WorldWideScience

Sample records for virus encoded lmp1

  1. RPS27a enhances EBV-encoded LMP1-mediated proliferation and invasion by stabilizing of LMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Woo; Kim, Seung-Mi; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Yeong Seok; Hur, Dae Young

    2017-09-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is an oncoviral protein that plays a pivotal role in EBV-induced oncogenic transformation. The function of LMP1 in EBV-induced oncogenesis has been well studied. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LMP1 protein stability remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that ribosomal protein s27a (RPS27a) regulates LMP1 stability by a tandem affinity purification analysis. RPS27a interacts directly with LMP1 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of RPS27a increases the half-life of LMP1 in 293T cells, whereas downregulation of RPS27a using lentiviral shRNA technology accelerates the decrease in LMP1 protein level in EBV-transformed B cells. We show that LMP1 ubiquitination via the proteasome is completely inhibited by overexpression of RPS27a. RPS27a also enhances LMP1-mediated proliferation and invasion, suggesting that RPS27a interacts with LMP1 and stabilizes it by suppressing proteasome-mediated ubiquitination. These results suggest that RSP27a could be a potential target in EBV-infected LMP1-positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TRAF1 Coordinates Polyubiquitin Signaling to Enhance Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1-Mediated Growth and Survival Pathway Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Greenfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 signals through two C-terminal tail domains to drive cell growth, survival and transformation. The LMP1 membrane-proximal TES1/CTAR1 domain recruits TRAFs to activate MAP kinase, non-canonical and canonical NF-kB pathways, and is critical for EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. TRAF1 is amongst the most highly TES1-induced target genes and is abundantly expressed in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. We found that TRAF1 expression enhanced LMP1 TES1 domain-mediated activation of the p38, JNK, ERK and canonical NF-kB pathways, but not non-canonical NF-kB pathway activity. To gain insights into how TRAF1 amplifies LMP1 TES1 MAP kinase and canonical NF-kB pathways, we performed proteomic analysis of TRAF1 complexes immuno-purified from cells uninduced or induced for LMP1 TES1 signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that LMP1 TES1 domain signaling induced an association between TRAF1 and the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, and stimulated linear (M1-linked polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes. LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes isolated from EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs were highly modified by M1-linked polyubiqutin chains. The M1-ubiquitin binding proteins IKK-gamma/NEMO, A20 and ABIN1 each associate with TRAF1 in cells that express LMP1. TRAF2, but not the cIAP1 or cIAP2 ubiquitin ligases, plays a key role in LUBAC recruitment and M1-chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, implicating the TRAF1:TRAF2 heterotrimer in LMP1 TES1-dependent LUBAC activation. Depletion of either TRAF1, or the LUBAC ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit HOIP, markedly impaired LCL growth. Likewise, LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes purified from LCLs were decorated by lysine 63 (K63-linked polyubiqutin chains. LMP1 TES1 signaling induced K63-polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, and TRAF2 was identified as K63-Ub chain target. Co-localization of M1- and K63

  3. Genetic diversity of EBV-encoded LMP1 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and implication for NF-Κb activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Zuercher

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with several types of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, a multifunctional oncoprotein, is a powerful activator of the transcription factor NF-κB, a property that is essential for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell survival. Previous studies reported LMP1 sequence variations and induction of higher NF-κB activation levels compared to the prototype B95-8 LMP1 by some variants. Here we used biopsies of EBV-associated cancers and blood of individuals included in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS to analyze LMP1 genetic diversity and impact of sequence variations on LMP1-mediated NF-κB activation potential. We found that a number of variants mediate higher NF-κB activation levels when compared to B95-8 LMP1 and mapped three single polymorphisms responsible for this phenotype: F106Y, I124V and F144I. F106Y was present in all LMP1 isolated in this study and its effect was variant dependent, suggesting that it was modulated by other polymorphisms. The two polymorphisms I124V and F144I were present in distinct phylogenetic groups and were linked with other specific polymorphisms nearby, I152L and D150A/L151I, respectively. The two sets of polymorphisms, I124V/I152L and F144I/D150A/L151I, which were markers of increased NF-κB activation in vitro, were not associated with EBV-associated HL in the SHCS. Taken together these results highlighted the importance of single polymorphisms for the modulation of LMP1 signaling activity and demonstrated that several groups of LMP1 variants, through distinct mutational paths, mediated enhanced NF-κB activation levels compared to B95-8 LMP1.

  4. Characterization of a Suppressive Cis-acting Element in the Epstein–Barr Virus LMP1 Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoshida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a major oncogene encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and is essential for immortalization of B cells by the virus. Previous studies suggested that several transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NFκB, EBF1, AP-2 and STAT, are involved in LMP1 induction; however, the means by which the oncogene is negatively regulated remains unclear. Here, we introduced short mutations into the proximal LMP1 promoter that includes recognition sites for the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors in the context of EBV-bacterial artificial chromosome. Upon infection, the mutant exhibited increased LMP1 expression and EBV-mediated immortalization of B cells. However, single mutations of either the E-box or Ikaros sites had limited effects on LMP1 expression and transformation. Our results suggest that this region contains a suppressive cis-regulatory element, but other transcriptional repressors (apart from the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors may remain to be discovered.

  5. Simultaneous detection of the two main proliferation driving EBV encoded proteins, EBNA-2 and LMP-1 in single B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Abu E; Nagy, Noémi; Sohlberg, Ebba; Ádori, Mónika; Claesson, Hans-Erik; Klein, George; Klein, Eva

    2012-11-30

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is carried by almost all adults, mostly without clinical manifestations. Latent virus infection of B lymphocytes induces activation and proliferation that can be demonstrated in vitro. In healthy individuals, generation of EBV induced malignant proliferation is avoided by continuous immunological surveillance. The proliferation inducing set of the virally encoded genes is expressed exclusively in B cells in a defined differentiation window. It comprises nine EBV encoded nuclear proteins, EBNA 1-6, and three cell membrane associated proteins, LMP-1, 2A and 2B, designated as latency Type III. Outside this window the expression of the viral genes is limited. Healthy carriers harbor a low number of B lymphocytes in which the viral genome is either silent or expresses one virally encoded protein, EBNA-1, latency Type I. In addition, EBV genome carrying B cells can lack either EBNA-2 or LMP-1, latency Type IIa or Type IIb respectively. These cells have no inherent proliferation capacity. Detection of both EBNA-2 and LMP-1 can identify B cells with growth potential. We devised therefore a method for their simultaneous detection in cytospin deposited cell populations. Simultaneous detection of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 was reported earlier in tissues derived from infectious mononucleosis (IM), postransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and from "humanized" mice infected with EBV. We show for the first time the occurrence of Type IIa and Type IIb cells in cord blood lymphocyte populations infected with EBV in vitro. Further, we confirm the variation of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 expression in several Type III lines and that they vary independently in individual cells. We visualize that in Type III LCL, induced for plasmacytoid differentiation by IL-21 treatment, EBV protein expression changes to Type IIa (EBNA-2 negative LMP-1 positive). We also show that when the proliferation of EBV infected cord blood lymphocyte culture is inhibited by the

  6. CD63 Regulates Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1 Exosomal Packaging, Enhancement of Vesicle Production, and Noncanonical NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Stephanie N; Nkosi, Dingani; Conlon, Meghan M; York, Sara B; Liu, Xia; Tremblay, Deanna C; Meckes, David G

    2017-03-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded oncoprotein that is packaged into small extracellular vesicles (EVs) called exosomes. Trafficking of LMP1 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) alters the content and function of exosomes. LMP1-modified exosomes enhance the growth, migration, and invasion of malignant cells, demonstrating the capacity to manipulate the tumor microenvironment and enhance the progression of EBV-associated cancers. Despite the growing evidence surrounding the significance of LMP1-modified exosomes in cancer, very little is understood about the mechanisms that orchestrate LMP1 incorporation into these vesicles. Recently, LMP1 was shown to be copurified with CD63, a conserved tetraspanin protein enriched in late endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CD63 presence for exosomal packaging of LMP1. Nanoparticle tracking analysis and gradient purification revealed an increase in extracellular vesicle secretion and exosomal proteins following LMP1 expression. Immunoisolation of CD63-positive exosomes exhibited accumulation of LMP1 in this vesicle population. Functionally, CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of CD63 resulted in a reduction of LMP1-induced particle secretion. Furthermore, LMP1 packaging was severely impaired in CD63 knockout cells, concomitant with a disruption in the perinuclear localization of LMP1. Importantly, LMP1 trafficking to lipid rafts and activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt pathways remained intact following CD63 knockout, while mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and noncanonical NF-κB activation were observed to be increased. These results suggest that CD63 is a critical player in LMP1 exosomal trafficking and LMP1-mediated enhancement of exosome production and may play further roles in limiting downstream LMP1 signaling.IMPORTANCE EBV is a ubiquitous gamma herpesvirus linked to malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  7. Loss of P16 Protein Expression and Its Association with Epstein-Barr Virus LMP-1 Expression in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshaid, Fawzi; Tarawneh, Khaled; Alshdefat, Aisha; Dilmi, Fatiha; Jaran, Adnan; Al-Hadithi, Raji; Al-Khatib, Ahad

    2013-01-01

    Expression of Epstein-Barr virus Latent Member Protein-1 (EBV LMP-1) and loss of P16 protein expression are documented in lymphoma, indicating a relationship between them, but this relationship is not clear and sometimes contradictory. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between the loss of P16 and EBV LMP-1 expression in Jordanian patients diagnosed with lymphoma. Sections were made from archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded blocks from 55 patients diagnosed with lymphoma. P16 expression and LMP-1 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies. In Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL), the loss of P16 was higher in LMP-1 positive cases (61%) than LMP-1 negative cases (25%; P = 0.072). Conversely, in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL), none of LMP-1 positive samples showed loss of P16. Furthermore, among LMP-1 HL positive cases, the loss of P16 was more frequent in male (75%) than female (33%). Also, there was a significantly higher proportion of LMP-1 positive cases showing loss of P16 in HL (11:18), compared to those in NHL (0:8, P < 0.001), confirming a difference between HL and NHL, concerning the LMP-1/P16 relationship. A trend for an association between loss of P16 and LMP-1 expression was observed in HL but not NHL patients. These findings suggest that there are molecular and clinical differences in the pathogenesis and development of different subtypes of lymphoma.

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) C-Terminal-Activating Region 3 Contributes to LMP1-Mediated Cellular Migration via Its Interaction with Ubc9 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Whitehurst, Christopher B.; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the principal viral oncoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is a constitutively active membrane signaling protein that regulates multiple signal transduction pathways via its C-terminal-activating region 1 (CTAR1) and CTAR2, and also the less-studied CTAR3. Because protein sumoylation among other posttranslational modifications may regulate many signaling pathways induced by LMP1, we investigated whether during EBV latency LMP1 regulates sumoylation processes that control cellular activation and cellular responses. By immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that LMP1 interacts with Ubc9, the single reported SUMO-conjugating enzyme. Requirements for LMP1-Ubc9 interactions include enzymatically active Ubc9: expression of inactive Ubc9 (Ubc9 C93S) inhibited the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction. LMP1 CTAR3, but not CTAR1 and CTAR2, participated in the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction, and amino acid sequences found in CTAR3, including the JAK-interacting motif, contributed to this interaction. Furthermore, LMP1 expression coincided with increased sumoylation of cellular proteins, and disruption of the Ubc9-LMP1 CTAR3 interaction almost completely abrogated LMP1-induced protein sumoylation, suggesting that this interaction promotes the sumoylation of downstream targets. Additional consequences of the disruption of the LMP1 CTAR3-Ubc9 interaction revealed effects on cellular migration, a hallmark of oncogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that LMP1 CTAR3 does in fact function in intracellular signaling and leads to biological effects. We propose that LMP1, by interaction with Ubc9, modulates sumoylation processes, which regulate signal transduction pathways that affect phenotypic changes associated with oncogenesis. PMID:21795333

  9. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) C-terminal-activating region 3 contributes to LMP1-mediated cellular migration via its interaction with Ubc9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Gretchen L; Whitehurst, Christopher B; Pagano, Joseph S

    2011-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the principal viral oncoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is a constitutively active membrane signaling protein that regulates multiple signal transduction pathways via its C-terminal-activating region 1 (CTAR1) and CTAR2, and also the less-studied CTAR3. Because protein sumoylation among other posttranslational modifications may regulate many signaling pathways induced by LMP1, we investigated whether during EBV latency LMP1 regulates sumoylation processes that control cellular activation and cellular responses. By immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that LMP1 interacts with Ubc9, the single reported SUMO-conjugating enzyme. Requirements for LMP1-Ubc9 interactions include enzymatically active Ubc9: expression of inactive Ubc9 (Ubc9 C93S) inhibited the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction. LMP1 CTAR3, but not CTAR1 and CTAR2, participated in the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction, and amino acid sequences found in CTAR3, including the JAK-interacting motif, contributed to this interaction. Furthermore, LMP1 expression coincided with increased sumoylation of cellular proteins, and disruption of the Ubc9-LMP1 CTAR3 interaction almost completely abrogated LMP1-induced protein sumoylation, suggesting that this interaction promotes the sumoylation of downstream targets. Additional consequences of the disruption of the LMP1 CTAR3-Ubc9 interaction revealed effects on cellular migration, a hallmark of oncogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that LMP1 CTAR3 does in fact function in intracellular signaling and leads to biological effects. We propose that LMP1, by interaction with Ubc9, modulates sumoylation processes, which regulate signal transduction pathways that affect phenotypic changes associated with oncogenesis.

  10. [Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1 oncogene variants in cell lines of different origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, L S; Senyuta, N B; Goncharova, E V; Scherback, L N; Smirnova, R V; Pavlish, O A; Gurtsevitch, V E

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a widespread infection in the human population. Typically, infection occurs in early childhood without serious consequences for infected people. At the same time, a secondary infection with an additional EBV strain occurs quite often. During the in vitro cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from persons infected with multiple strains of the virus, only one of these strains with higher transforming potential becomes dominant, while the others are eliminated. Under certain conditions, such a highly transforming EBV strain apparently is able to be the etiologic agent of EBVassociated diseases. To find out the range of highly transforming EBV strains prevalent among Russians, cell lines from patients with EBV-associated and non-associated tumors, as well as healthy individuals, were established. The structural analysis of the latent membrane protein 1 gene (LMP1), a key oncogene of the virus, isolated from established cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes of blood donors was carried out, and data obtained were compared with the respective data for LMP1 isolates, amplified from cell lines established from African and Japanese patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. The data obtained show a genetic relationship between Russian LMP1 isolates regardless the fact whether they come from patients with tumors or healthy individuals and differ significantly from LMP1 isolates from Burkitt's lymphoma patients. Thus, the results of the study suggest that in nonendemic region for EBV-associated pathology, Russia, any strain of EBV with any structure of LMP1 with concomitant effect of additional factors may become an etiologic agent for EBV-associated neoplasia.

  11. Epstein - Barr virus transforming protein LMP-1 alters B cells gene expression by promoting accumulation of the oncoprotein ΔNp73α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Accardi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have proved that oncogenic viruses develop redundant mechanisms to alter the functions of the tumor suppressor p53. Here we show that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, via the oncoprotein LMP-1, induces the expression of ΔNp73α, a strong antagonist of p53. This phenomenon is mediated by the LMP-1 dependent activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1 which in turn favours the recruitment of p73 to ΔNp73α promoter. A specific chemical inhibitor of JNK-1 or silencing JNK-1 expression strongly down-regulated ΔNp73α mRNA levels in LMP-1-containing cells. Accordingly, LMP-1 mutants deficient to activate JNK-1 did not induce ΔNp73α accumulation. The recruitment of p73 to the ΔNp73α promoter correlated with the displacement of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 which is part of the transcriptional repressive polycomb 2 complex. Inhibition of ΔNp73α expression in lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs led to the stimulation of apoptosis and up-regulation of a large number of cellular genes as determined by whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq. In particular, the expression of genes encoding products known to play anti-proliferative/pro-apoptotic functions, as well as genes known to be deregulated in different B cells malignancy, was altered by ΔNp73α down-regulation. Together, these findings reveal a novel EBV mechanism that appears to play an important role in the transformation of primary B cells.

  12. Tak1 is a Component of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lmp1 Complex and is Essential for Activation of JNK But Not of NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Noriyuki; Kajino, Taikuke; Sanjo, Hideki; Sato, Shintaro; Akira, Shizuo; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) activates NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is essential for LMP1 oncogenic activity. Genetic analysis has revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an indispensable intermediate of LMP1 signaling leading to activation of both NF-κB and JNK. However, the mechanism by which LMP1 engages TRAF6 for activation of NF-κB and JNK is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that TAK1 MAP kinase kinase kinase and TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2), together with TRAF6, are recruited to LMP1 through its N-terminal transmembrane region. The C-terminal cytoplasmic region of LMP1 facilitates the assembly of this complex and enhances activation of JNK. In contrast, IκB kinase γ (IKKγ) is recruited through the C-terminal cytoplasmic region and this is essential for activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, we found that ablation of TAK1 resulted in the loss of LMP1-induced activation of JNK, but not of NF-κB. These results suggest that an LMP1-associated complex containing TRAF6, TAB2 and TAK1 plays an essential role in the activation of JNK. However, TAK1 is not an exclusive intermediate for NF-κB activation in LMP1 signaling. PMID:16446357

  13. Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation in Vietnamese patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: full-length analysis of LMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Van, Do; Ernberg, Ingemar; Enrberg, Ingemar; Phan-Thi Phi, Phi; Tran-Thi, Chinh; Hu, LiFu

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variation in tumor virus genes and its impact on function might contribute to the understanding of geographic differences in risks for virus-associated tumors. This is particularly true for the genes known to contribute to the biology of the tumor. It is has been proposed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene variation has a role in the high risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in South-East Asia. NPC is among the five most common cancers in Vietnam. EBV-NPC cells always express EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and also frequently latent membrane protein 1 and 2 (LMP1 & LMP2). To investigate EBV gene variation in Vietnamese NPC patients we analyzed the full length of LMP1 gene including its promoter region, and the N-termini of both EBNA1 and LMP2A genes from five NPC biopsies. We detected two EBV variants V1 and V2 based on the LMP1 nucleotide sequence pattern compared with the prototype B95-8 and some available sequences including Chinese variants. The V1 variant shows strong similarity to a variant dominant in Southern China (China 1), while the V2 variant is similar to a Thai variant SEA 2 and partly identity with GD1 in the C-terminus. The promoter region and transmembrane domain of the SEA 2-like samples contained some specific differences compared with previously published variants. In contrast, analysis of EBNA1 N- and LMP2A N-termini only revealed minor changes. Our findings reinforces that the polymorphisms of whole LMP1 sequence should be considered in future EBV molecular epidemiology studies in different geographic populations.

  14. Triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes by down-regulating expression of a viral protein LMP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Heng [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Pathology and Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Long, Cong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jingchao [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Xiaoping, E-mail: xsun6@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Triptolide inhibits proliferation of EBV-positive lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. • Triptolide reduces expression of LMP1 by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide inhibits ED-L1 promoter activity. - Abstract: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects various types of cells and mainly establishes latent infection in B lymphocytes. The viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) plays important roles in transformation and proliferation of B lymphocytes infected with EBV. Triptolide is a compound of Tripterygium extracts, showing anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, it is determined whether triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes. The CCK-8 assays were performed to examine cell viabilities of EBV-positive B95-8 and P3HR-1 cells treated by triptolide. The mRNA and protein levels of LMP1 were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activities of two LMP1 promoters (ED-L1 and TR-L1) were determined by Dual luciferase reportor assay. The results showed that triptolide inhibited the cell viability of EBV-positive B lymphocytes, and the over-expression of LMP1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Triptolide decreased the LMP1 expression and transcriptional levels in EBV-positive B cells. The activity of LMP1 promoter ED-L1 in type III latent infection was strongly suppressed by triptolide treatment. In addition, triptolide strongly reduced growth of B95-8 induced B lymphoma in BALB/c nude mice. These results suggest that triptolide decreases proliferation of EBV-induced B lymphocytes possibly by a mechanism related to down-regulation of the LMP1 expression.

  15. Analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) gene and promoter in Hodgkin's disease isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Andresen, B S; Zhou, X G

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To study the distribution of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) variants containing mutations in the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) oncogene and promoter in EBV associated Hodgkin's disease and infectious mononucleosis compared with previous findings in asymptomatic EBV carriers. METHODS: Sequence...

  16. [The clinical significance of serum Epstein-Barr virus-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) assay in patients with nasal type extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Na; Cui, Xueying; Wang, Jingwen

    2015-02-01

    To explore the clinical significance of the serum Epstein-Barr virus-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) in patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL). The serum EBNA1 and LMP1 were detected by real-time PCR in 36 ENKL patients hospitalized in Beijing Tongren Hospital from August 2010 to August 2013. Twenty healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. The median serum EBNA1 was 1.9×10(4) (ranged from 0 to 11.0×10(4)) copies/µl in ENKL patients and 8.0 (ranged from 0 to 43.8) copies/µl in healthy volunteers. The median serum LMP1 was 3.9×10(3) (ranged from 118.3 to 24.0×10(3)) copies/µl in ENKL patients and 3.3 (ranged from 0 to 33.3) copies/µl in healthy volunteers. Both EBNA1 and LMP1 were higher in ENKL patients than healthy volunteers (all P < 0.01). The median EBNA1 and LMP1 in ENKL patients posttreatment were 1.0×10(3) (ranged from 0 to 2.0 × 10(3)) copies/µl and 300.8 (ranged from 0 to 825.7) copies/µl respectively, which were both significantly decreased than pretreatment (all P < 0.05). The EBNA1 and LMP1 were decreased in effective treatment group versus ineffective treatment group (P < 0.05). The serum EBNA1 and LMP1 were positively correlated with lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level (r = 0.364,0.546; P = 0.040,0.012). (1) The measurement of EBNA1/LMP1 may be useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect. (2) The serum EBNA1/LMP1 may reflect the tumor load in ENKL patients.

  17. Roles of the kinase TAK1 in TRAF6-dependent signaling by CD40 and its oncogenic viral mimic, LMP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Arcipowski

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded protein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is essential for EBV-mediated B cell transformation and plays a critical role in the development of post-transplant B cell lymphomas. LMP1 also contributes to the exacerbation of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. LMP1 is a functional mimic of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR superfamily member CD40, and relies on TNFR-associated factor (TRAF adaptor proteins to mediate signaling. However, LMP1 activation signals to the B cell are amplified and sustained compared to CD40 signals. We previously demonstrated that LMP1 and CD40 use TRAF molecules differently. Although associating with CD40 and LMP1 via separate mechanisms, TRAF6 plays a significant role in signal transduction by both. It is unknown whether TRAF6 mediates CD40 versus LMP1 functions via distinct or shared pathways. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TRAF6 uses the kinase TAK1 to trigger important signaling pathways following both CD40 and LMP1 stimulation. We determined that TAK1 was required for JNK activation and interleukin-6 (IL-6 production mediated by CD40 and LMP1, in both mouse and human B cells. Additionally, TRAF3 negatively regulated TRAF6-dependent, CD40-mediated TAK1 activation by limiting TRAF6 recruitment. This mode of regulation was not observed for LMP1 and may contribute to the dysregulation of LMP1 compared to CD40 signals.

  18. CD137 expression is induced by Epstein-Barr virus infection through LMP1 in T or NK cells and mediates survival promoting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, Mayumi; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Komatsu, Honami; Wang, Ludan; Saitoh, Yasunori; Yamaoka, Shoji; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Kurata, Morito; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Norio; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Miura, Osamu; Arai, Ayako

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism for development of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T- or NK-cell neoplasms, we focused on the costimulatory receptor CD137. We detected high expression of CD137 gene and its protein on EBV-positive T- or NK-cell lines as compared with EBV-negative cell lines. EBV-positive cells from EBV-positive T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-T/NK-LPDs) patients also had significantly higher CD137 gene expression than control cells from healthy donors. In the presence of IL-2, whose concentration in the serum of EBV-T/NK-LPDs was higher than that of healthy donors, CD137 protein expression was upregulated in the patients' cells whereas not in control cells from healthy donors. In vitro EBV infection of MOLT4 cells resulted in induction of endogenous CD137 expression. Transient expression of LMP1, which was enhanced by IL-2 in EBV-T/NK-LPDs cells, induced endogenous CD137 gene expression in T and NK-cell lines. In order to examine in vivo CD137 expression, we used EBV-T/NK-LPDs xenograft models generated by intravenous injection of patients' cells. We identified EBV-positive and CD8-positive T cells, as well as CD137 ligand-positive cells, in their tissue lesions. In addition, we detected CD137 expression on the EBV infected cells from the lesions of the models by immune-fluorescent staining. Finally, CD137 stimulation suppressed etoposide-induced cell death not only in the EBV-positive T- or NK-cell lines, but also in the patients' cells. These results indicate that upregulation of CD137 expression through LMP1 by EBV promotes cell survival in T or NK cells leading to development of EBV-positive T/NK-cell neoplasms.

  19. LMP1-induced cell death may contribute to the emergency of its oncogenic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ouk, Tan-Sothéa; Le Goff, Arnaud; De Witte, Caroline; Mougel, Alexandra; Coll, Jean; Fafeur, Véronique; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Adriaenssens, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) is linked to a variety of malignancies including Hodgkin's disease, lymphomas, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. LMP1 exerts its transforming or oncogenic activity mainly through the recruitment of intracellular adapters via LMP1 C-terminal Transformation Effector Sites (TES) 1 and 2. However, LMP1 is also reported to elicit significant cytotoxic effects in some other cell types. This cytotoxic effect is quite intriguing for an oncogenic protein, and it is unclear whether both functional aspects of the protein are related or mutually exclusive. Using different ectopic expression systems in both Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells and human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells, we observe that LMP1 ectopic expression massively induces cell death. Furthermore, we show that LMP1-induced cytotoxicity mainly implies LMP1 C-terminal transformation effector sites and TRADD recruitment. However, stable expression of LMP1 in the same cells, is found to be associated with an increase of cell survival and an acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype as evidenced by morphological modifications, increased cell mobility, increased expression of MMP9 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic and oncogenic effects of LMP1 are not mutually exclusive but may operate sequentially. We suggest that in a total cell population, cells resistant to LMP1-induced cytotoxicity are those that could take advantage of LMP1 oncogenic activity by integrating LMP1 signaling into the pre-existent signaling network. Our findings thus reconcile the apparent opposite apoptotic and oncogenic effects described for LMP1 and might reflect what actually happens on LMP1-induced cell transformation after EBV infection in patients.

  20. LMP1-induced cell death may contribute to the emergency of its oncogenic property.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Brocqueville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 is linked to a variety of malignancies including Hodgkin's disease, lymphomas, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. LMP1 exerts its transforming or oncogenic activity mainly through the recruitment of intracellular adapters via LMP1 C-terminal Transformation Effector Sites (TES 1 and 2. However, LMP1 is also reported to elicit significant cytotoxic effects in some other cell types. This cytotoxic effect is quite intriguing for an oncogenic protein, and it is unclear whether both functional aspects of the protein are related or mutually exclusive. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using different ectopic expression systems in both Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cells and human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells, we observe that LMP1 ectopic expression massively induces cell death. Furthermore, we show that LMP1-induced cytotoxicity mainly implies LMP1 C-terminal transformation effector sites and TRADD recruitment. However, stable expression of LMP1 in the same cells, is found to be associated with an increase of cell survival and an acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype as evidenced by morphological modifications, increased cell mobility, increased expression of MMP9 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic and oncogenic effects of LMP1 are not mutually exclusive but may operate sequentially. We suggest that in a total cell population, cells resistant to LMP1-induced cytotoxicity are those that could take advantage of LMP1 oncogenic activity by integrating LMP1 signaling into the pre-existent signaling network. Our findings thus reconcile the apparent opposite apoptotic and oncogenic effects described for LMP1 and might reflect what actually happens on LMP1-induced cell transformation after EBV infection in patients.

  1. C-terminal region of EBNA-2 determines the superior transforming ability of type 1 Epstein-Barr virus by enhanced gene regulation of LMP-1 and CXCR7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cancian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV strains immortalize B lymphocytes in vitro much more efficiently than type 2 EBV, a difference previously mapped to the EBNA-2 locus. Here we demonstrate that the greater transforming activity of type 1 EBV correlates with a stronger and more rapid induction of the viral oncogene LMP-1 and the cell gene CXCR7 (which are both required for proliferation of EBV-LCLs during infection of primary B cells with recombinant viruses. Surprisingly, although the major sequence differences between type 1 and type 2 EBNA-2 lie in N-terminal parts of the protein, the superior ability of type 1 EBNA-2 to induce proliferation of EBV-infected lymphoblasts is mostly determined by the C-terminus of EBNA-2. Substitution of the C-terminus of type 1 EBNA-2 into the type 2 protein is sufficient to confer a type 1 growth phenotype and type 1 expression levels of LMP-1 and CXCR7 in an EREB2.5 cell growth assay. Within this region, the RG, CR7 and TAD domains are the minimum type 1 sequences required. Sequencing the C-terminus of EBNA-2 from additional EBV isolates showed high sequence identity within type 1 isolates or within type 2 isolates, indicating that the functional differences mapped are typical of EBV type sequences. The results indicate that the C-terminus of EBNA-2 accounts for the greater ability of type 1 EBV to promote B cell proliferation, through mechanisms that include higher induction of genes (LMP-1 and CXCR7 required for proliferation and survival of EBV-LCLs.

  2. C-terminal region of EBNA-2 determines the superior transforming ability of type 1 Epstein-Barr virus by enhanced gene regulation of LMP-1 and CXCR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancian, Laila; Bosshard, Rachel; Lucchesi, Walter; Karstegl, Claudio Elgueta; Farrell, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) strains immortalize B lymphocytes in vitro much more efficiently than type 2 EBV, a difference previously mapped to the EBNA-2 locus. Here we demonstrate that the greater transforming activity of type 1 EBV correlates with a stronger and more rapid induction of the viral oncogene LMP-1 and the cell gene CXCR7 (which are both required for proliferation of EBV-LCLs) during infection of primary B cells with recombinant viruses. Surprisingly, although the major sequence differences between type 1 and type 2 EBNA-2 lie in N-terminal parts of the protein, the superior ability of type 1 EBNA-2 to induce proliferation of EBV-infected lymphoblasts is mostly determined by the C-terminus of EBNA-2. Substitution of the C-terminus of type 1 EBNA-2 into the type 2 protein is sufficient to confer a type 1 growth phenotype and type 1 expression levels of LMP-1 and CXCR7 in an EREB2.5 cell growth assay. Within this region, the RG, CR7 and TAD domains are the minimum type 1 sequences required. Sequencing the C-terminus of EBNA-2 from additional EBV isolates showed high sequence identity within type 1 isolates or within type 2 isolates, indicating that the functional differences mapped are typical of EBV type sequences. The results indicate that the C-terminus of EBNA-2 accounts for the greater ability of type 1 EBV to promote B cell proliferation, through mechanisms that include higher induction of genes (LMP-1 and CXCR7) required for proliferation and survival of EBV-LCLs.

  3. A neutralized human LMP1-IgG inhibits ENKTL growth by suppressing the JAK3/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Mingzhi; Fan, Weifei; Tang, Qi; Xiong, Siping; Tang, Xiaojun; Xu, Juqing; Wang, Lin; Yang, Shu; Liu, Suyao; Xu, Li; Chen, Yan; Xu, Lin; Yin, Rong; Zhu, Jin

    2017-02-14

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), which is associated with the development of different types of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related lymphoma, has been suggested to be an important oncoprotein. In this study, a human anti-LMP1 IgG antibody (LMP1-IgG) was constructed and characterized by ELISA, western blotting (WB), affinity and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses. CCK-8, MTT, apoptosis assays, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and CDC (complement-dependent cytotoxicity) assays were performed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of LMP1-IgG on extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). Then, the influence of LMP1-IgG on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway was investigated. The results showed that the successfully constructed LMP1-IgG inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and activated ADCC and CDC of ENKTL in a concentration- and time- dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of JAK3 and STAT3 was inhibited by LMP1-IgG. Our data indicate that LMP1-IgG may provide a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of LMP1-positive ENKTL.

  4. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 and tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptor 4 are induced by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1 and associated with the metastatic potential of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, which is encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, is an important oncogenic protein that is closely related to carcinogenesis and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, a prevalent cancer in China. We previously reported that the expression of the functional chemokine receptor CXCR4 is associated with human NPC metastasis. In this study, we show that LMP1 induces tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 through tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 (TPST-1, an enzyme that is responsible for catalysis of tyrosine sulfation in vivo, which is likely to contribute to the highly metastatic character of NPC. LMP1 could induce tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 and its associated cell motility and invasiveness in a NPC cell culture model. In contrast, the expression of TPST-1 small interfering RNA reversed LMP1-induced tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4. LMP1 conveys signals through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway, and EGFR-targeted siRNA inhibited the induction of TPST-1 by LMP1. We used a ChIP assay to show that EGFR could bind to the TPST-1 promoter in vivo under the control of LMP1. A reporter gene assay indicated that the activity of the TPST-1 promoter could be suppressed by deleting the binding site between EGFR and TPST-1. Finally, in human NPC tissues, the expression of TPST-1 and LMP1 was directly correlated and clinically, the expression of TPST-1 was associated with metastasis. These results suggest the up-regulation of TPST-1 and tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 by LMP1 might be a potential mechanism contributing to NPC metastasis.

  5. LMP1-mediated glycolysis induces myeloid-derived suppressor cell expansion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ting-Ting; Ye, Shu-Biao; Liu, Yi-Na; He, Jia; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Chuan-Xia; Cui, Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are expanded in tumor microenvironments, including that of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The link between MDSC expansion and EBV infection in NPC is unclear. Here, we show that EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) promotes MDSC expansion in the tumor microenvironment by promoting extra-mitochondrial glycolysis in malignant cells, which is a scenario for immune escape initially suggested by the frequent, concomitant detection of abundant LMP1, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and CD33+ MDSCs in tumor sections. The full process has been reconstituted in vitro. LMP1 promotes the expression of multiple glycolytic genes, including GLUT1. This metabolic reprogramming results in increased expression of the Nod-like receptor family protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, COX-2 and P-p65 and, consequently, increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. Finally, these changes in the environment of malignant cells result in enhanced NPC-derived MDSC induction. One key step is the physical interaction of LMP1 with GLUT1 to stabilize the GLUT1 protein by blocking its K48-ubiquitination and p62-dependent autolysosomal degradation. This work indicates that LMP1-mediated glycolysis regulates IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF production through the NLRP3 inflammasome, COX-2 and P-p65 signaling pathways to enhance tumor-associated MDSC expansion, which leads to tumor immunosuppression in NPC. PMID:28732079

  6. Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression in Hodgkin lymphoma and its correlation with clinical and histologic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Atif Ali; Hussain, Zubaida Fida; Hashmi, Kashif Ali; Zafar, Muhammad Irfan; Edhi, Muhammad Muzzammil; Faridi, Naveen; Khan, Mehmood

    2017-04-20

    Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most prevalent lymphoproliferative disorders in Pakistan; however, no risk factors for this disease have yet to be established in our population. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a well-known risk factor for Hodgkin lymphoma in endemic regions of the world; however, frequency of its association in our population has not been widely studied. Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a surrogate marker of EBV in Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of expression of LMP1 in cases of Hodgkin lymphoma at our institute and its correlation with other clinical and histologic parameters. The study included 66 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed at Liaquat National Hospital over a duration of 2 years from January 2014 to December 2015. The slides and blocks of all cases were retrieved, and representative blocks were selected for LMP1 by IHC. LMP1 expression of >10% of cells was considered as positive expression and correlated with histologic subtypes and clinical parameters like age, gender, and site of involvement. The mean age of patients was 35.11 (+20.22). LMP1 expression was found in 68.1% (45/66) of cases of Hodgkin lymphoma. Mean age of the patients with LMP1 expression was 32.04 (+21.02). LMP1 expression was found in 40% cases of lymphocyte-rich, 66.7% of lymphocyte-depleted, 73.9% of mixed cellularity, 66.7% of nodular sclerosis, and 73.7% of classic Hodgkin lymphoma, NOS. No significant correlation of LMP1 expression with any clinical or histological parameter could be established in our studied patient population. A high frequency of expression of LMP1 is seen in cases of Hodgkin lymphoma at our setup comparable to endemic regions of the world; therefore, preventive and treatment protocols should be designed accordingly.

  7. Piperlongumine inhibits LMP1/MYC-dependent mouse B-lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong-Su; Tompkins, Van S. [Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Son, Dong-Ju [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Stunz, Laura L. [Deparment of Microbiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Iowa City VAMC, Iowa City, IA (United States); Halwani, Ahmad [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bishop, Gail A. [Deparment of Microbiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Iowa City VAMC, Iowa City, IA (United States); Janz, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried-janz@uiowa.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma revealed cancer inhibition by PL. •Treatment with PL led to apoptosis of malignant but not normal B cells. •PL inhibited LMP1–NF-κB–Myc-dependent target genes including p21-encoding Cdkn1a. •PL holds promise for new interventions approaches to hematologic malignancies. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), isolated from the fruit of Long pepper, Piper longum, is a cancer-inhibiting compound that selectively kills tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the efficacy with which PL suppresses malignant B cells derived from a newly developed, double-transgenic mouse model of human endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), designated mCD40-LMP1/iMyc{sup Eμ}. PL inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and induced apoptosis of neoplastic but not normal B cells. Treatment with PL resulted in downregulation of EBV-encoded LMP1, cellular Myc, constitutive NF-κB activity, and a host of LMP1-Myc-NF-κB-regulated target genes including Aurka, Bcat1, Bub1b, Ccnb1, Chek1, Fancd2, Tfrc and Xrcc6. Of note, p21{sup Cip1}-encoding Cdkn1a was suppressed independent of changes in Trp53 mRNA levels and p53 DNA-binding activity. Considering the central role of the LMP1–NF-κB–Myc axis in B-lineage neoplasia, these findings further our understanding of the mechanisms by which PL inhibits B-lymphoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the inclusion of PL in new interventions in blood cancers.

  8. HSV-tk/GCV gene therapy mediated by EBV-LMP1 for EBV-associated cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midan Ai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the feasibility of gene therapy in treating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated cancer by employing the suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV, which uses the signaling pathway through the HIV-long terminal repeat (LTR gene which is expressed from a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB-binding motif-containing promoter that is regulated by EBV-latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 via NF-κB. Methods First, we constructed the plasmid pVLTR-tk, which was regulated by EBV-LMP1 via NF-κB, and then investigated the cytotoxic effect of the pVLTR-tk/GCV on cancer cells, using MTT assays, clonogenic assays, flow cytometry, and animal experiments. Results The activation of TK was increased after transfection of the pVLTR-tk into the EBV-LMP1 positive cells. After GCV treatment, the clonogenicity and survival of the cells substantially declined, and a bystander effect was also observed. The LMP1 positive cells exhibited remarkable apoptosis following pVLTR-tk/GCV treatment, and the pVLTR-tk/GCV restrained tumor growth in vivo for EBV-LMP1 positive cancers. Conclusion The pVLTR-tk/GCV suicide gene system may be used as a new gene targeting strategy for EBV-associated cancer.

  9. Regulation of EBV LMP1-triggered EphA4 downregulation in EBV-associated B lymphoma and its impact on patients' survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Sue-Jane; Lin, Kai-Min; Chou, Ya-Ching; Lin, Chung-Wu; Yu, Shan-Chi; Chen, Chi-Long; Shen, Tang-Long; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lu, Jean; Chen, Mei-Ru; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2016-09-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an oncogenic human virus, is associated with several lymphoproliferative disorders, including Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). In vitro, EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Recently, several studies have shown that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in EBV-associated neoplasia. However, details of the involvement of RTKs in EBV-regulated B-cell neoplasia and malignancies remain largely unclear. Here, we found that erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A4 (EphA4), which belongs to the largest RTK Eph family, was downregulated in primary B cells post-EBV infection at the transcriptional and translational levels. Overexpression and knockdown experiments confirmed that EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was responsible for this EphA4 suppression. Mechanistically, LMP1 triggered the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and promoted Sp1 to suppress EphA4 promoter activity. Functionally, overexpression of EphA4 prevented LCLs from proliferation. Pathologically, the expression of EphA4 was detected in EBV(-) tonsils but not in EBV(+) PTLD. In addition, an inverse correlation of EphA4 expression and EBV presence was verified by immunochemical staining of EBV(+) and EBV(-) DLBCL, suggesting EBV infection was associated with reduced EphA4 expression. Analysis of a public data set showed that lower EphA4 expression was correlated with a poor survival rate of DLBCL patients. Our findings provide a novel mechanism by which EphA4 can be regulated by an oncogenic LMP1 protein and explore its possible function in B cells. The results provide new insights into the role of EphA4 in EBV(+) PTLD and DLBCL. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus associated modulation of Wnt pathway is not dependent on latent membrane protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Webb

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can modulate the Wnt pathway in virus-infected cells and this effect is mediated by EBV-encoded oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1. Here we have reassessed the role of LMP1 in regulating the expression of various mediators of the canonical Wnt cascade. Contradicting the previous finding, we found that the levels of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3ss (GSK3beta, axin and alpha-catenin were not affected by the expression of LMP1 sequences from normal B cells or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Moreover, we also show that LMP1 expression had no detectable effect on the E-cadherin and beta-catenin interaction and did not induce transcriptional activation of beta-catenin. Taken together these studies demonstrate that EBV-mediated activation of Wnt pathway is not dependent on the expression of LMP1.

  11. KSHV LANA and EBV LMP1 induce the expression of UCH-L1 following viral transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; Wang, Ling [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Shackelford, Julia [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Damania, Blossom [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Pagano, Joseph S., E-mail: joseph_pagano@med.unc.edu [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-01-05

    Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) has oncogenic properties and is highly expressed during malignancies. We recently documented that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection induces uch-l1 expression. Here we show that Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection induced UCH-L1 expression, via cooperation of KSHV Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA) and RBP-Jκ and activation of the uch-l1 promoter. UCH-L1 expression was also increased in Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) cells co-infected with KSHV and EBV compared with PEL cells infected only with KSHV, suggesting EBV augments the effect of LANA on uch-l1. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is one of the few EBV products expressed in PEL cells. Results showed that LMP1 was sufficient to induce uch-l1 expression, and co-expression of LMP1 and LANA had an additive effect on uch-l1 expression. These results indicate that viral latency products of both human γ-herpesviruses contribute to uch-l1 expression, which may contribute to the progression of lymphoid malignancies. - Highlights: • Infection of endothelial cells with KSHV induced UCH-L1 expression. • KSHV LANA is sufficient for the induction of uch-l1. • Co-infection with KSHV and EBV (observed in some PELs) results in the additive induction of uch-l1. • EBV LMP1 also induced UCH-L1 expression. • LANA- and LMP1-mediated activation of the uch-l1 promoter is in part through RBP-Jκ.

  12. A role for protein kinase PKR in the mediation of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1-induced IL-6 and IL-10 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, San San; Lee, Davy C W; Law, Anna H Y; Fang, Jun Wei; Chua, Daniel T T; Lau, Allan S Y

    2010-05-01

    Expression of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded oncogenic latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) has been substantially associated with tumorigenic transformation in the virus-infected cells. The pathogenic complexity of LMP1 is partly due to the cytokine dysregulation including IL-6 and IL-10 in perturbing the host immune responses. Here we have identified an important signaling event mediated by a dsRNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase, PKR, in regulating LMP1-induced IL-6 and IL-10 expression. We first demonstrated that PKR plays a significant role in mediating LMP1-induced cytokine expression by using a PKR inhibitor 2-aminopurine, and the specific role of PKR involved was confirmed by the use of siRNA oligos targeting PKR and/or a dominant-negative PKR mutant. We next revealed that PKR activity mediates LMP1-enhanced NF-kappaB nuclear translocation resulting in cytokine induction. We further demonstrated at the chromatin level that LMP1 can significantly elevate the phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine 10 (Ser 10), and the process was dependent on PKR activity. Our findings thus suggest that PKR plays an important role in mediating the cytokine gene expression induced by LMP1 through NF-kappaB activation and histone H3 Ser 10 phosphorylation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of latent membrane protein 1 in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection-derived T/NK-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takuto; Kawazu, Hidetaka; Murata, Takayuki; Iwata, Seiko; Arakawa, Saki; Sato, Yoshitaka; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) predominantly infects B cells and causes B-cell lymphomas, such as Burkitt lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. However, it also infects other types of cells, including T and natural killer (NK) cells, and causes disorders, such as chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and T/NK-cell lymphoma. The CAEBV is a lymphoproliferative disease with poor prognosis, where EBV-positive T or NK cells grow rapidly, although the molecular mechanisms that cause the cell expansion still remain to be elucidated. EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is an oncogene that can transform some cell types, such as B cells and mouse fibroblasts, and thus may stimulate cell proliferation in CAEBV. Here, we examined the effect of LMP1 on EBV-negative cells using the cells conditionally expressing LMP1, and on CAEBV-derived EBV-positive cells by inhibiting the function of LMP1 using a dominant negative form of LMP1. We demonstrated that LMP1 was responsible for the increased cell proliferation in the cell lines derived from CAEBV, while LMP1 did not give any proliferative advantage to the EBV-negative cell line. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Role of latent membrane protein 1 in chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection-derived T/NK-cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takuto; Kawazu, Hidetaka; Murata, Takayuki; Iwata, Seiko; Arakawa, Saki; Sato, Yoshitaka; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) predominantly infects B cells and causes B-cell lymphomas, such as Burkitt lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. However, it also infects other types of cells, including T and natural killer (NK) cells, and causes disorders, such as chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and T/NK-cell lymphoma. The CAEBV is a lymphoproliferative disease with poor prognosis, where EBV-positive T or NK cells grow rapidly, although the molecular mechanisms that cause the cell expansion still remain to be elucidated. EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is an oncogene that can transform some cell types, such as B cells and mouse fibroblasts, and thus may stimulate cell proliferation in CAEBV. Here, we examined the effect of LMP1 on EBV-negative cells using the cells conditionally expressing LMP1, and on CAEBV-derived EBV-positive cells by inhibiting the function of LMP1 using a dominant negative form of LMP1. We demonstrated that LMP1 was responsible for the increased cell proliferation in the cell lines derived from CAEBV, while LMP1 did not give any proliferative advantage to the EBV-negative cell line. PMID:24799376

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin induces efficient tumor cell lysis via selective down-regulation of LMP1 and c-myc expression in EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Areumnuri; Kang, Hye Jin; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Dong Wan; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2015-08-10

    We investigated the role of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, romidepsin, in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with poor clinical outcomes. We used EBV-positive and EBV-negative DLBCL cell lines and generated two EBV-transfected cell lines, LY7/EBV and U2932/EBV. Romidepsin was cytotoxic to cultured EBV-positive cells via the activation of the caspase cascade. Moreover, in vivo mice xenograft models demonstrated the cytotoxicity of romidepsin to EBV-positive DLBCL cells. Romidepsin induced cytotoxicity via the reduction of LMP1 and c-myc expression in EBV-positive cells. Inhibiting either LMP1 or c-myc using small inhibitory RNAs caused partial cytotoxicity in EBV-positive Farage and U2932/EBV lines. The dual inhibition of LMP1 and c-myc showed a synergistic cytotoxic effect in EBV-positive cells similar in magnitude to that of romidepsin alone. In addition, either double blockade of LMP1 and c-myc activity or romidepsin single treatment activated EBV lytic cycle in EBV-positive cells. In conclusion, romidepsin exerts strong anti-tumor activity in EBV-positive DLBCL via the inhibition of both LMP1 and c-myc. Our findings indicate that romidepsin might be a promising treatment for EBV-positive DLBCL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequence analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 gene and promoter region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Gratama, J W; Munch, M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variations in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) gene have been described in a Chinese nasopharyngeal carcinoma-derived isolate (CAO), and in viral isolates from various EBV-associated tumors. It has been suggested that these genetic changes, which...

  17. FosPeg® PDT alters the EBV miRNAs and LMP1 protein expression in EBV positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ricky W K; Chu, Ellie S M; Huang, Zheng; Xu, C S; Ip, C W; Yow, Christine M N

    2013-10-05

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the top ten cancers highly prevalent in Hong Kong and South China. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection contributes to the tumorigenesis of NPC through the expression of different viral proteins. Among these, Latent Membrane Protein 1(LMP1) is the major oncoprotein expressed by EBV. Foscan® (Biolitec AG), m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC)-based photosensitizing drug, has been used in the photodynamic therapy (PDT) for head and neck cancers. FosPeg® (Biolitec AG) is a new formulation of mTHPC contained in PEGylated liposomes with optimized distribution properties. In this in vitro study, the potential of FosPeg®-PDT on human EBV positive NPC cell (c666-1) and EBV negative cells (HK1 and CNE2) were investigated. Effects of FosPeg®-PDT on the expression of EBV BART miRNAs (EBV miRNA BART 1-5p, BART 16, and BART 17-5p), LMP1 mRNA and proteins on c666-1 cells were also elucidated. The killing efficacy of FosPeg®-PDT on NPC cells were determined by MTT assay after LED activation. Effects of FosPeg®-PDT on the expression of LMP1 mRNA and protein were examined by real time PCR and western blot analysis. FosPeg®-PDT demonstrated its antitumor effect on c666-1 cells in a drug and light dose dependent manner. LD30, LD50 and LD70 were achieved by applying LED activation (3J/cm(2)) at 4h post incubated cells with 0.05μg/ml, 0.07μg/ml and 0.3μg/ml FosPeg®, respectively. Up-regulation of both LMP1 mRNA and protein were observed after FosPeg®-PDT in a dose dependent manner. FosPeg®-PDT exerted antitumor effect on c666-1 cells through up-regulation of LMP1 protein. Understanding the mechanism of FosPeg®-PDT may help to develop better strategies for the treatment of NPC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  19. Investigação da LMP1 do EBV e a coinfeçcão do HPV em lesões genitais de pacientes infectados ou não pelo HIV Investigation of the LMP1 EBV and co-infection by HPV in genital lesions of patients infected or not by HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Resende Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Vários estudos têm demonstrado associação do vírus Epstein-Barr (EBV com neoplasias malignas, inclusive genitais, em que o papilomavírus humano (HPV é o principal vírus associado às neoplasias epiteliais benignas e malignas. OBJETIVO: Investigar a presença do EBV e do HPV em lesões genitais de ambos os sexos, em pacientes soropositivos (grupo A ou não (grupo B para o vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Selecionados 126 pacientes e 135 lesões anogenitais, sendo 67 pacientes (53% e 75 lesões (56% no grupo A e 59 pacientes (47% e 60 lesões (44% no grupo B, para análise imuno-histoquímica (IHQ por meio dos anticorpos monoclonais antiproteína latente de membrana 1 (LMP1 e HPV (DAKO®. RESULTADOS: A análise mostrou que o número total de lesões com imunopositividade para o HPV e para a LMP1 foi maior no grupo A (32 e 35, respectivamente quando comparado ao B (16 e seis, respectivamente. A análise estatística (nível de significância de 5% mostrou que as proporções para o HPV não são estatisticamente significativas (z = 1,93; valor p = 0,053. Entretanto, para a LMP1, a diferença (47% no grupo A e 10% no B é significativa (z = 4,60; valor p = 4,2×10-6. Do mesmo modo, a associação HPV-LMP1 (21% no grupo A e 7% no B também mostrou diferença estatisticamente significativa (z = 2,38; valor p = 0,017. CONCLUSÃO: Esses resultados indicam a possibilidade de sinergismo da infecção pelo EBV e a coinfecção EBV-HPV em lesões epiteliais genitais, particularmente em pacientes soropositivos para o HIV. Entretanto, investigações com metodologia de maior especificidade e sensibilidade são necessárias para a verificação da real participação do EBV na patogênese de lesões epiteliais genitais.INTRODUCTION: Several studies have demonstrated the association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and malignant neoplasias, including genital lesions, in which the human papillomavirus (HPV is the

  20. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  1. Functional properties of Virus-Encoded and Virus-Regulated 7TM Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    -herpesvirus-encoded BILF1 receptors, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded US28 receptor and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-regulated EBI2 (or GPR183), 2) the tissue tropism and virus-dissemination properties, exemplified by the murine CMV-encoded M33, and 3) the tumorigenic properties, exemplified...... by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-encoded ORF74, HCMV-US28 and EBV-BILF1. Given the general high “druggability” of 7TM receptors, and the recent progress in the understanding of in particular immune evasive functions of the virus-exploited 7TM receptors, we put a special emphasis on the progress of novel anti...

  2. Vaccinia virus encodes a polypeptide with DNA ligase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, S M; Smith, G L

    1989-11-25

    Vaccinia virus gene SalF 15R potentially encodes a polypeptide of 63 kD which shares 30% amino acid identity with S. pombe and S. cerevisiae DNA ligases. DNA ligase proteins can be identified by incubation with alpha-(32P)ATP, resulting in the formation of a covalent DNA ligase-AMP adduct, an intermediate in the enzyme reaction. A novel radio-labelled polypeptide of approximately 61 kD appears in extracts from vaccinia virus infected cells after incubation with alpha-(32P)ATP. This protein is present throughout infection and is a DNA ligase as the radioactivity is discharged in the presence of either DNA substrate or pyrophosphate. DNA ligase assays show an increase in enzyme activity in cell extracts after vaccinia virus infection. A rabbit antiserum, raised against a bacterial fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and a portion of SalF 15R, immune-precipitates polypeptides of 61 and 54 kD from extracts of vaccinia virus-infected cells. This antiserum also immune-precipitates the novel DNA ligase-AMP adduct, thus proving that the observed DNA ligase is encoded by SalF 15R.

  3. Analyzing Influenza Virus Sequences using Binary Encoding Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ham Ching Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often challenging; in this paper, we demonstrated that using a binary encoding scheme coupled with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks at the variance between sequences instead of the commonly used p-distance or Hamming distance. We first convert the influenza genetic sequences to a binary strings and form a binary sequence alignment matrix and then apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA to this matrix. PCA also provides identification power to identify reassortant virus by using data projection technique. Due to the sparsity of the binary string, we were able to analyze large volume of influenza sequence data in a very short time. For protein sequences, our scheme also allows the incorporation of biophysical properties of each amino acid. Here, we present various encouraging results from analyzing influenza nucleotide, protein and genome sequences using the proposed approach.

  4. Korelasi antara Latent Membrane Protein-1 Virus Epstein-Barr dengan P53 pada Karsinoma Nasofaring (Penelitian Lanjutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenita .

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Latar Belakang: Karsinoma nasofaring (KNF merupakan tumor yang unik karena etiologi dan distribusi endemiknya. Di daerah endemik, etiologi KNF berkaitan dengan infeksi EBV. Infeksi EBV yang laten dan persisten pada KNF menunjukkan pola laten tipe II yang ditandai dengan ekspresi EBNA-1, LMP-1, 2 dan EBER. LMP-1 merupakan gen laten EBV yang pertama ditemukan yang dapat mentransformasi galur sel, merubah fenotip sel, menginduksi proliferasi dan mencegah apoptosis. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mengetahui korelasi antara ekspresi LMP-1 EBV dengan ekspresi p53 pada KNF. Cara: Empat puluh sembilan slaid HE dan blok parafin dari KNF dianalisis dan dipulas secara imunohistokima dengan antibodi LMP-1 EBV dan p53. Korelasi antara ekspresi LMP-1 dengan ekspresi p53 diuji dengan menggunakan uji Korelasi Pearson. Nilai p <0,05 dianggap bermakna secara statistik.Hasil: Terdapatkan korelasi yang lemah antara ekspresi LMP-1 dengan ekspresi p53 (r = 0,249 dan berpola positif. Dari hasil uji statistik didapatkan hubungan yang tidak bermakna antara ekspresi LMP-1 dengan ekspresi p53 (p=0,085. Kesimpulan: Terdapat korelasi yang lemah antara ekspresi LMP-1 dengan ekspresi p53 pada KNF. Kata kunci: LMP-1, Virus Epstein-Barr, p53, Karsinoma nasofaring.. Abstract Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a unique tumor due to its etiology and endemic distribution. In endemic region, the causes of the NPC related to EBV infection. Latent and persistent EBV infection on NPC show tipe II latent pattern which showed by EBNA-1, LMP-1, 2 and EBER expression. LMP-1 was the first EBV latent gene found to be able to transform cell lines, alter the phenotype of cells, induced proliferation and perevent apoptosis. This study aimed to know the correlation between LMP-1 and p53 expression in NPC. Method: Forty nine of NPC HE slides and paraffin blocks were analyzed, stained immunohistochemistrycally using antibody to LMP-1 EBV and p53. Correlation between LMP-1

  5. Tumor Suppressor p53 Stimulates the Expression of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianli; Lingel, Amy; Geiser, Vicki; Kwapnoski, Zachary; Zhang, Luwen

    2017-10-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple human malignancies. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is required for the efficient transformation of primary B lymphocytes in vitro and possibly in vivo The tumor suppressor p53 plays a seminal role in cancer development. In some EBV-associated cancers, p53 tends to be wild type and overly expressed; however, the effects of p53 on LMP1 expression is not clear. We find LMP1 expression to be associated with p53 expression in EBV-transformed cells under physiological and DNA damaging conditions. DNA damage stimulates LMP1 expression, and p53 is required for the stimulation. Ectopic p53 stimulates endogenous LMP1 expression. Moreover, endogenous LMP1 blocks DNA damage-mediated apoptosis. Regarding the mechanism of p53-mediated LMP1 expression, we find that interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a direct target of p53, is associated with both p53 and LMP1. IRF5 binds to and activates a LMP1 promoter reporter construct. Ectopic IRF5 increases the expression of LMP1, while knockdown of IRF5 leads to reduction of LMP1. Furthermore, LMP1 blocks IRF5-mediated apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. All of the data suggest that cellular p53 stimulates viral LMP1 expression, and IRF5 may be one of the factors for p53-mediated LMP1 stimulation. LMP1 may subsequently block DNA damage- and IRF5-mediated apoptosis for the benefits of EBV. The mutual regulation between p53 and LMP1 may play an important role in EBV infection and latency and its related cancers.IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical cellular protein in response to various stresses and dictates cells for various responses, including apoptosis. This work suggests that an Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) principal viral oncogene is activated by cellular p53. The viral oncogene blocks p53-mediated adverse effects during viral infection and transformation. Therefore, the induction of the viral oncogene by p53 provides a means for the virus to cope with infection and DNA

  6. Therapeutic implications of Epstein–Barr virus infection for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutajulu, Susanna Hilda; Kurnianda, Johan; Tan, I Bing; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly endemic in certain regions including the People’s Republic of China and Southeast Asia. Its etiology is unique and multifactorial, involving genetic background, epigenetic, and environment factors, including Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. The presence of EBV in all tumor cells, aberrant pattern of antibodies against EBV antigens in patient sera, and elevated viral DNA in patient circulation as well as nasopharyngeal site underline the role of EBV during NPC development. In NPC tumors, EBV expresses latency type II, where three EBV-encoded proteins, Epstein–Barr nuclear antigen 1, latent membrane protein 1 and 2 (LMP1, 2), are expressed along with BamH1-A rightward reading frame 1, Epstein–Barr virus-encoded small nuclear RNAs, and BamH1-A rightward transcripts. Among all encoded proteins, LMP1 plays a central role in the propagation of NPC. Standard treatment of NPC consists of radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for early stage, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced tumors, and palliative systemic chemotherapy in metastatic disease. However, this standard care has limitations, allowing recurrences and disease progression in a certain proportion of cases. Although the pathophysiological link and molecular process of EBV-induced oncogenesis are not fully understood, therapeutic approaches targeting the virus may increase the cure rate and add clinical benefit. The promising results of early phase clinical trials on EBV-specific immunotherapy, epigenetic therapy, and treatment with viral lytic induction offer new options for treating NPC. PMID:25228810

  7. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective tumor immunotherapy directed against an oncogene-encoded product using a vaccinia virus vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Destree, A.; McKenzie, S.; Gordon, E.; Weinberg, R.A.; Panicali, D.

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed a vaccinia virus recombinant that expresses the extracellular domain of the rat neu oncogene-encoded protein, a 185-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein termed p185. Strain NFS mice immunized with this recombinant virus developed a strong antibody response against the neu oncogene

  9. Epstein–Barr virus latent genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Kieff, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection has a substantial role in causing many human disorders. The persistence of these viral genomes in all malignant cells, yet with the expression of limited latent genes, is consistent with the notion that EBV latent genes are important for malignant cell growth. While the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein-2A (LMP-2A) are critical, the EBNA-leader proteins, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3C and LMP-1, are individually essential for in vitro transformation of primary B cells to lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA-3Bs are dispensable. In this review, the roles of EBV latent genes are summarized. PMID:25613728

  10. Characterization of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain encoding NSs of Punta Toro virus or sandfly fever Sicilian virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Lihoradova

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1 induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2 inhibits interferon (IFN-β promoter activation, and 3 promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA. Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which

  11. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus latent gene sequences as geographical markers of viral origin: unique EBNA3 gene signatures identify Japanese viruses as distinct members of the Asian virus family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Akihisa; Croom-Carter, Deborah; Kondo, Osamu; Yasui, Masahiro; Koyama-Sato, Maho; Inoue, Masami; Kawa, Keisei; Rickinson, Alan B; Tierney, Rosemary J

    2011-05-01

    Polymorphisms in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent genes can identify virus strains from different human populations and individual strains within a population. An Asian EBV signature has been defined almost exclusively from Chinese viruses, with little information from other Asian countries. Here we sequenced polymorphic regions of the EBNA1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C and LMP1 genes of 31 Japanese strains from control donors and EBV-associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (T/NK-LPD) patients. Though identical to Chinese strains in their dominant EBNA1 and LMP1 alleles, Japanese viruses were subtly different at other loci. Thus, while Chinese viruses mainly fall into two families with strongly linked 'Wu' or 'Li' alleles at EBNA2 and EBNA3A/B/C, Japanese viruses all have the consensus Wu EBNA2 allele but fall into two families at EBNA3A/B/C. One family has variant Li-like sequences at EBNA3A and 3B and the consensus Li sequence at EBNA3C; the other family has variant Wu-like sequences at EBNA3A, variants of a low frequency Chinese allele 'Sp' at EBNA3B and a consensus Sp sequence at EBNA3C. Thus, EBNA3A/B/C allelotypes clearly distinguish Japanese from Chinese strains. Interestingly, most Japanese viruses also lack those immune-escape mutations in the HLA-A11 epitope-encoding region of EBNA3B that are so characteristic of viruses from the highly A11-positive Chinese population. Control donor-derived and T/NK-LPD-derived strains were similarly distributed across allelotypes and, by using allelic polymorphisms to track virus strains in patients pre- and post-haematopoietic stem-cell transplant, we show that a single strain can induce both T/NK-LPD and B-cell-lymphoproliferative disease in the same patient.

  13. Open reading frame 193R of Chilo iridescent virus encodes a functional inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ince, I.A.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Nalcacioglu, R.; Oers, van M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is a major defense mechanism in insects in response to viral infections. The genome of Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) has three ORFs with homology to baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis (iap) genes. The proteins encoded by the 157L, 193R, and 332L ORFs contain 152,

  14. Epstein Barr virus Latent Membrane Protein-1 enhances dendritic cell therapy lymph node migration, activation, and IL-12 secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Termini

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a promising cell type for cancer vaccines due to their high immunostimulatory capacity. However, improper maturation of DC prior to treatment may account for the limited efficacy of DC vaccine clinical trials. Latent Membrane Protein-1 (LMP1 of Epstein-Barr virus was examined for its ability to mature and activate DC as a gene-based molecular adjuvant for DC vaccines. DC were transduced with an adenovirus 5 vector (Ad5 expressing LMP1 under the control of a Tet-inducible promoter. Ad5-LMP1 was found to mature and activate both human and mouse DC. LMP1 enhanced in vitro migration of DC toward CCL19, as well as in vivo migration of DC to the inguinal lymph nodes of mice following intradermal injection. LMP1-transduced DC increased T cell proliferation in a Pmel-1 adoptive transfer model and enhanced survival in B16-F10 melanoma models. LMP1-DC also enhanced protection in a vaccinia-Gag viral challenge assay. LMP1 induced high levels of IL-12p70 secretion in mouse DC when compared to standard maturation protocols. Importantly, LMP1-transduced human DC retained the capacity to secrete IL-12p70 and TNF in response to DC restimulation. In contrast, DC matured with Monocyte Conditioned Media-Mimic cocktail (Mimic were impaired in IL-12p70 secretion following restimulation. Overall, LMP1 matured and activated DC, induced migration to the lymph node, and generated high levels of IL-12p70 in a murine model. We propose LMP1 as a promising molecular adjuvant for DC vaccines.

  15. Measurement of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cell Frequencies Specific for EBV LMP1 and LMP2a Using mRNA-Transfected DCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Dae-Hee; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Seon-Duk; Kim, Sueon; Hyun, Seung-Joo; Cho, Hyun-Il; Cho, Seok-Goo; Lee, Suk-Kyeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    An EBV-specific cellular immune response is associated with the control of EBV-associated malignancies and lymphoproliferative diseases, some of which have been successfully treated by adoptive T cell therapy. Therefore, many methods have been used to measure EBV-specific cellular immune responses. Previous studies have mainly used autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs), recombinant viral vectors transfected or peptide pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as stimulators of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In the present study, we used an interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay by using isolated CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells stimulated with mRNA-transfected DCs. The frequency of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher than that of LMP2a. The frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells was significantly correlated with that of CD8(+) T cells in LMP1-specific immune responses (r = 0.7187, Pc EBV-seropositive donors secreted only the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, while Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17a) cytokines were not detected. CD4(+) T cells secreted significantly higher cytokine levels than did CD8(+) T cells. Analysis of EBV-specific T cell responses using autologous DCs transfected with mRNA might provide a comprehensive tool for monitoring EBV infection and new insights into the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases.

  16. Novel adenovirus encoded virus-like particles displaying the placental malaria associated VAR2CSA antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne-Marie C; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; Salanti, Ali

    2017-01-01

    and the CSA binding region of VAR2CSA has been identified as a promising vaccine target against placental malaria. Here we designed adenovirus encoded virus-like particles (VLP) by co-encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag and VAR2CSA. The VAR2CSA antigen was fused to the transmembrane (TM......The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum presents antigens on the infected erythrocyte surface that bind human receptors expressed on the vascular endothelium. The VAR2CSA mediated binding to a distinct chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) is a crucial step in the pathophysiology of placental malaria......CSA fused to HA TM-CT was significantly superior in inducing ID1-ID2a specific antibodies after the first immunization. A sequential study was performed to include a comparison to the soluble VAR2CSA protein vaccine, which has entered a phase I clinical trial (NCT02647489). The results revealed...

  17. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    The low number of envelope (Env) spikes presented on native HIV-1 particles is a major impediment for HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine development. We designed virus-like particle encoding adenoviral vectors utilizing SIVmac239 Gag as an anchor for full length and truncated HIV-1 M consensus Env...... were found between the different priming regimens as both induced high titered tier 1 neutralizing antibodies, but no tier 2 antibodies, possibly reflecting the similar presentation of trimer specific antibody epitopes. The described vaccine regimens provide insight into the effects of the HIV-1 Env...

  18. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhibit....... Consistent with these in vitro findings treatment with vMIP-II inhibited the adoptive transfer of a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vivo, but only when antigen-primed donor cells were transferred via the intravenous route and required to migrate actively, not when the cells were......-induced signals are pivotal in directing antiviral effector cells toward virus-infected organ sites and that vMIP-II is a potent inhibitor of type 1 T-cell-mediated inflammation....

  19. Chlorella virus ATCV-1 encodes a functional potassium channel of 82 amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Kang, Ming; Abenavoli, Alessandra; Romani, Giulia; Olivari, Claudio; Gaslini, Daniele; Ferrara, Giuseppina; van Etten, James L.; Kreim, Michael; Kast, Stefan M.; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Chlorella virus PBCV-1 (Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1) encodes the smallest protein (94 amino acids, named Kcv) previously known to form a functional K+ channel in heterologous systems. In this paper, we characterize another chlorella virus encoded K+ channel protein (82 amino acids, named ATCV-1 Kcv) that forms a functional channel in Xenopus oocytes and rescues Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack endogenous K+ uptake systems. Compared with the larger PBCV-1 Kcv, ATCV-1 Kcv lacks a cytoplasmic N-terminus and has a reduced number of charged amino acids in its turret domain. Despite these deficiencies, ATCV-1 Kcv accomplishes all the major features of K+ channels: it assembles into a tetramer, is K+ selective and is inhibited by the canonical K+ channel blockers, barium and caesium. Single channel analyses reveal a stochastic gating behavior and a voltage-dependent conductance that resembles the macroscopic I/V relationship. One difference between PBCV-1 and ATCV-1 Kcv is that the latter is more permeable to K+ than Rb+. This difference is partially explained by the presence of a tyrosine residue in the selective filter of ATCV-1 Kcv, whereas PBCV-1 Kcv has a phenylalanine. Hence, ATCV-1 Kcv is the smallest protein to form a K+ channel and it will serve as a model for studying structure–function correlations inside the potassium channel pore. PMID:19267691

  20. Posttranslational processing and identification of a neutralization domain of the GP4 protein encoded by ORF4 of Lelystad virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, J.J.M.; Nieuwstadt, van A.P.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    GP4 is a minor structural glycoprotein encoded by ORF4 of Lelystad virus (LV). When it was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and extracellular virus of CL2621 cells infected with LV, it was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of approximately 28 and 31 kDa, respectively. This difference in

  1. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Geerts-Dimitriadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intergenic region (IR of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and is predicted to fold into a stable hairpin structure. The presence of this hairpin structure sequence in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of TSWV mRNAs implies a possible role in translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyse the role of the predicted hairpin structure in translation, various Renilla luciferase constructs containing modified 3' and/or 5' UTR sequences of the TSWV S RNA encoded nucleocapsid (N gene were analyzed for expression. While good luciferase expression levels were obtained from constructs containing the 5' UTR and the 3' UTR, luciferase expression was lost when the hairpin structure sequence was removed from the 3' UTR. Constructs that only lacked the 5' UTR, still rendered good expression levels. When in addition the entire 3' UTR was exchanged for that of the S RNA encoded non-structural (NSs gene transcript, containing the complementary hairpin folding sequence, the loss of luciferase expression could only be recovered by providing the 5' UTR sequence of the NSs transcript. Luciferase activity remained unaltered when the hairpin structure sequence was swapped for the analogous one from Tomato yellow ring virus, another distinct tospovirus. The addition of N and NSs proteins further increased luciferase expression levels from hairpin structure containing constructs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a role for the predicted hairpin structure in translation in concert with the viral N and NSs proteins. The presence of stretches highly rich in A-residues does not rule out a concerted action with a poly(A-tail-binding protein. A common transcription termination and translation strategy for plant

  2. Virus-encoded microRNAs: an overview and a look to the future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney P Kincaid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs that play important roles in the regulation of gene expression. First described as posttranscriptional gene regulators in eukaryotic hosts, virus-encoded miRNAs were later uncovered. It is now apparent that diverse virus families, most with DNA genomes, but at least some with RNA genomes, encode miRNAs. While deciphering the functions of viral miRNAs has lagged behind their discovery, recent functional studies are bringing into focus these roles. Some of the best characterized viral miRNA functions include subtle roles in prolonging the longevity of infected cells, evading the immune response, and regulating the switch to lytic infection. Notably, all of these functions are particularly important during persistent infections. Furthermore, an emerging view of viral miRNAs suggests two distinct groups exist. In the first group, viral miRNAs mimic host miRNAs and take advantage of conserved networks of host miRNA target sites. In the larger second group, viral miRNAs do not share common target sites conserved for host miRNAs, and it remains unclear what fraction of these targeted transcripts are beneficial to the virus. Recent insights from multiple virus families have revealed new ways of interacting with the host miRNA machinery including noncanonical miRNA biogenesis and new mechanisms of posttranscriptional cis gene regulation. Exciting challenges await the field, including determining the most relevant miRNA targets and parlaying our current understanding of viral miRNAs into new therapeutic strategies. To accomplish these goals and to better grasp miRNA function, new in vivo models that recapitulate persistent infections associated with viral pathogens are required.

  3. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus.

  4. Effect of latent membrane protein 1 expression on overall survival in Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers: a literature-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Zhang, Wen-Na; Chen, Lei; Tang, Ling-Long; Mao, Yan-Ping; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Sun, Ying; Kang, Tie-Bang; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Liu, Na; Ma, Jun

    2015-10-06

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is identified as the main transforming oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). LMP1 is frequently expressed in a variety of EBV-associated cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin disease (HD), and gastric cancer (GC). However, due to conflicting results, the prognostic value of LMP1 expression on clinical outcomes in EBV-associated cancers remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis on 32 studies with a total of 3752 patients to explore the association between LMP1 expression and overall survival (OS) in EBV-associated cancers. Overall, LMP1 expression was significantly associated with poorer OS (hazard ratio, HR = 1.51, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.13-2.03), irrespective of cancer type. Further analyses showed that LMP1 expression correlated with poorer OS in NPC (HR = 2.48, 95% CI, 1.77-3.47) and NHL patients (HR = 1.83, 95% CI, 1.07-3.15), but not in HD patients (HR = 0.98, 95% CI, 0.60-1.62) or GC patients (HR = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.44-1.12). Subgroup analyses indicated that the age and geographical factors seemed to have an effect on the clinical outcomes of HD patients with positive LMP1 expression. In conclusion, LMP1 expression can be used as a prognostic biomarker in NPC, NHL, and certain HD patients. This data suggests that novel therapies targeting LMP1 may improve clinical outcomes for EBV-associated cancer patients.

  5. Analysis of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Infectious Mononucleosis: Investigation of the Potential Correlation with Biochemical Parameters of Hepatic Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevic, Ivana; Stevanovic, Goran; Cirkovic, Andja; Karalic, Danijela; Cupic, Maja; Banko, Bojan; Milovanovic, Jovica; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is usually asymptomatic, although at times it results in the benign lymphoproliferative disease, infectious mononucleosis (IM), during which almost half of patients develop hepatitis. The aims of the present study are to evaluate polymorphisms of EBV genes circulating in IM isolates from this geographic region and to investigate the correlation of viral sequence patterns with the available IM biochemical parameters. Methods The study included plasma samples from 128 IM patients. The genes EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 were amplified using nested-PCR. EBNA2 genotyping was performed by visualization of PCR products using gel electrophoresis. Investigation of LMP1 and EBNA1 included sequence, phylogenetic, and statistical analyses. Results The presence of EBV DNA in plasma samples showed correlation with patients’ necessity for hospitalization (p=0.034). The majority of EBV isolates was genotype 1. LMP1 variability showed 4 known variants, and two new deletions (27-bp and 147-bp). Of the 3 analyzed attributes of LMP1 isolates, the number of 33-bp repeats less than the reference 4.5 was the only one that absolutely correlated with the elevated levels of transaminases. EBNA1 variability was presented by prototype subtypes. A particular combination of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 polymorphisms, deleted LMP1/P-thr and non-deleted LMP1/P-ala, as well as genotype 1/ 4.5 33-bp LMP1 repeats or genotype 2/ 4.5 33-bp LMP1 repeats showed correlation with elevated AST (aspartate aminotransferase) and ALT (alanine transaminase). Conclusions This is the first study which identified the association between EBV variability and biochemical parameters in IM patients. These results showed a possibility for the identification of hepatic related diagnostic EBV markers. PMID:28356886

  6. Virus-viroid interactions: Citrus Tristeza Virus enhances the accumulation of Citrus Dwarfing Viroid in Mexican lime via virus-encoded silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Pedro; Bani Hashemian, Seyed M; Fagoaga, Carmen; Romero, Juan; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Gorris, Maria T; Bertolini, Edson; Duran-Vila, Núria

    2014-01-01

    An assay to identify interactions between Citrus Dwarfing Viroid (CDVd) and Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) showed that viroid titer was enhanced by the coinfecting CTV in Mexican lime but not in etrog citron. Since CTV encodes three RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), p23, p20 and p25, an assay using transgenic Mexican limes expressing each RSS revealed that p23 and, to a lesser extent, p25 recapitulated the effect observed with coinfections of CTV and CDVd.

  7. Epstein Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 in Hodgkin's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1), CD15 and CD30 immunohistochemistry was also performed. The clinical characteristics of each patient were documented. Objectives: To document the frequency of involvement of Epstein-Barr virus in cases of HL seen in a university hospital in Nigeria. Results: Out of ...

  8. Diverse circular replication-associated protein encoding viruses circulating in invertebrates within a lake ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaram, Anisha; Galatowitsch, Mark L; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Harding, Jon S; Roumagnac, Philippe; Martin, Darren P; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Over the last five years next-generation sequencing has become a cost effective and efficient method for identifying known and unknown microorganisms. Access to this technique has dramatically changed the field of virology, enabling a wide range of environmental viral metagenome studies to be undertaken of organisms and environmental samples from polar to tropical regions. These studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of highly divergent single stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus-like sequences encoding replication-associated proteins. Yet, few studies have explored how viruses might be shared in an ecosystem through feeding relationships. Here we identify 169 circular molecules (160 CRESS DNA molecules, nine circular molecules) recovered from a New Zealand freshwater lake, that we have tentatively classified into 51 putatively novel species and five previously described species (DflaCV-3, -5, -6, -8, -10). The CRESS DNA viruses identified in this study were recovered from molluscs (Echyridella menzeisii, Musculium novaezelandiae, Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta) and insect larvae (Procordulia grayi, Xanthocnemis zealandica, and Chironomus zealandicus) collected from Lake Sarah, as well as from the lake water and benthic sediments. Extensive diversity was observed across most CRESS DNA molecules recovered. The putative capsid protein of one viral species was found to be most similar to those of members of the Tombusviridae family, thus expanding the number of known RNA-DNA hybrid viruses in nature. We noted a strong association between the CRESS DNA viruses and circular molecules identified in the water and browser organisms (C. zealandicus, P. antipodarum and P. acuta), and between water sediments and undefended prey species (C. zealandicus). However, we were unable to find any significant correlation of viral assemblages to the potential feeding relationships of the host aquatic invertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccinia virus-encoded ribonucleotide reductase subunits are differentially required for replication and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don B Gammon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs are evolutionarily-conserved enzymes that catalyze the rate-limiting step during dNTP synthesis in mammals. RR consists of both large (R1 and small (R2 subunits, which are both required for catalysis by the R1(2R2(2 heterotetrameric complex. Poxviruses also encode RR proteins, but while the Orthopoxviruses infecting humans [e.g. vaccinia (VACV, variola, cowpox, and monkeypox viruses] encode both R1 and R2 subunits, the vast majority of Chordopoxviruses encode only R2 subunits. Using plaque morphology, growth curve, and mouse model studies, we investigated the requirement of VACV R1 (I4 and R2 (F4 subunits for replication and pathogenesis using a panel of mutant viruses in which one or more viral RR genes had been inactivated. Surprisingly, VACV F4, but not I4, was required for efficient replication in culture and virulence in mice. The growth defects of VACV strains lacking F4 could be complemented by genes encoding other Chordopoxvirus R2 subunits, suggesting conservation of function between poxvirus R2 proteins. Expression of F4 proteins encoding a point mutation predicted to inactivate RR activity but still allow for interaction with R1 subunits, caused a dominant negative phenotype in growth experiments in the presence or absence of I4. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that F4 (as well as other Chordopoxvirus R2 subunits form hybrid complexes with cellular R1 subunits. Mutant F4 proteins that are unable to interact with host R1 subunits failed to rescue the replication defect of strains lacking F4, suggesting that F4-host R1 complex formation is critical for VACV replication. Our results suggest that poxvirus R2 subunits form functional complexes with host R1 subunits to provide sufficient dNTPs for viral replication. Our results also suggest that R2-deficient poxviruses may be selective oncolytic agents and our bioinformatic analyses provide insights into how poxvirus nucleotide metabolism proteins may

  10. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retain their resistance to all VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. PMID:25965802

  11. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-09-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retained their resistance to all tested VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A recombinant rabies virus encoding two copies of the glycoprotein gene confers protection in dogs against a virulent challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Yang, Youtian; Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines.

  13. Critical role of the virus-encoded microRNA-155 ortholog in the induction of Marek's disease lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the well-characterised roles of a number of oncogenes in neoplastic transformation, microRNAs (miRNAs are increasingly implicated in several human cancers. Discovery of miRNAs in several oncogenic herpesviruses such as KSHV has further highlighted the potential of virus-encoded miRNAs to contribute to their oncogenic capabilities. Nevertheless, despite the identification of several possible cancer-related genes as their targets, the direct in vivo role of virus-encoded miRNAs in neoplastic diseases such as those induced by KSHV is difficult to demonstrate in the absence of suitable models. However, excellent natural disease models of rapid-onset Marek's disease (MD lymphomas in chickens allow examination of the oncogenic potential of virus-encoded miRNAs. Using viruses modified by reverse genetics of the infectious BAC clone of the oncogenic RB-1B strain of MDV, we show that the deletion of the six-miRNA cluster 1 from the viral genome abolished the oncogenicity of the virus. This loss of oncogenicity appeared to be primarily due to the single miRNA within the cluster, miR-M4, the ortholog of cellular miR-155, since its deletion or a 2-nucleotide mutation within its seed region was sufficient to inhibit the induction of lymphomas. The definitive role of this miR-155 ortholog in oncogenicity was further confirmed by the rescue of oncogenic phenotype by revertant viruses that expressed either the miR-M4 or the cellular homolog gga-miR-155. This is the first demonstration of the direct in vivo role of a virus-encoded miRNA in inducing tumors in a natural infection model. Furthermore, the use of viruses deleted in miRNAs as effective vaccines against virulent MDV challenge, enables the prospects of generating genetically defined attenuated vaccines.

  14. Enhanced Transgene Expression in Sugarcane by Co-Expression of Virus-Encoded RNA Silencing Suppressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Won; Beyene, Getu; Buenrostro-Nava, Marco T.; Molina, Joe; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Manabayeva, Shuga A.; Alvarado, Veria Y.; Rathore, Keerti S.; Scholthof, Herman B.; Mirkov, T. Erik

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing is commonly observed in polyploid species and often poses a major limitation to plant improvement via biotechnology. Five plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing were evaluated for their ability to counteract gene silencing and enhance the expression of the Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (EYFP) or the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in sugarcane, a major sugar and biomass producing polyploid. Functionality of these suppressors was first verified in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells, and later tested by transient expression in sugarcane young leaf segments and protoplasts. In young leaf segments co-expressing a suppressor, EYFP reached its maximum expression at 48–96 h post-DNA introduction and maintained its peak expression for a longer time compared with that in the absence of a suppressor. Among the five suppressors, Tomato bushy stunt virus-encoded P19 and Barley stripe mosaic virus-encoded γb were the most efficient. Co-expression with P19 and γb enhanced EYFP expression 4.6-fold and 3.6-fold in young leaf segments, and GUS activity 2.3-fold and 2.4-fold in protoplasts compared with those in the absence of a suppressor, respectively. In transgenic sugarcane, co-expression of GUS and P19 suppressor showed the highest accumulation of GUS levels with an average of 2.7-fold more than when GUS was expressed alone, with no detrimental phenotypic effects. The two established transient expression assays, based on young leaf segments and protoplasts, and confirmed by stable transgene expression, offer a rapid versatile system to verify the efficiency of RNA silencing suppressors that proved to be valuable in enhancing and stabilizing transgene expression in sugarcane. PMID:23799071

  15. An Immunoinformatics-Derived DNA Vaccine Encoding Human Class 2 T Cell Epitopes of Ebola Virus, Sudan Virus, and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus is Immunogenic in HLA Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-07

    1 An immunoinformatics-derived DNA vaccine encoding human Class II T cell epitopes of 1 Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Venezuelan equine...connie.s.schmaljohn.civ@mail.mil 13 14 Keywords: genome-derived vaccine, epitope-based vaccine, DNA vaccine, peptide vaccine, T 15 cell epitope, Ebola virus, EBOV...for biodefense. We previously developed and 53 tested DNA vaccines expressing the envelope glycoproteins of these viruses in mice and 54 nonhuman

  16. Groundnut bud necrosis virus encoded NSm associates with membranes via its C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Singh

    Full Text Available Groundnut Bud Necrosis Virus (GBNV is a tripartite ambisense RNA plant virus that belongs to serogroup IV of Tospovirus genus. Non-Structural protein-m (NSm, which functions as movement protein in tospoviruses, is encoded by the M RNA. In this communication, we demonstrate that despite the absence of any putative transmembrane domain, GBNV NSm associates with membranes when expressed in E. coli as well as in N. benthamiana. Incubation of refolded NSm with liposomes ranging in size from 200-250 nm resulted in changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of NSm. A similar behaviour was observed in the presence of anionic and zwitterionic detergents. Furthermore, the morphology of the liposomes was found to be modified in the presence of NSm. Deletion of coiled coil domain resulted in the inability of in planta expressed NSm to interact with membranes. Further, when the C-terminal coiled coil domain alone was expressed, it was found to be associated with membrane. These results demonstrate that NSm associates with membranes via the C-terminal coiled coil domain and such an association may be important for movement of viral RNA from cell to cell.

  17. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoliina Autio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  18. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 is involved in Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Huang, Guoliang; Zhang, Xiangning; Li, Rong; Wang, Jian; Dong, Ziming; He, Zhiwei

    2013-03-18

    Increased histone H3 phosphorylation is an essential regulatory mechanism for neoplastic cell transformation. We aimed to explore the role of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine10 (p-H3Ser10) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1)-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The expression of p-H3Ser10 was detected by the immunohistochemical analysis in NPC, chronic nasopharyngitis and normal nasopharynx tissues, and its correlation with LMP1 was analyzed in NPC tissues and cell lines. Using the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-H3 and histone H3 mutant (S10A), the effect of histone H3 Ser10 motif on LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, transformation and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation were evaluated by CCK-8, focus-forming and reporter gene assay respectively. Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) kinase activity and phosphorylation were detected by in vitro kinase assay and western blot. Using MSK1 inhibitor H89 or siRNA-MSK1, the regulatory role of MSK1 on histone H3 phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were analyzed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of p-H3Ser10 was significantly higher in the poorly differentiated NPC tissues than that in chronic nasopharyngitis (p histone H3 suppressed LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, foci formation and AP-1 activation. In addition, LMP1 could increase MSK1 kinase activity and phosphorylation. MSK1 inhibitor H89 or knockdown of MSK1 by siRNA blocked LMP1-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and AP-1 activation. EBV-LMP1 can induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 via MSK1. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 is likely a crucial regulatory mechanism involved in LMP1-induced carcinogenesis of NPC.

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF EPIGENETIC ALTERATIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-RELATED LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Takacs

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a human gammaherpesvirus, is associated with a series of malignant tumors. These include lymphomas (Burkitt’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, T/NK-cell lymphoma, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, AIDS-associated lymphoma, X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, carcinomas (nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, carcinomas of major salivary glands, thymic carcinoma, mammary carcinoma and a sarcoma (leiomyosarcoma. The latent EBV genomes persist in the tumor cells as circular episomes, co-replicating with the cellular DNA once per cell cycle. The expression of latent EBV genes is cell type specific due to the strict epigenetic control of their promoters. DNA methylation, histone modifications and binding of key cellular regulatory proteins contribute to the regulation of alternative promoters for transcripts encoding the nuclear antigens EBNA1 to 6 and affect the activity of promoters for transcripts encoding transmembrane proteins (LMP1, LMP2A, LMP2B. In addition to genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, there are also two RNA polymerase III transcribed genes in the EBV genome (EBER 1 and 2. The 5’ and internal regulatory sequences of EBER 1 and 2 transcription units are invariably unmethylated. The highly abundant EBER 1 and 2 RNAs are not translated to protein. Based on the cell type specific epigenetic marks associated with latent EBV genomes one can distinguish between viral epigenotypes that differ in transcriptional activity in spite of having an identical (or nearly identical DNA sequence. Whereas latent EBV genomes are regularly targeted by epigenetic control mechanisms in different cell types, EBV encoded proteins may, in turn, affect the activity of a set of cellular promoters by interacting with the very same epigenetic regulatory machinery. There are EBNA1 binding sites in the human genome. Because high affinity binding of EBNA1 to its recognition sites is known to specify sites of DNA

  20. Virus-encoded microRNA contributes to the molecular profile of EBV-positive Burkitt lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Navari, Mohsen; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Lazzi, Stefano; Fuligni, Fabio; Bellan, Cristiana; Rossi, Maura; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Etebari, Maryam; Rogena, Emily A; Tumwine, Lynnette; Tripodo, Claudio; Gibellini, Davide; Consiglio, Jessica; Croce, Carlo M; Pileri, Stefano A; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-05

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive neoplasm characterized by consistent morphology and phenotype, typical clinical behavior and distinctive molecular profile. The latter is mostly driven by the MYC over-expression associated with the characteristic translocation (8;14) (q24; q32) or with variant lesions. Additional genetic events can contribute to Burkitt Lymphoma pathobiology and retain clinical significance. A pathogenetic role for Epstein-Barr virus infection in Burkitt lymphomagenesis has been suggested; however, the exact function of the virus is largely unknown.In this study, we investigated the molecular profiles (genes and microRNAs) of Epstein-Barr virus-positive and -negative BL, to identify specific patterns relying on the differential expression and role of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNAs.First, we found significant differences in the expression of viral microRNAs and in selected target genes. Among others, we identified LIN28B, CGNL1, GCET2, MRAS, PLCD4, SEL1L, SXX1, and the tyrosine kinases encoding STK10/STK33, all provided with potential pathogenetic significance. GCET2, also validated by immunohistochemistry, appeared to be a useful marker for distinguishing EBV-positive and EBV-negative cases. Further, we provided solid evidences that the EBV-encoded microRNAs (e.g. BART6) significantly mold the transcriptional landscape of Burkitt Lymphoma clones.In conclusion, our data indicated significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of EBV-positive and EBV-negative BL and highlight the role of virus encoded miRNA.

  1. NSs encoded by groundnut bud necrosis virus is a bifunctional enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Lokesh

    Full Text Available Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV, a member of genus Tospovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infects a large number of leguminosae and solanaceae plants in India. With a view to elucidate the function of nonstructural protein, NSs encoded by the small RNA genome (S RNA, the NSs protein of GBNV- tomato (Karnataka was over-expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified rNSs protein exhibited an RNA stimulated NTPase activity. Further, this activity was metal ion dependent and was inhibited by adenosine 5' (beta, gamma imido triphosphate, an ATP analog. The rNSs could also hydrolyze dATP. Interestingly, in addition to the NTPase and dATPase activities, the rNSs exhibited ATP independent 5' RNA/DNA phosphatase activity that was completely inhibited by AMP. The 5' alpha phosphate could be removed from ssDNA, ssRNA, dsDNA and dsRNA thus confirming that rNSs has a novel 5' alpha phosphatase activity. K189A mutation in the Walker motif A (GxxxxGKT resulted in complete loss of ATPase activity, but the 5' phosphatase activity was unaffected. On the other hand, D159A mutation in the Walker motif B (DExx resulted in partial loss of both the activities. These results demonstrate for the first time that NSs is a bifunctional enzyme, which could participate in viral movement, replication or in suppression of the host defense mechanism.

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded RNAs: Key Molecules in Viral Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Dai [Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7 Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan)

    2014-08-06

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known as an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies. EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) are non-coding RNAs expressed abundantly in latently EBV-infected cells. Herein, I summarize the current understanding of the functions of EBERs, including the interactions with cellular factors through which EBERs contribute to EBV-mediated pathogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that EBERs are responsible for malignant phenotypes in lymphoid cells, and can induce several cytokines that can promote the growth of various EBV-infected cancer cells. EBERs were also found to bind retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and thus activate its downstream signaling. Furthermore, EBERs induce interleukin-10, an autocrine growth factor for Burkitt’s lymphoma cells, by activating RIG-I/interferon regulatory factor 3 pathway, suggesting that EBER-mediated innate immune signaling modulation contributes to EBV-mediated oncogenesis. Recently, EBV-infected cells were reported to secret EBERs, which were then recognized by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), leading to the induction of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines, and subsequent immune activation. Furthermore, EBER1 was detected in the sera of patients with active EBV-infectious diseases, suggesting that EBER1-meidated TLR3 signaling activation could account for the pathogenesis of active EBV-infectious diseases.

  3. Hepatitis A virus-encoded miRNAs attenuate the accumulation of viral genomic RNAs in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of persistent infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the common result of most HAV/cell culture systems. Previous observations show that the synthesis of viral RNAs is reduced during infection. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We characterized three HAV-encoded miRNAs in our previous study. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of these miRNAs on the accumulation of viral RNAs. The results indicated that the synthesis of viral genomic RNAs was dramatically reduced (more than 75 % reduction, P virus-derived miRNA could serve as a self-mediated feedback regulator during infection.

  4. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F; Suttle, Curtis A

    2016-06-14

    Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. Filamentous cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Nostoc are widespread and ecologically important in freshwater, yet little is known about the genomic content of their viruses. Here we report the first genomic analysis of cyanophages infecting

  5. G-quadruplexes regulate Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Pierre; Zhong, Jie; Lekieffre, Lea; Cowieson, Nathan P; Clancy, Jennifer L; Preiss, Thomas; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Khanna, Rajiv; Tellam, Judy

    2014-05-01

    Viruses that establish latent infections have evolved unique mechanisms to avoid host immune recognition. Maintenance proteins of these viruses regulate their synthesis to levels sufficient for maintaining persistent infection but below threshold levels for host immune detection. The mechanisms governing this finely tuned regulation of viral latency are unknown. Here we show that mRNAs encoding gammaherpesviral maintenance proteins contain within their open reading frames clusters of unusual structural elements, G-quadruplexes, which are responsible for the cis-acting regulation of viral mRNA translation. By studying the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mRNA, we demonstrate that destabilization of G-quadruplexes using antisense oligonucleotides increases EBNA1 mRNA translation. In contrast, pretreatment with a G-quadruplex-stabilizing small molecule, pyridostatin, decreases EBNA1 synthesis, highlighting the importance of G-quadruplexes within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and immune evasion. Furthermore, these findings suggest alternative therapeutic strategies focused on targeting RNA structure within viral ORFs.

  6. Immunogenicity and efficacy of codon optimized DNA vaccines encoding the F-protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternette, Nicola; Tippler, Bettina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2007-10-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus F-protein (RSV-F) is poorly expressed from DNA expression plasmids containing the wild type RSV-F open reading frame. By codon optimization, premature polyadenylation signals were deleted and a striking enhancement of RSV-F expression levels was achieved. Therefore, the immunogenicity and efficacy of wild type DNA vaccines were compared to codon optimized expression plasmids encoding full-length RSV-F or its ectodomain. Mice were immunized twice with the different DNA vaccines followed by an RSV challenge. Only codon optimized DNA vaccines and in particular the one encoding the ectodomain of RSV-F induced substantial antibody levels and reduced viral load 13-170-fold. Thus, codon optimization enhances the immunogenicity and efficacy of RSV encoding DNA vaccines.

  7. Supervised learning classification models for prediction of plant virus encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenia Jagga

    Full Text Available Viral encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins interfere with the host RNA silencing machinery, facilitating viral infection by evading host immunity. In plant hosts, the viral proteins have several basic science implications and biotechnology applications. However in silico identification of these proteins is limited by their high sequence diversity. In this study we developed supervised learning based classification models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins in plant viruses. We developed four classifiers based on supervised learning algorithms: J48, Random Forest, LibSVM and Naïve Bayes algorithms, with enriched model learning by correlation based feature selection. Structural and physicochemical features calculated for experimentally verified primary protein sequences were used to train the classifiers. The training features include amino acid composition; auto correlation coefficients; composition, transition, and distribution of various physicochemical properties; and pseudo amino acid composition. Performance analysis of predictive models based on 10 fold cross-validation and independent data testing revealed that the Random Forest based model was the best and achieved 86.11% overall accuracy and 86.22% balanced accuracy with a remarkably high area under the Receivers Operating Characteristic curve of 0.95 to predict viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins. The prediction models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressors can potentially aid identification of novel viral RNA silencing suppressors, which will provide valuable insights into the mechanism of RNA silencing and could be further explored as potential targets for designing novel antiviral therapeutics. Also, the key subset of identified optimal features may help in determining compositional patterns in the viral proteins which are important determinants for RNA silencing suppressor activities. The best prediction model developed in the study is available as a

  8. Borna disease virus encoded phosphoprotein inhibits host innate immunity by regulating miR-155.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Kao, Wenping; Li, Aimei; Li, Yujun; He, Junming; Zhang, Qingmeng; Song, Wuqi; Fu, Yingmei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Xiaobei; Li, Hui; Zhong, Zhaohua; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-04-01

    It has been reported that the Borna disease virus (BDV) encoded phosphoprotein (P protein) can inhibit the activity of Traf family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1), thus preventing the induction of type I interferon (IFN). However, the effects of microRNA on the regulation of BDV infection and the host's immune response have not been characterized. miR-155 was predicted to be complementary to the BDV P mRNA by RNAhybrid software. Here, we showed that miR-155 was down-regulated in BDV persistently infected human oligodendroglial (OL/BDV) cells and that the BDV P protein, but not the X protein, directly inhibited miR-155 expression in cells. When miR-155 was over-expressed, the inhibition of type I IFNs by BDV in cells was reversed, and the expression of type I IFNs was increased. When miR-155 expression was specifically blocked, cellular IFN expression and the induction of IFN by poly I:C treatment were suppressed. Furthermore, miR-155 promoted type I IFN production by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3. Mutations in the nt1138-nt1158 region of SOCS3 abandoned the impact of miR-155 on the expression of SOCS3-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The levels of BDV P mRNA and protein were significantly decreased in OL/BDV cells when miR-155 was over-expressed; however, miR-155-mutation did not affect the expression of BDV P-EGFP. Thus, BDV persistent infection inhibited the expression of type I IFNs through the suppression of miR-155, and miR-155 played an important immune regulatory role in BDV persistent infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the genes encoding the proteins of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wangheng; Cruz-Cosme, Ruth; Armstrong, Najealicka; Obwolo, Lilian Akello; Wen, Fayuan; Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Min-Hua; Tang, Qiyi

    2017-09-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) encodes a precursor protein (also called polyprotein) of about 3424 amino acids that is processed by proteases to generate 10 mature proteins and a small peptide. In the present study, we characterized the chemical features, suborganelle distribution and potential function of each protein using Flag-tagged protein expression system. Western blot analysis revealed the molecular weight of the proteins and the polymerization of E, NS1, and NS3 proteins. In addition, we performed multi-labeled fluorescent immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation to determine the subcellular localization of these proteins in host cells. We found that 1) the capsid protein colocalizes with 3 different cellular organelles: nucleoli, Golgi apparatus, and lipid droplet; NS2b and NS4a are associated with the Golgi apparatus; 2) the capsid and NS1proteins distribute in both cytoplasm and nucleus, NS5 is a nuclear protein; 3) NS3 protein colocalizes with tubulin and affects Lamin A; 4) Envelope, PrM, and NS2a proteins co-localize with the endoplasmic reticulum; 5) NS1 is associated with autophagosomes and NS4b is related to early endosome; 6) NS5 forms punctate structures in the nucleus that associate with splicing compartments shown by SC35, leading to reduction of SC35 protein level and trafficking of SC35 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These data suggest that ZIKV generates 10 functional viral proteins that exhibit distinctive subcellular distribution in host cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) ORF 012L encodes a protein with both exonuclease and endonuclease functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizman, Yesim Akturk; Muratoglu, Hacer; Sandalli, Cemal; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-11-01

    Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is the type member of the genus Iridovirus within the family Iridoviridae. The virions of CIV contain a single linear dsDNA molecule that is circularly permuted and terminally redundant. The genome of CIV contains an open reading frame (ORF 012L) encoding a protein homologous to exonuclease II of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we focused on the characterization of CIV ORF 012L. The target ORF was cloned into the pET28a vector, expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLysS with an N-terminal His tag and purified to homogeneity by using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization of the purified CIV 012L confirmed that this viral protein is a functional 5'-3' exonuclease that digests 3'-biotin-labelled oligonucleotides and linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules from their 5' termini in a highly processive manner. CIV 012L also has a potent endonuclease activity on dsDNA in vitro. In addition, CIV 012L converted supercoiled plasmid DNA (replicative form I, RFI) into the open circular form (RFII) and then open circular form into linear form (RFIII). Endonuclease activity of CIV 012L was optimal in the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) or 30 mM Mn(2+) ions and at 150 mM NaCl or KCl salt concentrations. The highest endonuclease activity was obtained at pH 8, and it reached a maximum at 55 °C. The CIV 012L protein showed deficiencies for both double- and single-stranded RNAs.

  11. A Single Amino Acid Substitution Changes Antigenicity of ORF2-Encoded Proteins of Hepatitis E Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hong Meng

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive genomic diversity has been observed among hepatitis E virus (HEV strains. However, the implication of the genetic heterogeneity on HEV antigenic properties is uncertain. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (Mabs against truncated ORF2-encoded proteins (aa452‑617, designated p166 proteins derived from HEV strains of Burma (genotype 1a, p166Bur, Pakistan (1b, p166Pak and Morocco (1c, p166Mor were raised and used for identification of HEV antigenic diversity. Six Mabs reacted to these 3 p166 proteins as well as p166 proteins constructed from strains derived from Mexico (genotype 2, US (genotype 3 and China (genotype 4, indicating the existence of pan‑genotypic epitopes. Two Mabs, 1B5 and 6C7, reacted with p166Bur and p166Mor, but not p166Pak or p166s derived from genotypes 2, 3, and 4, indicating that these 2 Mabs recognized strain-specific HEV epitopes. Both the common and specific epitopes could not be mapped by 23 synthetic peptides spanning the p166Bur sequence, suggesting that they are confirmation‑dependent. Comparative sequence analysis showed that p166Bur and p166Mor shared an identical aa sequence along their entire lengths, whereas for p166Pak the aas occupying positions 606 and 614 are different from aas at corresponding positions of p166Bur and p166Mor. Reactivity between 1B5 and p166Bur was abrogated with mutation of p166Bur/A606V, whereas p166Pak acquired the reactivity to 1B5 with mutation of p166Pak/V606A. However, mutations of p166Bur/L614M and P166Pak/M614L did not affect the immunoreactivity. Therefore, the aa occupying position 606 plays a critical role in maintaining the antigenicity of the HEV p166 proteins.

  12. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  13. PRIMA-1MET induces nucleolar translocation of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA-5 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rökaeus Nina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The low molecular weight compound, PRIMA-1MET restores the transcriptional transactivation function of certain p53 mutants in tumor cells. We have previously shown that PRIMA-1MET induces nucleolar translocation of p53, PML, CBP and Hsp70. The Epstein-Barr virus encoded, latency associated antigen EBNA-5 (also known as EBNA-LP is required for the efficient transformation of human B lymphocytes by EBV. EBNA-5 associates with p53-hMDM2-p14ARF complexes. EBNA-5 is a nuclear protein that translocates to the nucleolus upon heat shock or inhibition of proteasomes along with p53, hMDM2, Hsp70, PML and proteasome subunits. Here we show that PRIMA-1MET induces the nucleolar translocation of EBNA-5 in EBV transformed B lymphoblasts and in transfected tumor cells. The PRIMA-1MET induced translocation of EBNA-5 is not dependent on the presence of mutant p53. It also occurs in p53 null cells or in cells that express wild type p53. Both the native and the EGFP or DSRed conjugated EBNA-5 respond to PRIMA-1MET treatment in the same way. Image analysis of DSRed-EBNA-5 expressing cells, using confocal fluorescence time-lapse microscopy showed that the nucleolar translocation requires several hours to complete. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and FLIP (fluorescence loss in photobleaching measurements on live cells showed that the nucleolar translocation was accompanied by the formation of EBNA-5 aggregates. The process is reversible since the aggregates are dissolved upon removal of PRIMA-1MET. Our results suggest that mutant p53 is not the sole target of PRIMA-1MET. We propose that PRIMA-1MET may reversibly inhibit cellular chaperons that prevent the aggregation of misfolded proteins, and that EBNA-5 may serve as a surrogate drug target for elucidating the precise molecular action of PRIMA-1MET.

  14. Clonal deleted latent membrane protein 1 variants of Epstein-Barr virus are predominant in European extranodal NK/T lymphomas and disappear during successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Mohamad Adnan; Jaccard, Arnaud; Moulinas, Rémi; Bahri, Racha; Al Mouhammad, Hazar; Mammari, Nour; Feuillard, Jean; Ranger-Rogez, Sylvie

    2016-08-15

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphomas (NK/TL), rare in Europe, are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphomas with poor outcomes. Here, we determined the virus type and analyzed the EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) gene sequence in NK/TL from French patients. Six clones of viral LMP1 were sequenced by Sanger technology in blood from 13 patients before treatment with an l-asparaginase based regimen and, for 8 of them, throughout the treatment. Blood LMP1 sequences from 21 patients without any known malignancy were tested as controls. EBV Type A was identified for 11/13 patients and for all controls. Before treatment, a clonal LMP1 gene containing a 30 bp deletion (del30) was found in 46.1% of NK/TL and only in 4.8% of controls. Treatment was less effective in these patients who died more rapidly than the others. Patients with a deleted strain evolving toward a wild-type strain during treatment reached complete remission. The LMP1 gene was sequenced by highly sensitive next-generation sequencing technology in five NK/TL nasopharyngeal biopsies, two of them originating from the previous patients. Del30 was present in 100% of the biopsies; two viruses at least coexisted in three biopsies. These results suggest that del30 may be associated with poor prognosis NK/TL and that strain evolution could be used as a potential marker to monitor treatment. © 2016 UICC.

  15. RNA polymerase II stalling promotes nucleosome occlusion and pTEFb recruitment to drive immortalization by Epstein-Barr virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Palermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV immortalizes resting B-cells and is a key etiologic agent in the development of numerous cancers. The essential EBV-encoded protein EBNA 2 activates the viral C promoter (Cp producing a message of ~120 kb that is differentially spliced to encode all EBNAs required for immortalization. We have previously shown that EBNA 2-activated transcription is dependent on the activity of the RNA polymerase II (pol II C-terminal domain (CTD kinase pTEFb (CDK9/cyclin T1. We now demonstrate that Cp, in contrast to two shorter EBNA 2-activated viral genes (LMP 1 and 2A, displays high levels of promoter-proximally stalled pol II despite being constitutively active. Consistent with pol II stalling, we detect considerable pausing complex (NELF/DSIF association with Cp. Significantly, we observe substantial Cp-specific pTEFb recruitment that stimulates high-level pol II CTD serine 2 phosphorylation at distal regions (up to +75 kb, promoting elongation. We reveal that Cp-specific pol II accumulation is directed by DNA sequences unfavourable for nucleosome assembly that increase TBP access and pol II recruitment. Stalled pol II then maintains Cp nucleosome depletion. Our data indicate that pTEFb is recruited to Cp by the bromodomain protein Brd4, with polymerase stalling facilitating stable association of pTEFb. The Brd4 inhibitor JQ1 and the pTEFb inhibitors DRB and Flavopiridol significantly reduce Cp, but not LMP1 transcript production indicating that Brd4 and pTEFb are required for Cp transcription. Taken together our data indicate that pol II stalling at Cp promotes transcription of essential immortalizing genes during EBV infection by (i preventing promoter-proximal nucleosome assembly and ii necessitating the recruitment of pTEFb thereby maintaining serine 2 CTD phosphorylation at distal regions.

  16. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chénard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus persistence and reactivation in myasthenia gravis thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Paola; Serafini, Barbara; Rosicarelli, Barbara; Maggi, Lorenzo; Barberis, Massimo; Antozzi, Carlo; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Aloisi, Francesca; Mantegazza, Renato

    2010-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports a link between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic human herpesvirus, and common B-cell-related autoimmune diseases. We sought evidence of EBV infection in thymuses from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease characterized by intrathymic B-cell activation. Seventeen MG thymuses (6 follicular hyperplastic, 6 diffuse hyperplastic, 5 involuted) and 6 control thymuses were analyzed using in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs), immunohistochemistry for EBV latent and lytic proteins, and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA and mRNA. All 17 MG thymuses showed evidence of active EBV infection, whereas none of the control thymuses were infected. Cells expressing EBERs (12 of 17) and EBV latency proteins (EBNA2, LMP1, and LMP2A) (16 of 17) were detected in medullary infiltrates and in germinal centers. Cells expressing early (BFRF1, BMRF1) and late (p160, gp350/220) lytic phase EBV proteins were present in 16 MG thymuses. Latency (EBNA1, LMP2A) or lytic (BZLF1) transcripts (often both) were present in all MG thymuses, and EBV DNA (LMP1 gene) was detected in 13 MG thymuses. We also found CD8+ T cells, CD56 + CD3-natural killer cells, and BDCA-2+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells in immune infiltrates of MG thymuses, but not germinal centers, suggesting an attempt of the immune system to counteract EBV infection. Dysregulated EBV infection in the pathological thymus appears common in MG and may contribute to the immunological alterations initiating and/or perpetuating the disease.

  19. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...

  20. Host-encoded reporters for the detection and purification of multiple enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketteler, Robin; Tomov, Vesselin; Neunkirchner, Alina; Xie, Qiang; Pickl, Winfried F; Seed, Brian

    2010-08-01

    The identification of host cell factors for virus replication holds great promise for the development of new antiviral therapies. Recently, high-throughput screening methods have emerged as powerful tools to identify candidate host factors for therapeutic intervention. The development of assay systems suitable for large-scale automated screening is of particular importance for novel viruses with high pathogenic potential for which limited biological information can be developed in a short period of time. This report presents a general enzymatic reporter system for the detection and characterization of multiple enveloped viruses that does not rely on engineering of the virus. Instead, reporter enzymes are incorporated into virus particles by targeting to lipid microdomains in producer cells. The approach allows a variety of human pathogenic enveloped viruses to be detected by sensitive, inexpensive and automatable enzymatic assays. Tagged viruses can be purified quickly and efficiently by a magnetic bead-based capture method. The method allows general detection of enveloped viruses without prior reference to their sequence. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Us3-encoded protein kinase from pseudorabies virus affects egress of virions from the nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, F.; Pol, J.M.A.; Peeters, B.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Wind, de N.; Kimman, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the influence of inactivation of various genes located in the unique short (U(s)) region of pseudorabies virus on virus replication and assembly in porcine nasal mucosa explant cultures. The following strains were used: the virulent wild-type strain NIA-3, and strains derived from NIA-3

  2. Isolation and characterization of the genes for two small RNAs of herpesvirus papio and their comparison with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBER RNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, J G; Shu, M D

    1988-01-01

    Genes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs), two low-molecular-weight RNAs encoded by the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hybridize to two small RNAs in a baboon cell line that contains a similar virus, herpesvirus papio (HVP). The genes for the HVP RNAs (HVP-1 and HVP-2) are located together in the small unique region at the left end of the viral genome and are transcribed by RNA polymerase III in a rightward direction, similar to the EBERs. There is significant si...

  3. Fowlpox virus encodes nonessential homologs of cellular alpha-SNAP, PC-1, and an orphan human homolog of a secreted nematode protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, S M; Anwar, M A; Thomas, W; Green, P; Shaw, K; Skinner, M A

    1998-08-01

    The genome of fowlpox virus (FWPV), type species of the Avipoxviridae, is considerably rearranged compared with that of vaccinia virus (the prototypic poxvirus and type species of the Orthopoxviridae) and is 30% larger. It is likely that the genome of FWPV contains genes in addition to those found in vaccinia virus, probably involved with its replication and survival in the chicken. A 7,470-bp segment of the FWPV genome has five open reading frames (ORFs), two of which encode ankyrin repeat proteins, many examples of which have been found in poxviruses. The remaining ORFs encode homologs of cellular genes not reported in any other virus. ORF-2 encodes a homolog of the yeast Sec17p and mammalian SNAP proteins, crucial to vesicular transport in the exocytic pathway. ORF-3 encodes a homolog of an orphan human protein, R31240_2, encoded on 19p13.2. ORF-3 is also homologous to three proteins (YLS2, YMV6, and C07B5.5) from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and to a 43-kDa antigen from the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis. ORF-5 encodes a homolog of the mammalian plasma cell antigen PC-1, a type II glycoprotein with exophosphodiesterase activity. The ORFs are present in the virulent precursor, HP1, of the sequenced attenuated virus (FP9) and are conserved in other strains of FWPV. They were shown, by deletion mutagenesis, to be nonessential to virus replication in tissue culture. RNA encoding the viral homolog of PC-1 is expressed strongly early and late in infection, but RNAs encoding the homologs of SNAP and R31240_2 are expressed weakly and late.

  4. Therapeutic implications of Epstein–Barr virus infection for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutajulu SH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Susanna Hilda Hutajulu,1 Johan Kurnianda,1 I Bing Tan,2,3 Jaap M Middeldorp4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Gadjah Mada/Dr Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; 2Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, The Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Gadjah Mada/Dr Sardjito General Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; 4Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is highly endemic in certain regions including the People's Republic of China and Southeast Asia. Its etiology is unique and multifactorial, involving genetic background, epigenetic, and environment factors, including Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. The presence of EBV in all tumor cells, aberrant pattern of antibodies against EBV antigens in patient sera, and elevated viral DNA in patient circulation as well as nasopharyngeal site underline the role of EBV during NPC development. In NPC tumors, EBV expresses latency type II, where three EBV-encoded proteins, Epstein–Barr nuclear antigen 1, latent membrane protein 1 and 2 (LMP1, 2, are expressed along with BamH1-A rightward reading frame 1, Epstein–Barr virus-encoded small nuclear RNAs, and BamH1-A rightward transcripts. Among all encoded proteins, LMP1 plays a central role in the propagation of NPC. Standard treatment of NPC consists of radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for early stage, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced tumors, and palliative systemic chemotherapy in metastatic disease. However, this standard care has limitations, allowing recurrences and disease progression in a certain proportion of cases. Although the pathophysiological link and molecular process of EBV-induced oncogenesis are not fully understood, therapeutic approaches targeting the virus may increase the

  5. Ebola virus encodes a miR-155 analog to regulate importin-α5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanwu; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Mingming; Gao, George Fu; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus caused more than 10,000 human deaths. Current knowledge of suitable drugs, clinical diagnostic biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of Ebola virus infection is either absent or insufficient. By screening stem-loop structures from the viral genomes of four virulence species, we identified a novel, putative viral microRNA precursor that is specifically expressed by the Ebola virus. The sequence of the microRNA precursor was further confirmed by mining the existing RNA-Seq database. Two putative mature microRNAs were predicted and subsequently validated in human cell lines. Combined with this prediction of the microRNA target, we identified importin-α5, which is a key regulator of interferon signaling following Ebola virus infection, as one putative target. We speculate that this microRNA could facilitate the evasion of the host immune system by the virus. Moreover, this microRNA might be a potential clinical therapeutic target or a diagnostic biomarker for Ebola virus.

  6. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Eckert

    Full Text Available Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  7. Helicase domain encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus RNA1 determines systemic infection of Cmr1 in pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Hee Kang

    Full Text Available The Cmr1 gene in peppers confers resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus isolate-P0 (CMV-P0. Cmr1 restricts the systemic spread of CMV strain-Fny (CMV-Fny, whereas this gene cannot block the spread of CMV isolate-P1 (CMV-P1 to the upper leaves, resulting in systemic infection. To identify the virulence determinant of CMV-P1, six reassortant viruses and six chimeric viruses derived from CMV-Fny and CMV-P1 cDNA clones were used. Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the helicase domain encoded by CMV-P1 RNA1 determines susceptibility to systemic infection, and that the helicase domain contains six different amino acid substitutions between CMV-Fny and CMV-P1(. To identify the key amino acids of the helicase domain determining systemic infection with CMV-P1, we then constructed amino acid substitution mutants. Of the mutants tested, amino acid residues at positions 865, 896, 957, and 980 in the 1a protein sequence of CMV-P1 affected the systemic infection. Virus localization studies with GFP-tagged CMV clones and in situ localization of virus RNA revealed that these four amino acid residues together form the movement determinant for CMV-P1 movement from the epidermal cell layer to mesophyll cell layers. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CMV-P1 and a chimeric virus with four amino acid residues of CMV-P1 accumulated more genomic RNA in inoculated leaves than did CMV-Fny, indicating that those four amino acids are also involved in virus replication. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the helicase domain is responsible for systemic infection by controlling virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Whereas four amino acids are responsible for acquiring virulence in CMV-Fny, six amino acid (positions at 865, 896, 901, 957, 980 and 993 substitutions in CMV-P1 were required for complete loss of virulence in 'Bukang'.

  8. Effect of the deletion of genes encoding proteins of the extracellular virion form of vaccinia virus on vaccine immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion (MV and the enveloped virion (EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and/or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  10. Genome wide identification of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded microRNA targets against Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweta; Akhter, Yusuf; Khan, Jawaid Ahmad

    2018-01-05

    Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBV, genus Begomovirus) causes devastating cotton leaf curl disease. Among various known virus controlling strategies, RNAi-mediated one has shown potential to protect host crop plants. Micro(mi) RNAs, are the endogenous small RNAs and play a key role in plant development and stress resistance. In the present study we have identified cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded miRNAs targeting the CLCuBV. Based on threshold free energy and maximum complementarity scores of host miRNA-viral mRNA target pairs, a number of potential miRNAs were annotated. Among them, ghr-miR168 was selected as the most potent candidate, capable of targeting several vital genes namely C1, C3, C4, V1 and V2 of CLCuBV genome. In addition, ghr-miR395a and ghr-miR395d were observed to target the overlapping transcripts of C1 and C4 genes. We have verified the efficacy of these miRNA targets against CLCuBV following suppression of RNAi-mediated virus control through translational inhibition or cleavage of viral mRNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Zika Virus Encoding Non-Glycosylated Envelope Protein is Attenuated and Defective in Neuroinvasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Arun S; Pattnaik, Aryamav; Sahoo, Bikash R; Muthukrishnan, Ezhumalai; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Steffen, David; Vu, Hiep L X; Delhon, Gustavo; Osorio, Fernando A; Petro, Thomas M; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2017-09-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, responsible for sporadic outbreaks of mild and febrile illness in Africa and Asia, re-emerged in the last decade causing serious human diseases including microcephaly, congenital malformations, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Although genomic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that genetic evolution may have led to enhanced virulence of ZIKV, experimental evidence supporting the role of specific genetic changes in virulence is currently outstanding. One sequence motif, VNDT, containing an N-linked glycosylation site in the envelope (E) protein, is polymorphic, being absent in many of the African isolates while present in all isolates from the recent outbreaks. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this sequence motif and glycosylation of the E protein in pathogenicity of ZIKV. We first constructed a stable full-length cDNA clone of ZIKV in a novel linear vector from which infectious virus was recovered. The recombinant ZIKV generated from the infectious clone, which contains the VNDT motif, is highly pathogenic and causes lethality in a mouse model. In contrast, recombinant viruses from which the VNDT motif is deleted or from which N-linked glycosylation site is mutated by single amino acid substitution, are highly attenuated and non-lethal. The mutant viruses replicate poorly in the brain of infected mice when inoculated subcutaneously but replicate well following intracranial inoculation. Our findings provide the first evidence that N-linked glycosylation of the E protein is an important determinant of ZIKV virulence and neuroinvasion.IMPORTANCE Recent emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has caused major worldwide public health concern. The virus appears to have gained significant pathogenicity, causing serious human diseases including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The factors responsible for the emergence of pathogenic ZIKV are not understood at this time, although genetic

  12. The p10 gene of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrosis virus encodes a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In baculovirus-based high-level expression of cloned foreign genes, the viral very late gene promoters of polyhedrin (polh) and p10 are extensively exploited. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the p10 gene from a local isolate of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrosis virus (BmNPV). The gene harbours a 213-bp ...

  13. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection.

  14. Deltabaculoviruses encode a functional type I budded virus envelope fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envelope fusion proteins (F proteins) are major constituents of budded viruses (BVs) of alpha- and betabaculoviruses (Baculoviridae) and are essential for the systemic infection of insect larvae and insect cells in culture. An F protein homolog gene was absent in gammabaculoviruses. Here we show tha...

  15. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  16. SHIV-1157i and passaged progeny viruses encoding R5 HIV-1 clade C env cause AIDS in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa Nagadenahalli B

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV or chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV strains is widely used to study lentiviral pathogenesis, antiviral immunity and the efficacy of AIDS vaccine candidates. SHIV challenges allow assessment of anti-HIV-1 envelope responses in primates. As such, SHIVs should mimic natural HIV-1 infection in humans and, to address the pandemic, encode HIV-1 Env components representing major viral subtypes worldwide. Results We have developed a panel of clade C R5-tropic SHIVs based upon env of a Zambian pediatric isolate of HIV-1 clade C, the world's most prevalent HIV-1 subtype. The parental infectious proviral clone, SHIV-1157i, was rapidly passaged through five rhesus monkeys. After AIDS developed in the first animal at week 123 post-inoculation, infected blood was infused into a sixth monkey. Virus reisolated at this late stage was still exclusively R5 tropic and mucosally transmissible. Here we describe the long-term follow-up of this initial cohort of six monkeys. Two have remained non-progressors, whereas the other four gradually progressed to AIDS within 123–270 weeks post-exposure. Two progressors succumbed to opportunistic infections, including a case of SV40 encephalitis. Conclusion These data document the disease progression induced by the first mucosally transmissible, pathogenic R5 non-clade B SHIV and suggest that SHIV-1157i-derived viruses, including the late-stage, highly replication-competent SHIV-1157ipd3N4 previously described (Song et al., 2006, display biological characteristics that mirror those of HIV-1 clade C and support their expanded use for AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates.

  17. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Aris; Ermawati, Ratna; Wati, Vera; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Wijayanti, Nastiti

    2016-01-01

    Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2) encoding gene of AE virus (AEV) from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/µl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with sample code 499/4/12. The sensitivity rate of RT-PCR is to amplify

  18. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  19. The ORF61 Protein Encoded by Simian Varicella Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus Inhibits NF-κB Signaling by Interfering with IκBα Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Travis; Malouli, Daniel; Uebelhoer, Luke S; DeFilippis, Victor R; Früh, Klaus; Verweij, Marieke C

    2015-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox upon primary infection and establishes latency in ganglia. Reactivation from latency causes herpes zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. Innate immunity mediated by interferon and proinflammatory cytokines represents the first line of immune defense upon infection and reactivation. VZV is known to interfere with multiple innate immune signaling pathways, including the central transcription factor NF-κB. However, the role of these inhibitory mechanisms in vivo is unknown. Simian varicella virus (SVV) infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates key aspects of VZV pathogenesis, and this model thus permits examination of the role of immune evasion mechanisms in vivo. Here, we compare SVV and VZV with respect to interference with NF-κB activation. We demonstrate that both viruses prevent ubiquitination of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, whereas SVV additionally prevents IκBα phosphorylation. We show that the ORF61 proteins of VZV and SVV are sufficient to prevent IκBα ubiquitination upon ectopic expression. We further demonstrate that SVV ORF61 interacts with β-TrCP, a subunit of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates the degradation of IκBα. This interaction seems to inactivate SCF-mediated protein degradation in general, since the unrelated β-TrCP target Snail is also stabilized by ORF61. In addition to ORF61, SVV seems to encode additional inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway, since SVV with ORF61 deleted still prevented IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that SVV interferes with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB activation at multiple levels, which is consistent with the importance of these countermechanisms for varicella virus infection. The role of innate immunity during the establishment of primary infection, latency, and reactivation by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is incompletely understood. Since infection of rhesus

  20. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of prime-boost immunization with recombinant poxvirus FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the full-length Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Michael; Thompson, Fiona M; Dunachie, Susanna; Keating, Sheila; Todryk, Stephen; Berthoud, Tamara; Andrews, Laura; Andersen, Rikke F; Moore, Anne; Gilbert, Sarah C; Poulton, Ian; Dubovsky, Filip; Tierney, Eveline; Correa, Simon; Huntcooke, Angela; Butcher, Geoffrey; Williams, Jack; Sinden, Robert E; Hill, Adrian V S

    2006-05-01

    Heterologous prime-boost immunization with DNA and various recombinant poxviruses encoding malaria antigens is capable of inducing strong cell-mediated immune responses and partial protection in human sporozoite challenges. Here we report a series of trials assessing recombinant fowlpox virus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein in various prime-boost combinations, doses, and application routes. For the first time, these vaccines were administered intramuscularly and at doses of up to 5 x 10(8) PFU. Vaccines containing this antigen proved safe and induced modest immune responses but showed no evidence of efficacy in a sporozoite challenge.

  1. Characterization of an anti-varicella-zoster virus compound that targets the portal protein encoded by ORF54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Ruka; Yoshida, Chinatsu; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi; Inoue, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    An anti-varicella-zoster virus compound, a 5-chlorobenzo[b]thiophen derivative (45B5), was characterized. Its 50% effective concentration against the cell-free vaccine Oka strain and 50% cytotoxic concentration in human fibroblasts were 16.9 µM and more than 100 µM, respectively. Treatment with 45B5 decreased viral DNA synthesis and IE62 expression weakly but significantly. All 45B5-resistant viral clones isolated were found to have at least one mutation in ORF54 that encodes the portal protein. There were no effects on interaction between the portal and scaffold proteins. Thus, 45B5 may inhibit nuclear delivery of viral DNA. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Analysis of borna disease virus trafficking in live infected cells by using a virus encoding a tetracysteine-tagged p protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Caroline M; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Allart, Sophie; Malnou, Cécile E; Schwemmle, Martin; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA virus characterized by noncytolytic persistent infection and replication in the nuclei of infected cells. To gain further insight on the intracellular trafficking of BDV components during infection, we sought to generate recombinant BDV (rBDV) encoding fluorescent fusion viral proteins. We successfully rescued a virus bearing a tetracysteine tag fused to BDV-P protein, which allowed assessment of the intracellular distribution and dynamics of BDV using real-time live imaging. In persistently infected cells, viral nuclear inclusions, representing viral factories tethered to chromatin, appeared to be extremely static and stable, contrasting with a very rapid and active trafficking of BDV components in the cytoplasm. Photobleaching (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching [FRAP] and fluorescence loss in photobleaching [FLIP]) imaging approaches revealed that BDV components were permanently and actively exchanged between cellular compartments, including within viral inclusions, albeit with a fraction of BDV-P protein not mobile in these structures, presumably due to its association with viral and/or cellular proteins. We also obtained evidence for transfer of viral material between persistently infected cells, with routing of the transferred components toward the cell nucleus. Finally, coculture experiments with noninfected cells allowed visualization of cell-to-cell BDV transmission and movement of the incoming viral material toward the nucleus. Our data demonstrate the potential of tetracysteine-tagged recombinant BDV for virus tracking during infection, which may provide novel information on the BDV life cycle and on the modalities of its interaction with the nuclear environment during viral persistence.

  3. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yoshimi; Caposio, Patrizia; Parkins, Christopher J; Botto, Sara; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees) are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes. We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV) vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP) of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL)). MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL) induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months) CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection. This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  4. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes.We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL. MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection.This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  5. Generation of Helper Plasmids Encoding Mutant Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Capsid Proteins with Increased Resistance against Proteasomal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2 vectors are widely used for both experimental and clinical gene therapy. A recent research has shown that the performance of these vectors can be greatly improved by substitution of specific surface-exposed tyrosine residues with phenylalanines. In this study, a fast and simple method is presented to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding capsid proteins with single, double or triple Y→F mutations.   Materials and Methods: A one-step, high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR cloning procedure involving the use of two partially overlapping primers to amplify a circular DNA template was applied to produce AAV2 cap genes encoding VP1 mutants with Y→F substitutions in residues 444, 500 or 730. The resulting constructs were used to make the different double and triple mutant by another round of PCR (Y444500F mutant, subcloning (Y444730F and Y500730F mutants or a combination of both techniques (Y444500730F mutant. Results: Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed successful introduction of the desired mutations in the AAV2 cap gene and showed the absence of any unintended mutations in the DNA fragments used to assemble the final set of AAV2 vector helper plasmids. The correctness of these plasmids was further confirmed by restriction mapping. Conclusion: PCR-based, single-step site-directed mutagenesis of circular DNA templates is a highly efficient and cost-effective method to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding mutant Cap proteins for the production of vector particles with increased gene transfer efficiency.

  6. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2014-01-01

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all- or a part of the conserved nonstructural proteins (nsPs) of HCV. We demonstrated that an rSFV vector was able to encode a transgene as large as 6.1 kb without affecting its vaccine immunogenicity. Prime-boost immunizations of mice with rSFV expressing all nsPs induced strong and long-lasting NS3-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. The strength and functional heterogeneity of the T-cell response was similar to that induced with rSFV expressing only NS3/4A. Furthermore this leads to a significant growth delay and negative selection of HCV-expressing EL4 tumors in an in vivo mouse model. In general, as broad-spectrum T-cell responses are only seen in patients with resolved HCV infection, this rSFV-based vector, which expresses all nsPs, inducing robust T-cell activity has a potential for the treatment of HCV infections. PMID:24370701

  7. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  8. The α2,3-sialyltransferase encoded by myxoma virus is a virulence factor that contributes to immunosuppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Boutard

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV induces a lethal disease called Myxomatosis in European rabbits. MYXV is one of the rare viruses that encodes an α2,3-sialyltransferase through its M138L gene. In this study, we showed that although the absence of the enzyme was not associated with any in vitro deficit, the M138L deficient strains are highly attenuated in vivo. Indeed, while all rabbits infected with the parental and the revertant strains died within 9 days post-infection from severe myxomatosis, all but one rabbit inoculated with the M138L deficient strains survived the infection. In primary lesions, this resistance to the infection was associated with an increased ability of innate immune cells, mostly neutrophils, to migrate to the site of virus replication at 4 days post-infection. This was followed by the development of a better specific immune response against MYXV. Indeed, at day 9 post-infection, we observed an important proliferation of lymphocytes and an intense congestion of blood vessels in lymph nodes after M138L knockouts infection. Accordingly, in these rabbits, we observed an intense mononuclear cell infiltration throughout the dermis in primary lesions and higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Finally, this adaptive immune response provided protection to these surviving rabbits against a challenge with the MYXV WT strain. Altogether, these results show that expression of the M138L gene contributes directly or indirectly to immune evasion by MYXV. In the future, these results could help us to better understand the pathogenesis of myxomatosis but also the importance of glycans in regulation of immune responses.

  9. The α2,3-sialyltransferase encoded by myxoma virus is a virulence factor that contributes to immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutard, Bérengère; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Sarlet, Mickaël; Desmecht, Daniel; McFadden, Grant; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Gillet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) induces a lethal disease called Myxomatosis in European rabbits. MYXV is one of the rare viruses that encodes an α2,3-sialyltransferase through its M138L gene. In this study, we showed that although the absence of the enzyme was not associated with any in vitro deficit, the M138L deficient strains are highly attenuated in vivo. Indeed, while all rabbits infected with the parental and the revertant strains died within 9 days post-infection from severe myxomatosis, all but one rabbit inoculated with the M138L deficient strains survived the infection. In primary lesions, this resistance to the infection was associated with an increased ability of innate immune cells, mostly neutrophils, to migrate to the site of virus replication at 4 days post-infection. This was followed by the development of a better specific immune response against MYXV. Indeed, at day 9 post-infection, we observed an important proliferation of lymphocytes and an intense congestion of blood vessels in lymph nodes after M138L knockouts infection. Accordingly, in these rabbits, we observed an intense mononuclear cell infiltration throughout the dermis in primary lesions and higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Finally, this adaptive immune response provided protection to these surviving rabbits against a challenge with the MYXV WT strain. Altogether, these results show that expression of the M138L gene contributes directly or indirectly to immune evasion by MYXV. In the future, these results could help us to better understand the pathogenesis of myxomatosis but also the importance of glycans in regulation of immune responses.

  10. Nuclear-Encoded Plastidal Carbonic Anhydrase Is Involved in Replication of Bamboo mosaic virus RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-Hsuan Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available On inoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana with Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV, a gene with downregulated expression was found involved in the infection cycle of BaMV. To uncover how this downregulated gene affects the accumulation of BaMV in plants, we used loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Knockdown of this gene decreased the accumulation of BaMV coat protein to approximately 60% in both plants and protoplasts of N. benthamiana but had no effect on Potato virus X and Cucumber mosaic virus infection. The full-length gene was cloned and revealed as an N. benthamiana nuclear-encoded chloroplast carbonic anhydrase (CA and so designated NbCA. As compared with the accumulation of BaMV RNAs in NbCA-knockdown protoplasts, both plus- and minus-strand RNAs were reduced. We further fused NbCA with Orange fluorescent protein to confirm its localization in chloroplasts on confocal microscopy. However, transiently expressed NbCA in chloroplasts did not considerably increase BaMV accumulation. The addition of exogenous CA may not have any additive effect on BaMV accumulation because of the natural abundance of CA in chloroplasts. In an in vitro replication assay, the addition of Escherichia coli-expressed NbCA enhanced exogenous template level (re-initiation and elongation but not endogenous template level (only elongation. These results suggest that NbCA is possibly involved in re-initiation step of BaMV RNA replication. Further analysis indicated that proton concentration could influence the endogenous and exogenous template activities. Hence, our results implied that NbCA could be playing a role in harnessing proton concentration and favoring the replicase with the re-initiation template.

  11. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J Sullivan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAd encoding the Ebola glycoprotein (GP and nucleoprotein (NP has been previously shown to confer specific protective immunity in nonhuman primates. GP can exert cytopathic effects on transfected cells in vitro, and multiple GP forms have been identified in nature, raising the question of which would be optimal for a human vaccine.To address this question, we have explored the efficacy of mutant GPs from multiple Ebola virus strains with reduced in vitro cytopathicity and analyzed their protective effects in the primate challenge model, with or without NP. Deletion of the GP transmembrane domain eliminated in vitro cytopathicity but reduced its protective efficacy by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, a point mutation was identified that abolished this cytopathicity but retained immunogenicity and conferred immune protection in the absence of NP. The minimal effective rAd dose was established at 10(10 particles, two logs lower than that used previously.Expression of specific GPs alone vectored by rAd are sufficient to confer protection against lethal challenge in a relevant nonhuman primate model. Elimination of NP from the vaccine and dose reductions to 10(10 rAd particles do not diminish protection and simplify the vaccine, providing the basis for selection of a human vaccine candidate.

  12. Virus encoded MHC-like decoys diversify the inhibitory KIR repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Carrillo-Bustamante

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self. Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV is able to evade NK cell responses by coding "decoy" molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules.

  13. Virus Encoded MHC-Like Decoys Diversify the Inhibitory KIR Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self). Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is able to evade NK cell responses by coding “decoy” molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules. PMID:24130473

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 and ZEBRA: targets for therapeutic strategies against EBV-carrying cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Pyndiah, Slovénie; Apcher, Sébastien; Mazars, Anne; Manoury, Bénédicte; Ammari, Nisrine; Nylander, Karin; Voisset, Cécile; Blondel, Marc; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The EBV-encoded EBNA1 was first discovered 40 years ago, approximately 10 years after the presence of EBV had been demonstrated in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. It took another 10 years before the functions of EBNA1 in maintaining the viral genome were revealed, and it has since been shown to be an essential viral factor expressed in all EBV-carrying cells. Apart from serving to maintain the viral episome and to control viral replication and gene expression, EBNA1 also harbours a cis-acting mechanism that allows virus-carrying host cells to evade the immune system. This relates to a particular glycine-alanine repeat (GAr) within EBNA1 that has the capacity to suppress antigen presentation to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway. We discuss the role of the GAr sequence at the level of mRNA translation initiation, rather than at the protein level, as at least part of the mechanism to avoid MHC presentation. Interfering with this mechanism has become the focus of the development of immune-based therapies against EBV-carrying cancers, and some lead compounds that affect translation of GAr-carrying mRNAs have been identified. In addition, we describe the EBV-encoded ZEBRA factor and the switch from the latent to the lytic cycle as an alternative virus-specific target for treating EBV-carrying cancers. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of how EBNA1 and ZEBRA interfere with cellular pathways not only opens new therapeutic approaches but continues to reveal new cell-biological insights on the interplay between host and virus. This review is a tale of discoveries relating to how EBNA1 and ZEBRA have emerged as targets for specific cancer therapies against EBV-carrying diseases, and serves as an illustration of how mRNA translation can play roles in future immune-based strategies to target viral disease. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding GM-CSF as a vector system for rapid and facile generation of autologous human tumor cell vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; Glazenburg, KL; van Veen, ML; Kraak, MMJ; Hospers, GAP; Storkel, S; de Vries, EGE; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the production of recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding murine or human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the capacity of these vectors to transduce murine and human tumor cells ex vivo. High-titer stocks (up to 3 x 10(9) particles/ml) of

  16. Induction of cytotoxic T-cell responses by gene gun DNA vaccination with minigenes encoding influenza A virus HA and NP CTL-epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Kirkby, N

    1999-01-01

    degree of controllability. We have examined the induction of murine CTL's by this approach using DNA plasmid minigene vaccines encoding known mouse K(k) minimal CTL epitopes (8 amino acids) from the influenza A virus hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein. We here report that such an approach is feasible...

  17. Functional diversification upon leader protease domain duplication in the Citrus tristeza virus genome: Role of RNA sequences and the encoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Atallah, Osama O; Sun, Yong-Duo; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2018-01-15

    Viruses from the family Closteroviridae show an example of intra-genome duplications of more than one gene. In addition to the hallmark coat protein gene duplication, several members possess a tandem duplication of papain-like leader proteases. In this study, we demonstrate that domains encoding the L1 and L2 proteases in the Citrus tristeza virus genome underwent a significant functional divergence at the RNA and protein levels. We show that the L1 protease is crucial for viral accumulation and establishment of initial infection, whereas its coding region is vital for virus transport. On the other hand, the second protease is indispensable for virus infection of its natural citrus host, suggesting that L2 has evolved an important adaptive function that mediates virus interaction with the woody host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  20. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Jong Seok [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Gyeonggi-do, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Minkyoung [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Sang-Moo, E-mail: skang24@gsu.edu [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  1. Characterization of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Nasopharyngeal Biopsies: Potential Predictors for Carcinoma Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V Banko

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, especially in the undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT, World Health Organization type III, which is the dominant histopathological type in high-risk areas. The major EBV oncogene is latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1. LMP1 gene shows variability with different tumorigenic and immunogenic potentials. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 regulates progression of EBV-related tumors; however, the influence of EBNA1 sequence variability on tumor pathogenesis is controversial. The aims of this study were to characterize polymorphisms of EBV genes in non-endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies and to investigate potential sequence patterns that correlate with the clinical presentation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In total, 116 tumor biopsies of undifferentiated carcinoma of nasopharyngeal type (UCNT, collected from 2008 to 2014, were evaluated in this study. The genes EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 were amplified using nested-PCR. EBNA2 genotyping was performed by visualization of PCR products using gel electrophoresis. Investigation of LMP1 and EBNA1 included sequence, phylogenetic, and statistical analyses. The presence of EBV DNA was significantly distributed between TNM stages. LMP1 variability showed six variants, with the detection of the first China1 and North Carolina variants in European nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies. Newly discovered variants Srb1 and Srb2 were UCNT-specific LMP1 polymorphisms. The B95-8 and North Carolina variants are possible predictors for favorable TNM stages. In contrast, deletions in LMP1 are possible risk factors for the most disfavorable TNM stage, independent of EBNA2 or EBNA1 variability. A newly discovered EBNA1 subvariant, P-thr-sv-5, could be a potential diagnostic marker, as it represented a UCNT-specific EBNA1 subvariant. A particular combination of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 polymorphisms, type 1/Med

  2. The BFRF1 Gene of Epstein-Barr Virus Encodes a Novel Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Gonnella, Roberta; Bei, Roberto; Muraro, Raffaella; Cardinali, Giorgia; Uccini, Stefania; Ragona, Giuseppe; Frati, Luigi; Faggioni, Alberto; Angeloni, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Computer analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome indicates there are ∼100 open reading frames (ORFs). Thus far about 30 EBV genes divided into the categories latent and lytic have been identified. The BamHI F region of EBV is abundantly transcribed during lytic replication. This region is highly conserved among herpesviruses, thus suggesting that some common function could be retained in the ORFs encompassed within this viral fragment. To identify putative novel proteins and possible new markers for viral replication, we focused our attention on the first rightward ORF in the BamHI F region (BFRF1). Histidine and glutathione S-transferase-tagged BFRF1 fusion proteins were synthesized to produce a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb). Analysis of human sera revealed a high seroprevalence of antibodies to BFRF1 in patients affected by nasopharyngeal carcinoma or Burkitt's lymphoma, whereas no humoral response to BFRF1 could be detected among healthy donors. An anti-BFRF1 MAb recognizes a doublet migrating at 37 to 38 kDa in cells extracts from EBV-infected cell lines following lytic cycle activation and in an EBV-negative cell line (DG75) transfected with a plasmid expressing the BFRF1 gene. Northern blot analysis allowed the detection of a major transcript of 3.7 kb highly expressed in EBV-positive lytic cycle-induced cell lines. Treatment with inhibitors of viral DNA polymerase, such as phosphonoacetic acid and acyclovir, reduced but did not abolish the transcription of BFRF1, thus indicating that BFRF1 can be classified as an early gene. Cell fractionation experiments, as well as immunolocalization by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy, showed that BFRF1 is localized on the plasma membrane and nuclear compartments of the cells and is a structural component of the viral particle. Identification of BFRF1 provides a new marker with which to monitor EBV infection and might help us better understand the biology of

  3. Improved strategy for phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus based on full-length E2 encoding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postel Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular epidemiology has proven to be an essential tool in the control of classical swine fever (CSF and its use has significantly increased during the past two decades. Phylogenetic analysis is a prerequisite for virus tracing and thus allows implementing more effective control measures. So far, fragments of the 5´NTR (150 nucleotides, nt and the E2 gene (190 nt have frequently been used for phylogenetic analyses. The short sequence lengths represent a limiting factor for differentiation of closely related isolates and also for confidence levels of proposed CSFV groups and subgroups. In this study, we used a set of 33 CSFV isolates in order to determine the nucleotide sequences of a 3508–3510 nt region within the 5´ terminal third of the viral genome. Including 22 additional sequences from GenBank database different regions of the genome, comprising the formerly used short 5´NTR and E2 fragments as well as the genomic regions encoding the individual viral proteins Npro, C, Erns, E1, and E2, were compared with respect to variability and suitability for phylogenetic analysis. Full-length E2 encoding sequences (1119 nt proved to be most suitable for reliable and statistically significant phylogeny and analyses revealed results as good as obtained with the much longer entire 5´NTR-E2 sequences. This strategy is therefore recommended by the EU and OIE Reference Laboratory for CSF as it provides a solid and improved basis for CSFV molecular epidemiology. Finally, the power of this method is illustrated by the phylogenetic analysis of closely related CSFV isolates from a recent outbreak in Lithuania.

  4. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  5. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  6. Improved foreign gene expression in plants using a virus-encoded suppressor of RNA silencing modified to be developmentally harmless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pooja; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Alvarado, Veria Y; Sainsbury, Frank; Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P; Scholthof, Herman B

    2011-08-01

    Endeavours to obtain elevated and prolonged levels of foreign gene expression in plants are often hampered by the onset of RNA silencing that negatively affects target gene expression. Plant virus-encoded suppressors of RNA silencing are useful tools for counteracting silencing but their wide applicability in transgenic plants is limited because their expression often causes harmful developmental effects. We hypothesized that a previously characterized tombusvirus P19 mutant (P19/R43W), typified by reduced symptomatic effects while maintaining the ability to sequester short-interfering RNAs, could be used to suppress virus-induced RNA silencing without the concomitant developmental effects. To investigate this, transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana was used to evaluate the ability of P19/R43W to enhance heterologous gene expression. Although less potent than wt-P19, P19/R43W was an effective suppressor when used to enhance protein expression from either a traditional T-DNA expression cassette or using the CPMV-HT expression system. Stable transformation of N. benthamiana yielded plants that expressed detectable levels of P19/R43W that was functional as a suppressor. Transgenic co-expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and P19/R43W also showed elevated accumulation of GFP compared with the levels found in the absence of a suppressor. In all cases, transgenic expression of P19/R43W caused no or minimal morphological defects and plants produced normal-looking flowers and fertile seed. We conclude that the expression of P19/R43W is developmentally harmless to plants while providing a suitable platform for transient or transgenic overexpression of value-added genes in plants with reduced hindrance by RNA silencing. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  7. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  8. Functional analysis of Rift Valley fever virus NSs encoding a partial truncation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Head

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, belongs to genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in infected ruminants as well as causing neurological disorders, blindness, or lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. RVFV is classified as a category A priority pathogen and a select agent in the U.S., and currently there are no therapeutics available for RVF patients. NSs protein, a major virulence factor of RVFV, inhibits host transcription including interferon (IFN-β mRNA synthesis and promotes degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. NSs self-associates at the C-terminus 17 aa., while NSs at aa.210-230 binds to Sin3A-associated protein (SAP30 to inhibit the activation of IFN-β promoter. Thus, we hypothesize that NSs function(s can be abolished by truncation of specific domains, and co-expression of nonfunctional NSs with intact NSs will result in the attenuation of NSs function by dominant-negative effect. Unexpectedly, we found that RVFV NSs truncated at aa. 6-30, 31-55, 56-80, 81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230, 231-248 or 249-265 lack functions of IFN-β mRNA synthesis inhibition and degradation of PKR. Truncated NSs were less stable in infected cells, while nuclear localization was inhibited in NSs lacking either of aa.81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230 or 231-248. Furthermore, none of truncated NSs had exhibited significant dominant-negative functions for NSs-mediated IFN-β suppression or PKR degradation upon co-expression in cells infected with RVFV. We also found that any of truncated NSs except for intact NSs does not interact with RVFV NSs even in the presence of intact C-terminus self-association domain. Our results suggest that conformational integrity of NSs is important for the stability, cellular localization and biological functions of RVFV NSs, and the co-expression of truncated NSs does not exhibit dominant-negative phenotype.

  9. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV) targeting human papillomavirus (HPV). Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7) via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus. PMID:26343186

  11. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  12. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector vaccine encoding the codon-optimized F protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans.

  13. An Epstein-Barr virus DNA fragment encodes messages for the two major envelope glycoproteins (gp350/300 and gp220/200).

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, M; Thorley-Lawson, D; Kieff, E

    1984-01-01

    The genes encoding the two major Epstein-Barr virus glycoproteins (gp350/300 and gp220/200) have been mapped to a 5-kilobase fragment of the viral genome (BamHI-L). This fragment encodes 3.4- and 2.8-kilobase RNAs which translate proteins of 135 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively. Both proteins react with antiserum specific for gp350/300 and gp220/200. The 135-kilodalton protein is identical in size to the nascent polypeptide precursor to gp350/300, and the 100-kilodalton protein is the expect...

  14. Influenza A virus does not encode a tetherin antagonist with Vpu-like activity and induces IFN-dependent tetherin expression in infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Winkler

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced host cell factor tetherin inhibits release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is counteracted by the HIV-1 protein Vpu. Influenza A virus (FLUAV also buds from the plasma membrane and is not inhibited by tetherin. Here, we investigated if FLUAV encodes a functional equivalent of Vpu for tetherin antagonism. We found that expression of the FLUAV protein NS1, which antagonizes the interferon (IFN response, did not block the tetherin-mediated restriction of HIV release, which was rescued by Vpu. Similarly, tetherin-mediated inhibition of HIV release was not rescued by FLUAV infection. In contrast, FLUAV infection induced tetherin expression on target cells in an IFN-dependent manner. These results suggest that FLUAV escapes the antiviral effects of tetherin without encoding a tetherin antagonist with Vpu-like activity.

  15. Quantitative analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related gene expression in patients with chronic active EBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Seiko; Wada, Kaoru; Tobita, Satomi; Gotoh, Kensei; Ito, Yoshinori; Demachi-Okamura, Ayako; Shimizu, Norio; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) infection is a systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms in patients with no known immunodeficiency. The detailed pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and no standard treatment regimen has been developed. EBV gene expression was analysed in peripheral blood samples collected from 24 patients with CAEBV infection. The expression levels of six latent and two lytic EBV genes were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. EBV-encoded small RNA 1 and BamHI-A rightward transcripts were abundantly detected in all patients, and latent membrane protein (LMP) 2 was observed in most patients. EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 and LMP1 were detected less frequently and were expressed at lower levels. EBNA2 and the two lytic genes were not detected in any of the patients. The pattern of latent gene expression was determined to be latency type II. EBNA1 was detected more frequently and at higher levels in the clinically active patients. Quantifying EBV gene expression is useful in clarifying the pathogenesis of CAEBV infection and may provide information regarding a patient's disease prognosis, as well as possible therapeutic interventions.

  16. Hepatitis B virus genotype C encoding resistance mutations that emerge during adefovir dipivoxil therapy: in vitro replication phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenpeng; Warner, Nadia; Sozzi, Vitina; Yuen, Lilly; Colledge, Danni; Li, Tong; Zhuang, Hui; Locarnini, Stephen; Revill, Peter A

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into ten genotypes (A-J), with genotypes B and C being the most common in Asia. Recent data suggest that the HBV genotype can influence disease progression, and genotype C has been associated with more aggressive liver disease than that of other genotypes. Although there is a preventative vaccine, chronic infection remains a public health problem with oral nucleos(t)ide analog therapy being the most common treatment. The HBV genome is composed of four partially overlapping reading frames, meaning that substitutions in the HBV polymerase selected during NA therapy may also alter the overlapping HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). We have recently shown that for HBV genotype D, the rtA181T/sW172stop substitution conferring resistance to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) alters secretion of HBsAg and exerts a dominant-negative effect on wild-type virion secretion. However, the effect of this and other ADV-resistance-associated mutations on HBV replication and HBsAg secretion for the HBV genotype C, the genotype with the most severe clinical prognosis, is unknown. We constructed 1.2-mer infectious cDNA clones of HBV genotype C encoding mutations associated with ADV resistance and established an in vitro replication assay in Huh7 cells. Decreased levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg were detected for all ADV variants relative to the 1.2-mer wild-type polymerase control plasmid. Importantly, less HBsAg was detected in the cells transfected with the rtA181T resistance mutants, and the overlapping sW172stop mutation ablated secretion of HBsAg into cell culture supernatants. The identification of secretion-defective HBV in the setting of ADV therapy for HBV genotype C, and to a lesser extent HBV genotype B, has major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of HBV in the Asia-Pacific region, as it is likely that quantitative HBsAg and viral load testing of serum from patients infected with HBV encoding rtA181T and rtN236T substitutions may not

  17. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  18. Epstein Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 interference with MHC class I antigen presentation reveals a close correlation between mRNA translation initiation and antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apcher, Sebastien; Daskalogianni, Chrysoula; Manoury, Benedicte; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2010-10-14

    Viruses are known to employ different strategies to manipulate the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway to avoid recognition of the infected host cell by the immune system. However, viral control of antigen presentation via the processes that supply and select antigenic peptide precursors is yet relatively unknown. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded EBNA1 is expressed in all EBV-infected cells, but the immune system fails to detect and destroy EBV-carrying host cells. This immune evasion has been attributed to the capacity of a Gly-Ala repeat (GAr) within EBNA1 to inhibit MHC class I restricted antigen presentation. Here we demonstrate that suppression of mRNA translation initiation by the GAr in cis is sufficient and necessary to prevent presentation of antigenic peptides from mRNAs to which it is fused. Furthermore, we demonstrate a direct correlation between the rate of translation initiation and MHC class I antigen presentation from a certain mRNA. These results support the idea that mRNAs, and not the encoded full length proteins, are used for MHC class I restricted immune surveillance. This offers an additional view on the role of virus-mediated control of mRNA translation initiation and of the mechanisms that control MHC class I restricted antigen presentation in general.

  19. Isolation and characterization of the genes for two small RNAs of herpesvirus papio and their comparison with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBER RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, J G; Shu, M D

    1988-08-01

    Genes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs), two low-molecular-weight RNAs encoded by the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hybridize to two small RNAs in a baboon cell line that contains a similar virus, herpesvirus papio (HVP). The genes for the HVP RNAs (HVP-1 and HVP-2) are located together in the small unique region at the left end of the viral genome and are transcribed by RNA polymerase III in a rightward direction, similar to the EBERs. There is significant similarity between EBER1 and HVP-1 RNA, except for an insert of 22 nucleotides which increases the length of HVP-1 RNA to 190 nucleotides. There is less similarity between the sequences of EBER2 and HVP-2 RNA, but both have a length of about 170 nucleotides. The predicted secondary structure of each HVP RNA is remarkably similar to that of the respective EBER, implying that the secondary structures are important for function. Upstream from the initiation sites of all four RNA genes are several highly conserved sequences which may function in the regulation of transcription. The HVP RNAs, together with the EBERs, are highly abundant in transformed cells and are efficiently bound by the cellular La protein.

  20. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads Andreas Bay; Kongsgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should...... these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response......, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both...

  1. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  2. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, Nancy J.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Shedlock, Devon J.; Xu, Ling; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Popernack, Paul M.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Pau, Maria G.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jahrling, Peter B.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or

  3. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  4. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of breast-evaluation for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, human papillomavirus, and markers of basal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Tanuja; Pai, Trupti; Shetty, Omshree; Desai, Sangeeta

    2016-12-01

    This is a largest series of 5 cases of lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LEC) of the breast attempting to look at the expression of basal cytokeratins (CKs), human papillomavirus, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs in these tumors. Five cases were selected after stringent evaluation of all breast carcinomas showing dense lymphoid infiltration. Histologically, all these tumors showed the typical histology except 1 tumor that showed an unusual granulomatous response. All tumors were negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 (triple negative). Three tumors expressed CK5/6 and high-molecular-weight CK, whereas only the case with nodal metastasis expressed CK14. Analysis for in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs and human papillomavirus DNA on paraffin-processed tissues was negative in all tumors. All of these patients received adjuvant therapy. One patient with tumor expressing basal marker, CK5/6, had contralateral breast malignancy after a duration of 53 months of treatment completion. The rest were disease free with the follow-up period in the range of 6 to 105 months. The lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of breast expressed basal CK profile that is more CK5/6 positive than CK14. Analysis of basal markers within these tumors may help in refining the definition of these tumors and in classifying them into prognostically relevant groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The 5'-terminal region of the Aichi virus genome encodes cis-acting replication elements required for positive- and negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-06-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5' end) formed at the 5' end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5'-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5'-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5'-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5'-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5' end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3' end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5' end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis.

  6. The 5′-Terminal Region of the Aichi Virus Genome Encodes cis-Acting Replication Elements Required for Positive- and Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2005-01-01

    Aichi virus is a member of the family Picornaviridae. It has already been shown that three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the 5′ end) formed at the 5′ end of the genome are critical elements for viral RNA replication. In this study, we further characterized the 5′-terminal cis-acting replication elements. We found that an additional structural element, a pseudoknot structure, is formed through base-pairing interaction between the loop segment of SL-B (nucleotides [nt] 57 to 60) and a sequence downstream of SL-C (nt 112 to 115) and showed that the formation of this pseudoknot is critical for viral RNA replication. Mapping of the 5′-terminal sequence of the Aichi virus genome required for RNA replication using a series of Aichi virus-encephalomyocarditis virus chimera replicons indicated that the 5′-end 115 nucleotides including the pseudoknot structure are the minimum requirement for RNA replication. Using the cell-free translation-replication system, we examined the abilities of viral RNAs with a lethal mutation in the 5′-terminal structural elements to synthesize negative- and positive-strand RNAs. The results showed that the formation of three stem-loops and the pseudoknot structure at the 5′ end of the genome is required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. In addition, specific nucleotide sequences in the stem of SL-A or its complementary sequences at the 3′ end of the negative-strand were shown to be critical for the initiation of positive-strand RNA synthesis but not for that of negative-strand synthesis. Thus, the 5′ end of the Aichi virus genome encodes elements important for not only negative-strand synthesis but also positive-strand synthesis. PMID:15890931

  7. Evaluation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes on efficacy of DNA vaccine encoding glycoprotein B of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsania, Masoud; Bamdad, Taravat; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Kheirandish, Maryam; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Sari, Rohollah Dorostkar; Jamali, Abbas

    2010-02-16

    Many approaches have so far been tried to enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. These include the use of various factors that induce apoptosis or anti-apoptosis effects when co-delivered with DNA vaccine. In the present study, the effects of pro-apoptotic Bax encoding plasmid (pBax) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-X(L) encoding plasmid (pBcl-xl), intradermally co-injected with glycoprotein B (gB) of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 encoding plasmid (pgB) into the C57BL/6 mice were evaluated. Immune responses of the mice to the antigen were assessed by antibody assay, lymphoproliferative responses as well as cytokine and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay. Analysis of the humoral and cellular responses showed that the mice immunized with pBax and pgB induced higher levels of antibody and Interleukin-4 as well as stronger lymphocyte proliferative responses and cytotoxic activity compared to those mice received pgB alone. pBcl-xl when intradermally co-injected with pgB showed no significant enhancement in immune responses comparing to pgB. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Single electrode genosensor for simultaneous determination of sequences encoding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of avian influenza virus type H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Iwona; Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2013-11-05

    The duo-genosensor consisting of two different oligonucleotide probes immobilized covalently on the surface of one gold electrode via Au-S bond formation was used for simultaneous determination of two different oligonucleotide targets. One of the probes, decorated on its 5'-end with ferrocene (SH-ssDNA-Fc), is complementary to the cDNA representing a sequence encoding part of H5 hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus. The second probe, decorated on its 5'-end with methylene blue (SH-ssDNA-MB), is complementary to cDNA representing the fragment of N1 neuraminidase from the same virus. The presence of both probes on the surface of gold electrodes was confirmed with Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The changes in redox activity of both redox active complexes before and after the hybridization process were used as analytical signal. The peak at +400 ± 2 mV was observed in the presence of 40 nM ssDNA used as a target for SH-ssDNA-Fc probe. This peak increased with the increase of concentration of target ssDNA. It indicates the "signal on" mode of analytical signal generation. The peak at -250 ± 4 mV, characteristic for SH-ssDNA-MB probe, was decreasing with the increase of the concentration of the complementary ssDNA target starting from 8 to 100 nM. This indicates the generation of electrochemical signal according to the "signal off" mode. The proposed duo-genosensor is capable of simultaneous, specific, and good sensitivity probing for the sequences derived from genes encoding two main markers of the influenza virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase.

  9. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Gastric Remnant Carcinoma and Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma in Qingdao of Northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Liu

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with a subset of gastric carcinoma which was defined as EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC. The proportion of EBVaGC in gastric remnant carcinoma (GRC which occurs in the intact stomach five or more years after gastric surgery for benign disease is significantly higher than that in conventional gastric carcinoma (CGC. The infection of EBV in recurrent gastric carcinoma (RGC with local anastomotic recurrence is poorly understood.53 cases of GRC and 58 cases of RGC were analyzed for the presence of EBV, and the variants of EBV Encoded RNAs (EBER, EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 and Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 gene in both groups were investigated.Thirteen (24.5% out of 53 GRC cases and 3 (5.2% out of 58 RGC cases were identified as EBVaGCs. In 17 paired RGC cases, only one case was classified as EBVaGC in both times specimen. Another one case was identified as EBVaGC in the primary gastroectomy specimen while the recurrent gastric cancer was not. The third EBVaGC in RGC was identified while the primary gastric cancer was not EBVaGC. In GRC and RGC cases, type 1, type F, EB-6m, V-val subtype, del-LMP1 were predominant type or variants, accounting for 10(76.9% and 2(66.7%, 13(100% and 3(100%, 13(100% and 3(100%, 9(69.2% and 3(100%, 12(92.3% and 3(100%, respectively. However, Type C was the predominant type in GRC accounting for 9(69.2% cases while type D was the predominant one accounting for 2(66.7% cases in RGC.The prevalence of EBVaGc in GRC and RGC was significantly different. The distributions of these variants were similar to each other in the two groups which indicated that there were no more aggressive EBV variants in EBVaGC in GRC compared with that in RGC.

  10. Different haplotypes encode the same protein for independent sources of zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistance in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) production is negatively affected by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Three sources of ZYMV resistance have been commercially deployed and all three resistances are conditioned by a single recessive gene. A vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4-like (VPS4-like)...

  11. The evolution of Epstein-Barr virus inferred from the conservation and mutation of the virus glycoprotein gp350/220 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asako; Kanai, Kyosuke; Satoh, Yukio; Touge, Chizu; Nagata, Keiko; Sairenji, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu

    2009-04-01

    To study variations of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we analyzed the gp350/220 gene for several cell lines and Japanese wild isolates using direct sequencing. The N-terminal region was highly conserved in all EBVs except for Jijoye/P3HR-1 and a few isolates. The variation of the region coincided with EBV types A and B (also referred to as types 1 and 2) and were, respectively, designated as the types a and b. The type A/a was detected in most Japanese cell lines and wild isolates, and was classified as China1 type with latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 gene. The type B/b was detected in only a few wild isolates with the Med and China2 types. The C-terminus had more diversity than the N-terminus and lacked the divergence between types A/a and B/b. The phylogenetic analyses of the gp350/220 and LMP1 genes may suggest a mode of EBV evolution into types A/a and B/b and then to LMP1 subtypes.

  12. Herpesvirus pan encodes a functional homologue of BHRF1, the Epstein-Barr virus v-Bcl-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Tracey

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latently infects about 90% of the human population and is associated with benign and malignant diseases of lymphoid and epithelial origin. BHRF1, an early lytic cycle antigen, is an apoptosis suppressing member of the Bcl-2 family. In vitro studies imply that BHRF1 is dispensable for both virus replication and transformation. However, the fact that BHRF1 is highly conserved not only in all EBV isolates studied to date but also in the analogous viruses Herpesvirus papio and Herpesvirus pan that infect baboons and chimpanzees respectively, suggests BHRF1 may play an important role in vivo. Results Herpesvirus papio BHRF1 has been shown to function in an analogous manner to EBV BHRF1 in response to DNA damaging agents in human keratinocytes. In this study we show that the heterologous expression of the previously uncharacterised Herpesvirus pan BHRF1 in the human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Ramos-BL provides similar anti-apoptotic functions to that of EBV BHRF1 in response to apoptosis triggered by serum withdrawal, etoposide treatment and ultraviolet (UV radiation. We also map the amino acid changes onto the recently solved structure of the EBV BHRF1 and reveal that these changes are unlikely to alter the 3D structure of the protein. Conclusions These findings show that the functional conservation of BHRF1 extends to a lymphoid background, suggesting that the primate virus proteins interact with cellular proteins that are themselves highly conserved across the higher primates. Further weight is added to this suggestion when we show that the difference in amino acid sequences map to regions on the 3D structure of EBV BHRF1 that are unlikely to change the conformation of the protein.

  13. Suppressive Effects of Chronic Stress on Influenza Virus Protection after Vaccination with Plasmid DNA-Encoded Nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezam, Fatemeh Sadat; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Abdoli, Asghar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shenagari, Mohammad; Gholami, Shima; Sohani, Hesam; Rahmatollahi, Hamidreza; Jamali, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a highly infectious and acute respiratory disease caused by an infection of the host respiratory tract mucosa by the influenza virus. The use of DNA vaccines that express conserved genes such as nucleoprotein (NP) represents a new method of vaccination against influenza. In this study, the effect of chronic stress on the efficiency of this type of vaccine has been evaluated in a mouse model. The NP DNA vaccine was administered intradermally 3 times on days 0, 3 and 6 to stressed and nonstressed male BALB/c mice. Two weeks after the last immunization, half of these mice were challenged with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) influenza virus and were weighed for 12 days, and their mortality rate was assessed during this period. The cellular immune response of the other half of the mice was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay. The results indicate a significant reduction in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response of stressed mice in comparison with unstressed mice. Also, the percentage of weight loss and mortality after the challenge in stressed mice was significantly increased compared to the other group. These results indicate that the NP DNA vaccine is not able to induce any effective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against influenza virus in stressed mice and cannot induce protective immunity against influenza infection in this group of mice. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Mutational analysis of two highly conserved motifs in the silencing suppressor encoded by tomato spotted wilt virus (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ying; Bag, Sudeep; Mitter, Neena; Turina, Massimo; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-06-01

    Tospoviruses cause serious economic losses to a wide range of field and horticultural crops on a global scale. The NSs gene encoded by tospoviruses acts as a suppressor of host plant defense. We identified amino acid motifs that are conserved in all of the NSs proteins of tospoviruses for which the sequence is known. Using tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) as a model, the role of these motifs in suppressor activity of NSs was investigated. Using site-directed point mutations in two conserved motifs, glycine, lysine and valine/threonine (GKV/T) at positions 181-183 and tyrosine and leucine (YL) at positions 412-413, and an assay to measure the reversal of gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c, we show that substitutions (K182 to A, and L413 to A) in these motifs abolished suppressor activity of the NSs protein, indicating that these two motifs are essential for the RNAi suppressor function of tospoviruses.

  15. Characterization of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 Prophages and Virus-Encoded DNA Methyltransferases in the Light of Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Sinorhizobial Virome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Decewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Sinorhizobium/Ensifer mostly groups nitrogen-fixing bacteria that create root or stem nodules on leguminous plants and transform atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which improves the productivity of the plants. Although these biotechnologically-important bacteria are commonly found in various soil environments, little is known about their phages. In this study, the genome of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21 isolated from a heavy-metal-contaminated copper mine in Poland was investigated for the presence of prophages and DNA methyltransferase-encoding genes. In addition to the previously identified temperate phage, ΦLM21, and the phage-plasmid, pLM21S1, the analysis revealed the presence of three prophage regions. Moreover, four novel phage-encoded DNA methyltransferase (MTase genes were identified and the enzymes were characterized. It was shown that two of the identified viral MTases methylated the same target sequence (GANTC as cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM of the bacterial host strain, LM21. This discovery was recognized as an example of the evolutionary convergence between enzymes of sinorhizobial viruses and their host, which may play an important role in virus cycle. In the last part of the study, thorough comparative analyses of 31 sinorhizobial (prophages (including active sinorhizobial phages and novel putative prophages retrieved and manually re-annotated from Sinorhizobium spp. genomes were performed. The networking analysis revealed the presence of highly conserved proteins (e.g., holins and endolysins and a high diversity of viral integrases. The analysis also revealed a large number of viral DNA MTases, whose genes were frequently located within the predicted replication modules of analyzed prophages, which may suggest their important regulatory role. Summarizing, complex analysis of the phage protein similarity network enabled a new insight into overall sinorhizobial virome diversity.

  16. [Cloning of y3 gene encoding a tobacco mosaic virus inhibitor from Coprinus comatus and transformation to Nicotiana tabacum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueren; He, Tao; Zhang, Gaina; Hao, Jianguo; Jia, Jingfen

    2010-02-01

    The protein Y3 was a TMV inhibitor which was encoded by y3 gene. The aim of this work was to clone the full length of y3 gene from Coprinus comatus and to reveal its inhibitory function to TMV in in vivo conditions. We amplified the unknown 5'- terminal cDNA sequence of y3 gene with 5'- Full RACE Core Set (TaKaRa), obtained the full length of this gene by RT-PCR, constructed the expression plasmid pCAMBIA1301-y3 via inserting gene y3 sequence, CaMV 35 S promoter, and NOS terminator at MCS and transformed it into Nicotiana tabacum via agrobacterium-mediation. The full length of y3 gene was 534 bps including one ORF encoding 130 amino acid residues (GenBank Accession No. GQ859168; EMBL FN546262). The cDNA sequence and its deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity (94%) to the published fragment of y3 gene sequence. Northern blot analysis proved the transcription of y3 gene in transgenic tobacco plants. The transgenic plants inoculated with TMV expressed the inhibitory activity to TMV. We cloned the full length of y3 gene and obtained transgenic tobacco plants. The expression of y3 gene in transgenic plants improved the inhibitory activity to TMV. The cloning and expression analysis of y3 gene might provide background information for future studying of y3 gene.

  17. Bioinformatics analysis and characteristics of VP23 encoded by the newly identified UL18 gene of duck enteritis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the predicted information about structures and functions of VP23 encoded by the newly identified DEV UL18 gene through bioinformatics softwares and tools. The DEV UL18 was predicted to encode a polypeptide with 322 amino acids, termed VP23, with a putative molecular mass of 35.250 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point (PI) of 8.37, no signal peptide and transmembrane domain in the polypeptide. The prediction of subcellular localization showed that the DEV-VP23 located at endoplasmic reticulum with 33.3%, mitochondrial with 22.2%, extracellular, including cell wall with 11.1%, vesicles of secretory system with 11.1%, Golgi with 11.1%, and plasma membrane with 11.1%. The acid sequence of analysis showed that the potential antigenic epitopes are situated in 45-47, 53-60, 102-105, 173-180, 185-189, 260-265, 267-271, and 292-299 amino acids. All the consequences inevitably provide some insights for further research about the DEV-VP23 and also provide a fundament for further study on the the new type clinical diagnosis of DEV and can be used for the development of new DEV vaccine.

  18. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  19. Increased motoneuron survival and improved neuromuscular function in transgenic ALS mice after intraspinal injection of an adeno-associated virus encoding Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, M; Hottinger, A; Paterna, J C; Zurn, A D; Aebischer, P; Büeler, H

    2000-03-22

    Mutations in the gene encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) underlie some familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of cortical, brainstem and spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice over- expressing a mutated form of human SOD1 containing a Gly-->Ala substitution at position 93 (SOD1(G93A)) develop a severe, progressive motoneuron disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) to transfer neuroprotective molecules in this animal ALS model. Initial experiments showed that injection of an rAAV vector encoding green fluorescent protein unilaterally into the lumbar spinal cord of wild-type mice leads to expression of the reporter gene in 34.7 +/- 5.2% of the motoneurons surrounding the injection site. Intraspinal injection of an rAAV encoding the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2 in SOD1 (G93A) mice resulted in sustained bcl-2 expression in motoneurons and significantly increased the number of surviving motoneurons at the end-stage of disease. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude elicited by nerve stimulation and recorded by electromyographic measurements was higher in the rAAV-bcl-2-treated group than in controls. Local bcl-2 expression in spinal motoneurons delayed the appearance of signs of motor deficiency but was not sufficient to prolong the survival of SOD1 (G93A) mice. To our know-ledge, this study describes the first successful transduction and protection of spinal motoneurons by direct gene transfer in a model of progressive motoneuron disease. Our results support the use of AAVs for the delivery of protective genes to spinal cord moto-neurons as a possible way to enhance motoneuron survival and repair.

  20. Replication-Competent Influenza A Virus That Encodes a Split-Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged PB2 Polymerase Subunit Allows Live-Cell Imaging of the Virus Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, Sergiy V.; Moisy, Dorothée; Munier, Sandie; Schraidt, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the intracellular trafficking of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins are currently limited by the lack of a method enabling their visualization during infection in single cells. This is largely due to the difficulty of encoding fluorescent fusion proteins within the viral genome. To circumvent this limitation, we used the split-green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system (S. Cabantous, T. C. Terwilliger, and G. S. Waldo, Nat. Biotechnol. 23:102–107, 2005) to produce a quasi-wild-type recombinant A/WSN/33/influenza virus which allows expression of individually fluorescent PB2 polymerase subunits in infected cells. The viral PB2 proteins were fused to the 16 C-terminal amino acids of the GFP, whereas the large transcomplementing GFP fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cultured cells that were permissive to infection. This system was used to characterize the intranuclear dynamics of PB2 by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and to visualize the trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) by dynamic light microscopy in live infected cells. Following nuclear export, vRNPs showed a transient pericentriolar accumulation and intermittent rapid (∼1 μm/s), directional movements in the cytoplasm, dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments. Our data establish the potential of split-GFP-based recombinant viruses for the tracking of viral proteins during a quasi-wild-type infection. This new virus, or adaptations of it, will be of use in elucidating many aspects of influenza virus host cell interactions as well as in screening for new antiviral compounds. Furthermore, the existence of cell lines stably expressing the complementing GFP fragment will facilitate applications to many other viral and nonviral systems. PMID:22114331

  1. Expression of LMP and EBNA genes in Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas in Hu-PBL/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunlian; Lu, Suli; Gan, Xiaoning; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yang; Luo, Chunyan; Pan, Yuxia; Hong, Li; Gan, Ruliang

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from healthy humans with latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice results in development of EBV-associated human B-cell lymphoma. However, the expression of EBV genes in relation to lymphoma development has not been reported. We investigated latent membrane protein (LMP) and EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) gene expression in PBLs from EBV-positive blood donors and induced-lymphoma cells from SCID mice to elucidate the functions and effects of the EBV genome in the occurrence and development of lymphoma. PBLs were isolated from 9 healthy blood donors and transplanted into SCID mice. Gene expression levels of LMP-1, LMP-2A, and LMP-2B and EBNA-1, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP were monitored by real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in cells from nine EBV-induced lymphomas and in matched lymphocytes from healthy subjects. LMP-1, EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 protein levels were detected by western blotting. As a result, LMP-1, LMP-2A and LMP-2B mRNA levels were upregulated 256-, 38- and 331-fold, respectively, in the EBV-induced lymphoma cells compared with the controls, while EBNA-1 and EBNA-3A mRNA levels were upregulated 1157- and 1154-fold, respectively. EBNA-2, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP mRNAs were detected in lymphoma cells, but not in lymphocytes from EBV-positive blood donors. LMP-1 and EBNA-2 proteins were not expressed in lymphocytes from EBV-positive blood donors, according to western blotting. Weak EBNA-1 expression was observed in lymphocytes from blood donors with latent EBV infection, while LMP-1, EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 protein levels were significantly upregulated in EBV-induced lymphoma cells, consistent with mRNA expression levels detected by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, LMP-1, LMP-2A, LMP-2B, EBNA-1 and EBNA-3A were upregulated in EBV-induced lymphoma cells, while EBNA-2, EBNA-3B, EBNA-3C and EBNA-LP were absent in lymphocytes from

  2. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design and evaluation of protein expression in a recombinant plasmid encoding epitope gp 350/220 of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmah, Karimatul; Dluha, Nurul; Anyndita, Nadya V. M.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin; Widodo

    2017-05-01

    The Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) causes severe infections that may lead to cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Development of effective EBV vaccines is necessary to prevent the virus spreading throughout the community. TheEBV has a surface protein gp 350/220, which serves as an antigen to help interact with host cells. Epitopes of the protein can potentially serve as bases for a vaccine. In a previous study, we have found a conserved epitope of gp 350/220 from all strains EBV through an in silico approach. The aim of this study is to design and overproduce a recombinant peptide of epitope gp 350/220 in E. coli. DNA encoding the conserved epitope was synthesized and cloned into plasmid pET-22b(+); the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli strains DH5α and BL21. The transformed plasmid DNA was isolated and confirmed by restriction using XbaI and PstI enzymes followed by DNA sequencing. Protein expression was induced by isopropyl-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) with final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 1, and 2 mM in consecutive times. An osmotic shock method was used to isolate protein from periplasmic fraction of E. coli DH5α and BL21. The SDS-PAGE analysis was carried out to detect peptide target (3.4 kDa). Based on this result, the induction process did not work properly, and thus needs further investigation.

  4. Efficient Gene Suppression in Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Using Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Encoding Short-Hairpin RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Takashi; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a powerful tool used to induce loss-of-function phenotypes through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules have been used to target the central nervous system (CNS) and are expected to have clinical utility against refractory neurodegenerative diseases. However, siRNA is characterized by low transduction efficiency, insufficient inhibition of gene expression, and short duration of therapeutic effects, and is thus not ideal for treatment of neural tissues and diseases. To address these problems, viral delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassettes that support more efficient and long-lasting transduction into target tissues is expected to be a promising delivery tool. Various types of gene therapy vectors have been developed, such as adenovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), herpes simplex virus and lentivirus; however, AAV is particularly advantageous because of its relative lack of immunogenicity and lack of chromosomal integration. In human clinical trials, recombinant AAV vectors are relatively safe and well-tolerated. In particular, serotype 9 of AAV (AAV9) vectors show the highest tropism for neural tissue and can cross the blood-brain barrier, and we have shown that intrathecal delivery of AAV9 yields relatively high gene transduction into dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord. This chapter describes how to successfully use AAV vectors encoding shRNA in vivo, particularly for RNA interference in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  5. The phosphoprotein genes of measles viruses from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis cases encode functional as well as non-functional proteins and display reduced editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, E L; Rennick, L J; Weissbrich, B; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Duprex, W P; Rima, B K

    2016-01-04

    Products expressed from the second (P/V/C) gene are important in replication and abrogating innate immune responses during acute measles virus (MV) infection. Thirteen clone sets were derived from the P/V/C genes of measles virus (MV) RNA extracted from brains of a unique collection of seven cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) caused by persistent MV in the central nervous system (CNS). Whether these functions are fully maintained when MV replicates in the CNS has not been previously determined. Co-transcriptional editing of the P mRNAs by non-template insertion of guanine (G) nucleotides, which generates mRNAs encoding the viral V protein, occurs much less frequently (9%) in the SSPE derived samples than during the acute infection (30-50%). Thus it is likely that less V protein, which is involved in combatting the innate immune response, is produced. The P genes in MV from SSPE cases were not altered by biased hypermutation but exhibited a high degree of variation within each case. Most but not all SSPE derived phospho-(P) proteins were functional in mini genome replication/transcription assays. An eight amino acid truncation of the carboxyl-terminus made the P protein non-functional while the insertion of an additional glycine residue by insertion of G nucleotides at the editing site had no effect on protein function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Subsurface metagenomes uncover a vast repertoire of hypervariable proteins encoded by genetic elements in uncultivated organisms and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B. G.; Burstein, D.; Castelle, C. J.; Banfield, J. F.; Valentine, D. L.; Miller, J. F.; Ghosh, P.; Handa, S.; Arambula, D.; Czornyj, E.; Thomas, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    Uncultivated microorganisms primarily account for the remarkable diversity harbored in subsurface environments and represent an expansive subset of the current Tree of Life. Recent metagenomic efforts to investigate subsurface biomes have unveiled an array of bacterial and archaeal candidate phyla, whose members have minimal genomes and an apparent host-dependent existence. Still, little is known about the adaptive strategies that mediate host interactions in these organisms or their viruses. Genomic features known as diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), which guide variability into targeted genes, were recently discovered in two single-cell genomes of uncultivated nanoarchaea, and independently in the genome of a marine virus from methane seep sediments. These prodigious drivers of protein hypervariability were first identified as the key force behind phage tail fiber diversification for binding different host receptors. Since their discovery, approximately 500 new DGRs have been found across a wide range of bacterial genomes representing various niches. We identified an unexpected 1136 distinct diversifiers from a single groundwater environment in reconstructed microbial genomes and genome fragments. The newly detected DGRs - predominantly linked to members of the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) - appear to target genes associated with cell-cell attachment, signaling, and transcription regulation. These findings suggest that targeted protein diversification may have an important role in regulating symbiotic or parasitic associations in groundwater microbiomes.

  7. Coimmunization with IL-15 plasmid enhances the longevity of CD8 T cells induced by DNA encoding hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Dong, Sheng-Fu; Sun, Shu-Hui; Wang, Yuan; Li, Guang-Di; Qu, Di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the feasibility of delivering a plasmid encoding IL-15 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for improving the immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine. METHODS: We used RT-PCR based strategies to develop IL-15 expression constructs. We first confirmed that the gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli due to the poor expression of IL-15. Then the bioactivity of IL-15 plasmid expression product was identified by CTLL-2 proliferation assay. One hundred micrograms of DNA from each of the IL-15 eukaryotic expressed plasmid and the recombinant plasmid harboring DNA encoding the 144 amino acids of the N-terminus of HBV core gene (abbreviated pHBc144) was used to co-immunize C57 BL/6 mice. The titer of anti-HBcIgG was detected by ELISA and the antigen-specific CD8+ T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells) were detected by intracellular cytokine staining at different time points. RESULTS: After co-immunization by pIL-15 and pHBc144 DNA vaccine the antigen-specific CD8+ cells of mice increased gradually, the first peak of immune response appeared 14 d later, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ Ts cells decreased gradually and maintained at a steady level in 3 mo. After boosting, the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells reached the second peak 10 d later with a double of the 1st peak, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells decreased slowly. IL-15 as a gene adjuvant had no significant effect on humoral immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine, but increased the memory antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine. CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine constructed by HBc Ag 1-144 amino acid induces effective cell immunity, and cytokine plasmid-delivered IL-15 enhances the longevity of CD8+ T cells. PMID:16937447

  8. DNA Epstein-Barr virus (EBV sebagai biomaker diagnosis karsinoma nasofaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Sudiono

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a malignant neoplasm arising from the mucosal epithelium of the nasopharynx with various cells differentiation. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is vastly more common in certain regions of East Asia, South Asia and Africa with viral, dietary which is typically includes consumption of salted vegetables, fish, meat and genetic factors that implicated in its causation. The undifferentiated is the most common type of NPC and strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection. Purpose: This paper was aimed to review about molecular biomarker as non invasive diagnosis of NPC especially in related to EBV infection in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Reviews: The pathogenesis of NPC particularly the endemic type seems to follow a multi-step process, in which EBV, ethnic background, and environmental carcinogens all seem to play important role. EBV DNA plasm level is used continuously in clinic as a promise, sensitive and specific molecular marker diagnostic that reflected the stage, treatment response and prognosis of NPC. Detection of nuclear antigen associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBNA and viral DNA has revealed that EBV can infect epithelial cells and associated with their transformation in carcinogenesis. Latent membrane protein (LMP-1 and LMP-2 oncogenes EBV encoded related to proliferative gene expression indicated invasive and progressive growth of NPC. Conclusion: The new biomarkers for NPC, including EBV DNA in serum; EBV DNA and BamH1-A Reading Frame-1 (BARF1 mRNA in NPC brushings have been developed for the molecular non invasive diagnosis of this tumour.Latar belakang: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, sering dikenal sebagai kanker nasofaring merupakan tumor ganas yang berasal dari epitel mukosa nasofaring dengan derajat diferensiasi sel yang bervariasi. Paling banyak ditemukan di Asia Selatan, Asia Timur, dan Afrika. Virus, pola diet tipikal seperti konsumsi sayuran, ikan dan daging yang

  9. BamHI-A rightward frame 1, an Epstein–Barr virus-encoded oncogene and immune modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, Eveline K; Le Large, Tessa Y S; Greijer, Astrid E; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) causes several benign and malignant disorders of lymphoid and epithelial origin. EBV-related tumors display distinct patterns of viral latent gene expression, of which the BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is selectively expressed in carcinomas, regulated by cellular differentiation factors including ΔNp63α. BARF1 functions as a viral oncogene, immortalizing and transforming epithelial cells of different origin by acting as a mitogenic growth factor, inducing cyclin-D expression, and up-regulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2, stimulating host cell growth and survival. In addition, secreted hexameric BARF1 has immune evasive properties, functionally corrupting macrophage colony stimulating factor, as supported by recent functional and structural data. Therefore, BARF1, an intracellular and secreted protein, not only has multiple pathogenic functions but also can function as a target for immune responses. Deciphering the role of BARF1 in EBV biology will contribute to novel diagnostic and treatment options for EBV-driven carcinomas. Herein, we discuss recent insights on the regulation of BARF1 expression and aspects of structure-function relating to its oncogenic and immune suppressive properties. © 2013 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23996634

  10. Small molecules targeting hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A cause subcellular redistribution of their target: insights into compound modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targett-Adams, Paul; Graham, Emily J S; Middleton, Jenny; Palmer, Amy; Shaw, Stephen M; Lavender, Helen; Brain, Philip; Tran, Thien Duc; Jones, Lyn H; Wakenhut, Florian; Stammen, Blanda; Pryde, David; Pickford, Chris; Westby, Mike

    2011-07-01

    The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients consists of lengthy treatment with interferon and ribavirin. To increase the effectiveness of HCV therapy, future regimens will incorporate multiple direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs. Recently, the HCV-encoded NS5A protein has emerged as a promising DAA target. Compounds targeting NS5A exhibit remarkable potency in vitro and demonstrate early clinical promise, suggesting that NS5A inhibitors could feature in future DAA combination therapies. Since the mechanisms through which these molecules operate are unknown, we have used NS5A inhibitors as tools to investigate their modes of action. Analysis of replicon-containing cells revealed dramatic phenotypic alterations in NS5A localization following treatment with NS5A inhibitors; NS5A was redistributed from the endoplasmic reticulum to lipid droplets. The NS5A relocalization did not occur in cells treated with other classes of HCV inhibitors, and NS5A-targeting molecules did not cause similar alterations in the localization of other HCV-encoded proteins. Time course analysis of the redistribution of NS5A revealed that the transfer of protein to lipid droplets was concomitant with the onset of inhibition, as judged by the kinetic profiles for these compounds. Furthermore, analysis of the kinetic profile of inhibition for a panel of test molecules permitted the separation of compounds into different kinetic classes based on their modes of action. Results from this approach suggested that NS5A inhibitors perturbed the function of new replication complexes, rather than acting on preformed complexes. Taken together, our data reveal novel biological consequences of NS5A inhibition, which may help enable the development of future assay platforms for the identification of new and/or different NS5A inhibitors.

  11. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  12. Experimental Infection of NOD/SCID Mice Reconstituted with Human CD34+ Cells with Epstein-Barr Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas-Ohlmayer, Miguel; Padgett-Thomas, Angela; Domiati-Saad, Rana; Melkus, Michael W.; Cravens, Petra D.; Martin, Maria del P.; Netto, George; Garcia, J. Victor

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced lymphoproliferative disease is an important complication in the context of immune deficiency. Impaired T-cell immunity allows the outgrowth of transformed cells with the subsequent production of predominantly B-cell lymphomas. Currently there is no in vivo model that can adequately recapitulate EBV infection and its association with B-cell lymphomas. NOD/SCID mice engrafted with human CD34+ cells and reconstituted mainly with human B lymphocytes may serve as a useful xenograft model to study EBV infection and pathogenesis. We therefore infected reconstituted mice with EBV. High levels of viral DNA were detected in the peripheral blood of all infected mice. All infected mice lost weight and showed decreased activity levels. Infected mice presented large visible tumors in multiple organs, most prominently in the spleen. These tumors stained positive for human CD79a, CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNAs and were light chain restricted. Their characterization is consistent with that of large cell immunoblastic lymphoma. In addition, tumor cells expressed EBNA1, LMP1, and LMP2a mRNAs, which is consistent with a type II latency program. EBV+ lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing human CD45, CD19, CD21, CD23, CD5, and CD30 were readily established from the bone marrow and spleens of infected animals. Finally, we also demonstrate that infection with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged virus can be monitored by the detection of infected EGFP+ cells and EGFP+ tumors. These data demonstrate that NOD/SCID mice that are reconstituted with human CD34+ cells are susceptible to infection by EBV and accurately recapitulate important aspects of EBV pathogenesis. PMID:15564497

  13. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  14. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schnee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS. In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G encoding messenger RNA (mRNA to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator.

  16. A herpes simplex virus type 2-encoded microRNA promotes tumor cell metastasis by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Liu, Shupeng; Zhou, Zhenhua; Yan, Hongli; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-05-01

    Certain viruses use microRNAs to regulate the expression of their own genes, host genes, or both. A number of microRNAs expressed by herpes simplex virus type 2 have been confirmed by previous studies. However, whether these microRNAs play a role in the metastasis of lung cancers and how these viral microRNAs precisely regulated the tumor biological process in lung cancer bone metastasis remain obscure. We recently identified the high expression of an acutely and latently expressed viral microRNA, Hsv2-miR-H9-5p, encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript through microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses which compared the expression of microRNAs in bone metastasis from lung cancer with primary lung cancers. We now reported that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p was highly expressed in bone metastasis and closely associated with pathological and metastatic processes of lung cancers. The functions of Hsv2-miR-H9-5p were determined by overexpression which results in an increase in survival, migration, and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro. We determined that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p directly targeted SOCS2 mechanistically by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Then, we investigated the functions of SOCS2 in the progress of lung cancers. Reduction of SOCS2 dosage by hsv2-miR-H9-5p induced increased migration and invasion of lung cancer cells. Overexpression of SOCS2 inverted these phenotypes generated by hsv2-miR-H9-5p, indicating the potential roles of SOCS2 in Hsv2-miR-H9-5p-driven metastasis in lung cancers. The results highlighted that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p regulated and contributed to bone metastasis of lung cancers. We proposed that Hsv2-miR-H9-5p could be used as a potential target in lung cancer therapy.

  17. Optical imaging: bacteria, viruses, and mammalian cells encoding light-emitting proteins reveal the locations of primary tumors and metastases in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong A; Timiryasova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qian; Beltz, Richard; Szalay, Aladar A

    2003-11-01

    Early detection of tumors and their metastases is crucial for the prognosis of cancer treatment. Traditionally, tumor detection is achieved by various methods, including magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography. With the recent cloning, cellular expression, and real-time imaging of light-emitting proteins, such as Renilla luciferase (Ruc), bacterial luciferase (Lux), firefly luciferase (Luc), green fluorescent protein (GFP), or Ruc-GFP fusion protein, significant efforts have been focused on using these marker proteins for tumor detection. It has also been demonstrated that certain bacteria, viruses, and mammalian cells (BVMC), when administered systemically, are able to gain entry and replicate selectively in tumors. In addition, many tissue/tumor specific promoters have been cloned which allow transgene expression specifically in tumor tissues. Therefore, when light-emitting protein encoded BVMC are injected systemically into rodents, tumor-specific marker gene expression is achieved and is detected in real time based on light emission. Consequently, the locations of primary tumors and previously unknown metastases in animals are revealed in vivo. In the future it will likely be feasible to use engineered light-emitting BVMC as probes for tumor detection and as gene-delivery vehicles in vivo for cancer therapy.

  18. Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interacts with Tat and Activates the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Teresa S.; Subramanian, Chitra; Cotter, Murray A.; Robert A. Thomas; Robertson, Erle S.

    2001-01-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is constitutively expressed in cells infected with the Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV), also referred to as human herpesvirus 8. KSHV is tightly associated with body cavity-based lymphomas (BCBLs) in immunocompromised patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). LANA, encoded by open reading frame 73 of KSHV, is one of a small subset of proteins expressed during latent infection and was shown to be important in tethering the...

  19. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  20. Carboxyl-terminal sequence variation of latent membrane protein 1 gene in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinomas from Eastern China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Kanai, Kyosuke; Satoh, Yukio; Luo, Bing; Sairenji, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate variations of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) and explore the LMP1 variations of neighboring countries, China and Japan. In 12 and 8 EBVaGCs from eastern China and Japan, respectively, the C-termini of LMP1 were analyzed using PCR and sequencing. The sequences were compared with previously published strains and were characterized on a phylogenetic tree. The difference between Chinese and Japanese isolates was characterized. Ten of 12 Chinese GC isolates (83.3%) and all of the 8 (100%) Japanese GC isolates belonged to the China 1 strain. Also, B95-8 type isolates were found in 2 of 12 Chinese GC. In the 18 China 1 type isolates, additional mutations outside the signature sequence changes were found. All Japanese isolates (100%) had two or more additional mutations, whereas only 5 of 10 (50%) Chinese isolates had two or more additional mutations. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0359). China 1 is the dominant strain in GC from eastern China and Japan. The similarity to that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from China supports the view that China 1 strain represents a geographic-associated polymorphism rather than an NPC-associated polymorphism. Japanese isolates show more mutations than Chinese isolates, suggesting a geographic difference between Chinese and Japanese isolates in GC. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Analysis of Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in North-Eastern India: A Chromogenic in Situ Hybridization Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Anjan; Raphael, Vandana; Shunyu, N-Brian; Khonglah, Yookarin; Mishra, Jaya; Jitani, Ankit-Kumar; Medhi, Jayanta

    2016-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common cancer in the North-East region of India. Though the role of environmental contributors of NPC in the North-Eastern part of India is firmly established, EBV as an etiological agent in the region remains unexplored. Fifty-one patients, who presented at the department of ENT, NEIGRIHMS and were confirmed as NPC upon histopathological examination, were included in the study. Chromogenic in-situ hybridization (CISH) was used for the evaluation of EBER (Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA). Presence of nuclear signals was taken as positive for EBER expression. EBER status was correlated with various clinicopathological parameters like age, sex, dietary habits, histological types of NPC, and ethnicity of the patients. The age range of the study group was 25 to 70 years with a mean age of 44.64 years and a male:female ratio of 3:2. Non-keratinizing undifferentiated type of NPC was the most common histological type. EBV was positive in 59% (30/51) of our cases. It showed a statistically significant correlation with the Naga community (P=0.01), with consumption of smoked food (P=0.02), and cigarette smoking (P=0.02). There was no correlation of EBV with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, stage, and histology. Our result indicates that EBV may be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of NPC in this region of India. So apart from lifestyle modification, a future study for a screening test for EBV viral load even in asymptomatic patients may be considered, for determination of disease susceptibility, early diagnosis, and proper management.

  2. Analysis of Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in North-Eastern India: A Chromogenic in Situ Hybridization Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Saikia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common cancer in the North-East region of India. Though the role of environmental contributors of NPC in the North-Eastern part of India is firmly established, EBV as an etiological agent in the region remains unexplored. Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients, who presented at the department of ENT, NEIGRIHMS and were confirmed as NPC upon histopathological examination, were included in the study. Chromogenic in-situ hybridization (CISH was used for the evaluation of EBER (Epstein Barr Virus Encoded RNA. Presence of nuclear signals was taken as positive for EBER expression. EBER status was correlated with various clinicopathological parameters like age, sex, dietary habits, histological types of NPC, and ethnicity of the patients. Results: The age range of the study group was 25 to 70 years with a mean age of 44.64 years and a male:female ratio of 3:2. Non-keratinizing undifferentiated type of NPC was the most common histological type. EBV was positive in 59% (30/51 of our cases. It showed a statistically significant correlation with the Naga community (P=0.01, with consumption of smoked food (P=0.02, and cigarette smoking (P=0.02. There was no correlation of EBV with age, sex, lymph node metastasis, stage, and histology. Conclusion: Our result indicates that EBV may be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of NPC in this region of India. So apart from lifestyle modification, a future study for a screening test for EBV viral load even in asymptomatic patients may be considered, for determination of disease susceptibility, early diagnosis, and proper management.

  3. Survey of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) immunogenic proteins and their epitopes: implications for vaccine preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajcani, Julius; Szenthe, Kalman; Banati, Ferenc; Szathmary, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (Human herpesvirus 4) encodes approximately 80 proteins, from which 15 possess at least 90 antigenic epitopes. Many of them stimulate the T cell receptors (TCR), but a few interact with the B cell receptors (BCR). Activation of B-cells and subsequent antibody production has not only been related to at least 3 envelope glycoproteins (mostly gp350) but also to latency associated membrane proteins (LMPs). The majority of EBV epitopes (over 80) inducing either cytotoxic and/or helper T lymphocytes were located on non-structural and/or latency associated polypeptides. The former interaction mediated by CD8plus/T cells is restricted by the HLA I molecules, predominantly of HLA-A subclass. In acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients (about 40 %) a considerable proportion of HLA B8 restricted CTL reactivity is directed against a single peptide (RAKFKQLL) of transactivator protein BZLF1/Zta. The EBV vaccines designed so far fall into two categories: those preventing any kind of infection (including prophylaxis of EBVassociated malignancies) and those designed for therapeutic purposes (to be used in subjects already infected). Preventive vaccines protecting against acute disease (such as IM) contain, as a rule, the gp350 polypeptide(s) encoded by the BLLF1 gene. Vaccines destined for tumor prevention rather consist of peptides derived from latency associated nuclear proteins (EBNA 2, 3 and 6) and/or from oncogenic latent membrane proteins (LMP1/LMP2a). Whereas the former generates antibodies preventing virus entry, the latter would potentiate the cell mediated response. In addition to recently described and purified individual recombinant immunogenic EBV polypeptides and/or their mixes, new perspectives were opened by construction of random overlapping strongly immunogenic scrambled polypeptide(s). Further novel approaches are based on carefully selected antigenic peptides (oligopeptides) coming from both, structural as well as non-structural or

  4. Cationic lipid-formulated DNA vaccine against hepatitis B virus: immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding small and large surface antigen in comparison to a licensed protein vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Endmann

    Full Text Available Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV based on the small (S hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible strategies to improve the efficacy of HBV vaccines. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S or the large (L protein of HBsAg in mice and pigs. In both animal models, vectors encoding the secretion-competent S protein induced stronger humoral responses than vectors encoding the L protein, which was shown to be retained mainly intracellularly despite the presence of a heterologous secretion signal. In pigs, SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S protein elicited an immune response of the same magnitude as the licensed protein vaccine Engerix-B, with S protein-specific antibody levels significantly higher than those considered protective in humans, and lasting for at least six months after the third immunization. Thus, our results provide not only the proof of concept for the SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vector approach but also confirm that with a cationic-lipid formulation, a DNA vaccine at a relatively low dose can elicit an immune response similar to a human dose of an aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted protein vaccine in large animals.

  5. L-A-lus, a New Variant of the L-A Totivirus Found in Wine Yeasts with Klus Killer Toxin-Encoding Mlus Double-Stranded RNA: Possible Role of Killer Toxin-Encoding Satellite RNAs in the Evolution of Their Helper Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cousiño, Nieves; Gómez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Yeast killer viruses are widely distributed in nature. Several toxins encoded in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) satellites of the L-A totivirus have been described, including K1, K2, K28, and Klus. The 4.6-kb L-A genome encodes the Gag major structural protein that forms a 39-nm icosahedral virion and Gag-Pol, a minor fusion protein. Gag-Pol has transcriptase and replicase activities responsible for maintenance of L-A (or its satellite RNAs). Recently we reported a new killer toxin, Klus. The L-A virus in Klus strains showed poor hybridization to known L-A probes, suggesting substantial differences in their sequences. Here we report the characterization of this new L-A variant named L-A-lus. At the nucleotide level, L-A and L-A-lus showed only 73% identity, a value that increases to 86% in the amino acid composition of Gag or Gag-Pol. Two regions in their genomes, however, the frameshifting region between Gag and Pol and the encapsidation signal, are 100% identical, implying the importance of these two cis signals in the virus life cycle. L-A-lus shows higher resistance than L-A to growth at high temperature or to in vivo expression of endo- or exonucleases. L-A-lus also has wider helper activity, being able to maintain not only Mlus but also M1 or a satellite RNA of L-A called X. In a screening of 31 wine strains, we found that none of them had L-A; they carried either L-A-lus or a different L-A variant in K2 strains. Our data show that distinct M killer viruses are specifically associated with L-As with different nucleotide compositions, suggesting coevolution. PMID:23728812

  6. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exosomes Derived from Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells Are Internalized via Caveola-Dependent Endocytosis and Promote Phenotypic Modulation in Target Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Eri; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, establishes a lifelong latent infection in B lymphocytes and epithelial cells following primary infection. Several lines of evidence suggest that exosomes derived from EBV-infected cells are internalized and transfer viral factors, including EBV-encoded latent membrane protein and microRNAs, to the recipient cells. However, the detailed mechanism by which exosomes are internalized and their physiological impact on the recipient cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we visualized the internalization of fluorescently labeled exosomes derived from EBV-uninfected and EBV-infected B cells of type I and type III latency into EBV-negative epithelial cells. In this way, we demonstrated that exosomes derived from all three cell types were internalized into the target cells in a similar fashion. Internalization of exosomes was significantly suppressed by treatment with an inhibitor of dynamin and also by the knockdown of caveolin-1. Labeled exosomes were colocalized with caveolae and subsequently trafficked through endocytic pathways. Moreover, we observed that exosomes derived from type III latency cells upregulated proliferation and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in the recipient cells more significantly than did those derived from EBV-negative and type I latency cells. We also identified the EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) gene as responsible for induction of ICAM-1 expression. Taken together, our data indicate that exosomes released from EBV-infected B cells are internalized via caveola-dependent endocytosis, which, in turn, contributes to phenotypic changes in the recipient cells through transferring one or more viral factors. PMID:23864627

  8. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  9. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  10. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Canato Santana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+ T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  11. Co-administration of plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases human immunodeficiency virus-1 DNA vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-12-01

    T-cell based vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generate specific responses that may limit both transmission and disease progression by controlling viral load. Broad, polyfunctional, and cytotoxic CD4+T-cell responses have been associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV-1 replication, supporting the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccine formulations. Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (pGM-CSF) co-administration has been shown to induce potent CD4+ T-cell responses and to promote accelerated priming and increased migration of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells. However, no study has shown whether co-immunisation with pGM-CSF enhances the number of vaccine-induced polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells. Our group has previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding conserved, multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR binding HIV-1 subtype B peptides, which elicited broad, polyfunctional and long-lived CD4+ T-cell responses. Here, we show that pGM-CSF co-immunisation improved both magnitude and quality of vaccine-induced T-cell responses, particularly by increasing proliferating CD4+ T-cells that produce simultaneously interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. Thus, we believe that the use of pGM-CSF may be helpful for vaccine strategies focused on the activation of anti-HIV CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  12. Deletion of the vaccinia virus gene A46R, encoding for an inhibitor of TLR signalling, is an effective approach to enhance the immunogenicity in mice of the HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate NYVAC-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Perdiguero

    Full Text Available Viruses have developed strategies to counteract signalling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs that are involved in the detection of viruses and induction of proinflammatory cytokines and IFNs. Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes A46 protein which disrupts TLR signalling by interfering with TLR: adaptor interactions. Since the innate immune response to viruses is critical to induce protective immunity, we studied whether deletion of A46R gene in a NYVAC vector expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens (NYVAC-C improves immune responses against HIV-1 antigens. This question was examined in human macrophages and in mice infected with a single A46R deletion mutant of the vaccine candidate NYVAC-C (NYVAC-C-ΔA46R. The viral gene A46R is not required for virus replication in primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF cells and its deletion in NYVAC-C markedly increases TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human macrophages. Analysis of the immune responses elicited in BALB/c mice after DNA prime/NYVAC boost immunization shows that deletion of A46R improves the magnitude of the HIV-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses during adaptive and memory phases, maintains the functional profile observed with the parental NYVAC-C and enhances anti-gp120 humoral response during the memory phase. These findings establish the immunological role of VACV A46R on innate immune responses of macrophages in vitro and antigen-specific T and B cell immune responses in vivo and suggest that deletion of viral inhibitors of TLR signalling is a useful approach for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine candidates.

  13. Immune properties of recombinant vaccinia virus encoding CD154 (CD40L) are determined by expression of virally encoded CD40L and the presence of CD40L protein in viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Michal; Bereta, Joanna; Park, Jonas; Medina, Freddy; Kwak, Heesun; Kaufman, Howard L

    2004-12-01

    Expression of costimulatory molecules by recombinant poxviruses is a promising strategy for enhancing therapeutic vaccines. CD40-CD40L interactions are critical for conditioning dendritic cells (DC) and priming T- and B-cell immunity. We constructed a vaccinia virus expressing murine CD40L (rV-CD40L) and studied its immunomodulatory properties in vitro. Direct DC infection with control vaccinia or psoralen/UV-inactivated rV-CD40L stimulated high levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) release. However, replication-competent rV-CD40L did not stimulate IL-12 under similar conditions. We observed a high level of CD40L protein on purified viral particles and demonstrated that induction of IL-12 by nonreplicating rV-CD40L was blocked by anti-CD40 antibodies suggesting that functional CD40L on viral particles contributed to alterations in IL-12 synthesis. Since cross-presentation of tumor-associated antigens by DC is augmented by viral infection of tumor cells, we infected MC38 murine colon carcinoma cells with rV-CD40L. Infected cells stimulated IL-12 secretion by DC and proliferation of B cells and DX5(+) (NK/NKT) cells through direct CD40-CD40L interaction. A subpopulation of NKT cells expressing CD40 (NK1.1(+), CD3(lo)) appeared to be a major effector population responding to MC38/rV-CD40L. These results highlight the complex immune regulatory effects of rV-CD40L defined by the cumulative effects of CD40L expression, presence of CD40L protein in viral particles, and the replication potential of the virus.

  14. Novel host-related virulence factors are encoded by squirrelpox virus, the main causative agent of epidemic disease in red squirrels in the UK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair C Darby

    Full Text Available Squirrelpox virus (SQPV shows little evidence for morbidity or mortality in North American grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, in which the virus is endemic. However, more recently the virus has emerged to cause epidemics with high mortality in Eurasian red squirrels (S. vulgaris in Great Britain, which are now threatened. Here we report the genome sequence of SQPV. Comparison with other Poxviridae revealed a core set of poxvirus genes, the phylogeny of which showed SQPV to be in a new Chordopoxvirus subfamily between the Molluscipoxviruses and Parapoxviruses. A number of SQPV genes were related to virulence, including three major histocomaptibility class I homologs, and one CD47 homolog. In addition, a novel potential virulence factor showing homology to mammalian oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS was identified. This family of proteins normally causes activation of an endoribonuclease (RNaseL within infected cells. The putative function of this novel SQPV protein was predicted in silico.

  15. Vaccinia virus A43R gene encodes an orthopoxvirus-specific late non-virion type-1 membrane protein that is dispensable for replication but enhances intradermal lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Cindy L; Moss, Bernard

    2010-01-05

    The vaccinia virus A43R open reading frame encodes a 168-amino acid protein with a predicted N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Although A43R is conserved in all sequenced members of the orthopoxvirus genus, no non-orthopoxvirus homolog or functional motif was recognized. Biochemical and confocal microscopic studies indicated that A43 is expressed at late times following viral DNA synthesis and is a type-1 membrane protein with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains. A43 was present in Golgi and plasma membranes but only a trace amount was detected in sucrose gradient purified mature virions and none in CsCl gradient purified enveloped virions. Prevention of A43R expression had no effect on plaque size or virus replication in cell culture and little effect on virulence after mouse intranasal infection. Although the A43 mutant produced significantly smaller lesions in skin of mice than the control, the amounts of virus recovered from the lesions were similar.

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of 18 Epstein-Barr Viruses Isolated from Primary Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Biopsy Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chaofeng; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Qi, Peng; Li, Xiayu; Yu, Zhengyuan; Guo, Can; Xiong, Fang; Xiang, Bo; Zhou, Ming; Gong, Zhaojian; Liao, Qianjin; Yu, Jianjun; He, Yi; Zhang, Wenling; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Yong; Li, Guiyuan; Xiong, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus that is highly prevalent in almost all human populations and is associated with many human cancers, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), Hodgkin's disease, and gastric carcinoma. However, in these EBV-associated cancers, only NPC exhibits remarkable ethnic and geographic distribution. We hypothesized that EBV genomic variations might contribute to the pathogenesis of different human cancers in different geographic areas. In this study, we collected 18 NPC biopsy specimens from the Hunan Province in southern China and de novo assembled 18 NPC biopsy specimen-derived EBV (NPC-EBV) genomes, designated HN1 to HN18. This was achieved through target enrichment of EBV DNA by hybridization, followed by next-generation sequencing, to reveal sequence diversity. These EBV genomes harbored 20,570 variations totally, including 20,328 substitutions, 88 insertions, and 154 deletions, compared to the EBV reference genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all NPC-EBV genomes were distinct from other EBV genomes. Furthermore, HN1 to HN18 had some nonsynonymous variations in EBV genes including genes encoding latent, early lytic, and tegument proteins, such as substitutions within transmembrane domains 1 and 3 of LMP1, FoP_duplication, and zf-AD domains of ENBA1, in addition to aberrations in noncoding regions, especially in BamHI A rightward transcript microRNAs. These variations might have potential biological significance. In conclusion, we reported a genome-wide view of sequence variation in EBV isolated from primary NPC biopsy specimens obtained from the Hunan Province. This might contribute to further understanding of how genomic variations contribute to carcinogenesis, which would impact the treatment of EBV-associated cancer.IMPORTANCE Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and exhibits remarkable ethnic and geographic distribution. Hunan Province in southern

  17. The Epstein-Barr virus-encoded glycoprotein gp 110 (BALF 4) can serve as a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Jilg, Wolfgang; Bogedain, C; Mairhofer, H.; Gu, S. Y.; Wolf, Hans J.

    1994-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is thought to play a major role in controlling the spread of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in an infected individual. Recently, the viral membrane protein gp 350/220, which is also expressed at the surface of the virus producing cell, was identified as a target for ADCC reactions. Due to its glycoprotein nature, the EBV protein gp 110 is another possible ADCC target. It is one of the most abundant proteins found during the late phase of vira...

  18. West Nile virus encodes a microRNA-like small RNA in the 3' untranslated region which up-regulates GATA4 mRNA and facilitates virus replication in mosquito cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, M.; Torres, S.; Schnettler, E.; Funk, A.; Grundhoff, A.; Pijlman, G.P.; Khromykh, A.A.; Asgari, S.

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) belongs to a group of medically important single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses causing deadly disease outbreaks around the world. The 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the flavivirus genome, in particular the terminal 3' stem–loop (3'SL) fulfils multiple functions in

  19. [Gene modification in the genome of Epstein-Barr virus cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhong; Tang, Yunlian; Zhou, Ming; Wu, Minghua; Ouyang, Jue; Gao, Jianming; Zhang, Liming; Li, Dan; Chen, Qiong; Xiong, Wei; Li, Xiaoling; Tang, Ke; Li, Guiyuan

    2008-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with a variety of malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Functions of most EBV genes have not been determined. The use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to clone and modify the genome of EBV has enhanced the gene function study in the context of genome. Infectious clones of EBV were previously established by using EBV-BAC plasmid p2089. In order to further investigate EBV mutant biology, an easy and efficient method for gene modification in EBV-BAC was developed and detailed. The kanamycin gene (kan) flanked by recombinase FLP recognition targets (FRTs) was amplified from plasmid pKD13 and inserted into the vector of pcDNA3.1(+). Through the introduction of restriction endonuclease BsmB I in PCR primers, NPC-derived LMP1 gDNA containing the full-length ORF was then precisely ligated with kan on pcDNA3.1(+). The linear DNA segment of kan-LMP1 was transformed into E. coli DH10B cells containing p2089 and plasmid pKD46, homologous recombination was subsequently mediated by redalphabetagamma system from bacteriophage lambda. By this linear transformation and ET cloning, the full-length LMP1 in EBV-BAC (p2089) was replaced by the kan-LMP1. The introduced kan gene in EBV-BAC genome was eliminated specifically by the recombinase FLP when transformed by plasmid pCP20, leaving an FRT scar of 69 bp. The mutant could be identified by antibiotic screening and PCR amplification on bacteria medium. This method allows the gene of interest to be easily modified alone and then to be introduced into EBV-BAC genome. Following this example of gene substitution, other mutations such as deletion, insertion and point mutation become convenient work, and this improved method can be a potential use of gene modification in other BAC-based herpesvirus genome.

  20. MicroRNA expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia caused by a fish rhabdovirus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), results in significant mortality in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum). Although the disease had been eradicated in Denmark, wildlife marine reservoir of VHSV poses a threat parti...

  1. The genome of Shope fibroma virus, a tumorigenic poxvirus, contains a growth factor gene with sequence similarity to those encoding epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, W; Upton, C.; Hu, S.L.; Purchio, A F; McFadden, G.

    1987-01-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region common to epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, and vaccinia growth factor were used to identify a novel growth factor gene in the Shope fibroma virus genome. Sequence analysis indicates that the Shope fibroma growth factor is a distinct new member of this family of growth factors.

  2. Presencia del virus de Epstein-Barr en casos colombianos de linfoma de Hodgkin y su relación con la respuesta al tratamiento.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Quijano

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available En el desarrollo y patogénesis del linfoma de Hodgkin se ha propuesto al virus de Epstein-Barr como posible factor etiológico debido a la detección de ADN viral en las células de Reed- Sternberg en un subgrupo de tumores y a los altos niveles de expresión de la proteína latente de membrana 1 (LMP-1. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la presencia de virus de Epstein-Barr en 67 ganglios linfáticos de pacientes con diagnóstico confirmado de linfoma de Hodgkin mediante hibridación in situ para la detección de transcritos de ARN del virus de Epstein-Barr e inmunohistoquímica para la detección de la proteína oncogénica LMP-1. La presencia del virus se relacionó con el subtipo histológico, la respuesta al tratamiento de los pacientes y el fenotipo del infiltrado linfocitario. En el 67% de los casos se detectaron transcritos de virus de Epstein-Barr, la proteína LMP-1 se detectó en 56,7% de los casos en la célula tumoral de Reed-Sternberg. La presencia del virus en cada tipo histológico fue de 69,81% en esclerosis nodular, 85,71% en celularidad mixta y 40% en clásico. El virus de Epstein-Barr se detectó con mayor frecuencia en niños (84,2% en comparación con los adultos (60,4% y los pacientes positivos para el virus mostraron mejor respuesta al tratamiento, reflejada en una menor tendencia a presentar recaídas. El análisis del infiltrado mostró un predominio de linfocitos T CD4 y presencia de linfocitos T CD8, con mayor expresión de ambas subpoblaciones en casos positivos para virus de Epstein-Barr. Los resultados muestran un alto porcentaje de infección por virus de Epstein-Barr con una probable implicación significativa en la respuesta al tratamiento, lo que sugiere que la detección de virus de Epstein-Barr se podría usar como marcador de pronóstico en este tipo de linfoma.

  3. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  4. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Margit Schnee; Vogel, Annette B.; Daniel De Voss; Benjamin Petsch; Patrick Baumhof; Thomas Kramps; Lothar Stitz

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly e...

  5. Immunogenicity of the candidate malaria vaccines FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding the pre-erythrocytic antigen ME-TRAP in 1-6 year old children in a malaria endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejon, Philip; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Kai, Oscar K; Todryk, Stephen; Keating, Sheila; Lang, Trudie; Gilbert, Sarah C; Peshu, Norbert; Marsh, Kevin; Hill, Adrian V S

    2006-05-29

    In a phase 1 trial, 22 children in a malaria endemic area were immunised with candidate malaria vaccination regimes. The regimes used two recombinant viral vectors, attenuated fowlpox strain FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Both encoded the pre-erythrocytic malaria antigen construct ME-TRAP. Strong T cell responses were detected by both ex vivo and cultured ELISpot assays. Data from phase 1 trials in adults on anti-vector responses raised by FP9 is presented. These responses partially cross-reacted with MVA, and detectably reduced the immunogenicity of vaccination with MVA. This prompted the comparison of half dose and full dose FP9 priming vaccinations in children. Regimes using half dose FP9 priming tended to be more immunogenic than full dose. The potential for enhanced immunogenicity with half doses of priming vectors warrants further investigation, and larger studies to determine protection against malaria in children are required.

  6. A Novel DNA Motif Contributes to Selective Replication of a Geminivirus-Associated Betasatellite by a Helper Virus-Encoded Replication-Related Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Xu, Xiongbiao; Huang, Changjun; Qian, Yajuan; Li, Zhenghe; Zhou, Xueping

    2015-12-09

    Rolling-circle replication of single-stranded genomes of plant geminiviruses is initiated by sequence-specific DNA binding of the viral replication-related protein (Rep) to its cognate genome at the replication origin. Monopartite begomovirus-associated betasatellites can be trans replicated by both cognate and some noncognate helper viruses, but the molecular basis of replication promiscuity of betasatellites remains uncharacterized. Earlier studies showed that when tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) or tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV) is coinoculated with both cognate and noncognate betasatellites, the cognate betasatellite dominates over the noncognate one at the late stages of infection. In this study, we constructed reciprocal chimeric betasatellites between tomato yellow leaf curl China betasatellite and tobacco curly shoot betasatellite and assayed their competitiveness against wild-type betasatellite when coinoculated with TYLCCNV or TbCSV onto plants. We mapped a region immediately upstream of the conserved rolling-circle cruciform structure of betasatellite origin that confers the cognate Rep-mediated replication advantage over the noncognate satellite. DNase I protection and in vitro binding assays further identified a novel sequence element termed Rep-binding motif (RBM), which specifically binds to the cognate Rep protein and to the noncognate Rep, albeit at lower affinity. Furthermore, we showed that RBM-Rep binding affinity is correlated with betasatellite replication efficiency in protoplasts. Our data suggest that although strict specificity of Rep-mediated replication does not exist, betasatellites have adapted to their cognate Reps for efficient replication during coevolution. Begomoviruses are numerous circular DNA viruses that cause devastating diseases of crops worldwide. Monopartite begomoviruses are frequently associated with betasatellites which are essential for induction of typical disease symptoms. Coexistence of two distinct

  7. The Viral Gene ORF79 Encodes a Repressor Regulating Induction of the Lytic Life Cycle in the Haloalkaliphilic Virus ϕCh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Regina; Derntl, Christian; Klein, Reinhard; Alte, Beatrix; Hofbauer, Christoph; Kaufmann, Martin; Beraha, Judith; Schöner, Léa; Witte, Angela

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we describe the construction of the first genetically modified mutant of a halovirus infecting haloalkaliphilic Archaea By random choice, we targeted ORF79, a currently uncharacterized viral gene of the haloalkaliphilic virus ϕCh1. We used a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation method to deliver a disruption cassette into a lysogenic strain of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii bearing ϕCh1 as a provirus. This approach yielded mutant virus particles carrying a disrupted version of ORF79. Disruption of ORF79 did not influence morphology of the mature virions. The mutant virus was able to infect cured strains of N. magadii , resulting in a lysogenic, ORF79-disrupted strain. Analysis of this strain carrying the mutant virus revealed a repressor function of ORF79. In the absence of gp79, onset of lysis and expression of viral proteins occurred prematurely compared to their timing in the wild-type strain. Constitutive expression of ORF79 in a cured strain of N. magadii reduced the plating efficiency of ϕCh1 by seven orders of magnitude. Overexpression of ORF79 in a lysogenic strain of N. magadii resulted in an inhibition of lysis and total absence of viral proteins as well as viral progeny. In further experiments, gp79 directly regulated the expression of the tail fiber protein ORF34 but did not influence the methyltransferase gene ORF94. Further, we describe the establishment of an inducible promoter for in vivo studies in N. magadii IMPORTANCE Genetic analyses of haloalkaliphilic Archaea or haloviruses are only rarely reported. Therefore, only little insight into the in vivo roles of proteins and their functions has been gained so far. We used a reverse genetics approach to identify the function of a yet undescribed gene of ϕCh1. We provide evidence that gp79, a currently unknown protein of ϕCh1, acts as a repressor protein of the viral life cycle, affecting the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state of the virus

  8. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youyuan; Xu, Miao; Liang, Liming; Zhang, Haojiong; Xu, Ruihua; Feng, Qisheng; Feng, Lin; Luo, Bing; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2017-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a ubiquitous virus and is associated with several human malignances, including the significant subset of gastric carcinoma, Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma. Some Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases are uniquely prevalent in populations with different geographic origins. However, the features of the disease and geographically associated Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation as well as the roles that the variation plays in carcinogenesis and evolution remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we sequenced 95 geographically distinct Epstein-Barr virus isolates from Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma biopsies and saliva of healthy donors to detect variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure from a genome-wide spectrum. We demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus revealed the population structure between North China and South China. In addition, we observed population stratification between Epstein-Barr virus strains from gastric carcinoma and healthy controls, indicating that certain Epstein-Barr virus subtypes are associated with different gastric carcinoma risks. We identified that the BRLF1, BBRF3, and BBLF2/BBLF3 genes had significant associations with gastric carcinoma. LMP1 and BNLF2a genes were strongly geographically associated genes in Epstein-Barr virus. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus for gastric carcinoma, and the genetic variants associated with gastric carcinoma can serve as biomarkers for oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus.

  9. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  10. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  11. Low-dose adenovirus vaccine encoding chimeric hepatitis B virus surface antigen-human papillomavirus type 16 E7 proteins induces enhanced E7-specific antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A; Juárez, Victoria; Zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-10-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (10(6) infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8(+)-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein.

  12. Frequency of epstein-barr virus in classical hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad; Din, Hafeez Ud; Muhammad, Iqbal; Hashmi, Shoaib Naiyar; Akhtar, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus plays an important role in pathogenesis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The first patient with Epstein-Barr positive Reed Sternberg cells was described in 1985. Since then association between Epstein-Barr virus and Hodgkin lymphoma has been shown in many parts of the world and its occurrence shows significant variation from continent to continent and from country to country. The study was carried out at department of histopathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology from 27th April 2013 to 10th March 2014. A total of 55 cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma were included in the study. Out of 55 patients, 38 (69%) were male and 17 (31%) were female. The age of the patients ranged between 4-67 years with an average age of 29.4±21.72 years. Out of these, 44 cases (80%) were positive for latent membrane protein-1. Among positive cases 32 (72.72%) were male and 12 (27.28%) were female. Based upon histological subtypes MCHL was the commonest as a whole accounting for 87.3% as well as among both genders. Out of total 55 cases, 79.16% (38/48) of mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma cases showed positivity for latent membrane protein-1 while 83.33% (5/6) cases of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma and 100% (1/1) cases of lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma showed positivity. No case of lymphocyte predominant classical Hodgkin lymphoma was diagnosed during the study. 80% of our classical Hodgkin lymphoma cases showed association with EBV expression. A total of 79.16% cases of mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma showed LMP1 expression while 100% of lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma showed LMP1 expression. The highest expression seen in lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma subtype in contrast to mixed cellularity requires to be confirmed by a larger scale study comprising of substantial number of patients of lymphocyte depleted Hodgkin lymphoma and lymphocyte rich classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

  13. Radioiodide imaging and radiovirotherapy of multiple myeloma using VSV(Delta51)-NIS, an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus encoding the sodium iodide symporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Apollina; Carlson, Stephanie K; Classic, Kelly L; Greiner, Suzanne; Naik, Shruthi; Power, Anthony T; Bell, John C; Russell, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Multiple myeloma is a radiosensitive malignancy that is currently incurable. Here, we generated a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV(Delta51)-NIS] that has a deletion of methionine 51 in the matrix protein and expresses the human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene. VSV(Delta51)-NIS showed specific oncolytic activity against myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells and was able to replicate to high titers in myeloma cells in vitro. Iodide uptake assays showed accumulation of radioactive iodide in VSV(Delta51)-NIS-infected myeloma cells that was specific to the function of the NIS transgene. In bg/nd/xid mice with established subcutaneous myeloma tumors, administration of VSV(Delta51)-NIS resulted in high intratumoral virus replication and tumor regression. VSV-associated neurotoxicity was not observed. Intratumoral spread of the infection was monitored noninvasively by serial gamma camera imaging of (123)I-iodide biodistribution. Dosimetry calculations based on these images pointed to the feasibility of combination radiovirotherapy with VSV(Delta51)-NIS plus (131)I. Immunocompetent mice with syngeneic 5TGM1 myeloma tumors (either subcutaneous or orthotopic) showed significant enhancements of tumor regression and survival when VSV(Delta51)-NIS was combined with (131)I. These results show that VSV(Delta51)-NIS is a safe oncolytic agent with significant therapeutic potential in multiple myeloma.

  14. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Y. Sardesai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC. This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6 with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus, the germinal centre and the development of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ghada; Vrzalikova, Katerina; Cader, Fathima Zumla; Vockerodt, Martina; Nagy, Eszter; Flodr, Patrik; Yap, Lee-Fah; Diepstra, Arjan; Kluin, Philip M; Rosati, Stefano; Murray, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the germinal centre (GC) of the asymptomatic host remains an enigma. The occasional appearance of EBV-positive germinal centres in some patients, particularly those with a history of immunosuppression, suggests that EBV numbers in the GC are subject to immune control. The relationship, if any, between lymphoid hyperplasia with EBV-positive germinal centres and subsequent or concurrent lymphomagenesis remains to be clarified. As far as the development of EBV-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma is concerned, the suppression of virus replication, mediated by LMP1 on the one hand, and the loss of B-cell receptor signalling on the other, appears to be an important pathogenic mechanism. A further important emerging concept is that alterations in the microenvironment of the EBV-infected B-cell may be important for lymphomagenesis. © 2014 The Authors.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–encoded small RNA is released from EBV-infected cells and activates signaling from toll-like receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai; Zhou, Li; Samanta, Mrinal; Matsumoto, Misako; Ebihara, Takashi; Seya, Tsukasa; Imai, Shosuke; Fujieda, Mikiya; Kawa, Keisei

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–encoded small RNA (EBER) is nonpolyadenylated, noncoding RNA that forms stem-loop structure by intermolecular base-pairing, giving rise to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)–like molecules, and exists abundantly in EBV-infected cells. Here, we report that EBER induces signaling from the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is a sensor of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and induces type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. A substantial amount of EBER, which was sufficient to induce signaling from TLR3, was released from EBV-infected cells, and the majority of the released EBER existed as a complex with a cellular EBER-binding protein La, suggesting that EBER was released from the cells by active secretion of La. Sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM), chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV), and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH), whose general symptoms are caused by proinflammatory cytokines contained EBER, and addition of RNA purified from the sera into culture medium induced signaling from TLR3 in EBV-transformed lymphocytes and peripheral mononuclear cells. Furthermore, DCs treated with EBER showed mature phenotype and antigen presentation capacity. These findings suggest that EBER, which is released from EBV-infected cells, is responsible for immune activation by EBV, inducing type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. EBER-induced activation of innate immunity would account for immunopathologic diseases caused by active EBV infection. PMID:19720839

  17. Partial correction of sensitivity to oxidant stress in Friedreich ataxia patient fibroblasts by frataxin-encoding adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane; Spinoulas, Afroditi; Zheng, Maolin; Cunningham, Sharon C; Ginn, Samantha L; McQuilty, Robert C; Rowe, Peter B; Alexander, Ian E

    2005-08-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons are directly involved in the pathophysiology of a number of debilitating inherited and acquired neurological conditions. The lack of effective treatments for many such conditions provides a strong rationale for exploring novel therapeutic approaches, including gene therapy. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), a sensory neuropathy, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with a loss of large sensory neurons from the dorsal root ganglia. Because a mouse model for this well-characterized disease has been generated, we elected to use FRDA as a model disease. In previous studies we achieved efficient and sustained delivery of a reporter gene to PNS sensory neurons, using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors. In the current study, AAV and LV vectors encoding the human frataxin cDNA were constructed and assessed for frataxin expression and function in primary FRDA patient fibroblast cell lines. FRDA fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit subtle biochemical changes, including increased mitochondrial iron and sensitivity to oxidant stress. Despite the inherent difficulty in working with primary cells, transduction of patient fibroblasts with either vector resulted in the expression of appropriately localized frataxin and partial reversal of phenotype.

  18. NLX-P101, an adeno-associated virus gene therapy encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase, for the potential treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Nido, Javier

    2010-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Dopamine depletion in the striatum leads to functional changes in several deep brain nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which becomes disinhibited and perturbs the control of body movement. Although there is no cure for PD, some pharmacological and surgical treatments can significantly improve the functional ability of patients, particularly in the early stages of the disease. Among neurodegenerative diseases, PD is a particularly suitable target for gene therapy because the neuropathology is largely confined to a relatively small region of the brain. Neurologix Inc is developing NLX-P101 (AAV2-GAD), an adeno-associated viral vector encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), for the potential therapy of PD. As GAD potentiates inhibitory neurotransmission from the STN, sustained expression of GAD in the STN by direct delivery of NLX-P101 decreases STN overactivation. This procedure was demonstrated to be a safe and efficient method of reducing motor deficits in animal models of PD. A phase I clinical trial has demonstrated that NLX-P101 was safe and indicated the efficacy of this approach in patients with PD. Results from an ongoing phase II clinical trial of NLX-P101 are awaited to establish the clinical efficacy of this gene therapy.

  19. Computational Prediction of the Heterodimeric and Higher-Order Structure of gpE1/gpE2 Envelope Glycoproteins Encoded by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Holly; Logan, Michael R; Hockman, Darren; Koehler Leman, Julia; Law, John Lok Man; Houghton, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Despite the recent success of newly developed direct-acting antivirals against hepatitis C, the disease continues to be a global health threat due to the lack of diagnosis of most carriers and the high cost of treatment. The heterodimer formed by glycoproteins E1 and E2 within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) lipid envelope is a potential vaccine candidate and antiviral target. While the structure of E1/E2 has not yet been resolved, partial crystal structures of the E1 and E2 ectodomains have been determined. The unresolved parts of the structure are within the realm of what can be modeled with current computational modeling tools. Furthermore, a variety of additional experimental data is available to support computational predictions of E1/E2 structure, such as data from antibody binding studies, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), mutational analyses, peptide binding analysis, linker-scanning mutagenesis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. In accordance with these rich experimental data, we have built an in silico model of the full-length E1/E2 heterodimer. Our model supports that E1/E2 assembles into a trimer, which was previously suggested from a study by Falson and coworkers (P. Falson, B. Bartosch, K. Alsaleh, B. A. Tews, A. Loquet, Y. Ciczora, L. Riva, C. Montigny, C. Montpellier, G. Duverlie, E. I. Pecheur, M. le Maire, F. L. Cosset, J. Dubuisson, and F. Penin, J. Virol. 89:10333-10346, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00991-15). Size exclusion chromatography and Western blotting data obtained by using purified recombinant E1/E2 support our hypothesis. Our model suggests that during virus assembly, the trimer of E1/E2 may be further assembled into a pentamer, with 12 pentamers comprising a single HCV virion. We anticipate that this new model will provide a useful framework for HCV envelope structure and the development of antiviral strategies. IMPORTANCE One hundred fifty million people have been estimated to be infected with hepatitis C virus, and

  20. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  1. Purified hexameric Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 protein for measuring anti-BARF1 antibody responses in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, E K; Hutajulu, S H; van Beek, J; Stevens, S J; Paramita, D K; Greijer, A E; Middeldorp, J M

    2011-02-01

    WHO type III nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in Indonesia and 100% associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). NPC tumor cells express viral proteins, including BARF1, which is secreted and is considered to have oncogenic and immune-modulating properties. Recently, we found conserved mutations in the BARF1 gene in NPC isolates. This study describes the expression and purification of NPC-derived BARF1 and analyzes humoral immune responses against prototype BARF1 (B95-8) and purified native hexameric BARF1 in sera of Indonesian NPC patients (n = 155) compared to healthy EBV-positive (n = 56) and EBV-negative (n = 16) individuals. BARF1 (B95-8) expressed in Escherichia coli and baculovirus, as well as BARF1-derived peptides, did not react with IgG or IgA antibodies in NPC. Purified native hexameric BARF1 protein isolated from culture medium was used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and revealed relatively weak IgG and IgA responses in human sera, although it had strong antibody responses to other EBV proteins. Higher IgG reactivity was found in NPC patients (P = 0.015) than in regional Indonesian controls or EBV-negative individuals (P native BARF1 were marginal. NPC sera with the highest IgG responses to hexameric BARF1 in ELISA showed detectable reactivity with denatured BARF1 by immunoblotting. In conclusion, BARF1 has low immunogenicity for humoral responses and requires native conformation for antibody binding. The presence of antibodies against native BARF1 in the blood of NPC patients provides evidence that the protein is expressed and secreted as a hexameric protein in NPC patients.

  2. The herpes simplex virus 1-encoded envelope glycoprotein B activates NF-κB through the Toll-like receptor 2 and MyD88/TRAF6-dependent signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Cai

    Full Text Available The innate immune response plays a critical role in the host defense against invading pathogens, and TLR2, a member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family, has been implicated in the immune response and initiation of inflammatory cytokine secretion against several human viruses. Previous studies have demonstrated that infectious and ultraviolet-inactivated herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 virions lead to the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines via TLR2. However, except for the envelope glycoprotein gH and gL, whether there are other determinants of HSV-1 responsible for TLR2 mediated biological effects is not known yet. Here, we demonstrated that the HSV-1-encoded envelope glycoprotein gB displays as molecular target recognized by TLR2. gB coimmunoprecipitated with TLR2, TLR1 and TLR6 in transfected and infected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T cells. Treatment of TLR2-transfected HEK293T (HEK293T-TLR2 cells with purified gB results in the activation of NF-κB reporter, and this activation requires the recruitment of the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 but not CD14. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB was abrogated by anti-gB and anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies. In addition, the expression of interleukin-8 induced by gB was abrogated by the treatment of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 with anti-TLR2 blocking antibody or by the incubation of gB with anti-gB antibody. Taken together, these results indicate the importance and potency of HSV-1 gB as one of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs molecule recognized by TLR2 with immediate kinetics.

  3. Maintenance of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Status by a Novel Mechanism, Latent Membrane Protein 1-Induced Interleukin-32, via the Protein Kinase Cδ Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kun-Yi; Chou, Ya-Ching; Lin, Jiun-Han; Liu, Yi; Lin, Kai-Min; Doong, Shin-Lian; Chen, Mei-Ru; Yeh, Te-Huei; Lin, Sue-Jane; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2015-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an oncogenic herpesvirus, has the potential to immortalize primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) in vitro. During immortalization, several EBV products induce cytokines or chemokines, and most of these are required for the proliferation of LCLs. Interleukin-32 (IL-32), a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine, is upregulated after EBV infection, and this upregulation is detectable in all LCLs tested. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is responsible for inducing IL-32 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, we showed that this LMP1 induction is provided by the p65 subunit of NF-κB, which binds to and activates the IL-32 promoter. Furthermore, the short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated depletion of endogenous LMP1 and p65 in LCLs suppressed IL-32 expression, further suggesting that LMP1 is the key factor that stimulates IL-32 in LCLs via the NF-κB p65 pathway. Functionally, knockdown of IL-32 in LCLs elicits viral reactivation and affects cytokine expression, but it has no impact on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Of note, we reveal the mechanism whereby IL-32 is involved in the maintenance of EBV viral latency by inactivation of Zta promoter activity. This atypical cytoplasmic IL-32 hijacks the Zta activator protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) and inhibits its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where PKCδ binds to the Zta promoter and activates lytic cycle progression. These novel findings reveal that IL-32 is involved in the maintenance of EBV latency in LCLs. This finding may provide new information to explain how EBV maintains latency, in addition to viral chromatin structure and epigenetic modification. EBV persists in two states, latency and lytic replication, which is a unique characteristic of human infections. So far, little is known about how herpesviruses maintain latency in particular tissues or cell types. EBV is an excellent model to study this question because more than 90% of

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded microRNA BART15-3p promotes cell apoptosis partially by targeting BRUCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Hanna; Kim, Sae Rom; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) generates a variety of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) by processing the BHRF1 and BamHI A rightward (BART) transcripts. BART miRNAs are expressed in all cells latently infected with EBV, but the functions of most BART miRNAs remain unknown. The results of a cell proliferation assay revealed that miR-BART15-3p inhibited cell proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting following staining with annexin V or propidium iodide showed that miR-BART15-3p promoted apoptosis. Furthermore, the inhibitor for miR-BART15-3p increased cell growth and reduced apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Using bioinformatic analyses, we predicted that miR-BART15-3p may target the antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2L2, DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 42 (DDX42), and baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) mRNAs. The luciferase reporter assay showed that only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of BRUCE was affected by miR-BART15-3p. Two putative seed-matched sites for miR-BART15-3p were evident on the BRUCE 3' UTR. The results of a mutation study indicated that miR-BART15-3p hybridized only with the first seed-matched site on the BRUCE 3' UTR. miR-BART15-3p downregulated the BRUCE protein in EBV-negative cells, while the inhibitor for miR-BART15-3p upregulated the BRUCE protein in EBV-infected cells without affecting the BRUCE mRNA level. miR-BART15-3p was secreted from EBV-infected gastric carcinoma cells, and the level of miR-BART15-3p was 2- to 16-fold higher in exosomes than in the corresponding cells. Our data suggest that miR-BART15-3p can induce apoptosis partially by inhibiting the translation of the apoptosis inhibitor BRUCE. Further study is warranted to understand the role of miR-BART15-3p in the EBV life cycle.

  5. Plant virus replication and movement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation, transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes, virus-encoded products and cellular factors...

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in whole blood as a superior prognostic and monitoring factor than EBV-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J-H; Lu, T-X; Tian, T; Wang, L; Fan, L; Xu, J; Zhang, R; Gong, Q-X; Zhang, Z-H; Li, J-Y; Xu, W

    2015-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status was retrospectively analysed by the use of EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization (ISH) and EBV DNA analysis in whole blood with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, to assess the clinical significance for diagnosis, prognostication, and monitoring of tumour burden. Three hundred and twenty-nine patients were retrospectively enrolled, with 232 patients being available for EBER ISH analysis, 189 patients for EBV DNA analysis, and 138 patients for both analyses. EBER was positive in 24 (10.3%) patients, and EBV DNA was positive in 18 (9.5%) patients; the two analyses had 92.8% concordance. Patients with pretreatment EBER positivity had worse overall survival (OS) than those without EBER positivity (p 0.03); the same pattern was observed for EBV DNA (p EBV DNA were combined (p EBV DNA (hazard ratio 3.71, 95% CI 1.78-7.74, p EBV DNA, the transformation from positive to negative after cycle 3 with chemotherapy may have the most capacity to distinguish a superior from an inferior outcome. These findings suggest that EBV DNA in whole blood has good concordance with EBER ISH, and that it may be a better prognostic and monitoring biomarker than EBER. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Adeno-Associated Virus-Based Genetic Vaccine Encoding the Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4 Protein Exhibits Immunogenic Properties in Mice Superior to Those of an NS3-Protein-Based Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqin Zhu

    Full Text Available More than 170 million individuals worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, and up to an estimated 30% of chronically infected individuals will go on to develop progressive liver disease. Despite the recent advances in antiviral treatment of HCV infection, it remains a major public health problem. Thus, development of an effective vaccine is urgently required. In this study, we constructed novel adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors expressing the full-length NS3 or NS3/4 protein of HCV genotype 1b. The expression of the NS3 or NS3/4 protein in HepG2 cells was confirmed by western blotting. C57BL/6 mice were intramuscularly immunised with a single injection of AAV vectors, and the resultant immune response was investigated. The AAV2/rh32.33.NS3/4 vaccine induced stronger humoral and cellular responses than did the AAV2/rh32.33.NS3 vaccine. Our results demonstrate that AAV-based vaccines exhibit considerable potential for the development of an effective anti-HCV vaccine.

  8. Ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor, kills Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B and T cells and reduces the percentage of EBV-infected cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber; Ali, Mir A; Chavez, Mayra; Dowdell, Kennichi; Lee, Min-Jung; Tomita, Yusuke; El-Hariry, Iman; Trepel, Jane B; Proia, David A; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-04-01

    HSP90 inhibitors have been shown to kill Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells by reducing the level of EBV EBNA-1 and/or LMP1. We treated virus-infected cells with ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor currently being evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer and found that the drug killed EBV-positive B and T cells and reduced the level of both EBV EBNA-1 and LMP1. Treatment of cells with ganetespib also reduced the level of pAkt. Ganetespib delayed the onset of EBV-positive lymphomas and prolonged survival in SCID mice inoculated with one EBV-transformed B-cell line, but not another B-cell line. The former cell line showed lower levels of EBNA-1 after treatment with ganetespib in vitro. Treatment of a patient with T-cell chronic active EBV with ganetespib reduced the percentage of EBV-positive cells in the peripheral blood. These data indicate that HSP90 inhibitors may have a role in the therapy of certain EBV-associated diseases.

  9. Molecular screening for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) among Sudanese patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Suliman, Rania Saad Abdul Gader; El Aziz, Mohammed Siddig Abd; Alshammari, Fawaz D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen for the presence of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) among Sudanese patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC). In this study, 150 tissue samples that were previously diagnosed as having NPC were screened for the presence of EBV using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). PCR was performed to amplify two viral genes; EBV nuclear antigen-4 (EBNA-4) and latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1). EBV genes were detected in 92/150 (61.3%) tissue samples. Of the 92 infected samples, 58/92 (63%) were found among males and 34/92 (37%) were among females. EBV is prevalent in the Sudan and responsible of the vast majority of cases of NPC.

  10. Enhanced anti-tumor effect of a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 oncoproteins genetically fused to the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Diniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer DNA vaccines have attracted growing interest as a simple and non-invasive method for both the treatment and prevention of tumors induced by human papillomaviruses. Nonetheless, the low immunogenicity of parenterally administered vaccines, particularly regarding the activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses, suggests that further improvements in both vaccine composition and administration routes are still required. In the present study, we report the immune responses and anti-tumor effects of a DNA vaccine (pgD-E7E6E5 expressing three proteins (E7, E6, and E5 of the human papillomavirus type 16 genetically fused to the glycoprotein D of the human herpes simplex virus type 1, which was administered to mice by the intradermal (id route using a gene gun. A single id dose of pgD-E7E6E5 (2 µg/dose induced a strong activation of E7-specific interferon-γ (INF-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and full prophylactic anti-tumor effects in the vaccinated mice. Three vaccine doses inhibited tumor growth in 70% of the mice with established tumors. In addition, a single vaccine dose consisting of the co-administration of pgD-E7E6E5 and the vector encoding interleukin-12 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects and conferred protection to 60 and 50% of the vaccinated mice, respectively. In conclusion, id administration of pgD-E7E6E5 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the DNA vaccine, representing a promising administration route for future clinical trials.

  11. Long-term protection against human papillomavirus e7-positive tumor by a single vaccination of adeno-associated virus vectors encoding a fusion protein of inactivated e7 of human papillomavirus 16/18 and heat shock protein 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqiao; Zhu, Tong; Ye, Xiaojing; Yang, Lin; Wang, Bing; Liang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lina; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a gene vaccine strategy against human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancer and premalignant diseases, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding the viral E7 oncoproteins as the tumor antigens from HPV serotypes 16 (HPV16) and 18 (HPV18). Genetically inactivated E7 proteins were fused with a heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) to minimize the risk of cell transformation and enhance immune responses. The fusion protein gene was packaged in AAV serotype 1 or 2 (AAV1 or 2) for efficient in vivo gene expression. Our results showed that after a single intramuscular injection, the AAV1 vector elicited stronger HPV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and interferon-gamma secretion when compared with the AAV2 vector. Prophylactic immunization with AAV1 protected 100% of the mice from tumor growth for more than 1 year, whereas all the control mice immunized with either a LacZ vector or saline grew large tumors and died within 6 weeks after inoculation of E7-positive tumor cell line TC-1. In addition, this single-dose AAV1 vaccination completely protected the mice against second and third challenges with higher numbers of TC-1 cells. Despite lower CTL responses against the E7 antigens, AAV2 vector prophylactic immunization was also sufficient to protect 100% of the mice against the initial and second tumor challenges and 70% of the mice against the third challenge. In addition, therapeutic immunization with AAV1 after palpable tumor formation inhibited tumor growth and caused tumor regression in some mice. Thus, our studies support the potential of AAV vectors as a genetic vaccine for the prevention and treatment of HPV-induced malignancies.

  12. N-acetylcysteine (NAC ameliorates Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 induced chronic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Gao

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation results when the immune system responds to trauma, injury or infection and the response is not resolved. It can lead to tissue damage and dysfunction and in some cases predispose to cancer. Some viruses (including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can induce inflammation, which may persist even after the infection has been controlled or cleared. The damage caused by inflammation, can itself act to perpetuate the inflammatory response. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 of EBV is a pro-inflammatory factor and in the skin of transgenic mice causes a phenotype of hyperplasia with chronic inflammation of increasing severity, which can progress to pre-malignant and malignant lesions. LMP1 signalling leads to persistent deregulated expression of multiple proteins throughout the mouse life span, including TGFα S100A9 and chitinase-like proteins. Additionally, as the inflammation increases, numerous chemokines and cytokines are produced which promulgate the inflammation. Deposition of IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE and complement activation form part of this process and through genetic deletion of CD40, we show that this contributes to the more tissue-destructive aspects of the phenotype. Treatment of the mice with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an antioxidant which feeds into the body's natural redox regulatory system through glutathione synthesis, resulted in a significantly reduced leukocyte infiltrate in the inflamed tissue, amelioration of the pathological features and delay in the inflammatory signature measured by in vivo imaging. Reducing the degree of inflammation achieved through NAC treatment, had the knock on effect of reducing leukocyte recruitment to the inflamed site, thereby slowing the progression of the pathology. These data support the idea that NAC could be considered as a treatment to alleviate chronic inflammatory pathologies, including post-viral disease. Additionally, the model described can be used to effectively monitor and

  13. THE MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF EPSTEINBARR VIRUS PERSISTENCE IN THE HUMAN ORGANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volyanskiy A.Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review describes advances in molecular aspects of EBV infection and disease. We discuss the spectrum of clinical illness due to EBV persistent infection. The main characteristic of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is that initial infection results in lifelong persistence. EBV infects nearly all humans by the time they reach adulthood. Healthy humans have approximately 1 to 50 infected cells per million leukocytes. EBV is one of the eight known human herpesviruses. EBV virions have a doublestranded linear DNA and 100 genes had been described in virus genome. Initial infection is thought to occur in the oral compartment. The host cells of EBV are mainly lymphocytes and epithelial cells. EBV attaches to B cells via binding of the viral gp350 protein to CD21 receptor. The consequence of EBV infection is cells proliferation and differentiation into memory B lymphocyte in the germinal center. Infected memory B cells are released into the peripheral circulation. EBV persists mostly in the memory B cell. Latency is the state of persistent viral infection without active viral production. In latently infected B cells EBV virus exist as episomes. During the latent phase episomal replication occurs via host DNA polymerase. Genes of the nuclear antigens (EBNA and latent membrane proteins (LMP are transcribed during latency. These include EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3B, EBNA3C, EBNA leader protein (EBNALP, LMP1 and LMP2 genes. All nuclear antigens are transcription transactivators which bind to cis-regulatory DNA elements of cell or virus genomes directly or in complex with other proteins. LMP2A and LMP1 can function to coordinately mimic B-cell receptor and CD40 coreceptor signaling in latently infected B cells. LMP proteins activate cell signaling systems and as the consequence different gene expression programs. Characterization of gene expression patterns in different cell lines and pathologic conditions has revealed that there are at least three different

  14. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    chemokine receptors (CKRs). Conserved families of v7TMRs distinguish between beta- versus gammaherpesviruses; furthermore, significant divisions within these subfamilies, such as between genera of the gammaherpesviruses or between the primate and rodent cytomegaloviruses, coincide with specific v7TMR gene...... families. Divergence of functional properties between the viral 7TMR and their cellular counterparts is likely, therefore, to reflect adaptation supporting various aspects of the viral lifecycle with concomitant effects upon viral pathogenesis. Consistent with their long evolutionary history, the v7TMRs...... activation. Indeed, many of the v7TMRs have been shown to signal constitutively, associated in some cases with notable divergence of highly conserved regulatory elements such as the “DRY” motif of TMIII. The availability of rodent models for v7TMR functional studies has provided evidence for important...

  15. Plant virus replication and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes virus encoded products and cellular factors. To enhance these processes viruses assemble and replicate in membrane associated complexes that may develop into "virus factories" or "viroplasms" in which viral components and host factors required for replication are concentrated. Many plant viruses replicate i...

  16. Development of Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type in Cerebrum Following Epstein-Barr Virus-positive Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ayano; Takase, Hiroshi; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Matsuda, Go; Ohnishi, Iichiro; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kudo, Takumi; Tanaka, Yoji; Maehara, Taketoshi; Miura, Osamu; Arai, Ayako

    2017-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed bilateral uveitis with high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load in the vitreous fluid without lymphoma cells. Four years after the onset, T2-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hyperintense lesions in the right occipital and parietal lobe. A biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type (ENKL). The repeat region of LMP1, an EBV gene, detected in the brain lesion was identical to that detected in the vitreous fluid. ENKL of the central nervous system is quite rare, and the pathogenesis has not been determined. The lymphoma in this case might have been closely associated with the EBV-positive uveitis.

  17. The Proto-Oncogene c-myc Is a Direct Target Gene of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Carmen; Laux, Gerhard; Eick, Dirk; Jochner, Nicola; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Kempkes, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects and transforms primary B lymphocytes in vitro. Viral infection initiates the cell cycle entry of the resting B lymphocytes. The maintenance of proliferation in the infected cells is strictly dependent on functional EBNA2. We have recently developed a conditional immortalization system for EBV by rendering the function of EBNA2, and thus proliferation of the immortalized cells, dependent on estrogen. This cellular system was used to identify early events preceding induction of proliferation. We show that LMP1 and c-myc are directly activated by EBNA2, indicating that all cellular factors essential for induction of these genes by EBNA2 are present in the resting cells. In contrast, induction of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D2 and cdk4 are secondary events, which require de novo protein synthesis. PMID:10196351

  18. Virus and cell RNAs expressed during Epstein-Barr virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-03-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was approximately 5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-kappaB responsive genes including IkappaBalpha and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication.

  19. An encoding device and a method of encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an encoding device, such as an optical position encoder, for encoding input from an object, and a method for encoding input from an object, for determining a position of an object that interferes with light of the device. The encoding device comprises a light source...... in the area in the space and may interfere with the light, which interference may be encoded into a position or activation....

  20. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918). However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R) were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. Conclusions It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis. PMID:20078890

  1. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen Lars E; Breum Solvej Ø; Polacek Charlotta; Belsham Graham J; Bøtner Anette

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over ...

  2. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Lars E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. Results An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918. However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. Conclusions It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis.

  3. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, Graham J; Polacek, Charlotta; Breum, Solvej Ø; Larsen, Lars E; Bøtner, Anette

    2010-01-16

    Myxoma virus is a member of the Poxviridae and causes disease in European rabbits. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical disease, which occurs in the autumn of most years in Denmark, has been achieved previously using antigen ELISA and electron microscopy. An unusually large number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently within an avirulent strain of myxoma virus (6918). However, three other frame-shift mutations found in this strain (in the genes M009L, M036L and M148R) were not shared with the Danish viruses but a single nucleotide deletion in the M138R/M139R intergenic region was a common feature. It appears that expression of the full-length myxoma virus M135R protein is not required for virulence in rabbits. Hence, the frame-shift mutation in the M135R gene in the nonpathogenic 6918 virus strain is not sufficient to explain the attenuation of this myxoma virus but one/some of the other frame-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis.

  4. Chimeras of receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus/feline leukemia virus B and amphotropic murine leukemia virus reveal different modes of receptor recognition by retrovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Johann, Stephen V; van Zeijl, Marja

    1995-01-01

    Glvr1 encodes the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related gene Glvr2 encodes the human receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (A-MLVs). The two proteins are 62% identical in their amino acid sequences...

  5. Analysis of the association between Epstein-Barr virus and classic Hodgkin’s lymphoma in adult patients from Ceará (Brazil by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization Análise da associação do vírus Epstein-Barr com a forma clássica do linfoma de Hodgkin em adultos do estado do Ceará: avaliação por imuno-histoquímica e hibridização in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Taumaturgo Pinto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (CHL is geographically variable. In the present study the prevalence of EBV in CHL was assessed in adult patients from Ceará, Brazil. Thirty-seven cases were immunohistochemically evaluated for EBV using latent membrane protein (LMP1 antibody and for EBV latency-associated RNA (EBER1 using in situ hybridization (ISH. Sex and age did not differ among patients as to the frequency of CHL. Nodular sclerosis was the predominant histological subtype. LMP1 was found in Reed-Sternberg cells in 67.5% of the cases whereas ISH detected EBER1 in 75.6%. Regarding histological subtypes EBV infection rates were not found statistically different in nodular sclerosis (NS and mixed cellularity (MC subtypes (p = 0.66.A freqüência do vírus Epstein-Barr (EBV em pacientes com linfoma de Hodgkin Clássico (LHC sofre variabilidade geográfica. No presente estudo investigamos a freqüência do EBV em pacientes com LHC no estado do Ceará. Trinta e sete casos de linfoma de Hodgkin clássico foram avaliados por imuno-histoquímica para EBV usando o anticorpo monoclonal contra a proteína latente da membrana (LMP1 e pelo método de hibridização in situ para RNA associado ao EBV (EBER1. Não há diferença por sexo e idade dos pacientes no que concerne à freqüência de LHC. O subtipo histológico esclerose nodular foi predominante. LMP1 esteve presente em células Reed-Sternberg em 67,5% e pela hibridização in situ, através da sonda EBER, foi evidente em 75,6% dos casos. Não observamos predominância significativa da associação de EBV com os subtipos histológicos esclerose nodular (EN e celularidade mista (CM (p = 0,66.

  6. Video time encoding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF ENCODED BEADS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is relates to methods for the identification of spatially encoded beaded or granulated matrices comprising a plurality of immobilised particles. The identification is based on a distance matrix determination or based on a set of geometrical figures, such a triangles...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoid lesions of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Aaron; Aguilera, Nadine S

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphoproliferative processes occur in the head and neck ranging from reactive processes such as infectious mononucleosis to high grade malignant lymphomas. EBV is a ubiquitous herpes virus that infects more than 90% of adults worldwide, and is generally transferred though saliva. Primary infection can occur throughout life. EBV is the first virus linked to malignancies, both epithelial and lymphoid. Both T and B cell lymphomas can be associated with EBV and evidence shows that an individual's response to the acute EBV infection may be critical in the development of subsequent lymphoma. Currently, in situ hybridization for EBER is the most sensitive available test to detect EBV and should be routinely performed in lymphoproliferative lesions of the head and neck. Immunohistochemistry for EBV related proteins, such as LMP1, is much less sensitive than EBER in situ hybridization, but can help determine latency patterns of EBV infection. Although relatively rare, primary EBV-related lymphomas must be considered in the differential of atypical lymphoid proliferations in the head and neck. We present selected EBV-related disorders of the head and neck discussing etiology as well as differential diagnosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Enhanced and sustained CD8+ T cell responses with an adenoviral vector-based hepatitis C virus vaccine encoding NS3 linked to the MHC class II chaperone protein invariant chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Marianne; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bukh, Jens

    2011-01-01

    memory. Functionally, the AdIiNS3-vaccinated mice had a significantly increased cytotoxic capacity compared with the AdNS3 group. The AdIiNS3-induced CD8(+) T cells protected mice from infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV NS3 of heterologous 1b strains, and studies in knockout mice...

  10. Cationic Lipid-Formulated DNA Vaccine against Hepatitis B Virus : Immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 Vectors Encoding Small and Large Surface Antigen in Comparison to a Licensed Protein Vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endmann, Anne; Klunder, Katharina; Kapp, Kerstin; Riede, Oliver; Oswald, Detlef; Talman, Eduard G.; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on the small (S) hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible

  11. Marek's disease virus-encoded analog of microRNA-155 activates the oncogene c-Myc by targeting LTBP1 and suppressing the TGF-β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jia-Qi; Teng, Man; Yu, Zu-Hua; Xu, Hui; Su, Jing-Wei; Zhao, Pu; Xing, Guang-Xu; Liang, Hong-De; Deng, Rui-Guang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Zhang, Gai-Ping; Luo, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a representative alpha herpes virus able to induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphoma in its natural host and regarded as an ideal model for the study of virus-induced tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that the mdv1-miR-M4-5p, a viral analog of cellular miR-155, is critical for MDV׳s oncogenicity. However, the precise mechanism whereby it was involved in MD lymphomagenesis remained unknown. We have presently identified the host mRNA targets of mdv1-miR-M4-5 and identified the latent TGF-β binding protein 1 (LTBP1) as a critical target for it. We found that during MDV infection, down-regulation of LTBP1 expression by mdv1-miR-M4-5p led to a significant decrease of the secretion and activation of TGF-β1, with suppression of TGF-β signaling and a significant activation of expression of c-Myc, a well-known oncogene which is critical for virus-induced tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal a novel and important mechanism of how mdv1-miR-M4-5p potentially contributes to MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  13. A member of a new plant gene family encoding a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain-containing protein is involved in restriction of long distance movement of plant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Patrick; Sofer, Luc; Schurdi-Levraud, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Restriction of long distance movement of several potyviruses in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by at least three dominant restricted TEV movement (RTM) genes, named RTM1, RTM2 and RTM3 and acts as a non-conventional resistance. RTM1 encodes a protein belonging to the jacalin family and RTM2 encodes a protein which has similarities to small heat shock proteins. The recent cloning of RTM3 which encodes a protein belonging to an unknown protein family of 29 members that has a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain in its N-terminal region and a coiled-coil (CC) domain at its C-terminal end is an important breakthrough for a better understanding of this resistance process. Not only the third gene involved in this resistance has been identified and has allowed revealing a new gene family in plant but the discovery that the RTM3 protein interacts directly with RTM1 strongly suggests that the RTM proteins form a multimeric complex. However, these data also highlight striking similarities of the RTM resistance with the well known R-gene mediated resistance. PMID:20930558

  14. Reassortant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Pigs, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Wendy A.; Essen, Steve C.; Strugnell, Benjamin W.; Russell, Christine; Barrass, Laura; Reid, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance for influenza virus in pigs in the United Kingdom during spring 2010 detected a novel reassortant influenza virus. This virus had genes encoding internal proteins from pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes from swine influenza virus (H1N2). Our results demonstrate processes contributing to influenza virus heterogeneity. PMID:21749767

  15. Multiple sclerosis: the elevated antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus primarily targets, but is not confined to, the glycine-alanine repeat of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, Klemens; Wunderlich, Benjamin; Gieß, René; Meyer, Petra; Loebel, Madlen; Lenz, Klaus; Hofmann, Jörg; Rosche, Berit; Wengert, Oliver; Paul, Friedemann; Reimer, Ulf; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2014-07-15

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have elevated antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), but data on the epitope-resolved specificity of these antibodies are scarce. Using a peptide microarray containing 1465 peptides representing 8 full-length EBV proteins, we identified higher (p<0.001) antibody reactivities to 39 EBV-peptides in MS patients (n=29) compared to healthy controls (n=22). Seventeen of the 39 peptides were from EBNA-1 and 13 located within the glycine-alanine repeat of EBNA-1. Further reactivities were directed against EBNA-3, EBNA-4, EBNA-6, VP26, and LMP1. Thus, antibodies against EBV in MS patients primarily target, but are not confined to, the glycine-alanine repeat of EBNA-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of myxoma viruses encoding a defective M135R gene from clinical cases of myxomatosis; possible implications for the role of the M135R protein as a virulence factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Polacek, Charlotta; Breum, Solvej Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    number of clinically suspected cases of myxomatosis were observed in Denmark during 2007. Myxoma virus DNA was detected, using a new real time PCR assay which targets the M029L gene, in over 70% of the clinical samples submitted for laboratory confirmation. Unexpectedly, further analysis revealed...... that a high proportion of these viral DNA preparations contained a frame-shift mutation within the M135R gene that has previously been identified as a virulence factor. This frame-shift mutation results in expression of a greatly truncated product. The same frame-shift mutation has also been found recently......-shift mutations alone or in conjunction with one/some of the thirty two amino acid substitutions must also contribute. The real time PCR assay for myxoma virus is a useful diagnostic tool for laboratory confirmation of suspected cases of myxomatosis....

  17. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity.

  18. Two Small RNAs Encoded within the First 1.5 Kilobases of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Can Inhibit Productive Infection and Cooperate To Inhibit Apoptosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenwen; Sa e Silva, Mariana; Jaber, Tareq; Vitvitskaia, Olga; Li, Sumin; Henderson, Gail; Jones, Clinton

    2009-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) is abundantly expressed in latently infected trigeminal ganglionic sensory neurons. Expression of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences is sufficient for the wild-type reactivation phenotype in small animal models of infection. The ability of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences to inhibit apoptosis is important for the latency-reactivation cycle. Several studies have also concluded that LAT inhibits productive infection. To date, a functional LAT protein has not been identified, suggesting that LAT is a regulatory RNA. Two small RNAs (sRNAs) were previously identified within the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences. In this study, we demonstrated that both LAT sRNAs were expressed in the trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with an HSV-1 strain that expresses LAT but not when mice were infected with a LAT null mutant. LAT sRNA1 and sRNA2 cooperated to inhibit cold shock-induced apoptosis in mouse neuroblastoma cells. LAT sRNA1, but not LAT sRNA2, inhibited apoptosis less efficiently than both sRNAs. When rabbit skin cells were cotransfected with plasmids that express LAT sRNA1 and HSV-1 genomic DNA, the amount of infectious virus released was reduced approximately 3 logs. Although LAT sRNA2 was less effective at inhibiting virus production, it inhibited expression of infected cell protein 4 (ICP4). Neither LAT sRNA had an obvious effect on ICP0 expression. These studies suggested that expression of two LAT sRNAs plays a role in the latency-reactivation cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and productive infection. PMID:19587058

  19. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  20. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  1. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  2. Encoding the Factorisation Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben N. S. Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay and Given-Wilson have recently introduced the Factorisation (or SF- calculus as a minimal fundamental model of intensional computation. It is a combinatory calculus containing a special combinator, F, which is able to examine the internal structure of its first argument. The calculus is significant in that as well as being combinatorially complete it also exhibits the property of structural completeness, i.e. it is able to represent any function on terms definable using pattern matching on arbitrary normal forms. In particular, it admits a term that can decide the structural equality of any two arbitrary normal forms. Since SF-calculus is combinatorially complete, it is clearly at least as powerful as the more familiar and paradigmatic Turing-powerful computational models of Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic. Its relationship to these models in the converse direction is less obvious, however. Jay and Given-Wilson have suggested that SF-calculus is strictly more powerful than the aforementioned models, but a detailed study of the connections between these models is yet to be undertaken. This paper begins to bridge that gap by presenting a faithful encoding of the Factorisation Calculus into the Lambda Calculus preserving both reduction and strong normalisation. The existence of such an encoding is a new result. It also suggests that there is, in some sense, an equivalence between the former model and the latter. We discuss to what extent our result constitutes an equivalence by considering it in the context of some previously defined frameworks for comparing computational power and expressiveness.

  3. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... shaped, bacilliform – not known to be associated with the other two cellular domains, Bacteria and Eukarya. The distinctiveness of the hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses extends to their genome sequences: a large majority of the predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public databases and encode...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...

  4. Detecção do vírus Epstein-Barr em tonsilites recorrentes Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in recurrent tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Pedra Dias

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As tonsilites recorrentes têm sido objeto de muitos estudos. Eventos considerados na predisposição e causa incluem a utilização errônea de antibióticos em crises agudas, alterações da microflora, mudanças estruturais nas criptas epiteliais tonsilares e infecções virais. A infecção pelo vírus Epstein-Barr (EBV ocorre freqüentemente na infância persistindo em linfócitos de tonsilas, podendo causar tonsilites recorrentes. Pouco se conhece sobre a persistência e reativação do EBV em pacientes imunocompetentes. Alguns métodos como a hibridização in situ, a reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR e a imuno-histoquímica têm sido utilizados no estudo da patogenia do vírus. OBJETIVO: Para caracterizar a associação do vírus Epstein-Barr com tonsilites recorrentes examinamos a presença do EBV pela PCR e por imuno-histoquímica usando como alvo a proteína viral LMP-1. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo transversal com análise de prevalência amostral. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados 24 blocos parafinados de tonsilas, provenientes do Serviço de Anatomia Patológica, removidas de crianças de 2 a 12 anos com diagnóstico de tonsilite recorrente. Resultados: O genoma do EBV foi detectado em 13 (54,1% e a LMP-1 em 9 (37,5% dos casos. CONCLUSÃO: As tonsilas das crianças podem ser colonizadas pelo EBV e este pode estar associado à patogenia das tonsilites recorrentes.Recurrent tonsillitis has been the subject of frequent investigation. Misuse of antibiotic therapy in acute tonsillitis, changes to the tonsillar microflora, structural changes to the tonsillar crypts, and viral infections have been listed as predisposing or causal factors for recurrent tonsillitis. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection usually occurs in early childhood and may persist in tonsillar lymphocytes, thus leading to the onset of recurrent tonsillitis. Little is known about the persistence and reactivation of EBV strains in immunocompetent patients. Methods such

  5. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  6. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  7. Detecting Faults from Encoded Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fault detection for linear continuous-time systems via encoded information is considered. The encoded information is received at a remote location by the monitoring deiice and assessed to infer the occurrence of the fault. A class of faults is considered which allows to use a simple

  8. A prime/boost DNA/Modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine expressing recombinant Leishmania DNA encoding TRYP is safe and immunogenic in outbred dogs, the reservoir of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Connor; Antoniou, Maria; Ruiz-Argüello, Maria Begoña; Alcami, Antonio; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Courtenay, Orin

    2009-02-11

    Previous studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime/boost vaccines expressing tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) and Leishmania homologue of the mammalian receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) against Leishmania major challenge in mice, which was consistent with results from TRYP protein/adjuvant combinations in non-human primates. This study aimed to conduct safety and immunogenicity trials of these DNA/MVA vaccines in dogs, the natural reservoir host of Leishmania infantum, followed-up for 4 months post-vaccination. In a cohort of 22 uninfected outbred dogs, blinded randomised administration of 1000 microg (high dose) or 100 microg (low dose) DNA prime (day 0) and 1x10(8)pfu MVA boost (day 28) was shown to be safe and showed no clinical side effects. High dose DNA/MVA vaccinated TRYP dogs produced statistically higher mean levels of the type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma than controls in whole blood assays (WBA) stimulated with the recombinant vaccine antigen TRYP, up to the final sampling at day 126, and in the absence of challenge with Leishmania. TRYP vaccinated dogs also demonstrated significantly higher TRYP-specific total IgG and IgG2 subtype titres than in controls, and positive in vivo intradermal reactions at day 156 in the absence of natural infection, observed in 6/8 TRYP vaccinated dogs. No significant increases in IFN-gamma in LACK-stimulated WBA, or in LACK-specific IgG levels, were detected in LACK vaccinated dogs compared to controls, and only 2/9 LACK vaccinated dogs demonstrated DTH responses at day 156. In all groups, IgG1 subclass responses and antigen-specific stimulation of IL-10 were similar to controls demonstrating an absence of Th2/T(reg) response, as expected in the absence of in vivo restimulation or natural/experimental challenge with Leishmania. These collective results indicate significant antigen-specific type-1 responses and in vivo memory phase cellular immune

  9. Natural Variation of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes, Proteins, and Primary MicroRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Samantha; Palser, Anne; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Ramayanti, Octavia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Hildesheim, Allan; Fellner, Maria Dolores; Wiels, Joelle; White, Robert E; Kellam, Paul; Farrell, Paul J

    2017-08-01

    Viral gene sequences from an enlarged set of about 200 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) strains, including many primary isolates, have been used to investigate variation in key viral genetic regions, particularly LMP1, Zp, gp350, EBNA1, and the BART microRNA (miRNA) cluster 2. Determination of type 1 and type 2 EBV in saliva samples from people from a wide range of geographic and ethnic backgrounds demonstrates a small percentage of healthy white Caucasian British people carrying predominantly type 2 EBV. Linkage of Zp and gp350 variants to type 2 EBV is likely to be due to their genes being adjacent to the EBNA3 locus, which is one of the major determinants of the type 1/type 2 distinction. A novel classification of EBNA1 DNA binding domains, named QCIGP, results from phylogeny analysis of their protein sequences but is not linked to the type 1/type 2 classification. The BART cluster 2 miRNA region is classified into three major variants through single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the primary miRNA outside the mature miRNA sequences. These SNPs can result in altered levels of expression of some miRNAs from the BART variant frequently present in Chinese and Indonesian nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) samples. The EBV genetic variants identified here provide a basis for future, more directed analysis of association of specific EBV variations with EBV biology and EBV-associated diseases.IMPORTANCE Incidence of diseases associated with EBV varies greatly in different parts of the world. Thus, relationships between EBV genome sequence variation and health, disease, geography, and ethnicity of the host may be important for understanding the role of EBV in diseases and for development of an effective EBV vaccine. This paper provides the most comprehensive analysis so far of variation in specific EBV genes relevant to these diseases and proposed EBV vaccines. By focusing on variation in LMP1, Zp, gp350, EBNA1, and the BART miRNA cluster 2, new relationships with the known

  10. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  11. Chimeric viruses blur the borders between the major groups of eukaryotic single-stranded DNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Simon; Enault, Francois; Bronner, Gisèle; Vaulot, Daniel; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have uncovered an astonishing diversity of ssDNA viruses encoding replication proteins (Reps) related to those of eukaryotic Circoviridae, Geminiviridae or Nanoviridae; however, exact evolutionary relationships among these viruses remain obscure. Recently, a unique chimeric virus (CHIV) genome, which has apparently emerged via recombination between ssRNA and ssDNA viruses, has been discovered. Here we report on the assembly of 13 new CHIV genomes recovered f...

  12. Generalized myositis mimicking polymyositis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Arai, Kimito; Yamamoto-Tabata, Takako; Hirai, Kanji; Kishimoto, Kouji; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Hattori, Takamichi

    2005-05-01

    Chronic generalized myositis has not so far been reported as a complication of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV). We encountered three patients with chronic generalized myositis mimicking polymyositis associated with CAEBV. To clarify the pathological character of this myositis, we investigated the distribution, clonality, and the immunophenotype of EBV-infected cells and lymphocytes infiltrating in muscles. Clinically, two patients showed symmetrical proximal weakness and muscle atrophy as the initial and main symptom. Although the condition resembled polymyositis, they had also lingual and/or orbital myositis. The other patient showed generalized myositis at the late phase of CAEBV. In all of them, immunotherapy was ineffective and prognosis was poor. Intramuscular infiltrating lymphocytes in our patients were mainly CD45RO+, CD3+, CD4-, CD8-, TCR betaF1-, TCR deltaTCS1-, CD56-, CD79a-, CD21-, HLA-DR+, ZEBRA -, LMP1-, and EBER+ T cells. Oligoclonal expansion of EBV-infected T cells was shown in the muscles. However, there were no malignant lymphocytes. This new form of myositis must be distinguished from polymyositis and the other conventional forms of myositis. Careful investigation of hidden CAEBV is recommended when patients present with steroid non-responsive chronic progressive generalized myositis, in particular, with lingual or orbital involvement.

  13. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  14. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glyc...

  15. New concepts in PCM encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Paul M.

    The Pulse Coded Modulation (PCM) Encoder Systems used in telemetry have gained enormous flexibility for various applications because the input data channels and frame sync codes are programmable via the EEPROMs or UVEPROMs. The firmware in the current PCM Encoder Systems can be readily tailored for a specific application to monitor numerous types of analog channels, as well as digital channels. However, the current PCM Encoder Systems require several types of strap options which dictate not only a limited choice of gains and offsets, but also a fixed choice of the premodulation filter characteristics. The brain of the 1000 PCM Encoder is the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) which eliminates the fixed premodulation filter characteristics via digital filter functions, and also eliminates strap options via general purpose microprocessor functions.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease exacerbation associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulia, Evangelia; Pitiriga, Vassiliki C; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Spanakis, Nicholas E; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infection is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, but its role as a pathogenetic or exacerbating factor remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Epstein-Barr virus infection and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in regard to exacerbation of disease activity. This was a nonrandomized crosssectional study in subgroups of patients with inflammatory bowel disease compared with a control group with noninflammatory disease. Participants were patients treated for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and individuals undergoing evaluation for noninflammatory disease recruited from 2 urban adult gastrointestinal referral centers in Greece. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease was based on standard clinical and endoscopic criteria. Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were recorded. Whole blood samples and fresh tissue samples from biopsy of intestinal sites were obtained from each participant. The presence of Epstein-Barr virus was determined by amplifying the LMP1 gene of the virus in blood and intestinal tissue samples. The study comprised 94 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (63 with ulcerative colitis and 31 with Crohn's disease) and 45 controls with noninflammatory disease. Of the 94 patients, 67 (71.3%) had disease exacerbation and 27 (28.7%) were in remission. The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus genome was significantly higher in patients than in controls for intestinal tissue (44 patients, 46.8% vs 6 controls, 13.3%; p = 0.001), but not for whole blood (24 patients, 25.5% vs 9 controls, 20%; p = 0.3). The viral genome was found significantly more frequently in intestinal samples from patients with disease exacerbation compared with patients in remission (38 patients with exacerbation, 56.7% vs 6 patients in remission, 22.2%; p = 0.001), but no significant difference was found for whole blood (18 patients with exacerbation, 26.8% vs 6 patients in remission, 22

  17. Structure and replication of hepatitis delta virus | Cunha | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis delta virus is the causative agent of one of the most severe forms of human virus hepatitis. It is a small and simple pathogen whose genome consists of a single RNA molecule of 1.7 Kb that encodes for only one antigen. The virus almost completely relies on the host cell machinery for replication and propagation of ...

  18. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  20. Ekspresi produk gen laten virus epstein-barr pada karsinoma sel skuamosa rongga mulut (The expressions of latent gene product of epstein-barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Indah Budhy S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is a type of cancer often found in oral cavity and the area of head and neck at about 90%. Based on the geographical incidence oral SCC (OSCC has many types of different emerging. This case probably has connection with ethnic group, habit and social and economical condition. In East Java, the incidence is about 2.64% and it increases every year. The virus is known as one of the main factors that result in this disease. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has potential capability of carcinogenesis. EBV is the family of herpesviridae that can infect cell through the linking of CD 21 receptor of the epithel with glycol protein 350/220 of the virus capsule. After primary infection, the virus will form latent-gene in human cell. Periodically, the latent-gene product can disturb proliferation and apoptotic regulator. In Indonesia, the expression of EBV latent geneproduct in the OSCC has not been reported yet. This study wanted to know the expression of EBV latent gene product found in the OSCC. This study found 25 cases of OSCC in which 17 were infected by EBV. Detection of EBV infection could be done by insitu hybridization to identify RNA EBV (EBER. To find the expression of EBV latent gene product, immunohistochemical analysis was done. The conclusion was that the emerging of expression of EBV latent gene product in OSCC were latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1, EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 and RNA EBV (EBER. They were 28.28%, 25.26% and 46.47%. It was suggested to do the following research on OSCC infected by EBV and the emerging of expression of EBV latent gene product with regulator gene of proliferation and apoptotic in OSCC.

  1. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  2. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  3. Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with epstein-barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Jianjiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-driven B cell proliferation is critical to its subsequent persistence in the host and is a key event in the development of EBV-associated B cell diseases. Thus, inquiry into early cellular events that precede EBV-driven proliferation of B cells is essential for understanding the processes that can lead to EBV-associated B cell diseases. Methods Infection with high titers of EBV of mixed, primary B cells in different stages of differentiation occurs during primary EBV infection and in the setting of T cell-immunocompromise that predisposes to development of EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases. Using an ex vivo system that recapitulates these conditions of infection, we correlated expression of selected B cell-surface markers and intracellular cytokines with expression of EBV latency genes and cell proliferation. Results We identified CD23, CD58, and IL6, as molecules expressed at early times after EBV-infection. EBV differentially infected B cells into two distinct sub-populations of latently infected CD23+ cells: one fraction, marked as CD23hiCD58+IL6- by day 3, subsequently proliferated; another fraction, marked as CD23loCD58+, expressed IL6, a B cell growth factor, but failed to proliferate. High levels of LMP1, a critical viral oncoprotein, were expressed in individual CD23hiCD58+ and CD23loCD58+ cells, demonstrating that reduced levels of LMP1 did not explain the lack of proliferation of CD23loCD58+ cells. Differentiation stage of B cells did not appear to govern this dichotomy in outcome either. Memory or naïve B cells did not exclusively give rise to either CD23hi or IL6-expressing cells; rather memory B cells gave rise to both sub-populations of cells. Conclusions B cells are differentially susceptible to EBV-mediated proliferation despite expression of viral gene products known to be critical for continuous B cell growth. Cellular events, in addition to viral gene expression, likely play a

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Brian P.; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance. PMID:23202490

  5. Marine Viruses: Truth or Dare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, Mya

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, marine virology has progressed from a curiosity to an intensely studied topic of critical importance to oceanography. At concentrations of approximately 10 million viruses per milliliter of surface seawater, viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans. The majority of these viruses are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Through lysing their bacterial hosts, marine phages control bacterial abundance, affect community composition, and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In addition, phages influence their hosts through selection for resistance, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of bacterial metabolism. Recent work has also demonstrated that marine phages are extremely diverse and can carry a variety of auxiliary metabolic genes encoding critical ecological functions. This review is structured as a scientific "truth or dare," revealing several well-established "truths" about marine viruses and presenting a few "dares" for the research community to undertake in future studies.

  6. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  7. Early Decoding and Encoding Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater-Rozensher, Susan; Hebard, Amy J.

    A combination of case study observation and mini-experimentation techniques were used to examine a number of issues of relevance in the study of the acquisition of beginning reading skills. Six children were divided equally among three instructional modes: phonics, whole word, and mixed. They were asked to decode and encode words, and their…

  8. The full-length DNA sequence of Epstein Barr virus from a human gastric carcinoma cell line, SNU-719.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-A; Yang, San-Duk; Hwang, Jinha; Kim, Jong-Il; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The consistent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in malignant cells of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) suggests it plays an important role during the development of EBVaGC. However, the entire genomic sequence of EBV from EBVaGC has yet to be determined. This study first determined, annotated, and analyzed the full genomic sequence of EBV from the naturally infected gastric carcinoma cell line SNU-719 using next-generation sequencing and comparative analyses. In consistent with the notion that EBV sequence isolates better reflect their geographic area than tissue origin, the SNU-719 EBV (named as GC1) was categorized as an East Asian type I EBV. Compared with the prototype B95.8 sequence, SNU-719 EBV contained 1372 variations, with 937 and 435 within coding and non-coding regions, respectively. Of the 937 variations, 465 were non-synonymous changes, while 472 synonymous changes included partial internal deletions in the coding regions of LMP1 and gp350. The RNAseq transcriptome revealed that multiple BART transcripts comprised the majority of EBV RNA reads. The SNU-719 EBV expressed high levels of BART, LF3, BHLF1, and BNLF2. Evidence of RNA editing at multiple sites in the host chromosome was found; however, no evidence of genome integration was seen. The annotated SNU-719 EBV sequence will be a useful reference in future EBVaGC studies.

  9. Cloned genomes of infectious hepatitis C viruses and uses thereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention discloses nucleic acid sequences which encode infectious hepatitis C viruses and the use of these sequences, and polypeptides encoded by all or part of these sequences, in the development of vaccines and diagnostics for HCV and in the development of screening assays for the ......The present invention discloses nucleic acid sequences which encode infectious hepatitis C viruses and the use of these sequences, and polypeptides encoded by all or part of these sequences, in the development of vaccines and diagnostics for HCV and in the development of screening assays...

  10. Influence of Epstein-Barr virus infection in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Satomi; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Terufumi; Hanamoto, Hitoshi; Hijikata, Yasuki; Tanaka, Miyako; Takai, Shunsuke; Hirase, Chikara; Morita, Yasuyoshi; Kanamaru, Akihisa

    2008-06-01

    The involvement of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells in organs such as the skin and lymph nodes is observed in about 50% of cases of ATL. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has often been observed in the clinical course of ATL. In this study, we established two B-cell lines from peripheral blood of patients with ATL. EBV DNA, proviral DNA for HTLV-1 and Tax mRNA were detected in both lines. As part of the characterization of these cells, an enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) or ICAM-3 (ICAM-3) (CD50), lymphocyte function-1 (LFA-1) (CD11a/CD18), and Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) was observed. To investigate the role of the interaction of these viruses, we transfected EBV and/or HTLV-1 into a healthy donor's lymphocytes, an EBV-infected B cell line, Raji, and a HTLV-1 negative T-cell line, Jurkat. Enhanced expression of adhesion molecules was also observed in double transfectants (EBV and HTLV-1). In the clinical course of ATL, LMP-1, EBNA-2, CD50 and CD54 were detected in lymph nodes and skin specimens by immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) were detected in these cell lines and transfectants. The results indicated that coinfection with HTLV-1 and EBV may induce aggressive organ involvement through the enhanced expression of adhesion molecules via IL-4 signaling. A new mechanism of ATL involvement is discussed.

  11. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  12. Drug-Encoded Biomarkers for Monitoring Biological Therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Tsoneva

    Full Text Available Blood tests are necessary, easy-to-perform and low-cost alternatives for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy and other biological therapies in translational research. Here we assessed three candidate proteins with the potential to be used as biomarkers in biological fluids: two glucuronidases from E. coli (GusA and Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 (GusPlus, and the luciferase from Gaussia princeps (GLuc. The three genes encoding these proteins were inserted individually into vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 genome under the control of an identical promoter. The three resulting recombinant viruses were used to infect tumor cells in cultures and human tumor xenografts in nude mice. In contrast to the actively secreted GLuc, the cytoplasmic glucuronidases GusA and GusPlus were released into the supernatants only as a result of virus-mediated oncolysis. GusPlus resulted in the most sensitive detection of enzyme activity under controlled assay conditions in samples containing as little as 1 pg/ml of GusPlus, followed by GusA (25 pg/ml and GLuc (≥375 pg/ml. Unexpectedly, even though GusA had a lower specific activity compared to GusPlus, the substrate conversion in the serum of tumor-bearing mice injected with the GusA-encoding virus strains was substantially higher than that of GusPlus. This was attributed to a 3.2 fold and 16.2 fold longer half-life of GusA in the blood stream compared to GusPlus and GLuc respectively, thus a more sensitive monitor of virus replication than the other two enzymes. Due to the good correlation between enzymatic activity of expressed marker gene and virus titer, we conclude that the amount of the biomarker protein in the body fluid semiquantitatively represents the amount of virus in the infected tumors which was confirmed by low light imaging. We found GusA to be the most reliable biomarker for monitoring oncolytic virotherapy among the three tested markers.

  13. Another Really, Really Big Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Van Etten

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses with genomes larger than 300 kb and up to 1.2 Mb, which encode hundreds of proteins, are being discovered and characterized with increasing frequency. Most, but not all, of these large viruses (often referred to as giruses infect protists that live in aqueous environments. Bioinformatic analyses of metagenomes of aqueous samples indicate that large DNA viruses are quite common in nature and await discovery. One issue that is perhaps not appreciated by the virology community is that large viruses, even those classified in the same family, can differ significantly in morphology, lifestyle, and gene complement. This brief commentary, which will mention some of these unique properties, was stimulated by the characterization of the newest member of this club, virus CroV (Fischer, M.G.; Allen, M.J.; Wilson, W.H.; Suttle, C.A. Giant virus with a remarkable complement of genes infects marine zooplankton. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2010, 107, 19508-19513 [1]. CroV has a 730 kb genome (with ~544 protein-encoding genes and infects the marine microzooplankton Cafeteria roenbergensis producing a lytic infection.

  14. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, G.; Maussang, D.; Muniz, L.R.; Noriega, V.M.; Fraile-Ramos, A.; Barker, N.; Marchesi, F.; Thirunarayanan, N.; Vischer, H.F.; Qin, L.; Mayer, L.; Harpaz, N.; Leurs, R.; Furtado, G.C.; Clevers, H.; Tortorella, D.; Smit, M.J.; Lira, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice)

  15. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  16. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2014-02-01

    Life is a constant flow of electrons via redox couples. Redox reactions determine many if not all major cellular functions. Until recently, redox processes remained hidden from direct observation in living systems due to the lack of adequate methodology. Over the last years, imaging tools including small molecule probes and genetically encoded sensors appeared, which provided, for the first time, an opportunity to visualize and, in some cases, quantify redox reactions in live cells. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes, such as HyPer, rxYFP and roGFPs, have been used in several models, ranging from cultured cells to transgenic animals, and now enough information has been collected to highlight advantages and pitfalls of these probes. In this review, we describe the main types of genetically encoded redox probes, their essential properties, advantages and disadvantages. We also provide an overview of the most important, in our opinion, results obtained using these probes. Finally, we discuss redox-dependent photoconversions of GFP and other prospective directions in redox probe development. Fluorescent protein-based redox probes have important advantages such as high specificity, possibility of transgenesis and fine subcellular targeting. For proper selection of a redox sensor for a particular model, it is important to understand that HyPer and roGFP2-Orp1 are the probes for H2O2, whereas roGFP1/2, rxYFP and roGFP2-Grx1 are the probes for GSH/GSSG redox state. Possible pH changes should be carefully controlled in experiments with HyPer and rxYFP. Genetically encoded redox probes are the only instruments allowing real-time monitoring of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state in living cells and tissues. We believe that in the near future the palette of FP-based redox probes will be expanded to red and far-red parts of the spectrum and to other important reactive species such as NO, O2 and superoxide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  17. Holographically Encoded Volume Phase Masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-13

    optics ,” Nat. Photonics 4, 188–193 (2010). 26. H. Kogelnik, “Coupled wave theory for thick volume holograms ,” Bell System Tech. J. 45(9), 2909–2944...phase masks Marc SeGall, Ivan Divliansky,* Clémence Jollivet, Axel Schülzgen, and Leonid B. Glebov University of Central Florida, College of Optics and...satisfying the Bragg condition of the hologram . Moreover, this approach enables the capability to encode and multiplex several phase masks into a single

  18. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and Kelp fly virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Valles

    Full Text Available Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the structural proteins map to both ORF2 and the 3' end of ORF1, downstream of the sequence that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization and structural protein expression strategy resemble those of Acyrthosiphon pisum virus (APV, an aphid virus. The capsid protein that is encoded by the 3' end of ORF1 in SINV-3 and APV is predicted to have a jelly-roll fold similar to the capsid proteins of picornaviruses and caliciviruses. The capsid-extension protein that is produced by frameshifting, includes the jelly-roll fold domain encoded by ORF1 as its N-terminus, while the C-terminus encoded by the 5' half of ORF2 has no clear homology with other viral structural proteins. A third protein, encoded by the 3' half of ORF2, is associated with purified virions at sub-stoichiometric ratios. Although the structural proteins can be translated from the genomic RNA, we show that SINV-3 also produces a subgenomic RNA encoding the structural proteins. Circumstantial evidence suggests that APV may also produce such a subgenomic RNA. Both SINV-3 and APV are unclassified picorna-like viruses distantly related to members of the order Picornavirales and the family Caliciviridae. Within this grouping, features of the genome organization and capsid domain structure of SINV-3 and APV appear more similar to caliciviruses, perhaps suggesting the basis for a "Calicivirales" order.

  19. Analysis of the coding-complete genomic sequence of groundnut ringspot virus suggests a common ancestor with tomato chlorotic spot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Breuil, Soledad; Cañizares, Joaquín; Blanca, José Miguel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; Giolitti, Fabián; Ziarsolo, Peio; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) share biological and serological properties, so their identification is carried out by molecular methods. Their genomes consist of three segmented RNAs: L, M and S. The finding of a reassortant between these two viruses may complicate correct virus identification and requires the characterization of the complete genome. Therefore, we present for the first time the complete sequences of all the genes encoded by a GRSV isolate. The high level of sequence similarity between GRSV and TCSV (over 90 % identity) observed in the genes and proteins encoded in the M RNA support previous results indicating that these viruses probably have a common ancestor.

  20. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is upregulated by the Epstein-Barr virus infection and promotes the proliferation of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuewei; Sun, Le; Wang, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study confirmed the significant high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was promoted in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, in association with the malignant status of NPC, and promoted the proliferation NPC cells RAGE-dependently. The present study was to examine the association of HMGB1 over-expression in human NPC with the EBV-positivity and to determine the regulatory role of HMGB1 on the proliferation of NPC cells in vitro. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were utilized to examine the HMGB1 expression. EBV infection in CNE-2 cells was performed to investigate the HMGB1 promotion by EBV infection. RNA interference technology was utilized for the RAGE knockout. It was demonstrated that HMGB1 was significantly higher in both mRNA and protein levels in the EBV-positive NPC tissues, in marked association with the malignant status of NPC, and with the LMP1 DNA level in EBV-positive NPC samples. In addition, the MTT assay, growth curve, and the colony forming assay confirmed the promotion by HMGB1 to the proliferation of CNE-2 cells, depending on RAGE.

  1. The H3K27me3 demethylase, KDM6B, is induced by Epstein-Barr virus and over-expressed in Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderton, J A; Bose, S; Vockerodt, M

    2011-01-01

    There is now evidence for both increased and decreased activity of the enzymes controlling the methylation of lysine 27 on histone 3 (H3K27) in cancer. One of these enzymes, KDM6B formally known as JMJD3, a histone demethylase, which removes the trimethyl mark from H3K27, is required for the line......There is now evidence for both increased and decreased activity of the enzymes controlling the methylation of lysine 27 on histone 3 (H3K27) in cancer. One of these enzymes, KDM6B formally known as JMJD3, a histone demethylase, which removes the trimethyl mark from H3K27, is required......), an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated malignancy. KDM6B is over-expressed in primary HL and induced by the EBV oncogene, latent membrane protein (LMP1) in GC B cells, the presumptive progenitors of HL. Consistent with these observations, we found that KDM6B transcriptional targets in GC B cells are enriched...

  2. Epstein-Barr virus integrates frequently into chromosome 4q, 2q, 1q and 7q of Burkitt's lymphoma cell line (Raji).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianming; Luo, Xiaomin; Tang, Ke; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan

    2006-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) integration into a Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell line (Raji) was investigated, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern hybridization, genomic library screening and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). BaMHIW fragments of the EBV genome and DNA sequences of the viral latent membrane protein (LMP)1 and LMP2 genes were detected in Raji cells. BaMHI-digested high-molecular weight DNA from Raji cells generated 4 and 10 kb, 23 kb fragments that hybridized to Probe-1 (EBV genome 13232-16189) and Probe-2 (EBV genome 5-3271). Genomic library for Raji cells was constructed. Plaques (1 x 10(5)) were screened with Probe-2, and four positive clones were obtained. Chromosomal integration of EBV DNA was detected in the Raji cell. The viral integration sites included 1p, 1q, 2q, 3p, 3q, 4q, 5q, 6q, 7p, 7q, 9q, 11p, 14q and 15q. Despite this multiplicity of integration sites, integration showed high frequency only at the sites 4q, 2q, 1q and 7q; 64% of the total signals were found in these four chromosomal bands. No viral integration occurred in chromosomes 16-22 or the sex chromosomes (X, Y). This study is the first comprehensive FISH analysis of EBV integration into the chromosomes of the Raji cell line. The findings support the notion that EBV integrates into the Raji cell genome non-randomly.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus (HHV-4) inoculation to rabbits by intranasal and oral routes results in subacute and/or persistent infection dissimilar to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajčáni, Julius; Szenthe, Kalman; Durmanová, Vladimira; Tóth, Agnes; Asványi, Balazs; Pitlik, Ervin; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Szathmary, Susan

    2014-01-01

    We report the infection of New Zealand white rabbits with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV prepared in B95-8 (producer) cells was inoculated to rabbits by combined intranasal and oral routes. Blood and white blood cell (WBC) samples were taken before infection, then on days 8, 28 and 98 post-infection (p.i.). Administration of either 3 × 10(8) (group A, 11 rabbits) or 1 × 10(9) (group B, 10 rabbits) EBV DNA copies per animal induced subacute and/or persistent infection. The IgG antibodies in plasma were detected by ELISA as well as by immunoblot (IB). The IB bands showed mainly antibodies to the BZRF1/Zta transactivation polypeptide (69.2%), the p54 early protein (53.4%) and to the p23 capsid protein (35.8%). No anti-EBNA1 antibody was detected throughout. Viral DNA could be detected by PCR in WBCs and/or spleen of 7 out of 21 infected rabbits (30%), while 60-80% of them showed serologic response. The transiently present EBV DNA was accompanied by LMP1 antigen. Rabbits developed persistent EBV infection in the absence of EBNA1 antibodies and by the lack of typical infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome. The absence of EBNA1 antibody may reflect the lack of EBNA1 in B cells of EBV-inoculated rabbits. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Myxoma Virus: Propagation, Purification, Quantification, and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Smallwood, Sherin E.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Smith, Dorothy W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a member of the Poxviridae family and prototype for the genus Leporipoxvirus. It is pathogenic only for European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), in which it causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis, and for two North American species, Sylvilagus audubonni and Sylvilagus nuttalli, in which it causes a less severe disease. MYXV replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm of the host cell, and its genome encodes 171 open reading frames. A number of these genes encode protei...

  5. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  6. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  7. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  8. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  9. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  10. Dynamical encoding of cursive handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Y; Tishby, N

    1994-01-01

    A model-based approach to on-line cursive handwriting analysis and recognition is presented and evaluated. In this model, on-line handwriting is considered as a modulation of a simple cycloidal pen motion, described by two coupled oscillations with a constant linear drift along the line of the writing. By slow modulations of the amplitudes and phase lags of the two oscillators, a general pen trajectory can be efficiently encoded. These parameters are then quantized into a small number of values without altering the writing intelligibility. A general procedure for the estimation and quantization of these cycloidal motion parameters for arbitrary handwriting is presented. The result is a discrete motor control representation of the continuous pen motion, via the quantized levels of the model parameters. This motor control representation enables successful word spotting and matching of cursive scripts. Our experiments clearly indicate the potential of this dynamic representation for complete cursive handwriting recognition.

  11. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  12. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-16

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low.

  13. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  14. Development of Drugs for Epstein - Barr virus using High-Throughput in silico Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Thompson, Scott; Jiang, Hualiang; Lieberman, Paul M.; Luo, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitious human herpesvirus that is causally associated with endemic forms of Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and lymphoproliferative disease in immunosuppressed individuals. On a global scale, EBV infects over 90% of the adult population and is responsible for ~1% of all human cancers. To date, there is no efficacious drug or therapy for the treatment of EBV infection and EBV-related diseases. Areas covered in this review In this review, we discuss the existing anti-EBV inhibitors and those under development. We discuss the value of different molecular targets, including EBV lytic DNA replication enzymes, as well as proteins that are expressed exclusively during latent infection, like EBNA1 and LMP1. Since the atomic structure of the EBNA1 DNA binding domain has been described, it is an attractive target for in silico methods of drug design and small molecule screening. We discuss the use of computational methods that can greatly facilitate the development of novel inhibitors and how in silico screening methods can be applied to target proteins with known structures, like EBNA1, to treat EBV infection and disease. What the reader will gain The reader will be familiarized with the problems in targeting of EBV for inhibition by small molecules and how computational methods can greatly facilitate this process. Take home message Despite the impressive efficacy of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of herpesvirus lytic infection, there remain few effective treatments for latent infections. Since EBV-latent infection persists within and contributes to the formation of EBV-associated cancers, targeting EBV latent proteins is an unmet medical need. High throughput in silico screening can accelerate the process of drug discovery for novel and selective agents that inhibit EBV latent infection and associated disease. PMID:22822721

  15. Virus world as an evolutionary network of viruses and capsidless selfish elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V

    2014-06-01

    Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus "self" that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral "hallmark genes" encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Virus World as an Evolutionary Network of Viruses and Capsidless Selfish Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolja, Valerian V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus “self” that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral “hallmark genes” encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host. PMID:24847023

  17. New World Bats Harbor Diverse Influenza A Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Suxiang Tong; Xueyong Zhu; Yan Li; Mang Shi; Jing Zhang; Melissa Bourgeois; Hua Yang; Xianfeng Chen; Sergio Recuenco; Jorge Gomez; Li-Mei Chen; Adam Johnson; Ying Tao; Cyrille Dreyfus; Wenli Yu

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Previous studies indicated that a novel influenza A virus (H17N10) was circulating in fruit bats from Guatemala (Central America). Herein, we investigated whether similar viruses are present in bat species from South America. Analysis of rectal swabs from bats sampled in the Amazon rainforest region of Peru identified another new influenza A virus from bats that is phylogenetically distinct from the one identified in Guatemala. The genes that encode the surface proteins of the ...

  18. Novelty's effect on memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Janenaite, Sigita; Meeter, Martijn

    2015-07-01

    It is often thought that novelty benefits memory formation. However, support for this idea mostly comes from paradigms that are open to alternative explanations. In the present study we manipulated novelty in a word-learning task through task-irrelevant background images. These background images were either standard (presented repeatedly), or novel (presented only once). Two types of background images were used: Landscape pictures and fractals. EEG was also recorded during encoding. Contrary to the idea that novelty aids memory formation, memory performance was not affected by the novelty of the background. In the evoked response potentials, we found evidence of distracting effects of novelty: both the N1 and P3b components were smaller to words studied with novel backgrounds, and the amplitude of the N2b component correlated negatively with subsequent retrieval. We conclude that although evidence from other studies does suggest benefits on a longer time scale, novelty has no instantaneous benefits for learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Universal dynamic goniometer for rotary encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Nikolai V.; Latyev, Svjatoslav M.; Naumova, Anastasiia I.

    2017-06-01

    A novel dynamic goniometer for the accuracy of rotary encoders has been developed on the base of the method of comparison with the reference encoder. The set-up of the goniometer considers all constructive and informative characteristics of measured encoders. The novel goniometer construction uses the new compensating method of instrumental errors in automatic working process. The advantages of the dynamic goniometer in combination with an optical rotary encoder at the reduction of the measuring time and a simultaneous increase of the accuracy.

  20. Activation of protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases phosphorylation of the c-erbA-encoded thyroid hormone receptor and of the v-erbA-encoded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, Y; Glineur, C; Gesquière, J C

    1988-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone (T3), which is believed to stimulate transcription from specific target promoters upon binding to cis-acting DNA sequence elements. The v-erbA oncogene of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) encodes a ligand-independent version...... of this nuclear receptor. The v-erbA product inhibits terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts, presumably by affecting the transcription of specific genes. We show here that the c-erbA-encoded nuclear receptor (p46c-erbA) is phosphorylated on serine residues on two distinct sites. One of these sites...

  1. Deciphering the Origin and Evolution of Hepatitis B Viruses by Means of a Family of Non-enveloped Fish Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lauber, Chris; Seitz, Stefan; Mattei, Simone; Suh, Alexander; Beck, Jürgen; Herstein, Jennifer; Börold, Jacob; Salzburger, Walter; Kaderali, Lars; Briggs, John A. G.; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (HBVs), which are enveloped viruses with reverse-transcribed DNA genomes, constitute the family Hepadnaviridae. An outstanding feature of HBVs is their streamlined genome organization with extensive gene overlap. Remarkably, the similar to 1,100 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding the envelope proteins is fully nested within the ORF of the viral replicase P. Here, we report the discovery of a diversified family of fish viruses, designated nackednaviruses, which lack the e...

  2. Spying on cancer: molecular imaging in vivo with genetically encoded reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Shimon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2005-01-01

    Genetically encoded imaging reporters introduced into cells and transgenic animals enable noninvasive, longitudinal studies of dynamic biological processes in vivo. The most common reporters include firefly luciferase (bioluminescence imaging), green fluorescence protein (fluorescence imaging), herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (positron emission tomography), and variants with enhanced spectral and kinetic properties. When cloned into promoter/enhancer sequences or engineered into fusion proteins, imaging reporters allow transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interactions, oncogenic transformation, cell trafficking, and targeted drug action to be spatiotemporally resolved in vivo. Spying on cancer with genetically encoded imaging reporters provides insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal.

  3. Cloning and Analysis of microRNAs Encoded by the Primate γ-Herpesvirus Rhesus Monkey Rhadinovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Cai, Xuezhong; Bilello, John P.; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2007-01-01

    Several pathogenic human herpesviruses have recently been shown to express virally encoded microRNAs in infected cells. Although the function of these microRNAs is largely unknown, they are hypothesized to play a role in mediating viral replication by down-regulating cellular mRNAs encoding antiviral factors. Here, we report the cloning and analysis of microRNAs encoded by Rhesus Monkey Rhadinovirus (RRV), an animal virus model for the pathogenic human γ-herpesvirus Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associate...

  4. [Capping strategies in RNA viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Ferron, François; Imbert, Isabelle; Gluais, Laure; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-04-01

    Most viruses use the mRNA-cap dependent cellular translation machinery to translate their mRNAs into proteins. The addition of a cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is therefore an essential step for the replication of many virus families. Additionally, the cap protects the viral RNA from degradation by cellular nucleases and prevents viral RNA recognition by innate immunity mechanisms. Viral RNAs acquire their cap structure either by using cellular capping enzymes, by stealing the cap of cellular mRNA in a process named "cap snatching", or using virus-encoded capping enzymes. Many viral enzymes involved in this process have recently been structurally and functionally characterized. These studies have revealed original cap synthesis mechanisms and pave the way towards the development of specific inhibitors bearing antiviral drug potential. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  5. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... must additionally provide the following minimum specifications: (1) Encoder programming. Access to encoder programming shall be protected by a lock or other security measures and be configured so that... fundamental frequencies of 853 and 960 Hz and not vary over ±0.5 Hz. (ii) Harmonic Distortion. The total...

  6. Effects of diazepam on encoding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, M.; Eling, P.; Luijtelaar, G. van; Coenen, A.

    1995-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are known to induce amnesic effects. To specify these effects more precisely, 40 healthy volunteers were given 15 mg diazepam or placebo. Effects on a chain of encoding operations were investigated: activation of memory representations, spreading of activation, semantic encoding and

  7. Regularity-Preserving but not Reflecting Encodings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, J.; Grabmayer, C.A.; Hendriks, R.D.A.; Palamidessi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Encodings, that is, injective functions from words to words, have been studied extensively in several settings. In computability theory the notion of encoding is crucial for defining computability on arbitrary domains, as well as for comparing the power of models of computation. In language theory

  8. Cellular encoding for interactive evolutionary robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Gruau; K. Quatramaran

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis work reports experiments in interactive evolutionary robotics. The goal is to evolve an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to control the locomotion of an 8-legged robot. The ANNs are encoded using a cellular developmental process called cellular encoding. In a previous work similar

  9. Encoding information using Laguerre Gaussian modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ben Salem, Amine; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an information encoding protocol using the two degrees of freedom of Laguerre Gaussian modes having different radial and azimuthal components. A novel method, based on digital holography, for information encoding and decoding using different data transmission scenarios is presented. The effects of the atmospheric turbulence introduced in free space communication is discussed as well.

  10. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  11. Self-perpetuating development of encoding biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, P; Hill, T; Sasaki, I

    1989-12-01

    The process of encoding new information involves the imposition of preexisting interpretive categories on newly encountered stimuli, even if the categories do not match perfectly those stimuli. We hypothesized that such encoding of stimuli as supportive of preexisting encoding dispositions may become a source of a perceiver's subjective experiences that support these dispositions. Through this nonconsciously operating mechanism, encoding rules may gradually develop in a self-perpetuating manner, even in the absence of any objectively supportive evidence. Results demonstrated this self-perpetuating process in three studies involving different stimulus materials and experimental tasks (matrix-scanning paradigm and two "intuitive judgment" tasks). The self-perpetuating development of encoding biases is discussed as one of the elementary mechanisms involved in the development of interpretive categories and other individually differentiated cognitive dispositions.

  12. The Arabic Diatessaron Project: Digitalizing, Encoding, Lemmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Lancioni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic Diatessaron Project (henceforth ADP is an international research project in Digital Humanities that aims to collect, digitalise and encode all known manuscripts of the Arabic Diatessaron (henceforth AD, a text that has been relatively neglected in scholarly research. ADP’s final goal is to provide a number of tools that can enable scholars to effectively query, compare and investigate all known variants of the text that will be encoded as far as possible in compliance with the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI guidelines. The paper addresses a number of issues involved in the process of digitalising manuscripts included in the two existing editions (Ciasca 1888 and Marmardji 1935, adding variants in unedited manuscripts, encoding and lemmatising the text. Issues involved in the design of the ADP include presentation of variants, choice of the standard text, applicability of TEI guidelines, automatic translation between different encodings, cross-edition concordances and principles of lemmatisation.

  13. Synthesis of extended nanoscale optical encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Charles E; Kerr, Daniel H S; Lipman, Everett A

    2010-12-15

    An optical encoder is a device that uses an interrupted light source-sensor pair to map linear or rotational motion onto a periodic signal. Simple, inexpensive optical encoders are used for precise positioning in machines such as desktop printers, disk drives, and astronomical telescopes. A strand of DNA labeled with a series of Förster resonance energy transfer acceptor dyes can perform the same function at the nanometer scale, producing a periodic fluorescence signal that encodes the movement of a single donor-labeled molecular motor with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous measurements of this type have employed encoders limited to five acceptor dyes, and hence five signal periods, restricting the range of motion that could be followed. Here we describe two methods for synthesizing double-stranded DNA containing several to hundreds of regularly spaced dyes on one strand. Distinct functional groups incorporated at the encoder ends enable tethering for single-molecule measurements.

  14. Incidental Epstein-Barr virus associated atypical lymphoid proliferation arising in a left atrial myxoma: a case of long survival without any postsurgical treatment and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoloni, Giovanni; Pucci, Angela; Giorlandino, Alexandra; Berretta, Massimiliano; Mignosa, Carmelo; Italia, Fabrizio; Carbone, Antonino; Canzonieri, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of left atrial cardiac myxoma harbouring an incidental atypical B-cell lymphoid proliferation. Histology disclosed classic myxoma cells embedded in a mucopolysaccharide-rich matrix and a micronodular atypical lymphoid proliferation under the surface of the mass. Myxoma cells were immunoreactive for calretinin, while lymphoid cells expressed B lineage markers (CD 20+, CD79a), without evidence of clonality. Moreover, they were LMP1 positive; EBNA2 negative; KSHV/HHV8 negative; and, by in situ hybridization, EBER/Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and Kappa and Lambda negative. According to the 2008 WHO schemes, the present case shares close similarities either with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas growing in the context of long-standing chronic inflammation or with primary effusion lymphomas, solid variant, both associated with EBV infection. This is the sixth case of incidental atypical lymphoid proliferation discovered in a cardiac myxoma reported so far. The optimal treatment of such lesions remains undefined, but their clinical course is indolent. After an accurate staging workup, without any postsurgical treatment, the patient we observed has been well with no recurrence of the disease at 6 years of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) provides survival factors to EBV+diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) lines and modulates cytokine induced specific chemotaxis in EBV+ DLBCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhu, Hong; Ernberg, Ingemar; Kis, Lorand L; Klein, George

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of malignant lymphoma, accounts for 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -positive DLBCL of the elderly is a newly recognized subtype that accounts for 8-10% of DLBCLs in Asian countries, but is less common in Western populations. Five DLBCL-derived cell lines were employed to characterize patterns of EBV latent gene expression, as well as response to cytokines and chemotaxis. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-21 modified LMP1, EBNA1 and EBNA2 expression depending on cell phenotype and type of EBV latent programme (type I, II or III). These cytokines also affected CXCR4- or CCR7-mediated chemotaxis in two of the cell lines, Farage (type III) and Val (type II). Further, we investigated the effect of EBV by using dominant-negative EBV nuclear antigen 1(dnEBNA1) to eliminate EBV genomes. This resulted in decreased chemotaxis. By employing an alternative way to eliminate EBV genomes, Roscovitine, we show an increase of apoptosis in the EBV-positive lines. These results show that EBV plays an important role in EBV-positive DLBCL lines with regard to survival and chemotactic response. Our findings provide evidence for the impact of microenvironment on EBV-carrying DLBCL cells and might have therapeutic implications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  17. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  18. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  19. Encoding of coordination complexes with XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, P; Sankar, P

    2017-09-01

    An in-silico system to encode structure, bonding and properties of coordination complexes is developed. The encoding is achieved through a semantic XML markup frame. Composition of the coordination complexes is captured in terms of central atom and ligands. Structural information of central atom is detailed in terms of electron status of valence electron orbitals. The ligands are encoded with specific reference to the electron environment of ligand centre atoms. Behaviour of ligands to form low or high spin complexes is accomplished by assigning a Ligand Centre Value to every ligand based on the electronic environment of ligand centre atom. Chemical ontologies are used for categorization purpose and to control different hybridization schemes. Complexes formed by the central atoms of transition metal, non-transition elements belonging to s-block, p-block and f-block are encoded with a generic encoding platform. Complexes of homoleptic, heteroleptic and bridged types are also covered by this encoding system. Utility of the encoded system to predict redox electron transfer reaction in the coordination complexes is demonstrated with a simple application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microarray analysis of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai-Balser, Giane M; Duncan, Garry A; Eudy, James D; Wang, Dong; Li, Xiao; Agarkova, Irina V; Dunigan, David D; Van Etten, James L

    2010-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1), a member of the family Phycodnaviridae, is a large double-stranded DNA, plaque-forming virus that infects the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A. The 330-kb PBCV-1 genome is predicted to encode 365 proteins and 11 tRNAs. To monitor global transcription during PBCV-1 replication, a microarray containing 50-mer probes to the PBCV-1 365 protein-encoding genes (CDSs) was constructed. Competitive hybridization experiments were conducted by using cDNAs from poly(A)-containing RNAs obtained from cells at seven time points after virus infection. The results led to the following conclusions: (i) the PBCV-1 replication cycle is temporally programmed and regulated; (ii) 360 (99%) of the arrayed PBCV-1 CDSs were expressed at some time in the virus life cycle in the laboratory; (iii) 227 (62%) of the CDSs were expressed before virus DNA synthesis begins; (iv) these 227 CDSs were grouped into two classes: 127 transcripts disappeared prior to initiation of virus DNA synthesis (considered early), and 100 transcripts were still detected after virus DNA synthesis begins (considered early/late); (v) 133 (36%) of the CDSs were expressed after virus DNA synthesis begins (considered late); and (vi) expression of most late CDSs is inhibited by adding the DNA replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, prior to virus infection. This study provides the first comprehensive evaluation of virus gene expression during the PBCV-1 life cycle.

  1. Lack of Epstein-Barr virus infection in Chinese myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, F; Wei, D; Wang, D; Li, N; Cui, F; Yang, F; Chen, Z; Huang, X

    2013-11-01

    There are three recent contradictory reports on the incidence of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, with all studies carried out in Caucasian patients. The current study evaluated whether Epstein-Barr virus infection had a role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis in a cohort of 30 Chinese patients. Serial paraffin sections of thymic hyperplasia obtained from myasthenia gravis patients were analyzed for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1 and Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Epstein-Barr virus(+) cervical lymph nodes from lymphoma patients and Epstein-Barr virus(-) thymus specimens obtained during cardiac surgery served as the positive and negative control groups, respectively. All the 30 myasthenia gravis specimens were negative for both Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1 and Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 tests. However, we obtained well-characterized membrane and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization staining for both Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA -1, respectively, in the positive control samples. Our results therefore do not support a role of thymic Epstein-Barr virus infection in myasthenia gravis pathogenesis and calls for an integration of methodological and interpretation issues in detecting Epstein-Barr virus incidence in myasthenia gravis patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in children: a disease reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccini, Stefania; Al-Jadiry, Mazin F; Scarpino, Stefania; Ferraro, Daniela; Alsaadawi, Adel R; Al-Darraji, Amir F; Moleti, Maria Luisa; Testi, Anna Maria; Al-Hadad, Salma A; Ruco, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+ DLBCL) is a rare disease in nonimmunocompromised hosts. In a review of 231 cases of malignant lymphoma (87 Hodgkin lymphoma and 144 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) occurring in Iraqi children, 7 cases (5% of NHLs) were classified as EBV+ DLBCL. Six children presented with nodal disease, and 1 presented with extranodal localization (bone). In all cases, the disease was at an advanced clinical stage (III/IV). Evidence of immunodeficiency (Evans syndrome and selective IgA deficiency) was observed in a single case. Two cases were "monomorphic" with immunoblastic histology, and 5 cases were "polymorphic" with histologic aspects reminiscent of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (2 cases) and of CD30+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (3 cases). In all cases, tumor cells were EBV infected (EBER+/LMP-1+), were medium-large B-cells (CD20+/CD79a+/PAX-5+/BOB-1+/OCT-2+) of non-germinal center (non-GC) origin (CD10-/MUM-1+), and had high proliferative activity (50%-70%). Chromosomal translocations involving BCL2, MYC, and IGH genes were not observed. IGH monoclonality could be demonstrated in 3 of 3 investigated cases. Six cases of EBV-negative DLBCL (4% of NHL) were present in the same series. All had monomorphic histology with centroblastic/immunoblastic morphology; 3 cases were of GC type and 3 of non-GC type. Our findings indicate that in Iraq, DLBCLs are 9% of NHLs. Moreover, 2 different types of the disease do exist; the EBV-positive cases, with strong histologic and immunohistochemical resemblance with EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly, and the EBV-negative cases, which are similar to the pediatric DLBCL usually observed in Western populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Retrovirus pol Gene Encodes a Product Required for DNA Integration: Identification of a Retrovirus int Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganiban, Antonito T.; Temin, Howard M.

    1984-12-01

    We mutagenized cloned spleen necrosis virus DNA to identify a region of the retrovirus genome encoding a polypeptide required for integration of viral DNA. Five plasmids bearing different lesions in the 3' end of the pol gene were examined for the ability to integrate or replicate following transfection of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Transfection with one of these DNAs resulted in the generation of mutant virus incapable of integrating but able to replicate at low levels; this phenotype is identical to that of mutants bearing alterations in the cis-acting region, att. To determine whether the 3' end of the pol gene encodes a protein that interacts with att, we did a complementation experiment. Cells were first infected with an att- virus and then superinfected with the integration-deficient virus containing a lesion in the pol gene and a wild-type att site. The results showed that the att- virus provided a trans-acting function allowing integration of viral DNA derived from the mutant bearing a wild-type att site. Thus, the 3' end of the pol gene serves as an ``int'' locus and encodes a protein mediating integration of retrovirus DNA through interaction with att.

  4. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Femke; Drolet, B.S.; Boonstra, Jan; Rijn, Van P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication.

  5. Sequence analysis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus of the American type collected from Danish swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K.G.; Hansen, C.M.; Madsen, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccine-like viruses of American type of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were detected in serum samples by RT-PCR. The viruses were analysed by nucleotide sequencing of the genomic region encoding open reading frames 2 to 7. During the ongoing study of Danish isolates...

  6. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. However...

  7. Serological and genetic characterization of newly isolated Peaton virus in Japan. Brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumori, Y; Inai, K; Yanase, T; Ohashi, S; Kato, T; Yoshida, K; Tsuda, T

    2002-01-01

    The viruses were isolated from the blood of sentinel cattle and Culicoides biting midges in the Kyushu district, southwestern Japan, in 1999 and identified by neutralization tests as Peaton (PEA) viruses. Before this study, PEA virus had been isolated in Australia only. The nucleotide identity of the nucleocapsid (N) protein encoded by the S segment ranged from 91.1 to 91.6% between the Australian and Japanese strains. A phylogenetic analysis of the N protein sequence revealed that the PEA virus strains are closely related to Aino (AIN) virus and suggested reassortment events for PEA and AIN viruses.

  8. Zika Virus: An Emergent Neuropathological Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Martyn K.; Wollebo, Hassen S.; Beckham, J. David; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus in the Americas has followed a pattern that is familiar from earlier epidemics of other viruses, where a new disease is introduced into a human population and then spreads rapidly with important public health consequences. In the case of Zika virus, an accumulating body of recent evidence implicates the virus in the etiology of serious pathologies of the human nervous system, that is, the occurrence of microcephaly in neonates and Guillain–Barré syndrome in adults. Zika virus is an arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) and a member of the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. Zika virions are enveloped and icosahedral, and contain a nonsegmented, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome, which encodes 3 structural and 7 nonstructural proteins that are expressed as a single polyprotein that undergoes cleavage. Zika genomic RNA replicates in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Zika virus was first detected in 1947 in the blood of a febrile monkey in Uganda’s Zika Forest and in crushed suspensions of the Aedes mosquito, which is one of the vectors for Zika virus. The virus remained obscure, with a few human cases confined to Africa and Asia. There are two lineages of the Zika virus, African and Asian, with the Asian strain causing outbreaks in Micronesia in 2007 and French Polynesia in 2013–2014. From here, the virus spread to Brazil with the first report of autochthonous Zika transmission in the Americas in March 2015. The rapid advance of the virus in the Americas and its likely association with microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome make Zika an urgent public health concern. PMID:27464346

  9. Quantitative profiling of housekeeping and Epstein-Barr virus gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines using an oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niggli Felix K

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with lymphoid malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, and can transform human B cells in vitro. EBV-harboring cell lines are widely used to investigate lymphocyte transformation and oncogenesis. Qualitative EBV gene expression has been extensively described, but knowledge of quantitative transcription is lacking. We hypothesized that transcription levels of EBNA1, the gene essential for EBV persistence within an infected cell, are similar in BL cell lines. Results To compare quantitative gene transcription in the BL cell lines Namalwa, Raji, Akata, Jijoye, and P3HR1, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray chip, including 17 housekeeping genes, six latent EBV genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, LMP1, LMP2, and four lytic EBV genes (BZLF1, BXLF2, BKRF2, BZLF2, and used the cell line B95.8 as a reference for EBV gene transcription. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to validate microarray results. We found that transcription levels of housekeeping genes differed considerably among BL cell lines. Using a selection of housekeeping genes with similar quantitative transcription in the tested cell lines to normalize EBV gene transcription data, we showed that transcription levels of EBNA1 were quite similar in very different BL cell lines, in contrast to transcription levels of other EBV genes. As demonstrated with Akata cells, the chip allowed us to accurately measure EBV gene transcription changes triggered by treatment interventions. Conclusion Our results suggest uniform EBNA1 transcription levels in BL and that microarray profiling can reveal novel insights on quantitative EBV gene transcription and its impact on lymphocyte biology.

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNAs are Expressed in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Correlate with Overall Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Ivan, Cristina; Ciccone, Maria; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Ohtsuka, Masahisha; D'Abundo, Lucilla; Qiang, Jun; Lerner, Susan; Nouraee, Nazila; Rabe, Kari G; Rassenti, Laura Z; Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Manning, John T; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Xinna; Shanafelt, Tait D; Wierda, William G; Sabbioni, Silvia; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Estrov, Zeev; Radovich, Milan; Liang, Han; Negrini, Massimo; Kipps, Thomas J; Kay, Neil E; Keating, Michael; Calin, George A

    2015-06-01

    Although numerous studies highlighted the role of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in B-cell transformation, the involvement of EBV proteins or genome in the development of the most frequent adult leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), has not yet been defined. We hypothesized that EBV microRNAs contribute to progression of CLL and demonstrated the presence of EBV miRNAs in B-cells, in paraffin-embedded bone marrow biopsies and in the plasma of patients with CLL by using three different methods (small RNA-sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription PCR [q-RT-PCR] and miRNAs in situ hybridization [miRNA-ISH]). We found that EBV miRNA BHRF1-1 expression levels were significantly higher in the plasma of patients with CLL compared with healthy individuals (p < 0 · 0001). Notably, BHRF1-1 as well as BART4 expression were detected in the plasma of either seronegative or seropositive (anti-EBNA-1 IgG and EBV DNA tested) patients; similarly, miRNA-ISH stained positive in bone marrow specimens while LMP1 and EBER immunohistochemistry failed to detect viral proteins and RNA. We also found that BHRF1-1 plasma expression levels were positively associated with elevated beta-2-microglobulin levels and advanced Rai stages and observed a correlation between higher BHRF1-1 expression levels and shorter survival in two independent patients' cohorts. Furthermore, in the majority of CLL cases where BHRF1-1 was exogenously induced in primary malignant B cells the levels of TP53 were reduced. Our findings suggest that EBV may have a role in the process of disease progression in CLL and that miRNA RT-PCR and miRNAs ISH could represent additional methods to detect EBV miRNAs in patients with CLL.

  11. Lymphocytic Arteritis in Epstein-Barr Virus Vulvar Ulceration (Lipschütz Disease): A Report of 7 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Mary M; Sangüeza, Martin; Werner, Betina; Kutzner, Heinz; Carlson, John A

    2015-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can rarely present as painful genital ulcers, mostly in young female adolescents. Typically diagnosed by clinical findings, EBV vulvar ulceration (EBVVU) is rarely biopsied. Herein, the authors report the histopathology in 8 biopsies from 7 EBVVU patients, all serologically confirmed for acute (4/7) or reactivated-chronic (3/7) EBV infection. The 7 women all presented with 1 or more painful, punched-out vulvar ulcers. Only patients with acute EBV infection showed other clinical findings: fever and/or atypical lymphocytosis affected 75% (3/4); lymphadenopathy in 50%; and malaise/fatigue, dysuria and/or hepatomegaly in 25%. All reactivated-chronic EBVVU had a solitary ulcer, and 2 had history of a similar episode of vulvar ulceration (aphthosis). Histopathologically, lymphocytic arteritis was identified in 88% (7/8); a submucosal scar was found in the eighth specimen. Other histopathologies included venulitis (62%), endarteritis obliterans (38%), thrombosis (25%), neutrophilic sebaceous adenitis (25%), and mucosal lymphoid hyperplasia (12%). Dense angiocentric CD3 CD4 T-cell lymphocyte-predominant infiltrates were found, regionally or diffusely. In 2 specimens, neutrophils compromised half of the infiltrate. Minor components of CD8, CD20, and CD30 lymphocytes, CD123 plasmacytoid monocytes, CD68 macrophages, and plasma cells were present. Small-vessel endothelium and smooth muscle adjacent to the ulcers faintly expressed cytoplasmic EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1). In situ hybridization for early EBV mRNA (EBER) identified rare solitary or scattered clustered positive lymphocytes in 38%. Polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA was positive in one EBER positive biopsy. EBV infection has been documented in muscular vessel vasculitis. Based on the aforementioned, EBVVU appears to be the consequence of localized lymphocytic arteritis.

  12. Epstein–Barr Virus MicroRNAs are Expressed in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Correlate with Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferrajoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous studies highlighted the role of Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV in B-cell transformation, the involvement of EBV proteins or genome in the development of the most frequent adult leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, has not yet been defined. We hypothesized that EBV microRNAs contribute to progression of CLL and demonstrated the presence of EBV miRNAs in B-cells, in paraffin-embedded bone marrow biopsies and in the plasma of patients with CLL by using three different methods (small RNA-sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription PCR [q-RT-PCR] and miRNAs in situ hybridization [miRNA-ISH]. We found that EBV miRNA BHRF1-1 expression levels were significantly higher in the plasma of patients with CLL compared with healthy individuals (p < 0 · 0001. Notably, BHRF1-1 as well as BART4 expression were detected in the plasma of either seronegative or seropositive (anti-EBNA-1 IgG and EBV DNA tested patients; similarly, miRNA-ISH stained positive in bone marrow specimens while LMP1 and EBER immunohistochemistry failed to detect viral proteins and RNA. We also found that BHRF1-1 plasma expression levels were positively associated with elevated beta-2-microglobulin levels and advanced Rai stages and observed a correlation between higher BHRF1-1 expression levels and shorter survival in two independent patients' cohorts. Furthermore, in the majority of CLL cases where BHRF1-1 was exogenously induced in primary malignant B cells the levels of TP53 were reduced. Our findings suggest that EBV may have a role in the process of disease progression in CLL and that miRNA RT-PCR and miRNAs ISH could represent additional methods to detect EBV miRNAs in patients with CLL.

  13. Encoding information using laguerre gaussian modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors experimentally demonstrate an information encoding protocol using the two degrees of freedom of Laguerre Gaussian modes having different radial and azimuthal components. A novel method, based on digital holography, for information...

  14. Sequence analysis of the medium RNA segment of three Simbu serogroup viruses, Akabane, Aino, and Peaton viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Tohru; Yoshida, Kazuo; Ohashi, Seiichi; Kato, Tomoko; Tsuda, Tomoyuki

    2003-05-01

    The sequence analysis was carried out for the medium (M) RNA segment of the Akabane virus (AKAV), Aino virus (AINV), and Peaton virus (PEAV) of the Simbu serogroup of the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. The complementary sequences of the M RNA segments of AKAV, AINV, and PEAV contain a single large open reading frame (ORF), like other orthobunyaviruses. The ORFs potentially encode 1401 amino acids (aa), 1404 aa, and 1400 aa polypeptides, respectively. The identity of the M segment among these viruses is remarkably low, although previous researchers reported that the small RNA segments are highly conserved. Because the M segment codes for the viral surface glycoproteins G1 and G2, the variability of the M segment may affect the antigenicity of these viruses. Phylogenetic studies based on the M and S segment sequences suggested that genetic reassortment has been occurring among ancestral viruses of the three Simbu serogroup viruses throughout their evolution.

  15. African swine fever virus replication and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Linda K; Chapman, David A G; Netherton, Christopher L; Upton, Chris

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large icosahedral DNA virus which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The ASFV double-stranded DNA genome varies in length from about 170 to 193 kbp depending on the isolate and contains between 150 and 167 open reading frames. These are closely spaced and read from both DNA strands. The virus genome termini are covalently closed by imperfectly base-paired hairpin loops that are present in two forms that are complimentary and inverted with respect to each other. Adjacent to the termini are inverted arrays of different tandem repeats. Head to head concatemeric genome replication intermediates have been described. A similar mechanism of replication to Poxviruses has been proposed for ASFV. Virus genome transcription occurs independently of the host RNA polymerase II and virus particles contain all of the enzymes and factors required for early gene transcription. DNA replication begins in perinuclear factory areas about 6h post-infection although an earlier stage of nuclear DNA synthesis has been reported. The virus genome encodes enzymes required for transcription and replication of the virus genome and virion structural proteins. Enzymes that are involved in a base excision repair pathway may be an adaptation to enable virus replication in the oxidative environment of the macrophage cytoplasm. Other ASFV genes encode factors involved in evading host defence systems and modulating host cell function. Variation between the genomes of different ASFV isolates is most commonly due to gain or loss of members of multigene families, MGFs 100, 110, 300, 360, 505/530 and family p22. These are located within the left terminal 40kbp and right terminal 20kbp. ASFV is the only member of the Asfarviridae, which is one of the families within the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus superfamily. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lyttleton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  17. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  18. Reading Neural Encodings using Phase Space Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Tumer, Evren C.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental signals sensed by nervous systems are often represented in spike trains carried from sensory neurons to higher neural functions where decisions and functional actions occur. Information about the environmental stimulus is contained (encoded) in the train of spikes. We show how to "read" the encoding using state space methods of nonlinear dynamics. We create a mapping from spike signals which are output from the neural processing system back to an estimate of the analog input sig...

  19. Genomic characterisation of Almpiwar virus, Harrison Dam virus and Walkabout Creek virus; three novel rhabdoviruses from northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane McAllister

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdoviridae represent a diverse group of viruses with the potential to cause disease in humans, animals and plants. Currently there are nine genera in the family; however a large number of rhabdoviruses remain unassigned. Here we characterise three novel rhabdoviruses genomes. Almpiwar virus (ALMV, isolated from skinks in northern Queensland, is the first completely sequenced rhabdovirus from squamates, with serological studies indicating multiple animal host species. Harrison Dam virus (HARDV and Walkabout Creek virus (WACV were isolated from mosquitoes in the Northern Territory and biting midges in southern Queensland respectively and their vertebrate hosts remain unknown. Serological cross-neutralisation tests with other Australian rhabdoviruses indicate that ALMV, WACV and HARDV are distinct viruses with little antigenic cross-reactivity. Next-generation sequencing revealed that all viruses encode the core proteins common to rhabdoviruses (N, P, M, G and L, plus additional ORFs between the M and G genes. HARDV also contains a small ORF between the G and L genes. Phylogenetic analysis of N and L proteins suggests that HARDV and WACV share a common lineage with the tupaviruses and Sandjimba group, whereas ALMV is a distinct and divergent virus showing no clear relationship to any rhabdovirus except the recently characterised Niahka virus (NIAV.

  20. Acquisition of full-length viral helicase domains by insect retrotransposon-encoded polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina eLazareva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent metagenomic studies in insects identified many sequences unexpectedly closely related to plant virus genes. Here we describe a new example of this kind, insect R1 LINEs with an additional C-terminal domain in their open reading frame 2. This domain is similar to NTPase/helicase (SF1H domains, which are found in replicative proteins encoded by plant viruses of the genus Tobamovirus. We hypothesize that the SF1H domain could be acquired by LINEs, directly or indirectly, upon insect feeding on virus-infected plants. Possible functions of this domain in LINE transposition and involvement in LINEs counteraction the silencing-based cell defense against retrotransposons are discussed.

  1. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  2. Viral exploitation of the MEK/ERK pathway - A tale of vaccinia virus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2017-07-01

    The VACV replication cycle is remarkable in the sense that it is performed entirely in the cytoplasmic compartment of vertebrate cells, due to its capability to encode enzymes required either for regulating the macromolecular precursor pool or the biosynthetic processes. Although remarkable, this gene repertoire is not sufficient to confer the status of a free-living microorganism to the virus, and, consequently, the virus relies heavily on the host to successfully generate its progeny. During the complex virus-host interaction, viruses must deal not only with the host pathways to accomplish their temporal demands but also with pathways that counteract viral infection, including the inflammatory, innate and acquired immune responses. This review focuses on VACV and other DNA or RNA viruses that stimulate the MEK (MAPK - Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase)/ERK- Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase) pathway as part of their replication cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The molecular biology of Bluetongue virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Avnish; Roy, Polly

    2014-03-01

    The members of Orbivirus genus within the Reoviridae family are arthropod-borne viruses which are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in ruminants. Bluetongue virus (BTV) which causes disease in livestock (sheep, goat, cattle) has been in the forefront of molecular studies for the last three decades and now represents the best understood orbivirus at a molecular and structural level. The complex nature of the virion structure has been well characterised at high resolution along with the definition of the virus encoded enzymes required for RNA replication; the ordered assembly of the capsid shell as well as the protein and genome sequestration required for it; and the role of host proteins in virus entry and virus release. More recent developments of Reverse Genetics and Cell-Free Assembly systems have allowed integration of the accumulated structural and molecular knowledge to be tested at meticulous level, yielding higher insight into basic molecular virology, from which the rational design of safe efficacious vaccines has been possible. This article is centred on the molecular dissection of BTV with a view to understanding the role of each protein in the virus replication cycle. These areas are important in themselves for BTV replication but they also indicate the pathways that related viruses, which includes viruses that are pathogenic to man and animals, might also use providing an informed starting point for intervention or prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Giant viruses of amoebas: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eAherfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreoever, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages.

  5. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Purification and crystallization of Kokobera virus helicase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colibus, Luigi; Speroni, Silvia [Department of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Coutard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS et Université Aix-Marseille I et II, ESIL, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 09 (France); Forrester, Naomi L.; Gould, Ernest [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (formerly Institute of Virology), Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3SR (United Kingdom); Canard, Bruno [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS et Université Aix-Marseille I et II, ESIL, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille CEDEX 09 (France); Mattevi, Andrea, E-mail: mattevi@ipvgen.unipv.it [Department of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2007-03-01

    Kokobera virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus belonging, like West Nile virus, to the Japanese encephalitis virus serocomplex. Crystals of the Kokobera virus helicase domain were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and exhibit a diffraction limit of 2.3 Å. Kokobera virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus belonging, like West Nile virus, to the Japanese encephalitis virus serocomplex. The flavivirus genus is characterized by a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome. The unique open reading frame of the viral RNA is transcribed and translated as a single polyprotein which is post-translationally cleaved to yield three structural and seven nonstructural proteins, one of which is the NS3 gene that encodes a C-terminal helicase domain consisting of 431 amino acids. Helicase inhibitors are potential antiviral drugs as the helicase is essential to viral replication. Crystals of the Kokobera virus helicase domain were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = 88.6, c = 138.6 Å, and exhibit a diffraction limit of 2.3 Å.

  7. Encoder: a connectionist model of how learning to visually encode fixated text images improves reading fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gale L

    2004-07-01

    This article proposes that visual encoding learning improves reading fluency by widening the span over which letters are recognized from a fixated text image so that fewer fixations are needed to cover a text line. Encoder is a connectionist model that learns to convert images like the fixated text images human readers encode into the corresponding letter sequences. The computational theory of classification learning predicts that fixated text-image size makes this learning difficult but that reducing image variability and biasing learning should help. Encoder confirms these predictions. It fails to learn as image size increases but achieves humanlike visual encoding accuracy when image variability is reduced by regularities in fixation positions and letter sequences and when learning is biased to discover mapping functions based on the sequential, componential structure of text. After training, Encoder exhibits many humanlike text familiarity effects. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  8. Involvement of C4 protein of beet severe curly top virus (family Geminiviridae in virus movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunling Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV is a leafhopper transmitted geminivirus with a monopartite genome. C4 proteins encoded by geminivirus play an important role in virus/plant interaction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To understand the function of C4 encoded by BSCTV, two BSCTV mutants were constructed by introducing termination codons in ORF C4 without affecting the amino acids encoded by overlapping ORF Rep. BSCTV mutants containing disrupted ORF C4 retained the ability to replicate in Arabidopsis protoplasts and in the agro-inoculated leaf discs of N. benthamiana, suggesting C4 is not required for virus DNA replication. However, both mutants did not accumulate viral DNA in newly emerged leaves of inoculated N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis, and the inoculated plants were asymptomatic. We also showed that C4 expression in plant could help C4 deficient BSCTV mutants to move systemically. C4 was localized in the cytosol and the nucleus in both Arabidopsis protoplasts and N. benthamiana leaves and the protein appeared to bind viral DNA and ds/ssDNA nonspecifically, displaying novel DNA binding properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that C4 protein in BSCTV is involved in symptom production and may facilitate virus movement instead of virus replication.

  9. Extraterrestrial Viruses?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado Hernández, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Life - Origin and Fundamentals of Living Things. Evaluation rubric to evaluate the debate and presentation about the point of view regarding the possibility of viruses from the outer space.

  10. Zika Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especi...

  11. Method of implementing frequency-encoded NOT, OR and NOR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this context, polarization encoding technique, intensity-based encoding technique, tristate and quaternary logic operation, multivalued logic operations, symbolic substitution techniques etc. may be mentioned. Very recently, frequency encoding/decoding technique has drawn interest from the scientific community.

  12. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  13. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle disease virus ( ...

  14. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  15. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Nidom, Chairul A; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-02

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development.

  16. An information theoretic characterisation of auditory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Overath

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The entropy metric derived from information theory provides a means to quantify the amount of information transmitted in acoustic streams like speech or music. By systematically varying the entropy of pitch sequences, we sought brain areas where neural activity and energetic demands increase as a function of entropy. Such a relationship is predicted to occur in an efficient encoding mechanism that uses less computational resource when less information is present in the signal: we specifically tested the hypothesis that such a relationship is present in the planum temporale (PT. In two convergent functional MRI studies, we demonstrated this relationship in PT for encoding, while furthermore showing that a distributed fronto-parietal network for retrieval of acoustic information is independent of entropy. The results establish PT as an efficient neural engine that demands less computational resource to encode redundant signals than those with high information content.

  17. Encoding Microreactors with Droplet Chains in Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenya; Lin, Gungun; Ge, Jin; Fassbender, Jürgen; Makarov, Denys

    2017-12-13

    Droplet-based high throughput biomolecular screening and combinatorial synthesis entail a viable indexing strategy to be developed for the identification of each microreactor. Here, we propose a novel indexing scheme based on the generation of droplet sequences on demand to form unique encoding droplet chains in fluidic networks. These codes are represented by multiunit and multilevel droplets packages, with each code unit possessing several distinct signal levels, potentially allowing large encoding capacity. For proof of concept, we use magnetic nanoparticles as the encoding material and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor-based active sorting system supplemented with an optical detector to generate and decode the sequence of one exemplar sample droplet reactor and a 4-unit quaternary magnetic code. The indexing capacity offered by 4-unit multilevel codes with this indexing strategy is estimated to exceed 104, which holds great promise for large-scale droplet-based screening and synthesis.

  18. Influence of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen EBNA 2 on the growth phenotype of virus-transformed B cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Rickinson, A B; Young, L S; M. Rowe

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) isolates show sequence divergence in the BamHI YH region of the genome which encodes the nuclear antigen EBNA 2, a protein thought to be involved in the initiation of virus-induced B-cell transformation; type A isolates (such as B95-8 EBV) encode a 82- to 87-kilodalton EBNA 2A protein, whereas type B isolates (such as AG876 EBV) encode an antigenically distinct 75-kilodalton EBNA 2B protein. In the present work 12 type A isolates and 8 type B isolates have been compar...

  19. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  20. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Ohs

    Full Text Available Interleukins (IL are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70 in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  1. Giant Viruses of Amoebae: A Journey Through Innovative Research and Paradigm Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2017-09-29

    Giant viruses of amoebae were discovered serendipitously in 2003; they are visible via optical microscopy, making them bona fide microbes. Their lifestyle, structure, and genomes break the mold of classical viruses. Giant viruses of amoebae are complex microorganisms. Their genomes harbor between 444 and 2,544 genes, including many that are unique to viruses, and encode translation components; their virions contain >100 proteins as well as mRNAs. Mimiviruses have a specific mobilome, including virophages, provirophages, and transpovirons, and can resist virophages through a system known as MIMIVIRE (mimivirus virophage resistance element). Giant viruses of amoebae bring upheaval to the definition of viruses and tend to separate the current virosphere into two categories: very simple viruses and viruses with complexity similar to that of other microbes. This new paradigm is propitious for enhanced detection and characterization of giant viruses of amoebae, and a particular focus on their role in humans is warranted.

  2. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  3. Viruses Avian influenza, bovine herpes, bovine viral diarrhea virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus I, influenza, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, measles, papilloma, rabies, respiratory syncitial virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, simian virus 40. Bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Moraxella bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, ...

  4. Genome organization and transcriptional regulation of respiratory syncytial virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analyze the RS virus order of transcription, gene organization and transcriptional regulation to determine other unique RS virus features and better compare RS virus to other paramyxoviruses. The number of viral promoters and the order of transcription was determined using UV inactivation experiments. RNA transcribed from UV damaged genomes was analyzed by gel electrophoresis and dot blot hybridization. These experiments revealed that RS virus has a single transcriptional promoter, as has been shown for other paramyxoviruses. Also like other paramyxoviruses, the gene encoding the major nucleocapsid protein (N) lies close to the promoter site at the 3' end of the genome while the gene presumed to encode the viral polymerase is found at the 5' end of the genome. However, unlike other paramyxoviruses, two genes coding for small, unique nonstructural proteins lie before the N gene at the 3' end of the genome.

  5. Cloned genome of infectious hepatitis C virus of genotype 2A and uses thereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses nucleic acid sequence which encodes infectious hepatitis C virus of strain HC-J6.sub.CH, genotype 2a, and the use of the sequence, and polypeptides encoded by all or part of the sequence, in the development of vaccines and diagnostics for HCV and in the development...

  6. Computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, F.B.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protection mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.

  7. Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 gene in rodent and primate cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Whang, Y.; Silberklang, M; Morgan, A; Munshi, S; Lenny, A B; Ellis, R.W.; Kieff, E

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the Epstein-Barr virus envelope glycoproteins gp350 and gp220 was inserted downstream of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early, Moloney murine leukemia virus, mouse mammary tumor virus, or varicella-zoster virus gpI promoters in vectors containing selectable markers. Host cell and recombinant vector systems were defined which enabled the isolation of rodent or primate cell clones which expressed gp350/220 in substantial quantities. Continued expression of gp350/220 required ma...

  8. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groof, Ad; Guelen, Lars; Deijs, Martin; van der Wal, Yorick; Miyata, Masato; Ng, Kah Sing; van Grinsven, Lotte; Simmelink, Bartjan; Biermann, Yvonne; Grisez, Luc; van Lent, Jan; de Ronde, Anthony; Chang, Siow Foong; Schrier, Carla; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-08-01

    From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch's postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease.

  9. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Encoding and Decoding Procedures for Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Babaev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an algorithm based on the encoding procedure for representing a set of arrangement elements as a single number. Also the author provides the procedure for the inverse transformation of the code into arrangement elements. In addition the Article includes recommendations on the use of the above procedures in combinatorial algorithms of optimization.

  11. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  12. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    Brain - Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain - Machine Interface 5b...Stanford Artificial Retina 15. SUBJECT TERMS Artificial retina, Retinal prosthesis, Brain - machine interface , Brain -computer interface ,

  13. Evaluative and Taxonomic Encoding in Children's Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kail, Robert V., Jr.; Schroll, John T.

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the development of evaluative and taxonomic encoding in children's memory. The task used was a modification of the Wickens short-term memory task in which subjects' recall of words is tested following a distraction task. The first experiment found that 11-year-old children, but not 8-year-old children,…

  14. Visual Memory : The Price of Encoding Details

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenstein, Mark; Kromm, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Studies on visual long-term memory have shown that we have a tremendous capacity for remembering pictures of objects, even at a highly detailed level. What remains unclear, however, is whether encoding objects at such a detailed level comes at any cost. In the current study, we examined how the

  15. Letter-Position Encoding and Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Carol; Cornelissen, Piers

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on applying the SERIOL model of orthographic processing to dyslexia. The model is extended to include a phonological route and reading acquisition. We propose that the temporal alignment of serial orthographic and phonological representations is a key aspect of learning to read, driving the formation of a phonemic encoding.…

  16. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Plasmid- Encoded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the distribution of plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lacatamases (ESBLs) in Lahore, Pakistan using different phenotypic and molecular methods. Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested ...

  17. Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1976-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, which produced 20 per cent mortality when it first occured during 1967 in Germany and Yugoslavia, recently appeared again in South Africa. The source of the first outbreak was monkeys shipped from Africa; the origin of the second episode is unclear. Because distribution of the virus in nature is unknown, its threat to man cannot be readily determined. Differential laboratory diagnoses of hemorrhagic fevers should be encouraged in order to learn more about the epidemiology of these diseases and to better assess the risks which their etiologic agents may pose for attending medical personnel.

  18. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noga Oren

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, which is evident in the prefrontal cortex sections of the task positive network (TPN, and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, a hub of the default mode network (DMN. Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC. These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the task increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the frontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the frontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed correlation between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points to this

  19. Chlorovirus PBCV-1 Encodes an Active Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ming; Duncan, Garry A.; Kuszynski, Charles; Oyler, George; Zheng, Jiayin; Becker, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are metalloproteins that protect organisms from toxic reactive oxygen species by catalyzing the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. Chlorovirus PBCV-1 encodes a 187-amino-acid protein that resembles a Cu-Zn SOD with all of the conserved amino acid residues for binding copper and zinc (named cvSOD). cvSOD has an internal Met that results in a 165-amino-acid protein (named tcvSOD). Both cvSOD and tcvSOD recombinant proteins inhibited nitroblue tetrazolium reduction of superoxide anion generated in a xanthine-xanthine oxidase system in solution. tcvSOD was chosen for further characterization because it was easier to produce. Recombinant tcvSOD also inhibited a riboflavin photochemical reduction system in a polyacrylamide gel assay, which was blocked by the Cu-Zn SOD inhibitor cyanide but not by azide, which inhibits Fe and Mn SODs. A kcat/Km value for cvSOD was determined by stop-flow spectrophotometry as 1.28 × 108 M−1 s−1, suggesting that cvSOD-catalyzed O2− dismutation was not a diffusion controlled encounter. The cvsod gene was expressed as a late gene, and cvSOD activity was detected in purified virions. Superoxide accumulated rapidly during virus infection, and circumstantial evidence indicates that cvSOD aids its decomposition to benefit virus replication. Cu-Zn SOD homologs have been described to occur in 3 other families of large DNA viruses, poxviruses, baculoviruses, and mimiviruses, which group as a clade. Interestingly, cvSOD does not group in the same clade as the other virus SODs but instead groups in an expanded clade that includes Cu-Zn SODs from many cellular organisms. IMPORTANCE Virus infection often leads to an increase in toxic reactive oxygen species in the host, which can be detrimental to virus replication. Viruses have developed various ways to overcome this barrier. As reported in this article, the chloroviruses often encode and package a functional Cu

  20. Genome Sequencing of the Behavior Manipulating Virus LbFV Reveals a Possible New Virus Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, David; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Varaldi, Julien

    2016-12-01

    Parasites are sometimes able to manipulate the behavior of their hosts. However, the molecular cues underlying this phenomenon are poorly documented. We previously reported that the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi which develops from Drosophila larvae is often infected by an inherited DNA virus. In addition to being maternally transmitted, the virus benefits from horizontal transmission in superparasitized larvae (Drosophila that have been parasitized several times). Interestingly, the virus forces infected females to lay eggs in already parasitized larvae, thus increasing the chance of being horizontally transmitted. In a first step towards the identification of virus genes responsible for the behavioral manipulation, we present here the genome sequence of the virus, called LbFV. The sequencing revealed that its genome contains an homologous repeat sequence (hrs) found in eight regions in the genome. The presence of this hrs may explain the genomic plasticity that we observed for this genome. The genome of LbFV encodes 108 ORFs, most of them having no homologs in public databases. The virus is however related to Hytrosaviridae, although distantly. LbFV may thus represent a member of a new virus family. Several genes of LbFV were captured from eukaryotes, including two anti-apoptotic genes. More surprisingly, we found that LbFV captured from an ancestral wasp a protein with a Jumonji domain. This gene was afterwards duplicated in the virus genome. We hypothesized that this gene may be involved in manipulating the expression of wasp genes, and possibly in manipulating its behavior.

  1. Infection of primary CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus enhances human immunodeficiency virus expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, M; Zhang, R D; Wu, B; Henderson, E E

    1996-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes purified from normal adult donors by flow cytometry could be infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as measured by the accumulation of components of the EBV replicative cycle, viral DNA and viral transcripts encoding EBER1 and BRLF1. EBV infection resulted in enhanced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB in CD4+ lymphocytes as measured by accumulation of reverse transcriptase and formation of syncytia. Furthermore, a small percentage of C...

  2. Identification and phylogeny of a protein kinase gene of white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virus infecting shrimp and other crustaceans, which is unclassified taxonomically. A 2193 bp long open reading frame, encoding a putative protein kinase (PK), was found on a 8.4 kb EcoRI fragment of WSSV proximal to the gene for the major envelope protein

  3. Contribution of Sec61α to the Life Cycle of Ebola Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, Ayaka; Halfmann, Peter; Noda, Takeshi; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Shinji; Shimojima, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tokiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Background. Similar to other viruses, the viral proteins of Ebola virus (EBOV) interact with a variety of host proteins for its replication. Of the 7 structural proteins encoded in the EBOV genome, VP24 is the smallest and is multifunctional.

  4. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype SAT 3 in Long-Horned Ankole Calf, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom

    2015-01-01

    After a 16-year interval, foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 was isolated in 2013 from an apparently healthy long-horned Ankole calf that grazed close to buffalo in Uganda. The emergent virus strain is ≈20% different in nucleotide sequence (encoding VP1 [viral protein 1]) from its closest...

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 in long-horned Ankole calf, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Namatovu, Alice; Ruhweza, Simon; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Normann, Preben; Belsham, Graham J

    2015-01-01

    After a 16-year interval, foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype SAT 3 was isolated in 2013 from an apparently healthy long-horned Ankole calf that grazed close to buffalo in Uganda. The emergent virus strain is ≈20% different in nucleotide sequence (encoding VP1 [viral protein 1]) from its closest relatives isolated previously from buffalo in Uganda.

  6. Experimental tests of host-virus coevolution in natural killer yeast strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieczynska, M.D.; Korona, R.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Fungi may carry cytoplasmic viruses that encode anticompetitor toxins. These so-called killer viruses may provide competitive benefits to their host, but also incur metabolic costs associated with viral replication, toxin production and immunity. Mechanisms responsible for the stable maintenance

  7. Novel RNA Virus Genome Discovered in Ghost Ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum) from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, Laura E; Mordecai, Gideon J; Pachori, Purnima; Martin, Stephen J

    2017-07-27

    Here, we report the full-genome sequence of Milolii virus, a novel single-stranded (positive-sense) RNA virus discovered from Tapinoma melanocephalum ants in Hawaii. The genome is 10,475 nucleotides long, encoding a polyprotein of 3,304 amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Brettell et al.

  8. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    system implemented on the Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). ... UL43 gene of HSV-1 encodes a non- glycosylated transmembrane protein which is conserved only in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses [8]. The HSV-1 UL43 has been ... AG-3'), which mutates the initiation codon from.

  9. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  10. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. NF-κB directly mediates epigenetic deregulation of common microRNAs in Epstein-Barr virus-mediated transformation of B-cells and in lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento-Tormo, Roser; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Lisio, Lorena Di; Islam, Abul B M M K; Urquiza, Jose M; Hernando, Henar; López-Bigas, Nuria; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Martínez, Nerea; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Piris, Miguel A; Ballestar, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have negative effects on gene expression and are major players in cell function in normal and pathological conditions. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of resting B lymphocytes results in their growth transformation and associates with different B cell lymphomas. EBV-mediated B cell transformation involves large changes in gene expression, including cellular miRNAs. We performed miRNA expression analysis in growth transformation of EBV-infected B cells. We observed predominant downregulation of miRNAs and upregulation of a few miRNAs. We observed similar profiles of miRNA expression in B cells stimulated with CD40L/IL-4, and those infected with EBNA-2- and LMP-1-deficient EBV particles, suggesting the implication of the NF-kB pathway, common to all four situations. In fact, the NF-kB subunit p65 associates with the transcription start site (TSS) of both upregulated and downregulated miRNAs following EBV infection This occurs together with changes at histone H3K27me3 and histone H3K4me3. Inhibition of the NF-kB pathway impairs changes in miRNA expression, NF-kB binding and changes at the above histone modifications near the TSS of these miRNA genes. Changes in expression of these miRNAs also occurred in diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL), which are strongly NF-kB dependent. Our results highlight the relevance of the NF-kB pathway in epigenetically mediated miRNA control in B cell transformation and DLBCL. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Viral microRNAs targeting virus genes promote virus infection in shrimp in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaodong; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Viral microRNAs (miRNAs), most of which are characterized in cell lines, have been found to play important roles in the virus life cycle to avoid attack by the host immune system or to keep virus in the latency state. Viral miRNAs targeting virus genes can inhibit virus infection. In this study, in vivo findings in Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp revealed that the viral miRNAs could target virus genes and further promote the virus infection. The results showed that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-encoded miRNAs WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 were transcribed at the early stage of WSSV infection. When the expression of WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 was silenced with sequence-specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), the number of copies of WSSV and the WSSV-infected shrimp mortality were significantly decreased, indicating that the two viral miRNAs had a great effect on virus infection. It was revealed that the WSSV wsv094 and wsv177 genes were the targets of WSSV-miR-66 and that the wsv248 and wsv309 genes were the targets of WSSV-miR-68. The data demonstrate that the four target genes play negative roles in the WSSV infection. The targeting of the four virus genes by WSSV-miR-66 and WSSV-miR-68 led to the promotion of virus infection. Therefore, our in vivo findings show a novel aspect of viral miRNAs in virus-host interactions.

  13. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  14. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae. Final technical report, June 1, 1989--February 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    We have isolated and partially characterized many large, polyhedral, DNA containing, plaque forming viruses which infect certain unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green algae. These viruses have several unique features, including the fact that they code for DNA site-specific endonucleases and DNA methyltransferases. The primary objectives of this study were to identify, clone, and characterize some of the virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases and DNA restriction endonucleases in order to understand their biological function.

  15. Human genome contains four genes homologous to transforming genes of Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, E H; Gonda, M A; Ellis, R.W.; Scolnick, E M; Lowy, D R

    1982-01-01

    Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses each encode a structurally and functionally related 21-kilodalton protein (p21), which is the transforming protein of each virus. Using probes from the 0.9-kilobase (kb) p21-coding region of each virus (called v-Ha-ras and v-Ki-ras, respectively), we have molecularly cloned from normal human genomic DNA the sequences that hybridize to these probes. Four evolutionarily divergent restriction endonuclease fragments were isolated. Two hybridized preferent...

  16. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  17. Safety and immunogenicity of novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines based on the RSV viral proteins F, N and M2-1 encoded by simian adenovirus (PanAd3-RSV) and MVA (MVA-RSV); protocol for an open-label, dose-escalation, single-centre, phase 1 clinical trial in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C A; Scarselli, E; Voysey, M; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Nicosia, A; Cortese, R; Thompson, A J; Sande, C S; de Lara, Catherine; Klenerman, P; Pollard, A J

    2015-10-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes respiratory disease throughout life, with infants and the elderly at risk of severe disease and death. RSV001 is a phase 1 (first-in-man), open-label, dose-escalation, clinical trial of novel genetic viral-vectored vaccine candidates PanAd3-RSV and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-RSV. The objective of RSV001 is to characterise the (primary objective) safety and (secondary objective) immunogenicity of these vaccines in healthy younger and older adults. Heterologous and homologous 'prime'/boost combinations of PanAd3-RSV and single-dose MVA-RSV are evaluated in healthy adults. 40 healthy adults aged 18-50 years test one of four combinations of intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) PanAd3-RSV prime and IM PanAd3 or IM MVA-RSV boost vaccination, starting at a low dose for safety. The following year an additional 30 healthy adults aged 60-75 years test either a single dose of IM MVA-RSV, one of three combinations of IN or IM PanAd3-RSV prime and PanAd3-RSV or MVA-RSV boost vaccination used in younger volunteers, and a non-vaccinated control group. Study participants are self-selected volunteers who satisfy the eligibility criteria and are assigned to study groups by sequential allocation. Safety assessment includes the daily recording of solicited and unsolicited adverse events for 1 week after vaccination, as well as visit (nursing) observations and safety bloods obtained at all scheduled attendances. Laboratory measures of RSV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses after vaccination will address the secondary end points. All study procedures are performed at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Oxford, UK. RSV001 has clinical trial authorisation from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and ethics approval from NRES Berkshire (reference 13/SC/0023). All study procedures adhere to International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Good Clinical

  18. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  20. Parameter Estimation of Turbo Code Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reconstruction of a channel code consists of finding out its design parameters solely based on its output. This paper investigates the problem of reconstruction of parallel turbo codes. Reconstruction of a turbo code has been addressed in the literature assuming that some of the parameters of the turbo encoder, such as the number of input and output bits of the constituent encoders and puncturing pattern, are known. However in practical noncooperative situations, these parameters are unknown and should be estimated before applying reconstruction process. Considering such practical situations, this paper proposes a novel method to estimate the above-mentioned code parameters. The proposed algorithm increases the efficiency of the reconstruction process significantly by judiciously reducing the size of search space based on an analysis of the observed channel code output. Moreover, simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is highly robust against channel errors when it is fed with noisy observations.

  1. Alteration in the chloroplastic metabolism leads to ROS accumulation in pea plants in response to plum pox virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Díaz-Vivancos; María José Clemente-Moreno; Manuel Rubio; Enrique Olmos; Juan Antonio García; Pedro Martínez-Gómez; José Antonio Hernández

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a recombinant plum pox virus (PPV, Sharka) encoding green fluorescent protein is used to study its effect on antioxidant enzymes and protein expression at the subcellular level in pea plants (cv. Alaska...

  2. An Encoding of XQuery in Prolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros-Jiménez, Jesús M.

    In this paper we describe the implementation of (a subset of) the XQuery language using logic programming (in particular, by means of Prolog). Such implementation has been developed using the Prolog interpreter SWI-Prolog. XML files are handled by means of the XML Library of SWI-Prolog. XPath/XQuery are encoded by means of Prolog rules. Such Prolog rules are executed in order to obtain the answer of the query.

  3. Toward Chemical Implementation of Encoded Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Janda, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    The recent application of "combinatorial libraries" to supplement existing drug screening processes might simplify and accelerate the search for new lead compounds or drugs. Recently, a scheme for encoded combinatorial chemistry was put forward to surmount a number of the limitations possessed...... by existing methodologies. Here we detail the synthesis of several matrices and the necessary chemistry to implement the conceptual scheme. In addition, we disclose how this novel technology permits a controlled ′dendritic" display of the chemical libraries....

  4. An Intensional Concurrent Faithful Encoding of Turing Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Given-Wilson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The benchmark for computation is typically given as Turing computability; the ability for a computation to be performed by a Turing Machine. Many languages exploit (indirect encodings of Turing Machines to demonstrate their ability to support arbitrary computation. However, these encodings are usually by simulating the entire Turing Machine within the language, or by encoding a language that does an encoding or simulation itself. This second category is typical for process calculi that show an encoding of lambda-calculus (often with restrictions that in turn simulates a Turing Machine. Such approaches lead to indirect encodings of Turing Machines that are complex, unclear, and only weakly equivalent after computation. This paper presents an approach to encoding Turing Machines into intensional process calculi that is faithful, reduction preserving, and structurally equivalent. The encoding is demonstrated in a simple asymmetric concurrent pattern calculus before generalised to simplify infinite terms, and to show encodings into Concurrent Pattern Calculus and Psi Calculi.

  5. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Blind Identification of Convolutional Encoder Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojing Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a solution to the blind parameter identification of a convolutional encoder. The problem can be addressed in the context of the noncooperative communications or adaptive coding and modulations (ACM for cognitive radio networks. We consider an intelligent communication receiver which can blindly recognize the coding parameters of the received data stream. The only knowledge is that the stream is encoded using binary convolutional codes, while the coding parameters are unknown. Some previous literatures have significant contributions for the recognition of convolutional encoder parameters in hard-decision situations. However, soft-decision systems are applied more and more as the improvement of signal processing techniques. In this paper we propose a method to utilize the soft information to improve the recognition performances in soft-decision communication systems. Besides, we propose a new recognition method based on correlation attack to meet low signal-to-noise ratio situations. Finally we give the simulation results to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  7. Shift-encoded optically multiplexed imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vinay; Rachlin, Yaron; Shepard, R. Hamilton; Shih, Tina

    2017-04-01

    In a multiplexed image, multiple fields-of-view (FoVs) are superimposed onto a common focal plane. The attendant gain in sensor FoV provides a new degree of freedom in the design of an imaging system, allowing for performance tradeoffs not available in traditional optical designs. We explore design choices relating to a shift-encoded optically multiplexed imaging system and discuss their performance implications. Unlike in a traditional imaging system, a single multiplexed image has a fundamental ambiguity regarding the location of objects in the image. We present a system that can shift each FoV independently to break this ambiguity and compare it to other potential disambiguation techniques. We then discuss the optical, mechanical, and encoding design choices of a shift-encoding midwave infrared imaging system that multiplexes six 15×15 deg FoVs onto a single one megapixel focal plane. Using this sensor, we demonstrate a computationally demultiplexed wide FoV video.

  8. Mengenal Hanta Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijayanti, Tri

    2009-01-01

    Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).

  9. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of closely related potyviruses infecting sweet potato determined by genomic characterization of Sweet potato virus G and Sweet potato virus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Xu, Donglin; Abad, Jorge; Li, Ruhui

    2012-08-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of Sweet potato virus G (SPVG) and Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2) were determined to be 10,800 and 10,731 nucleotides, respectively, excluding the 3'-poly(A) tail. Their genomic organizations are typical of potyviruses, encoding a polyprotein which is likely cleaved into 10 mature proteins by three viral proteinases. Conserved motifs of orthologous proteins of viruses in the genus Potyvirus are found in corresponding positions of both viruses. Pairwise comparisons of individual protein sequences of the two viruses with those of 78 other potyviruses show that P1 protein and coat protein (CP) of both viruses are significantly large, with the SPVG CP as the largest among the all the known species of the genus Potyvirus. The extended N-terminal region of the P1 protein is conserved in the potyviruses and ipomovirus infecting sweet potato. A novel ORF, PISPO, is identified within the P1 region of SPVG, SPV2, Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), and Sweet potato virus C (SPVC). The C-terminal half of CP is highly conserved among SPFMV, SPVC, SPVG, SPV2, and Sweet potato virus-Zimbabwe. Phylogenetic analysis based on the deduced CP amino acid sequences supports the view that these five viruses are grouped together in a SPFMV lineage. The analysis also reveals that Sweet potato virus Y and Ipomoea vein mosaic virus are grouped with SPV2 as one species, and these two viruses should be consolidated with SPV2.

  11. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Encoding the Codon-Optimized F Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V.; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the c...

  12. Quantitative analysis of clinically relevant mutations occurring in lymphoid cells harboring γ-retrovirus-encoded hsvtk suicide genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Olszewska, M; Capacio, V; Stefanski, J; Przybylowski, M.; Samakoglu, S; Chang, AH; Sadelain, M.; Rivière, I

    2008-01-01

    The in vivo regulation of T lymphocyte activity by the activation of a suicide mechanism is an essential paradigm for the safety of adoptive cell therapies. In light of reports showing that γ-retroviral vector-encoded herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (hsvtk) undergoes recombination, we undertook a thorough investigation of the genomic stability of SFG-based vectors using two variants of the wild-type hsvtk gene. In a large panel of independent clones, we demonstrate that both hsvtk genes...

  13. A dsRNA virus with filamentous viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hengxia; Dong, Kaili; Zhou, Lingling; Wang, Guoping; Hong, Ni; Jiang, Daohong; Xu, Wenxing

    2017-08-01

    Viruses with double-stranded RNA genomes form isometric particles or are capsidless. Here we report a double-stranded RNA virus, Colletotrichum camelliae filamentous virus 1 (CcFV-1) isolated from a fungal pathogen, that forms filamentous particles. CcFV-1 has eight genomic double-stranded RNAs, ranging from 990 to 2444 bp, encoding 10 putative open reading frames, of which open reading frame 1 encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and open reading frame 4 a capsid protein. When inoculated, the naked CcFV-1 double-stranded RNAs are infectious and induce the accumulation of the filamentous particles in vivo. CcFV-1 is phylogenetically related to Aspergillus fumigatus tetramycovirus-1 and Beauveria bassiana polymycovirus-1, but differs in morphology and in the number of genomic components. CcFV-1 might be an intermediate virus related to truly capsidated viruses, or might represent a distinct encapsidating strategy. In terms of genome and particle architecture, our findings are a significant addition to the knowledge of the virosphere diversity.Viruses with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes form typically isometric particles or are capsid-less. Here, the authors identify a mycovirus with an eight-segmented dsRNA genome that forms exceptionally long filamentous particles and could represent an evolutionary link between ssRNA and dsRNA viruses.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the 4.3 kbp BamHI-N fragment of fowlpox virus FP9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, E; Skinner, M A; Heaphy, S

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 4.3 kbp BamHI-N fragment of the fowlpox virus (FPV) genome revealed that it encodes 7 proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VV) E11L, E10R, O1L, O3L, I1L, I2L and I3L encoded proteins. No evidence of FPV homolog of VV O2L could be found.

  15. Assessing the expression of chicken anemia virus proteins in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacorte, C.C.; Lohuis, H.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is an important pathogen of chicken worldwide, causing severe anemia and immunodeficiency. Its small single-stranded DNA genome (2.3 kb) encodes three proteins: VP1, the only structural protein, VP2, a protein phosphatase, and VP3, also known as apoptin, which induces

  16. Characterization of the Sulfolobus host-SSV2 virus interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contursi, P.; Jensen, S.; Aucelli, T.

    2006-01-01

    The Sulfolobus spindle virus, SSV2, encodes a tyrosine integrase which furthers provirus formation in host chromosomes. Consistently with the prediction made during sequence analysis, integration was found to occur in the downstream half of the tRNAGly (CCC) gene. In this paper we report the find...

  17. Three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by a 20-kb viral RNA genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui; Folimonov, Alexey; Shintaku, Michael; Li, Wan-Xiang; Falk, Bryce W.; Dawson, William O.; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2004-11-01

    Viral infection in both plant and invertebrate hosts requires a virus-encoded function to block the RNA silencing antiviral defense. Here, we report the identification and characterization of three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by the 20-kb plus-strand RNA genome of citrus tristeza virus (CTV). When introduced by genetic crosses into plants carrying a silencing transgene, both p20 and p23, but not coat protein (CP), restored expression of the transgene. Although none of the CTV proteins prevented DNA methylation of the transgene, export of the silencing signal (capable of mediating intercellular silencing spread) was detected only from the F1 plants expressing p23 and not from the CP- or p20-expressing F1 plants, demonstrating suppression of intercellular silencing by CP and p20 but not by p23. Thus, intracellular and intercellular silencing are each targeted by a CTV protein, whereas the third, p20, inhibits silencing at both levels. Notably, CP suppresses intercellular silencing without interfering with intracellular silencing. The novel property of CP suggests a mechanism distinct to p20 and all of the other viral suppressors known to interfere with intercellular silencing and that this class of viral suppressors may not be consistently identified by Agrobacterium coinfiltration because it also induces RNA silencing against the infiltrated suppressor transgene. Our analyses reveal a sophisticated viral counter-defense strategy that targets the silencing antiviral pathway at multiple steps and may be essential for protecting CTV with such a large RNA genome from antiviral silencing in the perennial tree host. RNA interference | citrus tristeza virus | virus synergy | antiviral immunity

  18. BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF TOMBUSVIRUS-ENCODED SUPPRESSOR OF RNA SILENCING IN PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omarov R.T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi plays multiple biological roles in eukaryotic organisms to regulate gene expression. RNAi also operates as a conserved adaptive molecular immune mechanism against invading viruses. The antiviral RNAi pathway is initiated with the generation of virus-derived short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs that are used for subsequent sequence-specific recognition and degradation of the cognate viral RNA molecules. As an efficient counter-defensive strategy, most plant viruses evolved the ability to encode specific proteins capable of interfering with RNAi, and this process is commonly known as RNA silencing suppression. Virus-encoded suppressors of RNAi (VSRs operate at different steps in the RNAi pathway and display distinct biochemical properties that enable these proteins to efficiently interfere with the host-defense system. Tombusvirus-encoded P19 is an important pathogenicity factor, required for symptom development and elicitation of a hypersensitive response in a host-dependent manner. Protein plays a crucial role of TBSV P19 in protecting viral RNA during systemic infection on Nicotiana benthamiana. The X-ray crystallographic studies conducted by two independent groups revealed the existence of a P19-siRNA complex; a conformation whereby caliper tryptophan residues on two subunits of P19 dimers measure and bind 21-nt siRNA duplexes. These structural studies provided the first details on the possible molecular mechanism of any viral suppressor to block RNAi. The association between P19 and siRNAs was also shown to occur in infected plants These and related studies revealed that in general the ability of P19 to efficiently sequester siRNAs influences symptom severity, however this is not a strict correlation in all hosts.The current working model is that during TBSV infection of plants, P19 appropriates abundantly circulating Tombusvirus-derived siRNAs thereby rendering these unavailable to program RISC, to prevent degradation of

  19. Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Evolutionary conflicts between viruses and restriction factors shape immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Nisha K; Emerman, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Host restriction factors are potent, widely expressed intracellular blocks to viral replication that are an important component of the innate immune response to viral infection. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms that antagonize restriction factors. Through evolutionary pressure for both host survival and virus replication, an evolutionary 'arms race' has developed that drives continuous rounds of selection for beneficial mutations in the genes encoding restriction factors and their viral antagonists. Because viruses can evolve faster than their hosts, the innate immune system of modern-day vertebrates is for the most part optimized to defend against ancient viruses, rather than newer viral threats. Thus, the evolutionary history of restriction factors might, in part, explain why humans are susceptible or resistant to the viruses present in the modern world.

  2. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Mark Bellas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Gammaproteobacteria, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilise very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with

  3. Genomic sequencing and comparative analysis of Epstein-Barr virus genome isolated from primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin Kwok

    Full Text Available Whether certain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV strains are associated with pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is still an unresolved question. In the present study, EBV genome contained in a primary NPC tumor biopsy was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, and sequenced using next-generation (Illumina and conventional dideoxy-DNA sequencing. The EBV genome, designated HKNPC1 (Genbank accession number JQ009376 is a type 1 EBV of approximately 171.5 kb. The virus appears to be a uniform strain in line with accepted monoclonal nature of EBV in NPC but is heterogeneous at 172 nucleotide positions. Phylogenetic analysis with the four published EBV strains, B95-8, AG876, GD1, and GD2, indicated HKNPC1 was more closely related to the Chinese NPC patient-derived strains, GD1 and GD2. HKNPC1 contains 1,589 single nucleotide variations (SNVs and 132 insertions or deletions (indels in comparison to the reference EBV sequence (accession number NC007605. When compared to AG876, a strain derived from Ghanaian Burkitt's lymphoma, we found 322 SNVs, of which 76 were non-synonymous SNVs and were shared amongst the Chinese GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 isolates. We observed 88 non-synonymous SNVs shared only by HKNPC1 and GD2, the only other NPC tumor-derived strain reported thus far. Non-synonymous SNVs were mainly found in the latent, tegument and glycoprotein genes. The same point mutations were found in glycoprotein (BLLF1 and BALF4 genes of GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 strains and might affect cell type specific binding. Variations in LMP1 and EBNA3B epitopes and mutations in Cp (11404 C>T and Qp (50134 G>C found in GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 could potentially affect CD8(+ T cell recognition and latent gene expression pattern in NPC, respectively. In conclusion, we showed that whole genome sequencing of EBV in NPC may facilitate discovery of previously unknown variations of pathogenic significance.

  4. Healthy rabbits are susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus infection and infected cells proliferate in immunosuppressed animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gulfaraz; Ahmed, Waqar; Philip, Pretty S; Ali, Mahmoud H; Adem, Abdu

    2015-02-18

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. However, due to the lack of a suitable animal model, a number of fundamental questions pertaining to the biology of EBV remain poorly understood. Here, we explore the potential of rabbits as a model for EBV infection and investigate the impact of immunosuppression on viral proliferation and gene expression. Six healthy New Zealand white rabbits were inoculated intravenously with EBV and blood samples collected prior to infection and for 7 weeks post-infection. Three weeks after the last blood collection, animals were immunosuppressed with daily intramuscular injections of cyclosporin A at doses of 20 mg/kg for 15 days and blood collected twice a week from each rabbit. The animals were subsequently sacrificed and tissues from all major organs were collected for subsequent analysis. Following intravenous inoculation, all 6 rabbits seroconverted with raised IgG and IgM titres to EBV, but viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) could only be detected intermittently. Following immunosuppression however, EBV DNA could be readily detected in PBMCs from all 4 rabbits that survived the treatment. Quantitative PCR indicated an increase in EBV viral load in PBMCs as the duration of immunosuppression increased. At autopsy, splenomegaly was seen in 3/4 rabbits, but spleens from all 4 rabbit were EBV PCR positive. EBER-in situ hybridization and immunoshistochemistry revealed the presence of a large number of EBER-positive and LMP-1 positive lymphoblasts in the spleens of 3/4 rabbits. To a lesser extent, EBER-positive cells were also seen in the portal tract regions of the liver of these rabbits. Western blotting indicated that EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 were also expressed in the liver and spleen of infected animals. EBV can infect healthy rabbits and the infected cells proliferate when the animals are immunocompromised. The infected cells expressed several EBV

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  8. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  9. Virus Ebola Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuryadi, Suharyono

    1996-01-01

    Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  11. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  12. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  13. ChIP-seq guidelines and practices of the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landt, Stephen G.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Kundaje, Anshul; Kheradpour, Pouya; Pauli, Florencia; Batzoglou, Serafim; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Bickel, Peter; Brown, James B.; Cayting, Philip; Chen, Yiwen; DeSalvo, Gilberto; Epstein, Charles; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Gerstein, Mark; Gertz, Jason; Hartemink, Alexander J.; Hoffman, Michael M.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Jung, Youngsook L.; Karmakar, Subhradip; Kellis, Manolis; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Li, Qunhua; Liu, Tao; Liu, X. Shirley; Ma, Lijia; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Myers, Richard M.; Park, Peter J.; Pazin, Michael J.; Perry, Marc D.; Raha, Debasish; Reddy, Timothy E.; Rozowsky, Joel; Shoresh, Noam; Sidow, Arend; Slattery, Matthew; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; White, Kevin P.; Xi, Simon; Farnham, Peggy J.; Lieb, Jason D.; Wold, Barbara J.; Snyder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) has become a valuable and widely used approach for mapping the genomic location of transcription-factor binding and histone modifications in living cells. Despite its widespread use, there are considerable differences in how these experiments are conducted, how the results are scored and evaluated for quality, and how the data and metadata are archived for public use. These practices affect the quality and utility of any global ChIP experiment. Through our experience in performing ChIP-seq experiments, the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia have developed a set of working standards and guidelines for ChIP experiments that are updated routinely. The current guidelines address antibody validation, experimental replication, sequencing depth, data and metadata reporting, and data quality assessment. We discuss how ChIP quality, assessed in these ways, affects different uses of ChIP-seq data. All data sets used in the analysis have been deposited for public viewing and downloading at the ENCODE (http://encodeproject.org/ENCODE/) and modENCODE (http://www.modencode.org/) portals. PMID:22955991

  14. Convolutional over Recurrent Encoder for Neural Machine Translation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Praveen Dakwale; Christof Monz

    2017-01-01

    ...) called encoder and the target words are predicted using another RNN known as decoder. Recently, various models have been proposed which replace the RNN encoder with a convolutional neural network (CNN...

  15. Evaluating standard terminologies for encoding allergy information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Foster R; Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph M; Broverman, Carol; Robinson, George; Middleton, Blackford; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Allergy documentation and exchange are vital to ensuring patient safety. This study aims to analyze and compare various existing standard terminologies for representing allergy information. Five terminologies were identified, including the Systemized Nomenclature of Medical Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT), Medication Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), Unique Ingredient Identifier (UNII), and RxNorm. A qualitative analysis was conducted to compare desirable characteristics of each terminology, including content coverage, concept orientation, formal definitions, multiple granularities, vocabulary structure, subset capability, and maintainability. A quantitative analysis was also performed to compare the content coverage of each terminology for (1) common food, drug, and environmental allergens and (2) descriptive concepts for common drug allergies, adverse reactions (AR), and no known allergies. Our qualitative results show that SNOMED CT fulfilled the greatest number of desirable characteristics, followed by NDF-RT, RxNorm, UNII, and MedDRA. Our quantitative results demonstrate that RxNorm had the highest concept coverage for representing drug allergens, followed by UNII, SNOMED CT, NDF-RT, and MedDRA. For food and environmental allergens, UNII demonstrated the highest concept coverage, followed by SNOMED CT. For representing descriptive allergy concepts and adverse reactions, SNOMED CT and NDF-RT showed the highest coverage. Only SNOMED CT was capable of representing unique concepts for encoding no known allergies. The proper terminology for encoding a patient's allergy is complex, as multiple elements need to be captured to form a fully structured clinical finding. Our results suggest that while gaps still exist, a combination of SNOMED CT and RxNorm can satisfy most criteria for encoding common allergies and provide sufficient content coverage.

  16. 2D Barcode for DNA Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Purcaru, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a solution for endcoding/decoding DNA information in 2D barcodes. First part focuses on the existing techniques and symbologies in 2D barcodes field. The 2D barcode PDF417 is presented as starting point. The adaptations and optimizations on PDF417 and on DataMatrix lead to the solution - DNA2DBC - DeoxyriboNucleic Acid Two Dimensional Barcode. The second part shows the DNA2DBC encoding/decoding process step by step. In conclusions are enumerated the most important features of 2D barcode implementation for DNA.

  17. Rapidly-Indexing Incremental-Angle Encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Philip R.; Meyer, Wallace W.

    1989-01-01

    Optoelectronic system measures relative angular position of shaft or other device to be turned, also measures absolute angular position after device turned through small angle. Relative angular position measured with fine resolution by optoelectronically counting finely- and uniformly-spaced light and dark areas on encoder disk as disk turns past position-sensing device. Also includes track containing coarsely- and nonuniformly-spaced light and dark areas, angular widths varying in proportion to absolute angular position. This second track provides gating and indexing signal.

  18. Sulfolobus tengchongensis Spindle-Shaped Virus STSV1: Virus-Host Interactions and Genomic Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, X.; Chen, L.; Huang, X

    2005-01-01

    into the host chromosome and existed in a carrier state. The STSV1 DNA was modified in an unusual fashion, presumably by virally encoded modification systems. STSV1 harbors a double-stranded DNA genome of 75,294 bp, which shares no significant sequence similarity to those of fuselloviruses. The viral genome...... features identify STSV1 as a novel virus infecting the genus Sulfolobus....

  19. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21-23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs.

  20. HCVpro: hepatitis C virus protein interaction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwofie, Samuel K; Schaefer, Ulf; Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava S; Bajic, Vladimir B; Christoffels, Alan

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Design and generation of recombinant rabies virus vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Callaway, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies viruses, negative-strand RNA viruses, infect neurons through axon terminals and spread transsynaptically in a retrograde direction between neurons. Rabies viruses whose glycoprotein (G) gene is deleted from the genome cannot spread across synapses. Complementation of G in trans, however, enables transsynaptic spreading of G-deleted rabies viruses to directly-connected, presynaptic neurons. Recombinant rabies viruses can encode genes of interest for labeling cells, controlling gene expression, and monitoring or manipulating neural activity. Cre-dependent or bridge-protein-mediated transduction and single-cell electroporation via EnvA/TVA or EnvB/TVB system allow cell-type-specific or single-cell-specific targeting. These rabies virus-based approaches permit the linking of connectivity to cell morphology and circuit function for particular cell types or single cells. Here we describe methods for construction of rabies viral vectors, recovery of G-deleted rabies viruses from cDNA, amplification of the viruses, pseudotyping them with EnvA or EnvB, and concentration and titration of the viruses. The entire protocol takes 6–8 weeks. PMID:23887178

  2. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation. This review considers current knowledge and hypotheses relating to the mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation herpes simplex virus latency. PMID:22150699

  3. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer.

  4. Dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform security ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... This paper describes a simple method for making dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform (EFRT) security holograms. The hologram possesses different stages of encoding so that security features are concealed and remain invisible to the counterfeiter. These concealed and encoded ...

  5. Virocell Metabolism: Metabolic Innovations During Host-Virus Interactions in the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Shilo; Ziv, Carmit; Creveld, Shiri Graff van; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-10-01

    Marine viruses are considered to be major ecological, evolutionary, and biogeochemical drivers of the marine environment, responsible for nutrient recycling and determining species composition. Viruses can re-shape their host's metabolic network during infection, generating the virocell-a unique metabolic state that supports their specific requirement. Here we discuss the concept of 'virocell metabolism' and its formation by rewiring of host-encoded metabolic networks, or by introducing virus-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes which provide the virocell with novel metabolic capabilities. The ecological role of marine viruses is commonly assessed by their relative abundance and phylogenetic diversity, lacking the ability to assess the dynamics of active viral infection. The new ability to define a unique metabolic state of the virocell will expand the current virion-centric approaches in order to quantify the impact of marine viruses on microbial food webs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evolutionary genomics of archaeal viruses: unique viral genomes in the third domain of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.; Koonin, E.

    2006-01-01

    . In accord with this distinction, the sequenced genomes of euryarchaeal viruses encode many proteins homologous to bacteriophage capsid proteins. In contrast, initial analysis of the crenarchaeal viral genomes revealed no relationships with bacteriophages and, generally, very few proteins with detectable...... homologs.