 2602 (Australia); Sun, Chao, E-mail: sunchao2775@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Fan, Jun Y., E-mail: jun.fan@anu.edu.au [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  15. GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Cells and Langerhans Cells As Part of the Dendritic Cell Family

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    Manfred B. Lutz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mph share many characteristics as components of the innate immune system. The criteria to classify the multitude of subsets within the mononuclear phagocyte system are currently phenotype, ontogeny, transcription patterns, epigenetic adaptations, and function. More recently, ontogenetic, transcriptional, and proteomic research approaches uncovered major developmental differences between Flt3L-dependent conventional DCs as compared with Mphs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs, the latter mainly generated in vitro from murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs or human CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes. Conversely, in vitro GM-CSF-dependent monocyte-derived Mphs largely resemble MoDCs whereas tissue-resident Mphs show a common embryonic origin from yolk sac and fetal liver with Langerhans cells (LCs. The novel ontogenetic findings opened discussions on the terminology of DCs versus Mphs. Here, we bring forward arguments to facilitate definitions of BM-DCs, MoDCs, and LCs. We propose a group model of terminology for all DC subsets that attempts to encompass both ontogeny and function.

  16. Single Institution Experience of Ipilimumab 3 mg/kg with Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Donahue, Hilary; Nishino, Mizuki; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Davis, Meredith; Bailey, Nancy; Ott, Patrick A; Hodi, F Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Ipilimumab, 10 mg/kg with sargramostim (GM-CSF; GM), improved overall survival (OS) and safety of patients with advanced melanoma over ipilimumab in a randomized phase II trial. The FDA-approved dose of ipilimumab of 3 mg/kg has not been assessed with GM (IPI-GM). Consecutive patients treated with IPI-GM at a single institution were reviewed. Treatment included ipilimumab every 3 weeks × 4 and GM, 250-μg s.c. injection days 1 to 14 of each ipilimumab cycle. Efficacy, clinical characteristics, toxicities, and blinded radiology review of tumor burden were evaluated. Thirty-two patients were identified with 25 (78%) having immune-related response criteria (irRC) measurable disease and 41% with central nervous system metastases. A total of 88.6% of GM doses were administered. Response rate by irRC and disease control rate at 12 weeks were 20% and 44%, respectively (median follow-up 37 weeks). Immune-related adverse events (irAE) were observed in 10 (31.3%) patients, with 3 (9.4%) grade 3 events. Patients with grade 3 irAEs had prior autoimmunity, advanced age, and poor performance status. The median OS from first dose of ipilimumab was 41 weeks. Ipi-GM treatment is feasible and in this poor-risk advanced melanoma population, efficacy appeared similar but safety appeared improved relative to historical ipilimumab alone. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Up-regulation of cluster of differentiation (CD) 11b expression on the surface of canine granulocytes with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Nunomura, Yuka; Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Tazawa, Ryushi

    2014-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, sharing a common beta subunit (CDw131) with interleukins 3 and 5. GM-CSF is important for its direct and indirect involvement in host defense. In veterinary medicine, human (h) GM-CSF has been used as a substitute for canine GM-CSF to stimulate canine granulocytes and macrophages. In this study, we compared the effects of three distinct hGM-CSFs produced by bacteria, yeasts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with those of Escherichia (E) coli-produced canine GM-CSF on the cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) expression in canine granulocytes. The median effective dose (ED50) of hGM-CSFs from bacteria, yeasts and CHO cells was 3.09, 4.09 and 4.27 ng/ml, respectively, with no significant difference among three. In contrast, a significant difference was observed between ED50 of canine GM-CSF (0.56 ng/ml) and three hGM-CSFs according to the paired t-test (Pgranulocytes, but the average activity of the three rhGM-CSFs was approximately 15% of that of canine GM-CSF.

  18. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Enrichment of Ly6C(hi) monocytes by multiple GM-CSF injections with HBV vaccine contributes to viral clearance in a HBV mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Zhou, Xian; Zhao, Gan; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xianzheng; Yu, Xueping; Wang, Bin

    2017-07-12

    Adjuvants are considered a necessary component for HBV therapeutic vaccines but few are licensed in clinical practice due to concerns about safety or efficiency. In our recent study, we established that a combination protocol of 3-day pretreatments with GM-CSF before a vaccination (3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE) into the same injection site could break immune tolerance and cause over 90% reduction of HBsAg level in the HBsAg transgenic mouse model. Herein, we further investigated the therapeutic potential of the combination in AAV8-1.3HBV-infected mice. After 4 vaccinations, both serum HBeAg and HBsAg were cleared and there was a 95% reduction of HBV-positive hepatocytes, in addition to the presence of large number of infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in the livers. Mechanistically, the HBV-specific T-cell responses were elicited via a 3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE-induced conversion of CCR2-dependent CD11b(+) Ly6C(hi) monocytes into CD11b(+)CD11c(+) DCs. Experimental depletion of Ly6C(hi) monocytes resulted in a defective HBV-specific immune response thereby abrogating HBV eradication. This vaccination strategy could lead to development of an effective therapeutic protocol against chronic HBV in infected patients.

  20. Research on influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum

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    Han-Chun Yan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum. Methods: A total of 240 cases of patients with condyloma acuminatum were randomly divided into two groups, control group and observation group, each group of 120 cases. The CO2 laser was used for the removal of warts in all patients, while patients in the observation group were combined with interferon. Then the differences of curative effect and the recurrence of patients between the two groups were compared, and the change of T-lymphocyte subsets and serum inflammatory cytokines, HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in the two groups were compared before and after treatment. Results: The cure rate of observation group was 88.33%, significantly higher than that of control group by 65%. The recurrence rate of the observation group was 10.83% which was significantly lower than that of the control group by 30.83%. Three, six months after treatment, the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ of patients in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and CD8+ was significantly lower than that in the control group; the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were notably higher than those of control group, while the IL-4, IL-10 levels of patients were lower than those in control group; the serum levels of HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF were lower than control group too. The difference between groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Interferon can regulate T-lymphocyte subsets, inhibit inflammatory reaction and change the immune stress state, thereby profitably improving the cure rate and reduce the recurrence rate of CA patients.

  1. Randomized phase 1b trial of MOR103, a human antibody to GM-CSF, in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cris S; Asher, Aliya; Fryze, Waldemar; Kozubski, Wojciech; Wagner, Frank; Aram, Jehan; Tanasescu, Radu; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Dirnberger-Hertweck, Maren; Steidl, Stefan; Libretto, Susan E; Sprenger, Till; Radue, Ernst W

    2015-08-01

    To determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and immunogenicity of the recombinant human monoclonal antibody MOR103 to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with clinical or MRI activity. In this 20-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1b dose-escalation trial (registration number NCT01517282), adults with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or secondary progressive MS (SPMS) received an IV infusion of placebo (n = 6) or MOR103 0.5 (n = 8), 1.0 (n = 8), or 2.0 (n = 9) mg/kg every 2 weeks for 10 weeks. Patients had to have ≤10 gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing brain lesions on T1-weighted MRI at baseline. The primary objective was safety. Most treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were mild to moderate in severity. The most frequent was nasopharyngitis. Between-group differences in TEAE numbers were small. There were no TEAE-related trial discontinuations, infusion-related reactions, or deaths. Nine patients experienced MS exacerbations: 3, 5, 1, and 0 patient(s) in the placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg groups, respectively. A few T1 Gd-enhancing lesions and/or new or enlarging T2 lesions indicative of inflammation were observed in all treatment groups. No clinically significant changes were observed in other clinical assessments or laboratory safety assessments. No anti-MOR103 antibodies were detected. PK evaluations indicated dose linearity with low/no drug accumulation over time. MOR103 was generally well-tolerated in patients with RRMS or SPMS. No evidence of immunogenicity was found. This phase 1b study provides Class I evidence that MOR103 has acceptable tolerability in patients with MS.

  2. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Buchbinder

    Full Text Available A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M. Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env.Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination.All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%, the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%, and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response. The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF.This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960.

  3. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman H

    2015-12-01

    -γ secreting T-cells on ELISPOT for BCG treated groups, and a trend for higher numbers of tumor infiltrating CD3+ lymphocytes. Some tumors in the 4T1-BCG demonstrated organized lymphoid structures within the tumor microenvironment as well. Conclusion: The use of BCG bystander cell lines demonstrates proof of concept for anti-tumor activity and immunogenicity in an immunocompetent murine model of breast cancer. This vaccine is being evaluated in lung cancer and should be explored further in clinical trials of breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence or in combination with other immunomodulatory agents. Keywords: breast cancer, immunotherapy, bystander vaccine, CD40L, GM-CSF

  4. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

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    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autocrine GM-CSF transcription in the leukemic progenitor cell line KG1a is mediated by the transcription factor ETS1 and is negatively regulated through SECTM1 mediated ligation of CD7.

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    Bade-Döding, Christina; Göttmann, Wiebke; Baigger, Anja; Farren, Matthew; Lee, Kelvin P; Blasczyk, Rainer; Huyton, Trevor

    2014-03-01

    CD7 expression is found on ~30% of acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML). The leukemic progenitor cell line KG1a (CD7+) constitutively expresses GM-CSF while the parental KG1 (CD7-) cell line does not. This study focuses on the molecular basis of CD7 mediated GM-CSF regulation. KG1a cells were treated with recombinant SECTM1-Fc protein, the PI3K kinase inhibitors wortmannin, LY292004, or PI4K activator spermine. Stable KG1-CD7+, KG1a-shCD7, KG1a-shETS1 as well as KG1a-GFP, KG1a-PKCβII-GFP cell lines were generated and the levels of CD7, GM-CSF and ETS-1 mRNA and protein were compared by real-time-PCR, western blotting, flow cytometry and ELISA. SECTM1 is expressed in Human Bone Marrow Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) and its expression can be upregulated by both IFN-γ. KG1a cells demonstrated high expression levels of CD7 and ETS-1 allowing a constitutative signaling through the PI3K/Atk pathway to promote GM-CSF expression, while KG1 cells with low expression of CD7 and ETS-1 showed low GM-CSF expression. On KG1a cells GM-CSF expression could be negatively regulated by PI3K inhibitors or by recombinant SECTM1-Fc. Overexpression of CD7 in KG1 cells was insufficient to promote GM-CSF expression, while silencing of CD7 or ETS-1 resulted in reduced GM-CSF expression levels. Differentiation capable KG1a cells overexpressing PKCβII illustrated complete loss of CD7, but maintained normal levels of both ETS-1 and GM-CSF expression. These findings add an additional layer to the previously described autocrine/paracrine signaling between leukemic progenitor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight a role for SECTM1 in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This work shows that SECTM1 secreted from bone marrow stromal cells may interact with CD7 to influence GM-CSF expression in leukemic cells. © 2013.

  6. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy syndrome is associated with activation of GM-CSF and burst-like expression of IL-8 in peripheral blood.

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    Ling, Eduard; Israeli, Moshe; Klein, Tirza; Amir, Jacob; Harel, Liora

    2014-11-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, myalgia, and abdominal pain. Peripheral blood concentrations of selected cytokines of PFAPA patients during and between febrile episodes were analyzed in a search for PFAPA-specific molecular signature. 23 children with PFAPA (age 6.07 ± 2.94 years, range 5-9 years) and three control children with severe oropharyngeal infections (age 6.2 ± 7.95 years, range 1-17 years) participated in the study. Peripheral blood concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, TNF-α were measured using Luminex technology. PFAPA febrile episodes were characterized by detection of GM-CSF - 134.07 ± 315.5 pg/mL; significant (P < 0.001), compared to baseline and controls, elevation of concentrations of IL-8 (3193.7 ± 2508 pg/mL vs. 100.36 ± 119. pg/mL vs. 2.04 ± 4.08 pg/mL, respectively), IL-6 (1355.38 ± 2026.53 pg/mL vs. 28.8 ± 44.2 pg/mL and 27.13 ± 26.42 pg/mL, respectively). IL-1β was detected only in febrile and afebrile PFAPA patients (922.8 ± 1639 pg/mL vs. 10.98 ± 19.4 pg/ml, P < 0.002, respectively), but not in controls. Peripheral blood concentration of TNFα did not differ significantly between study groups. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were negligible in all study subjects. PFAPA febrile episodes are characterized by activation of GM-CSF and IL-8 with Th1 skewing. We propose a molecular mechanism governing this phenomenon.

  7. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

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    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Administration Attenuates Murine Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection through Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF)-dependent Macrophage Activation and Phagolysosome Fusion*

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    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K.; Gardner, Jason C.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; McCormack, Francis X.

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 105 M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:25605711

  9. Dragon's blood extracts reduce radiation-induced peripheral blood injury and protects human megakaryocyte cells from GM-CSF withdraw-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Xu, Bing; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Shan, Shuangquan; Ma, Hong; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB), a Chinese traditional herb, was shown to have certain protective effects on radiation-induced bone marrow injury due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. The 50% ethanol extracts (DBE) were separated from DB by the methods of alcohol extracting-water precipitating. The protective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis were studied, particularly on megakaryocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vivo radioprotective effects of DBE on hematopoiesis and pathological changes using an irradiated-mouse model. Moreover, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of DBE on megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro were explored in GM-CSF depletion-induced Mo7e cell model. DBE significantly promoted the recovery of peripheral blood cells in irradiated mice. Histology bone marrow confirmed the protective effect of DBE, as shown by an increased number of hematopoietic cells and a reduction of apoptosis. In a megakaryocytic apoptotic model, DBE (50 µg/mL) markedly alleviated GM-CSF withdrawal-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest of Mo7e cells. DBE (50 µg/mL) also significantly decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 expression, inhibited the active caspase-3 expression. In addition, DBE could induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation in GM-CSF-depleted Mo7e cell, but not Akt. Our data demonstrated that DBE could effectively accelerate the recovery of peripheral blood cells, especially platelet. DBE attenuated cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the reduction of active caspase-3 expression. The effect of DBE on Mo7e cells survival and proliferation is likely associated with the activation of ERK, but not Akt. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Complete Surgical Resection of Locally Advanced and/or Stage IV Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E4697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David H; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Margolin, Kim A; Ernstoff, Marc S; Atkins, Michael B; Cohen, Gary I; Whiteside, Theresa L; Butterfield, Lisa H; Kirkwood, John M

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma. Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2-positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2-negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population. A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF-treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2-positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups. Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high-risk resected melanoma. Exploratory analyses suggest

  11. Critical analysis of an oncolytic herpesvirus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor for the treatment of malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tasha Hughes,1 Robert S Coffin,2 Caroline E Lilley,2 Rafael Ponce,2 Howard L Kaufman1 1Departments of General Surgery and Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, 2BioVex, Inc, a subsidiary of Amgen, Inc, Sherman Oaks, CA, USA Abstract: Oncolytic viruses that selectively lyse tumor cells with minimal damage to normal cells are a new area of therapeutic development in oncology. An attenuated herpesvirus encoding the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, known as talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC, has been identified as an attractive oncolytic virus for cancer therapy based on preclinical tumor studies and results from early-phase clinical trials and a large randomized Phase III study in melanoma. In this review, we discuss the basic biology of T-VEC, describe the role of GM-CSF as an immune adjuvant, summarize the preclinical data, and report the outcomes of published clinical trials using T-VEC. The emerging data suggest that T-VEC is a safe and potentially effective antitumor therapy in malignant melanoma and represents the first oncolytic virus to demonstrate therapeutic activity against human cancer in a randomized, controlled Phase III study. Keywords: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, herpesvirus, melanoma, oncolytic virus, treatment

  12. CCR6+ Th cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of persons with multiple sclerosis are dominated by pathogenic non-classic Th1 cells and GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells.

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    Restorick, S M; Durant, L; Kalra, S; Hassan-Smith, G; Rathbone, E; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2017-08-01

    Considerable attention has been given to CCR6+ IL-17-secreting CD4+ T cells (Th17) in the pathology of a number of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, other Th subsets also play important pathogenic roles, including those that secrete IFNγ and GM-CSF. CCR6 expression by Th17 cells allows their migration across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they are involved in the early phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and in MS these cells are elevated in the CSF during relapses and contain high frequencies of autoreactive cells. However, the relatively low frequency of Th17 cells suggests they cannot by themselves account for the high percentage of CCR6+ cells in MS CSF. Here we identify the dominant CCR6+ T cell subsets in both the blood and CSF as non-classic Th1 cells, including many that secrete GM-CSF, a key encephalitogenic cytokine. In addition, we show that Th cells secreting GM-CSF but not IFNγ or IL-17, a subset termed GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells, also accumulate in the CSF. Importantly, in MS the proportion of IFNγ- and GM-CSF-secreting T cells expressing CCR6 was significantly enriched in the CSF, and was elevated in MS, suggesting these cells play a pathogenic role in this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine GM-CSF and IL-8 on CMT score, somatic cell count, and milk mononuclear cell populations in Holstein cows with Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, Yoshio; Ozawa, Tomomi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kushibiki, Shiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Shingu, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Yuya; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hata, Eiji; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2017-09-01

    The effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rbGM-CSF) and interleukin-8 (rbIL-8) on mononuclear cell populations in quarters, somatic cell count (SCC) and the California Mastitis Test (CMT) score were investigated. From the selected cows with naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis, one quarter of each cow were selected for the infusions of rbGM-CSF (400 μg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), rbIL-8 (1 mg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), and phosphate-buffered saline (5 mL/quarter, n = 7). The CMT score of both cytokines post infusion temporarily increased between days 0 and 1 and significantly decreased between days 7 and 14 compared to the preinfusion level. The SCC on day 14 after infusions of rbGM-CSF tended to be lower than that of the control group. The percentage of CD14+ cells increased on days 1 and 2 post infusion of rbGM-CSF. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells also increased on days 2 and 3, suggesting that the infusion of rbGM-CSF enhanced cellular immunity in the mammary gland. In contrast, the percentage of CD14+ cells decreased on days 0.25 and 1 post infusion of rbIL-8. No significant changes in the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in milk after infusion of rbIL-8 were evident during the experimental period, which suggested that rbIL-8 had little effect on the function of T cells in the mammary gland. These results indicated that rbGM-CSF and rbIL-8 decreased the CMT score by a different mechanism and may have a potential as therapeutic agents for subclinical mastitis.

  14. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  15. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

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    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Modulación de la expresión de la L-selectina por agentes quimiotácticos y GM-CSF

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    Carlos J. Montoya

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available La L-selectina es una molécula de adhesión que se expresa constitutivamente en la membrana de los granulocitos, monocitos y linfocitos, células en las cuales interviene en los procesos iniciales de migración hacia los sitios de inflamación y órganos linfoides. Una vez que dichas células son activadas, la L-selectina experimenta un proceso de regulación negativa con la liberación de un fragmento soluble. Con el objetivo de analizar el efecto de algunos agentes quimiotácticos fisiológicos y un estimulante artificial sobre la expresión de la L-selectina en la superficie de los granulocitos de sangre periférica, se evaluó ésta por citometría de flujo en leucocitos no estimulados y luego de su incubación con un éster de forbol (PMA, dos agentes quimiotácticos (fMLP y LTB4 y una citocina (GM-CSF. En condiciones basales, la expresión de la L-selectina se encontró en un porcentaje alto (95,03 ± 0,67; la estimulación con PMA indujo una disminución notable en la expresión de esta molécula (3,16 ± 0,63. Los factores quimiotácticos llevaron también a una reducción significativa (69,89 ± 4,96 para LTB4 y 53,70 ± 4,30 para fMLP, mientras que la incubación con GM-CSF no produjo cambios significativos con respecto a la expresión basal (89,08 ± 4,81. Al comparar las diferentes condiciones de estimulación entre ellas, se observó que el efecto del PMA fue significativamente mayor que los demás estímulos; además, cuando se comparó la reducción de la expresión generada por el fMLP y el LTB4 también se encontró que entre ellas existía una diferencia estadísticamente significativa. Estos resultados sugieren que el grado de activación alcanzado por los granulocitos se relaciona directamente con la capacidad para liberar la L-selectina desde su superficie, siendo ésta menos intensa después de la acción de estímulos fisiológicos como los agentes quimiotácticos; si bien el GM-CSF activa funciones importantes en la

  17. A novel self-assembled nanoparticle vaccine with HIV-1 Tat₄₉₋₅₇/HPV16 E7₄₉₋₅₇ fusion peptide and GM-CSF DNA elicits potent and prolonged CD8⁺ T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Yin, Rui; Tian, Yi; Huang, Zeming; Shi, Jinglei; Fu, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Wu, Yuzhang; Hao, Fei; Ni, Bing

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based vaccines derived from the E7 protein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 were developed to induce effective T cell responses against established cervical cancer, but have met with limited clinical success. It is necessary to develop novel peptide-based strategies to substantially improve the immune response against HPV16-related cancer. In this study, we aimed to design a novel peptide-based self-assembled nanoparticle HPV16 vaccine by combining the cell-penetrating peptide HIV-1 Tat(49-57) that was fused with the HPV16 E7(49-57) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope and the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene, and to investigate how it improves the immune response and the therapeutic outcome ex vivo and in vivo. Nanoparticles were prepared and identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gel retardation and DNase I protection assays. This type of vaccine formulation formed the 20-80 nm nanoparticles, and greatly improved epitope-specific immunity both ex vivo and in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine type was associated with decreased tumor growth and enhanced long-term survival in the prophylactic and therapeutic mouse models. The underlying mechanisms were determined to involve priming of enhanced frequency of CD8(+) memory T subtype cells. These results suggest that the nanoparticle Tat-E7/pGM-CSF represents a promising novel approach to enhance the potency of peptide-based cervical cancer vaccines, and this vaccine design strategy may act as a useful reference for research of virus-associated diseases and specific tumor immunotherapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Seibert, Tara; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Shi, Chunhua; Batulan, Zarah; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that heat shock protein (HSP)-27 is protective against the development of experimental atherosclerosis, reducing plaque cholesterol content by more than 30%. Moreover, elevated HSP-27 levels are predictive of relative freedom from clinical cardiovascular events. HSP-27 signaling occurs via the activation of NF-κB, which induces a marked up-regulation in expression of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that is known to alter ABC transporters involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Therefore, we hypothesized that HSP-27-derived GM-CSF has a potent role in impeding plaque formation by promoting macrophage RCT and sought to better characterize this pathway. Treatment of THP-1 cells, RAW-Blue cells, and primary macrophages with recombinant HSP-27 resulted in NF-κB activation via TLR-4 and was inhibited by various pharmacologic blockers of this pathway. Moreover, HSP-27-induced upregulation of GM-CSF expression was dependent on TLR-4 signaling. Recombinant (r)HSP-27 treatment of ApoE-/- female (but not male) mice for 4 wk yielded reductions in plaque area and cholesterol clefts of 33 and 47%, respectively, with no effect on GM-CSF-/-ApoE-/- mice. With 12 wk of rHSP-27 treatment, both female and male mice showed reductions in plaque burden (55 and 42%, respectively) and a 60% reduction in necrotic core area but no treatment effect in GM-CSF-/-ApoE-/- mice. In vitro functional studies revealed that HSP-27 enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as facilitated cholesterol efflux in vitro by ∼10%. These novel findings establish a paradigm for HSP-27-mediated RCT and set the stage for the development of HSP-27 atheroprotective therapeutics.-Pulakazhi Venu, V. K., Adijiang, A., Seibert, T., Chen, Y.-X., Shi, C., Batulan, Z., O'Brien, E. R. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in

  19. Glioblastoma-synthesized G-CSF and GM-CSF contribute to growth and immunosuppression: Potential therapeutic benefit from dapsone, fenofibrate, and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Richard E; Hill, Quentin A; Wion, Didier; Mellstedt, Håkan; Focosi, Daniele; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Heiland, Tim; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2017-05-01

    Increased ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes is a common finding in glioblastoma and other cancers. Data reviewed establish that any damage to brain tissue tends to cause an increase in G-CSF and/or GM-CSF (G(M)-CSF) synthesized by the brain. Glioblastoma cells themselves also synthesize G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF synthesized by brain due to damage by a growing tumor and by the tumor itself stimulates bone marrow to shift hematopoiesis toward granulocytic lineages away from lymphocytic lineages. This shift is immunosuppressive and generates the relative lymphopenia characteristic of glioblastoma. Any trauma to brain-be it blunt, sharp, ischemic, infectious, cytotoxic, tumor encroachment, or radiation-increases brain synthesis of G(M)-CSF. G(M)-CSF are growth and motility enhancing factors for glioblastomas. High levels of G(M)-CSF contribute to the characteristic neutrophilia and lymphopenia of glioblastoma. Hematopoietic bone marrow becomes entrained with, directed by, and contributes to glioblastoma pathology. The antibiotic dapsone, the lipid-lowering agent fenofibrate, and the antiviral drug ribavirin are Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved medicines that have potential to lower synthesis or effects of G(M)-CSF and thus deprive a glioblastoma of some of the growth promoting contributions of bone marrow and G(M)-CSF.

  20. Comparative Antitumor Effect of Preventive versus Therapeutic Vaccines Employing B16 Melanoma Cells Genetically Modified to Express GM-CSF and B7.2 in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador F. Aliño

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines have always been a subject of gene therapy research. One of the most successful approaches has been working with genetically modified tumor cells. In this study, we describe our approach to achieving an immune response against a murine melanoma model, employing B16 tumor cells expressing GM-CSF and B7.2. Wild B16 cells were injected in C57BL6 mice to cause the tumor. Irradiated B16 cells transfected with GM-CSF, B7.2, or both, were processed as a preventive and therapeutic vaccination. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. Blood samples were taken from mice, and IgGs of each treatment group were also measured. The regulatory T cells (Treg of selected groups were quantified using counts of images taken by confocal microscopy. Results: one hundred percent survival was achieved by preventive vaccination with the group of cells transfected with p2F_GM-CSF. Therapeutic vaccination achieved initial inhibition of tumor growth but did not secure overall survival of the animals. Classical Treg cells did not vary among the different groups in this therapeutic vaccination model.

  1. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  2. Different dynamics of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL‑1β production in GM-CSF- and M-CSF-differentiated human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Marietta Margit; Tőzsér, József; Benkő, Szilvia

    2017-06-01

    IL-1β is a "master" cytokine regulating a wide variety of physiologic and immunologic processes. The most frequently studied models for NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production are the macrophages; however, depending on their microenvironment, they can develop into functionally different cells. Several protocols have been developed to model the diversity of these cells in vitro. Here, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a comparative study about the dynamics and molecular mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome priming and activation in LPS-stimulated, human, monocyte-derived GM- or M-macrophages, differentiated in the presence of GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Our results show that IL-1β production by LPS-stimulated M-macrophages is a rapid and short event that requires ATP supplementation and is attenuated, in part, by the presence of IL-10, which reduces Akt signaling. However, IL-1β production by GM-macrophages develops gradually, and these cells produce IL-1β, even in the absence of ATP supplementation, because of the constitutively active caspase-1 enzyme. We show that the membrane-bound ectonucleotidases have an important regulatory role on the IL-1β secretion in GM-macrophages. Furthermore, we provide evidence that adenosine treatment enhances LPS-primed IL-1β secretion by GM-macrophages, but not by M-macrophages. These results show that, because of the different activation status and expression levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome components, as well as the signaling activity of the pathways, the two subtypes of macrophages respond very differently to the same stimuli. For this reason, the molecular composition of the microenvironment that shapes macrophage development should be considered when research or therapeutic methods are planned to control IL-1β production. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. GM-CSF and MEF-conditioned media support feeder-free reprogramming of mouse granulocytes to iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firas, Jaber; Liu, Xiaodong; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are characterised by their ability to differentiate into any cell type of the body. Accordingly, iPSCs possess immense potential for disease modelling, pharmaceutical screening and autologous cell therapies. The most common source of iPSCs derivation is skin fibroblasts. However, from a clinical point of view, skin fibroblasts may not be ideal, as invasive procedures such as skin biopsies are required for their extraction. Moreover, fibroblasts are highly heterogeneous with a poorly defined developmental pathway, which makes studying reprogramming mechanistics difficult. Granulocytes, on the other hand, are easily obtainable, their developmental pathway has been extensively studied and fluorescence activated cell sorting allows for the isolation of these cells at high purity; thus iPSCs derivation from granulocytes could provide an alternative to fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Previous studies succeeded in producing iPSC colonies from mouse granulocytes but with the use of a mitotically inactivated feeder layer, restricting their use for studying reprogramming mechanistics. As granulocytes display poor survival under culture conditions, we investigated the influence of haematopoietic cytokines to stabilise this cell type in vitro and allow for reprogramming in the absence of a feeder layer. Our results show that treatment with MEF-conditioned media and/or initial exposure to GM-CSF allows for reprogramming of granulocytes under feeder-free conditions. This work can serve as a basis for future work aimed at dissecting the reprogramming mechanism as well as obtaining large numbers of iPSCs from a clinically relevant cell source. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Interleukin 17 regulates SHP-2 and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF expression and RANKL mediated osteoclastogenesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2017-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 predominately produced by the Th17 cells, plays a crucial role in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) mediated disease process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-17 exerts its pathogenic effects in RA-FLS by IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling. Recent studies have shown that RA-FLS produces SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL which results in worsening of the disease. However, whether IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling regulates SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL expressions in RA-FLS remains unknown. In this study, IL-17 treatment dramatically induced the production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF in FLS isolated from adjuvant induced arthritis (AA) rats. Conversely, IL-17 mediated production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF was abrogated by knockdown of IL-17RA using a small interfering RNA or blockade of STAT-3 activation with S3I-201 in AA-FLS. Interestingly, IL-17 treatment noticeably increased the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. However, silencing of IL-17RA reversed the effect of IL-17 on the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. In addition, an increased number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells were observed in a coculture system consisting of IL-17 treated AA-FLS and rat bone marrow derived monocytes/macrophages. Further, mechanistically we found that IL-17 upregulated RANKL expression in AA-FLS that was dependent on the IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling cascade. Knockdown of IL-17RA or inhibition of STAT-3 activation decreased the IL- 17 induced RANKL expression by AA-FLS and their osteoclastogenic potential. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IL-17 regulates SHP-2 expression and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent production of Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL in AA-FLS and may reveal a new insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Miguel,1 Luis Sendra,1 Verónica Noé,2 Carles J Ciudad,2 Francisco Dasí,3,4 David Hervas,5 María José Herrero,1,6 Salvador F Aliño17 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 3Research University Hospital of Valencia, INCLIVA Health Research Institute, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia Foundation, 5Biostatistics Unit, 6Pharmacogenetics Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe (IIS La Fe, 7Clinical Pharmacology Unit, ACM Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain Abstract: The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg, which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2'-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2'-OMe-PS-ASOs and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs, were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2'-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following

  6. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

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    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  7. The necrotic venom of the brown recluse spider induces dysregulated endothelial cell-dependent neutrophil activation. Differential induction of GM-CSF, IL-8, and E-selectin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K D; Modur, V; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1994-01-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom induces severe dermonecrotic lesions. The mechanism for this is unknown but presents an interesting paradox: necrosis is completely dependent on the victim's neutrophils, yet neutrophils are not activated by the venom. We show Loxosceles venom is a potent, but disjointed, endothelial cell agonist. It weakly induced E-selectin expression, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or IL-6 expression, yet significantly stimulated release of IL-8 and large amounts of GM-CSF by 4 h. In contrast, TNF strongly induced all of these, except for GM-CSF. PMN bound to E-selectin on venom-activated endothelial cells, apparently via counterreceptors different from those that bind E-selectin on TNF alpha-activated monolayers. Notably, PMN bound venom-activated monolayers only at intercellular junctions, did not polarize, and completely failed to migrate beneath the monolayer. Despite this, bound PMN demonstrated increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and secreted primary and secondary granule markers. The latter event was suppressed by sulfones used to treat envenomation. We have defined a new endothelial cell agonist, Loxosceles venom, that differentially stimulates the inflammatory response of endothelial cells. This, in turn, leads to a dysregulated PMN response where adhesion and degranulation are completely dissociated from shape change and transmigration. Images PMID:7518841

  8. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  9. Functional properties of Virus-Encoded and Virus-Regulated 7TM Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    -herpesvirus-encoded BILF1 receptors, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded US28 receptor and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-regulated EBI2 (or GPR183), 2) the tissue tropism and virus-dissemination properties, exemplified by the murine CMV-encoded M33, and 3) the tumorigenic properties, exemplified...... by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-encoded ORF74, HCMV-US28 and EBV-BILF1. Given the general high “druggability” of 7TM receptors, and the recent progress in the understanding of in particular immune evasive functions of the virus-exploited 7TM receptors, we put a special emphasis on the progress of novel anti...

  10. Vaccinia virus encodes a polypeptide with DNA ligase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, S M; Smith, G L

    1989-11-25

    Vaccinia virus gene SalF 15R potentially encodes a polypeptide of 63 kD which shares 30% amino acid identity with S. pombe and S. cerevisiae DNA ligases. DNA ligase proteins can be identified by incubation with alpha-(32P)ATP, resulting in the formation of a covalent DNA ligase-AMP adduct, an intermediate in the enzyme reaction. A novel radio-labelled polypeptide of approximately 61 kD appears in extracts from vaccinia virus infected cells after incubation with alpha-(32P)ATP. This protein is present throughout infection and is a DNA ligase as the radioactivity is discharged in the presence of either DNA substrate or pyrophosphate. DNA ligase assays show an increase in enzyme activity in cell extracts after vaccinia virus infection. A rabbit antiserum, raised against a bacterial fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and a portion of SalF 15R, immune-precipitates polypeptides of 61 and 54 kD from extracts of vaccinia virus-infected cells. This antiserum also immune-precipitates the novel DNA ligase-AMP adduct, thus proving that the observed DNA ligase is encoded by SalF 15R.

  11. Analyzing Influenza Virus Sequences using Binary Encoding Approach

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    Ham Ching Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often challenging; in this paper, we demonstrated that using a binary encoding scheme coupled with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks at the variance between sequences instead of the commonly used p-distance or Hamming distance. We first convert the influenza genetic sequences to a binary strings and form a binary sequence alignment matrix and then apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA to this matrix. PCA also provides identification power to identify reassortant virus by using data projection technique. Due to the sparsity of the binary string, we were able to analyze large volume of influenza sequence data in a very short time. For protein sequences, our scheme also allows the incorporation of biophysical properties of each amino acid. Here, we present various encouraging results from analyzing influenza nucleotide, protein and genome sequences using the proposed approach.

  12. Differential expression of IL-17, 22 and 23 in the progression of colorectal cancer in patients with K-ras mutation: Ras signal inhibition and crosstalk with GM-CSF and IFN-γ.

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    Savvas Petanidis

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that aberrant K-ras signaling is responsible for triggering immunological responses and inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. Interleukins IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 have been reported in various types of malignancies, but the exact mechanistic role of these molecules remains to be elucidated. Given the role of K-ras and the involvement of interleukins in colorectal tumorigenesis, research efforts are reported for the first time, showing that differentially expressed interleukin IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 levels are associated with K-ras in a stage-specific fashion along colorectal cancer progression. Specifically, a the effect of K-ras signaling was investigated in the overall expression of interleukins in patients with colorectal cancer and healthy controls, and b an association was established between mutant K-ras and cytokines GM-CSF and IFN-γ. The results indicate that specific interleukins are differentially expressed in K-ras positive patients and the use of K-ras inhibitor Manumycin A decreases both interleukin levels and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by inhibiting cell viability. Finally, inflammation-driven GM-CSF and IFN-γ levels are modulated through interleukin expression in tumor patients, with interleukin expression in the intestinal lumen and cancerous tissue mediated by aberrant K-ras signaling. Collectively, the findings a indicate that interleukin expression is influenced by ras signaling and specific interleukins play an oncogenic promoter role in colorectal cancer, highlighting the molecular link between inflammation and tumorigenesis, and b accentuate the interwoven molecular correlations as leads to new therapeutic approaches in the future.

  13. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet

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    Lambracht-Washington Doris

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS, multiple sclerosis (MS. Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOGp35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA followed by pertussis toxin (PT. Only lymph node cells (LNC isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12 were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were

  14. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Petra D; Hussain, Rehana Z; Zacharias, Tresa E; Ben, Li-Hong; Herndon, Emily; Vinnakota, Ramya; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Nessler, Stefan; Zamvil, Scott S; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS). Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)p35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by pertussis toxin (PT). Only lymph node cells (LNC) isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were not characterized

  15. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cross-presentation of viral antigens in dribbles leads to efficient activation of virus-specific human memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Xing, Yun; Paustian, Christopher; van de Ven, Rieneke; Moudgil, Tarsem; Hilton, Traci L; Fox, Bernard A; Urba, Walter J; Zhao, Wei; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2014-04-16

    Autophagy regulates innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens and tumors. We have reported that autophagosomes derived from tumor cells after proteasome inhibition, DRibbles (Defective ribosomal products in blebs), were excellent sources of antigens for efficient cross priming of tumor-specific CD8⁺ T cells, which mediated regression of established tumors in mice. But the activity of DRibbles in human has not been reported. DRibbles or cell lysates derived from HEK293T or UbiLT3 cell lines expressing cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp65 protein or transfected with a plasmid encoding dominant HLA-A2 restricted CMV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Influenza (Flu) epitopes (CEF) were loaded onto human monocytes or PBMCs and the response of human CMV pp65 or CEF antigen-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells was detected by intracellular staining. The effect of cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ) TLR agonists (Lipopolysaccharide, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C), M52-CpG, R848, TLR2 ligand) and CD40 ligand on the cross-presentation of antigens contained in DRibbles or cell lysates was explored. In this study we showed that purified monocytes, or human PBMCs, loaded with DRibbles isolated from cells expressing CMV or CEF epitopes, could activate CMV- or CEF-specific memory T cells. DRibbles were significantly more efficient at stimulating CD8⁺ memory T cells compared to cell lysates expressing the same antigenic epitopes. We optimized the conditions for T-cell activation and IFN-γ production following direct loading of DRibbles onto PBMCs. We found that the addition of Poly(I:C), CD40 ligand, and GM-CSF to the PBMCs together with DRibbles significantly increased the level of CD8⁺ T cell responses. DRibbles containing specific viral antigens are an efficient ex vivo activator of human antigen-specific memory T cells specific for those antigens. This function could be enhanced by combining with Poly(I:C), CD40 ligand, and GM-CSF

  17. TL1A increases expression of CD25, LFA-1, CD134 and CD154, and induces IL-22 and GM-CSF production from effector CD4 T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Reichwald

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of the cytokine TL1A is associated with several autoimmune diseases e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the exact role of TL1A remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the function of TL1A in a pro-inflammatory setting. We show that TL1A together with IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 increases expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD154 (CD40 ligand and CD134 (OX40 on previously activated CD4+ T cells. This indicates that TL1A functions as a co-stimulatory molecule, decreasing the activation threshold of T-cells. We have previously shown that TL1A co-stimulation strongly induces IL-6 in human healthy leukocytes. Interestingly, the cytokine-activated effector T-cells did not produce IL-6 in response to TL1A, indicating distinct effects of TL1A on different cell populations. We further show that this co-stimulation increases the expression of CD25 (IL-2Rα and CD11a (α-chain of LFA-1 on CD4 T-cells, likely governing increased IL-2/IL-15 sensitivity and cell-cell contact. Along with this, TL1A co-stimulation caused a specific induction of IL-22 and GM-CSF from the activated T-cells. These results substantially contribute to the explanation of TL1A's role in inflammation. Our results suggest that TL1A should be considered as a target for immunotherapeutic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. First oncolytic virus approved for melanoma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Jonathan; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    On 2015, October 27th, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has officially approved talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC, also known as OncoVEX(GM-CSF)) for use in melanoma patients with injectable but non-resectable lesions in the skin and lymph nodes. T-VEC (which is commercialized by Amgen, Inc. under the name of Imlygic®) becomes therefore the first oncolytic virus approved for cancer therapy in the US.

  19. Effective tumor immunotherapy directed against an oncogene-encoded product using a vaccinia virus vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Destree, A.; McKenzie, S.; Gordon, E.; Weinberg, R.A.; Panicali, D.

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed a vaccinia virus recombinant that expresses the extracellular domain of the rat neu oncogene-encoded protein, a 185-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein termed p185. Strain NFS mice immunized with this recombinant virus developed a strong antibody response against the neu oncogene

  20. Characterization of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain encoding NSs of Punta Toro virus or sandfly fever Sicilian virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Lihoradova

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1 induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2 inhibits interferon (IFN-β promoter activation, and 3 promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA. Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which

  1. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  2. Open reading frame 193R of Chilo iridescent virus encodes a functional inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ince, I.A.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Nalcacioglu, R.; Oers, van M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is a major defense mechanism in insects in response to viral infections. The genome of Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) has three ORFs with homology to baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis (iap) genes. The proteins encoded by the 157L, 193R, and 332L ORFs contain 152,

  3. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    and the CSA binding region of VAR2CSA has been identified as a promising vaccine target against placental malaria. Here we designed adenovirus encoded virus-like particles (VLP) by co-encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag and VAR2CSA. The VAR2CSA antigen was fused to the transmembrane (TM......The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum presents antigens on the infected erythrocyte surface that bind human receptors expressed on the vascular endothelium. The VAR2CSA mediated binding to a distinct chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) is a crucial step in the pathophysiology of placental malaria......CSA fused to HA TM-CT was significantly superior in inducing ID1-ID2a specific antibodies after the first immunization. A sequential study was performed to include a comparison to the soluble VAR2CSA protein vaccine, which has entered a phase I clinical trial (NCT02647489). The results revealed...

  4. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    The low number of envelope (Env) spikes presented on native HIV-1 particles is a major impediment for HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine development. We designed virus-like particle encoding adenoviral vectors utilizing SIVmac239 Gag as an anchor for full length and truncated HIV-1 M consensus Env...... were found between the different priming regimens as both induced high titered tier 1 neutralizing antibodies, but no tier 2 antibodies, possibly reflecting the similar presentation of trimer specific antibody epitopes. The described vaccine regimens provide insight into the effects of the HIV-1 Env...

  5. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhibit....... Consistent with these in vitro findings treatment with vMIP-II inhibited the adoptive transfer of a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vivo, but only when antigen-primed donor cells were transferred via the intravenous route and required to migrate actively, not when the cells were......-induced signals are pivotal in directing antiviral effector cells toward virus-infected organ sites and that vMIP-II is a potent inhibitor of type 1 T-cell-mediated inflammation....

  6. Chlorella virus ATCV-1 encodes a functional potassium channel of 82 amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Kang, Ming; Abenavoli, Alessandra; Romani, Giulia; Olivari, Claudio; Gaslini, Daniele; Ferrara, Giuseppina; van Etten, James L.; Kreim, Michael; Kast, Stefan M.; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Chlorella virus PBCV-1 (Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1) encodes the smallest protein (94 amino acids, named Kcv) previously known to form a functional K+ channel in heterologous systems. In this paper, we characterize another chlorella virus encoded K+ channel protein (82 amino acids, named ATCV-1 Kcv) that forms a functional channel in Xenopus oocytes and rescues Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack endogenous K+ uptake systems. Compared with the larger PBCV-1 Kcv, ATCV-1 Kcv lacks a cytoplasmic N-terminus and has a reduced number of charged amino acids in its turret domain. Despite these deficiencies, ATCV-1 Kcv accomplishes all the major features of K+ channels: it assembles into a tetramer, is K+ selective and is inhibited by the canonical K+ channel blockers, barium and caesium. Single channel analyses reveal a stochastic gating behavior and a voltage-dependent conductance that resembles the macroscopic I/V relationship. One difference between PBCV-1 and ATCV-1 Kcv is that the latter is more permeable to K+ than Rb+. This difference is partially explained by the presence of a tyrosine residue in the selective filter of ATCV-1 Kcv, whereas PBCV-1 Kcv has a phenylalanine. Hence, ATCV-1 Kcv is the smallest protein to form a K+ channel and it will serve as a model for studying structure–function correlations inside the potassium channel pore. PMID:19267691

  7. Posttranslational processing and identification of a neutralization domain of the GP4 protein encoded by ORF4 of Lelystad virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, J.J.M.; Nieuwstadt, van A.P.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    GP4 is a minor structural glycoprotein encoded by ORF4 of Lelystad virus (LV). When it was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and extracellular virus of CL2621 cells infected with LV, it was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of approximately 28 and 31 kDa, respectively. This difference in

  8. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Geerts-Dimitriadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intergenic region (IR of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and is predicted to fold into a stable hairpin structure. The presence of this hairpin structure sequence in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of TSWV mRNAs implies a possible role in translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyse the role of the predicted hairpin structure in translation, various Renilla luciferase constructs containing modified 3' and/or 5' UTR sequences of the TSWV S RNA encoded nucleocapsid (N gene were analyzed for expression. While good luciferase expression levels were obtained from constructs containing the 5' UTR and the 3' UTR, luciferase expression was lost when the hairpin structure sequence was removed from the 3' UTR. Constructs that only lacked the 5' UTR, still rendered good expression levels. When in addition the entire 3' UTR was exchanged for that of the S RNA encoded non-structural (NSs gene transcript, containing the complementary hairpin folding sequence, the loss of luciferase expression could only be recovered by providing the 5' UTR sequence of the NSs transcript. Luciferase activity remained unaltered when the hairpin structure sequence was swapped for the analogous one from Tomato yellow ring virus, another distinct tospovirus. The addition of N and NSs proteins further increased luciferase expression levels from hairpin structure containing constructs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a role for the predicted hairpin structure in translation in concert with the viral N and NSs proteins. The presence of stretches highly rich in A-residues does not rule out a concerted action with a poly(A-tail-binding protein. A common transcription termination and translation strategy for plant

  9. Virus-encoded microRNAs: an overview and a look to the future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney P Kincaid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs that play important roles in the regulation of gene expression. First described as posttranscriptional gene regulators in eukaryotic hosts, virus-encoded miRNAs were later uncovered. It is now apparent that diverse virus families, most with DNA genomes, but at least some with RNA genomes, encode miRNAs. While deciphering the functions of viral miRNAs has lagged behind their discovery, recent functional studies are bringing into focus these roles. Some of the best characterized viral miRNA functions include subtle roles in prolonging the longevity of infected cells, evading the immune response, and regulating the switch to lytic infection. Notably, all of these functions are particularly important during persistent infections. Furthermore, an emerging view of viral miRNAs suggests two distinct groups exist. In the first group, viral miRNAs mimic host miRNAs and take advantage of conserved networks of host miRNA target sites. In the larger second group, viral miRNAs do not share common target sites conserved for host miRNAs, and it remains unclear what fraction of these targeted transcripts are beneficial to the virus. Recent insights from multiple virus families have revealed new ways of interacting with the host miRNA machinery including noncanonical miRNA biogenesis and new mechanisms of posttranscriptional cis gene regulation. Exciting challenges await the field, including determining the most relevant miRNA targets and parlaying our current understanding of viral miRNAs into new therapeutic strategies. To accomplish these goals and to better grasp miRNA function, new in vivo models that recapitulate persistent infections associated with viral pathogens are required.

  10. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus.

  11. Virus-viroid interactions: Citrus Tristeza Virus enhances the accumulation of Citrus Dwarfing Viroid in Mexican lime via virus-encoded silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Pedro; Bani Hashemian, Seyed M; Fagoaga, Carmen; Romero, Juan; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Gorris, Maria T; Bertolini, Edson; Duran-Vila, Núria

    2014-01-01

    An assay to identify interactions between Citrus Dwarfing Viroid (CDVd) and Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) showed that viroid titer was enhanced by the coinfecting CTV in Mexican lime but not in etrog citron. Since CTV encodes three RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), p23, p20 and p25, an assay using transgenic Mexican limes expressing each RSS revealed that p23 and, to a lesser extent, p25 recapitulated the effect observed with coinfections of CTV and CDVd.

  12. Cytokine production by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells varies with activation state and localization, but not with TCR avidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2004-01-01

    (peritoneum) and generally increased with transition into the memory phase; however, GM-CSF producing cells were only present transiently. Concerning factors predicted to influence the distribution of cytokine-producing subsets, IFN-gamma and IL-12 did not play a role, nor was extensive virus replication......The ability of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells to produce cytokines was studied in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Intracellular staining was used to visualize cytokine-producing CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Overall, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells...

  13. [Immuno-modulating effects of eukaryotic expressing vectors of IL-12 and GM-CSF associated to DNA-based vaccination against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in BALB/c mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S Ben Hadj; Dellagi, K; Bahloul, C

    2009-01-01

    Different works of DNA based vaccination against leishmaniasis highlight the complexity of the induced immune responses to fight against the disease. In this work, we exploited the capacity of IL-12 and GMC-SF to activate immune cell mediators and effectors to induce a Th1 response, more capable of clearing the parasite. To generate these immunomodulating activities, we associated eukaryotic expressing vectors of murine IL-12 and GMC-SF to several DNA based vaccine candidates encoding to several L. (L.) major antigens, in the BALB/c mouse. When mice were challenged with a high parasitic load in the hind footpad, no additional protective effect could be generated. However, when the challenge was carried out in the inner face of the ear with a small parasitic load, the association of plasmids encoding to IL-12 and GMC-SF to DNA based vaccination, the protective effects were increased.

  14. Diverse circular replication-associated protein encoding viruses circulating in invertebrates within a lake ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaram, Anisha; Galatowitsch, Mark L; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Harding, Jon S; Roumagnac, Philippe; Martin, Darren P; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Over the last five years next-generation sequencing has become a cost effective and efficient method for identifying known and unknown microorganisms. Access to this technique has dramatically changed the field of virology, enabling a wide range of environmental viral metagenome studies to be undertaken of organisms and environmental samples from polar to tropical regions. These studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of highly divergent single stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus-like sequences encoding replication-associated proteins. Yet, few studies have explored how viruses might be shared in an ecosystem through feeding relationships. Here we identify 169 circular molecules (160 CRESS DNA molecules, nine circular molecules) recovered from a New Zealand freshwater lake, that we have tentatively classified into 51 putatively novel species and five previously described species (DflaCV-3, -5, -6, -8, -10). The CRESS DNA viruses identified in this study were recovered from molluscs (Echyridella menzeisii, Musculium novaezelandiae, Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta) and insect larvae (Procordulia grayi, Xanthocnemis zealandica, and Chironomus zealandicus) collected from Lake Sarah, as well as from the lake water and benthic sediments. Extensive diversity was observed across most CRESS DNA molecules recovered. The putative capsid protein of one viral species was found to be most similar to those of members of the Tombusviridae family, thus expanding the number of known RNA-DNA hybrid viruses in nature. We noted a strong association between the CRESS DNA viruses and circular molecules identified in the water and browser organisms (C. zealandicus, P. antipodarum and P. acuta), and between water sediments and undefended prey species (C. zealandicus). However, we were unable to find any significant correlation of viral assemblages to the potential feeding relationships of the host aquatic invertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaccinia virus-encoded ribonucleotide reductase subunits are differentially required for replication and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don B Gammon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs are evolutionarily-conserved enzymes that catalyze the rate-limiting step during dNTP synthesis in mammals. RR consists of both large (R1 and small (R2 subunits, which are both required for catalysis by the R1(2R2(2 heterotetrameric complex. Poxviruses also encode RR proteins, but while the Orthopoxviruses infecting humans [e.g. vaccinia (VACV, variola, cowpox, and monkeypox viruses] encode both R1 and R2 subunits, the vast majority of Chordopoxviruses encode only R2 subunits. Using plaque morphology, growth curve, and mouse model studies, we investigated the requirement of VACV R1 (I4 and R2 (F4 subunits for replication and pathogenesis using a panel of mutant viruses in which one or more viral RR genes had been inactivated. Surprisingly, VACV F4, but not I4, was required for efficient replication in culture and virulence in mice. The growth defects of VACV strains lacking F4 could be complemented by genes encoding other Chordopoxvirus R2 subunits, suggesting conservation of function between poxvirus R2 proteins. Expression of F4 proteins encoding a point mutation predicted to inactivate RR activity but still allow for interaction with R1 subunits, caused a dominant negative phenotype in growth experiments in the presence or absence of I4. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that F4 (as well as other Chordopoxvirus R2 subunits form hybrid complexes with cellular R1 subunits. Mutant F4 proteins that are unable to interact with host R1 subunits failed to rescue the replication defect of strains lacking F4, suggesting that F4-host R1 complex formation is critical for VACV replication. Our results suggest that poxvirus R2 subunits form functional complexes with host R1 subunits to provide sufficient dNTPs for viral replication. Our results also suggest that R2-deficient poxviruses may be selective oncolytic agents and our bioinformatic analyses provide insights into how poxvirus nucleotide metabolism proteins may

  16. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retain their resistance to all VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. PMID:25965802

  17. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-09-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retained their resistance to all tested VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A recombinant rabies virus encoding two copies of the glycoprotein gene confers protection in dogs against a virulent challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Yang, Youtian; Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines.

  19. Critical role of the virus-encoded microRNA-155 ortholog in the induction of Marek's disease lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the well-characterised roles of a number of oncogenes in neoplastic transformation, microRNAs (miRNAs are increasingly implicated in several human cancers. Discovery of miRNAs in several oncogenic herpesviruses such as KSHV has further highlighted the potential of virus-encoded miRNAs to contribute to their oncogenic capabilities. Nevertheless, despite the identification of several possible cancer-related genes as their targets, the direct in vivo role of virus-encoded miRNAs in neoplastic diseases such as those induced by KSHV is difficult to demonstrate in the absence of suitable models. However, excellent natural disease models of rapid-onset Marek's disease (MD lymphomas in chickens allow examination of the oncogenic potential of virus-encoded miRNAs. Using viruses modified by reverse genetics of the infectious BAC clone of the oncogenic RB-1B strain of MDV, we show that the deletion of the six-miRNA cluster 1 from the viral genome abolished the oncogenicity of the virus. This loss of oncogenicity appeared to be primarily due to the single miRNA within the cluster, miR-M4, the ortholog of cellular miR-155, since its deletion or a 2-nucleotide mutation within its seed region was sufficient to inhibit the induction of lymphomas. The definitive role of this miR-155 ortholog in oncogenicity was further confirmed by the rescue of oncogenic phenotype by revertant viruses that expressed either the miR-M4 or the cellular homolog gga-miR-155. This is the first demonstration of the direct in vivo role of a virus-encoded miRNA in inducing tumors in a natural infection model. Furthermore, the use of viruses deleted in miRNAs as effective vaccines against virulent MDV challenge, enables the prospects of generating genetically defined attenuated vaccines.

  20. Enhanced Transgene Expression in Sugarcane by Co-Expression of Virus-Encoded RNA Silencing Suppressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Won; Beyene, Getu; Buenrostro-Nava, Marco T.; Molina, Joe; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Manabayeva, Shuga A.; Alvarado, Veria Y.; Rathore, Keerti S.; Scholthof, Herman B.; Mirkov, T. Erik

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing is commonly observed in polyploid species and often poses a major limitation to plant improvement via biotechnology. Five plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing were evaluated for their ability to counteract gene silencing and enhance the expression of the Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (EYFP) or the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in sugarcane, a major sugar and biomass producing polyploid. Functionality of these suppressors was first verified in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells, and later tested by transient expression in sugarcane young leaf segments and protoplasts. In young leaf segments co-expressing a suppressor, EYFP reached its maximum expression at 48–96 h post-DNA introduction and maintained its peak expression for a longer time compared with that in the absence of a suppressor. Among the five suppressors, Tomato bushy stunt virus-encoded P19 and Barley stripe mosaic virus-encoded γb were the most efficient. Co-expression with P19 and γb enhanced EYFP expression 4.6-fold and 3.6-fold in young leaf segments, and GUS activity 2.3-fold and 2.4-fold in protoplasts compared with those in the absence of a suppressor, respectively. In transgenic sugarcane, co-expression of GUS and P19 suppressor showed the highest accumulation of GUS levels with an average of 2.7-fold more than when GUS was expressed alone, with no detrimental phenotypic effects. The two established transient expression assays, based on young leaf segments and protoplasts, and confirmed by stable transgene expression, offer a rapid versatile system to verify the efficiency of RNA silencing suppressors that proved to be valuable in enhancing and stabilizing transgene expression in sugarcane. PMID:23799071

  1. An Immunoinformatics-Derived DNA Vaccine Encoding Human Class 2 T Cell Epitopes of Ebola Virus, Sudan Virus, and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus is Immunogenic in HLA Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-07

    1 An immunoinformatics-derived DNA vaccine encoding human Class II T cell epitopes of 1 Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Venezuelan equine...connie.s.schmaljohn.civ@mail.mil 13 14 Keywords: genome-derived vaccine, epitope-based vaccine, DNA vaccine, peptide vaccine, T 15 cell epitope, Ebola virus, EBOV...for biodefense. We previously developed and 53 tested DNA vaccines expressing the envelope glycoproteins of these viruses in mice and 54 nonhuman

  2. Groundnut bud necrosis virus encoded NSm associates with membranes via its C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Singh

    Full Text Available Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus (GBNV is a tripartite ambisense RNA plant virus that belongs to serogroup IV of Tospovirus genus. Non-Structural protein-m (NSm, which functions as movement protein in tospoviruses, is encoded by the M RNA. In this communication, we demonstrate that despite the absence of any putative transmembrane domain, GBNV NSm associates with membranes when expressed in E. coli as well as in N. benthamiana. Incubation of refolded NSm with liposomes ranging in size from 200-250 nm resulted in changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of NSm. A similar behaviour was observed in the presence of anionic and zwitterionic detergents. Furthermore, the morphology of the liposomes was found to be modified in the presence of NSm. Deletion of coiled coil domain resulted in the inability of in planta expressed NSm to interact with membranes. Further, when the C-terminal coiled coil domain alone was expressed, it was found to be associated with membrane. These results demonstrate that NSm associates with membranes via the C-terminal coiled coil domain and such an association may be important for movement of viral RNA from cell to cell.

  3. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

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    Karoliina Autio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  4. On the possibility of lipid-induced regulation of conformation and immunogenicity of influenza a virus H1/N1 hemagglutinin as antigen of TI-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieva, Natalia; Sanina, Nina; Vorontsov, Vladimir; Kostetsky, Eduard; Mazeika, Andrey; Tsybulsky, Alexander; Kim, Natalia; Shnyrov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    The tubular immunostimulating complex (TI-complex) consisting of cucumarioside A2-2, cholesterol and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from marine macrophytes is the perspective antigen delivery system for subunit vaccines. MGDG is a lipid matrix for the protein antigen incorporated in the TI-complex. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of MGDGs from different macrophytes on conformation and immunogenicity of the secreted recombinant uncleaved hemagglutinin monomer (HA0S) of influenza A virus H1/N1. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism showed a dependence of the conformational changes of HA0S on the microviscosity of MGDG. The most viscous MGDG from Zostera marina induced the strongest rearrangements in protein conformation. Immunization of mice with HA0S within TI-complexes comprising different MGDGs resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase of the levels of anti-HA0S antibodies and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) compared with those induced by HA0S alone. TI-complexes based on MGDG from Z. marina stimulated the maximal production of GM-CSF. However, humoral immune response (anti-HA0S antibodies), unlike cell-mediated immune response (GM-CSF), did not depend on the physicochemical properties of MGDGs. It is assumed that this is due to the different localization and conformational lipid sensitivity of the HA0S regions, which are responsible for these types of immune responses. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Virus-encoded microRNA contributes to the molecular profile of EBV-positive Burkitt lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Navari, Mohsen; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Lazzi, Stefano; Fuligni, Fabio; Bellan, Cristiana; Rossi, Maura; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Etebari, Maryam; Rogena, Emily A; Tumwine, Lynnette; Tripodo, Claudio; Gibellini, Davide; Consiglio, Jessica; Croce, Carlo M; Pileri, Stefano A; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-05

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive neoplasm characterized by consistent morphology and phenotype, typical clinical behavior and distinctive molecular profile. The latter is mostly driven by the MYC over-expression associated with the characteristic translocation (8;14) (q24; q32) or with variant lesions. Additional genetic events can contribute to Burkitt Lymphoma pathobiology and retain clinical significance. A pathogenetic role for Epstein-Barr virus infection in Burkitt lymphomagenesis has been suggested; however, the exact function of the virus is largely unknown.In this study, we investigated the molecular profiles (genes and microRNAs) of Epstein-Barr virus-positive and -negative BL, to identify specific patterns relying on the differential expression and role of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNAs.First, we found significant differences in the expression of viral microRNAs and in selected target genes. Among others, we identified LIN28B, CGNL1, GCET2, MRAS, PLCD4, SEL1L, SXX1, and the tyrosine kinases encoding STK10/STK33, all provided with potential pathogenetic significance. GCET2, also validated by immunohistochemistry, appeared to be a useful marker for distinguishing EBV-positive and EBV-negative cases. Further, we provided solid evidences that the EBV-encoded microRNAs (e.g. BART6) significantly mold the transcriptional landscape of Burkitt Lymphoma clones.In conclusion, our data indicated significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of EBV-positive and EBV-negative BL and highlight the role of virus encoded miRNA.

  6. NSs encoded by groundnut bud necrosis virus is a bifunctional enzyme.

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    Bhushan Lokesh

    Full Text Available Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV, a member of genus Tospovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infects a large number of leguminosae and solanaceae plants in India. With a view to elucidate the function of nonstructural protein, NSs encoded by the small RNA genome (S RNA, the NSs protein of GBNV- tomato (Karnataka was over-expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified rNSs protein exhibited an RNA stimulated NTPase activity. Further, this activity was metal ion dependent and was inhibited by adenosine 5' (beta, gamma imido triphosphate, an ATP analog. The rNSs could also hydrolyze dATP. Interestingly, in addition to the NTPase and dATPase activities, the rNSs exhibited ATP independent 5' RNA/DNA phosphatase activity that was completely inhibited by AMP. The 5' alpha phosphate could be removed from ssDNA, ssRNA, dsDNA and dsRNA thus confirming that rNSs has a novel 5' alpha phosphatase activity. K189A mutation in the Walker motif A (GxxxxGKT resulted in complete loss of ATPase activity, but the 5' phosphatase activity was unaffected. On the other hand, D159A mutation in the Walker motif B (DExx resulted in partial loss of both the activities. These results demonstrate for the first time that NSs is a bifunctional enzyme, which could participate in viral movement, replication or in suppression of the host defense mechanism.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded RNAs: Key Molecules in Viral Pathogenesis

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    Iwakiri, Dai [Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7 Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan)

    2014-08-06

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known as an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies. EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are non-coding RNAs expressed abundantly in latently EBV-infected cells. Herein, I summarize the current understanding of the functions of EBERs, including the interactions with cellular factors through which EBERs contribute to EBV-mediated pathogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that EBERs are responsible for malignant phenotypes in lymphoid cells, and can induce several cytokines that can promote the growth of various EBV-infected cancer cells. EBERs were also found to bind retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and thus activate its downstream signaling. Furthermore, EBERs induce interleukin-10, an autocrine growth factor for Burkitt’s lymphoma cells, by activating RIG-I/interferon regulatory factor 3 pathway, suggesting that EBER-mediated innate immune signaling modulation contributes to EBV-mediated oncogenesis. Recently, EBV-infected cells were reported to secret EBERs, which were then recognized by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), leading to the induction of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines, and subsequent immune activation. Furthermore, EBER1 was detected in the sera of patients with active EBV-infectious diseases, suggesting that EBER1-meidated TLR3 signaling activation could account for the pathogenesis of active EBV-infectious diseases.

  8. GM-CSF negatively regulates early IL-10 mediated responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbers, R.H.P.; Westerhof, L.B.; Raaij, van D.R.; Smant, G.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders are becoming more prevalent in the Western world. Treatment of these diseases relies on the intervention in inflammatory responses thereby restoring immune homeostasis. One cytokine that has the potential to restore immune homeostasis is the anti-inflammatory cytokine

  9. Hepatitis A virus-encoded miRNAs attenuate the accumulation of viral genomic RNAs in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of persistent infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the common result of most HAV/cell culture systems. Previous observations show that the synthesis of viral RNAs is reduced during infection. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We characterized three HAV-encoded miRNAs in our previous study. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of these miRNAs on the accumulation of viral RNAs. The results indicated that the synthesis of viral genomic RNAs was dramatically reduced (more than 75 % reduction, P virus-derived miRNA could serve as a self-mediated feedback regulator during infection.

  10. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F; Suttle, Curtis A

    2016-06-14

    Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. Filamentous cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Nostoc are widespread and ecologically important in freshwater, yet little is known about the genomic content of their viruses. Here we report the first genomic analysis of cyanophages infecting

  11. Oncolytic immunotherapy: unlocking the potential of viruses to help target cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Omid; Hoffner, Brianna; Gasal, Eduard; Hong, Jenny; Carvajal, Richard D

    2017-07-15

    Oncolytic immunotherapy is a research area of cancer immunotherapy investigating the use of modified viruses to target cancer cells. A variety of different viral backbones (e.g., adenovirus, reovirus) with a diverse range of genetic modifications are currently being investigated for the treatment of a variety of cancers. The oncolytic virus that has advanced the furthest in clinical development is talimogene laherparepvec, a recombinant HSV-1 virus expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In a phase 3 study in patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma, intralesional talimogene laherparepvec treatment resulted in a higher durable response rate compared with subcutaneous GM-CSF treatment (16.3 versus 2.1%; P < 0.001). Notably, responses were observed at uninjected lesions including visceral lesions, indicating a systemic antitumor response had occurred. Studies evaluating combination treatments involving oncolytic viruses and immunologic agents are ongoing. This review focuses on the mechanisms of action for oncolytic viruses and highlights select agents and combinations currently in development.

  12. G-quadruplexes regulate Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Pierre; Zhong, Jie; Lekieffre, Lea; Cowieson, Nathan P; Clancy, Jennifer L; Preiss, Thomas; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Khanna, Rajiv; Tellam, Judy

    2014-05-01

    Viruses that establish latent infections have evolved unique mechanisms to avoid host immune recognition. Maintenance proteins of these viruses regulate their synthesis to levels sufficient for maintaining persistent infection but below threshold levels for host immune detection. The mechanisms governing this finely tuned regulation of viral latency are unknown. Here we show that mRNAs encoding gammaherpesviral maintenance proteins contain within their open reading frames clusters of unusual structural elements, G-quadruplexes, which are responsible for the cis-acting regulation of viral mRNA translation. By studying the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mRNA, we demonstrate that destabilization of G-quadruplexes using antisense oligonucleotides increases EBNA1 mRNA translation. In contrast, pretreatment with a G-quadruplex-stabilizing small molecule, pyridostatin, decreases EBNA1 synthesis, highlighting the importance of G-quadruplexes within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and immune evasion. Furthermore, these findings suggest alternative therapeutic strategies focused on targeting RNA structure within viral ORFs.

  13. Immunogenicity and efficacy of codon optimized DNA vaccines encoding the F-protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternette, Nicola; Tippler, Bettina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2007-10-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus F-protein (RSV-F) is poorly expressed from DNA expression plasmids containing the wild type RSV-F open reading frame. By codon optimization, premature polyadenylation signals were deleted and a striking enhancement of RSV-F expression levels was achieved. Therefore, the immunogenicity and efficacy of wild type DNA vaccines were compared to codon optimized expression plasmids encoding full-length RSV-F or its ectodomain. Mice were immunized twice with the different DNA vaccines followed by an RSV challenge. Only codon optimized DNA vaccines and in particular the one encoding the ectodomain of RSV-F induced substantial antibody levels and reduced viral load 13-170-fold. Thus, codon optimization enhances the immunogenicity and efficacy of RSV encoding DNA vaccines.

  14. Supervised learning classification models for prediction of plant virus encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

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    Zeenia Jagga

    Full Text Available Viral encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins interfere with the host RNA silencing machinery, facilitating viral infection by evading host immunity. In plant hosts, the viral proteins have several basic science implications and biotechnology applications. However in silico identification of these proteins is limited by their high sequence diversity. In this study we developed supervised learning based classification models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins in plant viruses. We developed four classifiers based on supervised learning algorithms: J48, Random Forest, LibSVM and Naïve Bayes algorithms, with enriched model learning by correlation based feature selection. Structural and physicochemical features calculated for experimentally verified primary protein sequences were used to train the classifiers. The training features include amino acid composition; auto correlation coefficients; composition, transition, and distribution of various physicochemical properties; and pseudo amino acid composition. Performance analysis of predictive models based on 10 fold cross-validation and independent data testing revealed that the Random Forest based model was the best and achieved 86.11% overall accuracy and 86.22% balanced accuracy with a remarkably high area under the Receivers Operating Characteristic curve of 0.95 to predict viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins. The prediction models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressors can potentially aid identification of novel viral RNA silencing suppressors, which will provide valuable insights into the mechanism of RNA silencing and could be further explored as potential targets for designing novel antiviral therapeutics. Also, the key subset of identified optimal features may help in determining compositional patterns in the viral proteins which are important determinants for RNA silencing suppressor activities. The best prediction model developed in the study is available as a

  15. Borna disease virus encoded phosphoprotein inhibits host innate immunity by regulating miR-155.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Kao, Wenping; Li, Aimei; Li, Yujun; He, Junming; Zhang, Qingmeng; Song, Wuqi; Fu, Yingmei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Xiaobei; Li, Hui; Zhong, Zhaohua; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-04-01

    It has been reported that the Borna disease virus (BDV) encoded phosphoprotein (P protein) can inhibit the activity of Traf family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1), thus preventing the induction of type I interferon (IFN). However, the effects of microRNA on the regulation of BDV infection and the host's immune response have not been characterized. miR-155 was predicted to be complementary to the BDV P mRNA by RNAhybrid software. Here, we showed that miR-155 was down-regulated in BDV persistently infected human oligodendroglial (OL/BDV) cells and that the BDV P protein, but not the X protein, directly inhibited miR-155 expression in cells. When miR-155 was over-expressed, the inhibition of type I IFNs by BDV in cells was reversed, and the expression of type I IFNs was increased. When miR-155 expression was specifically blocked, cellular IFN expression and the induction of IFN by poly I:C treatment were suppressed. Furthermore, miR-155 promoted type I IFN production by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3. Mutations in the nt1138-nt1158 region of SOCS3 abandoned the impact of miR-155 on the expression of SOCS3-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The levels of BDV P mRNA and protein were significantly decreased in OL/BDV cells when miR-155 was over-expressed; however, miR-155-mutation did not affect the expression of BDV P-EGFP. Thus, BDV persistent infection inhibited the expression of type I IFNs through the suppression of miR-155, and miR-155 played an important immune regulatory role in BDV persistent infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the genes encoding the proteins of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wangheng; Cruz-Cosme, Ruth; Armstrong, Najealicka; Obwolo, Lilian Akello; Wen, Fayuan; Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Min-Hua; Tang, Qiyi

    2017-09-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) encodes a precursor protein (also called polyprotein) of about 3424 amino acids that is processed by proteases to generate 10 mature proteins and a small peptide. In the present study, we characterized the chemical features, suborganelle distribution and potential function of each protein using Flag-tagged protein expression system. Western blot analysis revealed the molecular weight of the proteins and the polymerization of E, NS1, and NS3 proteins. In addition, we performed multi-labeled fluorescent immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation to determine the subcellular localization of these proteins in host cells. We found that 1) the capsid protein colocalizes with 3 different cellular organelles: nucleoli, Golgi apparatus, and lipid droplet; NS2b and NS4a are associated with the Golgi apparatus; 2) the capsid and NS1proteins distribute in both cytoplasm and nucleus, NS5 is a nuclear protein; 3) NS3 protein colocalizes with tubulin and affects Lamin A; 4) Envelope, PrM, and NS2a proteins co-localize with the endoplasmic reticulum; 5) NS1 is associated with autophagosomes and NS4b is related to early endosome; 6) NS5 forms punctate structures in the nucleus that associate with splicing compartments shown by SC35, leading to reduction of SC35 protein level and trafficking of SC35 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These data suggest that ZIKV generates 10 functional viral proteins that exhibit distinctive subcellular distribution in host cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) ORF 012L encodes a protein with both exonuclease and endonuclease functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizman, Yesim Akturk; Muratoglu, Hacer; Sandalli, Cemal; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-11-01

    Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is the type member of the genus Iridovirus within the family Iridoviridae. The virions of CIV contain a single linear dsDNA molecule that is circularly permuted and terminally redundant. The genome of CIV contains an open reading frame (ORF 012L) encoding a protein homologous to exonuclease II of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we focused on the characterization of CIV ORF 012L. The target ORF was cloned into the pET28a vector, expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLysS with an N-terminal His tag and purified to homogeneity by using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization of the purified CIV 012L confirmed that this viral protein is a functional 5'-3' exonuclease that digests 3'-biotin-labelled oligonucleotides and linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules from their 5' termini in a highly processive manner. CIV 012L also has a potent endonuclease activity on dsDNA in vitro. In addition, CIV 012L converted supercoiled plasmid DNA (replicative form I, RFI) into the open circular form (RFII) and then open circular form into linear form (RFIII). Endonuclease activity of CIV 012L was optimal in the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) or 30 mM Mn(2+) ions and at 150 mM NaCl or KCl salt concentrations. The highest endonuclease activity was obtained at pH 8, and it reached a maximum at 55 °C. The CIV 012L protein showed deficiencies for both double- and single-stranded RNAs.

  18. A Single Amino Acid Substitution Changes Antigenicity of ORF2-Encoded Proteins of Hepatitis E Virus

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    Ji-Hong Meng

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive genomic diversity has been observed among hepatitis E virus (HEV strains. However, the implication of the genetic heterogeneity on HEV antigenic properties is uncertain. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (Mabs against truncated ORF2-encoded proteins (aa452‑617, designated p166 proteins derived from HEV strains of Burma (genotype 1a, p166Bur, Pakistan (1b, p166Pak and Morocco (1c, p166Mor were raised and used for identification of HEV antigenic diversity. Six Mabs reacted to these 3 p166 proteins as well as p166 proteins constructed from strains derived from Mexico (genotype 2, US (genotype 3 and China (genotype 4, indicating the existence of pan‑genotypic epitopes. Two Mabs, 1B5 and 6C7, reacted with p166Bur and p166Mor, but not p166Pak or p166s derived from genotypes 2, 3, and 4, indicating that these 2 Mabs recognized strain-specific HEV epitopes. Both the common and specific epitopes could not be mapped by 23 synthetic peptides spanning the p166Bur sequence, suggesting that they are confirmation‑dependent. Comparative sequence analysis showed that p166Bur and p166Mor shared an identical aa sequence along their entire lengths, whereas for p166Pak the aas occupying positions 606 and 614 are different from aas at corresponding positions of p166Bur and p166Mor. Reactivity between 1B5 and p166Bur was abrogated with mutation of p166Bur/A606V, whereas p166Pak acquired the reactivity to 1B5 with mutation of p166Pak/V606A. However, mutations of p166Bur/L614M and P166Pak/M614L did not affect the immunoreactivity. Therefore, the aa occupying position 606 plays a critical role in maintaining the antigenicity of the HEV p166 proteins.

  19. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  20. PRIMA-1MET induces nucleolar translocation of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA-5 protein

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    Rökaeus Nina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The low molecular weight compound, PRIMA-1MET restores the transcriptional transactivation function of certain p53 mutants in tumor cells. We have previously shown that PRIMA-1MET induces nucleolar translocation of p53, PML, CBP and Hsp70. The Epstein-Barr virus encoded, latency associated antigen EBNA-5 (also known as EBNA-LP is required for the efficient transformation of human B lymphocytes by EBV. EBNA-5 associates with p53-hMDM2-p14ARF complexes. EBNA-5 is a nuclear protein that translocates to the nucleolus upon heat shock or inhibition of proteasomes along with p53, hMDM2, Hsp70, PML and proteasome subunits. Here we show that PRIMA-1MET induces the nucleolar translocation of EBNA-5 in EBV transformed B lymphoblasts and in transfected tumor cells. The PRIMA-1MET induced translocation of EBNA-5 is not dependent on the presence of mutant p53. It also occurs in p53 null cells or in cells that express wild type p53. Both the native and the EGFP or DSRed conjugated EBNA-5 respond to PRIMA-1MET treatment in the same way. Image analysis of DSRed-EBNA-5 expressing cells, using confocal fluorescence time-lapse microscopy showed that the nucleolar translocation requires several hours to complete. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and FLIP (fluorescence loss in photobleaching measurements on live cells showed that the nucleolar translocation was accompanied by the formation of EBNA-5 aggregates. The process is reversible since the aggregates are dissolved upon removal of PRIMA-1MET. Our results suggest that mutant p53 is not the sole target of PRIMA-1MET. We propose that PRIMA-1MET may reversibly inhibit cellular chaperons that prevent the aggregation of misfolded proteins, and that EBNA-5 may serve as a surrogate drug target for elucidating the precise molecular action of PRIMA-1MET.

  1. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chénard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages.

  3. Co-expression of HIV-1 virus-like particles and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor by GEO-D03 DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, Michael; Xu, Yongxian; Marino, Tracie; Lu, Shan; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Robinson, Harriet L

    2012-11-01

    Here, we report on GEO-D03, a DNA vaccine that co-expresses non-infectious HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the human cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The virus-like particles display the native gp160 form of the HIV-1 Envelope glycoprotein (Env) and are designed to elicit antibody against the natural form of Env on virus and virus-infected cells. The DNA-expressed HIV Gag, Pol and Env proteins also have the potential to elicit virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. The purpose of the co-expressed GM-CSF is to target a cytokine that recruits, expands and differentiates macrophages and dendritic cells to the site of VLP expression. The GEO-D03 DNA vaccine is currently entered into human trials as a prime for a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost. In preclinical studies in macaques using an SIV prototype vaccine, this vaccination regimen elicited both anti-viral T cells and antibody, and provided 70% protection against acquisition during 12 weekly rectal exposures with a heterologous SIV. Higher avidity of the Env-specific Ab for the native form of the Env in the challenge virus correlated with lower likelihood of SIV infection.

  4. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...

  5. Host-encoded reporters for the detection and purification of multiple enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketteler, Robin; Tomov, Vesselin; Neunkirchner, Alina; Xie, Qiang; Pickl, Winfried F; Seed, Brian

    2010-08-01

    The identification of host cell factors for virus replication holds great promise for the development of new antiviral therapies. Recently, high-throughput screening methods have emerged as powerful tools to identify candidate host factors for therapeutic intervention. The development of assay systems suitable for large-scale automated screening is of particular importance for novel viruses with high pathogenic potential for which limited biological information can be developed in a short period of time. This report presents a general enzymatic reporter system for the detection and characterization of multiple enveloped viruses that does not rely on engineering of the virus. Instead, reporter enzymes are incorporated into virus particles by targeting to lipid microdomains in producer cells. The approach allows a variety of human pathogenic enveloped viruses to be detected by sensitive, inexpensive and automatable enzymatic assays. Tagged viruses can be purified quickly and efficiently by a magnetic bead-based capture method. The method allows general detection of enveloped viruses without prior reference to their sequence. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Us3-encoded protein kinase from pseudorabies virus affects egress of virions from the nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, F.; Pol, J.M.A.; Peeters, B.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Wind, de N.; Kimman, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the influence of inactivation of various genes located in the unique short (U(s)) region of pseudorabies virus on virus replication and assembly in porcine nasal mucosa explant cultures. The following strains were used: the virulent wild-type strain NIA-3, and strains derived from NIA-3

  7. Isolation and characterization of the genes for two small RNAs of herpesvirus papio and their comparison with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBER RNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, J G; Shu, M D

    1988-01-01

    Genes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs), two low-molecular-weight RNAs encoded by the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hybridize to two small RNAs in a baboon cell line that contains a similar virus, herpesvirus papio (HVP). The genes for the HVP RNAs (HVP-1 and HVP-2) are located together in the small unique region at the left end of the viral genome and are transcribed by RNA polymerase III in a rightward direction, similar to the EBERs. There is significant si...

  8. Fowlpox virus encodes nonessential homologs of cellular alpha-SNAP, PC-1, and an orphan human homolog of a secreted nematode protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, S M; Anwar, M A; Thomas, W; Green, P; Shaw, K; Skinner, M A

    1998-08-01

    The genome of fowlpox virus (FWPV), type species of the Avipoxviridae, is considerably rearranged compared with that of vaccinia virus (the prototypic poxvirus and type species of the Orthopoxviridae) and is 30% larger. It is likely that the genome of FWPV contains genes in addition to those found in vaccinia virus, probably involved with its replication and survival in the chicken. A 7,470-bp segment of the FWPV genome has five open reading frames (ORFs), two of which encode ankyrin repeat proteins, many examples of which have been found in poxviruses. The remaining ORFs encode homologs of cellular genes not reported in any other virus. ORF-2 encodes a homolog of the yeast Sec17p and mammalian SNAP proteins, crucial to vesicular transport in the exocytic pathway. ORF-3 encodes a homolog of an orphan human protein, R31240_2, encoded on 19p13.2. ORF-3 is also homologous to three proteins (YLS2, YMV6, and C07B5.5) from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and to a 43-kDa antigen from the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis. ORF-5 encodes a homolog of the mammalian plasma cell antigen PC-1, a type II glycoprotein with exophosphodiesterase activity. The ORFs are present in the virulent precursor, HP1, of the sequenced attenuated virus (FP9) and are conserved in other strains of FWPV. They were shown, by deletion mutagenesis, to be nonessential to virus replication in tissue culture. RNA encoding the viral homolog of PC-1 is expressed strongly early and late in infection, but RNAs encoding the homologs of SNAP and R31240_2 are expressed weakly and late.

  9. Ebola virus encodes a miR-155 analog to regulate importin-α5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanwu; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Mingming; Gao, George Fu; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus caused more than 10,000 human deaths. Current knowledge of suitable drugs, clinical diagnostic biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of Ebola virus infection is either absent or insufficient. By screening stem-loop structures from the viral genomes of four virulence species, we identified a novel, putative viral microRNA precursor that is specifically expressed by the Ebola virus. The sequence of the microRNA precursor was further confirmed by mining the existing RNA-Seq database. Two putative mature microRNAs were predicted and subsequently validated in human cell lines. Combined with this prediction of the microRNA target, we identified importin-α5, which is a key regulator of interferon signaling following Ebola virus infection, as one putative target. We speculate that this microRNA could facilitate the evasion of the host immune system by the virus. Moreover, this microRNA might be a potential clinical therapeutic target or a diagnostic biomarker for Ebola virus.

  10. Immunogenic and replicative properties of classical swine fever virus replicon particles modified to induce IFN-α/β and carry foreign genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Rolf; Summerfield, Artur; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; McCullough, Kenneth C; Tratschin, Jon-Duri; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2011-02-04

    Virus replicon particles (VRP) are genetically engineered infectious virions incapable of generating progeny virus due to partial or complete deletion of at least one structural gene. VRP fulfil the criteria of a safe vaccine and gene delivery system. With VRP derived from classical swine fever virus (CSF-VRP), a single intradermal vaccination protects from disease. Spreading of the challenge virus in the host is however not completely abolished. Parameters that are critical for immunogenicity of CSF-VRP are not well characterized. Considering the importance of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) to immune defence development, we generated IFN-α/β-inducing VRP to determine how this would influence vaccine efficacy. We also evaluated the effect of co-expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the vaccine context. The VRP were capable of long-term replication in cell culture despite the presence of IFN-α/β. In vivo, RNA replication was essential for the induction of an immune response. IFN-α/β-inducing and GM-CSF-expressing CSF-VRP were similar to unmodified VRP in terms of antibody and peripheral T-cell responses, and in reducing the blood levels of challenge virus RNA. Importantly, the IFN-α/β-inducing VRP did show increased efficacy over the unmodified VRP in terms of B-cell and T-cell responses, when tested with secondary immune responses by in vitro restimulation assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Eckert

    Full Text Available Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  12. Helicase domain encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus RNA1 determines systemic infection of Cmr1 in pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Hee Kang

    Full Text Available The Cmr1 gene in peppers confers resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus isolate-P0 (CMV-P0. Cmr1 restricts the systemic spread of CMV strain-Fny (CMV-Fny, whereas this gene cannot block the spread of CMV isolate-P1 (CMV-P1 to the upper leaves, resulting in systemic infection. To identify the virulence determinant of CMV-P1, six reassortant viruses and six chimeric viruses derived from CMV-Fny and CMV-P1 cDNA clones were used. Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the helicase domain encoded by CMV-P1 RNA1 determines susceptibility to systemic infection, and that the helicase domain contains six different amino acid substitutions between CMV-Fny and CMV-P1(. To identify the key amino acids of the helicase domain determining systemic infection with CMV-P1, we then constructed amino acid substitution mutants. Of the mutants tested, amino acid residues at positions 865, 896, 957, and 980 in the 1a protein sequence of CMV-P1 affected the systemic infection. Virus localization studies with GFP-tagged CMV clones and in situ localization of virus RNA revealed that these four amino acid residues together form the movement determinant for CMV-P1 movement from the epidermal cell layer to mesophyll cell layers. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CMV-P1 and a chimeric virus with four amino acid residues of CMV-P1 accumulated more genomic RNA in inoculated leaves than did CMV-Fny, indicating that those four amino acids are also involved in virus replication. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the helicase domain is responsible for systemic infection by controlling virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Whereas four amino acids are responsible for acquiring virulence in CMV-Fny, six amino acid (positions at 865, 896, 901, 957, 980 and 993 substitutions in CMV-P1 were required for complete loss of virulence in 'Bukang'.

  13. Effect of the deletion of genes encoding proteins of the extracellular virion form of vaccinia virus on vaccine immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion (MV and the enveloped virion (EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and/or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.

  14. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  15. Genome wide identification of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded microRNA targets against Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweta; Akhter, Yusuf; Khan, Jawaid Ahmad

    2018-01-05

    Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBV, genus Begomovirus) causes devastating cotton leaf curl disease. Among various known virus controlling strategies, RNAi-mediated one has shown potential to protect host crop plants. Micro(mi) RNAs, are the endogenous small RNAs and play a key role in plant development and stress resistance. In the present study we have identified cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded miRNAs targeting the CLCuBV. Based on threshold free energy and maximum complementarity scores of host miRNA-viral mRNA target pairs, a number of potential miRNAs were annotated. Among them, ghr-miR168 was selected as the most potent candidate, capable of targeting several vital genes namely C1, C3, C4, V1 and V2 of CLCuBV genome. In addition, ghr-miR395a and ghr-miR395d were observed to target the overlapping transcripts of C1 and C4 genes. We have verified the efficacy of these miRNA targets against CLCuBV following suppression of RNAi-mediated virus control through translational inhibition or cleavage of viral mRNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Zika Virus Encoding Non-Glycosylated Envelope Protein is Attenuated and Defective in Neuroinvasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Arun S; Pattnaik, Aryamav; Sahoo, Bikash R; Muthukrishnan, Ezhumalai; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Steffen, David; Vu, Hiep L X; Delhon, Gustavo; Osorio, Fernando A; Petro, Thomas M; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2017-09-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, responsible for sporadic outbreaks of mild and febrile illness in Africa and Asia, re-emerged in the last decade causing serious human diseases including microcephaly, congenital malformations, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Although genomic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that genetic evolution may have led to enhanced virulence of ZIKV, experimental evidence supporting the role of specific genetic changes in virulence is currently outstanding. One sequence motif, VNDT, containing an N-linked glycosylation site in the envelope (E) protein, is polymorphic, being absent in many of the African isolates while present in all isolates from the recent outbreaks. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this sequence motif and glycosylation of the E protein in pathogenicity of ZIKV. We first constructed a stable full-length cDNA clone of ZIKV in a novel linear vector from which infectious virus was recovered. The recombinant ZIKV generated from the infectious clone, which contains the VNDT motif, is highly pathogenic and causes lethality in a mouse model. In contrast, recombinant viruses from which the VNDT motif is deleted or from which N-linked glycosylation site is mutated by single amino acid substitution, are highly attenuated and non-lethal. The mutant viruses replicate poorly in the brain of infected mice when inoculated subcutaneously but replicate well following intracranial inoculation. Our findings provide the first evidence that N-linked glycosylation of the E protein is an important determinant of ZIKV virulence and neuroinvasion.IMPORTANCE Recent emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has caused major worldwide public health concern. The virus appears to have gained significant pathogenicity, causing serious human diseases including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The factors responsible for the emergence of pathogenic ZIKV are not understood at this time, although genetic

  17. The p10 gene of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrosis virus encodes a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In baculovirus-based high-level expression of cloned foreign genes, the viral very late gene promoters of polyhedrin (polh) and p10 are extensively exploited. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the p10 gene from a local isolate of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrosis virus (BmNPV). The gene harbours a 213-bp ...

  18. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection.

  19. Deltabaculoviruses encode a functional type I budded virus envelope fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envelope fusion proteins (F proteins) are major constituents of budded viruses (BVs) of alpha- and betabaculoviruses (Baculoviridae) and are essential for the systemic infection of insect larvae and insect cells in culture. An F protein homolog gene was absent in gammabaculoviruses. Here we show tha...

  20. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  1. SHIV-1157i and passaged progeny viruses encoding R5 HIV-1 clade C env cause AIDS in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa Nagadenahalli B

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV or chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV strains is widely used to study lentiviral pathogenesis, antiviral immunity and the efficacy of AIDS vaccine candidates. SHIV challenges allow assessment of anti-HIV-1 envelope responses in primates. As such, SHIVs should mimic natural HIV-1 infection in humans and, to address the pandemic, encode HIV-1 Env components representing major viral subtypes worldwide. Results We have developed a panel of clade C R5-tropic SHIVs based upon env of a Zambian pediatric isolate of HIV-1 clade C, the world's most prevalent HIV-1 subtype. The parental infectious proviral clone, SHIV-1157i, was rapidly passaged through five rhesus monkeys. After AIDS developed in the first animal at week 123 post-inoculation, infected blood was infused into a sixth monkey. Virus reisolated at this late stage was still exclusively R5 tropic and mucosally transmissible. Here we describe the long-term follow-up of this initial cohort of six monkeys. Two have remained non-progressors, whereas the other four gradually progressed to AIDS within 123–270 weeks post-exposure. Two progressors succumbed to opportunistic infections, including a case of SV40 encephalitis. Conclusion These data document the disease progression induced by the first mucosally transmissible, pathogenic R5 non-clade B SHIV and suggest that SHIV-1157i-derived viruses, including the late-stage, highly replication-competent SHIV-1157ipd3N4 previously described (Song et al., 2006, display biological characteristics that mirror those of HIV-1 clade C and support their expanded use for AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates.

  2. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Aris; Ermawati, Ratna; Wati, Vera; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Wijayanti, Nastiti

    2016-01-01

    Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2) encoding gene of AE virus (AEV) from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/µl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with sample code 499/4/12. The sensitivity rate of RT-PCR is to amplify

  3. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  4. The ORF61 Protein Encoded by Simian Varicella Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus Inhibits NF-κB Signaling by Interfering with IκBα Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Travis; Malouli, Daniel; Uebelhoer, Luke S; DeFilippis, Victor R; Früh, Klaus; Verweij, Marieke C

    2015-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox upon primary infection and establishes latency in ganglia. Reactivation from latency causes herpes zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. Innate immunity mediated by interferon and proinflammatory cytokines represents the first line of immune defense upon infection and reactivation. VZV is known to interfere with multiple innate immune signaling pathways, including the central transcription factor NF-κB. However, the role of these inhibitory mechanisms in vivo is unknown. Simian varicella virus (SVV) infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates key aspects of VZV pathogenesis, and this model thus permits examination of the role of immune evasion mechanisms in vivo. Here, we compare SVV and VZV with respect to interference with NF-κB activation. We demonstrate that both viruses prevent ubiquitination of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, whereas SVV additionally prevents IκBα phosphorylation. We show that the ORF61 proteins of VZV and SVV are sufficient to prevent IκBα ubiquitination upon ectopic expression. We further demonstrate that SVV ORF61 interacts with β-TrCP, a subunit of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates the degradation of IκBα. This interaction seems to inactivate SCF-mediated protein degradation in general, since the unrelated β-TrCP target Snail is also stabilized by ORF61. In addition to ORF61, SVV seems to encode additional inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway, since SVV with ORF61 deleted still prevented IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that SVV interferes with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB activation at multiple levels, which is consistent with the importance of these countermechanisms for varicella virus infection. The role of innate immunity during the establishment of primary infection, latency, and reactivation by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is incompletely understood. Since infection of rhesus

  5. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of prime-boost immunization with recombinant poxvirus FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the full-length Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Michael; Thompson, Fiona M; Dunachie, Susanna; Keating, Sheila; Todryk, Stephen; Berthoud, Tamara; Andrews, Laura; Andersen, Rikke F; Moore, Anne; Gilbert, Sarah C; Poulton, Ian; Dubovsky, Filip; Tierney, Eveline; Correa, Simon; Huntcooke, Angela; Butcher, Geoffrey; Williams, Jack; Sinden, Robert E; Hill, Adrian V S

    2006-05-01

    Heterologous prime-boost immunization with DNA and various recombinant poxviruses encoding malaria antigens is capable of inducing strong cell-mediated immune responses and partial protection in human sporozoite challenges. Here we report a series of trials assessing recombinant fowlpox virus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein in various prime-boost combinations, doses, and application routes. For the first time, these vaccines were administered intramuscularly and at doses of up to 5 x 10(8) PFU. Vaccines containing this antigen proved safe and induced modest immune responses but showed no evidence of efficacy in a sporozoite challenge.

  6. Oncolytic virus therapy: A new era of cancer treatment at dawn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is perhaps the next major breakthrough in cancer treatment following the success in immunotherapy using immune checkpoint inhibitors. Oncolytic viruses are defined as genetically engineered or naturally occurring viruses that selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells without harming the normal tissues. T-Vec (talimogene laherparepvec), a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) armed with GM-CSF, was recently approved as the first oncolytic virus drug in the USA and Europe. The phase III trial proved that local intralesional injections with T-Vec in advanced malignant melanoma patients can not only suppress the growth of injected tumors but also act systemically and prolong overall survival. Other oncolytic viruses that are closing in on drug approval in North America and Europe include vaccinia virus JX-594 (pexastimogene devacirepvec) for hepatocellular carcinoma, GM-CSF-expressing adenovirus CG0070 for bladder cancer, and Reolysin (pelareorep), a wild-type variant of reovirus, for head and neck cancer. In Japan, a phase II clinical trial of G47∆, a third-generation oncolytic HSV-1, is ongoing in glioblastoma patients. G47∆ was recently designated as a "Sakigake" breakthrough therapy drug in Japan. This new system by the Japanese government should provide G47∆ with priority reviews and a fast-track drug approval by the regulatory authorities. Whereas numerous oncolytic viruses have been subjected to clinical trials, the common feature that is expected to play a major role in prolonging the survival of cancer patients is an induction of specific antitumor immunity in the course of tumor-specific viral replication. It appears that it will not be long before oncolytic virus therapy becomes a standard therapeutic option for all cancer patients. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Characterization of an anti-varicella-zoster virus compound that targets the portal protein encoded by ORF54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Ruka; Yoshida, Chinatsu; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi; Inoue, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    An anti-varicella-zoster virus compound, a 5-chlorobenzo[b]thiophen derivative (45B5), was characterized. Its 50% effective concentration against the cell-free vaccine Oka strain and 50% cytotoxic concentration in human fibroblasts were 16.9 µM and more than 100 µM, respectively. Treatment with 45B5 decreased viral DNA synthesis and IE62 expression weakly but significantly. All 45B5-resistant viral clones isolated were found to have at least one mutation in ORF54 that encodes the portal protein. There were no effects on interaction between the portal and scaffold proteins. Thus, 45B5 may inhibit nuclear delivery of viral DNA. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Analysis of borna disease virus trafficking in live infected cells by using a virus encoding a tetracysteine-tagged p protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Caroline M; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Allart, Sophie; Malnou, Cécile E; Schwemmle, Martin; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA virus characterized by noncytolytic persistent infection and replication in the nuclei of infected cells. To gain further insight on the intracellular trafficking of BDV components during infection, we sought to generate recombinant BDV (rBDV) encoding fluorescent fusion viral proteins. We successfully rescued a virus bearing a tetracysteine tag fused to BDV-P protein, which allowed assessment of the intracellular distribution and dynamics of BDV using real-time live imaging. In persistently infected cells, viral nuclear inclusions, representing viral factories tethered to chromatin, appeared to be extremely static and stable, contrasting with a very rapid and active trafficking of BDV components in the cytoplasm. Photobleaching (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching [FRAP] and fluorescence loss in photobleaching [FLIP]) imaging approaches revealed that BDV components were permanently and actively exchanged between cellular compartments, including within viral inclusions, albeit with a fraction of BDV-P protein not mobile in these structures, presumably due to its association with viral and/or cellular proteins. We also obtained evidence for transfer of viral material between persistently infected cells, with routing of the transferred components toward the cell nucleus. Finally, coculture experiments with noninfected cells allowed visualization of cell-to-cell BDV transmission and movement of the incoming viral material toward the nucleus. Our data demonstrate the potential of tetracysteine-tagged recombinant BDV for virus tracking during infection, which may provide novel information on the BDV life cycle and on the modalities of its interaction with the nuclear environment during viral persistence.

  9. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yoshimi; Caposio, Patrizia; Parkins, Christopher J; Botto, Sara; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees) are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes. We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV) vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP) of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL)). MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL) induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months) CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection. This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  10. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes.We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL. MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection.This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  11. Generation of Helper Plasmids Encoding Mutant Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Capsid Proteins with Increased Resistance against Proteasomal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2 vectors are widely used for both experimental and clinical gene therapy. A recent research has shown that the performance of these vectors can be greatly improved by substitution of specific surface-exposed tyrosine residues with phenylalanines. In this study, a fast and simple method is presented to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding capsid proteins with single, double or triple Y→F mutations.   Materials and Methods: A one-step, high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR cloning procedure involving the use of two partially overlapping primers to amplify a circular DNA template was applied to produce AAV2 cap genes encoding VP1 mutants with Y→F substitutions in residues 444, 500 or 730. The resulting constructs were used to make the different double and triple mutant by another round of PCR (Y444500F mutant, subcloning (Y444730F and Y500730F mutants or a combination of both techniques (Y444500730F mutant. Results: Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed successful introduction of the desired mutations in the AAV2 cap gene and showed the absence of any unintended mutations in the DNA fragments used to assemble the final set of AAV2 vector helper plasmids. The correctness of these plasmids was further confirmed by restriction mapping. Conclusion: PCR-based, single-step site-directed mutagenesis of circular DNA templates is a highly efficient and cost-effective method to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding mutant Cap proteins for the production of vector particles with increased gene transfer efficiency.

  12. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2014-01-01

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all- or a part of the conserved nonstructural proteins (nsPs) of HCV. We demonstrated that an rSFV vector was able to encode a transgene as large as 6.1 kb without affecting its vaccine immunogenicity. Prime-boost immunizations of mice with rSFV expressing all nsPs induced strong and long-lasting NS3-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. The strength and functional heterogeneity of the T-cell response was similar to that induced with rSFV expressing only NS3/4A. Furthermore this leads to a significant growth delay and negative selection of HCV-expressing EL4 tumors in an in vivo mouse model. In general, as broad-spectrum T-cell responses are only seen in patients with resolved HCV infection, this rSFV-based vector, which expresses all nsPs, inducing robust T-cell activity has a potential for the treatment of HCV infections. PMID:24370701

  13. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  14. The α2,3-sialyltransferase encoded by myxoma virus is a virulence factor that contributes to immunosuppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Boutard

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV induces a lethal disease called Myxomatosis in European rabbits. MYXV is one of the rare viruses that encodes an α2,3-sialyltransferase through its M138L gene. In this study, we showed that although the absence of the enzyme was not associated with any in vitro deficit, the M138L deficient strains are highly attenuated in vivo. Indeed, while all rabbits infected with the parental and the revertant strains died within 9 days post-infection from severe myxomatosis, all but one rabbit inoculated with the M138L deficient strains survived the infection. In primary lesions, this resistance to the infection was associated with an increased ability of innate immune cells, mostly neutrophils, to migrate to the site of virus replication at 4 days post-infection. This was followed by the development of a better specific immune response against MYXV. Indeed, at day 9 post-infection, we observed an important proliferation of lymphocytes and an intense congestion of blood vessels in lymph nodes after M138L knockouts infection. Accordingly, in these rabbits, we observed an intense mononuclear cell infiltration throughout the dermis in primary lesions and higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Finally, this adaptive immune response provided protection to these surviving rabbits against a challenge with the MYXV WT strain. Altogether, these results show that expression of the M138L gene contributes directly or indirectly to immune evasion by MYXV. In the future, these results could help us to better understand the pathogenesis of myxomatosis but also the importance of glycans in regulation of immune responses.

  15. The α2,3-sialyltransferase encoded by myxoma virus is a virulence factor that contributes to immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutard, Bérengère; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Sarlet, Mickaël; Desmecht, Daniel; McFadden, Grant; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Gillet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) induces a lethal disease called Myxomatosis in European rabbits. MYXV is one of the rare viruses that encodes an α2,3-sialyltransferase through its M138L gene. In this study, we showed that although the absence of the enzyme was not associated with any in vitro deficit, the M138L deficient strains are highly attenuated in vivo. Indeed, while all rabbits infected with the parental and the revertant strains died within 9 days post-infection from severe myxomatosis, all but one rabbit inoculated with the M138L deficient strains survived the infection. In primary lesions, this resistance to the infection was associated with an increased ability of innate immune cells, mostly neutrophils, to migrate to the site of virus replication at 4 days post-infection. This was followed by the development of a better specific immune response against MYXV. Indeed, at day 9 post-infection, we observed an important proliferation of lymphocytes and an intense congestion of blood vessels in lymph nodes after M138L knockouts infection. Accordingly, in these rabbits, we observed an intense mononuclear cell infiltration throughout the dermis in primary lesions and higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Finally, this adaptive immune response provided protection to these surviving rabbits against a challenge with the MYXV WT strain. Altogether, these results show that expression of the M138L gene contributes directly or indirectly to immune evasion by MYXV. In the future, these results could help us to better understand the pathogenesis of myxomatosis but also the importance of glycans in regulation of immune responses.

  16. Nuclear-Encoded Plastidal Carbonic Anhydrase Is Involved in Replication of Bamboo mosaic virus RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-Hsuan Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available On inoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana with Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV, a gene with downregulated expression was found involved in the infection cycle of BaMV. To uncover how this downregulated gene affects the accumulation of BaMV in plants, we used loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Knockdown of this gene decreased the accumulation of BaMV coat protein to approximately 60% in both plants and protoplasts of N. benthamiana but had no effect on Potato virus X and Cucumber mosaic virus infection. The full-length gene was cloned and revealed as an N. benthamiana nuclear-encoded chloroplast carbonic anhydrase (CA and so designated NbCA. As compared with the accumulation of BaMV RNAs in NbCA-knockdown protoplasts, both plus- and minus-strand RNAs were reduced. We further fused NbCA with Orange fluorescent protein to confirm its localization in chloroplasts on confocal microscopy. However, transiently expressed NbCA in chloroplasts did not considerably increase BaMV accumulation. The addition of exogenous CA may not have any additive effect on BaMV accumulation because of the natural abundance of CA in chloroplasts. In an in vitro replication assay, the addition of Escherichia coli-expressed NbCA enhanced exogenous template level (re-initiation and elongation but not endogenous template level (only elongation. These results suggest that NbCA is possibly involved in re-initiation step of BaMV RNA replication. Further analysis indicated that proton concentration could influence the endogenous and exogenous template activities. Hence, our results implied that NbCA could be playing a role in harnessing proton concentration and favoring the replicase with the re-initiation template.

  17. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J Sullivan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAd encoding the Ebola glycoprotein (GP and nucleoprotein (NP has been previously shown to confer specific protective immunity in nonhuman primates. GP can exert cytopathic effects on transfected cells in vitro, and multiple GP forms have been identified in nature, raising the question of which would be optimal for a human vaccine.To address this question, we have explored the efficacy of mutant GPs from multiple Ebola virus strains with reduced in vitro cytopathicity and analyzed their protective effects in the primate challenge model, with or without NP. Deletion of the GP transmembrane domain eliminated in vitro cytopathicity but reduced its protective efficacy by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, a point mutation was identified that abolished this cytopathicity but retained immunogenicity and conferred immune protection in the absence of NP. The minimal effective rAd dose was established at 10(10 particles, two logs lower than that used previously.Expression of specific GPs alone vectored by rAd are sufficient to confer protection against lethal challenge in a relevant nonhuman primate model. Elimination of NP from the vaccine and dose reductions to 10(10 rAd particles do not diminish protection and simplify the vaccine, providing the basis for selection of a human vaccine candidate.

  18. Virus encoded MHC-like decoys diversify the inhibitory KIR repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Carrillo-Bustamante

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self. Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV is able to evade NK cell responses by coding "decoy" molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules.

  19. Virus Encoded MHC-Like Decoys Diversify the Inhibitory KIR Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self). Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is able to evade NK cell responses by coding “decoy” molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules. PMID:24130473

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 and ZEBRA: targets for therapeutic strategies against EBV-carrying cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Pyndiah, Slovénie; Apcher, Sébastien; Mazars, Anne; Manoury, Bénédicte; Ammari, Nisrine; Nylander, Karin; Voisset, Cécile; Blondel, Marc; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The EBV-encoded EBNA1 was first discovered 40 years ago, approximately 10 years after the presence of EBV had been demonstrated in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. It took another 10 years before the functions of EBNA1 in maintaining the viral genome were revealed, and it has since been shown to be an essential viral factor expressed in all EBV-carrying cells. Apart from serving to maintain the viral episome and to control viral replication and gene expression, EBNA1 also harbours a cis-acting mechanism that allows virus-carrying host cells to evade the immune system. This relates to a particular glycine-alanine repeat (GAr) within EBNA1 that has the capacity to suppress antigen presentation to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway. We discuss the role of the GAr sequence at the level of mRNA translation initiation, rather than at the protein level, as at least part of the mechanism to avoid MHC presentation. Interfering with this mechanism has become the focus of the development of immune-based therapies against EBV-carrying cancers, and some lead compounds that affect translation of GAr-carrying mRNAs have been identified. In addition, we describe the EBV-encoded ZEBRA factor and the switch from the latent to the lytic cycle as an alternative virus-specific target for treating EBV-carrying cancers. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of how EBNA1 and ZEBRA interfere with cellular pathways not only opens new therapeutic approaches but continues to reveal new cell-biological insights on the interplay between host and virus. This review is a tale of discoveries relating to how EBNA1 and ZEBRA have emerged as targets for specific cancer therapies against EBV-carrying diseases, and serves as an illustration of how mRNA translation can play roles in future immune-based strategies to target viral disease. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Induction of cytotoxic T-cell responses by gene gun DNA vaccination with minigenes encoding influenza A virus HA and NP CTL-epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Kirkby, N

    1999-01-01

    degree of controllability. We have examined the induction of murine CTL's by this approach using DNA plasmid minigene vaccines encoding known mouse K(k) minimal CTL epitopes (8 amino acids) from the influenza A virus hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein. We here report that such an approach is feasible...

  2. Functional diversification upon leader protease domain duplication in the Citrus tristeza virus genome: Role of RNA sequences and the encoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Atallah, Osama O; Sun, Yong-Duo; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2018-01-15

    Viruses from the family Closteroviridae show an example of intra-genome duplications of more than one gene. In addition to the hallmark coat protein gene duplication, several members possess a tandem duplication of papain-like leader proteases. In this study, we demonstrate that domains encoding the L1 and L2 proteases in the Citrus tristeza virus genome underwent a significant functional divergence at the RNA and protein levels. We show that the L1 protease is crucial for viral accumulation and establishment of initial infection, whereas its coding region is vital for virus transport. On the other hand, the second protease is indispensable for virus infection of its natural citrus host, suggesting that L2 has evolved an important adaptive function that mediates virus interaction with the woody host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Holck Draborg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients and healthy controls (HCs to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients.

  4. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients.

  5. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  7. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Jong Seok [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Gyeonggi-do, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Minkyoung [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Sang-Moo, E-mail: skang24@gsu.edu [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  8. The BFRF1 Gene of Epstein-Barr Virus Encodes a Novel Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Gonnella, Roberta; Bei, Roberto; Muraro, Raffaella; Cardinali, Giorgia; Uccini, Stefania; Ragona, Giuseppe; Frati, Luigi; Faggioni, Alberto; Angeloni, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Computer analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome indicates there are ∼100 open reading frames (ORFs). Thus far about 30 EBV genes divided into the categories latent and lytic have been identified. The BamHI F region of EBV is abundantly transcribed during lytic replication. This region is highly conserved among herpesviruses, thus suggesting that some common function could be retained in the ORFs encompassed within this viral fragment. To identify putative novel proteins and possible new markers for viral replication, we focused our attention on the first rightward ORF in the BamHI F region (BFRF1). Histidine and glutathione S-transferase-tagged BFRF1 fusion proteins were synthesized to produce a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb). Analysis of human sera revealed a high seroprevalence of antibodies to BFRF1 in patients affected by nasopharyngeal carcinoma or Burkitt's lymphoma, whereas no humoral response to BFRF1 could be detected among healthy donors. An anti-BFRF1 MAb recognizes a doublet migrating at 37 to 38 kDa in cells extracts from EBV-infected cell lines following lytic cycle activation and in an EBV-negative cell line (DG75) transfected with a plasmid expressing the BFRF1 gene. Northern blot analysis allowed the detection of a major transcript of 3.7 kb highly expressed in EBV-positive lytic cycle-induced cell lines. Treatment with inhibitors of viral DNA polymerase, such as phosphonoacetic acid and acyclovir, reduced but did not abolish the transcription of BFRF1, thus indicating that BFRF1 can be classified as an early gene. Cell fractionation experiments, as well as immunolocalization by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy, showed that BFRF1 is localized on the plasma membrane and nuclear compartments of the cells and is a structural component of the viral particle. Identification of BFRF1 provides a new marker with which to monitor EBV infection and might help us better understand the biology of

  9. Improved strategy for phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus based on full-length E2 encoding sequences

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    Postel Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular epidemiology has proven to be an essential tool in the control of classical swine fever (CSF and its use has significantly increased during the past two decades. Phylogenetic analysis is a prerequisite for virus tracing and thus allows implementing more effective control measures. So far, fragments of the 5´NTR (150 nucleotides, nt and the E2 gene (190 nt have frequently been used for phylogenetic analyses. The short sequence lengths represent a limiting factor for differentiation of closely related isolates and also for confidence levels of proposed CSFV groups and subgroups. In this study, we used a set of 33 CSFV isolates in order to determine the nucleotide sequences of a 3508–3510 nt region within the 5´ terminal third of the viral genome. Including 22 additional sequences from GenBank database different regions of the genome, comprising the formerly used short 5´NTR and E2 fragments as well as the genomic regions encoding the individual viral proteins Npro, C, Erns, E1, and E2, were compared with respect to variability and suitability for phylogenetic analysis. Full-length E2 encoding sequences (1119 nt proved to be most suitable for reliable and statistically significant phylogeny and analyses revealed results as good as obtained with the much longer entire 5´NTR-E2 sequences. This strategy is therefore recommended by the EU and OIE Reference Laboratory for CSF as it provides a solid and improved basis for CSFV molecular epidemiology. Finally, the power of this method is illustrated by the phylogenetic analysis of closely related CSFV isolates from a recent outbreak in Lithuania.

  10. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

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    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  11. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

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    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  12. Improved foreign gene expression in plants using a virus-encoded suppressor of RNA silencing modified to be developmentally harmless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pooja; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Alvarado, Veria Y; Sainsbury, Frank; Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P; Scholthof, Herman B

    2011-08-01

    Endeavours to obtain elevated and prolonged levels of foreign gene expression in plants are often hampered by the onset of RNA silencing that negatively affects target gene expression. Plant virus-encoded suppressors of RNA silencing are useful tools for counteracting silencing but their wide applicability in transgenic plants is limited because their expression often causes harmful developmental effects. We hypothesized that a previously characterized tombusvirus P19 mutant (P19/R43W), typified by reduced symptomatic effects while maintaining the ability to sequester short-interfering RNAs, could be used to suppress virus-induced RNA silencing without the concomitant developmental effects. To investigate this, transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana was used to evaluate the ability of P19/R43W to enhance heterologous gene expression. Although less potent than wt-P19, P19/R43W was an effective suppressor when used to enhance protein expression from either a traditional T-DNA expression cassette or using the CPMV-HT expression system. Stable transformation of N. benthamiana yielded plants that expressed detectable levels of P19/R43W that was functional as a suppressor. Transgenic co-expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and P19/R43W also showed elevated accumulation of GFP compared with the levels found in the absence of a suppressor. In all cases, transgenic expression of P19/R43W caused no or minimal morphological defects and plants produced normal-looking flowers and fertile seed. We conclude that the expression of P19/R43W is developmentally harmless to plants while providing a suitable platform for transient or transgenic overexpression of value-added genes in plants with reduced hindrance by RNA silencing. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  13. Functional analysis of Rift Valley fever virus NSs encoding a partial truncation.

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    Jennifer A Head

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, belongs to genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in infected ruminants as well as causing neurological disorders, blindness, or lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. RVFV is classified as a category A priority pathogen and a select agent in the U.S., and currently there are no therapeutics available for RVF patients. NSs protein, a major virulence factor of RVFV, inhibits host transcription including interferon (IFN-β mRNA synthesis and promotes degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. NSs self-associates at the C-terminus 17 aa., while NSs at aa.210-230 binds to Sin3A-associated protein (SAP30 to inhibit the activation of IFN-β promoter. Thus, we hypothesize that NSs function(s can be abolished by truncation of specific domains, and co-expression of nonfunctional NSs with intact NSs will result in the attenuation of NSs function by dominant-negative effect. Unexpectedly, we found that RVFV NSs truncated at aa. 6-30, 31-55, 56-80, 81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230, 231-248 or 249-265 lack functions of IFN-β mRNA synthesis inhibition and degradation of PKR. Truncated NSs were less stable in infected cells, while nuclear localization was inhibited in NSs lacking either of aa.81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230 or 231-248. Furthermore, none of truncated NSs had exhibited significant dominant-negative functions for NSs-mediated IFN-β suppression or PKR degradation upon co-expression in cells infected with RVFV. We also found that any of truncated NSs except for intact NSs does not interact with RVFV NSs even in the presence of intact C-terminus self-association domain. Our results suggest that conformational integrity of NSs is important for the stability, cellular localization and biological functions of RVFV NSs, and the co-expression of truncated NSs does not exhibit dominant-negative phenotype.

  14. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV) targeting human papillomavirus (HPV). Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7) via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus. PMID:26343186

  16. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  17. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector vaccine encoding the codon-optimized F protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans.

  18. An Epstein-Barr virus DNA fragment encodes messages for the two major envelope glycoproteins (gp350/300 and gp220/200).

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, M; Thorley-Lawson, D; Kieff, E

    1984-01-01

    The genes encoding the two major Epstein-Barr virus glycoproteins (gp350/300 and gp220/200) have been mapped to a 5-kilobase fragment of the viral genome (BamHI-L). This fragment encodes 3.4- and 2.8-kilobase RNAs which translate proteins of 135 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively. Both proteins react with antiserum specific for gp350/300 and gp220/200. The 135-kilodalton protein is identical in size to the nascent polypeptide precursor to gp350/300, and the 100-kilodalton protein is the expect...

  19. IN VITRO INTERACTION OF INFLUENZA VIRUS A(H1N1pdm09 WITH MONOCYTIC MACROPHAGES: INDIVIDUAL RESPONSES OF TLR7 AND RIG1 RECEPTOR GENES

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    T. M. Sokolova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro differentiation of donor blood monocytes to macrophages (Mph following GM-CSF treatment was accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of gene transcription signaling receptors TLR7 or RIG1. The levels of intracellular viral RNA (M1 gene in Mph remained high upon infection by influenza virus A H1N1pdm (Moscow 2009 for 24-96 hours. The innate immunity reactions caused by influenza virus show individual features: they are decreased in Mph from donor 1 which had initially high level of endosomal TLR7 gene activity, and it increased by influenza virus in MPh from donor 2 who had a very low level of TLR7 gene expression. The influenza H1N1pdm virus weakly stimulated expression of gene RIG1 and production of inflammatory cytokines in Mf in donor 1. The differences may be connected with individual sensitivity of the donors to influenza infection.

  20. Influenza A virus does not encode a tetherin antagonist with Vpu-like activity and induces IFN-dependent tetherin expression in infected cells.

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    Michael Winkler

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced host cell factor tetherin inhibits release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is counteracted by the HIV-1 protein Vpu. Influenza A virus (FLUAV also buds from the plasma membrane and is not inhibited by tetherin. Here, we investigated if FLUAV encodes a functional equivalent of Vpu for tetherin antagonism. We found that expression of the FLUAV protein NS1, which antagonizes the interferon (IFN response, did not block the tetherin-mediated restriction of HIV release, which was rescued by Vpu. Similarly, tetherin-mediated inhibition of HIV release was not rescued by FLUAV infection. In contrast, FLUAV infection induced tetherin expression on target cells in an IFN-dependent manner. These results suggest that FLUAV escapes the antiviral effects of tetherin without encoding a tetherin antagonist with Vpu-like activity.

  1. Hepatitis B virus genotype C encoding resistance mutations that emerge during adefovir dipivoxil therapy: in vitro replication phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenpeng; Warner, Nadia; Sozzi, Vitina; Yuen, Lilly; Colledge, Danni; Li, Tong; Zhuang, Hui; Locarnini, Stephen; Revill, Peter A

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into ten genotypes (A-J), with genotypes B and C being the most common in Asia. Recent data suggest that the HBV genotype can influence disease progression, and genotype C has been associated with more aggressive liver disease than that of other genotypes. Although there is a preventative vaccine, chronic infection remains a public health problem with oral nucleos(t)ide analog therapy being the most common treatment. The HBV genome is composed of four partially overlapping reading frames, meaning that substitutions in the HBV polymerase selected during NA therapy may also alter the overlapping HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). We have recently shown that for HBV genotype D, the rtA181T/sW172stop substitution conferring resistance to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) alters secretion of HBsAg and exerts a dominant-negative effect on wild-type virion secretion. However, the effect of this and other ADV-resistance-associated mutations on HBV replication and HBsAg secretion for the HBV genotype C, the genotype with the most severe clinical prognosis, is unknown. We constructed 1.2-mer infectious cDNA clones of HBV genotype C encoding mutations associated with ADV resistance and established an in vitro replication assay in Huh7 cells. Decreased levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg were detected for all ADV variants relative to the 1.2-mer wild-type polymerase control plasmid. Importantly, less HBsAg was detected in the cells transfected with the rtA181T resistance mutants, and the overlapping sW172stop mutation ablated secretion of HBsAg into cell culture supernatants. The identification of secretion-defective HBV in the setting of ADV therapy for HBV genotype C, and to a lesser extent HBV genotype B, has major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of HBV in the Asia-Pacific region, as it is likely that quantitative HBsAg and viral load testing of serum from patients infected with HBV encoding rtA181T and rtN236T substitutions may not

  2. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

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    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  3. Current status of clinical trials assessing oncolytic virus therapy for urological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Homma, Yukio; Todo, Tomoki

    2017-05-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy has recently been recognized as a promising new option for cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in cancer cells, thus killing them without harming normal cells. Notably, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly called OncoVEX(GM)(-)(CSF) ), an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable melanoma in October 2015, and was subsequently approved in Europe and Australia in 2016. The efficacies of many types of oncolytic viruses against urological cancers have been investigated in preclinical studies during the past decade, and some have already been tested in clinical trials. For example, a phase I trial of the third-generation oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type 1, G47Δ, in patients with prostate cancer was completed in 2016. We summarize the current status of clinical trials of oncolytic virus therapy in patients with the three major urological cancers: prostate, bladder and renal cell cancers. In addition to Herpes simplex virus type 1, adenoviruses, reoviruses, vaccinia virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus have also been used as parental viruses in these trials. We believe that oncolytic virus therapy is likely to become an important and major treatment option for urological cancers in the near future. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Epstein Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 interference with MHC class I antigen presentation reveals a close correlation between mRNA translation initiation and antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apcher, Sebastien; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Manoury, Benedicte; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2010-10-14

    Viruses are known to employ different strategies to manipulate the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway to avoid recognition of the infected host cell by the immune system. However, viral control of antigen presentation via the processes that supply and select antigenic peptide precursors is yet relatively unknown. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded EBNA1 is expressed in all EBV-infected cells, but the immune system fails to detect and destroy EBV-carrying host cells. This immune evasion has been attributed to the capacity of a Gly-Ala repeat (GAr) within EBNA1 to inhibit MHC class I restricted antigen presentation. Here we demonstrate that suppression of mRNA translation initiation by the GAr in cis is sufficient and necessary to prevent presentation of antigenic peptides from mRNAs to which it is fused. Furthermore, we demonstrate a direct correlation between the rate of translation initiation and MHC class I antigen presentation from a certain mRNA. These results support the idea that mRNAs, and not the encoded full length proteins, are used for MHC class I restricted immune surveillance. This offers an additional view on the role of virus-mediated control of mRNA translation initiation and of the mechanisms that control MHC class I restricted antigen presentation in general.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the genes for two small RNAs of herpesvirus papio and their comparison with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBER RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, J G; Shu, M D

    1988-08-01

    Genes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs), two low-molecular-weight RNAs encoded by the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hybridize to two small RNAs in a baboon cell line that contains a similar virus, herpesvirus papio (HVP). The genes for the HVP RNAs (HVP-1 and HVP-2) are located together in the small unique region at the left end of the viral genome and are transcribed by RNA polymerase III in a rightward direction, similar to the EBERs. There is significant similarity between EBER1 and HVP-1 RNA, except for an insert of 22 nucleotides which increases the length of HVP-1 RNA to 190 nucleotides. There is less similarity between the sequences of EBER2 and HVP-2 RNA, but both have a length of about 170 nucleotides. The predicted secondary structure of each HVP RNA is remarkably similar to that of the respective EBER, implying that the secondary structures are important for function. Upstream from the initiation sites of all four RNA genes are several highly conserved sequences which may function in the regulation of transcription. The HVP RNAs, together with the EBERs, are highly abundant in transformed cells and are efficiently bound by the cellular La protein.

  6. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads Andreas Bay; Kongsgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should...... these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response......, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both...

  7. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  8. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, Nancy J.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Shedlock, Devon J.; Xu, Ling; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Popernack, Paul M.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Pau, Maria G.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jahrling, Peter B.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or

  9. Oncology's Trojan Horse: Using Viruses to Battle Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavani, Heena J; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2016-12-01

    In 2016, the American health care system was faced with more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer, and individuals older than 65 years of age will be affected disproportionately. Many older individuals are poor candidates for traditional treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) because of actual or potential treatment-related adverse events. Researchers continuously look for novel therapeutic strategies, and an exciting new one is on the horizon: virotherapy. Viruses' ability to infect and kill human cells makes them promising cancer treatments. The greatest success has been seen in acute lymphocytic leukemia. To date, four genetically engineered oncolytic viruses have been approved globally by several countries' health regulatory agencies, but several challenges remain. Only one, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec), is available in the United States. Treatment-naive patients tend to respond better than patients receiving T-Vec as second-line therapy. Other good candidates for T-Vec include elderly patients who do not tolerate checkpoint inhibitors (the leading immunotherapy in advanced melanoma). Researchers continue to look for ways to increase oncolytic viruses' clinical potency. Once they do, these agents will become effective cancer therapy. GM-CSF = Genetically modified colony-stimulating factor, HIV = Human immunodeficiency virus, HSV-1 = Herpes simplex virus, OV = Oncolytic virus.

  10. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of breast-evaluation for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, human papillomavirus, and markers of basal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Tanuja; Pai, Trupti; Shetty, Omshree; Desai, Sangeeta

    2016-12-01

    This is a largest series of 5 cases of lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LEC) of the breast attempting to look at the expression of basal cytokeratins (CKs), human papillomavirus, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs in these tumors. Five cases were selected after stringent evaluation of all breast carcinomas showing dense lymphoid infiltration. Histologically, all these tumors showed the typical histology except 1 tumor that showed an unusual granulomatous response. All tumors were negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 (triple negative). Three tumors expressed CK5/6 and high-molecular-weight CK, whereas only the case with nodal metastasis expressed CK14. Analysis for in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs and human papillomavirus DNA on paraffin-processed tissues was negative in all tumors. All of these patients received adjuvant therapy. One patient with tumor expressing basal marker, CK5/6, had contralateral breast malignancy after a duration of 53 months of treatment completion. The rest were disease free with the follow-up period in the range of 6 to 105 months. The lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of breast expressed basal CK profile that is more CK5/6 positive than CK14. Analysis of basal markers within these tumors may help in refining the definition of these tumors and in classifying them into prognostically relevant groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The 5'-terminal region of the Aichi virus genome encodes cis-acting replication elements required for positive- and negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-06-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5' end) formed at the 5' end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5'-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5'-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5'-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5'-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5' end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3' end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5' end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis.

  12. The 5′-Terminal Region of the Aichi Virus Genome Encodes cis-Acting Replication Elements Required for Positive- and Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-01-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5′ end) formed at the 5′ end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5′-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5′-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5′-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5′-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5′ end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3′ end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5′ end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis. PMID:15890931

  13. Evaluation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes on efficacy of DNA vaccine encoding glycoprotein B of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsania, Masoud; Bamdad, Taravat; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Kheirandish, Maryam; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Sari, Rohollah Dorostkar; Jamali, Abbas

    2010-02-16

    Many approaches have so far been tried to enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. These include the use of various factors that induce apoptosis or anti-apoptosis effects when co-delivered with DNA vaccine. In the present study, the effects of pro-apoptotic Bax encoding plasmid (pBax) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-X(L) encoding plasmid (pBcl-xl), intradermally co-injected with glycoprotein B (gB) of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 encoding plasmid (pgB) into the C57BL/6 mice were evaluated. Immune responses of the mice to the antigen were assessed by antibody assay, lymphoproliferative responses as well as cytokine and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay. Analysis of the humoral and cellular responses showed that the mice immunized with pBax and pgB induced higher levels of antibody and Interleukin-4 as well as stronger lymphocyte proliferative responses and cytotoxic activity compared to those mice received pgB alone. pBcl-xl when intradermally co-injected with pgB showed no significant enhancement in immune responses comparing to pgB. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Single electrode genosensor for simultaneous determination of sequences encoding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of avian influenza virus type H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Iwona; Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2013-11-05

    The duo-genosensor consisting of two different oligonucleotide probes immobilized covalently on the surface of one gold electrode via Au-S bond formation was used for simultaneous determination of two different oligonucleotide targets. One of the probes, decorated on its 5'-end with ferrocene (SH-ssDNA-Fc), is complementary to the cDNA representing a sequence encoding part of H5 hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus. The second probe, decorated on its 5'-end with methylene blue (SH-ssDNA-MB), is complementary to cDNA representing the fragment of N1 neuraminidase from the same virus. The presence of both probes on the surface of gold electrodes was confirmed with Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The changes in redox activity of both redox active complexes before and after the hybridization process were used as analytical signal. The peak at +400 ± 2 mV was observed in the presence of 40 nM ssDNA used as a target for SH-ssDNA-Fc probe. This peak increased with the increase of concentration of target ssDNA. It indicates the "signal on" mode of analytical signal generation. The peak at -250 ± 4 mV, characteristic for SH-ssDNA-MB probe, was decreasing with the increase of the concentration of the complementary ssDNA target starting from 8 to 100 nM. This indicates the generation of electrochemical signal according to the "signal off" mode. The proposed duo-genosensor is capable of simultaneous, specific, and good sensitivity probing for the sequences derived from genes encoding two main markers of the influenza virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase.

  15. Different haplotypes encode the same protein for independent sources of zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistance in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) production is negatively affected by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Three sources of ZYMV resistance have been commercially deployed and all three resistances are conditioned by a single recessive gene. A vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4-like (VPS4-like)...

  16. Herpesvirus pan encodes a functional homologue of BHRF1, the Epstein-Barr virus v-Bcl-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Tracey

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latently infects about 90% of the human population and is associated with benign and malignant diseases of lymphoid and epithelial origin. BHRF1, an early lytic cycle antigen, is an apoptosis suppressing member of the Bcl-2 family. In vitro studies imply that BHRF1 is dispensable for both virus replication and transformation. However, the fact that BHRF1 is highly conserved not only in all EBV isolates studied to date but also in the analogous viruses Herpesvirus papio and Herpesvirus pan that infect baboons and chimpanzees respectively, suggests BHRF1 may play an important role in vivo. Results Herpesvirus papio BHRF1 has been shown to function in an analogous manner to EBV BHRF1 in response to DNA damaging agents in human keratinocytes. In this study we show that the heterologous expression of the previously uncharacterised Herpesvirus pan BHRF1 in the human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Ramos-BL provides similar anti-apoptotic functions to that of EBV BHRF1 in response to apoptosis triggered by serum withdrawal, etoposide treatment and ultraviolet (UV radiation. We also map the amino acid changes onto the recently solved structure of the EBV BHRF1 and reveal that these changes are unlikely to alter the 3D structure of the protein. Conclusions These findings show that the functional conservation of BHRF1 extends to a lymphoid background, suggesting that the primate virus proteins interact with cellular proteins that are themselves highly conserved across the higher primates. Further weight is added to this suggestion when we show that the difference in amino acid sequences map to regions on the 3D structure of EBV BHRF1 that are unlikely to change the conformation of the protein.

  17. Suppressive Effects of Chronic Stress on Influenza Virus Protection after Vaccination with Plasmid DNA-Encoded Nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezam, Fatemeh Sadat; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Abdoli, Asghar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shenagari, Mohammad; Gholami, Shima; Sohani, Hesam; Rahmatollahi, Hamidreza; Jamali, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a highly infectious and acute respiratory disease caused by an infection of the host respiratory tract mucosa by the influenza virus. The use of DNA vaccines that express conserved genes such as nucleoprotein (NP) represents a new method of vaccination against influenza. In this study, the effect of chronic stress on the efficiency of this type of vaccine has been evaluated in a mouse model. The NP DNA vaccine was administered intradermally 3 times on days 0, 3 and 6 to stressed and nonstressed male BALB/c mice. Two weeks after the last immunization, half of these mice were challenged with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) influenza virus and were weighed for 12 days, and their mortality rate was assessed during this period. The cellular immune response of the other half of the mice was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay. The results indicate a significant reduction in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response of stressed mice in comparison with unstressed mice. Also, the percentage of weight loss and mortality after the challenge in stressed mice was significantly increased compared to the other group. These results indicate that the NP DNA vaccine is not able to induce any effective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against influenza virus in stressed mice and cannot induce protective immunity against influenza infection in this group of mice. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Mutational analysis of two highly conserved motifs in the silencing suppressor encoded by tomato spotted wilt virus (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ying; Bag, Sudeep; Mitter, Neena; Turina, Massimo; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-06-01

    Tospoviruses cause serious economic losses to a wide range of field and horticultural crops on a global scale. The NSs gene encoded by tospoviruses acts as a suppressor of host plant defense. We identified amino acid motifs that are conserved in all of the NSs proteins of tospoviruses for which the sequence is known. Using tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) as a model, the role of these motifs in suppressor activity of NSs was investigated. Using site-directed point mutations in two conserved motifs, glycine, lysine and valine/threonine (GKV/T) at positions 181-183 and tyrosine and leucine (YL) at positions 412-413, and an assay to measure the reversal of gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c, we show that substitutions (K182 to A, and L413 to A) in these motifs abolished suppressor activity of the NSs protein, indicating that these two motifs are essential for the RNAi suppressor function of tospoviruses.

  19. Characterization of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 Prophages and Virus-Encoded DNA Methyltransferases in the Light of Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Sinorhizobial Virome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Decewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Sinorhizobium/Ensifer mostly groups nitrogen-fixing bacteria that create root or stem nodules on leguminous plants and transform atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which improves the productivity of the plants. Although these biotechnologically-important bacteria are commonly found in various soil environments, little is known about their phages. In this study, the genome of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 isolated from a heavy-metal-contaminated copper mine in Poland was investigated for the presence of prophages and DNA methyltransferase-encoding genes. In addition to the previously identified temperate phage, ΦLM21, and the phage-plasmid, pLM21S1, the analysis revealed the presence of three prophage regions. Moreover, four novel phage-encoded DNA methyltransferase (MTase genes were identified and the enzymes were characterized. It was shown that two of the identified viral MTases methylated the same target sequence (GANTC as cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM of the bacterial host strain, LM21. This discovery was recognized as an example of the evolutionary convergence between enzymes of sinorhizobial viruses and their host, which may play an important role in virus cycle. In the last part of the study, thorough comparative analyses of 31 sinorhizobial (prophages (including active sinorhizobial phages and novel putative prophages retrieved and manually re-annotated from Sinorhizobium spp. genomes were performed. The networking analysis revealed the presence of highly conserved proteins (e.g., holins and endolysins and a high diversity of viral integrases. The analysis also revealed a large number of viral DNA MTases, whose genes were frequently located within the predicted replication modules of analyzed prophages, which may suggest their important regulatory role. Summarizing, complex analysis of the phage protein similarity network enabled a new insight into overall sinorhizobial virome diversity.

  20. Talimogene Laherparepvec (T-VEC) and Other Oncolytic Viruses for the Treatment of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommareddy, Praveen K; Patel, Anand; Hossain, Saamia; Kaufman, Howard L

    2017-02-01

    Many mammalian viruses have properties that can be commandeered for the treatment of cancer. These characteristics include preferential infection and replication in tumor cells, the initiation of tumor cell lysis, and the induction of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Furthermore, viruses can be genetically engineered to reduce pathogenicity and increase immunogenicity resulting in minimally toxic therapeutic agents. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC; Imlygic™), is a genetically modified herpes simplex virus, type 1, and is the first oncolytic virus therapy to be approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma by the US FDA. T-VEC is attenuated by the deletion of the herpes neurovirulence viral genes and enhanced for immunogenicity by the deletion of the viral ICP47 gene. Immunogenicity is further supported by expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene, which helps promote the priming of T cell responses. T-VEC demonstrated significant improvement in durable response rate, objective response rate, and progression-free survival in a randomized phase III clinical trial for patients with advanced melanoma. This review will discuss the optimal selection of patients for such treatment and describe how therapy is optimally delivered. We will also discuss future directions for oncolytic virus immunotherapy, which will likely include combination T-VEC clinical trials, expansion of T-VEC to other types of non-melanoma skin cancers, and renewed efforts at oncolytic virus drug development with other viruses.

  1. [Cloning of y3 gene encoding a tobacco mosaic virus inhibitor from Coprinus comatus and transformation to Nicotiana tabacum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueren; He, Tao; Zhang, Gaina; Hao, Jianguo; Jia, Jingfen

    2010-02-01

    The protein Y3 was a TMV inhibitor which was encoded by y3 gene. The aim of this work was to clone the full length of y3 gene from Coprinus comatus and to reveal its inhibitory function to TMV in in vivo conditions. We amplified the unknown 5'- terminal cDNA sequence of y3 gene with 5'- Full RACE Core Set (TaKaRa), obtained the full length of this gene by RT-PCR, constructed the expression plasmid pCAMBIA1301-y3 via inserting gene y3 sequence, CaMV 35 S promoter, and NOS terminator at MCS and transformed it into Nicotiana tabacum via agrobacterium-mediation. The full length of y3 gene was 534 bps including one ORF encoding 130 amino acid residues (GenBank Accession No. GQ859168; EMBL FN546262). The cDNA sequence and its deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity (94%) to the published fragment of y3 gene sequence. Northern blot analysis proved the transcription of y3 gene in transgenic tobacco plants. The transgenic plants inoculated with TMV expressed the inhibitory activity to TMV. We cloned the full length of y3 gene and obtained transgenic tobacco plants. The expression of y3 gene in transgenic plants improved the inhibitory activity to TMV. The cloning and expression analysis of y3 gene might provide background information for future studying of y3 gene.

  2. Bioinformatics analysis and characteristics of VP23 encoded by the newly identified UL18 gene of duck enteritis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the predicted information about structures and functions of VP23 encoded by the newly identified DEV UL18 gene through bioinformatics softwares and tools. The DEV UL18 was predicted to encode a polypeptide with 322 amino acids, termed VP23, with a putative molecular mass of 35.250 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (PI) of 8.37, no signal peptide and transmembrane domain in the polypeptide. The prediction of subcellular localization showed that the DEV-VP23 located at endoplasmic reticulum with 33.3%, mitochondrial with 22.2%, extracellular, including cell wall with 11.1%, vesicles of secretory system with 11.1%, Golgi with 11.1%, and plasma membrane with 11.1%. The acid sequence of analysis showed that the potential antigenic epitopes are situated in 45-47, 53-60, 102-105, 173-180, 185-189, 260-265, 267-271, and 292-299 amino acids. All the consequences inevitably provide some insights for further research about the DEV-VP23 and also provide a fundament for further study on the the new type clinical diagnosis of DEV and can be used for the development of new DEV vaccine.

  3. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  4. Increased motoneuron survival and improved neuromuscular function in transgenic ALS mice after intraspinal injection of an adeno-associated virus encoding Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, M; Hottinger, A; Paterna, J C; Zurn, A D; Aebischer, P; Büeler, H

    2000-03-22

    Mutations in the gene encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) underlie some familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of cortical, brainstem and spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice over- expressing a mutated form of human SOD1 containing a Gly-->Ala substitution at position 93 (SOD1(G93A)) develop a severe, progressive motoneuron disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) to transfer neuroprotective molecules in this animal ALS model. Initial experiments showed that injection of an rAAV vector encoding green fluorescent protein unilaterally into the lumbar spinal cord of wild-type mice leads to expression of the reporter gene in 34.7 +/- 5.2% of the motoneurons surrounding the injection site. Intraspinal injection of an rAAV encoding the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2 in SOD1 (G93A) mice resulted in sustained bcl-2 expression in motoneurons and significantly increased the number of surviving motoneurons at the end-stage of disease. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude elicited by nerve stimulation and recorded by electromyographic measurements was higher in the rAAV-bcl-2-treated group than in controls. Local bcl-2 expression in spinal motoneurons delayed the appearance of signs of motor deficiency but was not sufficient to prolong the survival of SOD1 (G93A) mice. To our know-ledge, this study describes the first successful transduction and protection of spinal motoneurons by direct gene transfer in a model of progressive motoneuron disease. Our results support the use of AAVs for the delivery of protective genes to spinal cord moto-neurons as a possible way to enhance motoneuron survival and repair.

  5. Replication-Competent Influenza A Virus That Encodes a Split-Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged PB2 Polymerase Subunit Allows Live-Cell Imaging of the Virus Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, Sergiy V.; Moisy, Dorothée; Munier, Sandie; Schraidt, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the intracellular trafficking of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins are currently limited by the lack of a method enabling their visualization during infection in single cells. This is largely due to the difficulty of encoding fluorescent fusion proteins within the viral genome. To circumvent this limitation, we used the split-green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system (S. Cabantous, T. C. Terwilliger, and G. S. Waldo, Nat. Biotechnol. 23:102–107, 2005) to produce a quasi-wild-type recombinant A/WSN/33/influenza virus which allows expression of individually fluorescent PB2 polymerase subunits in infected cells. The viral PB2 proteins were fused to the 16 C-terminal amino acids of the GFP, whereas the large transcomplementing GFP fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cultured cells that were permissive to infection. This system was used to characterize the intranuclear dynamics of PB2 by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and to visualize the trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) by dynamic light microscopy in live infected cells. Following nuclear export, vRNPs showed a transient pericentriolar accumulation and intermittent rapid (∼1 μm/s), directional movements in the cytoplasm, dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments. Our data establish the potential of split-GFP-based recombinant viruses for the tracking of viral proteins during a quasi-wild-type infection. This new virus, or adaptations of it, will be of use in elucidating many aspects of influenza virus host cell interactions as well as in screening for new antiviral compounds. Furthermore, the existence of cell lines stably expressing the complementing GFP fragment will facilitate applications to many other viral and nonviral systems. PMID:22114331

  6. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and evaluation of protein expression in a recombinant plasmid encoding epitope gp 350/220 of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmah, Karimatul; Dluha, Nurul; Anyndita, Nadya V. M.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin; Widodo

    2017-05-01

    The Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) causes severe infections that may lead to cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Development of effective EBV vaccines is necessary to prevent the virus spreading throughout the community. TheEBV has a surface protein gp 350/220, which serves as an antigen to help interact with host cells. Epitopes of the protein can potentially serve as bases for a vaccine. In a previous study, we have found a conserved epitope of gp 350/220 from all strains EBV through an in silico approach. The aim of this study is to design and overproduce a recombinant peptide of epitope gp 350/220 in E. coli. DNA encoding the conserved epitope was synthesized and cloned into plasmid pET-22b(+); the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli strains DH5α and BL21. The transformed plasmid DNA was isolated and confirmed by restriction using XbaI and PstI enzymes followed by DNA sequencing. Protein expression was induced by isopropyl-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) with final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 1, and 2 mM in consecutive times. An osmotic shock method was used to isolate protein from periplasmic fraction of E. coli DH5α and BL21. The SDS-PAGE analysis was carried out to detect peptide target (3.4 kDa). Based on this result, the induction process did not work properly, and thus needs further investigation.

  8. Efficient Gene Suppression in Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Using Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Encoding Short-Hairpin RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Takashi; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a powerful tool used to induce loss-of-function phenotypes through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules have been used to target the central nervous system (CNS) and are expected to have clinical utility against refractory neurodegenerative diseases. However, siRNA is characterized by low transduction efficiency, insufficient inhibition of gene expression, and short duration of therapeutic effects, and is thus not ideal for treatment of neural tissues and diseases. To address these problems, viral delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassettes that support more efficient and long-lasting transduction into target tissues is expected to be a promising delivery tool. Various types of gene therapy vectors have been developed, such as adenovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), herpes simplex virus and lentivirus; however, AAV is particularly advantageous because of its relative lack of immunogenicity and lack of chromosomal integration. In human clinical trials, recombinant AAV vectors are relatively safe and well-tolerated. In particular, serotype 9 of AAV (AAV9) vectors show the highest tropism for neural tissue and can cross the blood-brain barrier, and we have shown that intrathecal delivery of AAV9 yields relatively high gene transduction into dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord. This chapter describes how to successfully use AAV vectors encoding shRNA in vivo, particularly for RNA interference in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  9. The phosphoprotein genes of measles viruses from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis cases encode functional as well as non-functional proteins and display reduced editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, E L; Rennick, L J; Weissbrich, B; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Duprex, W P; Rima, B K

    2016-01-04

    Products expressed from the second (P/V/C) gene are important in replication and abrogating innate immune responses during acute measles virus (MV) infection. Thirteen clone sets were derived from the P/V/C genes of measles virus (MV) RNA extracted from brains of a unique collection of seven cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) caused by persistent MV in the central nervous system (CNS). Whether these functions are fully maintained when MV replicates in the CNS has not been previously determined. Co-transcriptional editing of the P mRNAs by non-template insertion of guanine (G) nucleotides, which generates mRNAs encoding the viral V protein, occurs much less frequently (9%) in the SSPE derived samples than during the acute infection (30-50%). Thus it is likely that less V protein, which is involved in combatting the innate immune response, is produced. The P genes in MV from SSPE cases were not altered by biased hypermutation but exhibited a high degree of variation within each case. Most but not all SSPE derived phospho-(P) proteins were functional in mini genome replication/transcription assays. An eight amino acid truncation of the carboxyl-terminus made the P protein non-functional while the insertion of an additional glycine residue by insertion of G nucleotides at the editing site had no effect on protein function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Subsurface metagenomes uncover a vast repertoire of hypervariable proteins encoded by genetic elements in uncultivated organisms and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B. G.; Burstein, D.; Castelle, C. J.; Banfield, J. F.; Valentine, D. L.; Miller, J. F.; Ghosh, P.; Handa, S.; Arambula, D.; Czornyj, E.; Thomas, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    Uncultivated microorganisms primarily account for the remarkable diversity harbored in subsurface environments and represent an expansive subset of the current Tree of Life. Recent metagenomic efforts to investigate subsurface biomes have unveiled an array of bacterial and archaeal candidate phyla, whose members have minimal genomes and an apparent host-dependent existence. Still, little is known about the adaptive strategies that mediate host interactions in these organisms or their viruses. Genomic features known as diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), which guide variability into targeted genes, were recently discovered in two single-cell genomes of uncultivated nanoarchaea, and independently in the genome of a marine virus from methane seep sediments. These prodigious drivers of protein hypervariability were first identified as the key force behind phage tail fiber diversification for binding different host receptors. Since their discovery, approximately 500 new DGRs have been found across a wide range of bacterial genomes representing various niches. We identified an unexpected 1136 distinct diversifiers from a single groundwater environment in reconstructed microbial genomes and genome fragments. The newly detected DGRs - predominantly linked to members of the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) - appear to target genes associated with cell-cell attachment, signaling, and transcription regulation. These findings suggest that targeted protein diversification may have an important role in regulating symbiotic or parasitic associations in groundwater microbiomes.

  11. Familial pulmonary alveolar proteinosis caused by mutations in CSF2RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Rubin, Bruce K; Nogee, Lawrence M; Wood, Robert E; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Smolarek, Teresa; Dishop, Megan K; Wert, Susan E; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Grabowski, Gregory; Carey, Brenna C; Stevens, Carrie; van der Loo, Johannes C M; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2008-11-24

    Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by accumulation of surfactant in the lungs that is presumed to be mediated by disruption of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling based on studies in genetically modified mice. The effects of GM-CSF are mediated by heterologous receptors composed of GM-CSF binding (GM-CSF-Ralpha) and nonbinding affinity-enhancing (GM-CSF-Rbeta) subunits. We describe PAP, failure to thrive, and increased GM-CSF levels in two sisters aged 6 and 8 yr with abnormalities of both GM-CSF-Ralpha-encoding alleles (CSF2RA). One was a 1.6-Mb deletion in the pseudoautosomal region of one maternal X chromosome encompassing CSF2RA. The other, a point mutation in the paternal X chromosome allele encoding a G174R substitution, altered an N-linked glycosylation site within the cytokine binding domain and glycosylation of GM-CSF-Ralpha, severely reducing GM-CSF binding, receptor signaling, and GM-CSF-dependent functions in primary myeloid cells. Transfection of cloned cDNAs faithfully reproduced the signaling defect at physiological GM-CSF concentrations. Interestingly, at high GM-CSF concentrations similar to those observed in the index patient, signaling was partially rescued, thereby providing a molecular explanation for the slow progression of disease in these children. These results establish that GM-CSF signaling is critical for surfactant homeostasis in humans and demonstrate that mutations in CSF2RA cause familial PAP.

  12. Coimmunization with IL-15 plasmid enhances the longevity of CD8 T cells induced by DNA encoding hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Dong, Sheng-Fu; Sun, Shu-Hui; Wang, Yuan; Li, Guang-Di; Qu, Di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the feasibility of delivering a plasmid encoding IL-15 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for improving the immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine. METHODS: We used RT-PCR based strategies to develop IL-15 expression constructs. We first confirmed that the gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli due to the poor expression of IL-15. Then the bioactivity of IL-15 plasmid expression product was identified by CTLL-2 proliferation assay. One hundred micrograms of DNA from each of the IL-15 eukaryotic expressed plasmid and the recombinant plasmid harboring DNA encoding the 144 amino acids of the N-terminus of HBV core gene (abbreviated pHBc144) was used to co-immunize C57 BL/6 mice. The titer of anti-HBcIgG was detected by ELISA and the antigen-specific CD8+ T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells) were detected by intracellular cytokine staining at different time points. RESULTS: After co-immunization by pIL-15 and pHBc144 DNA vaccine the antigen-specific CD8+ cells of mice increased gradually, the first peak of immune response appeared 14 d later, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ Ts cells decreased gradually and maintained at a steady level in 3 mo. After boosting, the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells reached the second peak 10 d later with a double of the 1st peak, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells decreased slowly. IL-15 as a gene adjuvant had no significant effect on humoral immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine, but increased the memory antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine. CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine constructed by HBc Ag 1-144 amino acid induces effective cell immunity, and cytokine plasmid-delivered IL-15 enhances the longevity of CD8+ T cells. PMID:16937447

  13. Systemic versus local responses in melanoma patients treated with talimogene laherparepvec from a multi-institutional phase II study

    OpenAIRE

    Howard L. Kaufman; Amatruda, Thomas; Reid, Tony; Gonzalez, Rene; Glaspy, John; Whitman, Eric; Harrington, Kevin; Nemunaitis, John; Zloza, Andrew; Wolf, Michael; Senzer, Neil N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously reported that talimogene laherparepvec, an oncolytic herpes virus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), resulted in an objective response rate of 26?% in patients with advanced melanoma in a phase II clinical trial. The response of individual lesions, however, was not reported. Since talimogene laherparepvec is thought to mediate anti-tumor activity through both direct tumor cytolysis and induction of systemic tumor-specific immunity, we ...

  14. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  15. Hemopoietic stem cells in rhesus monkeys : surface antigens, radiosensitivity, and responses to GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wielenga (Jenne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractRhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were bred at the Primate Center TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands!. Both male and female animals were used for the experiments. The monkeys weighed 2.5-4 kg and were 2-4 years old at the time of the experiment. They were all typed for RhLA-A, -B and -DR

  16. GM-CSF Upregulated in Rheumatoid Arthritis Reverses Cognitive Impairment and Amyloidosis in Alzheimer Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Tim D.; Bennett, Steven P.; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W.; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients’ usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA’s protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in...

  17. BamHI-A rightward frame 1, an Epstein–Barr virus-encoded oncogene and immune modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, Eveline K; Le Large, Tessa Y S; Greijer, Astrid E; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) causes several benign and malignant disorders of lymphoid and epithelial origin. EBV-related tumors display distinct patterns of viral latent gene expression, of which the BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is selectively expressed in carcinomas, regulated by cellular differentiation factors including ΔNp63α. BARF1 functions as a viral oncogene, immortalizing and transforming epithelial cells of different origin by acting as a mitogenic growth factor, inducing cyclin-D expression, and up-regulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2, stimulating host cell growth and survival. In addition, secreted hexameric BARF1 has immune evasive properties, functionally corrupting macrophage colony stimulating factor, as supported by recent functional and structural data. Therefore, BARF1, an intracellular and secreted protein, not only has multiple pathogenic functions but also can function as a target for immune responses. Deciphering the role of BARF1 in EBV biology will contribute to novel diagnostic and treatment options for EBV-driven carcinomas. Herein, we discuss recent insights on the regulation of BARF1 expression and aspects of structure-function relating to its oncogenic and immune suppressive properties. © 2013 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23996634

  18. Small molecules targeting hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A cause subcellular redistribution of their target: insights into compound modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targett-Adams, Paul; Graham, Emily J S; Middleton, Jenny; Palmer, Amy; Shaw, Stephen M; Lavender, Helen; Brain, Philip; Tran, Thien Duc; Jones, Lyn H; Wakenhut, Florian; Stammen, Blanda; Pryde, David; Pickford, Chris; Westby, Mike

    2011-07-01

    The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients consists of lengthy treatment with interferon and ribavirin. To increase the effectiveness of HCV therapy, future regimens will incorporate multiple direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs. Recently, the HCV-encoded NS5A protein has emerged as a promising DAA target. Compounds targeting NS5A exhibit remarkable potency in vitro and demonstrate early clinical promise, suggesting that NS5A inhibitors could feature in future DAA combination therapies. Since the mechanisms through which these molecules operate are unknown, we have used NS5A inhibitors as tools to investigate their modes of action. Analysis of replicon-containing cells revealed dramatic phenotypic alterations in NS5A localization following treatment with NS5A inhibitors; NS5A was redistributed from the endoplasmic reticulum to lipid droplets. The NS5A relocalization did not occur in cells treated with other classes of HCV inhibitors, and NS5A-targeting molecules did not cause similar alterations in the localization of other HCV-encoded proteins. Time course analysis of the redistribution of NS5A revealed that the transfer of protein to lipid droplets was concomitant with the onset of inhibition, as judged by the kinetic profiles for these compounds. Furthermore, analysis of the kinetic profile of inhibition for a panel of test molecules permitted the separation of compounds into different kinetic classes based on their modes of action. Results from this approach suggested that NS5A inhibitors perturbed the function of new replication complexes, rather than acting on preformed complexes. Taken together, our data reveal novel biological consequences of NS5A inhibition, which may help enable the development of future assay platforms for the identification of new and/or different NS5A inhibitors.

  19. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  20. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  1. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schnee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS. In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G encoding messenger RNA (mRNA to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator.

  3. A herpes simplex virus type 2-encoded microRNA promotes tumor cell metastasis by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Liu, Shupeng; Zhou, Zhenhua; Yan, Hongli; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-05-01

    Certain viruses use microRNAs to regulate the expression of their own genes, host genes, or both. A number of microRNAs expressed by herpes simplex virus type 2 have been confirmed by previous studies. However, whether these microRNAs play a role in the metastasis of lung cancers and how these viral microRNAs precisely regulated the tumor biological process in lung cancer bone metastasis remain obscure. We recently identified the high expression of an acutely and latently expressed viral microRNA, Hsv2-miR-H9-5p, encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript through microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses which compared the expression of microRNAs in bone metastasis from lung cancer with primary lung cancers. We now reported that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p was highly expressed in bone metastasis and closely associated with pathological and metastatic processes of lung cancers. The functions of Hsv2-miR-H9-5p were determined by overexpression which results in an increase in survival, migration, and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro. We determined that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p directly targeted SOCS2 mechanistically by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Then, we investigated the functions of SOCS2 in the progress of lung cancers. Reduction of SOCS2 dosage by hsv2-miR-H9-5p induced increased migration and invasion of lung cancer cells. Overexpression of SOCS2 inverted these phenotypes generated by hsv2-miR-H9-5p, indicating the potential roles of SOCS2 in Hsv2-miR-H9-5p-driven metastasis in lung cancers. The results highlighted that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p regulated and contributed to bone metastasis of lung cancers. We proposed that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p could be used as a potential target in lung cancer therapy.

  4. Optical imaging: bacteria, viruses, and mammalian cells encoding light-emitting proteins reveal the locations of primary tumors and metastases in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong A; Timiryasova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qian; Beltz, Richard; Szalay, Aladar A

    2003-11-01

    Early detection of tumors and their metastases is crucial for the prognosis of cancer treatment. Traditionally, tumor detection is achieved by various methods, including magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography. With the recent cloning, cellular expression, and real-time imaging of light-emitting proteins, such as Renilla luciferase (Ruc), bacterial luciferase (Lux), firefly luciferase (Luc), green fluorescent protein (GFP), or Ruc-GFP fusion protein, significant efforts have been focused on using these marker proteins for tumor detection. It has also been demonstrated that certain bacteria, viruses, and mammalian cells (BVMC), when administered systemically, are able to gain entry and replicate selectively in tumors. In addition, many tissue/tumor specific promoters have been cloned which allow transgene expression specifically in tumor tissues. Therefore, when light-emitting protein encoded BVMC are injected systemically into rodents, tumor-specific marker gene expression is achieved and is detected in real time based on light emission. Consequently, the locations of primary tumors and previously unknown metastases in animals are revealed in vivo. In the future it will likely be feasible to use engineered light-emitting BVMC as probes for tumor detection and as gene-delivery vehicles in vivo for cancer therapy.

  5. Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interacts with Tat and Activates the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Teresa S.; Subramanian, Chitra; Cotter, Murray A.; Robert A. Thomas; Robertson, Erle S.

    2001-01-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is constitutively expressed in cells infected with the Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV), also referred to as human herpesvirus 8. KSHV is tightly associated with body cavity-based lymphomas (BCBLs) in immunocompromised patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). LANA, encoded by open reading frame 73 of KSHV, is one of a small subset of proteins expressed during latent infection and was shown to be important in tethering the...

  6. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  7. Analysis of Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in North-Eastern India: A Chromogenic in Situ Hybridization Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Anjan; Raphael, Vandana; Shunyu, N-Brian; Khonglah, Yookarin; Mishra, Jaya; Jitani, Ankit-Kumar; Medhi, Jayanta

    2016-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common cancer in the North-East region of India. Though the role of environmental contributors of NPC in the North-Eastern part of India is firmly established, EBV as an etiological agent in the region remains unexplored. Fifty-one patients, who presented at the department of ENT, NEIGRIHMS and were confirmed as NPC upon histopathological examination, were included in the study. Chromogenic in-situ hybridization (CISH) was used for the evaluation of EBER (Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA). Presence of nuclear signals was taken as positive for EBER expression. EBER status was correlated with various clinicopathological parameters like age, sex, dietary habits, histological types of NPC, and ethnicity of the patients. The age range of the study group was 25 to 70 years with a mean age of 44.64 years and a male:female ratio of 3:2. Non-keratinizing undifferentiated type of NPC was the most common histological type. EBV was positive in 59% (30/51) of our cases. It showed a statistically significant correlation with the Naga community (P=0.01), with consumption of smoked food (P=0.02), and cigarette smoking (P=0.02). There was no correlation of EBV with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, stage, and histology. Our result indicates that EBV may be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of NPC in this region of India. So apart from lifestyle modification, a future study for a screening test for EBV viral load even in asymptomatic patients may be considered, for determination of disease susceptibility, early diagnosis, and proper management.

  8. Analysis of Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in North-Eastern India: A Chromogenic in Situ Hybridization Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Saikia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common cancer in the North-East region of India. Though the role of environmental contributors of NPC in the North-Eastern part of India is firmly established, EBV as an etiological agent in the region remains unexplored. Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients, who presented at the department of ENT, NEIGRIHMS and were confirmed as NPC upon histopathological examination, were included in the study. Chromogenic in-situ hybridization (CISH was used for the evaluation of EBER (Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA. Presence of nuclear signals was taken as positive for EBER expression. EBER status was correlated with various clinicopathological parameters like age, sex, dietary habits, histological types of NPC, and ethnicity of the patients. Results: The age range of the study group was 25 to 70 years with a mean age of 44.64 years and a male:female ratio of 3:2. Non-keratinizing undifferentiated type of NPC was the most common histological type. EBV was positive in 59% (30/51 of our cases. It showed a statistically significant correlation with the Naga community (P=0.01, with consumption of smoked food (P=0.02, and cigarette smoking (P=0.02. There was no correlation of EBV with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, stage, and histology. Conclusion: Our result indicates that EBV may be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of NPC in this region of India. So apart from lifestyle modification, a future study for a screening test for EBV viral load even in asymptomatic patients may be considered, for determination of disease susceptibility, early diagnosis, and proper management.

  9. Protein transfer-mediated surface engineering to adjuvantate virus-like nanoparticles for enhanced anti-viral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaina M; Kim, Min-Chul; Vartabedian, Vincent F; Lee, Yu-Na; He, Sara; Song, Jae-Min; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Amaram, Nikhil; Lukacher, Anna; Montemagno, Carlo D; Compans, Richard W; Kang, Sang-Moo; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) are a promising nanoparticle platform to develop safe vaccines for many viruses. Herein, we describe a novel and rapid protein transfer process to enhance the potency of enveloped VLPs by decorating influenza VLPs with exogenously added glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored immunostimulatory molecules (GPI-ISMs). With protein transfer, the level of GPI-ISM incorporation onto VLPs is controllable by varying incubation time and concentration of GPI-ISMs added. ISM incorporation was dependent upon the presence of a GPI-anchor and incorporated proteins were stable and functional for at least 4weeks when stored at 4°C. Vaccinating mice with GPI-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-incorporated-VLPs induced stronger antibody responses and better protection against a heterologous influenza virus challenge than unmodified VLPs. Thus, VLPs can be enriched with ISMs by protein transfer to increase the potency and breadth of the immune response, which has implications in developing effective nanoparticle-based vaccines against a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses. The inherent problem with current influenza vaccines is that they do not generate effective cross-protection against heterologous viral strains. In this article, the authors described the development of virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) as influenza vaccines with enhanced efficacy for cross-protection, due to an easy protein transfer modification process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland); Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga [Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems (Germany); Summerfield, Artur, E-mail: artur.summerfield@ivi.admin.ch [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  11. Cationic lipid-formulated DNA vaccine against hepatitis B virus: immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding small and large surface antigen in comparison to a licensed protein vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Endmann

    Full Text Available Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV based on the small (S hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible strategies to improve the efficacy of HBV vaccines. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S or the large (L protein of HBsAg in mice and pigs. In both animal models, vectors encoding the secretion-competent S protein induced stronger humoral responses than vectors encoding the L protein, which was shown to be retained mainly intracellularly despite the presence of a heterologous secretion signal. In pigs, SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S protein elicited an immune response of the same magnitude as the licensed protein vaccine Engerix-B, with S protein-specific antibody levels significantly higher than those considered protective in humans, and lasting for at least six months after the third immunization. Thus, our results provide not only the proof of concept for the SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vector approach but also confirm that with a cationic-lipid formulation, a DNA vaccine at a relatively low dose can elicit an immune response similar to a human dose of an aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted protein vaccine in large animals.

  12. Systematic review of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeller, Christoph; Michielin, Olivier; Ascierto, Paolo A; Szabo, Zsolt; Blank, Christian U

    2016-09-01

    Several immunomodulatory checkpoint inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma, including ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic virus to gain regulatory approval in the USA; it is also approved in Europe. Talimogene laherparepvec expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and with other GM-CSF-expressing oncolytic viruses in development, understanding the clinical relevance of this cytokine in treating advanced melanoma is important. Results of trials of GM-CSF in melanoma have been mixed, and while GM-CSF has the potential to promote anti-tumor responses, some preclinical data suggest that GM-CSF may sometimes promote tumor growth. GM-CSF has not been approved as a melanoma treatment. We undertook a systematic literature review of studies of GM-CSF in patients with advanced melanoma (stage IIIB-IV). Of the 503 articles identified, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. Most studies investigated the use of GM-CSF in combination with another treatment, such as peptide vaccines or chemotherapy, or as an adjuvant to surgery. Some clinical benefit was reported in patients who received GM-CSF as an adjuvant to surgery, or in combination with other treatments. In general, outcomes for patients receiving peptide vaccines were not improved with the addition of GM-CSF. GM-CSF may be a valuable therapeutic adjuvant; however, further studies are needed, particularly head-to-head comparisons, to confirm the optimal dosing regimen and clinical effectiveness in patients with advanced melanoma.

  13. L-A-lus, a New Variant of the L-A Totivirus Found in Wine Yeasts with Klus Killer Toxin-Encoding Mlus Double-Stranded RNA: Possible Role of Killer Toxin-Encoding Satellite RNAs in the Evolution of Their Helper Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cousiño, Nieves; Gómez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Yeast killer viruses are widely distributed in nature. Several toxins encoded in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) satellites of the L-A totivirus have been described, including K1, K2, K28, and Klus. The 4.6-kb L-A genome encodes the Gag major structural protein that forms a 39-nm icosahedral virion and Gag-Pol, a minor fusion protein. Gag-Pol has transcriptase and replicase activities responsible for maintenance of L-A (or its satellite RNAs). Recently we reported a new killer toxin, Klus. The L-A virus in Klus strains showed poor hybridization to known L-A probes, suggesting substantial differences in their sequences. Here we report the characterization of this new L-A variant named L-A-lus. At the nucleotide level, L-A and L-A-lus showed only 73% identity, a value that increases to 86% in the amino acid composition of Gag or Gag-Pol. Two regions in their genomes, however, the frameshifting region between Gag and Pol and the encapsidation signal, are 100% identical, implying the importance of these two cis signals in the virus life cycle. L-A-lus shows higher resistance than L-A to growth at high temperature or to in vivo expression of endo- or exonucleases. L-A-lus also has wider helper activity, being able to maintain not only Mlus but also M1 or a satellite RNA of L-A called X. In a screening of 31 wine strains, we found that none of them had L-A; they carried either L-A-lus or a different L-A variant in K2 strains. Our data show that distinct M killer viruses are specifically associated with L-As with different nucleotide compositions, suggesting coevolution. PMID:23728812

  14. Oncolytic viruses and their application to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2014-04-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) selectively replicate and kill cancer cells and spread within the tumor, while not harming normal tissue. In addition to this direct oncolytic activity, OVs are also very effective at inducing immune responses to themselves and to the infected tumor cells. OVs encompass a broad diversity of DNA and RNA viruses that are naturally cancer selective or can be genetically engineered. OVs provide a diverse platform for immunotherapy; they act as in situ vaccines and can be armed with immunomodulatory transgenes or combined with other immunotherapies. However, the interactions of OVs with the immune system may affect therapeutic outcomes in opposing fashions: negatively by limiting virus replication and/or spread, or positively by inducing antitumor immune responses. Many aspects of the OV-tumor/host interaction are important in delineating the effectiveness of therapy: (i) innate immune responses and the degree of inflammation induced; (ii) types of virus-induced cell death; (iii) inherent tumor physiology, such as infiltrating and resident immune cells, vascularity/hypoxia, lymphatics, and stromal architecture; and (iv) tumor cell phenotype, including alterations in IFN signaling, oncogenic pathways, cell surface immune markers [MHC, costimulatory, and natural killer (NK) receptors], and the expression of immunosuppressive factors. Recent clinical trials with a variety of OVs, especially those expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have demonstrated efficacy and induction of antitumor immune responses in the absence of significant toxicity. Manipulating the balance between antivirus and antitumor responses, often involving overlapping immune pathways, will be critical to the clinical success of OVs.

  15. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidwood, Lynne; Graham, Sheila V; Graham, Alex; Conner, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs) have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVex(GM-CSF)]), is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with "standard-of-care" drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with "standard-of-care" drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report such studies of oncolytic HSV in combination with other drugs, and we review their findings here. Viral interactions with cellular hosts are complex and frequently involve intracellular signaling networks, thus creating diverse opportunities for synergistic or additive combinations with many anticancer drugs. We discuss potential mechanisms that may lead to synergistic interactions.

  16. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  18. Immunogenicity of oncolytic vaccinia viruses JX-GFP and TG6002 in a human melanoma in vitro model: studying immunogenic cell death, dendritic cell maturation and interaction with cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich B

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available B Heinrich,1 J Klein,1 M Delic,1 K Goepfert,1 V Engel,1 L Geberzahn,1 M Lusky,2 P Erbs,2 X Preville,3 M Moehler1 1First Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany; 2Transgene SA, Illkirch-Graffenstaden, 3Amoneta Diagnostics, Huningue, France Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging immunotherapeutic modality for cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses with genetic modifications can further enhance the oncolytic effects on tumor cells and stimulate antitumor immunity. The oncolytic vaccinia viruses JX-594-GFP+/hGM-CSF (JX-GFP and TG6002 are genetically modified by secreting granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF or transforming 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC into 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. We compared their properties to kill tumor cells and induce an immunogenic type of cell death in a human melanoma cell model using SK29-MEL melanoma cells. Their influence on human immune cells, specifically regarding the activation of dendritic cells (DCs and the interaction with the autologous cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL clone, was investigated. Melanoma cells were infected with either JX-GFP or TG6002 alone or in combination with 5-FC and 5-FU. The influence of viral infection on cell viability followed a time- and multiplicity of infection dependent manner. Combination of virus treatment with 5-FU resulted in stronger reduction of cell viability. TG6002 in combination with 5-FC did not significantly strengthen the reduction of cell viability in this setting. Expression of calreticulin and high mobility group 1 protein (HMGB1, markers of immunogenic cell death (ICD, could be detected after viral infection. Accordingly, DC maturation was noted after viral oncolysis. DCs presented stronger expression of activation and maturation markers. The autologous CTL clone IVSB expressed the activation marker CD69, but viral treatment failed to enhance cytotoxicity marker. In summary, vaccinia viruses JX-GFP and TG6002 lyse

  19. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  20. Deletion of the vaccinia virus gene A46R, encoding for an inhibitor of TLR signalling, is an effective approach to enhance the immunogenicity in mice of the HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate NYVAC-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Perdiguero

    Full Text Available Viruses have developed strategies to counteract signalling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs that are involved in the detection of viruses and induction of proinflammatory cytokines and IFNs. Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes A46 protein which disrupts TLR signalling by interfering with TLR: adaptor interactions. Since the innate immune response to viruses is critical to induce protective immunity, we studied whether deletion of A46R gene in a NYVAC vector expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens (NYVAC-C improves immune responses against HIV-1 antigens. This question was examined in human macrophages and in mice infected with a single A46R deletion mutant of the vaccine candidate NYVAC-C (NYVAC-C-ΔA46R. The viral gene A46R is not required for virus replication in primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF cells and its deletion in NYVAC-C markedly increases TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human macrophages. Analysis of the immune responses elicited in BALB/c mice after DNA prime/NYVAC boost immunization shows that deletion of A46R improves the magnitude of the HIV-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses during adaptive and memory phases, maintains the functional profile observed with the parental NYVAC-C and enhances anti-gp120 humoral response during the memory phase. These findings establish the immunological role of VACV A46R on innate immune responses of macrophages in vitro and antigen-specific T and B cell immune responses in vivo and suggest that deletion of viral inhibitors of TLR signalling is a useful approach for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine candidates.

  1. Immune properties of recombinant vaccinia virus encoding CD154 (CD40L) are determined by expression of virally encoded CD40L and the presence of CD40L protein in viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Michal; Bereta, Joanna; Park, Jonas; Medina, Freddy; Kwak, Heesun; Kaufman, Howard L

    2004-12-01

    Expression of costimulatory molecules by recombinant poxviruses is a promising strategy for enhancing therapeutic vaccines. CD40-CD40L interactions are critical for conditioning dendritic cells (DC) and priming T- and B-cell immunity. We constructed a vaccinia virus expressing murine CD40L (rV-CD40L) and studied its immunomodulatory properties in vitro. Direct DC infection with control vaccinia or psoralen/UV-inactivated rV-CD40L stimulated high levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) release. However, replication-competent rV-CD40L did not stimulate IL-12 under similar conditions. We observed a high level of CD40L protein on purified viral particles and demonstrated that induction of IL-12 by nonreplicating rV-CD40L was blocked by anti-CD40 antibodies suggesting that functional CD40L on viral particles contributed to alterations in IL-12 synthesis. Since cross-presentation of tumor-associated antigens by DC is augmented by viral infection of tumor cells, we infected MC38 murine colon carcinoma cells with rV-CD40L. Infected cells stimulated IL-12 secretion by DC and proliferation of B cells and DX5(+) (NK/NKT) cells through direct CD40-CD40L interaction. A subpopulation of NKT cells expressing CD40 (NK1.1(+), CD3(lo)) appeared to be a major effector population responding to MC38/rV-CD40L. These results highlight the complex immune regulatory effects of rV-CD40L defined by the cumulative effects of CD40L expression, presence of CD40L protein in viral particles, and the replication potential of the virus.

  2. Novel host-related virulence factors are encoded by squirrelpox virus, the main causative agent of epidemic disease in red squirrels in the UK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair C Darby

    Full Text Available Squirrelpox virus (SQPV shows little evidence for morbidity or mortality in North American grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, in which the virus is endemic. However, more recently the virus has emerged to cause epidemics with high mortality in Eurasian red squirrels (S. vulgaris in Great Britain, which are now threatened. Here we report the genome sequence of SQPV. Comparison with other Poxviridae revealed a core set of poxvirus genes, the phylogeny of which showed SQPV to be in a new Chordopoxvirus subfamily between the Molluscipoxviruses and Parapoxviruses. A number of SQPV genes were related to virulence, including three major histocomaptibility class I homologs, and one CD47 homolog. In addition, a novel potential virulence factor showing homology to mammalian oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS was identified. This family of proteins normally causes activation of an endoribonuclease (RNaseL within infected cells. The putative function of this novel SQPV protein was predicted in silico.

  3. Vaccinia virus A43R gene encodes an orthopoxvirus-specific late non-virion type-1 membrane protein that is dispensable for replication but enhances intradermal lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Cindy L; Moss, Bernard

    2010-01-05

    The vaccinia virus A43R open reading frame encodes a 168-amino acid protein with a predicted N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Although A43R is conserved in all sequenced members of the orthopoxvirus genus, no non-orthopoxvirus homolog or functional motif was recognized. Biochemical and confocal microscopic studies indicated that A43 is expressed at late times following viral DNA synthesis and is a type-1 membrane protein with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains. A43 was present in Golgi and plasma membranes but only a trace amount was detected in sucrose gradient purified mature virions and none in CsCl gradient purified enveloped virions. Prevention of A43R expression had no effect on plaque size or virus replication in cell culture and little effect on virulence after mouse intranasal infection. Although the A43 mutant produced significantly smaller lesions in skin of mice than the control, the amounts of virus recovered from the lesions were similar.

  4. The Epstein-Barr virus-encoded glycoprotein gp 110 (BALF 4) can serve as a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Jilg, Wolfgang; Bogedain, C; Mairhofer, H.; Gu, S. Y.; Wolf, Hans J.

    1994-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is thought to play a major role in controlling the spread of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in an infected individual. Recently, the viral membrane protein gp 350/220, which is also expressed at the surface of the virus producing cell, was identified as a target for ADCC reactions. Due to its glycoprotein nature, the EBV protein gp 110 is another possible ADCC target. It is one of the most abundant proteins found during the late phase of vira...

  5. West Nile virus encodes a microRNA-like small RNA in the 3' untranslated region which up-regulates GATA4 mRNA and facilitates virus replication in mosquito cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, M.; Torres, S.; Schnettler, E.; Funk, A.; Grundhoff, A.; Pijlman, G.P.; Khromykh, A.A.; Asgari, S.

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) belongs to a group of medically important single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses causing deadly disease outbreaks around the world. The 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the flavivirus genome, in particular the terminal 3' stem–loop (3'SL) fulfils multiple functions in

  6. A role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8{sup +} T cell responses to rabies virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8{sup +} T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8{sup +} T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8{sup +} T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8{sup +} T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  7. MicroRNA expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia caused by a fish rhabdovirus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), results in significant mortality in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum). Although the disease had been eradicated in Denmark, wildlife marine reservoir of VHSV poses a threat parti...

  8. The genome of Shope fibroma virus, a tumorigenic poxvirus, contains a growth factor gene with sequence similarity to those encoding epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, W; Upton, C.; Hu, S.L.; Purchio, A F; McFadden, G.

    1987-01-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region common to epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, and vaccinia growth factor were used to identify a novel growth factor gene in the Shope fibroma virus genome. Sequence analysis indicates that the Shope fibroma growth factor is a distinct new member of this family of growth factors.

  9. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  11. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Margit Schnee; Vogel, Annette B.; Daniel De Voss; Benjamin Petsch; Patrick Baumhof; Thomas Kramps; Lothar Stitz

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly e...

  12. Immunogenicity of the candidate malaria vaccines FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the pre-erythrocytic antigen ME-TRAP in 1-6 year old children in a malaria endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejon, Philip; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Kai, Oscar K; Todryk, Stephen; Keating, Sheila; Lang, Trudie; Gilbert, Sarah C; Peshu, Norbert; Marsh, Kevin; Hill, Adrian V S

    2006-05-29

    In a phase 1 trial, 22 children in a malaria endemic area were immunised with candidate malaria vaccination regimes. The regimes used two recombinant viral vectors, attenuated fowlpox strain FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Both encoded the pre-erythrocytic malaria antigen construct ME-TRAP. Strong T cell responses were detected by both ex vivo and cultured ELISpot assays. Data from phase 1 trials in adults on anti-vector responses raised by FP9 is presented. These responses partially cross-reacted with MVA, and detectably reduced the immunogenicity of vaccination with MVA. This prompted the comparison of half dose and full dose FP9 priming vaccinations in children. Regimes using half dose FP9 priming tended to be more immunogenic than full dose. The potential for enhanced immunogenicity with half doses of priming vectors warrants further investigation, and larger studies to determine protection against malaria in children are required.

  13. A Novel DNA Motif Contributes to Selective Replication of a Geminivirus-Associated Betasatellite by a Helper Virus-Encoded Replication-Related Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Xu, Xiongbiao; Huang, Changjun; Qian, Yajuan; Li, Zhenghe; Zhou, Xueping

    2015-12-09

    Rolling-circle replication of single-stranded genomes of plant geminiviruses is initiated by sequence-specific DNA binding of the viral replication-related protein (Rep) to its cognate genome at the replication origin. Monopartite begomovirus-associated betasatellites can be trans replicated by both cognate and some noncognate helper viruses, but the molecular basis of replication promiscuity of betasatellites remains uncharacterized. Earlier studies showed that when tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) or tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV) is coinoculated with both cognate and noncognate betasatellites, the cognate betasatellite dominates over the noncognate one at the late stages of infection. In this study, we constructed reciprocal chimeric betasatellites between tomato yellow leaf curl China betasatellite and tobacco curly shoot betasatellite and assayed their competitiveness against wild-type betasatellite when coinoculated with TYLCCNV or TbCSV onto plants. We mapped a region immediately upstream of the conserved rolling-circle cruciform structure of betasatellite origin that confers the cognate Rep-mediated replication advantage over the noncognate satellite. DNase I protection and in vitro binding assays further identified a novel sequence element termed Rep-binding motif (RBM), which specifically binds to the cognate Rep protein and to the noncognate Rep, albeit at lower affinity. Furthermore, we showed that RBM-Rep binding affinity is correlated with betasatellite replication efficiency in protoplasts. Our data suggest that although strict specificity of Rep-mediated replication does not exist, betasatellites have adapted to their cognate Reps for efficient replication during coevolution. Begomoviruses are numerous circular DNA viruses that cause devastating diseases of crops worldwide. Monopartite begomoviruses are frequently associated with betasatellites which are essential for induction of typical disease symptoms. Coexistence of two distinct

  14. The Viral Gene ORF79 Encodes a Repressor Regulating Induction of the Lytic Life Cycle in the Haloalkaliphilic Virus ϕCh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Regina; Derntl, Christian; Klein, Reinhard; Alte, Beatrix; Hofbauer, Christoph; Kaufmann, Martin; Beraha, Judith; Schöner, Léa; Witte, Angela

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we describe the construction of the first genetically modified mutant of a halovirus infecting haloalkaliphilic Archaea By random choice, we targeted ORF79, a currently uncharacterized viral gene of the haloalkaliphilic virus ϕCh1. We used a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation method to deliver a disruption cassette into a lysogenic strain of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii bearing ϕCh1 as a provirus. This approach yielded mutant virus particles carrying a disrupted version of ORF79. Disruption of ORF79 did not influence morphology of the mature virions. The mutant virus was able to infect cured strains of N. magadii , resulting in a lysogenic, ORF79-disrupted strain. Analysis of this strain carrying the mutant virus revealed a repressor function of ORF79. In the absence of gp79, onset of lysis and expression of viral proteins occurred prematurely compared to their timing in the wild-type strain. Constitutive expression of ORF79 in a cured strain of N. magadii reduced the plating efficiency of ϕCh1 by seven orders of magnitude. Overexpression of ORF79 in a lysogenic strain of N. magadii resulted in an inhibition of lysis and total absence of viral proteins as well as viral progeny. In further experiments, gp79 directly regulated the expression of the tail fiber protein ORF34 but did not influence the methyltransferase gene ORF94. Further, we describe the establishment of an inducible promoter for in vivo studies in N. magadii IMPORTANCE Genetic analyses of haloalkaliphilic Archaea or haloviruses are only rarely reported. Therefore, only little insight into the in vivo roles of proteins and their functions has been gained so far. We used a reverse genetics approach to identify the function of a yet undescribed gene of ϕCh1. We provide evidence that gp79, a currently unknown protein of ϕCh1, acts as a repressor protein of the viral life cycle, affecting the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state of the virus

  15. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  16. Low-dose adenovirus vaccine encoding chimeric hepatitis B virus surface antigen-human papillomavirus type 16 E7 proteins induces enhanced E7-specific antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A; Juárez, Victoria; Zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-10-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (10(6) infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8(+)-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein.

  17. Cuscuta chinensis Ameliorates Immunosuppression and Urotoxic Effect of Cyclophosphamide by Regulating Cytokines - GM-CSF and TNF-Alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Nidhi; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Kannan, Narayanan; Vinod Prabhu, Venugopal; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is commonly used as anticancer drug which causes toxicity by its reactive metabolites such as acroline and phosphoramide mustard. In this study, Cuscuta chinensis (C. chinensis) (family: Convolvulaceae) was assessed for ability to restore mice against CTX-induced toxicity. Coadministration of C. chinensis extract (10 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) for ten consecutive days reduced CTX-induced (25 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) toxicity. Treatment with C. chinensis extract significantly (p < 0.01) increased the relative organ weight and body weight. Moreover, administration of C. chinensis extract significantly increased bone marrow cellulatity and α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested its protective role on the hematopoietic system. The GSH content was drastically reduced by CTX administration in urinary bladder which was enhanced by treatment with C. chinensis extract, indicating that preventing acroline-mediated tissue damage or cell toxicity and also the extract decreased the urinary bladder nitric oxide (NO) level which proves recovery over urinary tract injury associated with CTX treatment. The administration of C. chinensis extract decreased serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin levels when compared to CTX-alone-treated group. Histopathological analysis of the urinary bladder of CTX-alone-treated group showed necrotic damage whereas the C. chinensis-treated group showed normal bladder architecture. The above data clearly demonstrates chemoprotective role of C. chinensis against CTX-induced toxicities by regulating antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

  18. Standardized serum GM-CSF autoantibody testing for the routine clinical diagnosis of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Carey, Brenna; Chalk, Claudia; Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Koch, Diana E; Stevens, Carrie; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2014-01-15

    Autoantibodies against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMAbs) cause autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and measurement of the GMAb level in serum is now commonly used to identify this disease, albeit, in a clinical research setting. The present study was undertaken to optimize and standardize serum GMAb concentration testing using a GMAb enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GMAb ELISA) to prepare for its introduction into routine clinical use. The GMAb ELISA was evaluated using serum specimens from autoimmune PAP patients, healthy people, and GMAb-spiked serum from healthy people. After optimizing assay components and procedures, its accuracy, precision, reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and ruggedness were evaluated. The coefficient of variation in repeated measurements was acceptable (standards, or by storage of serum samples at -80°C. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of the PAP patient-derived polyclonal GMAb reference standard (PCRS) was 0.78ng/ml. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified a serum GMAb level of 5μg/ml (based on PCRS) as the optimal cut off value for distinguishing autoimmune PAP serum from normal serum. A pharmaceutical-grade, monoclonal GMAb reference standard (MCRS) was developed as the basis of a new unit of measure for GMAb concentration: one International Unit (IU) of GMAb is equivalent to 1μg/ml of MCRS. The median [interquartile range] serum GMAb level was markedly higher in autoimmune PAP patients than in healthy people (21.54 [12.83-36.38] versus 0.08 [0.05-0.14] IU; n=56, 38; respectively; Pstandardized units. These findings support the use of this GMAb ELISA for the routine clinical diagnosis of autoimmune PAP and introduce a new unit of measure to enable standardized reporting of serum GMAb data from different laboratories. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: Molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne); P.J. Coffer (Paul); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as

  20. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  1. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  2. Radioiodide imaging and radiovirotherapy of multiple myeloma using VSV(Delta51)-NIS, an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus encoding the sodium iodide symporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Apollina; Carlson, Stephanie K; Classic, Kelly L; Greiner, Suzanne; Naik, Shruthi; Power, Anthony T; Bell, John C; Russell, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Multiple myeloma is a radiosensitive malignancy that is currently incurable. Here, we generated a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV(Delta51)-NIS] that has a deletion of methionine 51 in the matrix protein and expresses the human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene. VSV(Delta51)-NIS showed specific oncolytic activity against myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells and was able to replicate to high titers in myeloma cells in vitro. Iodide uptake assays showed accumulation of radioactive iodide in VSV(Delta51)-NIS-infected myeloma cells that was specific to the function of the NIS transgene. In bg/nd/xid mice with established subcutaneous myeloma tumors, administration of VSV(Delta51)-NIS resulted in high intratumoral virus replication and tumor regression. VSV-associated neurotoxicity was not observed. Intratumoral spread of the infection was monitored noninvasively by serial gamma camera imaging of (123)I-iodide biodistribution. Dosimetry calculations based on these images pointed to the feasibility of combination radiovirotherapy with VSV(Delta51)-NIS plus (131)I. Immunocompetent mice with syngeneic 5TGM1 myeloma tumors (either subcutaneous or orthotopic) showed significant enhancements of tumor regression and survival when VSV(Delta51)-NIS was combined with (131)I. These results show that VSV(Delta51)-NIS is a safe oncolytic agent with significant therapeutic potential in multiple myeloma.

  3. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Y. Sardesai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC. This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6 with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development.

  4. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  5. Boosting of DNA Vaccine-Elicited Gamma Interferon Responses in Humans by Exposure to Malaria Parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ruobing; Richie, Thomas L; Baraceros, Maria F; Rahardjo, Nancy; Gay, Tanya; Banania, Jo-Glenna; Charoenvit, Yupin; Epstein, Judith E; Luke, Thomas; Freilich, Daniel A; Norman, Jon; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2004-01-01

    A mixture of DNA plasmids expressing five Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocyte-stage antigens was administered with or without a DNA plasmid encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF...

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–encoded small RNA is released from EBV-infected cells and activates signaling from toll-like receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai; Zhou, Li; Samanta, Mrinal; Matsumoto, Misako; Ebihara, Takashi; Seya, Tsukasa; Imai, Shosuke; Fujieda, Mikiya; Kawa, Keisei

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–encoded small RNA (EBER) is nonpolyadenylated, noncoding RNA that forms stem-loop structure by intermolecular base-pairing, giving rise to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)–like molecules, and exists abundantly in EBV-infected cells. Here, we report that EBER induces signaling from the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is a sensor of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and induces type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. A substantial amount of EBER, which was sufficient to induce signaling from TLR3, was released from EBV-infected cells, and the majority of the released EBER existed as a complex with a cellular EBER-binding protein La, suggesting that EBER was released from the cells by active secretion of La. Sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM), chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV), and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH), whose general symptoms are caused by proinflammatory cytokines contained EBER, and addition of RNA purified from the sera into culture medium induced signaling from TLR3 in EBV-transformed lymphocytes and peripheral mononuclear cells. Furthermore, DCs treated with EBER showed mature phenotype and antigen presentation capacity. These findings suggest that EBER, which is released from EBV-infected cells, is responsible for immune activation by EBV, inducing type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. EBER-induced activation of innate immunity would account for immunopathologic diseases caused by active EBV infection. PMID:19720839

  7. Partial correction of sensitivity to oxidant stress in Friedreich ataxia patient fibroblasts by frataxin-encoding adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane; Spinoulas, Afroditi; Zheng, Maolin; Cunningham, Sharon C; Ginn, Samantha L; McQuilty, Robert C; Rowe, Peter B; Alexander, Ian E

    2005-08-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons are directly involved in the pathophysiology of a number of debilitating inherited and acquired neurological conditions. The lack of effective treatments for many such conditions provides a strong rationale for exploring novel therapeutic approaches, including gene therapy. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), a sensory neuropathy, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with a loss of large sensory neurons from the dorsal root ganglia. Because a mouse model for this well-characterized disease has been generated, we elected to use FRDA as a model disease. In previous studies we achieved efficient and sustained delivery of a reporter gene to PNS sensory neurons, using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors. In the current study, AAV and LV vectors encoding the human frataxin cDNA were constructed and assessed for frataxin expression and function in primary FRDA patient fibroblast cell lines. FRDA fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit subtle biochemical changes, including increased mitochondrial iron and sensitivity to oxidant stress. Despite the inherent difficulty in working with primary cells, transduction of patient fibroblasts with either vector resulted in the expression of appropriately localized frataxin and partial reversal of phenotype.

  8. NLX-P101, an adeno-associated virus gene therapy encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase, for the potential treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Nido, Javier

    2010-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Dopamine depletion in the striatum leads to functional changes in several deep brain nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which becomes disinhibited and perturbs the control of body movement. Although there is no cure for PD, some pharmacological and surgical treatments can significantly improve the functional ability of patients, particularly in the early stages of the disease. Among neurodegenerative diseases, PD is a particularly suitable target for gene therapy because the neuropathology is largely confined to a relatively small region of the brain. Neurologix Inc is developing NLX-P101 (AAV2-GAD), an adeno-associated viral vector encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), for the potential therapy of PD. As GAD potentiates inhibitory neurotransmission from the STN, sustained expression of GAD in the STN by direct delivery of NLX-P101 decreases STN overactivation. This procedure was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient method of reducing motor deficits in animal models of PD. A phase I clinical trial has demonstrated that NLX-P101 was safe and indicated the efficacy of this approach in patients with PD. Results from an ongoing phase II clinical trial of NLX-P101 are awaited to establish the clinical efficacy of this gene therapy.

  9. Computational Prediction of the Heterodimeric and Higher-Order Structure of gpE1/gpE2 Envelope Glycoproteins Encoded by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Holly; Logan, Michael R; Hockman, Darren; Koehler Leman, Julia; Law, John Lok Man; Houghton, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Despite the recent success of newly developed direct-acting antivirals against hepatitis C, the disease continues to be a global health threat due to the lack of diagnosis of most carriers and the high cost of treatment. The heterodimer formed by glycoproteins E1 and E2 within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) lipid envelope is a potential vaccine candidate and antiviral target. While the structure of E1/E2 has not yet been resolved, partial crystal structures of the E1 and E2 ectodomains have been determined. The unresolved parts of the structure are within the realm of what can be modeled with current computational modeling tools. Furthermore, a variety of additional experimental data is available to support computational predictions of E1/E2 structure, such as data from antibody binding studies, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), mutational analyses, peptide binding analysis, linker-scanning mutagenesis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. In accordance with these rich experimental data, we have built an in silico model of the full-length E1/E2 heterodimer. Our model supports that E1/E2 assembles into a trimer, which was previously suggested from a study by Falson and coworkers (P. Falson, B. Bartosch, K. Alsaleh, B. A. Tews, A. Loquet, Y. Ciczora, L. Riva, C. Montigny, C. Montpellier, G. Duverlie, E. I. Pecheur, M. le Maire, F. L. Cosset, J. Dubuisson, and F. Penin, J. Virol. 89:10333-10346, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00991-15). Size exclusion chromatography and Western blotting data obtained by using purified recombinant E1/E2 support our hypothesis. Our model suggests that during virus assembly, the trimer of E1/E2 may be further assembled into a pentamer, with 12 pentamers comprising a single HCV virion. We anticipate that this new model will provide a useful framework for HCV envelope structure and the development of antiviral strategies. IMPORTANCE One hundred fifty million people have been estimated to be infected with hepatitis C virus, and

  10. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  11. Talimogene Laherparepvec Improves Durable Response Rate in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andtbacka, Robert H I; Kaufman, Howard L; Collichio, Frances; Amatruda, Thomas; Senzer, Neil; Chesney, Jason; Delman, Keith A; Spitler, Lynn E; Puzanov, Igor; Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Milhem, Mohammed; Cranmer, Lee; Curti, Brendan; Lewis, Karl; Ross, Merrick; Guthrie, Troy; Linette, Gerald P; Daniels, Gregory A; Harrington, Kevin; Middleton, Mark R; Miller, Jr, Wilson H; Zager, Jonathan S; Ye, Yining; Yao, Bin; Li, Ai; Doleman, Susan; VanderWalde, Ari; Gansert, Jennifer; Coffin, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is a herpes simplex virus type 1-derived oncolytic immunotherapy designed to selectively replicate within tumors and produce granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF...

  12. Purified hexameric Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 protein for measuring anti-BARF1 antibody responses in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, E K; Hutajulu, S H; van Beek, J; Stevens, S J; Paramita, D K; Greijer, A E; Middeldorp, J M

    2011-02-01

    WHO type III nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in Indonesia and 100% associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). NPC tumor cells express viral proteins, including BARF1, which is secreted and is considered to have oncogenic and immune-modulating properties. Recently, we found conserved mutations in the BARF1 gene in NPC isolates. This study describes the expression and purification of NPC-derived BARF1 and analyzes humoral immune responses against prototype BARF1 (B95-8) and purified native hexameric BARF1 in sera of Indonesian NPC patients (n = 155) compared to healthy EBV-positive (n = 56) and EBV-negative (n = 16) individuals. BARF1 (B95-8) expressed in Escherichia coli and baculovirus, as well as BARF1-derived peptides, did not react with IgG or IgA antibodies in NPC. Purified native hexameric BARF1 protein isolated from culture medium was used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and revealed relatively weak IgG and IgA responses in human sera, although it had strong antibody responses to other EBV proteins. Higher IgG reactivity was found in NPC patients (P = 0.015) than in regional Indonesian controls or EBV-negative individuals (P native BARF1 were marginal. NPC sera with the highest IgG responses to hexameric BARF1 in ELISA showed detectable reactivity with denatured BARF1 by immunoblotting. In conclusion, BARF1 has low immunogenicity for humoral responses and requires native conformation for antibody binding. The presence of antibodies against native BARF1 in the blood of NPC patients provides evidence that the protein is expressed and secreted as a hexameric protein in NPC patients.

  13. The herpes simplex virus 1-encoded envelope glycoprotein B activates NF-κB through the Toll-like receptor 2 and MyD88/TRAF6-dependent signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Cai

    Full Text Available The innate immune response plays a critical role in the host defense against invading pathogens, and TLR2, a member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family, has been implicated in the immune response and initiation of inflammatory cytokine secretion against several human viruses. Previous studies have demonstrated that infectious and ultraviolet-inactivated herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 virions lead to the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines via TLR2. However, except for the envelope glycoprotein gH and gL, whether there are other determinants of HSV-1 responsible for TLR2 mediated biological effects is not known yet. Here, we demonstrated that the HSV-1-encoded envelope glycoprotein gB displays as molecular target recognized by TLR2. gB coimmunoprecipitated with TLR2, TLR1 and TLR6 in transfected and infected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T cells. Treatment of TLR2-transfected HEK293T (HEK293T-TLR2 cells with purified gB results in the activation of NF-κB reporter, and this activation requires the recruitment of the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 but not CD14. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB was abrogated by anti-gB and anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies. In addition, the expression of interleukin-8 induced by gB was abrogated by the treatment of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 with anti-TLR2 blocking antibody or by the incubation of gB with anti-gB antibody. Taken together, these results indicate the importance and potency of HSV-1 gB as one of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs molecule recognized by TLR2 with immediate kinetics.

  14. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNA BART15-3p promotes cell apoptosis partially by targeting BRUCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Hanna; Kim, Sae Rom; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) generates a variety of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) by processing the BHRF1 and BamHI A rightward (BART) transcripts. BART miRNAs are expressed in all cells latently infected with EBV, but the functions of most BART miRNAs remain unknown. The results of a cell proliferation assay revealed that miR-BART15-3p inhibited cell proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting following staining with annexin V or propidium iodide showed that miR-BART15-3p promoted apoptosis. Furthermore, the inhibitor for miR-BART15-3p increased cell growth and reduced apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Using bioinformatic analyses, we predicted that miR-BART15-3p may target the antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2L2, DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 42 (DDX42), and baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) mRNAs. The luciferase reporter assay showed that only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of BRUCE was affected by miR-BART15-3p. Two putative seed-matched sites for miR-BART15-3p were evident on the BRUCE 3' UTR. The results of a mutation study indicated that miR-BART15-3p hybridized only with the first seed-matched site on the BRUCE 3' UTR. miR-BART15-3p downregulated the BRUCE protein in EBV-negative cells, while the inhibitor for miR-BART15-3p upregulated the BRUCE protein in EBV-infected cells without affecting the BRUCE mRNA level. miR-BART15-3p was secreted from EBV-infected gastric carcinoma cells, and the level of miR-BART15-3p was 2- to 16-fold higher in exosomes than in the corresponding cells. Our data suggest that miR-BART15-3p can induce apoptosis partially by inhibiting the translation of the apoptosis inhibitor BRUCE. Further study is warranted to understand the role of miR-BART15-3p in the EBV life cycle.

  16. Prime-boost using separate oncolytic viruses in combination with checkpoint blockade improves anti-tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, E; Kottke, T; Thompson, J; Rajani, K; Zaidi, S; Evgin, L; Coffey, M; Ralph, C; Diaz, R; Pandha, H; Harrington, K; Selby, P; Bram, R; Melcher, A; Vile, R

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumour effects associated with oncolytic virus therapy are mediated significantly through immune-mediated mechanisms, which depend both on the type of virus and the route of delivery. Here, we show that intra-tumoral oncolysis by Reovirus induced the priming of a CD8+, Th1-type anti-tumour response. By contrast, systemically delivered Vesicular Stomatitis Virus expressing a cDNA library of melanoma antigens (VSV-ASMEL) promoted a potent anti-tumour CD4+ Th17 response. Therefore, we hypothesised that combining the Reovirus-induced CD8+ T cell response, with the VSV-ASMEL CD4+ Th17 helper response, would produce enhanced anti-tumour activity. Consistent with this, priming with intra-tumoral Reovirus, followed by an intra-venous VSV-ASMEL Th17 boost, significantly improved survival of mice bearing established subcutaneous B16 melanoma tumours. We also show that combination of either therapy alone with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade augmented both the Th1 response induced by systemically delivered Reovirus in combination with GM-CSF, and also the Th17 response induced by VSV-ASMEL. Significantly, anti-PD-1 also uncovered an anti-tumour Th1 response following VSV-ASMEL treatment that was not seen in the absence of checkpoint blockade. Finally, the combination of all three treatments (priming with systemically delivered Reovirus, followed by double boosting with systemic VSV-ASMEL and anti-PD-1) significantly enhanced survival, with long-term cures, compared to any individual, or double, combination therapies, associated with strong Th1 and Th17 responses to tumour antigens. Our data show that it is possible to generate fully systemic, highly effective anti-tumour immunovirotherapy by combining oncolytic viruses, along with immune checkpoint blockade, to induce complementary mechanisms of anti-tumour immune responses.

  17. Plant virus replication and movement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation, transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes, virus-encoded products and cellular factors...

  18. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in whole blood as a superior prognostic and monitoring factor than EBV-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J-H; Lu, T-X; Tian, T; Wang, L; Fan, L; Xu, J; Zhang, R; Gong, Q-X; Zhang, Z-H; Li, J-Y; Xu, W

    2015-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status was retrospectively analysed by the use of EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization (ISH) and EBV DNA analysis in whole blood with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, to assess the clinical significance for diagnosis, prognostication, and monitoring of tumour burden. Three hundred and twenty-nine patients were retrospectively enrolled, with 232 patients being available for EBER ISH analysis, 189 patients for EBV DNA analysis, and 138 patients for both analyses. EBER was positive in 24 (10.3%) patients, and EBV DNA was positive in 18 (9.5%) patients; the two analyses had 92.8% concordance. Patients with pretreatment EBER positivity had worse overall survival (OS) than those without EBER positivity (p 0.03); the same pattern was observed for EBV DNA (p EBV DNA were combined (p EBV DNA (hazard ratio 3.71, 95% CI 1.78-7.74, p EBV DNA, the transformation from positive to negative after cycle 3 with chemotherapy may have the most capacity to distinguish a superior from an inferior outcome. These findings suggest that EBV DNA in whole blood has good concordance with EBER ISH, and that it may be a better prognostic and monitoring biomarker than EBER. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Novel Adeno-Associated Virus-Based Genetic Vaccine Encoding the Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4 Protein Exhibits Immunogenic Properties in Mice Superior to Those of an NS3-Protein-Based Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqin Zhu

    Full Text Available More than 170 million individuals worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, and up to an estimated 30% of chronically infected individuals will go on to develop progressive liver disease. Despite the recent advances in antiviral treatment of HCV infection, it remains a major public health problem. Thus, development of an effective vaccine is urgently required. In this study, we constructed novel adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors expressing the full-length NS3 or NS3/4 protein of HCV genotype 1b. The expression of the NS3 or NS3/4 protein in HepG2 cells was confirmed by western blotting. C57BL/6 mice were intramuscularly immunised with a single injection of AAV vectors, and the resultant immune response was investigated. The AAV2/rh32.33.NS3/4 vaccine induced stronger humoral and cellular responses than did the AAV2/rh32.33.NS3 vaccine. Our results demonstrate that AAV-based vaccines exhibit considerable potential for the development of an effective anti-HCV vaccine.

  20. Cutaneous head and neck melanoma in OPTiM, a randomized phase 3 trial of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of unresected stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andtbacka, Robert H I; Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Ollila, David W; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Milhem, Mohammed; Amatruda, Thomas; Nemunaitis, John J; Harrington, Kevin J; Chen, Lisa; Shilkrut, Mark; Ross, Merrick; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous head and neck melanoma has poor outcomes and limited treatment options. In OPTiM, a phase 3 study in patients with unresectable stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma, intralesional administration of the oncolytic virus talimogene laherparepvec improved durable response rate (DRR; continuous response ≥6 months) compared with subcutaneous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Retrospective review of OPTiM identified patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma given talimogene laherparepvec (n = 61) or GM-CSF (n = 26). Outcomes were compared between talimogene laherparepvec and GM-CSF treated patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. DRR was higher for talimogene laherparepvec-treated patients than for GM-CSF treated patients (36.1% vs 3.8%; p = .001). A total of 29.5% of patients had a complete response with talimogene laherparepvec versus 0% with GM-CSF. Among talimogene laherparepvec-treated patients with a response, the probability of still being in response after 12 months was 73%. Median overall survival (OS) was 25.2 months for GM-CSF and had not been reached with talimogene laherparepvec. Treatment with talimogene laherparepvec was associated with improved response and survival compared with GM-CSF in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1752-1758, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. THE CYTOKINES SYNTHESIS IN VITRO IN THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS INFECTED CELLS AND IN THE PRESENCE OF INACTIVATED VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mesentseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE is severe neuroinfectious disease with involvement of immune mechanisms in pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of synthesis of key cytokines had been performed for the TBE virus (TBEV infected cells and in the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE in vitro. Persistent TBEV infection of immortal tissue culture of human larynx cancer cells caused transcription activation of interferons IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ1, interleukins IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor TNFα as well as one of apoptosis factors Fas. Comparison of transcription and production of cytokines revealed that the TBEV infection resulted in posttranscription Th1 shift of cytokine response. In the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE based on the same strain Sofjin of the TBEV activation of transcription of cytokines IFNα, IFNλ1, IL-4, IL-10 was also observed as after the TBEV infection that together with an additional stimulation of GM-CSF production might serve as an evidence of Th2 response. Involvement of IFNIII type (IFNλ1 both during persistent infection and after addition of inactivated vaccines was found in the first time. Differences in dynamics of cytokines IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNFα response during the TBEV infection and in the presence of inactivated vaccine are described.

  2. Motavizumab, A Neutralizing Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv Monoclonal Antibody Significantly Modifies The Local And Systemic Cytokine Responses Induced By Rsv In The Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafri Hasan S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motavizumab (MEDI-524 is a monoclonal antibody with enhanced neutralizing activity against RSV. In mice, motavizumab suppressed RSV replication which resulted in significant reduction of clinical parameters of disease severity. We evaluated the effect of motavizumab on the local and systemic immune response induced by RSV in the mouse model. Balb/c mice were intranasally inoculated with 106.5 PFU RSV A2 or medium. Motavizumab was given once intraperitoneally (1.25 mg/mouse as prophylaxis, 24 h before virus inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and serum samples were obtained at days 1, 5 (acute and 28 (long-term post inoculation and analyzed with a multiplex assay (Beadlyte Upstate, NY for simultaneous quantitation of 18 cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC (similar to human IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, RANTES, IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Overall, cytokine concentrations were lower in serum than in BAL samples. By day 28, only KC was detected in BAL specimens at low concentrations in all groups. Administration of motavizumab significantly reduced (p

  3. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Heba H; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus-specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential.

  4. Enhanced anti-tumor effect of a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 oncoproteins genetically fused to the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Diniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer DNA vaccines have attracted growing interest as a simple and non-invasive method for both the treatment and prevention of tumors induced by human papillomaviruses. Nonetheless, the low immunogenicity of parenterally administered vaccines, particularly regarding the activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses, suggests that further improvements in both vaccine composition and administration routes are still required. In the present study, we report the immune responses and anti-tumor effects of a DNA vaccine (pgD-E7E6E5 expressing three proteins (E7, E6, and E5 of the human papillomavirus type 16 genetically fused to the glycoprotein D of the human herpes simplex virus type 1, which was administered to mice by the intradermal (id route using a gene gun. A single id dose of pgD-E7E6E5 (2 µg/dose induced a strong activation of E7-specific interferon-γ (INF-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and full prophylactic anti-tumor effects in the vaccinated mice. Three vaccine doses inhibited tumor growth in 70% of the mice with established tumors. In addition, a single vaccine dose consisting of the co-administration of pgD-E7E6E5 and the vector encoding interleukin-12 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects and conferred protection to 60 and 50% of the vaccinated mice, respectively. In conclusion, id administration of pgD-E7E6E5 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the DNA vaccine, representing a promising administration route for future clinical trials.

  5. Long-term protection against human papillomavirus e7-positive tumor by a single vaccination of adeno-associated virus vectors encoding a fusion protein of inactivated e7 of human papillomavirus 16/18 and heat shock protein 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqiao; Zhu, Tong; Ye, Xiaojing; Yang, Lin; Wang, Bing; Liang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lina; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a gene vaccine strategy against human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancer and premalignant diseases, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding the viral E7 oncoproteins as the tumor antigens from HPV serotypes 16 (HPV16) and 18 (HPV18). Genetically inactivated E7 proteins were fused with a heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) to minimize the risk of cell transformation and enhance immune responses. The fusion protein gene was packaged in AAV serotype 1 or 2 (AAV1 or 2) for efficient in vivo gene expression. Our results showed that after a single intramuscular injection, the AAV1 vector elicited stronger HPV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and interferon-gamma secretion when compared with the AAV2 vector. Prophylactic immunization with AAV1 protected 100% of the mice from tumor growth for more than 1 year, whereas all the control mice immunized with either a LacZ vector or saline grew large tumors and died within 6 weeks after inoculation of E7-positive tumor cell line TC-1. In addition, this single-dose AAV1 vaccination completely protected the mice against second and third challenges with higher numbers of TC-1 cells. Despite lower CTL responses against the E7 antigens, AAV2 vector prophylactic immunization was also sufficient to protect 100% of the mice against the initial and second tumor challenges and 70% of the mice against the third challenge. In addition, therapeutic immunization with AAV1 after palpable tumor formation inhibited tumor growth and caused tumor regression in some mice. Thus, our studies support the potential of AAV vectors as a genetic vaccine for the prevention and treatment of HPV-induced malignancies.

  6. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 and tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptor 4 are induced by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1 and associated with the metastatic potential of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, which is encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, is an important oncogenic protein that is closely related to carcinogenesis and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, a prevalent cancer in China. We previously reported that the expression of the functional chemokine receptor CXCR4 is associated with human NPC metastasis. In this study, we show that LMP1 induces tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 through tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 (TPST-1, an enzyme that is responsible for catalysis of tyrosine sulfation in vivo, which is likely to contribute to the highly metastatic character of NPC. LMP1 could induce tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 and its associated cell motility and invasiveness in a NPC cell culture model. In contrast, the expression of TPST-1 small interfering RNA reversed LMP1-induced tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4. LMP1 conveys signals through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway, and EGFR-targeted siRNA inhibited the induction of TPST-1 by LMP1. We used a ChIP assay to show that EGFR could bind to the TPST-1 promoter in vivo under the control of LMP1. A reporter gene assay indicated that the activity of the TPST-1 promoter could be suppressed by deleting the binding site between EGFR and TPST-1. Finally, in human NPC tissues, the expression of TPST-1 and LMP1 was directly correlated and clinically, the expression of TPST-1 was associated with metastasis. These results suggest the up-regulation of TPST-1 and tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 by LMP1 might be a potential mechanism contributing to NPC metastasis.

  7. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    chemokine receptors (CKRs). Conserved families of v7TMRs distinguish between beta- versus gammaherpesviruses; furthermore, significant divisions within these subfamilies, such as between genera of the gammaherpesviruses or between the primate and rodent cytomegaloviruses, coincide with specific v7TMR gene...... families. Divergence of functional properties between the viral 7TMR and their cellular counterparts is likely, therefore, to reflect adaptation supporting various aspects of the viral lifecycle with concomitant effects upon viral pathogenesis. Consistent with their long evolutionary history, the v7TMRs...... activation. Indeed, many of the v7TMRs have been shown to signal constitutively, associated in some cases with notable divergence of highly conserved regulatory elements such as the “DRY” motif of TMIII. The availability of rodent models for v7TMR functional studies has provided evidence for important...

  8. Plant virus replication and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes virus encoded products and cellular factors. To enhance these processes viruses assemble and replicate in membrane associated complexes that may develop into "virus factories" or "viroplasms" in which viral components and host factors required for replication are concentrated. Many plant viruses replicate i...

  9. Immature dendritic cells selectively replicate macrophagetropic (M-tropic) human immunodeficiency virus type 1, while mature cells efficiently transmit both M- and T-tropic virus to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granelli-Piperno, A.; Delgado, E.; Finkel, V.; Paxton, W.; Steinman, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can develop from CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes cultured in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). By 6 days in culture, the cells have the characteristics of immature DCs and can be further induced to mature by inflammatory

  10. Nocardia-induced granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is neutralized by autoantibodies in disseminated/extrapulmonary nocardiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Lindsey B; Rocha Pereira, Nuno; Figueiredo, Cristóvão; Fiske, Lauren C; Ressner, Roseanne A; Hong, Julie C; Gregg, Kevin S; Henry, Tracey L; Pak, Kirk J; Baumgarten, Katherine L; Seoane, Leonardo; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Olivier, Kenneth N; Zelazny, Adrian M; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K

    2015-04-01

    Nocardia species cause infections in both immunocompromised and otherwise immunocompetent patients, although the mechanisms defining susceptibility in the latter group are elusive. Anticytokine autoantibodies are an emerging cause of pathogen-specific susceptibility in previously healthy human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected adults, including anti-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies with cryptococcal meningitis. Plasma from patients with disseminated/extrapulmonary nocardiosis and healthy controls was screened for anticytokine autoantibodies using a particle-based approach. Autoantibody function was assessed by intranuclear staining for GM-CSF-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in normal cells incubated with either patient or normal plasma. GM-CSF-mediated cellular activation by Nocardia was assessed by staining for intracellular cytokine production and intranuclear STAT5 phosphorylation. We identified neutralizing anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in 5 of 7 patients studied with central nervous system nocardiosis and in no healthy controls (n = 14). GM-CSF production was induced by Nocardia in vitro, suggesting a causative role for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in Nocardia susceptibility and dissemination. In previously healthy adults with otherwise unexplained disseminated/extrapulmonary Nocardia infections, anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies should be considered. Their presence may suggest that these patients may be at risk for later development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis or other opportunistic infections, and that patients may benefit from therapeutic GM-CSF administration. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Current status of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Howard L; Ruby, Carl E; Hughes, Tasha; Slingluff, Craig L

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF-expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma.

  12. An encoding device and a method of encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an encoding device, such as an optical position encoder, for encoding input from an object, and a method for encoding input from an object, for determining a position of an object that interferes with light of the device. The encoding device comprises a light source...... in the area in the space and may interfere with the light, which interference may be encoded into a position or activation....

  13. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918). However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R) were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. Conclusions It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis. PMID:20078890

  14. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen Lars E; Breum Solvej Ø; Polacek Charlotta; Belsham Graham J; Bøtner Anette

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over ...

  15. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Lars E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918. However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. Conclusions It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis.

  16. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, Graham J; Polacek, Charlotta; Breum, Solvej Ø; Larsen, Lars E; Bøtner, Anette

    2010-01-16

    Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918). However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R) were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis.

  17. Chimeras of receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus/feline leukemia virus B and amphotropic murine leukemia virus reveal different modes of receptor recognition by retrovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Johann, Stephen V; van Zeijl, Marja

    1995-01-01

    Glvr1 encodes the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related gene Glvr2 encodes the human receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (A-MLVs). The two proteins are 62% identical in their amino acid sequences...

  18. Video time encoding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF ENCODED BEADS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is relates to methods for the identification of spatially encoded beaded or granulated matrices comprising a plurality of immobilised particles. The identification is based on a distance matrix determination or based on a set of geometrical figures, such a triangles...

  20. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  1. Enhanced and sustained CD8+ T cell responses with an adenoviral vector-based hepatitis C virus vaccine encoding NS3 linked to the MHC class II chaperone protein invariant chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Marianne; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bukh, Jens

    2011-01-01

    memory. Functionally, the AdIiNS3-vaccinated mice had a significantly increased cytotoxic capacity compared with the AdNS3 group. The AdIiNS3-induced CD8(+) T cells protected mice from infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV NS3 of heterologous 1b strains, and studies in knockout mice...

  2. Cationic Lipid-Formulated DNA Vaccine against Hepatitis B Virus : Immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 Vectors Encoding Small and Large Surface Antigen in Comparison to a Licensed Protein Vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endmann, Anne; Klunder, Katharina; Kapp, Kerstin; Riede, Oliver; Oswald, Detlef; Talman, Eduard G.; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on the small (S) hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible

  3. Marek's disease virus-encoded analog of microRNA-155 activates the oncogene c-Myc by targeting LTBP1 and suppressing the TGF-β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jia-Qi; Teng, Man; Yu, Zu-Hua; Xu, Hui; Su, Jing-Wei; Zhao, Pu; Xing, Guang-Xu; Liang, Hong-De; Deng, Rui-Guang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Zhang, Gai-Ping; Luo, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a representative alpha herpes virus able to induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphoma in its natural host and regarded as an ideal model for the study of virus-induced tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that the mdv1-miR-M4-5p, a viral analog of cellular miR-155, is critical for MDV׳s oncogenicity. However, the precise mechanism whereby it was involved in MD lymphomagenesis remained unknown. We have presently identified the host mRNA targets of mdv1-miR-M4-5 and identified the latent TGF-β binding protein 1 (LTBP1) as a critical target for it. We found that during MDV infection, down-regulation of LTBP1 expression by mdv1-miR-M4-5p led to a significant decrease of the secretion and activation of TGF-β1, with suppression of TGF-β signaling and a significant activation of expression of c-Myc, a well-known oncogene which is critical for virus-induced tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal a novel and important mechanism of how mdv1-miR-M4-5p potentially contributes to MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  5. A member of a new plant gene family encoding a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain-containing protein is involved in restriction of long distance movement of plant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Patrick; Sofer, Luc; Schurdi-Levraud, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Restriction of long distance movement of several potyviruses in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by at least three dominant restricted TEV movement (RTM) genes, named RTM1, RTM2 and RTM3 and acts as a non-conventional resistance. RTM1 encodes a protein belonging to the jacalin family and RTM2 encodes a protein which has similarities to small heat shock proteins. The recent cloning of RTM3 which encodes a protein belonging to an unknown protein family of 29 members that has a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain in its N-terminal region and a coiled-coil (CC) domain at its C-terminal end is an important breakthrough for a better understanding of this resistance process. Not only the third gene involved in this resistance has been identified and has allowed revealing a new gene family in plant but the discovery that the RTM3 protein interacts directly with RTM1 strongly suggests that the RTM proteins form a multimeric complex. However, these data also highlight striking similarities of the RTM resistance with the well known R-gene mediated resistance. PMID:20930558

  6. Reassortant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Pigs, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Wendy A.; Essen, Steve C.; Strugnell, Benjamin W.; Russell, Christine; Barrass, Laura; Reid, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance for influenza virus in pigs in the United Kingdom during spring 2010 detected a novel reassortant influenza virus. This virus had genes encoding internal proteins from pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes from swine influenza virus (H1N2). Our results demonstrate processes contributing to influenza virus heterogeneity. PMID:21749767

  7. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Polacek, Charlotta; Breum, Solvej Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed...... that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently......-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis....

  8. CCL11 and GM-CSF differentially use the Rho GTPase pathway to regulate motility of human eosinophils in a three-dimensional microenvironment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muessel, M.J.; Scott, K.S.; Friedl, P.H.A.; Bradding, P.; Wardlaw, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease that causes considerable morbidity. Increased numbers of airway eosinophils are a hallmark of asthma. Mechanisms controlling the entry of eosinophils into asthmatic lung have been intensively investigated, but factors regulating migration within the tissue microenvironment

  9. GM-CSF as successful salvage therapy of metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis with Fournier's gangrene and severe septic shock in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Annegret; Kietz, Silke; Bahlmann, Hagen; Jafarzade, Gunel; Lode, Holger N; Heckmann, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    This case report describes the successful use of granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor as salvage therapy and an alternative to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a 14-year-old adolescent with metamizole (dipyrone)-induced agranulocytosis and severe septic shock.

  10. Interleukin-1α controls allergic sensitization to inhaled house dust mite via the epithelial release of GM-CSF and IL-33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Willart (Monique); K. Deswarte (Kim); P. Pouliot (Philippe); H. Braun (Harald); R. Beyaert (Rudi); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H. Hammad (Hamida)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHouse dust mite (HDM) is one of the most common allergens worldwide. In this study, we have addressed the involvement of IL-1 in the interaction between HDM and the innate immune response driven by lung epithelial cells (ECs) and dendritic cells (DCs) that leads to asthma. Mice lacking

  11. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid...... results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially...

  12. Two Small RNAs Encoded within the First 1.5 Kilobases of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Can Inhibit Productive Infection and Cooperate To Inhibit Apoptosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenwen; Sa e Silva, Mariana; Jaber, Tareq; Vitvitskaia, Olga; Li, Sumin; Henderson, Gail; Jones, Clinton

    2009-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) is abundantly expressed in latently infected trigeminal ganglionic sensory neurons. Expression of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences is sufficient for the wild-type reactivation phenotype in small animal models of infection. The ability of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences to inhibit apoptosis is important for the latency-reactivation cycle. Several studies have also concluded that LAT inhibits productive infection. To date, a functional LAT protein has not been identified, suggesting that LAT is a regulatory RNA. Two small RNAs (sRNAs) were previously identified within the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences. In this study, we demonstrated that both LAT sRNAs were expressed in the trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with an HSV-1 strain that expresses LAT but not when mice were infected with a LAT null mutant. LAT sRNA1 and sRNA2 cooperated to inhibit cold shock-induced apoptosis in mouse neuroblastoma cells. LAT sRNA1, but not LAT sRNA2, inhibited apoptosis less efficiently than both sRNAs. When rabbit skin cells were cotransfected with plasmids that express LAT sRNA1 and HSV-1 genomic DNA, the amount of infectious virus released was reduced approximately 3 logs. Although LAT sRNA2 was less effective at inhibiting virus production, it inhibited expression of infected cell protein 4 (ICP4). Neither LAT sRNA had an obvious effect on ICP0 expression. These studies suggested that expression of two LAT sRNAs plays a role in the latency-reactivation cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and productive infection. PMID:19587058

  13. TNF, IL6, and IL1B Polymorphisms Are Associated with Severe Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in the Mexican Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramírez, Román Alejandro; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; Quintana-Carrillo, Roger; Camarena, Ángel Eduardo; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypercytokinemia is the main immunopathological mechanism contributing to a more severe clinical course in influenza A (H1N1) virus infections. Most patients infected with the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus had increased systemic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines; including interleukin IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We propose that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter regions of pro-inflammatory genes are associated with the severity of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus infection. Methods 145 patients with influenza A (H1N1) (pA/H1N1), 133 patients with influenza-like illness (ILI), and 360 asymptomatic healthy contacts (AHCs) were included. Eleven SNPs were genotyped in six genes (TNF, LT, IL1B, IL6, CCL1, and IL8) using real-time PCR; the ancestral genotype was used for comparison. Genotypes were correlated with 27 clinical severity variables. Ten cytokines (GM-CSF, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-5, and IL-4) were measured on a Luminex 100. Results The IL6 rs1818879 (GA) heterozygous genotype was associated with severe influenza A (H1N1) virus infection (odds ratio [OR] = 5.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.05–11.56), and two IL1B SNPs, rs16944 AG and rs3136558 TC, were associated with a decreased risk of infection (OR = 0.52 and OR = 0.51, respectively). Genetic susceptibility was determined (pA/H1N1 vs. AHC): the LTA rs909253 TC heterozygous genotype conferred greater risk (OR = 1.9), and a similar association was observed with the IL1B rs3136558 CC genotype (OR = 1.89). Additionally, severely ill patients were compared with moderately ill patients. The TNF-238 GA genotype was associated with an increased risk of disease severity (OR = 16.06, p = 0.007). Compared with ILIs, patients with severe pA/H1N1 infections exhibited increased serum IL-5 (p <0.001) and IL-6 (p  =  0.007) levels. Conclusions The TNF gene was associated with disease severity, whereas IL1B and IL6 SNPs were

  14. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  15. Current status of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF–expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:24971166

  16. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  17. Encoding the Factorisation Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben N. S. Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay and Given-Wilson have recently introduced the Factorisation (or SF- calculus as a minimal fundamental model of intensional computation. It is a combinatory calculus containing a special combinator, F, which is able to examine the internal structure of its first argument. The calculus is significant in that as well as being combinatorially complete it also exhibits the property of structural completeness, i.e. it is able to represent any function on terms definable using pattern matching on arbitrary normal forms. In particular, it admits a term that can decide the structural equality of any two arbitrary normal forms. Since SF-calculus is combinatorially complete, it is clearly at least as powerful as the more familiar and paradigmatic Turing-powerful computational models of Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic. Its relationship to these models in the converse direction is less obvious, however. Jay and Given-Wilson have suggested that SF-calculus is strictly more powerful than the aforementioned models, but a detailed study of the connections between these models is yet to be undertaken. This paper begins to bridge that gap by presenting a faithful encoding of the Factorisation Calculus into the Lambda Calculus preserving both reduction and strong normalisation. The existence of such an encoding is a new result. It also suggests that there is, in some sense, an equivalence between the former model and the latter. We discuss to what extent our result constitutes an equivalence by considering it in the context of some previously defined frameworks for comparing computational power and expressiveness.

  18. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... shaped, bacilliform – not known to be associated with the other two cellular domains, Bacteria and Eukarya. The distinctiveness of the hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses extends to their genome sequences: a large majority of the predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public databases and encode...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...

  19. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  20. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  1. Detecting Faults from Encoded Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fault detection for linear continuous-time systems via encoded information is considered. The encoded information is received at a remote location by the monitoring deiice and assessed to infer the occurrence of the fault. A class of faults is considered which allows to use a simple

  2. A prime/boost DNA/Modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine expressing recombinant Leishmania DNA encoding TRYP is safe and immunogenic in outbred dogs, the reservoir of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Connor; Antoniou, Maria; Ruiz-Argüello, Maria Begoña; Alcami, Antonio; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Courtenay, Orin

    2009-02-11

    Previous studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime/boost vaccines expressing tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) and Leishmania homologue of the mammalian receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) against Leishmania major challenge in mice, which was consistent with results from TRYP protein/adjuvant combinations in non-human primates. This study aimed to conduct safety and immunogenicity trials of these DNA/MVA vaccines in dogs, the natural reservoir host of Leishmania infantum, followed-up for 4 months post-vaccination. In a cohort of 22 uninfected outbred dogs, blinded randomised administration of 1000 microg (high dose) or 100 microg (low dose) DNA prime (day 0) and 1x10(8)pfu MVA boost (day 28) was shown to be safe and showed no clinical side effects. High dose DNA/MVA vaccinated TRYP dogs produced statistically higher mean levels of the type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma than controls in whole blood assays (WBA) stimulated with the recombinant vaccine antigen TRYP, up to the final sampling at day 126, and in the absence of challenge with Leishmania. TRYP vaccinated dogs also demonstrated significantly higher TRYP-specific total IgG and IgG2 subtype titres than in controls, and positive in vivo intradermal reactions at day 156 in the absence of natural infection, observed in 6/8 TRYP vaccinated dogs. No significant increases in IFN-gamma in LACK-stimulated WBA, or in LACK-specific IgG levels, were detected in LACK vaccinated dogs compared to controls, and only 2/9 LACK vaccinated dogs demonstrated DTH responses at day 156. In all groups, IgG1 subclass responses and antigen-specific stimulation of IL-10 were similar to controls demonstrating an absence of Th2/T(reg) response, as expected in the absence of in vivo restimulation or natural/experimental challenge with Leishmania. These collective results indicate significant antigen-specific type-1 responses and in vivo memory phase cellular immune

  3. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  4. Chimeric viruses blur the borders between the major groups of eukaryotic single-stranded DNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Simon; Enault, Francois; Bronner, Gisèle; Vaulot, Daniel; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have uncovered an astonishing diversity of ssDNA viruses encoding replication proteins (Reps) related to those of eukaryotic Circoviridae, Geminiviridae or Nanoviridae; however, exact evolutionary relationships among these viruses remain obscure. Recently, a unique chimeric virus (CHIV) genome, which has apparently emerged via recombination between ssRNA and ssDNA viruses, has been discovered. Here we report on the assembly of 13 new CHIV genomes recovered f...

  5. Anti-tumoral effect of recombinant vaccinia virus through US guided injection in a rabbit model of hepatic VX2 carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Young; Park, Byeong Ho; Kang, Myong Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Choi, Jong Cheol; Choi, Sun Seob; Nam, Kyung Jin; Hwang, Tae Ho; Jeong, Jin Sook [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumoral effect of recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) (Thymidine kinase (-)/GM-CSF (+)) that was administered as a US guided intratumoral injection in a rabbit model of hepatic VX2 carcinoma. VX2 carcinoma was implanted in the livers of 12 rabbits. US was performed at every week interval to detect hepatic mass after the implantation of VX2 carcinoma. The accurate tumor size and volume was evaluated with CT when the tumor was detected on US. US guided injection of rVV (10{sup 9} pfu/ml) was preformed in three rabbits, intravenous injection of the same dose of rVV was done in two rabbits and another seven rabbits that were without any treatment were selected as a control group. We evaluated the change of the hepatic tumor size and extrahepatic metastasis on serial CT. Tumor specimens were harvested from rabbits that were killed at 8 weeks after VX2 implantation. These tissues were histoimmuopathologically compared to each other (the virus injection group and the control group). The differences between these groups were statistically assessed with student t-tests. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed in the US guided injection group compared with the intravenous injection group or the control group ({rho} < 0.01). The intravenous injection group showed statistically significant tumor suppression compared to the control group ({rho} < 0.01) until 2 weeks after virus injection. Quantification of the pulmonary metastatic nodules was performed in view of both the number and volume. The average number or volume of the pulmonary metastatic nodules in the US injection group was much smaller than these in the control group. Histopathologically, the tumors of the US guided injection group showed less extensive necrosis than those of the control group. Immunohistochemically, the tumor of the US guided injection group showed more prominent infiltration of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) lymphocytes than did the tumors of the other group

  6. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glyc...

  7. New concepts in PCM encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Paul M.

    The Pulse Coded Modulation (PCM) Encoder Systems used in telemetry have gained enormous flexibility for various applications because the input data channels and frame sync codes are programmable via the EEPROMs or UVEPROMs. The firmware in the current PCM Encoder Systems can be readily tailored for a specific application to monitor numerous types of analog channels, as well as digital channels. However, the current PCM Encoder Systems require several types of strap options which dictate not only a limited choice of gains and offsets, but also a fixed choice of the premodulation filter characteristics. The brain of the 1000 PCM Encoder is the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) which eliminates the fixed premodulation filter characteristics via digital filter functions, and also eliminates strap options via general purpose microprocessor functions.

  8. Structure and replication of hepatitis delta virus | Cunha | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis delta virus is the causative agent of one of the most severe forms of human virus hepatitis. It is a small and simple pathogen whose genome consists of a single RNA molecule of 1.7 Kb that encodes for only one antigen. The virus almost completely relies on the host cell machinery for replication and propagation of ...

  9. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  11. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  12. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decade