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Sample records for virus binds eif4f

  1. Identification of eukaryotic mRNAs that are translated at reduced cap binding complex eIF4F concentrations using a cDNA microarray

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    Johannes, Gregg; Carter, Mark S.; Eisen, Michael B.; Brown, Patrick O.; Sarnow, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Although most eukaryotic mRNAs need a functional cap binding complex eIF4F for efficient 5′ end- dependent scanning to initiate translation, picornaviral, hepatitis C viral, and a few cellular RNAs have been shown to be translated by internal ribosome entry, a mechanism that can operate in the presence of low levels of functional eIF4F. To identify cellular mRNAs that can be translated when eIF4F is depleted or in low abundance and that, therefore, may contain internal ribosome entry sites, mRNAs that remained associated with polysomes were isolated from human cells after infection with poliovirus and were identified by using a cDNA microarray. Approximately 200 of the 7000 mRNAs analyzed remained associated with polysomes under these conditions. Among the gene products encoded by these polysome-associated mRNAs were immediate-early transcription factors, kinases, and phosphatases of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and several protooncogenes, including c-myc and Pim-1. In addition, the mRNA encoding Cyr61, a secreted factor that can promote angiogenesis and tumor growth, was selectively mobilized into polysomes when eIF4F concentrations were reduced, although its overall abundance changed only slightly. Subsequent tests confirmed the presence of internal ribosome entry sites in the 5′ noncoding regions of both Cyr61 and Pim-1 mRNAs. Overall, this study suggests that diverse mRNAs whose gene products have been implicated in a variety of stress responses, including inflammation, angiogenesis, and the response to serum, can use translational initiation mechanisms that require little or no intact cap binding protein complex eIF4F. PMID:10557283

  2. m6A Facilitates eIF4F-Independent mRNA Translation.

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    Coots, Ryan A; Liu, Xiao-Min; Mao, Yuanhui; Dong, Leiming; Zhou, Jun; Wan, Ji; Zhang, Xingqian; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2017-10-23

    In eukaryotic cells, protein synthesis typically begins with the binding of eIF4F to the 7-methylguanylate (m7G) cap found on the 5' end of the majority of mRNAs. Surprisingly, overall translational output remains robust under eIF4F inhibition. The broad spectrum of eIF4F-resistant translatomes is incompatible with cap-independent translation mediated by internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs). Here, we report that N6-methyladenosine (m6A) facilitates mRNA translation that is resistant to eIF4F inactivation. Depletion of the methyltransferase METTL3 selectively inhibits translation of mRNAs bearing 5' UTR methylation, but not mRNAs with 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) elements. We identify ABCF1 as a critical mediator of m6A-promoted translation under both stress and physiological conditions. Supporting the role of ABCF1 in m6A-facilitated mRNA translation, ABCF1-sensitive transcripts largely overlap with METTL3-dependent mRNA targets. By illustrating the scope and mechanism of eIF4F-independent mRNA translation, these findings reshape our current perceptions of cellular translational pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting Synthetic Lethal Interactions between Myc and the eIF4F Complex Impedes Tumorigenesis

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    Chen-Ju Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The energetically demanding process of translation is linked to multiple signaling events through mTOR-mediated regulation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4F complex assembly. Disrupting mTOR constraints on eIF4F activity can be oncogenic and alter chemotherapy response, making eIF4F an attractive antineoplastic target. Here, we combine a newly developed inducible RNAi platform and pharmacological targeting of eIF4F activity to define a critical role for endogenous eIF4F in Myc-dependent tumor initiation. We find elevated Myc levels are associated with deregulated eIF4F activity in the prelymphomatous stage of the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Inhibition of eIF4F is synthetic lethal with elevated Myc in premalignant pre-B/B cells resulting in reduced numbers of cycling pre-B/B cells and delayed tumor onset. At the organismal level, eIF4F suppression affected a subset of normal regenerating cells, but this was well tolerated and rapidly and completely reversible. Therefore, eIF4F is a key Myc client that represents a tumor-specific vulnerability.

  4. Dynamic changes in eIF4F-mRNA interactions revealed by global analyses of environmental stress responses.

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    Costello, Joseph L; Kershaw, Christopher J; Castelli, Lydia M; Talavera, David; Rowe, William; Sims, Paul F G; Ashe, Mark P; Grant, Christopher M; Hubbard, Simon J; Pavitt, Graham D

    2017-10-27

    Translation factors eIF4E and eIF4G form eIF4F, which interacts with the messenger RNA (mRNA) 5' cap to promote ribosome recruitment and translation initiation. Variations in the association of eIF4F with individual mRNAs likely contribute to differences in translation initiation frequencies between mRNAs. As translation initiation is globally reprogrammed by environmental stresses, we were interested in determining whether eIF4F interactions with individual mRNAs are reprogrammed and how this may contribute to global environmental stress responses. Using a tagged-factor protein capture and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) approach, we have assessed how mRNA associations with eIF4E, eIF4G1 and eIF4G2 change globally in response to three defined stresses that each cause a rapid attenuation of protein synthesis: oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and nutrient stresses caused by amino acid or glucose withdrawal. We find that acute stress leads to dynamic and unexpected changes in eIF4F-mRNA interactions that are shared among each factor and across the stresses imposed. eIF4F-mRNA interactions stabilised by stress are predominantly associated with translational repression, while more actively initiating mRNAs become relatively depleted for eIF4F. Simultaneously, other mRNAs are insulated from these stress-induced changes in eIF4F association. Dynamic eIF4F-mRNA interaction changes are part of a coordinated early translational control response shared across environmental stresses. Our data are compatible with a model where multiple mRNA closed-loop complexes form with differing stability. Hence, unexpectedly, in the absence of other stabilising factors, rapid translation initiation on mRNAs correlates with less stable eIF4F interactions.

  5. Caliciviruses differ in their functional requirements for eIF4F components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhry, Y.; Nayak, A.; Bordeleau, M-E.

    2006-01-01

    proteins can interact directly with the initiation factors eIF4E and eIF3. Translation initiation on feline calicivirus (FCV) RNA requires eIF4E because it is inhibited by recombinant 4E-BP1. However, to date, there have been no functional studies carried out with respect to norovirus translation...... initiation, because of a lack of a suitable source of VPg-linked viral RNA. We have now used the recently identified murine norovirus (MNV) as a model system for norovirus translation and have extended our previous studies with FCV RNA to examine the role of the other eIF4F components in translation...

  6. Translation initiation complex eIF4F is a therapeutic target for dual mTOR kinase inhibitors in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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    Demosthenous, Christos; Han, Jing Jing; Stenson, Mary J; Maurer, Matthew J; Wellik, Linda E; Link, Brian; Hege, Kristen; Dogan, Ahmet; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Witzig, Thomas; Gupta, Mamta

    2015-04-20

    Deregulated mRNA translation has been implicated in disease development and in part is controlled by a eukaryotic initiation complex eIF4F (composed of eIF4E, eIF4G and eIF4A). We demonstrate here that the cap bound fraction from lymphoma cells was enriched with eIF4G and eIF4E indicating that lymphoma cells exist in an activated translational state. Moreover, 77% (110/142) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma tumors expressed eIF4E and this was associated with an inferior event free survival. Over-expression of wild-type eIF4E (eIF4E(WT)) but not cap-mutant eIF4E (eIF4E(cap mutant)) increased the activation of the eIF4F complex. Treatment with the active-site dual mTOR inhibitor CC214-1 reduced the level of the eIF4F complex by decreasing the cap bound fraction of eIF4G and increasing the levels of 4E-BP1. CC214-1 inhibited both the cap dependent and global protein translation. CC214-1 inhibited c-Myc, and cyclin D3 translation by decreasing polysomal fractions from lymphoma cells. Inhibition of eIF4E with shRNA further decreased the CC214-1 induced inhibition of the eIF4F complex, c-Myc, cyclin D3 translation, and colony formation. These studies demonstrate that the eIF4F complex is deregulated in aggressive lymphoma and that dual mTOR therapy has therapeutic potential in these patients.

  7. Protein Phosphatase 2A Negatively Regulates Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E Phosphorylation and eIF4F Assembly through Direct Dephosphorylation of Mnk and eIF4E

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    Yikun Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and is associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, and metastatic progression. It is known that Mnks can phosphorylate eIF4E. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A functions as a tumor suppressor, and it was previously suggested to regulate eIF4E phosphorylation. However, how PP2A regulates eIF4E phosphorylation has not been fully addressed. In this study, we have not only validated the role of PP2A in regulation of eIF4E phosphorylation but also demonstrated the mechanism underlying this process. Inhibition of PP2A using either okadaic acid or PP2A small interfering RNA (siRNA increased eIF4E phosphorylation, which could be abolished by the presence of the Mnk inhibitor CGP57380 or deficiency of Mnk genes. Thus, Mnks are involved in PP2A-mediated regulation of eIF4E phosphorylation. Moreover, a dephosphorylation assay revealed that PP2A could directly dephosphorylate Mnk1 and eIF4E. m7GTP pull-down assay detected more eIF4G and phospho-eIF4E and less 4EBP-1 in PP2A siRNA-transfected cells than in control siRNA-transfected cells, indicating an increased cap binding of eIF4F complex. Accordingly, okadaic acid treatment or PP2A knockdown increased the levels of c-Myc and Mcl-1, which are proteins known to be regulated by a cap-dependent translation mechanism. Taken together, we conclude that PP2A negatively regulates eIF4E phosphorylation and eIF4F complex assembly through dephosphorylation of Mnk and eIF4E, thus suggesting a novel mechanism by which PP2A exerts its tumor-suppressive function.

  8. A unique phosphorylation-dependent eIF4E assembly on 40S ribosomes co-ordinated by hepatitis C virus protein NS5A that activates internal ribosome entry site translation.

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    Panda, Swarupa; Vedagiri, Dhiviya; Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Harshan, Krishnan Harinivas

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported that the HCV (hepatitis C virus) protein NS5A up-regulated mRNA cap binding eIF4F (eukaryotic initiation factor 4F) complex assembly through mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin)-4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein 1) pathway and that NS5A (non-structural protein 5A) physically interacted with translation apparatus. In the present study, we demonstrate that NS5A co-ordinates a unique assembly of the cap binding protein eIF4E and 40S ribosome to form a complex that we call ENR (eIF4E-NS5A-ribosome). Recruitment of NS5A and eIF4E to 40S ribosome was confirmed by polysome fractionation, subcellular fractionation and high-salt-wash immunoprecipitation. These observations were also confirmed in HCV-infected cells, validating its biological significance. eIF4E phosphorylation was critical for ENR assembly. 80S ribosome dissociation and RNase integrity assays revealed that, once associated, the ENR complex is stable and RNA interaction is dispensable. Both the N- and C-terminal regions of NS5A domain 1 were indispensable for this assembly and for the NS5A-induced HCV IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activation. The present study demonstrates that NS5A initially associates with phosphorylated eIF4E of eIF4F complex and subsequently recruits it to 40S ribosomes. This is the first time the interaction of viral protein with both eIF4E and ribosomes has been reported. We propose that this assembly would determine the outcome of HCV infection and pathogenesis through regulation of viral and host translation.

  9. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

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    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  10. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Augments mRNA Translation.

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    Jeeva, Subbiah; Cheng, Erdong; Ganaie, Safder S; Mir, Mohammad A

    2017-08-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne Nairovirus of the Bunyaviridae family, causing severe illness with high mortality rates in humans. Here, we demonstrate that CCHFV nucleocapsid protein (CCHFV-NP) augments mRNA translation. CCHFV-NP binds to the viral mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) with high affinity. It facilitates the translation of reporter mRNA both in vivo and in vitro with the assistance of the viral mRNA 5' UTR. CCHFV-NP equally favors the translation of both capped and uncapped mRNAs, demonstrating the independence of this translation strategy on the 5' cap. Unlike the canonical host translation machinery, inhibition of eIF4F complex, an amalgam of three initiation factors, eIF4A, eIF4G, and eIF4E, by the chemical inhibitor 4E1RCat did not impact the CCHFV-NP-mediated translation mechanism. However, the proteolytic degradation of eIF4G alone by the human rhinovirus 2A protease abrogated this translation strategy. Our results demonstrate that eIF4F complex formation is not required but eIF4G plays a critical role in this translation mechanism. Our results suggest that CCHFV has adopted a unique translation mechanism to facilitate the translation of viral mRNAs in the host cell cytoplasm where cellular transcripts are competing for the same translation apparatus.IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, a highly contagious viral disease endemic to more than 30 countries, has limited treatment options. Our results demonstrate that NP favors the translation of a reporter mRNA harboring the viral mRNA 5' UTR. It is highly likely that CCHFV uses an NP-mediated translation strategy for the rapid synthesis of viral proteins during the course of infection. Shutdown of this translation mechanism might selectively impact viral protein synthesis, suggesting that an NP-mediated translation strategy is a target for therapeutic intervention against this viral disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

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    Shives, Katherine D.; Massey, Aaron R.; May, Nicholas A.; Morrison, Thomas E.; Beckham, J. David

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome. PMID:27763553

  12. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

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    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  13. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Massey, Aaron R; May, Nicholas A; Morrison, Thomas E; Beckham, J David

    2016-10-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5' cap with 2'-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  14. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

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    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  15. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W.; Konowalchuk, Jack

    2017-07-18

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods of inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further includes methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  16. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

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    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...

  17. Neutralisation and binding of VHS virus by monovalent antibody fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupit, P.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; Strachan, G.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and characterisation of the heavy and light chain variable domain genes encoding three monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) that bind viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Two of these antibodies, 3F1H10 and 3F1A2 both neutralised the virus though 3F1A2...... appeared to recognise a broader range of virus isolates. The variable domains of these two antibodies differ by only four residues (Lorenzen et al., 2000a. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 10, 129-142). To further study the mechanism of neutralisation, Fab fragments as well as a series of recombinant bacterial...... by BIAcore analysis and found to correlate with the capacity of each molecule to neutralise DK-F1. These investigations, together with computer assisted molecular analysis of the theoretical influence of each mutation on antigen binding, led to the identification of a single mutation at position 35a...

  18. High-Dose Mannose-Binding Lectin Therapy for Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    viruses . N-glycosylation of viral envelopes is an important such target shared between in- fluenza, HIV, HCV, West Nile virus , SARS-CoV, Hendra virus ...host cells. Therefore, MBL preferentially recognizes glycosylated viruses including influenza virus , human immunodeficiency virus , severe acute...are heavily glycosylated and contain high-mannose. As a result, MBL binds to Ebola and Marburg viruses and mediates com- plement-dependent virus

  19. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...... to the mass of the HA1 peptide. Of several monosaccharides tested only D-mannose interfered with SAP's inhibition of both HA and infectivity. The glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate and heparin, which bind SAP, reduced SAPs binding to the virus. The results indicate that the inhibition by SAP is due to steric...

  20. Control of eIF4E cellular localization by eIF4E-binding proteins, 4E-BPs.

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    Rong, Liwei; Livingstone, Mark; Sukarieh, Rami; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Crosby, Katherine; Smith, Bradley; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Pelletier, Jerry; Ferraiuolo, Maria A; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2008-07-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E, the mRNA 5'-cap-binding protein, mediates the association of eIF4F with the mRNA 5'-cap structure to stimulate cap-dependent translation initiation in the cytoplasm. The assembly of eIF4E into the eIF4F complex is negatively regulated through a family of repressor proteins, called the eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs). eIF4E is also present in the nucleus, where it is thought to stimulate nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of certain mRNAs. eIF4E is transported to the nucleus via its interaction with 4E-T (4E-transporter), but it is unclear how it is retained in the nucleus. Here we show that a sizable fraction (approximately 30%) of 4E-BP1 is localized to the nucleus, where it binds eIF4E. In mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) subjected to serum starvation and/or rapamycin treatment, nuclear 4E-BPs sequester eIF4E in the nucleus. A dramatic loss of nuclear 4E-BP1 occurs in c-Ha-Ras-expressing MEFs, which fail to show starvation-induced nuclear accumulation of eIF4E. Therefore, 4E-BP1 is a regulator of eIF4E cellular localization.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

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    Laure Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs, including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Regulation of host translational machinery by African swine fever virus.

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    Castelló, Alfredo; Quintas, Ana; Sánchez, Elena G; Sabina, Prado; Nogal, Marisa; Carrasco, Luis; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-08-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), like other complex DNA viruses, deploys a variety of strategies to evade the host's defence systems, such as inflammatory and immune responses and cell death. Here, we analyse the modifications in the translational machinery induced by ASFV. During ASFV infection, eIF4G and eIF4E are phosphorylated (Ser1108 and Ser209, respectively), whereas 4E-BP1 is hyperphosphorylated at early times post infection and hypophosphorylated after 18 h. Indeed, a potent increase in eIF4F assembly is observed in ASFV-infected cells, which is prevented by rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E, eIF4GI and 4E-BP1 is important to enhance viral protein production, but is not essential for ASFV infection as observed in rapamycin- or CGP57380-treated cells. Nevertheless, eIF4F components are indispensable for ASFV protein synthesis and virus spread, since eIF4E or eIF4G depletion in COS-7 or Vero cells strongly prevents accumulation of viral proteins and decreases virus titre. In addition, eIF4F is not only activated but also redistributed within the viral factories at early times of infection, while eIF4G and eIF4E are surrounding these areas at late times. In fact, other components of translational machinery such as eIF2alpha, eIF3b, eIF4E, eEF2 and ribosomal P protein are enriched in areas surrounding ASFV factories. Notably, the mitochondrial network is polarized in ASFV-infected cells co-localizing with ribosomes. Thus, translation and ATP synthesis seem to be coupled and compartmentalized at the periphery of viral factories. At later times after ASFV infection, polyadenylated mRNAs disappear from the cytoplasm of Vero cells, except within the viral factories. The distribution of these pools of mRNAs is similar to the localization of viral late mRNAs. Therefore, degradation of cellular polyadenylated mRNAs and recruitment of the translation machinery to viral factories may contribute to the inhibition of host protein synthesis, facilitating ASFV

  3. Regulation of host translational machinery by African swine fever virus.

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    Alfredo Castelló

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever virus (ASFV, like other complex DNA viruses, deploys a variety of strategies to evade the host's defence systems, such as inflammatory and immune responses and cell death. Here, we analyse the modifications in the translational machinery induced by ASFV. During ASFV infection, eIF4G and eIF4E are phosphorylated (Ser1108 and Ser209, respectively, whereas 4E-BP1 is hyperphosphorylated at early times post infection and hypophosphorylated after 18 h. Indeed, a potent increase in eIF4F assembly is observed in ASFV-infected cells, which is prevented by rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E, eIF4GI and 4E-BP1 is important to enhance viral protein production, but is not essential for ASFV infection as observed in rapamycin- or CGP57380-treated cells. Nevertheless, eIF4F components are indispensable for ASFV protein synthesis and virus spread, since eIF4E or eIF4G depletion in COS-7 or Vero cells strongly prevents accumulation of viral proteins and decreases virus titre. In addition, eIF4F is not only activated but also redistributed within the viral factories at early times of infection, while eIF4G and eIF4E are surrounding these areas at late times. In fact, other components of translational machinery such as eIF2alpha, eIF3b, eIF4E, eEF2 and ribosomal P protein are enriched in areas surrounding ASFV factories. Notably, the mitochondrial network is polarized in ASFV-infected cells co-localizing with ribosomes. Thus, translation and ATP synthesis seem to be coupled and compartmentalized at the periphery of viral factories. At later times after ASFV infection, polyadenylated mRNAs disappear from the cytoplasm of Vero cells, except within the viral factories. The distribution of these pools of mRNAs is similar to the localization of viral late mRNAs. Therefore, degradation of cellular polyadenylated mRNAs and recruitment of the translation machinery to viral factories may contribute to the inhibition of host protein synthesis

  4. The Role of the Hendra Virus and Nipah Virus Attachment Glycoproteins in Receptor Binding and Antibody Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The Role of the Hendra Virus and Nipah Virus Attachment Glycoproteins in Receptor Binding and Antibody Neutralization by...Henipavirus mediated membrane fusion, virus entry and targeted therapeutics. Viruses 4:280-308. and Bossart KN, Fusco DL, Broder CC. 2013. Paramyxovirus...of the hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody. PLoS pathogens 9:e1003684

  5. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

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    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  6. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...... receptor binding domain mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of two H5N1 viruses and evaluated changes in receptor binding specificity by glycan microarray analysis. The impact of these mutations on replication efficiency was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Although certain mutations switched...... the receptor binding preference of the H5 HA, the rescued mutant viruses displayed reduced replication in vitro and delayed peak virus shedding in ferrets. An improvement in transmission efficiency was not observed with any of the mutants compared to the parental viruses, indicating that alternative molecular...

  7. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus CellBinding to Membrane Fusion

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    Mareike K. S. van Duijl-Richter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  8. The role of the poly(A) binding protein in the assembly of the Cap-binding complex during translation initiation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Translation initiation in eukaryotes requires the involvement of multiple initiation factors (eIFs) that facilitate the binding of the 40 S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA and assemble the 80 S ribosome at the correct initiation codon. eIF4F, composed of eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4G, binds to the 5′-cap structure of an mRNA and prepares an mRNA for recruitment of a 40 S subunit. eIF4B promotes the ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity of eIF4A and eIF4F needed to unwind secondary structure present in a 5′-leader that would otherwise impede scanning of the 40 S subunit during initiation. The poly(A) binding protein (PABP), which binds the poly(A) tail, interacts with eIF4G and eIF4B to promote circularization of an mRNA and stimulates translation by promoting 40 S subunit recruitment. Thus, these factors serve essential functions in the early steps of protein synthesis. Their assembly and function requires multiple interactions that are competitive in nature and determine the nature of interactions between the termini of an mRNA. In this review, the domain organization and partner protein interactions are presented for the factors in plants which share similarities with those in animals and yeast but differ in several important respects. The functional consequences of their interactions on factor activity are also discussed. PMID:26779409

  9. The Positively Charged Surface of Herpes Simplex Virus UL42 Mediates DNA Binding*S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Santos, Webster L.; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Verdine, Gregory L.; Coen, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase is a heterodimer composed of UL30, a catalytic subunit, and UL42, a processivity subunit. Mutations that decrease DNA binding by UL42 decrease long chain DNA synthesis by the polymerase. The crystal structure of UL42 bound to the C terminus of UL30 revealed an extensive positively charged surface (“back face”). We tested two hypotheses, 1) the C terminus of UL30 affects DNA binding and 2) the positively charged back face mediates DNA binding. Addressing the first hypothesis, we found that the presence of a peptide corresponding to the UL30 C terminus did not result in altered binding of UL42 to DNA. Addressing the second hypothesis, previous work showed that substitution of four conserved arginine residues on the basic face with alanines resulted in decreased DNA affinity. We tested the affinities for DNA and the stimulation of long chain DNA synthesis of mutants in which the four conserved arginine residues were substituted individually or together with lysines and also a mutant in which a conserved glutamine residue was substituted with an arginine to increase positive charge on the back face. We also engineered cysteines onto this surface to permit disulfide cross-linking studies. Last, we assayed the effects of ionic strength on DNA binding by UL42 to estimate the number of ions released upon binding. Our results taken together strongly suggest that the basic back face of UL42 contacts DNA and that positive charge on this surface is important for this interaction. PMID:18178550

  10. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in undiff...... delayed relative to that of the wild-type virus, molecular tumor analysis indicated that all the primer binding site-modified viruses induce T-cell lymphomas similar to those induced by the wild-type virus in terms of frequencies of genomic rearrangements within the T-cell receptor beta......, recombination with endogenous viruses resulting in the generation of recombinant viruses carrying a glutamine primer binding site was detected in the majority of the tumors induced by the SL3-3 Lys3 mutant as well as in two tumors induced by wild-type SL3-3 and the SL3-3 Arg1,2 mutant....

  11. Structure of human Aichi virus and implications for receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Yuan, Shuai; Yamashita, Teruo; Tuthill, Tobias J; Fry, Elizabeth E; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I

    2016-09-05

    Aichi virus (AiV), an unusual and poorly characterized picornavirus, classified in the genus Kobuvirus, can cause severe gastroenteritis and deaths in children below the age of five years, especially in developing countries(1,2). The seroprevalence of AiV is approximately 60% in children under the age of ten years and reaches 90% later in life(3,4). There is no available vaccine or effective antiviral treatment. Here, we describe the structure of AiV at 3.7 Å. This first high-resolution structure for a kobuvirus is intermediate between those of the enteroviruses and cardioviruses, with a shallow, narrow depression bounded by the prominent VP0 CD loops (linking the C and D strands of the β-barrel), replacing the depression known as the canyon, frequently the site of receptor attachment in enteroviruses. VP0 is not cleaved to form VP2 and VP4, so the 'VP2' β-barrel structure is complemented with a unique extended structure on the inside of the capsid. On the outer surface, a polyproline helix structure, not seen previously in picornaviruses is present at the C terminus of VP1, a position where integrin binding motifs are found in some other picornaviruses. A peptide corresponding to this polyproline motif somewhat attenuates virus infectivity, presumably blocking host-cell attachment. This may guide cellular receptor identification.

  12. Efficient cleavage of p220 by poliovirus 2Apro expression in mammalian cells: effects on vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, R; Feduchi, E; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-10-24

    Poliovirus protease 2A cleaves p220, a component of initiation factor eIF-4F. Polyclonal antibodies that recognize p220 and the cleaved products from different species have been raised. Transfection of several cell lines with poliovirus 2Apro cloned in different plasmids leads to efficient cleavage of p220 upon infection with VT7, a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the T7 RNA polymerase. Under these conditions vaccinia virus protein synthesis is severely inhibited, while expression of poliovirus protein 2C from a similar plasmid has no effect. These results show by the first time the effects of p220 cleavage on vaccinia virus translation in the infected cells.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection of a Vero cell clone displaying efficient virus-cell binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M B; Carloni, G; Manzin, A; Nasorri, F; Ponzetto, A; Clementi, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Vero cells and derivative cell clones to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was assayed by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Cell extracts from Vero cells inoculated with HCV were tested for the presence of both positive and negative strands of HCV RNA; in parallel, cell-free HCV genomes were assayed in culture supernatant fluids. Quantitation of genomic HCV RNA molecules in infected cells by competitive reverse transcription PCR (cRT-PCR) indicated that HCV replication was more efficient in a derivative clone (named clone 10) than in parental Vero cells or other clones under study. Analysis of HCV-binding to cell receptors, performed by cRT-PCR quantitation of viral particles adsorbed to the cell surface, demonstrated a 10-fold higher virus-binding level of clone 10 than that of parental Vero cells. The results shown here indicate that the Vero clone 10 may constitute an efficient model system for analysing early events in HCV infection as well as a source of virus for diagnostic and biotechnological applications.

  14. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

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    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  15. Binding of virus-like particles of Norwalk virus to romaine lettuce veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal M; Mandrell, Robert E; Tian, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) annually cause millions of cases of gastrointestinal disease in the United States. NoV are associated with raw shellfish outbreaks, particularly oysters, which are thought to bioaccumulate NoV particles during the filter-feeding process. NoV outbreaks, however, have also been known to occur from other common-source food-borne vehicles, such as lettuce, frozen raspberries, and salad. In this study, we evaluated romaine lettuce as a potential vehicle for NoV transmission by testing the binding and distribution of NoV to the surface of romaine. Recombinant Norwalk virus-like particles (rNVLP) applied to the surface of romaine lettuce localized as large clusters primarily on the leaf veins. An extract of romaine lettuce leaves in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (romaine extract [RE]) bound rNVLP in a dose-dependent manner. RE did not bind rNVLP by histo-blood group antigens (HBGA), nor was RE competitive with rNVLP binding to porcine gastric mucin. These results suggested that non-HBGA molecules in RE bind rNVLP by a binding site(s) that is different from the defined binding pocket on the virion. Extracts of cilantro, iceberg lettuce, spinach, and celery also bound rNVLP. Samples of each of the vegetables spiked with rNVLP and tested with anti-NVLP antibody revealed by confocal microscopy the presence of rNVLP not only on the veins of cilantro but also throughout the surface of iceberg lettuce.

  16. Nanomechanical mapping of first binding steps of a virus to animal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Newton, Richard; Schubert, Rajib; Martinez-Martin, David; Delguste, Martin; Roska, Botond; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Viral infection is initiated when a virus binds to cell surface receptors. Because the cell membrane is dynamic and heterogeneous, imaging living cells and simultaneously quantifying the first viral binding events is difficult. Here, we show an atomic force and confocal microscopy set-up that allows the surface receptor landscape of cells to be imaged and the virus binding events within the first millisecond of contact with the cell to be mapped at high resolution (virus and cell surface receptors. We find that the first bond formed between the viral glycoprotein and its cognate cell surface receptor has relatively low lifetime and free energy, but this increases as additional bonds form rapidly (≤1 ms). The formation of additional bonds occurs with positive allosteric modulation and the three binding sites of the viral glycoprotein are quickly occupied. Our quantitative approach can be readily applied to study the binding of other viruses to animal cells.

  17. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

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    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  18. C1q binding to Dengue Virus inhibits infection of THP-1 and cellular inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P.; de Melo, Klecia M. Soares; Smith, Amanda P.; Krishna, Neel K.; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M.; Evans, Jared D.; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T. A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to Dengue Virus Envelope protein and to whole Dengue Virus serotype 2. Incubation of Dengue Virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses. PMID:24246304

  19. Innate immune response of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) mannose-binding lectin to channel catfish virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The channel catfish virus (CCV) is a pathogenic herpesvirus that infects channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) in pond aquaculture in the Southeast USA. The innate immune protein mannose-binding lectin (MBL) could play an important role in the innate response of channel catfish by binding to the CC...

  20. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  1. Adsorption characteristics of an enteric virus-binding protein to norovirus, rotavirus and poliovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imai Takahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water contamination with human enteric viruses has posed human health risks all over the world. Reasonable and facile methodologies for recovering and quantifying infectious enteric viruses in environmental samples are needed to address the issues of waterborne viral infectious diseases. In this study, a bacterial protein that has a binding capability with several enteric viruses is discovered, and its binding characteristics were investigated for utilizing it as a viral adsorbent in virus recovery and detection technologies. Results A gene of an enteric virus-binding protein (EVBP, derived from a monomer of a bacterial chaperon protein GroEL, was successfully acquired from a genomic DNA library of activated sludge microorganisms with nested PCR. Equilibrium dissociation constants between EVBP and norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs of genotypes GI.7 and GII.4, estimated with quartz crystal microbalance method, were 240 and 210 nM, respectively. These values of equilibrium dissociation constant imply that the binding affinity between EVBP and NoVLPs is 1 to 3-log weaker than that in general antigen-antibody interactions, but about 2-log stronger than that in weak specific interactions of proteins with cations and organic polymers. The adsorptions of EVBP to norovirus, group A rotavirus and poliovirus type 1 were found to be significant in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Meanwhile, the binding of native GroEL tetradecamer to viral particles was weaker than that of EVBP, presumably because of a steric hindrance. The small molecule of EVBP could have an advantage in the access to the surface of viral particles with rugged structure. Conclusions EVBP that has a broad binding spectrum to enteric viruses was newly discovered. The broad binding characteristic of EVBP would allow us to utilize it as a novel adsorbent for detecting diverse enteric viruses in clinical and environmental samples.

  2. Variation in vector competence for dengue viruses does not depend on mosquito midgut binding affinity.

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    Jonathan Cox

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus genotypes of Southeast Asian origin have been associated with higher virulence and transmission compared to other genotypes of serotype 2 (DEN-2. We tested the hypothesis that genetic differences in dengue viruses may result in differential binding to the midgut of the primary vector, Aedes aegypti, resulting in increased transmission or vectorial capacity.Two strains of each of the four DEN-2 genotypes (Southeast Asian, American, Indian, and West African were tested to determine their binding affinity for mosquito midguts from two distinct populations (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico and McAllen, Texas, USA. Our previous studies demonstrated that Southeast Asian viruses disseminated up to 65-fold more rapidly in Ae. aegypti from Texas and were therefore more likely to be transmitted to humans. Results shown here demonstrate that viruses from all four genotypes bind to midguts at the same rate, in a titer-dependent manner. In addition, we show population differences when comparing binding affinity for DEN-2 between the Tapachula and McAllen mosquito colonies.If midgut binding potential is the same for all DEN-2 viruses, then viral replication differences in these tissues and throughout the mosquito can thus probably explain the significant differences in dissemination and vector competence. These conclusions differ from the established paradigms to explain mosquito barriers to infection, dissemination, and transmission.

  3. Variation in vector competence for dengue viruses does not depend on mosquito midgut binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jonathan; Brown, Heidi E; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-05-01

    Dengue virus genotypes of Southeast Asian origin have been associated with higher virulence and transmission compared to other genotypes of serotype 2 (DEN-2). We tested the hypothesis that genetic differences in dengue viruses may result in differential binding to the midgut of the primary vector, Aedes aegypti, resulting in increased transmission or vectorial capacity. Two strains of each of the four DEN-2 genotypes (Southeast Asian, American, Indian, and West African) were tested to determine their binding affinity for mosquito midguts from two distinct populations (Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico and McAllen, Texas, USA). Our previous studies demonstrated that Southeast Asian viruses disseminated up to 65-fold more rapidly in Ae. aegypti from Texas and were therefore more likely to be transmitted to humans. Results shown here demonstrate that viruses from all four genotypes bind to midguts at the same rate, in a titer-dependent manner. In addition, we show population differences when comparing binding affinity for DEN-2 between the Tapachula and McAllen mosquito colonies. If midgut binding potential is the same for all DEN-2 viruses, then viral replication differences in these tissues and throughout the mosquito can thus probably explain the significant differences in dissemination and vector competence. These conclusions differ from the established paradigms to explain mosquito barriers to infection, dissemination, and transmission.

  4. Single hemagglutinin mutations that alter both antigenicity and receptor binding avidity influence influenza virus antigenic clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Bostick, David L; Sullivan, Colleen B; Myers, Jaclyn L; Griesemer, Sara B; Stgeorge, Kirsten; Plotkin, Joshua B; Hensley, Scott E

    2013-09-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay is the primary measurement used for identifying antigenically novel influenza virus strains. HAI assays measure the amount of reference sera required to prevent virus binding to red blood cells. Receptor binding avidities of viral strains are not usually taken into account when interpreting these assays. Here, we created antigenic maps of human H3N2 viruses that computationally account for variation in viral receptor binding avidities. These new antigenic maps differ qualitatively from conventional antigenic maps based on HAI measurements alone. We experimentally focused on an antigenic cluster associated with a single N145K hemagglutinin (HA) substitution that occurred between 1992 and 1995. Reverse-genetics experiments demonstrated that the N145K HA mutation increases viral receptor binding avidity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that the N145K HA mutation does not prevent antibody binding; rather, viruses possessing this mutation escape antisera in HAI assays simply by attaching to cells more efficiently. Unexpectedly, we found an asymmetric antigenic effect of the N145K HA mutation. Once H3N2 viruses acquired K145, an epitope involving amino acid 145 became antigenically dominant. Antisera raised against an H3N2 strain possessing K145 had reduced reactivity to H3N2 strains possessing N145. Thus, individual mutations in HA can influence antigenic groupings of strains by altering receptor binding avidity and by changing the dominance of antibody responses. Our results indicate that it will be important to account for variation in viral receptor binding avidity when performing antigenic analyses in order to identify genuine antigenic differences among influenza virus variants.

  5. Potyvirus virion structure shows conserved protein fold and RNA binding site in ssRNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Miguel; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Cuesta, Rebeca; Lavín, José L; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A; Valle, Mikel

    2017-09-01

    Potyviruses constitute the second largest genus of plant viruses and cause important economic losses in a large variety of crops; however, the atomic structure of their particles remains unknown. Infective potyvirus virions are long flexuous filaments where coat protein (CP) subunits assemble in helical mode bound to a monopartite positive-sense single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] genome. We present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the potyvirus watermelon mosaic virus at a resolution of 4.0 Å. The atomic model shows a conserved fold for the CPs of flexible filamentous plant viruses, including a universally conserved RNA binding pocket, which is a potential target for antiviral compounds. This conserved fold of the CP is widely distributed in eukaryotic viruses and is also shared by nucleoproteins of enveloped viruses with segmented (-)ssRNA (negative-sense ssRNA) genomes, including influenza viruses.

  6. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

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    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  7. Receptor binding specificity of recent human H3N2 influenza viruses

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    Cummings Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human influenza viruses are known to bind to sialic acid linked α2-6 to galactose, but the binding specificity beyond that linkage has not been systematically examined. H3N2 human influenza isolates lost binding to chicken red cells in the 1990s but viruses isolated since 2003 have re-acquired the ability to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes. We have investigated specificity of binding, changes in hemagglutinin sequence of the recent viruses and the role of sialic acid in productive infection. Results Viruses that agglutinate, or do not agglutinate, chicken red cells show identical binding to a Glycan Array of 264 oligosaccharides, binding exclusively to a subset of α2-6-sialylsaccharides. We identified an amino acid change in hemagglutinin that seemed to correlate with chicken red cell binding but when tested by mutagenesis there was no effect. Recombinant hemagglutinins expressed on Sf-9 cells bound chicken red cells but the released recombinant baculoviruses agglutinated only human red cells. Similarly, an isolate that does not agglutinate chicken red cells show hemadsorption of chicken red cells to infected MDCK cells. We suggest that binding of chicken red cells to cell surface hemagglutinin but not to virions is due to a more favorable hemagglutinin density on the cell surface. We investigated whether a virus specific for α2-6 sialyloligosaccharides shows differential entry into cells that have varying proportions of α2-6 and α2-3 sialic acids, including human A549 and HeLa cells with high levels of α2-6 sialic acid, and CHO cells that have only α2-3 sialic acid. We found that the virus enters all cell types tested and synthesizes viral nucleoprotein, localized in the nucleus, and hemagglutinin, transported to the cell surface, but infectious progeny viruses were released only from MDCK cells. Conclusion Agglutination of chicken red cells does not correlate with altered binding to any oligosaccharide on the Glycan

  8. Dissecting virus entry: replication-independent analysis of virus binding, internalization, and penetration using minimal complementation of β-galactosidase.

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    Christine Burkard

    Full Text Available Studies of viral entry into host cells often rely on the detection of post-entry parameters, such as viral replication or the expression of a reporter gene, rather than on measuring entry per se. The lack of assays to easily detect the different steps of entry severely hampers the analysis of this key process in virus infection. Here we describe novel, highly adaptable viral entry assays making use of minimal complementation of the E. coli β-galactosidase in mammalian cells. Enzyme activity is reconstituted when a small intravirion peptide (α-peptide is complementing the inactive mutant form ΔM15 of β-galactosidase. The method allows to dissect and to independently detect binding, internalization, and fusion of viruses during host cell entry. Here we use it to confirm and extend current knowledge on the entry process of two enveloped viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV.

  9. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-09-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024-21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A pseudoreceptor modelling study of the varicella-zoster virus and human thymidine kinase binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenidge, Paulette A.; Merz, Alfred; Folkers, Gerd

    1995-12-01

    A representative range of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues that are known to inhibit herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication have been used to construct receptor binding site models for the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), thymidine kinase (TK) and human TK1. Given a set of interacting ligands, superimposed in such a manner as to define a pharmacophore, the pseudoreceptor modelling technique Yak provides a means of building binding site models of macromolecules for which no three-dimensional experimental structures are available. Once the models have been evaluated by their ability to reproduce experimental binding data [Vedani et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 117 (1995) 4987], they can be used for predictive purposes. Calculated and experimental values of relative binding affinity are compared. Our models suggest that the substitution of one residue may be sufficient to determine ligand subtype affinity.

  11. Binding of white spot syndrome virus to Artemia sp. cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuying; Li, Guangda; Feng, Wenpo; Huang, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Using differential velocity centrifugation, cell membranes of Artemia sp. were prepared, and their binding to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was analyzed in vitro. The results indicated that WSSV can specifically bind to Artemia cell membranes, and that WSSV receptor very likely existed in this membrane, which suggested that Artemia sp. may be a reservoir of WSSV. This study investigated the specific WSSV binding site by performing competitive inhibition experiments using shrimp gill cell membranes to bind WSSV to Artemia cell membranes. The results showed that shrimp gill cell membranes had a distinct inhibition effect on the specific binding of Artemia cell membranes to WSSV. Thus, potentially similar WSSV receptors or binding sites existed on Artemia sp. cell membranes and shrimp gill cell membranes. Taken together, these findings may provide experimental basis for the development of an effective approach to controlling WSSV, and theoretical basis for the study of WSSV receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for zinc binding by two structural proteins of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Workers in our laboratory previously reported the possibility of cation involvement in the in vitro dissociation of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus nucleocapsids (K. A. Tweeten, L. A. Bulla, Jr., and R. A. Consigli, J. Virol. 33:866-876, 1980; M. E. Wilson and R. A. Consigli, Virology 143:516-525, 1985). The current study found zinc associated with both granulosis virus nucleocapsids and granulin by atomic absorption analysis. A blotting assay with 65Zn2+ specifically identified the radioactive cation as binding to two viral structural proteins, granulin and VP12. These findings indicate that zinc may have a critical role in maintaining virus stability.

  13. Mechanism of Binding to Ebola Virus Glycoprotein by the ZMapp, ZMAb, and MB-003 Cocktail Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Edgar; Bryan, Christopher; Fong, Rachel H.; Barnes, Trevor; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Mabila, Manu; Rucker, Joseph B.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Cocktails of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that target the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) are effective in nonhuman primate models and have been used under emergency compassionate-treatment protocols in human patients. However, the amino acids that form the detailed binding epitopes for the MAbs in the ZMapp, ZMAb, and the related MB-003 cocktails have yet to be identified. Other binding properties that define how each MAb functionally interacts with GP—such as affinity, epito...

  14. Triggering of the Newcastle Disease Virus Fusion Protein by a Chimeric Attachment Protein That Binds to Nipah Virus Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Anne M.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhu, Qiyun; Mahon, Paul J.; Rota, Paul A.; Lee, Benhur; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are both triggered by binding to receptors, mediated in both viruses by a second protein, the attachment protein. However, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) attachment protein of NDV recognizes sialic acid receptors, whereas the NiV G attachment protein recognizes ephrinB2/B3 as receptors. Chimeric proteins composed of domains from the two attachment proteins have been evaluated for fusion-promoting activity with each F protein. Chimeras having NiV G-derived globular domains and NDV HN-derived stalks, transmembranes, and cytoplasmic tails are efficiently expressed, bind ephrinB2, and trigger NDV F to promote fusion in Vero cells. Thus, the NDV F protein can be triggered by binding to the NiV receptor, indicating that an aspect of the triggering cascade induced by the binding of HN to sialic acid is conserved in the binding of NiV G to ephrinB2. However, the fusion cascade for triggering NiV F by the G protein and that of triggering NDV F by the chimeras can be distinguished by differential exposure of a receptor-induced conformational epitope. The enhanced exposure of this epitope marks the triggering of NiV F by NiV G but not the triggering of NDV F by the chimeras. Thus, the triggering cascade for NiV G-F fusion may be more complex than that of NDV HN and F. This is consistent with the finding that reciprocal chimeras having NDV HN-derived heads and NiV G-derived stalks, transmembranes, and tails do not trigger either F protein for fusion, despite efficient cell surface expression and receptor binding. PMID:21460213

  15. Triggering of the newcastle disease virus fusion protein by a chimeric attachment protein that binds to Nipah virus receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Anne M; Aguilar, Hector C; Zhu, Qiyun; Mahon, Paul J; Rota, Paul A; Lee, Benhur; Iorio, Ronald M

    2011-05-20

    The fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are both triggered by binding to receptors, mediated in both viruses by a second protein, the attachment protein. However, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) attachment protein of NDV recognizes sialic acid receptors, whereas the NiV G attachment protein recognizes ephrinB2/B3 as receptors. Chimeric proteins composed of domains from the two attachment proteins have been evaluated for fusion-promoting activity with each F protein. Chimeras having NiV G-derived globular domains and NDV HN-derived stalks, transmembranes, and cytoplasmic tails are efficiently expressed, bind ephrinB2, and trigger NDV F to promote fusion in Vero cells. Thus, the NDV F protein can be triggered by binding to the NiV receptor, indicating that an aspect of the triggering cascade induced by the binding of HN to sialic acid is conserved in the binding of NiV G to ephrinB2. However, the fusion cascade for triggering NiV F by the G protein and that of triggering NDV F by the chimeras can be distinguished by differential exposure of a receptor-induced conformational epitope. The enhanced exposure of this epitope marks the triggering of NiV F by NiV G but not the triggering of NDV F by the chimeras. Thus, the triggering cascade for NiV G-F fusion may be more complex than that of NDV HN and F. This is consistent with the finding that reciprocal chimeras having NDV HN-derived heads and NiV G-derived stalks, transmembranes, and tails do not trigger either F protein for fusion, despite efficient cell surface expression and receptor binding. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes and susceptibility to epstein-barr virus infection in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Jeppe T; Jarrett, Ruth F; Koch, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient childr...

  17. The NTP-binding motif in cowpea mosaic virus B polyprotein is essential for viral replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S A; Verver, J; Nollen, E A; van Lent, J W; Wellink, J; van Kammen, A

    1994-01-01

    We have assessed the functional importance of the NTP-binding motif (NTBM) in the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) B-RNA-encoded 58K domain by changing two conserved amino acids within the consensus A and B sites (GKSRTGK500S and MDD545, respectively). Both Lys-500 to Thr and Asp-545 to Pro substitutions

  18. Antibodies elicited by influenza virus hemagglutinin fail to bind to synthetic peptides representing putative antigenic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorowicz, A; Tregear, G W; Southwell, C N; Martyn, J; Murray, J M; White, D O; Jackson, D C

    1985-02-01

    A number of peptides of the hemagglutinin (HA) of X-31 influenza virus have been synthesised. The amino acid sequences of some of these peptides represent regions of HA which have been postulated [Wiley et al., Nature, Lond. 289, 373-378 (1981)] to form the antigenic sites of this molecule. Animals were immunized with free peptide or peptide conjugated to a carrier and the resulting antisera examined for their capacities to bind to homologous peptide, whole HA, reduced and alkylated HA, and intact virus. Not all peptides examined in this way were immunogenic. Only antibodies raised against the C-terminus of HA1 peptide displayed binding to virus. This antiserum bound to the intact HA but not to the reduced and alkylated form of the molecule. These results raise questions as to the feasibility of using synthetic peptides of the influenza HA in short linear sequences to elicit neutralising antibody.

  19. Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly and receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Liu, Zheng; Ye, Qiaozhen; Mata, Douglas A.; Li, Kunpeng; Yin, Changcheng; Zhang, Jingqiang; Tao, Yizhi Jane; (Sun Yat-Sen); (Rice); (Peking)

    2009-08-25

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a small, non-enveloped RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae, is associated with endemic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. Our 3.5-{angstrom} structure of a HEV-like particle (VLP) shows that each capsid protein contains 3 linear domains that form distinct structural elements: S, the continuous capsid; P1, 3-fold protrusions; and P2, 2-fold spikes. The S domain adopts a jelly-roll fold commonly observed in small RNA viruses. The P1 and P2 domains both adopt {beta}-barrel folds. Each domain possesses a potential polysaccharide-binding site that may function in cell-receptor binding. Sugar binding to P1 at the capsid protein interface may lead to capsid disassembly and cell entry. Structural modeling indicates that native T = 3 capsid contains flat dimers, with less curvature than those of T = 1 VLP. Our findings significantly advance the understanding of HEV molecular biology and have application to the development of vaccines and antiviral medications.

  20. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-06-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Density consistent with SIA was observed in a pocket located at the base of capsid protrusions surrounding icosahedral 3-fold axes. Site-directed mutagenesis substitution of the amino acids forming this pocket with structurally equivalent residues from AAV2, a heparan sulfate binding serotype, followed by cell binding and transduction assays, further mapped the critical residues conferring SIA binding to AAV1 and AAV6. For both viruses five of the six binding pocket residues mutated (N447S, V473D, N500E, T502S, and W503A) abolished SIA binding, whereas S472R increased binding. All six mutations abolished or decreased transduction by at least 50% in AAV1. Surprisingly, the T502S substitution did not affect transduction efficiency of wild-type AAV6. Furthermore, three of the AAV1 SIA binding site mutants-S472R, V473D, and N500E-escaped recognition by the anti-AAV1 capsid antibody ADK1a. These observations demonstrate that common key capsid surface residues dictate both virus binding and entry processes, as well as antigenic reactivity. This study identifies an important functional capsid surface "hot spot" dictating receptor attachment, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity which could prove useful for vector engineering. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector gene delivery system has shown promise in several clinical trials and an AAV1-based vector has been approved as the first gene therapy treatment. However, limitations still exist with respect to transduction efficiency and

  1. Semisynthetic teicoplanin derivatives as new influenza virus binding inhibitors: synthesis and antiviral studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Ilona; Kicsák, Máté; Dobray, Laura; Borbás, Anikó; Batta, Gyula; Kéki, Sándor; Nikodém, Éva Nemes; Ostorházi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Vanderlinden, Evelien; Naesens, Lieve; Herczegh, Pál

    2014-08-01

    In order to obtain new, cluster-forming antibiotic compounds, teicoplanin pseudoaglycone derivatives containing two lipophilic n-octyl chains have been synthesized. The compounds proved to be poor antibacterials, but, surprisingly, they exhibited potent anti-influenza virus activity against influenza A strains. This antiviral action was related to inhibition of the binding interaction between the virus and the host cell. Related analogs bearing methyl substituents in lieu of the octyl chains, displayed no anti-influenza virus activity. Hence, an interaction between the active, dually n-octylated compounds and the lipid bilayer of the host cell can be postulated, to explain the observed inhibition of influenza virus attachment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  3. Nucleoproteins of Negative Strand RNA Viruses; RNA Binding, Oligomerisation and Binding to Polymerase Co-Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Crépin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Commentary on Tawar, R.G.; Duquerroy, S.; Vonrhein, C.; Varela, P.F.; Damier-Piolle, L.; Castagné, N.; MacLellan, K.; Bedouelle, H.; Bricogne, G.; Bhella, D.; Eléouët, J.-F.; Rey, F.A. Crystal structure of a nucleocapsid-like nucleoprotein-RNA complex of respiratory syncytial virus. Science 2009, 326, 1279-1283.

  4. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  5. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  6. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  7. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  8. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Isabel Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS, characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa. Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1 that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2 that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  9. Identifying gp85-regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus binding to B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Vega, Erika; Patino, Helena; Garcia, Javier; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Guzman, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-06-18

    Epstein-Barr virus lacking glycoprotein gp85 cannot infect B-cells and epithelial cells. The gp85 belongs to the molecular complex required for virus invasion of B-lymphocyte or epithelial cells. Moreover, there is evidence that gp85 is necessary for virus attachment to epithelial cells. Thirty-six peptides from the entire gp85-sequence were tested in epithelial and lymphoblastoid cell line binding assays to identify gp85-regions involved in virus-cell interaction. Five of these peptides presented high binding activity to Raji, Ramos, P3HR-1, and HeLa cells, but not to erythrocytes; Raji-cell affinity constants were between 80 and 140nM. Of these five peptides, 11435 ((181)TYKRVTEKGDEHVLSLVFGK(200)), 11436 ((201)TKDLPDLRGPFSYPSLTSAQ(220)), and 11438 ((241)YFVPNLKDMFSRAVTMTAAS(260)) bound to a 65kDa protein on Raji-cell surface. These peptides and antibodies induced by them (recognising live EBV-infected cells) inhibited Epstein-Barr virus interaction with cord blood lymphocytes. It is thus probable that gp85-regions defined by peptides 11435, 11436, and 11438 are involved in EBV invasion of B-lymphocytes.

  10. PARP1 restricts Epstein Barr Virus lytic reactivation by binding the BZLF1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupey-Green, Lena N; Moquin, Stephanie A; Martin, Kayla A; McDevitt, Shane M; Hulse, Michael; Caruso, Lisa B; Pomerantz, Richard T; Miranda, Jj L; Tempera, Italo

    2017-07-01

    The Epstein Barr virus (EBV) genome persists in infected host cells as a chromatinized episome and is subject to chromatin-mediated regulation. Binding of the host insulator protein CTCF to the EBV genome has an established role in maintaining viral latency type, and in other herpesviruses, loss of CTCF binding at specific regions correlates with viral reactivation. Here, we demonstrate that binding of PARP1, an important cofactor of CTCF, at the BZLF1 lytic switch promoter restricts EBV reactivation. Knockdown of PARP1 in the Akata-EBV cell line significantly increases viral copy number and lytic protein expression. Interestingly, CTCF knockdown has no effect on viral reactivation, and CTCF binding across the EBV genome is largely unchanged following reactivation. Moreover, EBV reactivation attenuates PARP activity, and Zta expression alone is sufficient to decrease PARP activity. Here we demonstrate a restrictive function of PARP1 in EBV lytic reactivation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative characterization of glycan-receptor binding of H9N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1 subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties.

  12. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Densi...

  13. Second Sialic Acid Binding Site in Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase: Implications for Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, Viatcheslav; von Itzstein, Mark; Groves, Darrin; Kiefel, Milton; Takimoto, Toru; Portner, Allen; Taylor, Garry

    2004-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are the leading cause of respiratory disease in children. Several paramyxoviruses possess a surface glycoprotein, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), that is involved in attachment to sialic acid receptors, promotion of fusion, and removal of sialic acid from infected cells and progeny virions. Previously we showed that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) HN contained a pliable sialic acid recognition site that could take two states, a binding state and a catalytic state. Here we ...

  14. Evidence for the Inhibition of Dengue Virus Binding in the Presence of Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    treatment methods [8]. In this suspended form, DENV would not be infectious and requires parenteral transmission. Dengue is only infectious... Dengue : guidelines for diagnosis, treatment , prevention, and control,” Spec. Program. Res. Train. Trop. Dis., pp. x, 147, 2009. [7] R. V Gibbons...protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-089 EVIDENCE FOR INHIBITION OF DENGUE VIRUS BINDING IN THE PRESENCE OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES THESIS

  15. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  16. Dengue viruses binding proteins from Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao-Lormeau Van-Mai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dengue virus (DENV, the etiological agent of dengue fever, is transmitted to the human host during blood uptake by an infective mosquito. Infection of vector salivary glands and further injection of infectious saliva into the human host are key events of the DENV transmission cycle. However, the molecular mechanisms of DENV entry into the mosquito salivary glands have not been clearly identified. Otherwise, although it was demonstrated for other vector-transmitted pathogens that insect salivary components may interact with host immune agents and impact the establishment of infection, the role of mosquito saliva on DENV infection in human has been only poorly documented. To identify salivary gland molecules which might interact with DENV at these key steps of transmission cycle, we investigated the presence of proteins able to bind DENV in salivary gland extracts (SGE from two mosquito species. Using virus overlay protein binding assay, we detected several proteins able to bind DENV in SGE from Aedes aegypti (L. and Aedes polynesiensis (Marks. The present findings pave the way for the identification of proteins mediating DENV attachment or entry into mosquito salivary glands, and of saliva-secreted proteins those might be bound to the virus at the earliest step of human infection. The present findings might contribute to the identification of new targets for anti-dengue strategies.

  17. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  18. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  19. Investigation of the Lipid Binding Properties of the Marburg Virus Matrix Protein VP40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-12-30

    Marburg virus (MARV), which belongs to the virus family Filoviridae, causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates that is often fatal. MARV is a lipid-enveloped virus that during the replication process extracts its lipid coat from the plasma membrane of the host cell it infects. MARV carries seven genes, one of which encodes its matrix protein VP40 (mVP40), which regulates the assembly and budding of the virions. Currently, little information is available on mVP40 lipid binding properties. Here, we have investigated the in vitro and cellular mechanisms by which mVP40 associates with lipid membranes. mVP40 associates with anionic membranes in a nonspecific manner that is dependent upon the anionic charge density of the membrane. These results are consistent with recent structural determination of mVP40, which elucidated an mVP40 dimer with a flat and extensive cationic lipid binding interface. Marburg virus (MARV) is a lipid-enveloped filamentous virus from the family Filoviridae. MARV was discovered in 1967, and yet little is known about how its seven genes are used to assemble and form a new viral particle in the host cell it infects. The MARV matrix protein VP40 (mVP40) underlies the inner leaflet of the virus and regulates budding from the host cell plasma membrane. In vitro and cellular assays in this study investigated the mechanism by which mVP40 associates with lipids. The results demonstrate that mVP40 interactions with lipid vesicles or the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane are electrostatic but nonspecific in nature and are dependent on the anionic charge density of the membrane surface. Small molecules that can disrupt lipid trafficking or reduce the anionic charge of the plasma membrane interface may be useful in inhibiting assembly and budding of MARV. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Combining confocal and atomic force microscopy to quantify single-virus binding to mammalian cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Delguste, Martin; Koehler, Melanie; Dumitru, Andra C; Laskowski, Pawel R; Müller, Daniel J; Alsteens, David

    2017-11-01

    Over the past five years, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based approaches have evolved into a powerful multiparametric tool set capable of imaging the surfaces of biological samples ranging from single receptors to membranes and tissues. One of these approaches, force-distance curve-based AFM (FD-based AFM), uses a probing tip functionalized with a ligand to image living cells at high-resolution and simultaneously localize and characterize specific ligand-receptor binding events. Analyzing data from FD-based AFM experiments using appropriate probabilistic models allows quantification of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that describe the free-energy landscape of the ligand-receptor bond. We have recently developed an FD-based AFM approach to quantify the binding events of single enveloped viruses to surface receptors of living animal cells while simultaneously observing them by fluorescence microscopy. This approach has provided insights into the early stages of the interaction between a virus and a cell. Applied to a model virus, we probed the specific interaction with cells expressing viral cognate receptors and measured the affinity of the interaction. Furthermore, we observed that the virus rapidly established specific multivalent interactions and found that each bond formed in sequence strengthened the attachment of the virus to the cell. Here we describe detailed procedures for probing the specific interactions of viruses with living cells; these procedures cover tip preparation, cell sample preparation, step-by-step FD-based AFM imaging and data analysis. Experienced microscopists should be able to master the entire set of protocols in 1 month.

  1. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term

  2. Characterization of the Virus and Monoclonal Antibody Binding Sites of the Mouse Hepatitis Virus Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-16

    clinical syndromes (Sturman and Holmes, 1983). The murine hepatitis viruses (MHV) belong to antigenic group II and can cause enteric infections...region ( Moebius et al., 1992). The goal of this work is two fold. First, to determine whether Bgp1a and Bgp1b are allelic variants of the same gene...residues homologous to the I9 CDR2 region also contacts a small pocket within the HIV gp120. More recently, Moebius et al. (1992) created point mutation

  3. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J; Martin, Stephen R; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J; Hay, Alan J; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D; Feizi, Ten

    2013-12-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. Copyright © 2013 The Authros. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Ebola virus VP35 protein binds viral immunostimulatory and host RNAs identified through deep sequencing.

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    Kari A Dilley

    Full Text Available Ebola virus and Marburg virus are members of the Filovirdae family and causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates in humans. Filovirus virulence is partially attributed to the VP35 protein, a well-characterized inhibitor of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway that triggers the antiviral interferon (IFN response. Prior work demonstrates the ability of VP35 to block potent RIG-I activators, such as Sendai virus (SeV, and this IFN-antagonist activity is directly correlated with its ability to bind RNA. Several structural studies demonstrate that VP35 binds short synthetic dsRNAs; yet, there are no data that identify viral immunostimulatory RNAs (isRNA or host RNAs bound to VP35 in cells. Utilizing a SeV infection model, we demonstrate that both viral isRNA and host RNAs are bound to Ebola and Marburg VP35s in cells. By deep sequencing the purified VP35-bound RNA, we identified the SeV copy-back defective interfering (DI RNA, previously identified as a robust RIG-I activator, as the isRNA bound by multiple filovirus VP35 proteins, including the VP35 protein from the West African outbreak strain (Makona EBOV. Moreover, RNAs isolated from a VP35 RNA-binding mutant were not immunostimulatory and did not include the SeV DI RNA. Strikingly, an analysis of host RNAs bound by wild-type, but not mutant, VP35 revealed that select host RNAs are preferentially bound by VP35 in cell culture. Taken together, these data support a model in which VP35 sequesters isRNA in virus-infected cells to avert RIG-I like receptor (RLR activation.

  5. Mapping of the Lassa virus LAMP1 binding site reveals unique determinants not shared by other old world arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Hadar; Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Shulman, Anastasiya; Shimon, Amir; Diskin, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Cell entry of many enveloped viruses occurs by engagement with cellular receptors, followed by internalization into endocytic compartments and pH-induced membrane fusion. A previously unnoticed step of receptor switching was found to be critical during cell entry of two devastating human pathogens: Ebola and Lassa viruses. Our recent studies revealed the functional role of receptor switching to LAMP1 for triggering membrane fusion by Lassa virus and showed the involvement of conserved histidines in this switching, suggesting that other viruses from this family may also switch to LAMP1. However, when we investigated viruses that are genetically close to Lassa virus, we discovered that they cannot bind LAMP1. A crystal structure of the receptor-binding module from Morogoro virus revealed structural differences that allowed mapping of the LAMP1 binding site to a unique set of Lassa residues not shared by other viruses in its family, illustrating a key difference in the cell-entry mechanism of Lassa virus that may contribute to its pathogenicity.

  6. Impact of Heparan Sulfate Binding on Transduction of Retina by Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Sanford L.; Bennett, Antonette; Scalabrino, Miranda L.; McCullough, K. Tyler; Van Vliet, Kim; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Ruan, Qing; Peterson, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) currently are being developed to efficiently transduce the retina following noninvasive, intravitreal (Ivt) injection. However, a major barrier encountered by intravitreally delivered AAVs is the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a basement membrane rich in heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of HS binding on retinal transduction by Ivt-delivered AAVs. The heparin affinities of AAV2-based tyrosine-to-phenylalanine (Y-F) and threonine-to-valine (T-V) capsid mutants, designed to avoid proteasomal degradation during cellular trafficking, were established. In addition, the impact of grafting HS binding residues onto AAV1, AAV5, and AAV8(Y733F) as well as ablation of HS binding by AAV2-based vectors on retinal transduction was investigated. Finally, the potential relationship between thermal stability of AAV2-based capsids and Ivt-mediated transduction was explored. The results show that the Y-F and T-V AAV2 capsid mutants bind heparin but with slightly reduced affinity relative to that of AAV2. The grafting of HS binding increased Ivt transduction by AAV1 but not by AAV5 or AAV8(Y733F). The substitution of any canonical HS binding residues ablated Ivt-mediated transduction by AAV2-based vectors. However, these same HS variant vectors displayed efficient retinal transduction when delivered subretinally. Notably, a variant devoid of canonical HS binding residues, AAV2(4pMut)ΔHS, was remarkably efficient at transducing photoreceptors. The disparate AAV phenotypes indicate that HS binding, while critical for AAV2-based vectors, is not the sole determinant for transduction via the Ivt route. Finally, Y-F and T-V mutations alter capsid stability, with a potential relationship existing between stability and improvements in retinal transduction by Ivt injection. IMPORTANCE AAV has emerged as the vector of choice for gene delivery to the retina, with attention focused on developing vectors

  7. Proteomic Identification of Dengue Virus Binding Proteins in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes and Aedes albopictus Cells

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    Maria de Lourdes Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main vector of dengue in America is the mosquito Aedes aegypti, which is infected by dengue virus (DENV through receptors of midgut epithelial cells. The envelope protein (E of dengue virus binds to receptors present on the host cells through its domain III that has been primarily recognized to bind cell receptors. In order to identify potential receptors, proteins from mosquito midgut tissue and C6/36 cells were purified by affinity using columns with the recombinant E protein domain III (rE-DIII or DENV particles bound covalently to Sepharose 4B to compare and evaluate their performance to bind proteins including putative receptors from female mosquitoes of Ae. aegypti. To determine their identity mass spectrometric analysis of purified proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. Our results indicate that both viral particles and rE-DIII bound proteins with the same apparent molecular weights of 57 and 67 kDa. In addition, viral particles bound high molecular weight proteins. Purified proteins identified were enolase, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-ARK, translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha/Tu, and cadherin.

  8. The receptor-binding site of the measles virus hemagglutinin protein itself constitutes a conserved neutralizing epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Maino; Ohno, Shinji; Sakai, Kouji; Ito, Yuri; Fukuhara, Hideo; Komase, Katsuhiro; Brindley, Melinda A; Rota, Paul A; Plemper, Richard K; Maenaka, Katsumi; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    Here, we provide direct evidence that the receptor-binding site of measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin protein itself forms an effective conserved neutralizing epitope (CNE). Several receptor-interacting residues constitute the CNE. Thus, viral escape from neutralization has to be associated with loss of receptor-binding activity. Since interactions with both the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) and nectin4 are critical for MV pathogenesis, its escape, which results from loss of receptor-binding activity, should not occur in nature.

  9. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Sapovirus translation requires an interaction between VPg and the cap binding protein eIF4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Kim, Deok-Song; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-11-01

    Sapoviruses of the Caliciviridae family of small RNA viruses are emerging pathogens that cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals. Molecular studies on human sapovirus have been hampered due to the lack of a cell culture system. In contrast, porcine sapovirus (PSaV) can be grown in cell culture, making it a suitable model for understanding the infectious cycle of sapoviruses and the related enteric caliciviruses. Caliciviruses are known to use a novel mechanism of protein synthesis that relies on the interaction of cellular translation initiation factors with the virus genome-encoded viral protein genome (VPg) protein, which is covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral genome. Using PSaV as a representative member of the Sapovirus genus, we characterized the role of the viral VPg protein in sapovirus translation. As observed for other caliciviruses, the PSaV genome was found to be covalently linked to VPg, and this linkage was required for the translation and the infectivity of viral RNA. The PSaV VPg protein was associated with the 4F subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4F) complex in infected cells and bound directly to the eIF4E protein. As has been previously demonstrated for feline calicivirus, a member of the Vesivirus genus, PSaV translation required eIF4E and the interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G. Overall, our study provides new insights into the novel mechanism of sapovirus translation, suggesting that sapovirus VPg can hijack the cellular translation initiation mechanism by recruiting the eIF4F complex through a direct eIF4E interaction. Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are one of the causative agents of viral gastroenteritis in humans. However, human sapovirus remains noncultivable in cell culture, hampering the ability to characterize the virus infectious cycle. Here, we show that the VPg protein from porcine sapovirus, the only cultivatable sapovirus, is essential for viral translation and

  11. Identification of a PA-binding peptide with inhibitory activity against influenza A and B virus replication.

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    Kerstin Wunderlich

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new drugs against influenza type A and B viruses due to incomplete protection by vaccines and the emergence of resistance to current antivirals. The influenza virus polymerase complex, consisting of the PB1, PB2 and PA subunits, represents a promising target for the development of new drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between the PB1 and PA subunits of the polymerase complex of influenza A virus using a small peptide derived from the PA-binding domain of PB1. However, this influenza A virus-derived peptide did not affect influenza B virus polymerase activity. Here we report that the PA-binding domain of the polymerase subunit PB1 of influenza A and B viruses is highly conserved and that mutual amino acid exchange shows that they cannot be functionally exchanged with each other. Based on phylogenetic analysis and a novel biochemical ELISA-based screening approach, we were able to identify an influenza A-derived peptide with a single influenza B-specific amino acid substitution which efficiently binds to PA of both virus types. This dual-binding peptide blocked the viral polymerase activity and growth of both virus types. Our findings provide proof of principle that protein-protein interaction inhibitors can be generated against influenza A and B viruses. Furthermore, this dual-binding peptide, combined with our novel screening method, is a promising platform to identify new antiviral lead compounds.

  12. Capsid Antibodies to Different Adeno-Associated Virus Serotypes Bind Common Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurda, Brittney L.; DiMattia, Michael A.; Miller, Edward B.; Bennett, Antonette; McKenna, Robert; Weichert, Wendy S.; Nelson, Christian D.; Chen, Wei-jun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Chiorini, John A.; Zolotutkhin, Sergei; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Baker, Timothy S.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between viruses and the host antibody immune response are critical in the development and control of disease, and antibodies are also known to interfere with the efficacy of viral vector-based gene delivery. The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) being developed as vectors for corrective human gene delivery have shown promise in clinical trials, but preexisting antibodies are detrimental to successful outcomes. However, the antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids remain poorly characterized. Cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction were used to define the locations of epitopes to which monoclonal fragment antibodies (Fabs) against AAV1, AAV2, AAV5, and AAV6 bind. Pseudoatomic modeling showed that, in each serotype, Fabs bound to a limited number of sites near the protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes of the T=1 icosahedral capsids. For the closely related AAV1 and AAV6, a common Fab exhibited substoichiometric binding, with one Fab bound, on average, between two of the three protrusions as a consequence of steric crowding. The other AAV Fabs saturated the capsid and bound to the walls of all 60 protrusions, with the footprint for the AAV5 antibody extending toward the 5-fold axis. The angle of incidence for each bound Fab on the AAVs varied and resulted in significant differences in how much of each viral capsid surface was occluded beyond the Fab footprints. The AAV-antibody interactions showed a common set of footprints that overlapped some known receptor-binding sites and transduction determinants, thus suggesting potential mechanisms for virus neutralization by the antibodies. PMID:23760240

  13. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

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    Hugo de Almeida

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4, and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO, which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation, a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  14. Annexin A2 binds RNA and reduces the frameshifting efficiency of infectious bronchitis virus.

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    Hoyun Kwak

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 is a protein implicated in diverse cellular functions, including exocytosis, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. It was recently proposed to be involved in RNA metabolism because it was shown to associate with some cellular mRNA. Here, we identified ANXA2 as a RNA binding protein (RBP that binds IBV (Infectious Bronchitis Virus pseudoknot RNA. We first confirmed the binding of ANXA2 to IBV pseudoknot RNA by ultraviolet crosslinking and showed its binding to RNA pseudoknot with ANXA2 protein in vitro and in the cells. Since the RNA pseudoknot located in the frameshifting region of IBV was used as bait for cellular RBPs, we tested whether ANXA2 could regulate the frameshfting of IBV pseudoknot RNA by dual luciferase assay. Overexpression of ANXA2 significantly reduced the frameshifting efficiency from IBV pseudoknot RNA and knockdown of the protein strikingly increased the frameshifting efficiency. The results suggest that ANXA2 is a cellular RBP that can modulate the frameshifting efficiency of viral RNA, enabling it to act as an anti-viral cellular protein, and hinting at roles in RNA metabolism for other cellular mRNAs.

  15. Identification of the galactose binding domain of the adeno-associated virus serotype 9 capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christie L; Gurda, Brittney L; Van Vliet, Kim; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wilson, James M

    2012-07-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors show promise for gene therapy of a variety of diseases due to their ability to transduce multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and the alveolar epithelium of the lung. In addition, AAV9 is unique compared to other AAV serotypes in that it is capable of surpassing the blood-brain barrier and transducing neurons in the brain and spinal cord. It has recently been shown that AAV9 uses galactose as a receptor to transduce many different cell types in vitro, as well as cells of the mouse airway in vivo. In this study, we sought to identify the specific amino acids of the AAV9 capsid necessary for binding to galactose. By site-directed mutagenesis and cell binding assays, plus computational ligand docking studies, we discovered five amino acids, including N470, D271, N272, Y446, and W503, which are required for galactose binding that form a pocket at the base of the protrusions around the icosahedral 3-fold axes of symmetry. The importance of these amino acids for tissue tropism was also confirmed by in vivo studies in the mouse lung. Identifying the interactions necessary for AAV9 binding to galactose may lead to advances in vector engineering.

  16. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

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    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  17. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S. (Oregon HSU)

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  18. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S., E-mail: chapmami@ohsu.edu

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia targeting by myxoma virus in vivo depends on cell binding but not permissiveness to infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlambayan, Gerard J; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2012-05-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifically targets human AML cells. MYXV prevented chloroma formation and bone marrow engraftment of two human AML cell lines, KG-1 and THP-1. The reduction in human leukemia engraftment after ex vivo MYXV treatment was dose-dependent and required a minimum MOI of 3. Both AML cell lines demonstrated MYXV binding to leukemia cell membranes following co-incubation: however, evidence of productive MYXV infection was observed only in THP-1 cells. This observation, that KG-1 can be targeted in vivo even in the absence of in vitro permissive viral infection, contrasts with the current understanding of oncolytic virotherapy, which assumes that virus infection and productive replication is a requirement. Preventing MYXV binding to AML cells with heparin abrogated the purging capacity of MYXV, indicating that binding of infectious virus particles is a necessary step for effective viral oncolysis. Our results challenge the current dogma of oncolytic virotherapy and show that in vitro permissiveness to an oncolytic virus is not necessarily an accurate predictor of oncolytic potency in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that confer binding to human tracheal airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Ayora-Talavera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence in 2009 of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus as the first pandemic of the 21st Century is a timely reminder of the international public health impact of influenza viruses, even those associated with mild disease. The widespread distribution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in the avian population has spawned concern that it may give rise to a human influenza pandemic. The mortality rate associated with occasional human infection by H5N1 virus approximates 60%, suggesting that an H5N1 pandemic would be devastating to global health and economy. To date, the H5N1 virus has not acquired the propensity to transmit efficiently between humans. The reasons behind this are unclear, especially given the high mutation rate associated with influenza virus replication. Here we used a panel of recombinant H5 hemagglutinin (HA variants to demonstrate the potential for H5 HA to bind human airway epithelium, the predominant target tissue for influenza virus infection and spread. While parental H5 HA exhibited limited binding to human tracheal epithelium, introduction of selected mutations converted the binding profile to that of a current human influenza strain HA. Strikingly, these amino-acid changes required multiple simultaneous mutations in the genomes of naturally occurring H5 isolates. Moreover, H5 HAs bearing intermediate sequences failed to bind airway tissues and likely represent mutations that are an evolutionary "dead end." We conclude that, although genetic changes that adapt H5 to human airways can be demonstrated, they may not readily arise during natural virus replication. This genetic barrier limits the likelihood that current H5 viruses will originate a human pandemic.

  1. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

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    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M. (NCI); (Cornell); (CM); (NIST)

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  2. Genetics, Receptor Binding, Replication, and Mammalian Transmission of H4 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Live Poultry Markets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Libin; Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuntao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Liu, Liling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT H4 avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in the world. However, whether H4 AIVs pose a threat to public health remains largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships, receptor binding properties, replication, and transmissibility in mammals of H4 AIVs isolated from live poultry markets in China between 2009 and 2012. Genomic sequence analysis of 36 representative H4 viruses revealed 32 different genotypes, indicating that these viruses are undergoing complex and frequent reassortment events. All 32 viruses tested could replicate in the respiratory organs of infected mice without prior adaptation. Receptor binding analysis demonstrated that the H4 AIVs bound to α-2,6-linked glycans, although they retained the binding preference for α-2,3-linked glycans. When we tested the direct-contact transmission of 10 H4 viruses in guinea pigs, we found that three viruses did not transmit to any of the contact animals, one virus transmitted to one of three contact animals, and six viruses transmitted to all three contact animals. When we further tested the respiratory droplet transmissibility of four of the viruses that transmitted efficiently via direct contact, we found that three of them could transmit to one or two of the five exposed animals. Our study demonstrates that the current circulating H4 AIVs can infect, replicate in, and transmit to mammalian hosts, thereby posing a potential threat to human health. These findings emphasize the continual need for enhanced surveillance of H4 AIVs. IMPORTANCE Numerous surveillance studies have documented the wide distribution of H4 AIVs throughout the world, yet the biological properties of H4 viruses have not been well studied. In this study, we found that multiple genotypes of H4 viruses are cocirculating in the live poultry markets of China and that H4 viruses can replicate in mice, possess human-type receptor binding specificity, and transmit between

  3. Genetics, Receptor Binding Property, and Transmissibility in Mammals of Naturally Isolated H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guohua; Zhang, Qianyi; Wang, Jinliang; He, Xijun; Wang, Kaicheng; Chen, Jiming; Li, Yuanyuan; Fan, Jun; Kong, Huiui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuantao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Li, Yanbing; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    H9N2 subtype influenza viruses have been detected in different species of wild birds and domestic poultry in many countries for several decades. Because these viruses are of low pathogenicity in poultry, their eradication is not a priority for animal disease control in many countries, which has allowed them to continue to evolve and spread. Here, we characterized the genetic variation, receptor-binding specificity, replication capability, and transmission in mammals of a series of H9N2 influenza viruses that were detected in live poultry markets in southern China between 2009 and 2013. Thirty-five viruses represented 17 genotypes on the basis of genomic diversity, and one specific “internal-gene-combination” predominated among the H9N2 viruses. This gene combination was also present in the H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that have infected humans in China. All of the 35 viruses preferentially bound to the human-like receptor, although two also retained the ability to bind to the avian-like receptor. Six of nine viruses tested were transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet; two were highly transmissible. Some H9N2 viruses readily acquired the 627K or 701N mutation in their PB2 gene upon infection of ferrets, further enhancing their virulence and transmission in mammals. Our study indicates that the widespread dissemination of H9N2 viruses poses a threat to human health not only because of the potential of these viruses to cause an influenza pandemic, but also because they can function as “vehicles” to deliver different subtypes of influenza viruses from avian species to humans. PMID:25411973

  4. A human inferred germline antibody binds to an immunodominant epitope and neutralizes Zika virus.

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    Diogo M Magnani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nmAbs against the Zika virus (ZIKV might lead to novel preventative strategies for infections in at-risk individuals, primarily pregnant women. Here we describe the characterization of human mAbs from the plasmablasts of an acutely infected patient. One of the 18 mAbs had the unusual feature of binding to and neutralizing ZIKV despite not appearing to have been diversified by affinity maturation. This mAb neutralized ZIKV (Neut50 ~ 2 μg/ml but did not react with any of the four dengue virus serotypes. Except for the expected junctional diversity created by the joining of the V-(D-J genes, there was no deviation from immunoglobulin germline genes. This is a rare example of a human mAb with neutralizing activity in the absence of detectable somatic hypermutation. Importantly, binding of this mAb to ZIKV was specifically inhibited by human plasma from ZIKV-exposed individuals, suggesting that it may be of value in a diagnostic setting.

  5. Binding of RNA by the Nucleoproteins of Influenza Viruses A and B

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    Alice Labaronne

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a biochemical study for making complexes between the nucleoprotein of influenza viruses A and B (A/NP and B/NP and small RNAs (polyUC RNAs from 5 to 24 nucleotides (nt, starting from monomeric proteins. We used negative stain electron microscopy, size exclusion chromatography-multi-angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS analysis, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements to show how the NP-RNA complexes evolve. Both proteins make small oligomers with 24-nt RNAs, trimers for A/NP, and dimers, tetramers, and larger complexes for B/NP. With shorter RNAs, the affinities of NP are all in the same range at 50 mM NaCl, showing that the RNAs bind on the same site. The affinity of B/NP for a 24-nt RNA does not change with salt. However, the affinity of A/NP for a 24-nt RNA is lower at 150 and 300 mM NaCl, suggesting that the RNA binds to another site, either on the same protomer or on a neighbour protomer. For our fluorescence anisotropy experiments, we used 6-fluorescein amidite (FAM-labelled RNAs. By using a (UC6-FAM3′ RNA with 150 mM NaCl, we observed an interesting phenomenon that gives macromolecular complexes similar to the ribonucleoprotein particles purified from the viruses.

  6. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

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    Shlomai, Amir, E-mail: amirsh@tasmc.health.gov.il [Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver disease, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizmann street, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Shaul, Yosef [Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  7. The binding of a novel bisheteroarylpiperazine mediates inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueweke, T J; Kézdy, F J; Waszak, G A; Deibel, M R; Tarpley, W G

    1992-01-05

    The bisheteroarylpiperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and specifically block HIV-1 replication (Romero, D. L., Busso, M., Tan, C.-K., Reusser, F., Palmer, J. R., Poppe, S. M., Aristoff, P. A., Downey, K. M., So, A. G., Resnick, L., and Tarpley, W. G. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 8806-8810). Here we show that the radiolabeled BHAP [3H]U-88204 binds specifically to HIV-1 RT with high affinity (KD of 50 nM) and a stoichiometry of 1 mol of U-88204 per 1 mol of p66/p51 RT heterodimer. Binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT is unaffected by the presence of saturating poly(rC).oligo (dG)12-18 template-primer. Direct measurement of competition between [3H]U-88204 and other RT inhibitors for binding to RT reveals mutually exclusive competition between [3H]U-88204 and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor BI-RG-587 (Kopp, E. B., Miglietta, J. J., Shrutkowski, A. G., Shih, C.-K., Grob, P. M. and Skoog, M.T. (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 3035-3039), indicating that both share the same binding site. Phosphonoformate in concentrations up to 50 microM shows no competition with [3H]U-88204 for binding to RT either alone or in the presence of template-primer. Dideoxynucleotide RT inhibitors affect the binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT when complementary template-primer is present. [3H]U-88204 and the dideoxynucleotide ddGTP can bind RT simultaneously, but the presence of one ligand decreases the affinity of RT for the second. Inasmuch as ddGTP approximates the nucleotide substrate of RT, the direct demonstration of an RT-dideoxynucleotide-[3H]U-88204 complex validates the use of indirect kinetic methods to assess the strength of BHAP interaction with RT and suggests that RT inhibition by U-88204 is achieved via effects on nucleotide substrate binding.

  8. Antagonistic Effects of Cellular Poly(C) Binding Proteins on Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Gene Expression ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Beura, Lalit K.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis of the cellular proteins from cells expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) P protein identified the poly(C) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as one of the P protein-interacting proteins. To investigate the role of PCBP2 in the viral life cycle, we examined the effects of depletion or overexpression of this protein on VSV growth. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PCBP2 promoted VSV replication. Conversely, overexpression of PCBP2 in transfected cells suppressed VSV growth. Further studies revealed that PCBP2 negatively regulates overall viral mRNA accumulation and subsequent genome replication. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence microscopic studies showed that PCBP2 interacts and colocalizes with VSV P protein in virus-infected cells. The P-PCBP2 interaction did not result in reduced levels of protein complex formation with the viral N and L proteins, nor did it induce degradation of the P protein. In addition, PCBP1, another member of the poly(C) binding protein family with homology to PCBP2, was also found to interact with the P protein and inhibit the viral mRNA synthesis at the level of primary transcription without affecting secondary transcription or genome replication. The inhibitory effects of PCBP1 on VSV replication were less pronounced than those of PCBP2. Overall, the results presented here suggest that cellular PCBP2 and PCBP1 antagonize VSV growth by affecting viral gene expression and highlight the importance of these two cellular proteins in restricting virus infections. PMID:21752917

  9. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  10. Characterization of glycan binding specificities of influenza B viruses with correlation with hemagglutinin genotypes and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Chi, Chia-Yu; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih-Jen

    2012-04-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificities are different among avian and human influenza A viruses and may affect the tissue tropism and transmission of these viruses. The glycan binding biology for influenza B, however, has not been systematically characterized. Glycan binding specificities of influenza B viral isolates were analyzed and correlated to hemagglutinin (HA) genotypes and clinical manifestations. A newly developed solution glycan array was applied to characterize the receptor binding specificities of influenza B virus clinical isolates from 2001 to 2007 in Taiwan. Thirty oligosaccharides which include α-2,3 and α-2,6 linkage glycans were subjected to analysis. The glycan binding patterns of 53 influenza B isolates could be categorized into three groups and were well correlated to their HA genotypes. The Yamagata-like strains predominantly bound to α-2,6-linkage glycan (24:29, 83%) while Victoria-like strains preferentially bound to both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linkage glycans (13:24, 54%). A third group of viruses bound to sulfated glycans and these all belonged to Victoria-like strains. Based on the HA sequences, Asn-163, Glu-198, Ala-202, and Lys-203 were conserved among Victoria-like strains which may influence their carbohydrate recognition. The viruses bound to dual type glycans were more likely to be associated with the development of bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal illness than those bound only to α-2,6 sialyl glycans (P B viruses, and will contribute to virus surveillance and vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. More recent swine vesicular disease virus isolates retain binding to coxsackie-adenovirus receptor, but have lost the ability to bind human decay-accelerating factor (CD55).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Ley, Victoria; Spiller, O Brad

    2005-05-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) evolved from coxsackie B virus serotype 5 (CVB5) in the recent past, crossing the species barrier from humans to pigs. Here, SVDV isolates from early and recent outbreaks have been compared for their capacity to utilize the progenitor virus receptors coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). Virus titre of CVB5 and SVDV isolates It'66 and UK'72 on human HeLa cells was reduced by pre-incubation with either anti-DAF or anti-CAR antibodies; however, recent SVDV isolates R1072, R1120 and SPA'93 did not infect HeLa cells lytically. CVB5 and SVDV infection of the pig cell line IB-RS-2 was inhibited completely by anti-CAR antibodies for all isolates, and no reduction was observed following pre-incubation of cells with anti-pig DAF antibodies. Expression of human DAF in the pig cell line IB-RS-2 enhanced the virus titre of early SVDV isolates by 25-fold, but had no effect on recent SVDV isolate titre. Binding of radiolabelled CVB5 to IB-RS-2 cells was increased seven- to eightfold by expression of human DAF and binding of early SVDV isolates was increased 1.2-1.3-fold, whereas no increase in binding by recent SVDV isolates was mediated by human DAF expression. Addition of soluble hDAF-Fc inhibited CVB5, but not SVDV, infection of pig cells. Pre-incubation of all viruses with soluble hCAR-Fc blocked infection of IB-RS-2 pig cells completely; titration of the amount of soluble hCAR-Fc required to block infection revealed that early isolate UK'72 was the least susceptible to inhibition, and the most recent isolate, SPA'93, was the most susceptible.

  12. Monomeric ephrinB2 binding induces allosteric changes in Nipah virus G that precede its full activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Joyce J W; Young, Tracy A; Zhang, Jiayan; Liu, Shiheng; Leser, George P; Komives, Elizabeth A; Lamb, Robert A; Zhou, Z Hong; Salafsky, Joshua; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2017-10-03

    Nipah virus is an emergent paramyxovirus that causes deadly encephalitis and respiratory infections in humans. Two glycoproteins coordinate the infection of host cells, an attachment protein (G), which binds to cell surface receptors, and a fusion (F) protein, which carries out the process of virus-cell membrane fusion. The G protein binds to ephrin B2/3 receptors, inducing G conformational changes that trigger F protein refolding. Using an optical approach based on second harmonic generation, we show that monomeric and dimeric receptors activate distinct conformational changes in G. The monomeric receptor-induced changes are not detected by conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies or through electron microscopy analysis of G:ephrinB2 complexes. However, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments confirm the second harmonic generation observations and reveal allosteric changes in the G receptor binding and F-activating stalk domains, providing insights into the pathway of receptor-activated virus entry.Nipah virus causes encephalitis in humans. Here the authors use a multidisciplinary approach to study the binding of the viral attachment protein G to its host receptor ephrinB2 and show that monomeric and dimeric receptors activate distinct conformational changes in G and discuss implications for receptor-activated virus entry.

  13. Heat shock protein 90β in the Vero cell membrane binds Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Li, Yan; Ding, Tianbing

    2017-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is complex and unclearly defined, and in particular, the effects of the JEV receptor (JEVR) on diverse susceptible cells are elusive. In contrast to previous studies investigating JEVR in rodent or mosquito cells, in this study, we used primate Vero cells instead. We noted that few novel proteins co‑immunoprecipitated with JEV, and discovered that one of these was heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β), which was probed by mass spectrometry with the highest score of 60.3 after questing the monkey and human protein databases. The specific HSP90β‑JEV binding was confirmed by western blot analysis under non‑reducing conditions, and this was significantly inhibited by an anti‑human HSP90β monoclonal antibody in a dose‑dependent manner, as shown by immunofluorescence assay and flow cytometry. In addition, the results of confocal laser scanning microscopic examination demonstrated that the HSP90β‑JEV binding occurred on the Vero cell surface. Finally, JEV progeny yields determined by plaque assay were also markedly decreased in siRNA‑treated Vero cells, particularly at 24 and 36 h post‑infection. Thus, our data indicate that HSP90β is a binding receptor for JEV in Vero cells.

  14. Isolation of Panels of Llama Single-Domain Antibody Fragments Binding All Nine Neuraminidase Subtypes of Influenza A Virus

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    Guus Koch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza A virus comprises sixteen hemagglutinin (HA and nine neuraminidase (NA subtypes (N1–N9. To isolate llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs against all N subtypes, four llamas were immunized with mixtures of influenza viruses. Selections using influenza virus yielded predominantly VHHs binding to the highly immunogenic HA and nucleoprotein. However, selection using enzymatically active recombinant NA (rNA protein enabled us to isolate NA binding VHHs. Some isolated VHHs cross-reacted to other N subtypes. These were subsequently used for the capture of N subtypes that could not be produced as recombinant protein (rN6 or were enzymatically inactive (rN1, rN5 in phage display selection, yielding novel VHHs. In total we isolated 188 NA binding VHHs, 64 of which were expressed in yeast. Most VHHs specifically recognize a single N subtype, but some VHHs cross-react with other N-subtypes. At least one VHH bound to all N subtypes, except N4, identifying a conserved antigenic site. Thus, this work (1 describes methods for isolating NA binding VHHs, (2 illustrates the suitability of llama immunization with multiple antigens for retrieving many binders against different antigens and (3 describes 64 novel NA binding VHHs, including a broadly reactive VHH, which can be used in various assays for influenza virus subtyping, detection or serology.

  15. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  17. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 protein regions that specifically bind to HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier Eduardo; Puentes, Alvaro; Súarez, Jorge; López, Ramses; Vera, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Guzman, Fanny; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-02-01

    Identify hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences in E1 and E2 protein binding to HepG2. Synthetic 20-mer long, ten-residue overlapped peptides, from E1 and E2 proteins, were tested in HepG2 or Raji cell-binding assays. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay for high activity binding peptides (HABPs). Receptors for HepG2 cell were determined by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. Twelve HABPs were found in HCV genotype 1a, allowing six hepatocyte-binding sequences (HBSs) to be defined: two peptide-binding regions in E1 HABPs 4913 (YQVRNSTGLYHVTNDCPNSS) and 4918 (MTPTVATRDGKLPATQLRRHY). Four hepatocyte-binding regions were defined in E2: region-I, peptide 4931 (ETHVTGGSAGHTVSGFVSLLY); region-II, 4937-4939 (HHKFNSSGCPERLASCRPLTDFDQGWGPISYANGSGPDQR); region-III, 4943-4945 (PVYCFTPSPVVVGTTDRSGAPTYSWGENDTDVFVLNNTR) and region-IV, 4949-4952 (CGAPPCVIGGAGNNTLHCPTDCFRKHPDATYSRCGSGPWITPRCLVDYPY). The underlined sequences are most relevant in the binding process. HABPs 4913 and 4938 also bind to CD81 positive Raji cells. Region-II 4938 HABPs bind to 50 and 60kDa HepG2 cell membrane surface proteins. Six HVRs to the HepG2 were identified. Some HABPs have been previously found to be antigenic and immunogenic. HABPs, 4918 (from E1), 4938, 4949, 4950, 4951 and 4952 (from E2) have not been previously recognised. These HABPs could be relevant to HCV invasion of hepatocytes.

  18. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  19. Translation of mRNAs from vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus is differentially blocked in cells with depletion of eIF4GI and/or eIF4GII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welnowska, Ewelina; Castelló, Alfredo; Moral, Pablo; Carrasco, Luis

    2009-12-04

    Cytolytic viruses abrogate host protein synthesis to maximize the translation of their own mRNAs. In this study, we analyzed the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G requirement for translation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and vaccinia virus (VV) mRNAs in HeLa cells using two different strategies: eIF4G depletion by small interfering RNAs or cleavage of eIF4G by expression of poliovirus 2A protease. Depletion of eIF4GI or eIF4GII moderately inhibits cellular protein synthesis, whereas silencing of both factors has only a slightly higher effect. Under these conditions, the extent of VSV protein synthesis is similar to that of nondepleted control cells, whereas VV expression is substantially reduced. Similar results were obtained when eIF4E was depleted. On the other hand, eIF4G cleavage by poliovirus 2A protease strongly inhibits translation of VV protein expression, whereas translation directed by VSV mRNAs is not abrogated, even though VSV mRNAs are capped. Therefore, the requirement for eIF4F activity is different for VV and VSV, suggesting that the molecular mechanism by which their mRNAs initiate their translation is also different. Consistent with these findings, eIF4GI does not colocalize with ribosomes in VSV-infected cells, while eIF2alpha locates at perinuclear sites coincident with ribosomes.

  20. Identification of an adeno-associated virus binding epitope for AVB sepharose affinity resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    Full Text Available Recent successes of adeno-associated virus (AAV–based gene therapy have created a demand for large-scale AAV vector manufacturing and purification techniques for use in clinical trials and beyond. During the development of purification protocols for rh.10, hu.37, AAV8, rh.64R1, AAV3B, and AAV9 vectors, based on a widely used affinity resin, AVB sepharose (GE, we found that, under the same conditions, different serotypes have different affinities to the resin, with AAV3B binding the best and AAV9 the poorest. Further analysis revealed a surface-exposed residue (amino acid number 665 in AAV8 VP1 numbering differs between the high-affinity AAV serotypes (serine in AAV3B, rh.10, and hu.37 and the low-affinity ones (asparagine in AAV8, rh.64R1, and AAV9. The residue locates within a surface-exposed, variable epitope flanked by highly conserved residues. The substitution of the epitope in AAV8, rh.64R1, and AAV9 with the corresponding epitope of AAV3B (SPAKFA resulted in greatly increased affinity to AVB sepharose with no reduction in the vectors’ in vitro potency. The presence of the newly identified AVB-binding epitope will be useful for affinity resin selection for the purification of novel AAV serotypes. It also suggests the possibility of vector engineering to yield a universal affinity chromatography purification method for multiple AAV serotypes.

  1. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  2. Structural Characterization of the Dual Glycan Binding Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Robert; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Parent, Kristin N.; Baker, Timothy S.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) was determined using cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction and using X-ray crystallography to 9.7- and 3.0-Å resolution, respectively. The AAV6 capsid contains a highly conserved, eight-stranded (βB to βI) β-barrel core and large loop regions between the strands which form the capsid surface, as observed in other AAV structures. The loops show conformational variation compared to other AAVs, consistent with previous reports that amino acids in these loop regions are involved in differentiating AAV receptor binding, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity properties. Toward structure-function annotation of AAV6 with respect to its unique dual glycan receptor (heparan sulfate and sialic acid) utilization for cellular recognition, and its enhanced lung epithelial transduction compared to other AAVs, the capsid structure was compared to that of AAV1, which binds sialic acid and differs from AAV6 in only 6 out of 736 amino acids. Five of these residues are located at or close to the icosahedral 3-fold axis of the capsid, thereby identifying this region as imparting important functions, such as receptor attachment and transduction phenotype. Two of the five observed amino acids are located in the capsid interior, suggesting that differential AAV infection properties are also controlled by postentry intracellular events. Density ordered inside the capsid, under the 3-fold axis in a previously reported, conserved AAV DNA binding pocket, was modeled as a nucleotide and a base, further implicating this capsid region in AAV genome recognition and/or stabilization. PMID:20861247

  3. Structural characterization of the dual glycan binding adeno-associated virus serotype 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Robert; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Gurda, Brittney L; McKenna, Robert; Kozyreva, Olga G; Samulski, R Jude; Parent, Kristin N; Baker, Timothy S; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2010-12-01

    The three-dimensional structure of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) was determined using cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction and using X-ray crystallography to 9.7- and 3.0-Å resolution, respectively. The AAV6 capsid contains a highly conserved, eight-stranded (βB to βI) β-barrel core and large loop regions between the strands which form the capsid surface, as observed in other AAV structures. The loops show conformational variation compared to other AAVs, consistent with previous reports that amino acids in these loop regions are involved in differentiating AAV receptor binding, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity properties. Toward structure-function annotation of AAV6 with respect to its unique dual glycan receptor (heparan sulfate and sialic acid) utilization for cellular recognition, and its enhanced lung epithelial transduction compared to other AAVs, the capsid structure was compared to that of AAV1, which binds sialic acid and differs from AAV6 in only 6 out of 736 amino acids. Five of these residues are located at or close to the icosahedral 3-fold axis of the capsid, thereby identifying this region as imparting important functions, such as receptor attachment and transduction phenotype. Two of the five observed amino acids are located in the capsid interior, suggesting that differential AAV infection properties are also controlled by postentry intracellular events. Density ordered inside the capsid, under the 3-fold axis in a previously reported, conserved AAV DNA binding pocket, was modeled as a nucleotide and a base, further implicating this capsid region in AAV genome recognition and/or stabilization.

  4. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  5. T Regulatory Cell Induced Foxp3 Binds the IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα Promoters in Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells from Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Nag, Mukta; Tuohy, Joanne L; De Paris, Kristina; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2017-11-17

    Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells play a critical role in controlling viremia during AIDS lentiviral infections. However, for most HIV-infected individuals, virus-specific CD8+ T cells exhibit loss of polyfunctionality, including loss of IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for AIDS lentiviral persistence, our laboratory has demonstrated that FIV-activated Treg cells target CD8+ T cells, leading to a reduction in IL2 and IFNγ production. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that Treg cells induce expression of the repressive transcription factor, Foxp3, in CD8+ T cells. Based upon these findings, we asked if Treg-induced Foxp3 could bind to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoter regions in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Following coculture with autologous Treg cells, we demonstrated decreased mRNA levels of IL2 and IFNγ at weeks 4 and 8 postinfection and decreased TNFα at week 4 postinfection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We also clearly demonstrated Treg cell-induced Foxp3 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T cells at weeks 1, 4, and 8 postinfection. Finally, we documented Foxp3 binding to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoters at 8 weeks and 6 months postinfection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells following Treg cell coculture. In summary, the results here clearly demonstrate that Foxp3 inhibits IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ transcription by binding to their promoter regions in lentivirus-specific CD8+ T cells. We believe this is the first description of this process during the course of AIDS lentiviral infection.

  6. SF2/ASF binding region within JC virus NCCR limits early gene transcription in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleri, Elena; Regan, Patrick; Dolei, Antonina; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret

    2013-05-14

    Patients undergoing immune modulatory therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and individuals with an impaired-immune system, most notably AIDS patients, are in the high risk group of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the white matter caused by human neurotropic polyomavirus, JC virus. It is now widely accepted that pathologic strains of JCV shows unique rearrangements consist of deletions and insertions within viral NCCR. While these kinds of rearrangements are related to viral tropism and pathology of the disease, their roles in molecular regulation of JCV gene expression and replication are unclear. We have previously identified SF2/ASF as a negative regulator of JCV gene expression in glial cells. This negative impact of SF2/ASF was dependent on its ability to bind a specific region mapped to the tandem repeat within viral promoter. In this report, functional role of SF2/ASF binding region in viral gene expression and replication was investigated by using deletion mutants of viral regulatory sequences. The second 98-base-pair tandem repeat on Mad1 strain was first mutated by deletion and named Mad1-(1X98). In addition to this mutant, the CR3 region which served the binding side for SF2/ASF was also mutated and named Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73). Both mutations were tested for SF2/ASF binding by ChIP assay. While SF2/ASF was associated with Mad1-WT and Mad1-(1X98), its interaction was completely abolished on Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) construct as expected. Surprisingly, reporter gene analysis of Mad1-(1X98) and Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) early promoter sequences showed two and three fold increase in promoter activities, respectively. The impact of "CR3" region on JCV propagation was also tested on the viral background. While replication of Mad1-(1X98) strain in glial cells was similar to Mad1-WT strain, propagation of Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) was less productive. Further analysis of the

  7. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  8. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  9. Role of LAMP1 Binding and pH Sensing by the Spike Complex of Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Israeli, Hadar; Shani, Orly; Katz, Aliza; Diskin, Ron

    2016-11-15

    To effectively infect cells, Lassa virus needs to switch in an endosomal compartment from its primary receptor, α-dystroglycan, to a protein termed LAMP1. A unique histidine triad on the surface of the receptor-binding domain from the glycoprotein spike complex of Lassa virus is important for LAMP1 binding. Here we investigate mutated spikes that have an impaired ability to interact with LAMP1 and show that although LAMP1 is important for efficient infectivity, it is not required for spike-mediated membrane fusion per se Our studies reveal important regulatory roles for histidines from the triad in sensing acidic pH and preventing premature spike triggering. We further show that LAMP1 requires a positively charged His230 residue to engage with the spike complex and that LAMP1 binding promotes membrane fusion. These results elucidate the molecular role of LAMP1 binding during Lassa virus cell entry and provide new insights into how pH is sensed by the spike. Lassa virus is a devastating disease-causing agent in West Africa, with a significant yearly death toll and severe long-term complications associated with its infection in survivors. In recent years, we learned that Lassa virus needs to switch receptors in a pH-dependent manner to efficiently infect cells, but neither the molecular mechanisms that allow switching nor the actual effects of switching were known. Here we investigate the activity of the viral spike complex after abrogation of its ability to switch receptors. These studies inform us about the role of switching receptors and provide new insights into how the spike senses acidic pH. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Characterization of Zika virus binding and enhancement potential of a large panel of flavivirus murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Elinor; Hensley, Scott E

    2017-08-01

    Zika viruses (ZIKVs) are circulating in parts of the world endemic for other flavivirus infections. Some cross-reactive antibodies (Abs) elicited by prior flavivirus exposures can bind to ZIKV and enhance infection of Fc receptor-bearing cells. Here, we measured ZIKV binding of 54 murine monoclonal Abs (mAbs) elicited by exposure with Dengue virus and West Nile virus antigens. We found that 8 of 54 mAbs recognized the envelope protein of ZIKV in conventional binding assays. These 8 cross-reactive mAbs have different specificities; most recognize the DI/II region of the envelope protein but one mAb recognized the DIII lateral ridge of the envelope protein. Interestingly, only 3 of these cross-reactive mAbs were able to enhance ZIKV infection in vitro, and enhancing potential was not strictly correlated with relative binding ability. These data suggest that the ability of flavivirus Abs to enhance ZIKV is dependent on multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Single Amino Acid Changes Can Influence Titer, Heparin Binding, and Tissue Tropism in Different Adeno-Associated Virus Serotypes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhijian; Asokan, Aravind; Joshua C Grieger; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    Despite the high degree of sequence homology between adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 6 capsids (99.2%), these viruses have different liver transduction profiles when tested as vectors. Examination of the six amino acid residues that differ between AAV1 and AAV6 revealed that a lysine-to-glutamate change (K531E) suppresses the heparin binding ability of AAV6. In addition, the same mutation in AAV6 reduces transgene expression to levels similar to those achieved with AAV1 in HepG2 c...

  12. Binding of human lipoproteins (low, very low, high density lipoproteins) to recombinant envelope proteins of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazahian, M; Kippenberger, S; Müller, A; Seitz, H; Böhme, I; Grethe, S; Thomssen, R

    2000-06-01

    Heterogeneities in the density of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA-carrying material from human sera (1.03-1.20 g/ml) are partially due to the binding of lipoproteins [low density (LDL), very low density (VLDL), high density (HDL) lipoproteins] and immunoglobulins. In this study we demonstrate the binding of recombinant HCV envelope protein (El/E2) to human LDL, VLDL and HDL on a molecular basis. The binding of lipoproteins was restricted to the middle part of the El gene product (amino acids 222-336) and the C-terminal part of the E2 protein (amino acids 523-809). Lipoproteins did not bind to recombinant HCV core protein.

  13. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 facilitates vesicular stomatitis virus infection by binding vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hongjun; Tan, Binghe; Wei, Yinglei; Xiong, Qingqing; Yan, Yan; Hou, Lili; Wu, Nannan; Siwko, Stefan; Cimarelli, Andrea; Xu, Jianrong; Han, Honghui; Qian, Min; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing

    2017-10-06

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies and Chandipura viruses belong to the Rhabdovirus family. VSV is a common laboratory virus to study viral evolution and host immune responses to viral infection, and recombinant VSV-based vectors have been widely used for viral oncolysis, vaccination, and gene therapy. Although the tropism of VSV is broad, and its envelope glycoprotein G is often used for pseudotyping other viruses, the host cellular components involved in VSV infection remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the host protein leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is essential for VSV and VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus (VSVG-LV) to infect susceptible cells. Accordingly, Lgr4-deficient mice had dramatically decreased VSV levels in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, Lgr4 knockdown in RAW 264.7 cells also significantly suppressed VSV infection, and Lgr4 overexpression in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced VSV infection. Interestingly, only VSV infection relied on Lgr4, whereas infections with Newcastle disease virus, influenza A virus (A/WSN/33), and herpes simplex virus were unaffected by Lgr4 status. Of note, assays of virus entry, cell ELISA, immunoprecipitation, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that VSV bound susceptible cells via the Lgr4 extracellular domain. Pretreating cells with an Lgr4 antibody, soluble LGR4 extracellular domain, or R-spondin 1 blocked VSV infection by competitively inhibiting VSV binding to Lgr4. Taken together, the identification of Lgr4 as a VSV-specific host factor provides important insights into understanding VSV entry and its pathogenesis and lays the foundation for VSV-based gene therapy and viral oncolytic therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  15. Effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Aldabe, R; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-15

    The effects of transient expression of poliovirus 2A(pro) on p220 cleavage in COS cells have been analyzed. When 2A(pro) was cloned in plasmid pTM1 and transiently expressed in COS cells, efficient cleavage of p220 occurred after infection of these cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus bearing phage T7 RNA polymerase. High numbers of COS cells were transfected with pTM1-2A, as judged by p220 cleavage, thereby allowing an analysis of the effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression. A 40-50% cleavage of p220 by transfected poliovirus 2A(pro) was observed ten hours post infection and cleavage was almost complete (80-90%) 20-25 hours post infection with vaccinia virus. Profound inhibition of vaccinia virus protein synthesis was detectable ten hours post infection and was maximal 20-25 hours post infection. This inhibition resulted from neither a blockade of transcription of vaccinia virus nor a lack of translatability of the mRNAs present in cells that synthesize poliovirus 2A(pro). Addition of ara-C inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and allowed the continued synthesis of cellular proteins. Under these conditions, 2A(pro) is expressed and blocks cellular translation. Finally, p220 cleavage by 2A(pro) did not inhibit the translation of a mRNA encoding poliovirus protein 2C, as directed by the 5' leader sequences of encephalomiocarditis virus. Therefore, these findings show a correlation between p220 cleavage and inhibition of translation from newly made mRNAs. Our results are discussed in the light of present knowledge of p220 function, and new approaches are considered that might provide further insights into the function(s) of initiation factor eIF-4F.

  16. DNA binding specificity of ATAF2, a NAC domain transcription factor targeted for degradation by Tobacco mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of the host transcriptome represents a key battleground in the interaction of plants and pathogens. Specifically, plants have evolved complex defense systems that induce profound transcriptional changes in response to pathogen attack while pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert or disable these defenses. Several NAC transcription factors such as ATAF2 have been linked to plant defense responses, including those targeting viruses. The replication protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV has been shown to interact with and target the degradation of ATAF2. These findings suggest that the transcriptional targets of ATAF2 are involved in defense against TMV. Results To detect potential ATAF2 transcriptional targets, a genomic pull-down assay was utilized to identify ATAF2 promoter binding sequences. Subsequent mobility shift and DNA footprinting assays identified a 30-bp ATAF2 binding sequence. An in vivo GUS reporter system confirmed the function of the identified 30-bp binding sequence as an ATAF2 specific transcriptional activator in planta. Gel filtration studies of purified ATAF2 protein and mutagenesis studies of the 30-bp binding sequence indicate ATAF2 functions as a dimer. Computational analysis of interacting promoter sequences identified a corresponding 25-bp A/T-rich consensus sequence with repeating [GC]AAA motifs. Upon ATAF2 induction real-time qRT-PCR studies confirmed the accumulation of select gene transcripts whose promoters contain this consensus sequence. Conclusion We report the identification of a cis-regulatory binding sequence for ATAF2. Different from other known NAC protein binding sequences, the A/T-rich ATAF2 binding motif represents a novel binding sequence for NAC family proteins. Combined this information represents a unique tool for the identification of ATAF2 target genes.

  17. Identification and Comparison of Receptor Binding Characteristics of the Spike Protein of Two Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strains

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    Feng Deng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV, a member of Alphacoronavirus, has caused huge economic losses for the global pork industry recently. The spike (S protein mediates PEDV entry into host cells. Herein, we investigated the interactions between the S protein and its receptor porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN or co-receptor sugars. The C-terminal domain (CTD of the S1 domain is bound to pAPN. The prototype strain demonstrated similar receptor-binding activity compared with the variant field isolate. Three loops at the tips of the β-barrel domains did not play crucial roles in the PEDV S-pAPN association, indicating that PEDV conforms to a different receptor recognition model compared with transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, porcine respiratory CoV (PRCV, and human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63. The N-terminal domain (NTD of the PEDV S1 domain could bind sugar, a possible co-receptor for PEDV. The prototype strain exhibited weaker sugar-binding activity compared with the variant field isolate. Strategies targeting the receptor binding domain (RBD may be helpful for developing vaccines or antiviral drugs for PEDV. Understanding the differences in receptor binding between the prototype and the variant strains may provide insight into PEDV pathogenesis.

  18. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentian Chen

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  19. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentian; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs) are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA) on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA) receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  20. Almond Skin Extracts Abrogate HSV-1 Replication by Blocking Virus Binding to the Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bisignano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to determine the effect of almond skin extracts on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 replication. Drug-resistant strains of HSV frequently develop following therapeutic treatment. Therefore, the discovery of novel anti-HSV drugs deserves great effort. Here, we tested both natural (NS and blanched (BS polyphenols-rich almond skin extracts against HSV-1. HPLC analysis showed that the prevalent compounds in NS and BS extracts contributing to their antioxidant activity were quercetin, epicatechin and catechin. Results of cell viability indicated that NS and BS extracts were not toxic to cultured Vero cells. Furthermore, NS extracts were more potent inhibitors of HSV-1 than BS extracts, and this trend was in agreement with different concentrations of flavonoids. The plaque forming assay, Western blot and real-time PCR were used to demonstrate that NS extracts were able to block the production of infectious HSV-1 particles. In addition, the viral binding assay demonstrated that NS extracts inhibited HSV-1 adsorption to Vero cells. Our conclusion is that natural products from almond skin extracts are an extraordinary source of antiviral agents and provide a novel treatment against HSV-1 infections.

  1. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

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    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  2. Binding of Human GII.4 Norovirus Virus-Like Particles to Carbohydrates of Romaine Lettuce Leaf Cell Wall Materials

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    Esseili, Malak A.

    2012-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) strains are the dominant cause of the majority of food-borne outbreaks, including those that involve leafy greens, such as lettuce. Since human NoVs use carbohydrates of histo-blood group antigens as receptors/coreceptors, we examined the role of carbohydrates in the attachment of NoV to lettuce leaves by using virus-like particles (VLPs) of a human NoV/GII.4 strain. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the VLPs attached to the leaf surface, especially to cut edges, stomata, and along minor veins. Binding was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed on cell wall materials (CWM) from innermost younger leaves and outermost lamina of older leaves. The binding to CWM of older leaves was significantly (P carbohydrates of CWM or porcine gastric mucin (PGM) (a carbohydrate control) using 100 mM sodium periodate (NaIO4) significantly decreased the binding an average of 17% in younger leaves, 43% in older leaves, and 92% for PGM. In addition, lectins recognizing GalNAc, GlcNAc, and sialic acid at 100 μg/ml significantly decreased the binding an average of 41%, 33%, and 20% on CWM of older leaves but had no effect on younger leaves. Lectins recognizing α-d-Gal, α-d-Man/α-d-Glc, and α-l-Fuc showed significant inhibition on CWM of older leaves as well as that of younger leaves. All lectins, except for the lectin recognizing α-d-Gal, significantly inhibited NoV VLP binding to PGM. Collectively, our results indicate that NoV VLPs bind to lettuce CWM by utilizing multiple carbohydrate moieties. This binding may enhance virus persistence on the leaf surface and prevent effective decontamination. PMID:22138991

  3. Time-controlled phagocytosis of asymmetric liposomes: Application to phosphatidylserine immunoliposomes binding HIV-1 virus-like particles.

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    Petazzi, Roberto Arturo; Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiantia, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Macrophage immune functions such as antibody-mediated phagocytosis are strongly impaired in individuals affected by HIV-1. Nevertheless, infected macrophages are still able to phagocytose apoptotic cells. For this reason, we recently developed antibody-decorated phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing liposomes that bind HIV-1 virus-like particles and, by mimicking apoptotic cells, are efficiently internalized by macrophages. In the context of an in vivo application, it would be extremely important to initially protect immunoliposomes from macrophages, in order to provide enough time to redistribute through the body and achieve maximum virus binding. To this end, we have designed asymmetric immunoliposomes in which the PS is initially confined to the inner leaflet and thus cannot be recognized by macrophages. Spontaneous PS flip-flop to the outer surface leads to a time-delay in internalization by macrophages in vitro. Such a delay can be fine-tuned by altering the molecular composition of the immunoliposomes. In the fight against HIV-1, macrophage plays an important role. Ironically, the phagocytic functions of these cells are often impaired by HIV-1. In this interesting article, the authors described the development of asymmetric liposomes, which would bind HIV-1 with prolonged systemic circulation, such that the clearance of virus by macrophages is enhanced. This system represents a promising effective approach to utilize the phagocytic capability of macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family

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    Shchelkunov Sergei N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variola virus (VARV the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. Findings De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  5. Geraniin extracted from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum binds to dengue virus type-2 envelope protein and inhibits early stage of virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Ahmad, Siti Aisyah; Palanisamy, Uma D; Tejo, Bimo A; Chew, Miaw Fang; Tham, Hong Wai; Syed Hassan, Sharifah

    2017-11-21

    The rapid rise and spread in dengue cases, together with the unavailability of safe vaccines and effective antiviral drugs, warrant the need to discover and develop novel anti-dengue treatments. In this study the antiviral activity of geraniin, extracted from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum, against dengue virus type-2 (DENV-2) was investigated. Geraniin was prepared from Nephelium lappaceum rind by reverse phase C-18 column chromatography. Cytotoxicity of geraniin towards Vero cells was evaluated using MTT assay while IC 50 value was determined by plaque reduction assay. The mode-of-action of geraniin was characterized using the virucidal, attachment, penetration and the time-of-addition assays'. Docking experiments with geraniin molecule and the DENV envelope (E) protein was also performed. Finally, recombinant E Domain III (rE-DIII) protein was produced to physiologically test the binding of geraniin to DENV-2 E-DIII protein, through ELISA competitive binding assay. Cytotoxicity assay confirmed that geraniin was not toxic to Vero cells, even at the highest concentration tested. The compound exhibited DENV-2 plaque formation inhibition, with an IC 50 of 1.75 μM. We further revealed that geraniin reduced viral infectivity and inhibited DENV-2 from attaching to the cells but had little effect on its penetration. Geraniin was observed to be most effective when added at the early stage of DENV-2 infection. Docking experiments showed that geraniin binds to DENV E protein, specifically at the DIII region, while the ELISA competitive binding assay confirmed geraniin's interaction with rE-DIII with high affinity. Geraniin from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum has antiviral activity against DENV-2. It is postulated that the compound inhibits viral attachment by binding to the E-DIII protein and interferes with the initial cell-virus interaction. Our results demonstrate that geraniin has the potential to be developed into an effective antiviral treatment, particularly for

  6. HERP Binds TBK1 To Activate Innate Immunity and Repress Virus Replication in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

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    Ge, Maolin; Luo, Zhen; Qiao, Zhi; Zhou, Yao; Cheng, Xin; Geng, Qibin; Cai, Yanyan; Wan, Pin; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Host innate immunity is crucial for cellular responses against viral infection sensed by distinct pattern recognition receptors and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease and neurological diseases. However, the exact mechanism underlying the link between ER stress induced by EV71 infection and host innate immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection induces the homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP), a modulator of the ER stress response which is dependent on the participation of MAVS. Virus-induced HERP subsequently stimulates host innate immunity to repress viral replication by promoting type-I IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β) and type-III IFN (IFN-λ1) expression. Through interacting with TANK-binding kinase 1, HERP amplifies the MAVS signaling and facilitates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and NF-κB to enhance the expression of IFNs, which leads to a broad inhibition of the replication of RNA viruses, including EV71, Sendai virus, influenza A virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, we demonstrated that HERP plays an important role in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to ER stress during the infection of RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the replication of RNA viruses and the production of IFNs, and also demonstrate a new role of HERP in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to viral infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Characterization of the sialic acid binding activity of influenza A viruses using soluble variants of the H7 and H9 hemagglutinins.

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    Anne-Kathrin Sauer

    Full Text Available Binding of influenza viruses to target cells is mediated by the viral surface protein hemagglutinin. To determine the presence of binding sites for influenza A viruses on cells and tissues, soluble hemagglutinins of the H7 and H9 subtype were generated by connecting the hemagglutinin ectodomain to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (H7Fc and H9Fc. Both chimeric proteins bound to different cells and tissues in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Pronounced differences were observed between H7Fc and H9Fc, in the binding both to different mammalian and avian cultured cells and to cryosections of the respiratory epithelium of different virus host species (turkey, chicken and pig. Binding of the soluble hemagglutinins was similar to the binding of virus particles, but showed differences in the binding pattern when compared to two sialic acid-specific plant lectins. These findings were substantiated by a comparative glycan array analysis revealing a very narrow recognition of sialoglycoconjugates by the plant lectins that does not reflect the glycan structures preferentially recognized by H7Fc and H9Fc. Thus, soluble hemagglutinins may serve as sialic acid-specific lectins and are a more reliable indicator of the presence of binding sites for influenza virus HA than the commonly used plant lectins.

  8. Minor Coat and Heat Shock Proteins Are Involved in the Binding of Citrus Tristeza Virus to the Foregut of Its Aphid Vector, Toxoptera citricida.

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    Killiny, N; Harper, S J; Alfaress, S; El Mohtar, C; Dawson, W O

    2016-11-01

    Vector transmission is a critical stage in the viral life cycle, yet for most plant viruses how they interact with their vector is unknown or is explained by analogy with previously described relatives. Here we examined the mechanism underlying the transmission of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) by its aphid vector, Toxoptera citricida, with the objective of identifying what virus-encoded proteins it uses to interact with the vector. Using fluorescently labeled virions, we demonstrated that CTV binds specifically to the lining of the cibarium of the aphid. Through in vitro competitive binding assays between fluorescent virions and free viral proteins, we determined that the minor coat protein is involved in vector interaction. We also found that the presence of two heat shock-like proteins, p61 and p65, reduces virion binding in vitro Additionally, treating the dissected mouthparts with proteases did not affect the binding of CTV virions. In contrast, chitinase treatment reduced CTV binding to the foregut. Finally, competition with glucose, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine, chitobiose, and chitotriose reduced the binding. These findings together suggest that CTV binds to the sugar moieties of the cuticular surface of the aphid cibarium, and the binding involves the concerted activity of three virus-encoded proteins. Limited information is known about the specific interactions between citrus tristeza virus and its aphid vectors. These interactions are important for the process of successful transmission. In this study, we localized the CTV retention site as the cibarium of the aphid foregut. Moreover, we demonstrated that the nature of these interactions is protein-carbohydrate binding. The viral proteins, including the minor coat protein and two heat shock proteins, bind to sugar moieties on the surface of the foregut. These findings will help in understanding the transmission mechanism of CTV by the aphid vector and may help in developing control strategies which interfere

  9. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

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    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  10. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  11. Amphotropic murine leukemia virus is preferentially attached to cholesterol-rich microdomains after binding to mouse fibroblasts

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    Pedersen Lene

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently shown that amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV can enter the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 via caveola-dependent endocytosis. But due to the size and omega-like shape of caveolae it is possible that A-MLV initially binds cells outside of caveolae. Rafts have been suggested to be pre-caveolae and we here investigate whether A-MLV initially binds to its receptor Pit2, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, in rafts or caveolae or outside these cholesterol-rich microdomains. Results Here, we show that a high amount of cell-bound A-MLV was attached to large rafts of NIH3T3 at the time of investigation. These large rafts were not enriched in caveolin-1, a major structural component of caveolae. In addition, they are rather of natural occurrence in NIH3T3 cells than a result of patching of smaller rafts by A-MLV. Thus cells incubated in parallel with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped MLV particles showed the same pattern of large rafts as cells incubated with A-MLV, but VSV-G pseudotyped MLV particles did not show any preference to attach to these large microdomains. Conclusion The high concentration of A-MLV particles bound to large rafts of NIH3T3 cells suggests a role of these microdomains in early A-MLV binding events.

  12. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045–092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-04-10

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012–2013. Here we describe an antibody, F045–092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045–092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045–092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2 and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower-affinity Fab binding, as observed with other antibodies that target the receptor-binding site. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small-molecule therapeutics.

  13. The structure of adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B): Insights into receptor binding and immune evasion

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    Lerch, Thomas F.; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are leading candidate vectors for human gene therapy. AAV serotypes have broad cellular tropism and use a variety of cellular receptors. AAV serotype 3 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycan prior to cell entry and is serologically distinct from other serotypes. The capsid features that distinguish AAV-3B from other serotypes are poorly understood. The structure of AAV-3B has been determined to 2.6Å resolution from twinned crystals of an infectious virus. The most distinctive structural features are located in regions implicated in receptor and antibody binding, providing insights into the cell entry mechanisms and antigenic nature of AAVs. We show that AAV-3B has a lower affinity for heparin than AAV-2, which can be rationalized by the distinct features of the AAV-3B capsid. The structure of AAV-3B provides an additional foundation for the future engineering of improved gene therapy vectors with modified receptor binding or antigenic characteristics. PMID:20444480

  14. A peptide derived from hepatitis C virus E2 envelope protein inhibits a post-binding step in HCV entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Tewari, M; Kong, R; Zhang, R; Ingravallo, P; Ralston, R

    2010-05-01

    The HCV envelope proteins E1 and E2 are required for virus binding to cellular receptors and pH-dependent fusion with endosomal membranes. Envelope protein interactions within this multistep process may provide novel targets for development of antiviral agents. To identify E1 and E2 regions involved in critical steps of HCV entry, we screened an E1E2 overlapping peptide library for inhibition of infection using a lentiviral reporter vector pseudotyped with E1E2 envelope proteins. A 16-residue polypeptide containing a portion of the E2 transmembrane domain (Peptide 75) inhibited HCV pseudoparticle infection with an IC50 of approximately 0.3microM and did not inhibit infection by VSV-g pseudoparticles at concentrations up to 50microM. Structure-activity analysis of Peptide 75 showed that antiviral activity was dependent upon L-configuration and hydrophobic character, and that the native sequence was required for maximal activity. Peptide 75 did not show virocidal activity against HCV pseudoparticles or other viruses. Temperature-shift experiments showed that the peptide acted at a post-binding step and that inhibition was further increased when used in combination with an anti-CD81 antibody previously shown to inhibit pseudoparticle entry at a post-binding step. These data suggest that interactions involving the C terminal region of E2 may play an important role in the HCV entry process.

  15. Crystal structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex reveals a gating mechanism for RNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; King, Liam B; Ngo, Nhi; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Woods, Virgil L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2011-11-29

    Arenaviruses cause disease in industrialized and developing nations alike. Among them, the hemorrhagic fever virus Lassa is responsible for ~300,000-500,000 infections/y in Western Africa. The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) forms the protein scaffold of the genomic ribonucleoprotein complexes and is critical for transcription and replication of the viral genome. Here, we present crystal structures of the RNA-binding domain of Lassa virus NP in complex with ssRNA. This structure shows, in contrast to the predicted model, that RNA binds in a deep, basic crevice located entirely within the N-terminal domain. Furthermore, the NP-ssRNA structures presented here, combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/MS and functional studies, suggest a gating mechanism by which NP opens to accept RNA. Directed mutagenesis and functional studies provide a unique look into how the arenavirus NPs bind to and protect the viral genome and also suggest the likely assembly by which viral ribonucleoprotein complexes are organized.

  16. Aptamers that bind to the hemagglutinin of the recent pandemic influenza virus H1N1 and efficiently inhibit agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates both receptor (glycan) binding and membrane fusion for cell entry and has been the basis for typing influenza A viruses. In this study we have selected RNA aptamers (D-12 and D-26) that specifically target the HA protein of the recent pandemic influenza virus pdmH1N1 (A/California/07/2009). Among the selected aptamers the D-26 aptamer showed higher affinity for the HA of pdmH1N1 and was able to distinguish HA derived from other sub-types of influenza A viruses. The affinity of the D-26 aptamer was further improved upon incorporation of 2'-fluoropyrimidines to a level of 67 fM. Furthermore, the high affinity D-12 and D-26 aptamers were tested for their ability to interfere with HA-glycan interactions using a chicken red blood cell (RBC) agglutination assay. At a concentration of 200 nM the D-26 aptamer completely abolished the agglutination of RBCs, whereas D-12 only did so at 400 nM. These studies suggest that the selected aptamer D-26 not only has a higher affinity and specificity for the HA of pdmH1N1 but also has a better ability to efficiently interfere with HA-glycan interactions compared with the D-12 aptamer. The D-26 aptamer warrants further study regarding its application in developing topical virucidal products against the pdmH1N1 virus and also in surveillance of the pdmH1N1 influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

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    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  18. Identification and structural characterization of the ALIX-binding late domains of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 and SIVagmTan-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qianting; Landesman, Michael B; Robinson, Howard; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    Retroviral Gag proteins contain short late-domain motifs that recruit cellular ESCRT pathway proteins to facilitate virus budding. ALIX-binding late domains often contain the core consensus sequence YPX(n)L (where X(n) can vary in sequence and length). However, some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag proteins lack this consensus sequence, yet still bind ALIX. We mapped divergent, ALIX-binding late domains within the p6(Gag) proteins of SIV(mac239) ((40)SREKPYKEVTEDLLHLNSLF(59)) and SIV(agmTan-1) ((24)AAGAYDPARKLLEQYAKK(41)). Crystal structures revealed that anchoring tyrosines (in lightface) and nearby hydrophobic residues (underlined) contact the ALIX V domain, revealing how lentiviruses employ a diverse family of late-domain sequences to bind ALIX and promote virus budding.

  19. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  20. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... concentration were increased (>90%, P protease were similar between groups (all P > .5), whereas, in LIPO, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 were reduced (-36%, P

  1. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4(+) T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M. J.; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Background: Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict...... 9mer peptides derived from available influenza A viral proteins with binding affinity for at least one of the 12 HLA-I supertypes. The predicted peptides were then selected in a way that ensured maximal coverage of the available influenza A strains. One hundred and thirty one peptides were...... synthesized and their binding affinities for the HLA-I supertypes were measured in a biochemical assay. Influenza-specific T cell responses towards the peptides were quantified using IFN gamma ELISPOT assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult healthy HLA-I typed donors as responder...

  2. Functional studies indicate amantadine binds to the pore of the influenza A virus M2 proton-selective ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xianghong; Ma, Chunlong; Ohigashi, Yuki; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Pinto, Lawrence H.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses contain proton-selective ion channels, A/M2 and BM2, respectively, and the A/M2 channel activity is inhibited by the drugs amantadine and its methyl derivative rimantadine. The structure of the pore-transmembrane domain has been determined by both x-ray crystallography [Stouffer et al. (2008) Nature 451:596–599] and by NMR methods [Schnell and Chou (2008) Nature 451:591–595]. Whereas the crystal structure indicates a single amantadine molecule in the pore of the channel, the NMR data show four rimantadine molecules bound on the outside of the helices toward the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Drug binding includes interactions with residues 40–45 with a polar hydrogen bond between rimantadine and aspartic acid residue 44 (D44) that appears to be important. These two distinct drug-binding sites led to two incompatible drug inhibition mechanisms. We mutagenized D44 and R45 to alanine as these mutations are likely to interfere with rimantadine binding and lead to a drug insensitive channel. However, the D44A channel was found to be sensitive to amantadine when measured by electrophysiological recordings in oocytes of Xenopus laevis and in mammalian cells, and when the D44 and R45 mutations were introduced into the influenza virus genome. Furthermore, transplanting A/M2 pore residues 24–36 into BM2, yielded a pH-activated chimeric ion channel that was partially inhibited by amantadine. Thus, taken together our functional data suggest that amantadine/rimantadine binding outside of the channel pore is not the primary site associated with the pharmacological inhibition of the A/M2 ion channel. PMID:18669647

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of the nucleoprotein of influenza A virus: role of the protein flexibility in RNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Tarus

    Full Text Available The influenza viruses contain a segmented, negative stranded RNA genome. Each RNA segment is covered by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (NP. X-ray structures have shown that NP contains well-structured domains juxtaposed with regions of missing electron densities corresponding to loops. In this study, we tested if these flexible loops gated or promoted RNA binding and RNA-induced oligomerization of NP. We first performed molecular dynamics simulations of wt NP monomer and trimer in comparison with the R361A protein mutated in the RNA binding groove, using the H1N1 NP as the initial structure. Calculation of the root-mean-square fluctuations highlighted the presence of two flexible loops in NP trimer: loop 1 (73-90, loop 2 (200-214. In NP, loops 1 and 2 formed a 10-15 Å-wide pinch giving access to the RNA binding groove. Loop 1 was stabilized by interactions with K113 of the adjacent β-sheet 1 (91-112 that interacted with the RNA grove (linker 360-373 via multiple hydrophobic contacts. In R361A, a salt bridge formed between E80 of loop 1 and R208 of loop 2 driven by hydrophobic contacts between L79 and W207, due to a decreased flexibility of loop 2 and loop 1 unfolding. Thus, RNA could not access its binding groove in R361A; accordingly, R361A had a much lower affinity for RNA than NP. Disruption of the E80-R208 interaction in the triple mutant R361A-E80A-E81A increased its RNA binding affinity and restored its oligomerization back to wt levels in contrast with impaired levels of R361A. Our data suggest that the flexibility of loops 1 and 2 is required for RNA sampling and binding which likely involve conformational change(s of the nucleoprotein.

  4. Evolution of human receptor binding affinity of H1N1 hemagglutinins from 1918 to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Malaisree, Maturos; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Decha, Panita; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Poovorawan, Yong; Hannongbua, Supot

    2010-08-23

    The recent outbreak of the novel 2009 H1N1 influenza in humans has focused global attention on this virus, which could potentially have introduced a more dangerous pandemic of influenza flu. In the initial step of the viral attachment, hemagglutinin (HA), a viral glycoprotein surface, is responsible for the binding to the human SIA alpha2,6-linked sialopentasaccharide host cell receptor (hHAR). Dynamical and structural properties, based on molecular dynamics simulations of the four different HAs of Spanish 1918 (H1-1918), swine 1930 (H1-1930), seasonal 2005 (H1-2005), and a novel 2009 (H1-2009) H1N1 bound to the hHAR were compared. In all four HA-hHAR complexes, major interactions with the receptor binding were gained from HA residue Y95 and the conserved HA residues of the 130-loop, 190-helix, and 220-loop. However, introduction of the charged HA residues K145 and E227 in the 2009 HA binding pocket was found to increase the HA-hHAR binding efficiency in comparison to the three previously recognized H1N1 strains. Changing of the noncharged HA G225 residue to a negatively charged D225 provides a larger number of hydrogen-bonding interactions. The increase in hydrophilicity of the receptor binding region is apparently an evolution of the current pandemic flu from the 1918 Spanish, 1930 swine, and 2005 seasonal strains. Detailed analysis could help the understanding of how different HAs effectively attach and bind with the hHAR.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes and susceptibility to epstein-barr virus infection in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Jeppe T; Jarrett, Ruth F; Koch, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient children...

  6. Natural variation in the heparan sulfate binding domain of the eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 glycoprotein alters interactions with cell surfaces and virulence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christina L; Choi-Nurvitadhi, Jo; Sun, Chengqun; Bayer, Avraham; Hritz, Jozef; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2013-08-01

    Recently, we compared amino acid sequences of the E2 glycoprotein of natural North American eastern equine encephalitis virus (NA-EEEV) isolates and demonstrated that naturally circulating viruses interact with heparan sulfate (HS) and that this interaction contributes to the extreme neurovirulence of EEEV (C. L. Gardner, G. D. Ebel, K. D. Ryman, and W. B. Klimstra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 108:16026-16031, 2011). In the current study, we have examined the contribution to HS binding of each of three lysine residues in the E2 71-to-77 region that comprise the primary HS binding site of wild-type (WT) NA-EEEV viruses. We also report that the original sequence comparison identified five virus isolates, each with one of three amino acid differences in the E2 71-to-77 region, including mutations in residues critical for HS binding by the WT virus. The natural variant viruses, which possessed either a mutation from lysine to glutamine at E2 71, a mutation from lysine to threonine at E2 71, or a mutation from threonine to lysine at E2 72, exhibited altered interactions with heparan sulfate and cell surfaces and altered virulence in a mouse model of EEEV disease. An electrostatic map of the EEEV E1/E2 heterotrimer based upon the recent Chikungunya virus crystal structure (J. E. Voss, M. C. Vaney, S. Duquerroy, C. Vonrhein, C. Girard-Blanc, E. Crublet, A. Thompson, G. Bricogne, and F. A. Rey, Nature, 468:709-712, 2010) showed the HS binding site to be at the apical surface of E2, with variants affecting the electrochemical nature of the binding site. Together, these results suggest that natural variation in the EEEV HS binding domain may arise during EEEV sylvatic cycles and that this variation may influence receptor interaction and the severity of EEEV disease.

  7. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus

    OpenAIRE

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M. Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P.; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis fact...

  8. Isolation of a high affinity neutralizing monoclonal antibody against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus that binds at the 'Sa' antigenic site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachiket Shembekar

    Full Text Available Influenza virus evades host immunity through antigenic drift and shift, and continues to circulate in the human population causing periodic outbreaks including the recent 2009 pandemic. A large segment of the population was potentially susceptible to this novel strain of virus. Historically, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been fundamental tools for diagnosis and epitope mapping of influenza viruses and their importance as an alternate treatment option is also being realized. The current study describes isolation of a high affinity (K(D = 2.1±0.4 pM murine MAb, MA2077 that binds specifically to the hemagglutinin (HA surface glycoprotein of the pandemic virus. The antibody neutralized the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in an in vitro microneutralization assay (IC(50 = 0.08 µg/ml. MA2077 also showed hemagglutination inhibition activity (HI titre of 0.50 µg/ml against the pandemic virus. In a competition ELISA, MA2077 competed with the binding site of the human MAb, 2D1 (isolated from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic on pandemic H1N1 HA. Epitope mapping studies using yeast cell-surface display of a stable HA1 fragment, wherein 'Sa' and 'Sb' sites were independently mutated, localized the binding site of MA2077 within the 'Sa' antigenic site. These studies will facilitate our understanding of antigen antibody interaction in the context of neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus.

  9. Aptamer That Binds to the gD Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Efficiently Inhibits Viral Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hayashi, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    The ectodomain of the gD protein of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) plays an important role in viral entry by binding to specific cellular coreceptors and mediating viral entry to the host cells. In the present study, we isolated RNA aptamers (aptamer-1 and aptamer-5) that specifically bind to the gD protein of HSV-1 with high affinity and are able to discriminate the gD protein of a different virus, HSV-2. Aptamer-1 efficiently interfered with the interaction between the gD protein and the HSV-1 target cell receptor (HVEM) in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of aptamer-1 was estimated to be in the nanomolar range (60 nM). Furthermore, aptamer-1 was analyzed for anti-HSV-1 activity by using plaque assays, and it efficiently inhibited viral entry with an estimated Ki of 0.8 μM. To expand the future applications of aptamer-1, a shorter variant was designed by using both mapping and boundary analyses, resulting in the mini-1 aptamer (44-mer). Compared to the full-length aptamer, mini-1 had at least as high an affinity, specificity, and ability to interfere with gD-HVEM interactions. These studies suggest that the mini-1 aptamer could be explored further as an anti-HSV-1 topical therapy designed to prevent the risk of acquiring HSV-1 infection through physical contact. PMID:22514343

  10. PCR bias associated with conserved primer binding sites, used to determine genotype diversity within Citrus tristeza virus populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, David Alan; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is present in almost all of the major citrus production areas where it continues to reduce the profitability of citriculture. The accurate characterisation of CTV populations, which are usually made up of a number of disparate strains, requires the use of robust PCR protocols. Mismatches between primers and their corresponding binding sites may introduce primer-associated bias during amplification. The primer-associated bias of four sets of CTV specific primers, targeting the A and F regions and the p33 and p23 genes, were evaluated. This was done through the amplification of defined templates followed by their characterisation using the sequencing of multiple clones, as well as Illumina next generation sequencing. High levels of bias were found to be associated with the primer pairs targeting the A and F regions. The p33 gene primers were found to be biased against two genotypes and suggestions for preventing this apparent bias are discussed. The primer pair targeting the conserved p23 gene was found to have very little associated bias. Primers should undergo rigorous screening before being used to characterize virus populations that are known to exhibit high levels of variation, especially within primer binding sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The ebola virus interferon antagonist VP24 directly binds STAT1 and has a novel, pyramidal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Adrianna P P; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Liu, Tong; Abelson, Dafna M; Lee, David E; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-02-01

    Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan) and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston). These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle.

  12. The ebola virus interferon antagonist VP24 directly binds STAT1 and has a novel, pyramidal fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna P P Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston. These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle.

  13. Binding by the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase partially melts duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Veronica M; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Harrison, Melody K; Harrison, David K; Cameron, Craig E; Raney, Kevin D

    2012-09-25

    Binding of NS3 helicase to DNA was investigated by footprinting with KMnO(4), which reacts preferentially with thymidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) compared to those in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). A distinct pattern of reactivity was observed on ssDNA, which repeated every 8 nucleotides (nt) and is consistent with the known binding site size of NS3. Binding to a DNA substrate containing a partial duplex was also investigated. The DNA contained a 15 nt overhang made entirely of thymidine residues adjacent to a 22 bp duplex that contained thymidine at every other position. Surprisingly, the KMnO(4) reactivity pattern extended from the ssDNA into the dsDNA region of the substrate. Lengthening the partial duplex to 30 bp revealed a similar pattern extending from the ssDNA into the dsDNA, indicating that NS3 binds within the duplex region. Increasing the length of the ssDNA portion of the partial duplex by 4 nt resulted in a shift in the footprinting pattern for the ssDNA by 4 nt, which is consistent with binding to the 3'-end of the ssDNA. However, the footprinting pattern in the dsDNA region was shifted by only 1-2 bp, indicating that binding to the ssDNA-dsDNA region was preferred. Footprinting performed as a function of time indicated that NS3 binds to the ssDNA rapidly, followed by slower binding to the duplex. Hence, multiple molecules of NS3 can bind along a ssDNA-dsDNA partial duplex by interacting with the ssDNA as well as the duplex DNA.

  14. Single amino acid changes can influence titer, heparin binding, and tissue tropism in different adeno-associated virus serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Asokan, Aravind; Grieger, Joshua C; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R Jude

    2006-11-01

    Despite the high degree of sequence homology between adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 6 capsids (99.2%), these viruses have different liver transduction profiles when tested as vectors. Examination of the six amino acid residues that differ between AAV1 and AAV6 revealed that a lysine-to-glutamate change (K531E) suppresses the heparin binding ability of AAV6. In addition, the same mutation in AAV6 reduces transgene expression to levels similar to those achieved with AAV1 in HepG2 cells in vitro and in mouse liver following portal vein administration. In corollary, the converse E531K mutation in AAV1 imparts heparin binding ability and increases transduction efficiency. Extraction of vector genomes from liver tissue suggests that the lysine 531 residue assists in preferential transduction of parenchymal cells by AAV6 vectors in comparison with AAV1. Lysine 531 is unique to AAV6 among other known AAV serotypes and is located in a basic cluster near the spikes that surround the icosahedral threefold axes of the AAV capsid. Similar to studies with autonomous parvoviruses, this study describes the first example of single amino acid changes that can explain differential phenotypes such as viral titer, receptor binding, and tissue tropism exhibited by closely related AAV serotypes. In particular, a single lysine residue appears to provide the critical minimum charged surface required for interacting with heparin through electrostatic interaction and simultaneously plays an unrelated yet critical role in the liver tropism of AAV6 vectors.

  15. Alterations in Receptor Binding Properties of Recent Human Influenza H3N2 Viruses Are Associated with Reduced Natural Killer Cell Lysis of Infected Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Rachel E.; Yamada, Eriko; Thompson, Catherine I.; Phillipson, Louisa J.; Thompson, Clare; Taylor, Elizabeth; Zambon, Maria; Osborn, Helen M. I.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Borrow, Persephone

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell recognition of influenza virus-infected cells involves hemagglutinin (HA) binding to sialic acid (SA) on activating NK receptors. SA also acts as a receptor for the binding of influenza virus to its target host cells. The SA binding properties of H3N2 influenza viruses have been observed to change during circulation in humans: recent isolates are unable to agglutinate chicken red blood cells and show reduced affinity for synthetic glycopolymers representing SA-α-2,3-lactose (3′SL-PAA) and SA-α-2,6-N-acetyl lactosamine (6′SLN-PAA) carbohydrates. Here, NK lysis of cells infected with human H3N2 influenza viruses isolated between 1969 and 2003 was analyzed. Cells infected with recent isolates (1999 to 2003) were found to be lysed less effectively than cells infected with older isolates (1969 to 1996). This change occurred concurrently with the acquisition of two new potential glycosylation site motifs in HA. Deletion of the potential glycosylation site motif at 133 to 135 in HA1 from a recent isolate partially restored the agglutination phenotype to a recombinant virus, indicating that the HA-SA interaction is inhibited by the glycosylation modification. Deletion of either of the recently acquired potential glycosylation sites from HA led to increased NK lysis of cells infected with recombinant viruses carrying modified HA. These results indicate that alterations in HA glycosylation may affect NK cell recognition of influenza virus-infected cells in addition to virus binding to host cells. PMID:17670834

  16. Binding affinity of the L-742,001 inhibitor to the endonuclease domain of A/H1N1/PA influenza virus variants: Molecular simulation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung; Nguyen, Hoang Linh; Linh, Huynh Quang; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2018-01-01

    The steered molecular dynamics (SMD), molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) and free energy perturbation (FEP) methods were used to determine the binding affinity of the L-742,001 inhibitor to the endonuclease domain of the A/H1N1/PA influenza viruses (including wild type (WT) and three mutations I79L, E119D and F105S for both pH1N1 PA and PR8 PA viruses). Calculated results showed that the L-742,001 inhibitor not only binds to the PR8 PAs (1934 A influenza virus) better than to the pH1N1 PAs (2009 A influenza virus) but also more strongly interacts with the WT endonuclease domain than with three mutant variants for both pH1N1 PA and PR8 PA viruses. The binding affinities obtained by the SMD, MM-PBSA and FEP methods attain high correlation with available experimental data. Here the FEP method appears to provide a more accurate determination of the binding affinity than the SMD and MM-PBSA counterparts.

  17. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  18. Design of peptide-based epitope vaccine and further binding site scrutiny led to groundswell in drug discovery against Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Omar, Taimur Md; Oany, Arafat Rahman; Kibria, K M Kaderi; Shibly, Abu Zaffar; Moniruzzaman, Md; Ali, Syed Raju; Islam, Md Monirul

    2018-02-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is responsible for an acute viral hemorrhagic fever known as Lassa fever. Sequence analyses of LASV proteome identified the most immunogenic protein that led to predict both T-cell and B-cell epitopes and further target and binding site depiction could allow novel drug findings for drug discovery field against this virus. To induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity peptide sequence SSNLYKGVY, conserved region 41-49 amino acids were found as the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, respectively. The peptide sequence might intermingle with 17 HLA-I and 16 HLA-II molecules, also cover 49.15-96.82% population coverage within the common people of different countries where Lassa virus is endemic. To ensure the binding affinity to both HLA-I and HLA-II molecules were employed in docking simulation with suggested epitope sequence. Further the predicted 3D structure of the most immunogenic protein was analyzed to reveal out the binding site for the drug design against Lassa Virus. Herein, sequence analyses of proteome identified the most immunogenic protein that led to predict both T-cell and B-cell epitopes and further target and binding site depiction could allow novel drug findings for drug discovery field against this virus.

  19. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewary, Sunil K; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared...... with that of the wild-type vector. Thirty-two of 60 transduced proviruses analyzed harbored a primer binding site sequence matching a glutamine tRNA primer. Sequence analysis of the regions flanking the glutamine tRNA primer binding site revealed a distinct pattern of nucleotide differences from the Akv-based vector......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  1. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus E3 protein: the biological functions do not correlate with its biochemical capacity to bind double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueck, Kevin J; Hu, YuanShen Sandy; Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie; Cao, Jingxin

    2015-05-01

    Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they suppress the related

  2. Modeling virus capsids and their protein binding -- the search for weak regions within the HIV capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Benson, Daryn E.; Gilbert, C. Michael

    2011-03-01

    Viruses remain a threat to the health of humans worldwide with 33 million infected with HIV. Viruses are ubiquitous, infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Each virus infects in its own unique manner making the problem seem intractable. However, some general physical steps apply to many viruses and the application of basic physical modeling can potentially have great impact. The aim of this theoretical study is to investigate the stability of the HIV viral capsid (protein shell). The structural shell can be compromised by physical probes such as pulsed laser light [1,2]. But, what are the weakest regions of the capsid so that we can begin to understand vulnerabilities of these deadly materials? The atomic structure of HIV capsids is not precisely known and we begin by describing our work to model the capsid structure. We have constructed three representative viral capsids of different CA protein number -- HIV-900, HIV-1260 and HIV-1740. The complexity of the assembly requires a course grained model to investigate protein interactions within the capsid which we will describe.

  3. DNA binding properties of the integrase proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); Y. Elgersma (Ype); M.W. Bolk; C. Vink (Cornelis); R.H. Plassterk

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIntegration of retroviral DNA into the host chromosome requires the integrase protein (IN). We overexpressed the IN proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) in E. coli and purified them. Both proteins were found to specifically cut two

  4. Expression and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Fusion Proteins Comprising Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Structural Protein VP1 and DC-SIGN-Binding Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Xinsheng Liu; Jianliang Lv; Yuzhen Fang; Peng Zhou; Yanzhen Lu; Li Pan; Zhongwang Zhang; Junwu Ma; Yongguang Zhang; Yonglu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Improving vaccine immunogenicity by targeting antigens to dendritic cells has recently emerged as a new design strategy in vaccine development. In this study, the VP1 gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A was fused with the gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane glycoprotein gp120 or C2-V3 domain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2, both of which are DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins. After codon optimization, the VP1 protein and the two recombi...

  5. Molecular Characterisation of the Haemagglutinin Glycan-Binding Specificity of Egg-Adapted Vaccine Strains of the Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Swine Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The haemagglutinin (HA glycan binding selectivity of H1N1 influenza viruses is an important determinant for the host range of the virus and egg-adaption during vaccine production. This study integrates glycan binding data with structure-recognition models to examine the impact of the K123N, D225G and Q226R mutations (as seen in the HA of vaccine strains of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 swine influenza A virus. The glycan-binding selectivity of three A/California/07/09 vaccine production strains, and purified recombinant A/California/07/09 HAs harboring these mutations was examined via a solid-phase ELISA assay. Wild-type A/California/07/09 recombinant HA bound specifically to α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans, with no affinity for the α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. In contrast, the vaccine virus strains and recombinant HA harboring the Q226R HA mutation displayed a comparable pattern of highly specific binding to α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans, with a negligible affinity for α2,6-linked sialyl-glycans. The D225G A/California/07/09 recombinant HA displayed an enhanced binding affinity for both α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialyl-glycans in the array. Notably its α2,6-glycan affinity was generally higher compared to its α2,3-glycan affinity, which may explain why the double mutant was not naturally selected during egg-adaption of the virus. The K123N mutation which introduces a glycosylation site proximal to the receptor binding site, did not impact the α2,3/α2,6 glycan selectivity, however, it lowered the overall glycan binding affinity of the HA; suggesting glycosylation may interfere with receptor binding. Docking models and ‘per residues’ scoring were employed to provide a structure-recognition rational for the experimental glycan binding data. Collectively, the glycan binding data inform future vaccine design strategies to introduce the D225G or Q226R amino acid substitutions into recombinant H1N1 viruses.

  6. Structure-Guided Functional Annotation of the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Reveals Dynamic Evolution of the p85β-Binding Site during Circulation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Antonio M; Domingues, Patricia; Zell, Roland; Hale, Benjamin G

    2017-11-01

    Rational characterization of virulence and host-adaptive markers in the multifunctional influenza A virus NS1 protein is hindered by a lack of comprehensive knowledge about NS1-host protein protein interfaces. Here, we surveyed the impact of amino acid variation in NS1 at its structurally defined binding site for host p85β, a regulator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Structure-guided alanine scanning of all viral residues at this interface defined 10 positions contributing to the interaction, with residues 89, 95, 98, 133, 145, and 162 being the most important. A bioinformatic study of >24,000 publicly available NS1 sequences derived from viruses infecting different hosts highlighted several prevalent amino acid variants at the p85β interface that either enhanced (I95) or weakened (N135, T145, L161, Y161, S164) p85β binding. Interestingly, analysis of viruses circulating in humans since the 1918 pandemic revealed the temporal acquisition of functionally relevant variants at this interface. I95 (which enhanced p85β binding) quickly became prevalent in the 1940s and experimentally conferred a fitness advantage to a recombinant 1930s-based H1N1 virus in human lung epithelial cells. Surprisingly, H1N1 and H3N2 viruses recently acquired T145 or N135, respectively, which diminished p85β binding but apparently not the overall fitness in the human population. Evolutionary analyses revealed covariation of the NS1-p85β binding phenotype in humans with functional changes at multiple residues in other viral proteins, suggesting an unexplored compensatory or synergistic interplay between phenotypes in vivo Overall, our data provide a resource to understand the consequences of the NS1-p85β binding spectrum of different influenza viruses and highlight the dynamic evolution of this property in viruses circulating in humans.IMPORTANCE In humans, influenza A viruses are responsible for causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. These viruses also

  7. [Application of artificial DNA-binding proteins and artificial nucleases to prevention of virus infection: development of virus-resistant plants and protein-based anti-viral drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Various DNA viruses are known to cause severe infectious diseases in both plants and mammals, including humans. For many of these infectious diseases, we have yet to find an effective prevention or treatment. Therefore, new methodologies for the prevention of virus infections in both agricultural crops and humans have been vigorously sought for a long time. One attractive approach to the prevention is inhibition of virus replication. We first inhibited virus replication by blocking binding of a viral replication protein, which initiates virus replication, to its replication origin, with using an artificial DNA-binding protein. We demonstrated that this new methodology was very effective in plants and mammalian cells: especially, we created transgenic plants that were immune to a geminivirus. We also developed novel protein-based antiviral drugs by fusing a cell-penetrating peptide to an artificial DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, we successfully generated a more effective protein-based antiviral, which was one hundred thousand times more active than the antiviral chemical drug Cidofovia, by alternatively fusing an DNA-cleaving enzyme to an artificial DNA-binding protein. Since this artificial protein has little cytotoxicity, it is expected that it will be used as a new antiviral drug.

  8. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health.

  9. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytom......We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse...... and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients...

  10. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble pathogen recognition protein of the innate immune system that binds specific mannose-containing glycans on the surfaces of microbial agents and initiates complement activation via the lectin pathway. Prior studies showed that MBL...... deficient in different complement components, we showed that inhibition of infection by insect cell- and mammalian cell-derived DENV was primarily dependent on the lectin pathway. Human MBL also bound to DENV and neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation...... hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation...

  11. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I.-Jung; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-02-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP’s RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus.

  12. Role of the IE62 Consensus Binding Site in Transactivation by the Varicella-Zoster Virus IE62 Protein ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kris; Peng, Hua; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2010-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE62 protein is the major transcriptional activator. IE62 is capable of associating with DNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner via a consensus binding site (5′-ATCGT-3′). However, the function of the consensus site is poorly understood, since IE62 efficiently transactivates promoter elements lacking this sequence. In the work presented here, sequence analysis of the VZV genome revealed the presence of 245 IE62 consensus sites throughout the genome. Some 54 sites were found to be present within putative VZV promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) experiments using an IE62 fragment containing the IE62 DNA-binding domain and duplex oligonucleotides that did or did not contain the IE62 consensus binding sequence yielded KD (equilibrium dissociation constant) values in the nanomolar range. Further, the IE62 DNA binding domain was shown to have a 5-fold-increased affinity for its consensus site compared to nonconsensus sequences. The effect of consensus site presence and position on IE62-mediated activation of native VZV and model promoters was examined using site-specific mutagenesis and transfection and superinfection reporter assays. In all promoters examined, the consensus sequence functioned as a distance-dependent repressive element. Protein recruitment assays utilizing the VZV gI promoter indicated that the presence of the consensus site increased the recruitment of IE62 but not Sp1. These data suggest a model where the IE62 consensus site functions to down-modulate IE62 activation, and interaction of IE62 with this sequence may result in loss or decrease of the ability of IE62 to recruit cellular factors needed for full promoter activation. PMID:20130051

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Tat binds to dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (CD26): a possible mechanism for Tat's immunosuppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutheil, W G; Subramanyam, M; Flentke, G R; Sanford, D G; Munoz, E; Huber, B T; Bachovchin, W W

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein suppresses antigen-induced, but not mitogen-induced, activation of human T cells when added to T-cell cultures [Viscidi, R. P., Mayur, K., Lederman, H. M. & Frankel, A. D. (1989) Science 246, 1606-1608]. This activity is potentially pertinent to the development of AIDS because lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals exhibit a similar antigen-specific dysfunction. Here we report that Tat binds with high affinity to the T-cell activation molecule dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (DP IV), also known as CD26. This molecule occurs on the surface of CD4+ cells responsible for the recall antigen response and appears to play an essential role in this response. Tat binds to both the cell surface and soluble forms of DP IV at physiological salt concentrations without inhibiting the protease activity of DP IV against small chromogenic substrates used to assay activity, but Tat markedly inhibits the activity of DP IV at lower salt concentrations. The kinetics of inhibition indicate the affinity of Tat for DP IV varies from 20 pM to 11 nM, and the activity of the Tat-DP IV complex varies from 13% to 100%, as the NaCl concentration varies from 0 to 140 mM. Cytofluorometry experiments demonstrate that Tat competes with anti-Ta1, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for DP IV, for binding to cell surface DP IV, thus indicating that Tat binds DP IV at or near the Ta1 epitope. Moreover, the anti-Ta1 mAb blocks the immunosuppressive activity of Tat. The high affinity of Tat for DP IV, previous evidence implicating DP IV in antigen-specific T-cell activation events, and the ability of anti-Ta1 mAb to block the immunosuppressive effect of Tat make DP IV a plausible receptor for Tat's immunosuppressive activity. Images PMID:7912830

  14. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G; Jacobsen, S

    2016-12-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29 healthy controls using ELISAs. Regression analyses and univariate comparisons were performed for associative evaluation between virus serology, plasma galectin-3 binding protein and autoantibodies, along with other clinical and demographic parameters. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P = 0.02 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anti-extractable nuclear antigens had significantly higher antibody levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (P = 0.02). Our study supports a link between active Epstein-Barr virus infections, positivity for anti-extractable nuclear antigens and increased plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations/type I interferon activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Quantitative investigation of the affinity of human respiratory syncytial virus phosphoprotein C-terminus binding to nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; O'Connell, Nichole; Hu, Jun; Thresher, Jason; Gu, Rong-Fang; Overman, Ross; Hardern, Ian M; Sproat, Graham G

    2014-11-19

    There are no approved small molecule drug therapies for human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a cause of morbidity and mortality in at-risk newborns, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. We have investigated as a potential novel hRSV drug target the protein-protein interaction between the C-terminus of the viral phosphoprotein (P) and the viral nucleocapsid protein (N), components of the ribonucleoprotein complex that contains, replicates, and transcribes the viral RNA genome. Earlier work by others established that the 9 C-terminal residues of P are necessary and sufficient for binding to N. We used a fluorescence anisotropy assay, surface plasmon resonance and 2-D NMR to quantify the affinities of peptides based on the C terminus of P for RNA-free, monomeric N-terminal-truncated N(13-391). We calculated the contributions to the free energies of binding of P to N(13-391) attributable to the C-terminal 11 residues, phosphorylation of the C-terminal 2 serine residues, the C-terminal Asp-Phe, and the phenyl ring of the C-terminal Phe. Binding studies confirmed the crucial role of the phosphorylated C-terminal peptide D(pS)DNDL(pS)LEDF for binding of P to RNA-free, monomeric N(13-391), contributing over 90% of the binding free energy at low ionic strength. The phenyl ring of the C-terminal Phe residue contributed an estimated -2.7 kcal/mole of the free energy of binding, the C-terminal Asp-Phe residues contributed -3.8 kcal/mole, the sequence DSDNDLSLE contributed -3.1 kcal/mole, and phosphorylation of the 2 Ser residues contributed -1.8 kcal/mole. Due to the high negative charge of the C-terminal peptide, the affinity of the P C-terminus for N(13-391) decreased as the ionic strength increased. The results support the idea that the interaction of the C-terminal residues of P with N constitutes a protein-protein interaction hotspot that may be a suitable target for small-molecule drugs that inhibit viral genome replication and transcription.

  16. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 4 (AAV4) and AAV5 Both Require Sialic Acid Binding for Hemagglutination and Efficient Transduction but Differ in Sialic Acid Linkage Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaludov, Nikola; Brown, Kevin E.; Walters, Robert W.; Zabner, Joseph; Chiorini, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 4 (AAV4) and AAV5 have different tropisms compared to AAV2 and to each other. We recently reported that α2-3 sialic acid is required for AAV5 binding and transduction. In this study, we characterized AAV4 binding and transduction and found it also binds sialic acid, but the specificity is significantly different from AAV5. AAV4 can hemagglutinate red blood cells from several species, whereas AAV5 hemagglutinates only rhesus monkey red blood cells. Treatment of ...

  17. The lectin from Musa paradisiaca binds with the capsid protein of tobacco mosaic virus and prevents viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-04

    It has been demonstrated that the lectin from Musa paradisiaca (BanLec-1) could inhibit the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to evaluate its effects on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the banlec-1 gene was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and tobacco, respectively. Recombinant BanLec-1 showed metal ions dependence, and higher thermal and pH stability. Overexpression of banlec-1 in tobacco resulted in decreased leaf size, and higher resistance to TMV infection, which includes reduced TMV cellular entry, more stable chlorophyll contents, and enhanced antioxidant enzymes. BanLec-1 was found to bind directly to the TMV capsid protein in vitro, and to inhibit TMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to limited prevention in vivo, purified rBanLec-1 exhibited more significant effects on TMV infection in vitro. Taken together, our study indicated that BanLec-1 could prevent TMV infection in tobacco, probably through the interaction between BanLec-1 and TMV capsid protein.

  18. Molecular modeling of the RNA binding N-terminal part of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus coat protein in solution with phosphate ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, D.; Feenstra, K.A; Hemminga, M.A.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The RNA-binding N-terminal arm of the coat protein of cowpea ch[orotic mottle virus has been studied with five molecular dynamics simulations of 2.0 ns each. This 25-residue peptide (pep25) is highly charged: it contains six Arg and three Lys residues. An alpha-helical fraction of the sequence is

  19. Epitope identification and in silico prediction of the specificity of antibodies binding to the coat proteins of Potato Virus Y strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, H.J.H.G.; Pomp, H.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2005-01-01

    A phage library containing 2.7 × 10(9) randomly expressed peptides was used to determine the epitopes of three monoclonal antibodies that bind to the coat protein of Potato Virus Y. Construction of the consensus sequences for the peptides obtained after three selection rounds indicated that each

  20. Influence of a yeast fermented product on the serum levels of the mannan-binding lectin and the antibodies against the Newcastle disease virus in Ross broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortés-Coronado, R F; Gómez-Rosales, S; de L Angeles, M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) at different ages in Ross broilers fed increasing amounts of a yeast-fermented product (YFP) and inoculated with a vaccine against Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Eighty mixed Ross B308 broilers...

  1. Epigallocatechin gallate, an active green tea compound inhibits the Zika virus entry into host cells via binding the envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nitin; Murali, Aarthy; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-11-01

    Emerging infections of Zika virus (ZIKV) are associated with serious consequences like microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It leads to a situation of global health emergency and demand an intensive research investigation to develop safe and effective therapeutics. Various efforts have been made to reduce the pathological pressure of ZIKV, but no effective drug has been introduced against ZIKV infections. A recent study has reported the inhibition of ZIKV entry into the host cells by an active green tea ingredient, Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) in Vero E6cells. The effect of EGCG seems remarkable but lacking the information of the mechanism of action. In this study, we have investigated the binding site (Site1) of EGCG on envelope protein and provided the insights into various interactions of molecule with the binding site using molecular docking studies. Further, using molecular dynamics approaches we proposed the possible associated mechanism of inhibition of ZIKV entry by EGCG molecule. EGCG has found to interact with several residues and providing stability to the protein conformations up to 50ns simulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative analysis of hepatitis B virus polymerase sequences required for viral RNA binding, RNA packaging, and protein priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott A; Clark, Daniel N; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E; Hu, Jianming

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus replicates a DNA genome through reverse transcription of a pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) by using a multifunctional polymerase (HP). A critical function of HP is its specific association with a viral RNA signal, termed ε (Hε), located on pgRNA, which is required for specific packaging of pgRNA into viral nucleocapsids and initiation of viral reverse transcription. HP initiates reverse transcription by using itself as a protein primer (protein priming) and Hε as the obligatory template. HP is made up of four domains, including the terminal protein (TP), the spacer, the reverse transcriptase (RT), and the RNase H domains. A recently developed, Hε-dependent, in vitro protein priming assay was used in this study to demonstrate that almost the entire TP and RT domains and most of the RNase H domain were required for protein priming. Specific residues within TP, RT, and the spacer were identified as being critical for HP-Hε binding and/or protein priming. Comparison of HP sequence requirements for Hε binding, pgRNA packaging, and protein priming allowed the classification of the HP mutants into five groups, each with distinct effects on these complex and related processes. Detailed characterization of HP requirements for these related and essential functions of HP will further elucidate the mechanisms of its multiple functions and aid in the targeting of these functions for antiviral therapy.

  3. Structural Characterization of the Dual Glycan Binding Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Robert; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Parent, Kristin N.; Baker, Timothy S.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) was determined using cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction and using X-ray crystallography to 9.7- and 3.0-Å resolution, respectively. The AAV6 capsid contains a highly conserved, eight-stranded (βB to βI) β-barrel core and large loop regions between the strands which form the capsid surface, as observed in other AAV structures. The loops show conformational variation compared to other AAVs, consiste...

  4. Use of surface plasmon resonance for the measurement of low affinity binding interactions between HSP72 and measles virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinsheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 is a molecular chaperone that binds native protein with low affinity. These interactions can alter function of the substrate, a property known as HSP-mediated activity control. In the present work, BIAcore instrumentation was used to monitor binding reactions between HSP72 and naturally occurring sequence variants of the measles virus (MV nucleocapsid protein (N, a structural protein regulating transcription/replication of the viral genome. Binding reactions employed synthetic peptides mimicking a putative HSP72 binding motif of N. Sequences were identified that bound HSP72 with affinities comparable to well-characterized activity control reactions. These sequences, but not those binding with lesser affinity, supported HSP72 activity control of MV transcription/replication. BIAcore instrumentation thus provides an effective way to measure biologically relevant low affinity interactions with structural variants of viral proteins.

  5. Sialic acid receptor detection in the human respiratory tract: evidence for widespread distribution of potential binding sites for human and avian influenza viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus binds to cell receptors via sialic acid (SA linked glycoproteins. They recognize SA on host cells through their haemagglutinins (H. The distribution of SA on cell surfaces is one determinant of host tropism and understanding its expression on human cells and tissues is important for understanding influenza pathogenesis. The objective of this study therefore was to optimize the detection of α2,3-linked and α2,6-linked SA by lectin histochemistry by investigating the binding of Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA for SAα2,6Gal and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA for SAα2,3Gal in the respiratory tract of normal adults and children. Methods We used fluorescent and biotinylated SNA and MAA from different suppliers on archived and prospectively collected biopsy and autopsy specimens from the nasopharynx, trachea, bronchus and lungs of fetuses, infants and adults. We compared different methods of unmasking for tissue sections to determine if these would affect lectin binding. Using serial sections we then compared the lectin binding of MAA from different suppliers. Results We found that unmasking using microwave treatment in citrate buffer produced increased lectin binding to the ciliated and glandular epithelium of the respiratory tract. In addition we found that there were differences in tissue distribution of the α2,3 linked SA when 2 different isoforms of MAA (MAA1 and MAA2 lectin were used. MAA1 had widespread binding throughout the upper and lower respiratory tract and showed more binding to the respiratory epithelium of children than in adults. By comparison, MAA2 binding was mainly restricted to the alveolar epithelial cells of the lung with weak binding to goblet cells. SNA binding was detected in bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells and binding of this lectin was stronger to the paediatric epithelium compared to adult epithelium. Furthermore, the MAA lectins from 2 suppliers (Roche and EY Labs tended

  6. Dengue virus induces expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, which competitively inhibits viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Perng; Lu, Hsin-Lin; Lai, Szu-Liang; Campanella, Gabriele S; Sung, Jui-Ming; Lu, Mei-Yi; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Lin, Yi-Ling; Lane, Thomas E; Luster, Andrew D; Liao, Fang

    2006-09-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes a mild febrile illness, dengue fever, or a potentially fatal syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of viral infection, which makes them critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the induction and function of chemokines in mice early after infection with dengue virus in vivo. We found that CXCL10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) expression was rapidly and transiently induced in liver following infection. The expressed CXCL10/IP-10 likely mediates the recruitment of activated NK cells, given that anti-CXCL10/IP-10-treated mice showed diminished NK cell infiltration and reduced hepatic expression of effector molecules in activated NK cells after dengue virus infection. Of particular interest, we found that CXCL10/IP-10 also was able to inhibit viral binding to target cells in vitro. Further investigation revealed that various CXCL10/IP-10 mutants, in which the residues that mediate the interaction between the chemokine and heparan sulfate were substituted, failed to exert the inhibitory effect on dengue binding, which suggests that CXCL10/IP-10 competes with dengue virus for binding to heparan sulfate on the cell surface. Moreover, subsequent plaque assays showed that this inhibition of dengue binding blocked viral uptake and replication. The inhibitory effect of CXCL10/IP-10 on the binding of dengue virus to cells may represent a novel contribution of this chemokine to the host defense against viral infection.

  7. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiya Fedosyuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1-83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1-83 structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1-240, we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88.

  8. Evaluation of live attenuated H7N3 and H7N7 vaccine viruses for their receptor binding preferences, immunogenicity in ferrets and cross reactivity to the novel H7N9 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    Full Text Available Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV candidates of the H7 subtype, A/Netherlands/219/03 (H7N7, NL03 ca and A/chicken/British Columbia/CN-6/2004 (H7N3, BC04 ca, were evaluated for their receptor binding specificity and immunogenicity in ferrets. The BC04 ca virus exhibited α2,3-SA and α2,6-SA dual receptor binding preference while the NL03 ca virus preferentially bound to α2,3-SA. Substitution of the Q226 and G228 (Q-G by the L226 and S228 (L-S residues in the HA improved binding to α2,6-SA for NL03 ca. The vaccine viruses with L-S retained the attenuation phenotype. NL03 L-S ca replicated more efficiently than the original NL03 ca virus in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets, and induced higher levels of humoral and cellular immune responses. Prior vaccination with seasonal LAIV reduced H7-specific antibody responses, but did not reduce the H7N7 vaccine mediated protection against a heterologous H7N3 BC04 wt virus infection in ferrets. In addition, the H7N3 and H7N7 vaccine immunized ferret sera cross reacted with the newly emerged H7N9 virus. These data, in combination with the safety data from previously conducted Phase 1 studies, suggest that these vaccines may have a role in responding to the threat posed by the H7N9 virus.

  9. Identification and Structural Characterization of the ALIX-Binding Late Domains of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 and SIVagmTan-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Q.; Robinson, H.; Landesman, M. B.; Sundquist, W. I.; Hill, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Retroviral Gag proteins contain short late-domain motifs that recruit cellular ESCRT pathway proteins to facilitate virus budding. ALIX-binding late domains often contain the core consensus sequence YPX{sub n}L (where X{sub n} can vary in sequence and length). However, some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag proteins lack this consensus sequence, yet still bind ALIX. We mapped divergent, ALIX-binding late domains within the p6{sup Gag} proteins of SIV{sub mac239} ({sub 40}SREK{und P}YKE{und VT}ED{und L}LHLNSLF{sub 59}) and SIV{sub agmTan-1} ({sub 24}AAG{und A}YDP{und AR}KL{und L}EQYAKK{sub 41}). Crystal structures revealed that anchoring tyrosines (in lightface) and nearby hydrophobic residues (underlined) contact the ALIX V domain, revealing how lentiviruses employ a diverse family of late-domain sequences to bind ALIX and promote virus budding.

  10. Identification and Structural Characterization of the ALIX-Binding Late Domains of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIV mac239 and SIV agmTan-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Q Zhai; M Landesman; H Robinson; W Sundquist; C Hill

    2011-12-31

    Retroviral Gag proteins contain short late-domain motifs that recruit cellular ESCRT pathway proteins to facilitate virus budding. ALIX-binding late domains often contain the core consensus sequence YPX{sub n}L (where X{sub n} can vary in sequence and length). However, some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag proteins lack this consensus sequence, yet still bind ALIX. We mapped divergent, ALIX-binding late domains within the p6{sup Gag} proteins of SIV{sub MAC239} ({sub 40}SREK{und P}YKE{und VT}ED{und L}LHLNSLF{sub 59}) and SIV{sub agmTan-1} ({sub 24}AAG{und A}YDP{und AR}KL{und L}EQYAKK{sub 41}). Crystal structures revealed that anchoring tyrosines (in lightface) and nearby hydrophobic residues (underlined) contact the ALIX V domain, revealing how lentiviruses employ a diverse family of late-domain sequences to bind ALIX and promote virus budding.

  11. Lack of the pattern recognition molecule mannose-binding lectin increases susceptibility to influenza A virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartshorn Kevan L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a pattern recognition innate immune molecule, inhibits influenza A virus infection in vitro. MBL deficiency due to gene polymorphism in humans has been associated with infection susceptibility. These clinical observations were confirmed by animal model studies, in which mice genetically lacking MBL were susceptible to certain pathogens, including herpes simplex virus 2. Results We demonstrate that MBL is present in the lung of naïve healthy wild type (WT mice and that MBL null mice are more susceptible to IAV infection. Administration of recombinant human MBL (rhMBL reverses the infection phenotype, confirming that the infection susceptibility is MBL-mediated. The anti-viral mechanisms of MBL include activation of the lectin complement pathway and coagulation, requiring serum factors. White blood cells (WBCs in the lung increase in WT mice compared with MBL null mice on day 1 post-infection. In contrast, apoptotic macrophages (MΦs are two-fold higher in the lung of MBL null mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, MBL deficient macrophages appear to be susceptible to apoptosis in vitro. Lastly, soluble factors, which are associated with lung injury, are increased in the lungs of MBL null mice during IAV infection. These results suggest that MBL plays a key role against IAV infection. Conclusion MBL plays a key role in clearing IAV and maintaining lung homeostasis. In addition, our findings also suggest that MBL deficiency maybe a risk factor in IAV infection and MBL may be a useful adjunctive therapy for IAV infection.

  12. VP40 of the Ebola Virus as a Target for EboV Therapy: Comprehensive Conformational and Inhibitor Binding Landscape from Accelerated Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmith, Marissa; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2017-03-01

    The first account of the dynamic features of the loop region of VP40 of the Ebola virus was studied using accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and reported herein. Among the proteins of the Ebola virus, the matrix protein (VP40) plays a significant role in the virus lifecycle thereby making it a promising therapeutic target. Of interest is the newly elucidated N-terminal domain loop region of VP40 comprising residues K127, T129, and N130 which when mutated to alanine have demonstrated an unrecognized role for N-terminal domain-plasma membrane interaction for efficient VP40-plasma membrane localization, oligomerization, matrix assembly, and egress. The molecular understanding of the conformational features of VP40 in complex with a known inhibitor still remains elusive. Using accelerated molecular dynamics approaches, we conducted a comparative study on VP40 apo and bound systems to understand the conformational features of VP40 at the molecular level and to determine the effect of inhibitor binding with the aid of a number of post-dynamic analytical tools. Significant features were seen in the presence of an inhibitor as per molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area binding free energy calculations. Results revealed that inhibitor binding to VP40 reduces the flexibility and mobility of the protein as supported by root mean square fluctuation and root mean square deviation calculations. The study revealed a characteristic "twisting" motion and coiling of the loop region of VP40 accompanied by conformational changes in the dimer interface upon inhibitor binding. We believe that results presented in this study will ultimately provide useful insight into the binding landscape of VP40 which could assist researchers in the discovery of potent Ebola virus inhibitors for anti-Ebola therapies.

  13. The BDLF3 gene product of Epstein-Barr virus, gp150, mediates non-productive binding to heparan sulfate on epithelial cells and only the binding domain of CD21 is required for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, Liudmila S; Valencia, Sarah M; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2016-07-01

    The cell surface molecules used by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to attach to epithelial cells are not well-defined, although when CD21, the B cell receptor for EBV is expressed epithelial cell infection increases disproportionately to the increase in virus bound. Many herpesviruses use low affinity charge interactions with molecules such as heparan sulfate to attach to cells. We report here that the EBV glycoprotein gp150 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, but that attachment via this glycoprotein is not productive of infection. We also report that only the aminoterminal two short consensus repeats of CD21 are required for efficient infection, This supports the hypothesis that, when expressed on an epithelial cell CD21 serves primarily to cluster the major attachment protein gp350 in the virus membrane and enhance access of other important glycoproteins to the epithelial cell surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface IgM λ light chain is involved in the binding and infection of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) to DT40 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jiaqi; You, Leiming; Li, Peipei; Teng, Man; Zhang, Gaiping; Luo, Jun; Wang, Aiping

    2018-01-25

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an important immunosuppressive virus in chickens. Surface immunoglobulin M (sIgM)-bearing B lymphocytes act as the major targets of IBDV in the bursa of Fabricius, and sIgM may function as one of the membrane binding sites responsible for IBDV infection. Recently, using the virus overlay protein binding assay, the chicken λ light chain of sIgM was identified to specifically interact with IBDV in a virulence-independent manner in vitro. To further investigate sIgM λ light chain-mediated IBDV binding and infection in pre-B cells, the cell line DT40, which is susceptible to both pathogenic and attenuated IBDV, was used. Based on the RNA interference strategy, the DT40 cell line whose λ light chain of sIgM was stably knocked down, herein termed DT40LKD, was generated by the genomic integration of a specific small hairpin RNA and a green fluorescence protein co-expression construct. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the binding of IBDV to DT40LKD cells was significantly reduced due to the loss of sIgM λ light chain. In particular, reduced viral replication was observed in IBDV-incubated DT40LKD cells, and no viral release into cell culture medium was detected by the IBDV rapid diagnostic strips. In addition, the rescue of sIgM λ light chain expression restored viral binding and replication in DT40LKD cells. These results show that sIgM λ light chain appears to be beneficial for IBDV attachment and infection, suggesting that sIgM acts as a binding site involved in IBDV infection.

  15. Co-expression of sialic acid receptors compatible with avian and human influenza virus binding in emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Naveen; Chothe, Shubhada K; Gawai, Shashikant; Nissly, Ruth; Bhushan, Gitanjali; Kanagaraj, Vijayarani; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Kathaperumal, Kumanan; Subbiah, Madhuri; Kuchipudi, Suresh V

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) continue to threaten animal and human health with constant emergence of novel variants. While aquatic birds are a major reservoir of most IAVs, the role of other terrestrial birds in the evolution of IAVs is becoming increasingly evident. Since 2006, several reports of IAV isolations from emus have surfaced and avian influenza infection of emus can lead to the selection of mammalian like PB2-E627K and PB2-D701N mutants. However, the potential of emus to be co-infected with avian and mammalian IAVs is not yet understood. As a first step, we investigated sialic acid (SA) receptor distribution across major organs and body systems of emu and found a widespread co-expression of both SAα2,3Gal and SAα2,6Gal receptors in various tissues that are compatible with avian and human IAV binding. Our results suggest that emus could allow genetic recombination and hence play an important role in the evolution of IAVs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Binding of hepatitis B virus to its cellular receptor alters the expression profile of genes of bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Nicola; Volz, Tassilo; Bhadra, Oliver D; Kah, Janine; Allweiss, Lena; Giersch, Katja; Bierwolf, Jeanette; Riecken, Kristoffer; Pollok, Jörg M; Lohse, Ansgar W; Fehse, Boris; Petersen, Joerg; Urban, Stephan; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Heeren, Joerg; Dandri, Maura

    2014-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been associated with alterations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), responsible for bile acid (BA) uptake into hepatocytes, was identified as the functional cellular receptor mediating HBV entry. The aim of the study was to determine whether HBV alters the liver metabolic profile by employing HBV-infected and uninfected human liver chimeric mice. Humanized urokinase plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficiency mice were used to establish chronic HBV infection. Gene expression profiles were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction using primers specifically recognizing transcripts of either human or murine origin. Liver biopsy samples obtained from HBV-chronic individuals were used to validate changes determined in mice. Besides modest changes in lipid metabolism, HBV-infected mice displayed a significant enhancement of human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (human [h]CYP7A1; median 12-fold induction; Pmetabolic alterations. Binding of HBV to NTCP limits its function, thus promoting compensatory BA synthesis and cholesterol provision. The intimate link determined between HBV and liver metabolism underlines the importance to exploit further metabolic pathways, as well as possible NTCP-related viral-drug interactions. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Relationship between the loss of neutralizing antibody binding and fusion activity of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarisky Robert T

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To elucidate the relationship between resistance to HRSV neutralizing antibodies directed against the F protein and the fusion activity of the F protein, a recombinant approach was used to generate a panel of mutations in the major antigenic sites of the F protein. These mutant proteins were assayed for neutralizing mAb binding (ch101F, palivizumab, and MAb19, level of expression, post-translational processing, cell surface expression, and fusion activity. Functional analysis of the fusion activity of the panel of mutations revealed that the fusion activity of the F protein is tolerant to multiple changes in the site II and IV/V/VI region in contrast with the somewhat limited spectrum of changes in the F protein identified from the isolation of HRSV neutralizing antibody virus escape mutants. This finding suggests that aspects other than fusion activity may limit the spectrum of changes tolerated within the F protein that are selected for by neutralizing antibodies.

  18. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chang, Chungming

    2015-11-01

    The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBV(G2335A) expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients infected with other HBV

  19. Serum levels of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) during virus infections; indication that chicken MBL is an acute phase reactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jensenius, J. C.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum collectin which is believed to be an opsonin of the innate immune defence against various microorganisms. MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in man. We investigated the concentration of serum MBL in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV...... levels returned to normal values 6-10 days after infection. The results indicated that MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in chickens....

  20. X-linked RNA-binding motif protein (RBMX) is required for the maintenance of Borna disease virus nuclear viral factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yuya; Honda, Tomoyuki; Makino, Akiko; Watanabe, Yuzo; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2015-11-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a non-segmented, negative-strand RNA virus that establishes persistent infection in the nucleus. Although BDV forms viral inclusion bodies, termed viral speckles of transcripts (vSPOTs), which are associated with chromatin in the nucleus, the host factors involved in the maintenance of vSPOTs remain largely unknown. In this study, we identified X-linked RNA-binding motif protein (RBMX) as a nuclear factor interacting with BDV nucleoprotein. Interestingly, knockdown of RBMX led to disruption of the formation of vSPOTs and reduced both transcription and replication of BDV. Our results indicate that RBMX is involved in the maintenance of the structure of the virus factory in the nucleus.

  1. Antibodies against Lewis antigens inhibit the binding of human norovirus GII.4 virus-like particles to saliva but not to intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Vicente, Noelia; Allen, David J; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Buesa, Javier

    2016-05-21

    Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the main cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. The most commonly detected NoV strains belong to the genetically diverse GII.4 genotype, with new pandemic variants emerging periodically. Despite extensive efforts, NoV investigation has been hampered by the lack of an effective in vitro cell culture system. However, NoV-derived recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) resembling empty capsids are good surrogates for analysing NoV antigenicity and virus-ligand interactions. NoV VLPs have been reported to bind to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). We have analysed the ability of NoV VLPs derived from GI.1 genotype and from three GII.4 genotype variants, GII.4-1999, GII.4-2004 and GII.4-2006b, to bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM), human saliva and differentiated human intestinal Caco-2 cells (D-Caco-2 cells). Distinct patterns of saliva binding with the NoV GII.4 variant VLPs were observed, although they bound to D-Caco-2 cells independently of the expression of HBGAs. Monoclonal antibodies against Lewis antigens were able to block the binding of NoV VLPs to saliva, but not to D-Caco-2 cells. Blocking HBGAs on the surface of D-Caco-2 cells with specific monoclonal antibodies did not affect NoV VLP binding to cellular membranes. Co-localisation of Lewis y (Le(y)) and H-type 2 antigens with NoV VLPs was not observed by immunofluorescence assays. Although the binding of NoV VLPs of GII.4 genotype variants to human saliva samples occur with distinct HBGA binding patterns and can be blocked by antibodies against Lewis antigens, their attachment to D-Caco-2 cells can be mediated by other receptors, which still need further investigation.

  2. Mutagenic analysis of potato virus X movement protein (TGBp1) and the coat protein (CP): in vitro TGBp1-CP binding and viral RNA translation activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayakina, Olga; Arkhipenko, Marina; Kozlovsky, Stanislav; Nikitin, Nikolai; Smirnov, Alexander; Susi, Petri; Rodionova, Nina; Karpova, Olga; Atabekov, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that encapsidated Potato virus X (PVX) RNA was non-translatable in vitro, but could be converted into a translatable form by binding of the PVX movement protein TGBp1 to one end of the virion or by coat protein (CP) phosphorylation. Here, a mutagenic analysis of PVX CP and TGBp1 was used to identify the regions involved in TGBp1-CP binding and translational activation of PVX RNA by TGBp1. It was found that the C-terminal (C-ter) 10/18 amino acids region was not essential for virus-like particle (VP) assembly from CP and RNA. However, the VPs assembled from the CP lacking C-ter 10/18 amino acids were incapable of TGBp1 binding and being translationally activated. It was suggested that the 10-amino-acid C-ter regions of protein subunits located at one end of a polar helical PVX particle contain a domain accessible to TGBp1 binding and PVX remodelling. The non-translatable particles assembled from the C-ter mutant CP could be converted into a translatable form by CP phosphorylation. The TGBp1-CP binding activity was preserved unless a conservative motif IV was removed from TGBp1. By contrast, TGBp1-dependent activation of PVX RNA translation was abolished by deletions of various NTPase/helicase conservative motifs and their combinations. The motif IV might be essential for TGBp1-CP binding, but insufficient for PVX RNA translation activation. The evidence to discriminate between these two events, i.e. TGBp1 binding to the CP-helix and TGBp1-dependent RNA translation activation, is discussed.

  3. Effects of the binding of calcium ions on the structure and dynamics of the ΦX174 virus investigated using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Jason E; Lee, Kuo Hao; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2012-06-01

    It is known that the presence of calcium ions (Ca(2 + )) is necessary for the enterobacterial virus ΦX174 to inject its DNA into the host cell, and that some mutations in the major capsid proteins lead to better survivability at higher temperatures. Our goal in the current study is to determine the physical changes in both the wild-type and mutant virus due to the binding of Ca(2 + ). Thus, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the ΦX174 major capsid protein complex with and without Ca(2 + ) bound. Our results show that binding of Ca(2 + ) leads to energetic and dynamical changes in the virus proteins. In particular, the results suggest that binding of Ca(2 + ) is energetically favorable and that the mutation leads to increased fluctuations of the protein complex (especially with the calcium ions bound to the complex), which may increase the rate of genome packaging and ejection for ΦX174.

  4. Amino acids substitutions in σ1 and μ1 outer capsid proteins of a Vero cell-adapted mammalian orthoreovirus are required for optimal virus binding and disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandekian, Véronique; Lemay, Guy

    2015-01-22

    In a recent study, the serotype 3 Dearing strain of mammalian orthoreovirus was adapted to Vero cells; cells that exhibit a limited ability to support the early steps of reovirus uncoating and are unable to produce interferon as an antiviral response upon infection. The Vero cell-adapted virus (VeroAV) exhibits amino acids substitutions in both the σ1 and μ1 outer capsid proteins but no changes in the σ3 protein. Accordingly, the virus was shown not to behave as a classical uncoating mutant. In the present study, an increased ability of the virus to bind at the Vero cell surface was observed and is likely associated with an increased ability to bind onto cell-surface sialic acid residues. In addition, the kinetics of μ1 disassembly from the virions appears to be altered. The plasmid-based reverse genetics approach confirmed the importance of σ1 amino acids substitutions in VeroAV's ability to efficiently infect Vero cells, although μ1 co-adaptation appears necessary to optimize viral infection. This approach of combining in vitro selection of reoviruses with reverse genetics to identify pertinent amino acids substitutions appears promising in the context of eventual reovirus modification to increase its potential as an oncolytic virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recent sequence variation in probe binding site affected detection of respiratory syncytial virus group B by real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Everlyn; Agoti, Charles N; Lewa, Clement S; Oketch, John; Owor, Betty E; Otieno, Grieven P; Bett, Anne; Cane, Patricia A; Nokes, D James

    2017-03-01

    Direct immuno-fluorescence test (IFAT) and multiplex real-time RT-PCR have been central to RSV diagnosis in Kilifi, Kenya. Recently, these two methods showed discrepancies with an increasing number of PCR undetectable RSV-B viruses. Establish if mismatches in the primer and probe binding sites could have reduced real-time RT-PCR sensitivity. Nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes were sequenced for real-time RT-PCR positive and negative samples. Primer and probe binding regions in N gene were checked for mismatches and phylogenetic analyses done to determine molecular epidemiology of these viruses. New primers and probe were designed and tested on the previously real-time RT-PCR negative samples. N gene sequences revealed 3 different mismatches in the probe target site of PCR negative, IFAT positive viruses. The primers target sites had no mismatches. Phylogenetic analysis of N and G genes showed that real-time RT-PCR positive and negative samples fell into distinct clades. Newly designed primers-probe pair improved detection and recovered previous PCR undetectable viruses. An emerging RSV-B variant is undetectable by a quite widely used real-time RT-PCR assay due to polymorphisms that influence probe hybridization affecting PCR accuracy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, John T. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Keefer, Christopher J. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Slaughter, James C. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Biostatistics and Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Kulp, Daniel W. [IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center and Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Schief, William R. [IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center and Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Crowe, James E., E-mail: james.crowe@vanderbilt.edu [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (K{sub on}) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (K{sub off}) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced K{sub on} with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased K{sub on} found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants. - Highlights: • The relationship of affinity to neutralization for virus antibodies is uncertain. • Palivizumab binds to RSV escape mutant fusion proteins, but with reduced affinity. • Association rate (K{sub on}) correlated well with the potency of neutralization.

  7. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...

  8. A plant small polypeptide is a novel component of DNA-binding protein phosphatase 1-mediated resistance to plum pox virus in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló, María José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Daniel, Jacques; Granot, David; Vera, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    DNA-binding protein phosphatases (DBPs) have been identified as a novel class of plant-specific regulatory factors playing a role in plant-virus interactions. NtDBP1 from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was shown to participate in transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to virus infection in compatible interactions, and AtDBP1, its closest relative in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), has recently been found to mediate susceptibility to potyvirus, one of the most speciose taxa of plant viruses. Here, we report on the identification of a novel family of highly conserved small polypeptides that interact with DBP1 proteins both in tobacco and Arabidopsis, which we have designated DBP-interacting protein 2 (DIP2). The interaction of AtDIP2 with AtDBP1 was demonstrated in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and AtDIP2 was shown to functionally interfere with AtDBP1 in yeast. Furthermore, reducing AtDIP2 gene expression leads to increased susceptibility to the potyvirus Plum pox virus and to a lesser extent also to Turnip mosaic virus, whereas overexpression results in enhanced resistance. Therefore, we describe a novel family of conserved small polypeptides in plants and identify AtDIP2 as a novel host factor contributing to resistance to potyvirus in Arabidopsis.

  9. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  10. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrig, John T., E-mail: jtr1@cdc.gov [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Bennett, Susan L. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  11. Solution structure of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV p9 Gag protein contains the late (L- domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. Results In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this α-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. Conclusions These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  12. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding.

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Increases the Virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Binding to Penicillin Binding Protein 1a A New Paradigm in Respiratory Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Claire M.; Sandrini, Sara; Datta, Sumit; Freestone, Primrose; Shafeeq, Sulman; Radhakrishnan, Priya; Williams, Gwyneth; Glenn, Sarah M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hirst, Robert A.; Easton, Andrew J.; Andrew, Peter W.; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major respiratory pathogens. Coinfection with RSV and S. pneumoniae is associated with severe and often fatal pneumonia but the molecular basis for this remains unclear. ObjeOtives: Todetermine if interaction between RSV

  14. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwet, K; Vitale, M; De Pelsmaeker, S; Jacob, T; Laval, K; Moretta, L; Parodi, M; Parolini, S; Cantoni, C; Favoreel, H W

    2015-11-18

    Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The identification of this

  15. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J; Kalekar, Radha; Shin, Jong; Archambault, Jacques; Bohm, Andrew; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV) DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD) of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  16. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of “blue eye disease”, causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β PMID:26546155

  17. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-02

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Chapuis, Sophie [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Revers, Frédéric [INRA, Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1332 de Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon (France); Ziegler-Graff, Véronique [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Brault, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brault@colmar.inra.fr [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France)

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  19. Identification of a binding site for ASF/SF2 on an RNA fragment derived from the hepatitis delta virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Dorota; Zhang, Dajiang; Bojic, Teodora; Beeharry, Yasnee; Tanara, Ali; Pelchat, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a small (~1700 nucleotides) RNA pathogen which encodes only one open reading frame. Consequently, HDV is dependent on host proteins to replicate its RNA genome. Recently, we reported that ASF/SF2 binds directly and specifically to an HDV-derived RNA fragment which has RNA polymerase II promoter activity. Here, we localized the binding site of ASF/SF2 on the HDV RNA fragment by performing binding experiments using purified recombinant ASF/SF2 combined with deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In addition, we investigated the requirement of ASF/SF2 for HDV RNA replication using RNAi-mediated knock-down of ASF/SF2 in 293 cells replicating HDV RNA. Overall, our results indicate that ASF/SF2 binds to a purine-rich region distant from both the previously published initiation site of HDV mRNA transcription and binding site of RNAP II, and suggest that this protein is not involved in HDV replication in the cellular system used.

  20. The Triticum Mosaic Virus 5' Leader Binds to Both eIF4G and eIFiso4G for Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Roberts

    Full Text Available We recently identified a remarkably strong (739 nt-long IRES-like element in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, Potyviridae. Here, we define the components of the cap-binding translation initiation complex that are required for TriMV translation. Using bio-layer interferometry and affinity capture of the native translation apparatus, we reveal that the viral translation element has a ten-fold greater affinity for the large subunit eIF4G/eIFiso4G than to the cap binding protein eIF4E/eIFiso4E. This data supports a translation mechanism that is largely dependent on eIF4G and its isoform. The binding of both scaffold isoforms requires an eight base-pair-long hairpin structure located 270 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation site, which we have previously shown to be crucial for IRES activity. Despite a weak binding affinity to the mRNA, eIFiso4G alone or in combination with eIFiso4E supports TriMV translation in a cap-binding factor-depleted wheat germ extract. Notably, TriMV 5' UTR-mediated translation is dependent upon eIF4A helicase activity, as the addition of the eIF4A inhibitor hippuristanol inhibits 5' UTR-mediated translation. This inhibition is reversible with the addition of recombinant wheat eIF4A. These results and previous observations demonstrate a key role of eIF4G and eIF4A in this unique mechanism of cap-independent-translation. This work provides new insights into the lesser studied translation mechanisms of plant virus-mediated internal translation initiation.

  1. Structure and Functional Analysis of the RNA- and Viral Phosphoprotein-Binding Domain of Respiratory Syncytial Virus M2-1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondot, Marie-Lise; Dubosclard, Virginie; Fix, Jenna; Lassoued, Safa; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Bontems, François; Eléouët, Jean-François; Sizun, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) protein M2-1 functions as an essential transcriptional cofactor of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) complex by increasing polymerase processivity. M2-1 is a modular RNA binding protein that also interacts with the viral phosphoprotein P, another component of the RdRp complex. These binding properties are related to the core region of M2-1 encompassing residues S58 to K177. Here we report the NMR structure of the RSV M2-158–177 core domain, which is structurally homologous to the C-terminal domain of Ebola virus VP30, a transcription co-factor sharing functional similarity with M2-1. The partial overlap of RNA and P interaction surfaces on M2-158–177, as determined by NMR, rationalizes the previously observed competitive behavior of RNA versus P. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified eight residues located on these surfaces that are critical for an efficient transcription activity of the RdRp complex. Single mutations of these residues disrupted specifically either P or RNA binding to M2-1 in vitro. M2-1 recruitment to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which are regarded as sites of viral RNA synthesis, was impaired by mutations affecting only binding to P, but not to RNA, suggesting that M2-1 is associated to the holonucleocapsid by interacting with P. These results reveal that RNA and P binding to M2-1 can be uncoupled and that both are critical for the transcriptional antitermination function of M2-1. PMID:22675274

  2. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sialic acid and sialyl-lactose glyco-conjugates: design, synthesis and binding assays to lectins and swine influenza H1N1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevgiti, Stella; Zabala, Juliana Gonzalez; Darji, Ayub; Dietrich, Ursula; Panou-Pomonis, Eugenia; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The terminal parts of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) receptors α2,6- and α2,3-sialyllactoses were conjugated to an artificial carrier, named sequential oligopeptide carrier (SOC(4) ), to formulate human and avian receptor mimics, respectively. SOC(4) , formed by the tripeptide unit Lys-Aib-Gly, adopts a rigid helicoids-type conformation, which enables the conjugation of biomolecules to the Lys-N(ε) H(2) groups. By doing so, it preserves their initial conformations and functionalities of the epitopes. We report that SOC(4) -glyco-conjugate bearing two copies of the α2,6-sialyllactose is specifically recognized by the biotinylated Sambucus nigra (elderberry) bark lectin, which binds preferentially to sialic acid in an α2,6-linkage. SOC(4) -glyco-conjugate bearing two copies of the α2,3-sialyllactose was not recognized by the biotinylated Maackia amurensis lectin, despite its well-known α2,3-sialyl bond specificity. However, preliminary immune blot assays showed that H1N1 virus binds to both the SOC(4) -glyco-conjugates immobilized onto nitrocellulose membrane. It is concluded that Ac-SOC(4) [(Ac)(2) ,(3'SL-Aoa)(2) ]-NH(2) 5 and Ac-SOC(4) [(Ac)(2) ,(6'SL-Aoa)(2) ]-NH(2) 6 mimic the HA receptors. These findings could be useful for easy screening of binding and inhibition assays of virus-receptor interactions. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Fusion of mApple and Venus fluorescent proteins to the Sindbis virus E2 protein leads to different cell-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, Irina B; Cheng, Fan; Ma, Xiang; Moore, Alan W; Howard, Benny; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-11-06

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in real-time single virus particle studies to visualize, track and quantify the spatial and temporal parameters of viral pathways. However, potential functional differences between the wild type and the FP-tagged virus may specifically affect particular stages in the virus life-cycle. In this work, we genetically modified the E2 spike protein of Sindbis virus (SINV) with two FPs. We inserted mApple, a red FP, or Venus, a yellow FP, at the N-terminus of the E2 protein of SINV to make SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus. Our results indicate that SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus have similar levels of infectivity and are morphologically similar to SINV-wild-type by negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Both mutants are highly fluorescent and have excellent single-particle tracking properties. However, despite these similarities, when measuring cell entry at the single-particle level, we found that SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus are different in their interaction with the cell surface and FPs are not always interchangeable. We went on to determine that the FP changes the net surface charge on the virus particles, the folding of the spike proteins, and the conformation of the spikes on the virus particle surface, ultimately leading to different cell-binding properties between SINV-Apple and SINV-Venus. Our results are consistent with recent findings that FPs may alter the biological and cellular localization properties of bacterial proteins to which they are fused. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In depth analysis on the binding sites of adamantane derivatives in HCV (hepatitis C virus p7 channel based on the NMR structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recently solved solution structure of HCV (hepatitis C virus p7 ion channel provides a solid structure basis for drug design against HCV infection. In the p7 channel the ligand amantadine (or rimantadine was determined in a hydrophobic pocket. However the pharmocophore (-NH2 of the ligand was not assigned a specific binding site. RESULTS: The possible binding sites for amino group of adamantane derivatives is studied based on the NMR structure of p7 channel using QM calculation and molecular modeling. In the hydrophobic cavity and nearby three possible binding sites are proposed: His17, Phe20, and Trp21. The ligand binding energies at the three binding sites are studied using high level QM method CCSD(T/6-311+G(d,p and AutoDock calculations, and the interaction details are analyzed. The potential application of the binding sites for rational inhibitor design are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Some useful viewpoints are concluded as follows. (1 The amino group (-NH2 of adamantane derivatives is protonated (-NH3+, and the positively charged cation may form cation-π interactions with aromatic amino acids. (2 The aromatic amino acids (His17, Phe20, and Trp21 are the possible binding sites for the protonated amino group (-NH3+ of adamantane derivatives, and the cation-π bond energies are 3 to 5 times stronger than the energies of common hydrogen bonds. (3 The higher inhibition potent of rimantadine than amantadine probably because of its higher pKa value (pKa = 10.40 and the higher positive charge in the amino group. The potential application of p7 channel structure for inhibitor design is discussed.

  6. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S.; Childs, Robert A.; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A.; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J.; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S.; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J.; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J.; Hay, Alan J.; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; Feizi, Ten

    2013-01-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of

  7. Heparan Sulfate-Binding Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Enters Cells Via Caveolae-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) utilizes different cell surface macromolecules to facilitate infection of cultured cells. Virus which is virulent for susceptible animals infects cells via four members of the alpha V subclass of cellular integrins. In contrast, tissue culture adaptation of some...

  8. Impaired uptake of conjugated bile acids and hepatitis b virus pres1-binding in na(+) -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijepcevic, Davor; Kaufman, Christina; Wichers, Catharina G. K.; Gilglioni, Eduardo H.; Lempp, Florian A.; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R.; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Mier, Walter; Stieger, Bruno; Beuers, Ulrich; Urban, Stephan; van de Graaf, Stan F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Na(+) -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) mediates uptake of conjugated bile acids (BAs) and is localized at the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes. It has recently been recognized as the receptor mediating hepatocyte-specific entry of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

  9. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, John T; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M; Bennett, Susan L; Luy, Betty E; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L; Stovall, Janae L; Calvert, Amanda E; Blair, Carol D; Huang, Claire Y-H

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Inhibition of cell-to-cell transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in vitro by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Ascolani, Arianna; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Oki, Toshikazu; Mastino, Antonio; Balzarini, Jan; Macchi, Beatrice

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals can be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) upon cocultivation of the PBMCs with irradiated HTLV-1-transformed human MT-2 cells. This model system closely mimics HTLV-1 transmission through cell-to-cell contact. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) such as the alpha(1,3)/alpha(1,6)mannose-specific Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin and the GlcNAc-specific Urtica dioica agglutinin, and also the small, nonpeptidic alpha(1,2)-mannose-specific antibiotic pradimicin A, were able to efficiently prevent cell-to-cell HTLV-1 transmission at nontoxic concentrations, as evidenced by the lack of appearance of virus-specific mRNA and of the viral protein Tax in the acceptor cells. Consistently, antivirally active doses of CBAs fully prevented HTLV-1-induced stimulation of PBMC growth. The inhibitory effects of CBAs on HTLV-1 transmission were also evident when HTLV-1-infected C5MJ cells were used in place of MT-2 cells as a virus donor cell line. The anti-HTLV-1 properties of the CBAs highlight the importance of the envelope glycans in events underlying HTLV-1 passage from cell to cell and indicate that CBAs should be further investigated for their potential to prevent HTLV-1 infection, including mother-to-child virus transmission by cell-to-cell contact through breast milk feeding.

  11. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Jespersen, Thomas; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2003-01-01

    The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV...... mutational library of Arg 85 and Asp 86 in the first variable region of Akv envelope protein. Homologous amino acids to Asp 86 in Moloney and Friend murine leukemia viruses are thought to be directly involved in receptor binding. Subsequent selection of mutants capable of infecting murine NIH 3T3 cells...... indicated that the wild type aspartic acid or another hydrophilic residue at position 86 is an important determinant for envelope function....

  12. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-02

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Epstein-Barr viruses that express a CD21 antibody provide evidence that gp350's functions extend beyond B-cell surface binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Clemens; Feederle, Regina; Schnölzer, Martina; Behrends, Uta; Mautner, Josef; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The gp350 glycoprotein encoded by BLLF1 is crucial for efficient Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of resting B cells. Gp350 binds to CD21, but whether this interaction sums up its functions remains unknown. We generated gp350-null EBVs that display CD19-, CD21-, or CD22-specific antibodies at their surface (designated as DeltaBLLF1-Ab). Gp350-complemented (DeltaBLLF1-C) and DeltaBLLF1-Ab were found to bind equally well to B cells. Surprisingly, DeltaBLLF1 binding was reduced only 1.7-fold relative to its complemented counterparts. Furthermore, B cells exposed to DeltaBLLF1-Ab or DeltaBLLF1 viruses presented structural antigens with comparable efficiency and achieved 25 to 80% of the T-cell activation elicited by DeltaBLLF1-C. These findings show that the gp350-CD21 interaction pair plays only a modest role during virus transfer to the endosomal compartment. However, primary B cells or Raji B cells infected with DeltaBLLF1-C viruses displayed a 35- to 70-fold higher infection rates than those exposed to DeltaBLLF1, DeltaBLLF1-CD22Ab, or DeltaBLLF1-CD19Ab viruses. Complementation of the gp350 knockout phenotype with CD21Ab substantially enhanced infection rates relative to DeltaBLLF1 but remained sevenfold (Raji B-cell line) to sixfold (primary B cells) less efficient than with gp350. We therefore infer that gp350 mainly exerts its functions after the internalization step, presumably during release of the viral capsid from the endosomal compartment, and that CD21-dependent but also CD21-independent molecular mechanisms are involved in this process. The latter appear to be characteristic of B-cell infection since transfection of CD21 in 293 cells improved the infection rates with both DeltaBLLF1-CD21Ab and DeltaBLLF1-C to a similar extent.

  14. Investigation of the mode of binding of a novel series of N-benzyl-4-heteroaryl-1-(phenylsulfonyl)piperazine-2-carboxamides to the hepatitis C virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentles, Robert G.; Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R.; Wan, Changhong; Kish, Kevin; Ding, Min; Zheng, Xiaofan; Chupak, Louis; Poss, Michael A.; Witmer, Mark R.; Morin, Paul; Wang, Ying-Kai; Rigat, Karen; Lemm, Julie; Voss, Stacey; Liu, Mengping; Pelosi, Lenore; Roberts, Susan B.; Gao, Min; Kadow, John F. (BMS)

    2013-11-20

    Structure based rationales for the activities of potent N-benzyl-4-heteroaryl-1-(phenylsulfonyl)piperazine-2-carboxamide inhibitors of the hepatitis C viral polymerase are described herein. These compounds bind to the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5B (NS5B), and co-crystal structures of select examples from this series with NS5B are reported. Comparison of co-crystal structures of a potent analog with both NS5B genotype 1a and genotype 1b provides a possible explanation for the genotype-selectivity observed with this compound class and suggests opportunities for the further optimization of the series.

  15. Hepatitis delta antigen requires a flexible quasi-double-stranded RNA structure to bind and condense hepatitis delta virus RNA in a ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brittany L; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Casey, John L

    2014-07-01

    The circular genome and antigenome RNAs of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) form characteristic unbranched, quasi-double-stranded RNA secondary structures in which short double-stranded helical segments are interspersed with internal loops and bulges. The ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) formed by these RNAs with the virus-encoded protein hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) perform essential roles in the viral life cycle, including viral replication and virion formation. Little is understood about the formation and structure of these complexes and how they function in these key processes. Here, the specific RNA features required for HDAg binding and the topology of the complexes formed were investigated. Selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) applied to free and HDAg-bound HDV RNAs indicated that the characteristic secondary structure of the RNA is preserved when bound to HDAg. Notably, the analysis indicated that predicted unpaired positions in the RNA remained dynamic in the RNP. Analysis of the in vitro binding activity of RNAs in which internal loops and bulges were mutated and of synthetically designed RNAs demonstrated that the distinctive secondary structure, not the primary RNA sequence, is the major determinant of HDAg RNA binding specificity. Atomic force microscopy analysis of RNPs formed in vitro revealed complexes in which the HDV RNA is substantially condensed by bending or wrapping. Our results support a model in which the internal loops and bulges in HDV RNA contribute flexibility to the quasi-double-stranded structure that allows RNA bending and condensing by HDAg. RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) formed by the hepatitis delta virus RNAs and protein, HDAg, perform critical roles in virus replication. Neither the structures of these RNPs nor the RNA features required to form them have been characterized. HDV RNA is unusual in that it forms an unbranched quasi-double-stranded structure in which short base-paired segments are interspersed

  16. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2003-01-01

    )beta(1) parallels that of viral-specific effector CD8(+) T cells (defined by tetramer and IFN-gamma staining). In an adoptive transfer model, mAb-mediated blockade of these integrins on activated effector and memory T cells inhibited Ag-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity responses; similar...... of alpha(1)beta(1) blockade on the delayed-type hypersensitivity response could be bypassed by direct injection of Ag-specific T cells to inflammatory sites, demonstrating for the first time in vivo that collagen-binding integrins are involved in leukocyte migration into tissues.......Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...

  17. Independent evolution of tetraloop in enterovirus oriL replicative element and its putative binding partners in virus protein 3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviatkin, Andrei A.; Tcelykh, Irina O.; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Enteroviruses are small non-enveloped viruses with a (+) ssRNA genome with one open reading frame. Enterovirus protein 3C (or 3CD for some species) binds the replicative element oriL to initiate replication. The replication of enteroviruses features a low-fidelity process, which allows the virus to adapt to the changing environment on the one hand, and requires additional mechanisms to maintain the genome stability on the other. Structural disturbances in the apical region of oriL domain d can be compensated by amino acid substitutions in positions 154 or 156 of 3C (amino acid numeration corresponds to poliovirus 3C), thus suggesting the co-evolution of these interacting sequences in nature. The aim of this work was to understand co-evolution patterns of two interacting replication machinery elements in enteroviruses, the apical region of oriL domain d and its putative binding partners in the 3C protein. Methods To evaluate the variability of the domain d loop sequence we retrieved all available full enterovirus sequences (>6, 400 nucleotides), which were present in the NCBI database on February 2017 and analysed the variety and abundance of sequences in domain d of the replicative element oriL and in the protein 3C. Results A total of 2,842 full genome sequences was analysed. The majority of domain d apical loops were tetraloops, which belonged to consensus YNHG (Y = U/C, N = any nucleotide, H = A/C/U). The putative RNA-binding tripeptide 154–156 (Enterovirus C 3C protein numeration) was less diverse than the apical domain d loop region and, in contrast to it, was species-specific. Discussion Despite the suggestion that the RNA-binding tripeptide interacts with the apical region of domain d, they evolve independently in nature. Together, our data indicate the plastic evolution of both interplayers of 3C-oriL recognition. PMID:29018627

  18. A Single Mutation at Position 190 in Hemagglutinin Enhances Binding Affinity for Human Type Sialic Acid Receptor and Replication of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Qiaoyang; Xu, Dawei; Shen, Weixia; Liu, Qinfang; Rong, Guangyu; Li, Xuesong; Yan, Liping; Yang, Jianmei; Chen, Hongjun; Yu, Hai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) has an extended host range, but the molecular basis underlying H9N2 AIV transmission to mammals remains unclear. We isolated more than 900 H9N2 AIVs in our 3-year surveillance in live bird markets in China from 2009 to 2012. Thirty-seven representative isolates were selected for further detailed characterization. These isolates were categorized into 8 genotypes (B64 to B71) and formed a distinct antigenic subgroup. Three isolates belonging to genotype B69, which is a predominant genotype circulating in China, replicated efficiently in mice, while the viruses tested in parallel in other genotypes replicated poorly, although they, like the three B69 isolates, have a leucine at position 226 in the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding site, which is critical for binding human type sialic acid receptors. Further molecular and single mutation analysis revealed that a valine (V) residue at position 190 in HA is responsible for efficient replication of these H9N2 viruses in mice. The 190V in HA does not affect virus receptor binding specificity but enhances binding affinity to human cells and lung tissues from mouse and humans. All these data indicate that the 190V in HA is one of the important determinants for H9N2 AIVs to cross the species barrier to infect mammals despite multiple genes conferring adaptation and replication of H9N2 viruses in mammals. Our findings provide novel insights on understanding host range expansion of H9N2 AIVs. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is responsible for binding to host cell receptors and therefore influences the viral host range and pathogenicity in different species. We showed that the H9N2 avian influenza viruses harboring 190V in the HA exhibit enhanced virus replication in mice. Further studies demonstrate that 190V in the HA does not change virus receptor binding specificity but enhances virus binding affinity of the H9N2 virus to human cells and attachment to lung tissues

  19. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  20. Selective inhibition of the reverse transcription of duck hepatitis B virus by binding of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate to the viral polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A Y; Robins, M J; Wilson, J S; Tyrrell, D L

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is mediated by the viral polymerase that possesses three functional domains: primer, DNA polymerase/reverse transcriptase, and RNase H. Using the Pekin duck as an animal model, we demonstrate a novel mechanism of inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by 2,6-diaminopurine 2',3'-dideoxyriboside (ddDAPR), a prodrug of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine (ddG). A selective and irreversible inhibition of DHBV DNA replication is found in ducklings treated with high doses of ddDAPR (20 to 50 mg/kg), but not with similar doses of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC). The inhibition mediated by ddDAPR occurs at a very early stage of the reverse transcription. Despite the inhibition of DHBV DNA replication by ddDAPR, the DNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activities of the polymerase are found to remain active when tested on exogenous templates in activity gels. We have demonstrated direct binding of [alpha-32P]ddGTP to the DHBV polymerase expressed in an in vitro transcription and translation system. These results suggest that the binding of ddGTP to the polymerase blocks the initial DNA replication.

  1. Structural features of NS3 of Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 in solution and insight into RNA binding and the inhibitory role of quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ankita; Saw, Wuan Geok; Subramanian Manimekalai, Malathy Sony; Grüber, Ardina; Joon, Shin; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Grüber, Gerhard

    2017-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), which has four serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4), is the causative agent of the viral infection dengue. DENV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) comprises a serine protease domain and an RNA helicase domain which has nucleotide triphosphatase activities that are essential for RNA replication and viral assembly. Here, solution X-ray scattering was used to provide insight into the overall structure and flexibility of the entire NS3 and its recombinant helicase and protease domains for Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 in solution. The DENV-2 and DENV-4 NS3 forms are elongated and flexible in solution. The importance of the linker residues in flexibility and domain-domain arrangement was shown by the compactness of the individual protease and helicase domains. Swapping of the 174 PPAVP 179 linker stretch of the related Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 into DENV-2 NS3 did not alter the elongated shape of the engineered mutant. Conformational alterations owing to RNA binding are described in the protease domain, which undergoes substantial conformational alterations that are required for the optimal catalysis of bound RNA. Finally, the effects of ATPase inhibitors on the enzymatically active DENV-2 and DENV-4 NS3 and the individual helicases are presented, and insight into the allosteric effect of the inhibitor quercetin is provided.

  2. Expression and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Fusion Proteins Comprising Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Structural Protein VP1 and DC-SIGN-Binding Glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinsheng; Lv, Jianliang; Fang, Yuzhen; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yanzhen; Pan, Li; Zhang, Zhongwang; Ma, Junwu; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2017-01-01

    Improving vaccine immunogenicity by targeting antigens to dendritic cells has recently emerged as a new design strategy in vaccine development. In this study, the VP1 gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A was fused with the gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane glycoprotein gp120 or C2-V3 domain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2, both of which are DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins. After codon optimization, the VP1 protein and the two recombinant VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins were expressed in Sf9 insect cells using the insect cell-baculovirus expression system. Western blotting showed that the VP1 protein and two recombinant VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins were correctly expressed in the Sf9 insect cells and had good reactogenicity. Guinea pigs were then immunized with the purified proteins, and the resulting humoral and cellular immune responses were analyzed. The VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins induced significantly higher specific anti-FMDV antibody levels than the VP1 protein and stronger cell-mediated immune responses. This study provides a new perspective for the development of novel FMDV subunit vaccines.

  3. Expression and Immunogenicity of Two Recombinant Fusion Proteins Comprising Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Structural Protein VP1 and DC-SIGN-Binding Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinsheng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving vaccine immunogenicity by targeting antigens to dendritic cells has recently emerged as a new design strategy in vaccine development. In this study, the VP1 gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV serotype A was fused with the gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV membrane glycoprotein gp120 or C2-V3 domain of hepatitis C virus (HCV envelope glycoprotein E2, both of which are DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins. After codon optimization, the VP1 protein and the two recombinant VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins were expressed in Sf9 insect cells using the insect cell-baculovirus expression system. Western blotting showed that the VP1 protein and two recombinant VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins were correctly expressed in the Sf9 insect cells and had good reactogenicity. Guinea pigs were then immunized with the purified proteins, and the resulting humoral and cellular immune responses were analyzed. The VP1-gp120 and VP1-E2 fusion proteins induced significantly higher specific anti-FMDV antibody levels than the VP1 protein and stronger cell-mediated immune responses. This study provides a new perspective for the development of novel FMDV subunit vaccines.

  4. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E binds to classical swine fever virus NS5A and facilitates viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Mingyang; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Tu, Changchun; Sun, Jinfu

    2017-12-07

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS5A protein is a multifunctional protein, playing critical roles in viral RNA replication, translation and assembly. To further explore its functions in viral replication, interaction of NS5A with host factors was assayed using a his-tag "pull down" assay coupled with shotgun LC-MS/MS. Host protein translation initiation factor 3 subunit E was identified as a binding partner of NS5A, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization analysis. Overexpression of eIF3E markedly enhanced CSFV genomic replication, viral protein expression and production of progeny virus, and downregulation of eIF3E by siRNA significantly decreased viral proliferation in PK-15 cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed an enhancement of translational activity of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV by eIF3E and a decrease in cellular translation by NS5A. These data indicate that eIF3E plays an important role in CSFV replication, thereby identifying it as a potential target for inhibition of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex of the herpes simplex virus type 1 origin binding protein UL9 with DNA as a platform for the design of a new type of antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhulina, N P; Surovaya, A N; Gursky, Y G; Andronova, V L; Moiseeva, E D; Nikitin, Capital A Cyrillic M; Golovkin, M V; Galegov, G А; Grokhovsky, S L; Gursky, G V

    2014-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 origin-binding protein, OBP, is a DNA helicase encoded by the UL9 gene. The protein binds in a sequence-specific manner to the viral origins of replication, two OriS sites and one OriL site. In order to search for efficient inhibitors of the OBP activity, we have obtained a recombinant origin-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The UL9 gene has been amplified by PCR and inserted into a modified plasmid pET14 between NdeI and KpnI sites. The recombinant protein binds to Box I and Box II sequences and possesses helicase and ATPase activities. In the presence of ATP and viral protein ICP8 (single-strand DNA-binding protein), the initiator protein induces unwinding of the minimal OriS duplex (≈80 bp). The protein also binds to a single-stranded DNA (OriS*) containing a stable Box I-Box III hairpin and an unstable AT-rich hairpin at the 3'-end. In the present work, new minor groove binding ligands have been synthesized which are capable to inhibit the development of virus-induced cytopathic effect in cultured Vero cells. Studies on binding of these compounds to DNA and synthetic oligonucleotides have been performed by fluorescence methods, gel mobility shift analysis and footprinting assays. Footprinting studies have revealed that Pt-bis-netropsin and related molecules exhibit preferences for binding to the AT-spacer in OriS. The drugs stabilize structure of the AT-rich region and inhibit the fluctuation opening of AT-base pairs which is a prerequisite to unwinding of DNA by OBP. Kinetics of ATP-dependent unwinding of OriS in the presence and absence of netropsin derivatives have been studied by measuring the efficiency of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorophores attached to 5'- and 3'- ends of an oligonucleotide in the minimal OriS duplex. The results are consistent with the suggestion that OBP is the DNA Holiday junction (HJ) binding helicase. The protein induces conformation changes (bending

  6. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  7. Mutational analyses of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein 42 reveal functional domains not involved in receptor binding but required for membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda L; Omerovic, Jasmina; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2004-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gammaherpesvirus associated with malignancies of both epithelial and lymphoid origin. Efficient infection of the latent host reservoir B lymphocytes involves the binding of glycoproteins gp350/220 for initial attachment, followed by the concerted action of gH, gL, gB, and gp42 for membrane fusion. The type II membrane protein gp42 is required for infection of B cells and assembles into a complex with gH and gL. The cellular host receptor for gp42, class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA), has been structurally verified by crystallization analyses of gp42 bound to HLA-DR1. Interestingly, the crystal structure revealed a hydrophobic pocket consisting of many aromatic and aliphatic residues from the predicted C-type lectin domain of gp42 that in other members of the C-type lectin family binds major histocompatibility complex class I or other diverse ligands. Although the hydrophobic pocket does not bind HLA class II, mutational analyses presented here indicate that this domain is essential for EBV-induced membrane fusion. In addition, mutational analysis of the region of gp42 contacting HLA class II in the gp42-HLA-DR1 cocrystal confirms that this region interacts with HLA class II and that this interaction is also important for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

  8. N-Terminal Phosphorylation of Phosphoprotein of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Is Required for Preventing Nucleoprotein from Binding to Cellular RNAs and for Functional Template Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyun; Zhang, Shengwei; Banerjee, Amiya K.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) plays essential roles in viral RNA synthesis. It associates with nascent nucleoprotein (N) to form N0-P (free of RNAs), thereby preventing the N from binding to cellular RNAs and maintaining the N in a viral genomic RNA encapsidation-competent form for transcription and replication. The contributions of phosphorylation of P to transcription and replication have been studied intensively, but a concrete mechanism of action still remains unclear. In this study, using a VSV minigenome system, we demonstrated that a mutant of P lacking N-terminal phosphorylation (P3A), in which the N-terminal phosphate acceptor sites are replaced with alanines (S60/A, T62/A, and S64/A), does not support transcription and replication. However, results from protein interaction assays showed that P3A self-associates and interacts with N and the large protein (L) as efficiently as P does. Furthermore, purified recombinant P3A from Sf21 cells supported transcription in an in vitro transcription reconstitution assay. We also proved that P3A is not distributed intranuclearly in vivo. CsCl gradient centrifugation showed that P3A is incapable of preventing N from binding to cellular RNAs and therefore prevents functional template formation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that N-terminal phosphorylation is indispensable for P to prevent N from binding to nonviral RNAs and to maintain the N-specific encapsidation of viral genomic RNA for functional template formation. PMID:23283948

  9. Dual function of the nuclear export signal of the Borna disease virus nucleoprotein in nuclear export activity and binding to viral phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Mako; Sakai, Madoka; Makino, Akiko; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2017-07-11

    Borna disease virus (BoDV), which has a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome, causes persistent infection in the cell nucleus. The nuclear export signal (NES) of the viral nucleoprotein (N) consisting of leucine at positions 128 and 131 and isoleucine at positions 133 and 136 overlaps with one of two predicted binding sites for the viral phosphoprotein (P). A previous study demonstrated that higher expression of BoDV-P inhibits nuclear export of N; however, the function of N NES in the interaction with P remains unclear. We examined the subcellular localization, viral polymerase activity, and P-binding ability of BoDV-N NES mutants. We also characterized a recombinant BoDV (rBoDV) harboring an NES mutation of N. BoDV-N with four alanine-substitutions in the leucine and isoleucine residues of the NES impaired its cytoplasmic localization and abolished polymerase activity and P-binding ability. Although an alanine-substitution at position 131 markedly enhanced viral polymerase activity as determined by a minigenome assay, rBoDV harboring this mutation showed expression of viral RNAs and proteins relative to that of wild-type rBoDV. Our results demonstrate that BoDV-N NES has a dual function in BoDV replication, i.e., nuclear export of N and an interaction with P, affecting viral polymerase activity in the nucleus.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus transcription activator R upregulates BARF1 expression by direct binding to its promoter, independent of methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, E. K.; Wille, C.; Hopmans, E. S.; Robinson, A. R.; Middeldorp, J. M.; Kenney, S. C.; Greijer, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is considered a major viral oncogene in epithelial cells and has immune-modulating properties. However, in B cells and lymphomas, BARF1 expression is restricted to the viral lytic replication cycle. In this report, the transcriptional

  11. Molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (GPR183)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    , the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about...

  12. Receptor binding and cell entry of Old World arenaviruses reveal novel aspects of virus-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan

    2009-05-10

    Ten years ago, the first cellular receptor for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the highly pathogenic Lassa virus (LASV) was identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG), a versatile receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Biochemical analysis of the interaction of alpha-DG with arenaviruses and ECM proteins revealed a strikingly similar mechanism of receptor recognition that critically depends on specific sugar modification on alpha-DG involving a novel class of putative glycosyltransferase, the LARGE proteins. Interestingly, recent genome-wide detection and characterization of positive selection in human populations revealed evidence for positive selection of a locus within the LARGE gene in populations from Western Africa, where LASV is endemic. While most enveloped viruses that enter the host cell in a pH-dependent manner use clathrin-mediated endocytosis, recent studies revealed that the Old World arenaviruses LCMV and LASV enter the host cell predominantly via a novel and unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the virus is rapidly delivered to endosomes via an unusual route of vesicular trafficking that is largely independent of the small GTPases Rab5 and Rab7. Since infection of cells with LCMV and LASV depends on DG, this unusual endocytotic pathway could be related to normal cellular trafficking of the DG complex. Alternatively, engagement of arenavirus particles may target DG for an endocytotic pathway not normally used in uninfected cells thereby inducing an entry route specifically tailored to the pathogen's needs.

  13. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus E2 protein bind discontinuous epitopes and inhibit infection at a postattachment step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Prentoe, Jannick

    2011-01-01

    The E2 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) mediates viral attachment and entry into target hepatocytes and elicits neutralizing antibodies in infected patients. To characterize the structural and functional basis of HCV neutralization, we generated a novel panel of 78 monoclonal antibodies (M...

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Facilitates Hepatitis B Virus Replication through Binding with Type I Interferon (IFN) Receptor 1 To Repress IFN/JAK/STAT Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junbo; Xu, Wei; Chen, Yanni; Xie, Xueping; Zhang, Yecheng; Ma, Chunqiang; Yang, Qingyu; Han, Yang; Zhu, Chengliang; Xiong, Ying; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-04-15

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may cause acute hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanisms by which HBV evades host immunity and maintains chronic infection are largely unknown. Here, we revealed that matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is activated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HBV-infected patients, and HBV stimulates MMP-9 expression in macrophages and PBMCs isolated from healthy individuals. MMP-9 plays important roles in the breakdown of the extracellular matrix and in the facilitation of tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. MMP-9 also regulates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication, but the mechanism underlying such regulation is unknown. We further demonstrated that MMP-9 facilitates HBV replication by repressing the interferon (IFN)/Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, IFN action, STAT1/2 phosphorylation, and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. Moreover, MMP-9 binds to type I IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1) and facilitates IFNAR1 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, subcellular distribution, and degradation to interfere with the binding of IFANR1 to IFN-α. Thus, we identified a novel positive-feedback regulation loop between HBV replication and MMP-9 production. On one hand, HBV activates MMP-9 in infected patients and leukocytes. On the other hand, MMP-9 facilitates HBV replication through repressing IFN/JAK/STAT signaling, IFNAR1 function, and IFN-α action. Therefore, HBV may take the advantage of MMP-9 function to establish or maintain chronic infection.IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanisms by which HBV maintains chronic infection are largely unknown. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) plays important roles in the facilitation of tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis

  15. A laminin-receptor-like protein regulates white spot syndrome virus infection by binding to the viral envelope protein VP28 in red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling-Ke; Li, Wei-Dong; Gao, Yan; Chen, Rong-Yuan; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Hong, Heng; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2018-02-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, which has been causing huge economic losses in global aquaculture. Laminin receptor (LR) is a cell surface receptor which participates in the interactions between cells as well as cells and extracellular matrix. Previously, we found that a CqLR-like gene was responsive to WSSV infection in the hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells from red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. To further reveal the role of CqLR-like gene involved in WSSV infection, the full-length cDNA of CqLR-like gene was cloned with 1000 bp, and the open reading frame encoded 308 amino acids with a conserved laminin-binding domain. Importantly, both the WSSV entry and viral replication were strongly reduced in Hpt cells after loss-of-function of CqLR-like gene by gene silencing. Protein interaction assay demonstrated that the recombinant CqLR-like protein could bind to WSSV virion in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the binding affinity was in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, recombinant CqLR-like protein was found to bind to WSSV envelop protein VP28, but not other envelop proteins tested including VP19, VP24, and VP26, by pull down assay in HEK293T cells. In regarding to that LR is mainly localized on many types of cells' membrane, these data together suggested that CqLR-like protein was likely to function as a putative recognition molecule towards WSSV and act in the viral entry into a crustacean host cell, which may benefit the elucidation of the WSSV pathogenesis and further the pharmaceutical target for the possibly effective control of WSSV disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Potent rescue of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 late domain mutants by ALIX/AIP1 depends on its CHMP4 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Yoshiko; Popov, Sergei; Göttlinger, Heinrich G

    2007-06-01

    The release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and of other retroviruses from certain cells requires the presence of distinct regions in Gag that have been termed late assembly (L) domains. HIV-1 harbors a PTAP-type L domain in the p6 region of Gag that engages an endosomal budding machinery through Tsg101. In addition, an auxiliary L domain near the C terminus of p6 binds to ALIX/AIP1, which functions in the same endosomal sorting pathway as Tsg101. In the present study, we show that the profound release defect of HIV-1 L domain mutants can be completely rescued by increasing the cellular expression levels of ALIX and that this rescue depends on an intact ALIX binding site in p6. Furthermore, the ability of ALIX to rescue viral budding in this system depended on two putative surface-exposed hydrophobic patches on its N-terminal Bro1 domain. One of these patches mediates the interaction between ALIX and the ESCRT-III component CHMP4B, and mutations which disrupt the interaction also abolish the activity of ALIX in viral budding. The ability of ALIX to rescue a PTAP mutant also depends on its C-terminal proline-rich domain (PRD), but not on the binding sites for Tsg101, endophilin, CIN85, or for the newly identified binding partner, CMS, within the PRD. Our data establish that ALIX can have a dramatic effect on HIV-1 release and suggest that the ability to use ALIX may allow HIV-1 to replicate in cells that express only low levels of Tsg101.

  17. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  18. Serum levels of mannan-binding lectin in chickens prior to and during experimental infection with avian infectious bronchitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Munch, M.; Handberg, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a glycoprotein and a member of the C-type lectin super family, the collectin family, and the acute phase protein family. The MBL exerts its function by directly binding to microbial surfaces through its carbohydrate recognition domains, followed by direct opsonization......, the highest value was found in chickens inoculated after 12 h of activity. Thus, an inverse relation exists between the MBL response and the IBV specific antibody response. The ability of MBL to activate the complement cascade was tested in a heterologous system by deposition of human C4 on the chicken MBL...

  19. Role of RNA structure and RNA binding activity of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protein in VPg uridylylation and virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, A.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Woolaway, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre/bus...... within 3C are also essential for VPg uridylylation activity and efficient virus replication.......The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre....../bus. We show that certain RNA sequences within the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 5' untranslated region but outside of the cre/bus can enhance VPg uridylylation activity. Furthermore, we have shown that the FMDV X protein alone can substitute for 3CD, albeit less efficiently. In addition, the VPg...

  20. Specific binding of sup 125 I-rErythropoietin to Friend polycythemia virus-transformed erythroleukemia cells purified by centrifugal elutriation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, P.N.; Bard, V.; Axelrad, A.A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    We have used countercurrent centrifugal elutriation (CCE) to determine the distribution of cells with respect to cell volume and buoyant density for an erythroleukemia cell line (JG6) transformed by the polycythemia strain of Friend virus (FV-P), and to determine the effect of inducing the cells to differentiate with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on this distribution. CCE made it possible to obtain suspensions of modal JG6 populations virtually free of dead cells and uniform with respect to volume and buoyant density. These modal populations were assayed for specific binding of erythropoietin (Epo). Between 500 and 550 Epo receptors per cell were detected. These belonged to a single class having a dissociation constant of 0.36 nM. DMSO induction of differentiation of the JG6 cells had no effect on the number of Epo receptors expressed.

  1. Distal leucines are key functional determinants of Alix-binding simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(smE543) and SIV(mac239) type 3 L domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Nana F; Wu, Fan; Sette, Paola; Dussupt, Vincent; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Bouamr, Fadila

    2011-11-01

    In addition to PTAP L domains, primate lentiviruses carry Alix-binding motifs that include the recently described type 3 SREKPYKEVTEDLLHLNSLF sequence. We examined the requirements for the type 3 sequence motif in simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(smE543) and identified the (499)LNSLF(503) sequence as a key functional determinant. Mutation of distal leucines (499)L and (502)L (LL mutant) caused an inhibitory effect on Alix-dependent SIV(smE543) release that was quantitatively similar to that observed following disruption of the type 3 L domain or RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of Alix. Similar results were obtained with the SIV(mac239) LL mutant. Thus, distal leucines are key determinants of SIV(smE543) and SIV(mac239) type 3 L domains.

  2. Upregulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in astrocytes of transgenic mice that express Borna disease virus phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ohtaki, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Horie, Masayuki; Daito, Takuji; Itoh, Masayuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-05-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that transgenic mice that express Borna disease virus (BDV) phosphoprotein (P) in astrocytes show striking neurobehavioral abnormalities resembling those in BDV-infected animals. To understand the molecular disturbances induced by the expression of P in astrocytes, we performed microarray analysis with cultured astroglial cells transiently expressing P. We showed that expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 mRNA increases not only in P-expressing cultured cells but also in astrocytes from the cerebella of P transgenic mice (P-Tg). Furthermore, we demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor signaling is disturbed in the P-Tg cerebellum, a factor that might be involved in the increased vulnerability of Purkinje cell neurons in the brain.

  3. HIV-1 Fusion Is Blocked through Binding of GB Virus C E2D Peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 Disulfide Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:23349893

  4. HIV-1 fusion is blocked through binding of GB Virus C E2-derived peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Eissmann

    Full Text Available A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C, since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  5. DNA-Binding Properties of African Swine Fever Virus pA104R, a Histone-Like Protein Involved in Viral Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouco, Gonçalo; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Coelho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2017-06-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) codes for a putative histone-like protein (pA104R) with extensive sequence homology to bacterial proteins that are implicated in genome replication and packaging. Functional characterization of purified recombinant pA104R revealed that it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over a wide range of temperatures, pH values, and salt concentrations and in an ATP-independent manner, with an estimated binding site size of about 14 to 16 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine located in pA104R's DNA-binding domain, at position 69, was found to be relevant for efficient DNA-binding activity. Together, pA104R and ASFV topoisomerase II (pP1192R) display DNA-supercoiling activity, although none of the proteins by themselves do, indicating that the two cooperate in this process. In ASFV-infected cells, A104R transcripts were detected from 2 h postinfection (hpi) onward, reaching a maximum concentration around 16 hpi. pA104R was detected from 12 hpi onward, localizing with viral DNA replication sites and being found exclusively in the Triton-insoluble fraction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown experiments revealed that pA104R plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells showing lower viral progeny numbers (up to a reduction of 82.0%), lower copy numbers of viral genomes (-78.3%), and reduced transcription of a late viral gene (-47.6%). Taken together, our results strongly suggest that pA104R participates in the modulation of viral DNA topology, probably being involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and packaging, emphasizing that ASFV mutants lacking the A104R gene could be used as a strategy to develop a vaccine against ASFV.IMPORTANCE Recently reintroduced in Europe, African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal disease in domestic pigs, causing high economic losses in affected countries, as no vaccine or treatment is currently

  6. Retinol binding protein and vitamin D associations with serum antibody isotypes, serum influenza virus-specific neutralizing activities and airway cytokine profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B G; Oshansky, C M; Bajracharya, R; Tang, L; Sun, Y; Wong, S S; Webby, R; Thomas, P G; Hurwitz, J L

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A supports the induction of immunoglobulin (Ig)A responses at mucosal surfaces in mice, but much less is known about the influence of vitamins on antibody isotype expression in humans. To address this knowledge gap, we examined 46 residual blood samples from adults and children, some of whom were experiencing influenza virus infections of the respiratory tract. Assays were performed for retinol binding protein (RBP, a surrogate for vitamin A), vitamin D (a related vitamin) and antibody isotypes. Results showed that all but two tested samples exhibited RBP and/or vitamin D insufficiencies or deficiencies. Vitamin D correlated with blood IgM and IgG3, while RBP correlated with IgG4 and IgA. RBP also correlated positively with age and with influenza virus-specific antibody neutralization titres. Individuals with low blood RBP levels exhibited the highest frequencies of over-expressed cytokines and growth factors in nasal wash samples, an indication of inflamed mucosal tissues. While cause-effect relationships were not discerned, results support a hypothesis that vitamins directly influence B cell isotype expression in humans, and by so doing may help protect mucosal surfaces from respiratory viral disease. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  7. A single amino acid substitution in the cytoplasmic tail of the glycoprotein B of herpes simplex virus 1 affects both syncytium formation and binding to intracellular heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakidi-Kosta, A; Michailidou, G; Kontogounis, G; Sivropoulou, A; Arsenakis, M

    2003-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) (S) is a spontaneous syncytial mutant derived from the prototype HSV-1(F) after extensive plaque purification, and produces large syncytial plaques on Vero cells. Marker transfer experiments and DNA sequence analysis mapped the syncytial phenotype to a T-C base substitution at codon 787 of the cytoplasmic domain of mature gB, that results in Leu to Pro substitution and consequently belongs to the syn 3 locus. Both the cytoplasmic and the extracellular domains of gB are active in the fusion event since the addition of anti-gB monoclonal antibodies that recognize the extracellular domain of gB prevent HSV-1(S) induced cell fusion. Similarly, gD also participates in cell fusion since addition of anti-gD monoclonal antibodies also prevent HSV-1(S) induced cell fusion. Furthermore the glycoproteins B and D formed complexes in cells infected with mutant or wild type viruses. The amount of gB bound to total heparan sulfate is lower in the mutant than in the wild type strain. This difference becomes particularly profound when gB is associated with a portion of heparan sulfate intercalated to the membranes. The discrepancy in the binding of the mutant and wild type gB to heparan sulfate may be related to the mechanism of cell fusion induced by HSV-1(S).

  8. Co-opted Oxysterol-Binding ORP and VAP Proteins Channel Sterols to RNA Virus Replication Sites via Membrane Contact Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Brandizzi, Federica; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses recruit cellular membranes and subvert cellular proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis to build viral replicase complexes and replication organelles. Among the lipids, sterols are important components of membranes, affecting the shape and curvature of membranes. In this paper, the tombusvirus replication protein is shown to co-opt cellular Oxysterol-binding protein related proteins (ORPs), whose deletion in yeast model host leads to decreased tombusvirus replication. In addition, tombusviruses also subvert Scs2p VAP protein to facilitate the formation of membrane contact sites (MCSs), where membranes are juxtaposed, likely channeling lipids to the replication sites. In all, these events result in redistribution and enrichment of sterols at the sites of viral replication in yeast and plant cells. Using in vitro viral replication assay with artificial vesicles, we show stimulation of tombusvirus replication by sterols. Thus, co-opting cellular ORP and VAP proteins to form MCSs serves the virus need to generate abundant sterol-rich membrane surfaces for tombusvirus replication. PMID:25329172

  9. Vaccinia virus protein C6 is a virulence factor that binds TBK-1 adaptor proteins and inhibits activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Unterholzner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs causes interferon-β (IFN-β induction, a key event in the anti-viral innate immune response, and also a target of viral immune evasion. Here the vaccinia virus (VACV protein C6 is identified as an inhibitor of PRR-induced IFN-β expression by a functional screen of select VACV open reading frames expressed individually in mammalian cells. C6 is a member of a family of Bcl-2-like poxvirus proteins, many of which have been shown to inhibit innate immune signalling pathways. PRRs activate both NF-κB and IFN regulatory factors (IRFs to activate the IFN-β promoter induction. Data presented here show that C6 inhibits IRF3 activation and translocation into the nucleus, but does not inhibit NF-κB activation. C6 inhibits IRF3 and IRF7 activation downstream of the kinases TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 and IκB kinase-ε (IKKε, which phosphorylate and activate these IRFs. However, C6 does not inhibit TBK1- and IKKε-independent IRF7 activation or the induction of promoters by constitutively active forms of IRF3 or IRF7, indicating that C6 acts at the level of the TBK1/IKKε complex. Consistent with this notion, C6 immunoprecipitated with the TBK1 complex scaffold proteins TANK, SINTBAD and NAP1. C6 is expressed early during infection and is present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutant viruses in which the C6L gene is deleted, or mutated so that the C6 protein is not expressed, replicated normally in cell culture but were attenuated in two in vivo models of infection compared to wild type and revertant controls. Thus C6 contributes to VACV virulence and might do so via the inhibition of PRR-induced activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

  10. CONFORMATION OF A PENTACOSAPEPTIDE REPRESENTING THE RNA-BINDING N-TERMINUS OF COWPEA CHLOROTIC MOTTLE VIRUS COAT PROTEIN IN THE PRESENCE OF OLIGOPHOSPHATES - A 2-DIMENSIONAL PROTON NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE AND DISTANCE GEOMETRY STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGRAAF, M; SCHEEK, RM; VANDERLINDEN, CC; HEMMINGA, MA

    1992-01-01

    Conformational studies were performed on a synthetic pentacosapeptide representing the RNA-binding N-terminal region of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. Two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on the highly positively charged peptide containing six arginines and three

  11. Low Retinol-Binding Protein and Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Severe Outcomes in Children Hospitalized with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection and Respiratory Syncytial Virus or Human Metapneumovirus Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Julia L; Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Gansebom, Shane; Sun, Yilun; Tang, Li; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; McCullers, Jonathan A; Arnold, Sandra R

    2017-08-01

    Retinol binding protein and vitamin D were measured in children aged respiratory tract infection and respiratory syncytial virus and/or human metapneumovirus detections. Low vitamin levels were observed in 50% of the children and were associated with significantly elevated risk of the need for intensive care unit admission and invasive mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Negative modulation of the chicken infectious anemia virus promoter by COUP-TF1 and an E box-like element at the transcription start site binding dEF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the promoter-enhancer of chicken infectious anemia virus (CAV) is increased in an estrogen receptor-enhanced cell line when treated with estrogen. This promoter-enhancer also binds unidentified proteins that recognize a consens...

  13. Evaluating the orthopoxvirus type I interferon-binding molecule as a vaccine target in the vaccinia virus intranasal murine challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joseph W; Hooper, Jay W

    2010-11-01

    The biological threat imposed by orthopoxviruses warrants the development of safe and effective vaccines. We developed a candidate orthopoxvirus DNA-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four viral structural components, A33, B5, A27, and L1. While this vaccine protects mice and nonhuman primates from lethal infections, we are interested in further enhancing its potency. One approach to enhance potency is to include additional orthopoxvirus immunogens. Here, we investigated whether vaccination with the vaccinia virus (VACV) interferon (IFN)-binding molecule (IBM) could protect BALB/c mice against lethal VACV challenge. We found that vaccination with this molecule failed to significantly protect mice from VACV when delivered alone. IBM modestly augmented protection when delivered together with the 4pox vaccine. All animals receiving the 4pox vaccine plus IBM lived, whereas only 70% of those receiving a single dose of 4pox vaccine survived. Mapping studies using truncated mutants revealed that vaccine-generated antibodies spanned the immunoglobulin superfamily domains 1 and 2 and, to a lesser extent, 3 of the IBM. These antibodies inhibited IBM cell binding and IFN neutralization activity, indicating that they were functionally active. This study shows that DNA vaccination with the VACV IBM results in a robust immune response but that this response does not significantly enhance protection in a high-dose challenge model.

  14. Endothelial galectin-1 binds to specific glycans on nipah virus fusion protein and inhibits maturation, mobility, and function to block syncytia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omai B Garner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus targets human endothelial cells via NiV-F and NiV-G envelope glycoproteins, resulting in endothelial syncytia formation and vascular compromise. Endothelial cells respond to viral infection by releasing innate immune effectors, including galectins, which are secreted proteins that bind to specific glycan ligands on cell surface glycoproteins. We demonstrate that galectin-1 reduces NiV-F mediated fusion of endothelial cells, and that endogenous galectin-1 in endothelial cells is sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation. Galectin-1 regulates NiV-F mediated cell fusion at three distinct points, including retarding maturation of nascent NiV-F, reducing NiV-F lateral mobility on the plasma membrane, and directly inhibiting the conformational change in NiV-F required for triggering fusion. Characterization of the NiV-F N-glycome showed that the critical site for galectin-1 inhibition is rich in glycan structures known to bind galectin-1. These studies identify a unique set of mechanisms for regulating pathophysiology of NiV infection at the level of the target cell.

  15. Antibody Treatment of Ebola and Sudan Virus Infection via a Uniquely Exposed Epitope within the Glycoprotein Receptor Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    BioTherapeutics , Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA; 2Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg...Correspondence author: javad@integratedbiotherapeutics.com Integrated BioTherapeutics , Inc. 21 Firstfield Rd, Suite 100 Gaithersburg, MD 20878...biolayer interferometry (BLI) to measure the affinity of FVM04 binding to EBOV, SUDV or BDBV GP ectodomains (GP∆TM). FVM04 was bound to Protein G sensors

  16. Residues 28 to 39 of the Extracellular Loop 1 of Chicken Na+/H+ Exchanger Type I Mediate Cell Binding and Entry of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaolu; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Mengmeng; Ren, Chaoqi; Gao, Yanni; Yun, Bingling; Liu, Yongzhen; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Liu, Changjun; Cui, Hongyu; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Pan, Qing; Zhang, Baoshan; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    Chicken Na+/H+ exchanger type I (chNHE1), a multispan transmembrane protein, is a cellular receptor of the subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). To identify the functional determinants of chNHE1 responsible for the ALV-J receptor activity, a series of chimeric receptors was created by exchanging the extracellular loops (ECL) of human NHE1 (huNHE1) and chNHE1 and by ECL replacement with a hemagglutinin (HA) tag. These chimeric receptors then were used in binding and entry assays to map the minimal ALV-J gp85-binding domain of chNHE1. We show that ECL1 of chNHE1 (chECL1) is the critical functional ECL that interacts directly with ALV-J gp85; ECL3 is also involved in ALV-J gp85 binding. Amino acid residues 28 to 39 of the N-terminal membrane-proximal region of chECL1 constitute the minimal domain required for chNHE1 binding of ALV-J gp85. These residues are sufficient to mediate viral entry into ALV-J nonpermissive cells. Point mutation analysis revealed that A30, V33, W38, and E39 of chECL1 are the key residues mediating the binding between chNHE1 and ALV-J gp85. Further, the replacement of residues 28 to 39 of huNHE1 with the corresponding chNHE1 residues converted the nonfunctional ALV-J receptor huNHE1 to a functional one. Importantly, soluble chECL1 and huECL1 harboring chNHE1 residues 28 to 39 both could effectively block ALV-J infection. Collectively, our findings indicate that residues 28 to 39 of chNHE1 constitute a domain that is critical for receptor function and mediate ALV-J entry.IMPORTANCE chNHE1 is a cellular receptor of ALV-J, a retrovirus that causes infections in chickens and serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Until now, the domains determining the chNHE1 receptor function remained unknown. We demonstrate that chECL1 is critical for receptor function, with residues 28 to 39 constituting the minimal functional domain responsible for chNHE1 binding of ALV-J gp85 and efficiently mediating ALV-J cell entry. These residues are located in

  17. Protein-x of hepatitis B virus in interaction with CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα - an in silico analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadkhani Ashraf

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though many functions of protein-x from the Hepatitis B virus (HBV have been revealed, the nature of protein-x is yet unknown. This protein is well-known for its transactivation activity through interaction with several cellular transcription factors, it is also known as an oncogene. In this work, we have presented computational approaches to design a model to show the structure of protein-x and its respective binding sites associated with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα. C/EBPα belongs to the bZip family of transcription factors, which activates transcription of several genes through its binding sites in liver and fat cells. The C/EBPα has been shown to bind and modulate enhancer I and the enhancer II/core promoter of HBV. In this study using the bioinformatics tools we tried to present a reliable model for the protein-x interaction with C/EBPα. Results The amino acid sequence of protein-x was extracted from UniProt [UniProt:Q80IU5] and the x-ray crystal structure of the partial CCAAT-enhancer α [PDB:1NWQ] was retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Similarity search for protein-x was carried out by psi-blast and bl2seq using NCBI [GenBank: BAC65106.1] and Local Meta-Threading-Server (LOMETS was used as a threading server for determining the maximum tertiary structure similarities. Advanced MODELLER was implemented to design a comparative model, however, due to the lack of a suitable template, Quark was used for ab initio tertiary structure prediction. The PDB-blast search indicated a maximum of 23% sequence identity and 33% similarity with crystal structure of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader protease Nsp1α [PDB:3IFU]. This meant that protein-x does not have a suitable template to predict its tertiary structure using comparative modeling tools, therefore we used QUARK as an ab initio 3D prediction approach. Docking results from the ab initio tertiary structure of

  18. Structure-function Analysis of Receptor-binding in Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6 (AAV-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Lerch, Thomas F.; Meyer, Nancy L.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Crystal structures of the AAV-6 capsid at 3 Å reveal a subunit fold homologous to other parvoviruses with greatest differences in two external loops. The electrostatic potential suggests that receptor-attachment is mediated by four residues: Arg576, Lys493, Lys459 and Lys531, defining a positively charged region curving up from the valley between adjacent spikes. It overlaps only partially with the receptor-binding site of AAV-2, and the residues endowing the electrostatic character are not homologous. Mutational substitution of each residue decreases heparin affinity, particularly Lys531 and Lys459. Neither is conserved among heparin-binding serotypes, indicating that diverse modes of receptor attachment have been selected in different serotypes. Surface topology and charge are also distinct at the shoulder of the spike, where linear epitopes for AAV-2’s neutralizing monoclonal antibody A20 come together. Evolutionarily, selection of changed side-chain charge may have offered a conservative means to evade immune neutralization while preserving other essential functionality. PMID:21917284

  19. Potato Virus Y HCPro Suppression of Antiviral Silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants Correlates with Its Ability To Bind In Vivo to 21- and 22-Nucleotide Small RNAs of Viral Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Donaire, Livia; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Chung, Bong-Nam; Tenllado, Francisco; Canto, Tomás

    2017-06-15

    We have investigated short and small RNAs (sRNAs) that were bound to a biologically active hexahistidine-tagged Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro suppressor of silencing, expressed from a heterologous virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and purified under nondenaturing conditions. We found that RNAs in purified preparations were differentially enriched in 21-nucleotide (nt) and, to a much lesser extent, 22-nt sRNAs of viral sequences (viral sRNAs [vsRNAs]) compared to those found in a control plant protein background bound to nickel resin in the absence of HCPro or in a purified HCPro alanine substitution mutant (HCPro mutB) control that lacked suppressor-of-silencing activity. In both controls, sRNAs were composed almost entirely of molecules of plant sequence, indicating that the resin-bound protein background had no affinity for vsRNAs and also that HCPro mutB failed to bind to vsRNAs. Therefore, PVY HCPro suppressor activity correlated with its ability to bind to 21- and 22-nt vsRNAs. HCPro constituted at least 54% of the total protein content in purified preparations, and we were able to calculate its contribution to the 21- and the 22-nt pools of sRNAs present in the purified samples and its binding strength relative to the background. We also found that in the 21-nt vsRNAs of the HCPro preparation, 5'-terminal adenines were overrepresented relative to the controls, but this was not observed in vsRNAs of other sizes or of plant sequences.IMPORTANCE It was previously shown that HCPro can bind to long RNAs and small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and, in the case of Turnip mosaic virus HCPro, also in vivo in arabidopsis AGO2-deficient plants. Our data show that PVY HCPro binds in vivo to sRNAs during infection in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants when expressed from a heterologous virus vector. Using a suppression-of-silencing-deficient HCPro mutant that can accumulate in this host when expressed from a virus vector, we also show that sRNA binding correlates

  20. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  1. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Alteration of Receptor-Binding Specificity in a Novel Genotype of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses Detected in Cambodia in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Davis, C. Todd; Duong, Veasna; Sar, Borann; Horm, Srey Viseth; Chin, Savuth; Ly, Sovann; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Oboho, Ikwo; Jang, Yunho; Davis, William; Thor, Sharmi; Balish, Amanda; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Sorn, San; Holl, Davun; Sok, Touch; Seng, Heng; Tarantola, Arnaud; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Parry, Amy; Chea, Nora; Allal, Lotfi; Kitsutani, Paul; Warren, Dora; Prouty, Michael; Horwood, Paul; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Lindstrom, Stephen; Villanueva, Julie; Donis, Ruben; Cox, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Human infections with influenza A(H5N1) virus in Cambodia increased sharply during 2013. Molecular characterization of viruses detected in clinical specimens from human cases revealed the presence of mutations associated with the alteration of receptor-binding specificity (K189R, Q222L) and respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets (N220K with Q222L). Discovery of quasispecies at position 222 (Q/L), in addition to the absence of the mutations in poultry/environmental samples, suggested that the mutations occurred during human infection and did not transmit further. PMID:25210193

  2. Suppression of type I interferon production by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by nsp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingzhan; Shi, Kaichuang; Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu

    2016-02-15

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are the major components of the innate immune response of hosts, and in turn many viruses have evolved to modulate the host response during infection. We found that the IFN-β production was significantly suppressed during PEDV infection in cells. To identify viral IFN antagonists and to study their suppressive function, viral coding sequences for the entire structural and nonstructural proteins were cloned and expressed. Of 16 PEDV nonstructural proteins (nsps), nsp1, nsp3, nsp7, nsp14, nsp15 and nsp16 were found to inhibit the IFN-β and IRF3 promoter activities. The sole accessory protein ORF3, structure protein envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) protein were also shown to inhibit such activities. PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) by degrading CBP. A further study showed that the CBP degradation by nsp1 was proteasome-dependent. Our data demonstrate that PEDV modulates the host innate immune responses by degrading CBP and suppressing ISGs expression. - Highlights: • PEDV modulates the host innate immune system by suppressing the type I interferon production and ISGs expression. • Ten viral proteins were identified as IFN antagonists, and nsp1 was the most potent viral IFN antagonist. • PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP). • PEDV nsp1 caused the CBP degradation in the nucleus, which may be the key mechanism for PEDV-mediated IFN downregulation.

  3. A glycoconjugate antigen based on the recognition motif of a broadly neutralizing human immunodeficiency virus antibody, 2G12, is immunogenic but elicits antibodies unable to bind to the self glycans of gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astronomo, Rena D; Lee, Hing-Ken; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2008-01-01

    The glycan shield of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 contributes to viral evasion from humoral immune responses. However, the shield is recognized by the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody (Ab), 2G12, at a relatively conserved cluster of oligomannose glycans. The discovery of 2G...... serum Ab titers to Man(4). However, these Abs are unable to bind gp120. Further analysis reveals that the elicited Abs bind a variety of unbranched and, to a lesser extent, branched Man(9) derivatives but not natural N-linked oligomannose containing the chitobiose core. These results suggest that Abs...

  4. Alpha2,3 and alpha2,6 N-linked sialic acids facilitate efficient binding and transduction by adeno-associated virus types 1 and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Miller, Edward; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors in the field of gene therapy. Different AAV serotypes display distinct tissue tropism, believed to be related to the distribution of their receptors on target cells. Of the 11 well-characterized AAV serotypes, heparan sulfate proteoglycan and sialic acid have been suggested to be the attachment receptors for AAV type 2 and types 4 and 5, respectively. In this report, we identify the receptor for the two closely related serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6. First, we demonstrate using coinfection experiments and luciferase reporter analysis that AAV1 and AAV6 compete for similar receptors. Unlike heparin sulfate, enzymatic or genetic removal of sialic acid markedly reduced AAV1 and AAV6 binding and transduction. Further analysis using lectin staining and lectin competition assays identified that AAV1 and AAV6 use either alpha2,3-linked or alpha2,6-linked sialic acid when transducing numerous cell types (HepG2, Pro-5, and Cos-7). Treatment of cells with proteinase K but not glycolipid inhibitor reduced AAV1 and AAV6 infection, supporting the hypothesis that the sialic acid that facilitates infection is associated with glycoproteins rather than glycolipids. In addition, we determined by inhibitor (N-benzyl GalNAc)- and cell line-specific (Lec-1) studies that AAV1 and AAV6 require N-linked and not O-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, a resialylation experiment on a deficient Lec-2 cell line confirmed a 2,3 and 2,6 N-linked sialic acid requirement, while studies of mucin with O-linked sialic acid showed no inhibition effect for AAV1 and AAV6 transduction on Cos-7 cells. Finally, using a glycan array binding assay we determined that AAV1 efficiently binds to NeuAcalpha2-3GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc, as well as two glycoproteins with alpha2,3 and alpha2,6 N-linked sialic acids. Taken together, competition, genetic, inhibitor, enzymatic reconstitution, and glycan array experiments support alpha2,3 and alpha2,6 sialic acids that

  5. α2,3 and α2,6 N-Linked Sialic Acids Facilitate Efficient Binding and Transduction by Adeno-Associated Virus Types 1 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Miller, Edward; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors in the field of gene therapy. Different AAV serotypes display distinct tissue tropism, believed to be related to the distribution of their receptors on target cells. Of the 11 well-characterized AAV serotypes, heparan sulfate proteoglycan and sialic acid have been suggested to be the attachment receptors for AAV type 2 and types 4 and 5, respectively. In this report, we identify the receptor for the two closely related serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6. First, we demonstrate using coinfection experiments and luciferase reporter analysis that AAV1 and AAV6 compete for similar receptors. Unlike heparin sulfate, enzymatic or genetic removal of sialic acid markedly reduced AAV1 and AAV6 binding and transduction. Further analysis using lectin staining and lectin competition assays identified that AAV1 and AAV6 use either α2,3-linked or α2,6-linked sialic acid when transducing numerous cell types (HepG2, Pro-5, and Cos-7). Treatment of cells with proteinase K but not glycolipid inhibitor reduced AAV1 and AAV6 infection, supporting the hypothesis that the sialic acid that facilitates infection is associated with glycoproteins rather than glycolipids. In addition, we determined by inhibitor (N-benzyl GalNAc)- and cell line-specific (Lec-1) studies that AAV1 and AAV6 require N-linked and not O-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, a resialylation experiment on a deficient Lec-2 cell line confirmed a 2,3 and 2,6 N-linked sialic acid requirement, while studies of mucin with O-linked sialic acid showed no inhibition effect for AAV1 and AAV6 transduction on Cos-7 cells. Finally, using a glycan array binding assay we determined that AAV1 efficiently binds to NeuAcα2-3GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, as well as two glycoproteins with α2,3 and α2,6 N-linked sialic acids. Taken together, competition, genetic, inhibitor, enzymatic reconstitution, and glycan array experiments support α2,3 and α2,6 sialic acids that are present on N

  6. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  7. Gene therapy of c-myc suppressor FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor by Sendai virus delivery prevents tracheal stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Mizokami

    Full Text Available Acquired tracheal stenosis remains a challenging problem for otolaryngologists. The objective of this study was to determine whether the Sendai virus (SeV-mediated c-myc suppressor, a far upstream element (FUSE-binding protein (FBP-interacting repressor (FIR, modulates wound healing of the airway mucosa, and whether it prevents tracheal stenosis in an animal model of induced mucosal injury. A fusion gene-deleted, non-transmissible SeV vector encoding FIR (FIR-SeV/ΔF was prepared. Rats with scraped airway mucosae were administered FIR-SeV/ΔF through the tracheostoma. The pathological changes in the airway mucosa and in the tracheal lumen were assessed five days after scraping. Untreated animals showed hyperplasia of the airway epithelium and a thickened submucosal layer with extensive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and collagen deposition causing lumen stenosis. By contrast, the administration of FIR-SeV/ΔF decreased the degree of tracheal stenosis (P < 0.05 and improved the survival rate (P < 0.05. Immunohistochemical staining showed that c-Myc expression was downregulated in the tracheal basal cells of the FIR-SeV/ΔF-treated animals, suggesting that c-myc was suppressed by FIR-SeV/ΔF in the regenerating airway epithelium of the injured tracheal mucosa. The airway-targeted gene therapy of the c-myc suppressor FIR, using a recombinant SeV vector, prevented tracheal stenosis in a rat model of airway mucosal injury.

  8. Association study between mannose-binding lectin haplotypes and X gene mutation of hepatitis B virus from treatment naïve patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chenghao; Lin, Yong; Mao, Qianguo; Wu, Daitze; Zhu, Lina; Najera, Isabel; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Niu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin (MBL) plays important role in the innate immunity of human. Mutations in the MBL2 gene can significantly change the serum level of MBL, and consequently alter the susceptibility and progression of infectious disease. However, the association between the MBL2 profile and the HBV mutation and quasispecies complexity has not yet been reported. Our approach includes the study of the MBL2 gene genotype as well as ultra-deep sequencing of the HBV viruses obtained from the plasma of 50 treatment naïve patients with chronic HBV infection. We found that the liver function was better among patients within the high MBL2 group with respect to those within the medium/low MBL2 group. Likewise, the number of mutations in the HBV X gene as well as the viral quasispecies complexity were significantly higher in medium/low MBL2 production group. Nucleotide substitution rates were also higher within the medium/low MBL2 production group in all positions described to have an influence in liver cancer development, except for A1499G. In this work we show that the MBL2 profile may have an impact on the HBV X gene mutations as well as on viral quasispecies complexity. PMID:27824315

  9. Newcastle Disease Virus Establishes Persistent Infection in Tumor Cells In Vitro: Contribution of the Cleavage Site of Fusion Protein and Second Sialic Acid Binding Site of Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Wang, Weijia; Cheng, Xing; McTamney, Patrick; Carroll, Danielle; Jin, Hong

    2017-08-15

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an oncolytic virus being developed for the treatment of cancer. Following infection of a human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR3) with a recombinant low-pathogenic NDV, persistent infection was established in a subset of tumor cells. Persistently infected (PI) cells exhibited resistance to superinfection with NDV and established an antiviral state, as demonstrated by upregulation of interferon and interferon-induced genes such as myxoma resistance gene 1 (Mx1) and retinoic acid-inducing gene-I (RIG-I). Viruses released from PI cells induced higher cell-to-cell fusion than the parental virus following infection in two tumor cell lines tested, HT1080 and HeLa, and remained attenuated in chickens. Two mutations, one in the fusion (F) protein cleavage site, F117S (F117S), and another in hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), G169R (HN169R), located in the second sialic acid binding region, were responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype. F117S improves F protein cleavage efficiency, facilitating cell-to-cell fusion, while HN169R possesses a multifaceted role in contributing to higher fusion, reduced receptor binding, and lower neuraminidase activity, which together result in increased fusion and reduced viral replication. Thus, establishment of persistent infection in vitro involves viral genetic changes that facilitate efficient viral spread from cell to cell as a potential mechanism to escape host antiviral responses. The results of our study also demonstrate a critical role in the viral life cycle for the second receptor binding region of the HN protein, which is conserved in several paramyxoviruses.IMPORTANCE Oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) could establish persistent infection in a tumor cell line, resulting in a steady antiviral state reflected by constitutively expressed interferon. Viruses isolated from persistently infected cells are highly fusogenic, and this phenotype has been mapped to two mutations, one each in the

  10. An anti-human immunodeficiency virus multiple antigen peptide encompassing the cleavage region of the env precursor interferes with membrane fusion at a post-CD4 binding step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbouche, R; Decroly, E; Kieny, M P; Fenouillet, E

    2000-07-20

    CLIV is a multiple antigen peptide ([PTKAKRRVVQREKR](4)-K(2)-K-betaA) that encompasses the cleavage region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope precursor. It displays an antiviral activity against HIV-1 and HIV-2 and inhibits HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. This effect has previously been attributed to interference with Env processing, resulting in the expression of a nonfusogenic envelope [Virology (1998) 247, 137]. However, we show here that CLIV does not alter the status of Env cleavage at steady state. Using various aggregation/syncytium assays that allow us to discriminate between gp120/CD4 binding and binding followed by gp41-mediated fusion, we demonstrate that CLIV inhibits a step of the cell-to-cell fusion process after CD4 binding. We demonstrate also that CLIV binds at 37 degrees C to a single class of protein present at the CD4(+) cell surface (Scatchard analysis: K(d) = 8 nM; B(max) = 10(4) sites/cell) and that the fusion inhibition activity seems to correlate with binding to this proteic component. In contrast, CLIV interacts with neither membrane-inserted nor CD4-associated Env. We therefore propose that CLIV interferes after Env/CD4 binding with a step of the membrane fusion process that may involve the C-terminal domain of gp120. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Immunization of rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from a highly conserved β-sheet epitope region underneath the receptor binding site of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideno S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoji Ideno,1,3 Kaoru Sakai,1 Mikihiro Yunoki,2–4 Ritsuko Kubota-Koketsu,3,5 Yuji Inoue,3 Shota Nakamura,6 Teruo Yasunaga,6 Yoshinobu Okuno,5 Kazuyoshi Ikuta3 1Infectious Pathogen Research Section, Central Research Laboratory, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Kobe, Japan; 2Research and Development Promotion Section, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Veterinary Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan; 5Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa, Japan; 6Department of Genome Informatics, Genome Information Research Center, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Background: There is increasing concern about the speed with which health care providers can administer prophylaxis and treatment in an influenza pandemic. Generally, it takes several months to manufacture an influenza vaccine by propagation of the virus in chicken eggs or cultured cells. Newer, faster protocols for the production of vaccines that induce broad-spectrum immunity are therefore highly desirable. We previously developed human monoclonal antibody B-1 that shows broadly neutralizing activity against influenza A virus H3N2. B-1 recognizes an epitope region that includes an antiparallel β-sheet structure underneath the receptor binding site of influenza hemagglutinin (HA. In this study, the efficacy of a synthetic peptide vaccine derived from this epitope region against influenza A was evaluated. Materials and methods: Two peptides were synthesized, the upper and lower peptides. These peptides comprise amino acid residues 167–187 and 225–241, respectively, of the B-1 epitope region of HA, which is involved in

  12. Tritium planigraphy study of structural alterations in the coat protein of Potato virus X induced by binding of its triple gene block 1 protein to virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashina, Elena; Badun, Gennady; Fedorova, Natalia; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Nemykh, Maria; Serebryakova, Marina; Mukhamedzhanova, Anna; Karpova, Olga; Rodionova, Nina; Baratova, Lyudmila; Dobrov, Evgeny

    2009-12-01

    Alterations in Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein structure after binding of the protein, encoded by the first gene of PVX triple gene block (triple gene block 1 protein, TGBp1), to the virions were studied using tritium planigraphy. Previously, it has been shown that TGBp1 molecules interact with the PVX particle end, containing the 5'-terminus of PVX RNA, and that this interaction results in a strong decrease in virion stability and its transformation to a translationally active state. In this work, it has been shown that the interaction of TGBp1 with PVX virions leads to an increase of approximately 50% in tritium label incorporation into the 176-198 segment of the 236-residue-long PVX coat protein subunit, with some decrease in label incorporation into the N-terminal coat protein region. According to the new 'sandwich' variant of our recently proposed model of the three-dimensional structure of the intravirus PVX coat protein, the 176-198 segment is assigned to the beta-sheet region located at the subunit surface, presumably participating in coat protein interactions with the intravirus RNA and/or in protein-protein interactions, whereas the N-terminal coat protein region corresponds to the other part of the same beta-sheet. For the remaining segments of the PVX coat protein subunit, no significant difference between tritium incorporation into untreated and TGBp1-treated PVX was observed. A detailed description of the 'sandwich' version of the intravirus PVX coat protein model is presented.

  13. Vaccination induced antibodies to recombinant avian influenza A virus M2 protein or synthetic M2e peptide do not bind to the M2 protein on the virus or virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Willem J C; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Sikkema, Reina; Vervelde, Lonneke; Koets, A D P

    2013-06-24

    Influenza viruses are characterized by their highly variable surface proteins HA and NA. The third surface protein M2 is a nearly invariant protein in all Influenza A strains. Despite extensive studies in other animal models, this study is the first to describe the use of recombinant M2 protein and a peptide coding for the extracellular part of the M2 protein (M2e) to vaccinate poultry. Four groups of layer chickens received a prime-boost vaccination with recombinant M2 protein, M2e, a tetrameric construct from M2e peptide bound to streptavidin and a control tetrameric construct formulated with Stimune adjuvant. We determined the M2-specific antibody (Ab) responses in the serum before vaccination, three weeks after vaccination and two weeks after booster, at days 21, 42 and 56 of age. The group vaccinated with the M2 protein in combination with Stimune adjuvant showed a significant Ab response to the complete M2 protein as compared to the other groups. In addition an increased Ab response to M2e peptide was found in the group vaccinated with the M2e tetrameric construct. None of the vaccinated animals showed seroconversion to AI in a commercial ELISA. Finally no Ab's were found that bound to M2 expressed on in vitro AI infected MDCK cells. Although Ab's are formed against the M2 protein and to Streptavidin bound M2e peptide in a tetrameric conformation these Ab's do not recognize of M2 on the virus or on infected cells.

  14. HIV: cell binding and entry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilen, Craig B; Tilton, John C; Doms, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    The first step of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle-binding and entry into the host cell-plays a major role in determining viral tropism and the ability of HIV to degrade the human immune system...

  15. High-affinity human leucocyte antigen class I binding variola-derived peptides induce CD4(+) T cell responses more than 30 years post-vaccinia virus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M.; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma secreting T lymphocytes against pox virus-derived synthetic 9-mer peptides were tested by enzyme-linked immunospot in peripheral blood of individuals vaccinated with vaccinia virus more than 30 years ago. The peptides were characterized biochemically as high-affinity human...

  16. Antigenic variation of clade 2.1 H5N1 virus is determined by a few amino acid substitutions immediately adjacent to the receptor binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F. Koel (Björn); S. van der Vliet (Stefan); D.F. Burke (David); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); E.E. Bharoto (Eny); I.W.W. Yasa (I. Wayan); I. Herliana (Inna); B.M. Laksono (Brigitta); K. Xu (Kemin); E. Skepner (Eugene); C.A. Russell (Colin); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); D.R. Perez (Daniel); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D.J. Smith (Derek James); T.Y. Prajitno (Teguh); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype are genetically highly variable and have diversified into multiple phylogenetic clades over the past decade. Antigenic drift is a well-studied phenomenon for seasonal human influenza viruses, but much less is known

  17. RNA sequencing-based analysis of the spleen transcriptome following infectious bronchitis virus infection of chickens selected for different mannose-binding lectin serum concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzić, Edin; Kjærup, Rikke Brødsgaard; Mach, Núria; Minozzi, Guilietta; Strozzi, Francesco; Gualdi, Valentina; Williams, John L; Chen, Jun; Wattrang, Eva; Buitenhuis, Bart; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen

    2016-01-27

    Avian infectious bronchitis is a highly contagious disease of the upper-respiratory tract caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between innate and adaptive immune responses to IBV infection is a crucial element for further improvements in strategies to control IB. To this end, two chicken lines, selected for high (L10H line) and low (L10L line) serum concentration of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) were studied. In total, 32 birds from each line were used. Sixteen birds from each line were infected with IBV and sixteen were left uninfected. Eight uninfected and infected birds from each line were euthanized at 1 and 3 weeks post infection. RNA sequencing was performed on spleen samples from all 64 birds and differential gene expression analysis was performed for four comparisons: L10L line versus L10H line for uninfected birds at weeks 1 and 3, respectively, and in the same way for infected birds. Functional analysis was performed using Gene Ontology (GO) Immune System Process terms specific for Gallus gallus. Comparing uninfected L10H and L10L birds, we identified 1698 and 1424 differentially expressed (DE) genes at weeks 1 and 3, respectively. For the IBV-infected birds, 1934 and 866 DE genes were identified between the two lines at weeks 1 and 3, respectively. The two most enriched GO terms emerging from the comparison of uninfected birds between the two lines were "Lymphocyte activation involved in immune response" and "Somatic recombination of immunoglobulin genes involved in immune response" at weeks 1 and 3, respectively. When comparing IBV-infected birds between the two lines, the most enriched GO terms were "Alpha-beta T cell activation" and "Positive regulation of leukocyte activation" at weeks 1 and 3, respectively. Healthy birds from the two lines showed significant differences in expression profiles for subsets of adaptive and innate immunity-related genes, whereas comparison of the

  18. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y.; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Couzens, Laura K.; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses. IMPORTANCE Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have caused hundreds of human infections in multiple states in the United States since 2009. Most cases have been children who had contact with swine in agricultural fairs. These viruses originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into the U

  19. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  20. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-binding sites on complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) using human-mouse chimeras and peptides. At least two distinct sites are necessary for ligand-receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, H; Brenner, C; Jacobi, S; Gorka, J; Carel, J C; Kinoshita, T; Holers, V M

    1991-07-05

    The predicted amino acid sequence of human complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21, C3d,g/Epstein-Barr virus receptor) and its genetic murine homologue are approximately 70% identical. The sequence of each consists of a linear array of 60-70 amino acid repeats designated short consensus repeats (SCRs). Although they share significant sequence identity, a major difference in the activities of these two proteins has been believed to be the ability of human, but not mouse, CR2 to mediate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of B lymphocytes. In order to formally address this question and to directly compare the activities of the CR2 protein of each species, we have expressed recombinant mouse CR2 (rMCR2) in a human K562 erythroleukemia cell line background. We have found that rMCR2 reacts with two previously described rat anti-MCR2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 7G6 and 7E9, but not mAb 8C12, which recognizes only mouse complement receptor 1. rMCR2 rosettes with erythrocytes bearing mouse and human C3d,g and binds glutaraldehyde cross-linked human C3d,g with a similar Kd as human CR2 (HCR2). rMCR2 does not bind EBV. By using this observation and constructing chimeras bearing portions of MCR2 on a HCR2 background, we have been able to define unique sequences in HCR2 SCRs 1 and 2 important in the interaction with both mAb OKB7, which blocks EBV binding and infection, and with EBV. In addition, by using blocking peptides derived from HCR2 sequence, we have identified a second distinct region in SCR2 important in EBV binding. Therefore, within the first two SCRs of HCR2 are multiple distinct sites of interaction with EBV and with mAb OKB7.

  1. An E2F binding sequence negatively regulates the response of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) promoter to simian virus 40T antigen and to serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcu, P; Graña, X; Li, S; Swantek, J; De Luca, A; Giordano, A; Baserga, R

    1994-08-01

    The promoter of the Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene is activated by the Simian Virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT), and one of the elements responding to SVLT activation has been localized to a short 124 bp immediately upstream of the first initiation of transcription site. This short promoter contains an E2F binding site, that, in gel shifts, binds a protein complex, but only when the promoter activity is reduced or absent. A mutation in the E2F binding site deregulates the activity of the promoter, which becomes active even in those conditions in which the wild type promoter is inactive. By using antibodies in gel retardation analyses, we can show that the different protein complexes include, at least, the following proteins: E2F, cyclin A and p107. We conclude that the short IGF-I promoter is negatively regulated by an E2F binding site that complexes with several proteins. Our data suggest that disaggregation of these complexes by the action of SVLT (or other activators) increases expression from the promoter, thus establishing a link between the regulation of cell proliferation by growth factors and the E2F-associated proteins.

  2. Crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune responses to infectious bronchitis virus after vaccination and challenge of chickens varying in serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle R.; Norup, Liselotte R.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a C-type collectin with structural similarities to C1q, is an innate pattern-recognition molecule that is sequestered to sites of inflammation and infections. MBL selectively binds distinct chemical patterns, including carbohydrates expressed on all kinds of pathogens...

  3. The PDZ domain-binding motif of the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein induces mislocalization of the tumor suppressor hScrib in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin-André, Charlotte; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2007-11-09

    Interactions with cellular PDZ domain-containing proteins obviously contribute to the tumorigenic potential of several viral oncoproteins. In this regard, the oncogenic potential of the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax protein correlates with its binding capacity to the tumor suppressor hDlg. Recent results show that hDlg in T cells is associated to a network of scaffolding proteins including another PDZ domain-containing protein termed hScrib. Interestingly, previous studies have revealed complementary activities of both proteins in the control of epithelial cell polarity. Here, we demonstrate that Tax can bind to hScrib and that the resulting Tax/hScrib complex is present in human T cell leukemia virus type 1-infected T cells. By confocal microscopy, we show that Tax modifies the localization of hScrib in transfected COS cells as well as in infected T cell lines and targets hScrib to particular spots exhibiting a granular distribution, mainly distributed in the cytoplasm. Given that Tax sequesters hScrib to these particular structures, we postulate that Tax might inhibit hScrib activity. Providing further support to this idea, we find that transient overexpression of hScrib attenuates T cell receptor-induced NFAT activity but that the presence of Tax counteracts this negative effect on the NFAT pathway. The fact that hDlg and hScrib are both targeted by Tax underlies their importance in T cell function.

  4. Mapping a region of hepatitis C virus E2 that is responsible for escape from neutralizing antibodies and a core CD81-binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Krey, Thomas; Rey, Felix A; Foung, Steven K H

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between broadly neutralizing antibodies and their epitopes provides a basis for the rational design of a preventive hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. CBH-2, HC-11, and HC-1 are representatives of antibodies to overlapping epitopes on E2 that mediate neutralization by blocking virus binding to CD81. To obtain insights into escape mechanisms, infectious cell culture virus, 2a HCVcc, was propagated under increasing concentrations of a neutralizing antibody to isolate escape mutants. Three escape patterns were observed with these antibodies. First, CBH-2 escape mutants that contained mutations at D431G or A439E, which did not compromise viral fitness, were isolated. Second, under the selective pressure of HC-11, escape mutations progressed from a single L438F substitution at a low antibody concentration to double substitutions, L438F and N434D or L438F and T435A, at higher antibody concentrations. Escape from HC-11 was associated with a loss of viral fitness. An HCV pseudoparticle (HCVpp) containing the L438F mutation bound to CD81 half as efficiently as did wild-type (wt) HCVpp. Third, for HC-1, the antibody at a critical concentration completely suppressed viral replication and generated no escape mutants. Epitope mapping revealed contact residues for CBH-2 and HC-11 in two regions of the E2 glycoprotein, amino acids (aa) 425 to 443 and aa 529 to 535. Interestingly, contact residues for HC-1 were identified only in the region encompassing aa 529 to 535 and not in aa 425 to 443. Taken together, these findings point to a region of variability, aa 425 to 443, that is responsible primarily for viral escape from neutralization, with or without compromising viral fitness. Moreover, the region aa 529 to 535 is a core CD81 binding region that does not tolerate neutralization escape mutations.

  5. The Rsv3 Locus Conferring Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus is Associated with a Cluster of Coiled-Coil Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suh, Su Jeoung; Bowman, Brian C; Jeong, Namhee; Yang, Kiwoung; Kastl, Christin; Tolin, Sue A; Maroof, M.A. Saghai; Jeong, Soon-Chun

    2011-01-01

    ...), has been characterized by examination of the soybean genome sequence. The 154 kbp interval encompassing contains a family of closely related coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) genes...

  6. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1997-01-01

    , but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer...... binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology....

  7. Modest human immunodeficiency virus coreceptor function of CXCR3 is strongly enhanced by mimicking the CXCR4 ligand binding pocket in the CXCR3 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, Sigrid; Huskens, Dana; Princen, Katrien

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR3 can exhibit weak coreceptor function for several human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical isolates. These viruses produced microscopically visible cytopathicity in U87.CD4.CXCR3 cell cultures, whereas untransfected (CXCR3-negative) U87...... at positions 300 and 304 of the CXCR3 receptor. This mutant receptor (CXCR3[K300A, S304E]) showed markedly enhanced HIV coreceptor function compared to the wild-type receptor (CXCR3[WT]). Moreover, the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 exhibited antagonistic and anti-HIV activities in U87.CD4.CXCR3[K300A, S304E] cells...

  8. Hepatitis B virus X protein up-regulates C4b-binding protein α through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guoxing; Li, Jiong; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Liu, Yunxia; Zhang, Shuqin; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Weiying; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-05-10

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays crucial roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously showed that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of CD59. Moreover, in this study we found that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of C4b-binding protein α (C4BPα), a potent inhibitor of complement system. We observed that HBx were positively correlated with those of C4BPα in clinical HCC tissues. Mechanistically, HBx activated the promoter core region of C4BPα, located at -1199/-803nt, through binding to transcription factor Sp1. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that HBx was able to bind to the promoter of C4BPα, which could be blocked by Sp1 silencing. Functionally, knockdown of C4BPα obviously increased the deposition of C5b-9, a complex of complement membrane attack, and remarkably abolished the HBx-induced resistance of hepatoma cells from complement attack in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that HBx up-regulates C4BPα through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of liver cancer cells from complement attack. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which HBx enhances protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack.

  9. Conformation of the RNA-binding N-terminus of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus : a nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this thesis was to obtain information about protein-RNA interactions in cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). CCMV consists of RNA and a protective protein coat, composed of 180 identical coat proteins. The positively charged N-terminal arm of the

  10. RNA sequencing based analysis of the spleen transcriptome following the infectious bronchitis virus infection of chickens selected for different mannose-binding lectin serum concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Kjærup, Rikke Brødsgaard; Mach, Núria

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAvian infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute and highly contagious disease of the upper-respiratory tract caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the immune response to IBV infection is a crucial element for further improvements in...

  11. Increased sensitivity to CD4 binding site-directed neutralization following in vitro propagation on primary lymphocytes of a neutralization-resistant human immunodeficiency virus IIIB strain isolated from an accidentally infected laboratory worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Tim; Quakkelaar, Esther; van Nuenen, Ad; Pantophlet, Ralph; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2004-06-01

    We previously described the adaptation of the neutralization-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB to a neutralization-resistant phenotype in an accidentally infected laboratory worker. During long-term propagation of this resistant isolate, designated FF3346, on primary peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro, an HIV-1 variant appeared that had regained sensitivity to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody b12. When an early passage of FF3346 was subjected to limiting-dilution culture in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, eight virus variants with various degrees of neutralization resistance were isolated. Two of them, the sCD4 neutralization-resistant variant LW_H8(res) and the sCD4 neutralization-sensitive variant LW_G9(sens), were selected for further study. Interestingly, these two viruses were equally resistant to neutralization by agents that recognize domains other than the CD4 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the increased neutralization sensitivity of variant LW_G9(sens) resulted from only two changes, an Asn-to-Ser substitution at position 164 in the V2 loop and an Ala-to-Glu substitution at position 370 in the C3 domain of gp120. In agreement with this notion, the affinity of b12 for monomeric gp120 containing the N164S and A370E substitutions in the background of the molecular clone LW_H8(res) was higher than its affinity for the parental gp120. Surprisingly, no correlation was observed between CD4 binding affinity for monomeric gp120 and the level of neutralization resistance, suggesting that differences in sCD4 neutralization sensitivity between these viruses are only manifested in the context of the tertiary or quaternary structure of gp120 on the viral surface. The results obtained here indicate that the neutralization-sensitive strain IIIB can become neutralization resistant in vivo under selective pressure by neutralizing antibodies but that this

  12. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation......, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular....... The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define “BoLA supertypes.” This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination....

  13. RNA binding is more critical to the suppression of silencing function of Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein than nuclear localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Inmaculada; Rakitina, Daria; Semashko, Maria; Taliansky, Michael; Praveen, Shelly; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P.; Kalinina, Natalia; Canto, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that silencing suppression by the 2b protein and six mutants correlated both with their ability to bind to double-stranded (ds) small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and with their nuclear/nucleolar localization. To further discern the contribution to suppression activity of sRNA binding and of nuclear localization, we have characterized the kinetics of in vitro binding to a ds sRNA, a single-stranded (ss) sRNA, and a micro RNA (miRNA) of the native 2b protein and eight mutant variants. We have also added a nuclear export signal (NES) to the 2b protein and assessed how it affected subcellular distribution and suppressor activity. We found that in solution native protein bound ds siRNA, miRNA, and ss sRNA with high affinity, at protein:RNA molar ratios ∼2:1. Of the four mutants that retained suppressor activity, three showed sRNA binding profiles similar to those of the native protein, whereas the remaining one bound ss sRNA at a 2:1 molar ratio, but both ds sRNAs with 1.5–2 times slightly lower affinity. Three of the four mutants lacking suppressor activity failed to bind to any sRNA, whereas the remaining one bound them at far higher ratios. NES-tagged 2b protein became cytoplasmic, but suppression activity in patch assays remained unaffected. These results support binding to sRNAs at molar ratios at or near 2:1 as critical to the suppressor activity of the 2b protein. They also show that cytoplasmically localized 2b protein retained suppressor activity, and that a sustained nuclear localization was not required for this function. PMID:22357910

  14. Sialic Acid Receptors of Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Herrler, Georg; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acid linked to glycoproteins and gangliosides is used by many viruses as a receptor for cell entry. These viruses include important human and animal pathogens, such as influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, corona, noro, rota, and DNA tumor viruses. Attachment to sialic acid is mediated by receptor binding proteins that are constituents of viral envelopes or exposed at the surface of non-enveloped viruses. Some of these viruses are also equipped with a neuraminidase or a sialyl-O-acetyl-esterase. These receptor-destroying enzymes promote virus release from infected cells and neutralize sialic acid-containing soluble proteins interfering with cell surface binding of the virus. Variations in the receptor specificity are important determinants for host range, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses.

  15. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  16. α2,3 and α2,6 N-Linked Sialic Acids Facilitate Efficient Binding and Transduction by Adeno-Associated Virus Types 1 and 6

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhijian; Miller, Edward; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors in the field of gene therapy. Different AAV serotypes display distinct tissue tropism, believed to be related to the distribution of their receptors on target cells. Of the 11 well-characterized AAV serotypes, heparan sulfate proteoglycan and sialic acid have been suggested to be the attachment receptors for AAV type 2 and types 4 and 5, respectively. In this report, we identify the receptor for the two closely related serotype...

  17. Epitope diversity of hepatitis B virus capsids: quasi-equivalent variations in spike epitopes and binding of different antibodies to the same epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A; Belnap, D M; Watts, N R; Conway, J F; Cheng, N; Stahl, S J; Vethanayagam, J G; Wingfield, P T; Steven, A C

    2006-01-20

    To investigate the range of antigenic variation of HBV capsids, we have characterized the epitopes for two anti-capsid antibodies by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of Fab-labeled capsids to approximately 10A resolution followed by molecular modeling. Both antibodies engage residues on the protruding spikes but their epitopes and binding orientations differ. Steric interference effects limit maximum binding to approximately 50% average occupancy in each case. However, the occupancies of the two copies of a given epitope that are present on a single spike differ, reflecting subtle distinctions in structure and hence, binding affinity, arising from quasi-equivalence. The epitope for mAb88 is conformational but continuous, consisting of a loop-helix motif (residues 77-87) on one of the two polypeptide chains in the spike. In contrast, the epitope for mAb842, like most conformational epitopes, is discontinuous, consisting of a loop on one polypeptide chain (residues 74-78) combined with a loop-helix element (residues 78-83) on the other. The epitope of mAb842 is essentially identical with that previously mapped for mAb F11A4, although the binding orientations of the two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) differ, as do their affinities measured by surface plasmon resonance. From the number of monoclonals (six) whose binding had to be characterized to give the first duplicate epitope, we estimate the total number of core antigen (cAg) epitopes to be of the order of 20. Given that different antibodies may share the same epitope, the potential number of distinct anti-cAg clones should be considerably higher. The observation that the large majority of cAg epitopes are conformational reflects the relative dimensions of a Fab (large) and the small size and close packing of the motifs that are exposed and accessible on the capsid surface.

  18. Binding of the endogenously expressed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) envelope glycoprotein gp350 with the viral receptor masks the major EBV-neutralizing epitope and affects gp350-specific ADCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khyatti, M; Ahmad, A; Blagdon, M; Frade, R; Menezes, J

    1998-08-01

    The major neutralizing epitope (MNE) for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present on its envelope glycoprotein gp350/220 (hereafter referred to as gp350) in close proximity to the virus-receptor (CR2) binding site and is recognized by the neutralizing murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 72A1. We studied the reactivities of 72A1 and another anti-gp350 mAb 2L10 (which does not neutralize EBV) with gp350 expressed on three different lymphoid cell lines (Raji, CEM.NKr and BJA-B). Our results indicate that gp350 expressed on the surface of CR2-positive cells interacts with the viral receptor and that this interaction masks the major EBV-neutralizing epitope. The interaction was reversible and the masked epitope was revealed on incubation with an excess of anti-CR2 mAb OKB7. Gp350-expressing CEM-NKr cells with intact MNE exhibited significantly higher (P gp350-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assays compared with its Raji counterpart. The present results may have important implications for the use of soluble viral receptors as therapeutic agents in acute and chronic EBV and other viral infections (e.g., HIV-1).

  19. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribas, A Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-20

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Characterization of the Interactome of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Reveals the Hyper Variable Region as a Binding Platform for Association with 14-3-3 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yihong; Wu, Weining; Gao, Jiming; Smith, Nikki; Burkard, Christine; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Minxia; Wang, Chengbao; Archibald, Alan; Digard, Paul; Zhou, En-Min; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-05-06

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry worldwide and hence global food security, exacerbated by a newly emerged highly pathogenic (HP-PRRSV) strain from China. PRRSV nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) is a multifunctional polypeptide with strain-dependent influences on pathogenicity. A number of discrete functional regions have been identified on the protein. Quantitative label free proteomics was used to identify cellular binding partners of nsp2 expressed by HP-PRRSV. This allowed the identification of potential cellular interacting partners and the discrimination of nonspecific interactions. The interactome data were further investigated and validated using biological replicates and also compared with nsp2 from a low pathogenic (LP) strain of PRRSV. Validation included both forward and reverse pulldowns and confocal microscopy. The data indicated that nsp2 interacted with a number of cellular proteins including 14-3-3, CD2AP, and other components of cellular aggresomes. The hyper-variable region of nsp2 protein was identified as a binding platform for association with 14-3-3 proteins.

  1. The block of adipocyte differentiation by a C-terminally truncated, but not by full-length, simian virus 40 large tumor antigen is dependent on an intact retinoblastoma susceptibility protein family binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C; Chatterjee, S; Cherington, V

    1996-02-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) can promote cell transformation and suppress differentiation. It does this partly by targeting tumor suppressors such as p53 and members of the retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (Rb) family. This work concentrates on mechanisms by which SV40 large tumor antigen (SVLT) suppresses adipocyte differentiation. We created cell lines derived from murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes expressing different versions of SV40 early-region sequences. SVLT-expressing cells failed to exhibit adipocyte morphology, to induce glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity, and to induce differentiation-dependent mRNA for adipocyte P2. SVLT alone was sufficient, in the absence of SV40 small tumor antigen, to inhibit differentiation. A truncated SVLT containing only the N-terminal 121 amino acids (SVLT1-121) blocked differentiation, thus mapping at least one differentiation blocking function to the N-terminal region. K1 (Glu-107-->Lys) point mutants of SVLT, which are unable to bind to the Rb protein family or induce neoplastic transformation, are defective for blocking differentiation in the case of SVLT1-121 but retain the ability to block differentiation in the case of full-length SVLT. This finding demonstrates that Rb family proteins are important in regulating adipocyte differentiation but that other functions of full-length SVLT can block adipocyte differentiation independently of RB family binding and transformation.

  2. Combinatorial Peptide-Based Epitope Mapping from Ebola Virus DNA Vaccines and Infections Reveals Residue-Level Determinants of Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    EBOV mAbs. 15 While such information has yielded deep insights into antibody binding, limitations on resolution 16 of these structures often...fragment P189. P189 was identified in our work as a strong antigenic region but 310 15 we have found no report based on structural data to confirm our...with a recent study on the conservancy of mAb epitopes 421 from previous outbreaks. 29 Based on a comparison with that work , all functional epitopes

  3. Norovirus translation requires an interaction between the C Terminus of the genome-linked viral protein VPg and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liliane; Bailey, Dalan; Leen, Eoin N; Emmott, Edward P; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Roberts, Lisa O; Curry, Stephen; Locker, Nicolas; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-08-01

    Viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to usurp the host cell translation machinery to enable translation of the viral genome in the presence of high levels of cellular mRNAs. Noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in man, have evolved a mechanism that relies on the interaction of translation initiation factors with the virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral RNA. To further characterize this novel mechanism of translation initiation, we have used proteomics to identify the components of the norovirus translation initiation factor complex. This approach revealed that VPg binds directly to the eIF4F complex, with a high affinity interaction occurring between VPg and eIF4G. Mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region of VPg is important for the VPg-eIF4G interaction; viruses with mutations that alter or disrupt this interaction are debilitated or non-viable. Our results shed new light on the unusual mechanisms of protein-directed translation initiation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  5. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

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    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  6. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment

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    Jia Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD. In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706 of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  7. Characterization of post-translation products of herpes simplex virus gene 35 proteins binding to the surfaces of full capsids but not empty capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.K.; Roizman, B.; Pereira, L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on the properties of a genetically and immunologically related family of structural (..gamma..) polypeptides of herpes simplex virus 1 designated as infected cell polypeptides (ICP) 35. The members of this family were identified and studied with the aid of a panel of monoclonal antibodies exemplified by H745. This monoclonal antibody reacted with six bands (ICP35a to 35f) formed by ICPs contained in either HEp-2 or Vero cell lysates electrophoretically separated in denaturing gels and transferred to nitrocell sheets. The six bands had apparent molecular weights in the range 39,000 to 50,000. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that ICP35a to 35d are cytoplasmic precursors to nuclear products. ICP35 was labeled by /sup 32/P/sub i/ added to the medium, but the extent of phosphorylation varied and may be a determinant of isoelectric properties. Iodination studies indicate that ICP35e and 35f are the predominant forms of ICP35 present on the surface of full, nuclear capsids containing DNA. None of the members of the ICP35 family were detected in empty capsids. Surface iodination labeled the major capsid protein (ICP5) of empty capsids, but not of full capsids, indicating the ICP35e of 35f coat the surface of the viral capsid and block access to sites for iodination of ICP5, the major capsid protein.

  8. Binding of the Epstein-Barr virus major envelope glycoprotein gp350 results in the upregulation of the TNF-alpha gene expression in monocytic cells via NF-kappaB involving PKC, PI3-K and tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addario, M; Ahmad, A; Morgan, A; Menezes, J

    2000-05-19

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus that interacts with various immunocompetent cells that carry the EBV receptor (CD21/CR2). EBV binds to CR2 through its major envelope glycoprotein 350 (gp350). Previously we had demonstrated that EBV and other human herpesviruses are capable of modulating cytokine synthesis through the deregulated expression of cytokine genes interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Here we show that, in contrast to infectious EBV, purified recombinant gp350 upregulates TNF-alpha gene expression in human monocyte/macrophages (M/M) as well as in a monocytoid cell line, U937. Our results also demonstrate that this increased expression is due to both enhanced transcription and stability of TNF-alpha mRNA in gp350-treated cells. The specificity of this effect is evidenced by the fact that pre-incubation of cells with anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody OKB7, which blocks binding of gp350 to CR2, inhibits the above mentioned effects of gp350. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of TNF-alpha by gp350 is mediated by NF-kappaB through signal transduction pathways involving PKC, PI3-K and tyrosine kinases. To our knowledge this is the first report describing the modulation of TNF-alpha gene expression by the EBV-gp350 molecule following its interaction with the viral receptor CR2 on cells of the monocytic lineage. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. The Rsv3 Locus Conferring Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus is Associated with a Cluster of Coiled-Coil Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes

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    Su Jeoung Suh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The (SMV resistance locus, , previously mapped between markers A519F/R and M3Satt in the soybean molecular linkage group B2 (chromosome 14, has been characterized by examination of the soybean genome sequence. The 154 kbp interval encompassing contains a family of closely related coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR genes. Tightly linked to this region are additional CC-NB-LRR genes and several leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK genes, thereby indicating that members of both multigene families constitute a heterogeneous cluster at the chromosomal region. To further confirm the sequence and genetic map concordance, we developed 16 markers from the genomic sequence including predicted CC-NB-LRR genes and their flanking sequences. Mapping of the resultant markers in three populations showed parallel alignment between the genetic and sequence maps in the -containing region. Phylogenetic analysis of five CC-NB-LRR genes including a pseudogene showed they were highly similar to each other and formed a subclade within a CC-NB-LRR gene clade with representatives from several plant families including legume species. These results demonstrate that the locus is associated with this cluster of CC-NB-LRR genes, thereby suggesting that the gene most likely encodes a member of this gene family. In addition, information from this study should facilitate marker-assisted selection and pyramiding of resistance genes.

  10. Residues R{sup 199}H{sup 200} of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan [Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education) and Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics (Tianjin), College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Cui, Xiaoxu [Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education) and Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics (Tianjin), College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Centre Laboratory, TianJin 4th Centre Hospital, Tianjin 300140 (China); Luo, Di; Yu, Miao [Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education) and Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics (Tianjin), College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liang, Chen [Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E2 (Canada); Departments of Medicine McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology (Ministry of Education) and Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics (Tianjin), College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-01-20

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R{sup 199}H{sup 200} and R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}, but not R{sup 199}H{sup 200}, relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}. Collectively, our findings suggest that R{sup 199}H{sup 200} directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}.

  11. PDZ domain-binding motif of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein is essential for the interleukin 2 independent growth induction of a T-cell line

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    Tanaka Yuetsu

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, whereas HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2, is not associated with ATL or any other leukemia. HTLV-1 encodes the transforming gene tax1, whose expression in an interleukin (IL-2-dependent T-cell line (CTLL-2 induces IL-2-independent growth. Results In this study, we demonstrated that IL-2-independent growth induction by Tax1 was abrogated by mutations of the PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM at the Tax1 C-terminus. HTLV-2 Tax2, which shares 75% amino acid identity with Tax1 but does not have a PBM, was not able to induce IL-2-independent growth of CTLL-2. Conclusion Our results suggest that Tax1, through interaction with PDZ domain protein(s induces IL-2-independent growth, which may be a factor in multi-step leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1.

  12. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Ma, Xiang; Schoot, Paul van der|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618; Zandi, Roya; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Virus binding to a surface results at least locally, at the contact area, in stress and potential structural perturbation of the virus cage. Here we address the question of the role of substrate-induced deformation in the overall virus mechanical response to the adsorption event. This question may

  13. Viral proteins that bind double-stranded RNA: countermeasures against host antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    Several animal viruses encode proteins that bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to counteract host dsRNA-dependent antiviral responses. This article discusses the structure and function of the dsRNA-binding proteins of influenza A virus and Ebola viruses (EBOVs).

  14. Targeting eukaryotic translation in mesothelioma cells with an eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide.

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    Blake A Jacobson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrant cap-dependent translation is implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple tumor types including mesothelioma. In this study, disabling the eIF4F complex by targeting eIF4E with eIF4E-specific antisense oligonucleotide (4EASO is assessed as a therapy for mesothelioma. METHODS: Mesothelioma cells were transfected with 4EASO, designed to target eIF4E mRNA, or mismatch-ASO control. Cell survival was measured in mesothelioma treated with 4EASO alone or combined with either gemcitabine or pemetrexed. Levels of eIF4E, ODC, Bcl-2 and β-actin were assessed following treatment. Binding to a synthetic cap-analogue was used to study the strength of eIF4F complex activation following treatment. RESULTS: eIF4E level and the formation of eIF4F cap-complex decreased in response to 4EASO, but not mismatch control ASO, resulting in cleavage of PARP indicating apoptosis. 4EASO treatment resulted in dose dependent decrease in eIF4E levels, which corresponded to cytotoxicity of mesothelioma cells. 4EASO resulted in decreased levels of eIF4E in non-malignant LP9 cells, but this did not correspond to increased cytotoxicity. Proteins thought to be regulated by cap-dependent translation, Bcl-2 and ODC, were decreased upon treatment with 4EASO. Combination therapy of 4EASO with pemetrexed or gemcitabine further reduced cell number. CONCLUSION: 4EASO is a novel drug that causes apoptosis and selectively reduces eIF4E levels, eIF4F complex formation, and proliferation of mesothelioma cells. eIF4E knockdown results in decreased expression of anti-apoptotic and pro-growth proteins and enhances chemosensitivity.

  15. CRISPR-Mediated Drug-Target Validation Reveals Selective Pharmacological Inhibition of the RNA Helicase, eIF4A

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    Jennifer Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting translation initiation is an emerging anti-neoplastic strategy that capitalizes on de-regulated upstream MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signaling pathways in cancers. A key regulator of translation that controls ribosome recruitment flux is eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4F, a hetero-trimeric complex composed of the cap binding protein eIF4E, the scaffolding protein eIF4G, and the RNA helicase eIF4A. Small molecule inhibitors targeting eIF4F display promising anti-neoplastic activity in preclinical settings. Among these are some rocaglate family members that are well tolerated in vivo, deplete eIF4F of its eIF4A helicase subunit, have shown activity as single agents in several xenograft models, and can reverse acquired resistance to MAPK and PI3K-mTOR targeted therapies. Herein, we highlight the power of using genetic complementation approaches and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing for drug-target validation ex vivo and in vivo, linking the anti-tumor properties of rocaglates to eIF4A inhibition.

  16. Myxoma Virus dsRNA Binding Protein M029  Inhibits the Type I IFN-Induced Antiviral State in a  Highly Species-Specific Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2017-02-02

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is Leporipoxvirus that possesses a specific rabbit-restricted host tropism but exhibits a much broader  cellular host range in cultured cells. MYXV is able to efficiently  block all aspects of the type I interferon (IFN)-induced  antiviral  state  in rabbit cells, partially in  human  cells  and  very  poorly  in  mouse  cells.  The mechanism(s) of this species-specific inhibition of  type I IFN-induced antiviral state is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that MYXV encoded  protein  M029, a truncated relative of the vaccinia virus (VACV) E3 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)  binding  protein  that  inhibits  protein  kinase  R (PKR),  can  also  antagonize the type I IFN-induced  antiviral state in a highly species-specific manner. In cells pre-treated with type I IFN prior to  infection,  MYXV  exploits  M029  to  overcome  the  induced  antiviral  state completely in rabbit cells,  partially  in  human  cells,  but  not at all in mouse cells. However, in cells pre-infected with MYXV,  IFN-induced  signaling  is fully  inhibited  even  in the  absence  of M029 in cells from all three species,  suggesting  that  other  MYXV  protein(s)  apart  from  M029  block  IFN  signaling  in  a  speciesindependent  manner.  We  also  show  that  the  antiviral  state  induced in rabbit, human or mouse cells  by  type  I IFN  can  inhibit M029-knockout MYXV even when PKR is genetically knocked-out, suggesting  that  M029  targets  other  host  proteins  for  this  antiviral state inhibition. Thus, the MYXV  dsRNA  binding  protein  M029  not  only  antagonizes  PKR  from  multiple  species  but  also blocks the  type I IFN antiviral state independently of PKR in a highly species-specific fashion.

  17. Myxoma Virus dsRNA Binding Protein M029  Inhibits the Type I IFN‐Induced Antiviral State in a  Highly Species‐Specific Fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmudur M. Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV is Leporipoxvirus that possesses a specific rabbit‐restricted host tropism but exhibits a much broader  cellular host range in cultured cells. MYXV is able to efficiently  block all aspects of the type I interferon (IFN‐induced  antiviral  state  in rabbit cells, partially in  human  cells  and  very  poorly  in  mouse  cells.  The mechanism(s of this species‐specific inhibition of  type I IFN‐induced antiviral state is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that MYXV encoded  protein  M029, a truncated relative of the vaccinia virus (VACV E3 double‐stranded RNA (dsRNA  binding  protein  that  inhibits  protein  kinase  R (PKR,  can  also  antagonize the type I IFN‐induced  antiviral state in a highly species‐specific manner. In cells pre‐treated with type I IFN prior to  infection,  MYXV  exploits  M029  to  overcome  the  induced  antiviral  state completely in rabbit cells,  partially  in  human  cells,  but  not at all in mouse cells. However, in cells pre‐infected with MYXV,  IFN‐induced  signaling  is fully  inhibited  even  in the  absence  of M029 in cells from all three species,  suggesting  that  other  MYXV  protein(s  apart  from  M029  block  IFN  signaling  in  a  speciesindependent  manner.  We  also  show  that  the  antiviral  state  induced in rabbit, human or mouse cells  by  type  I IFN  can  inhibit M029‐knockout MYXV even when PKR is genetically knocked‐out, suggesting  that  M029  targets  other  host  proteins  for  this  antiviral state inhibition. Thus, the MYXV  dsRNA  binding  protein  M029  not  only  antagonizes  PKR  from  multiple  species  but  also blocks the  type I IFN antiviral state independently of PKR in a highly species‐specific fashion.

  18. Rice black streaked dwarf virus P7-2 forms a SCF complex through binding to Oryza sativa SKP1-like proteins, and interacts with GID2 involved in the gibberellin pathway.

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    Tao Tao

    Full Text Available As a core subunit of the SCF complex that promotes protein degradation through the 26S proteasome, S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1 plays important roles in multiple cellular processes in eukaryotes, including gibberellin (GA, jasmonate, ethylene, auxin and light responses. P7-2 encoded by Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV, a devastating viral pathogen that causes severe symptoms in infected plants, interacts with SKP1 from different plants. However, whether RBSDV P7-2 forms a SCF complex and targets host proteins is poorly understood. In this study, we conducted yeast two-hybrid assays to further explore the interactions between P7-2 and 25 type I Oryza sativa SKP1-like (OSK proteins, and found that P7-2 interacted with eight OSK members with different binding affinity. Co-immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed the interaction of P7-2 with OSK1, OSK5 and OSK20. It was also shown that P7-2, together with OSK1 and O. sativa Cullin-1, was able to form the SCF complex. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that P7-2 interacted with gibberellin insensitive dwarf2 (GID2 from rice and maize plants, which is essential for regulating the GA signaling pathway. It was further demonstrated that the N-terminal region of P7-2 was necessary for the interaction with GID2. Overall, these results indicated that P7-2 functioned as a component of the SCF complex in rice, and interaction of P7-2 with GID2 implied possible roles of the GA signaling pathway during RBSDV infection.

  19. NMR spectra of PB2 627, the RNA-binding domain in influenza A virus RNA polymerase that contains the pathogenicity factor lysine 627, and improvement of the spectra by small osmolytes

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    Yusuke S. Kato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus, which has an RNA genome, requires RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for transcription and replication. The polymerase is comprised of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. The C-terminal RNA-binding domain in PB2 contains lysine 627 (PB2 627, which is associated with pathogenicity and host range. However, the structure and molecular mechanism of PB2 627 in solution remain obscure. Here, we investigated PB2 627 in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and detected inhomogeneity in the intensities of backbone amide proton signals due to local fluctuations in structure. To characterize the effects of chemical chaperones on spectral data and improve the data quality, we tested 20 different additives, including L-arginine L-glutamate salt, (L-arginine2SO4, glycerol, β-octylglucoside, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate, Na2SO4, 1,5-diaminopentane, 1,4-diaminobutane, trehalose, sucrose, glycine, trimethylamine N-oxide, β-alanine, L-α-alanine, hydroxyectoine, betaine, L-proline, and non-detergent sulfobetaine 195, 201, and 256. We evaluated the quality of the resulting spectra by calculating the standard deviation and average of the ratio of signal intensities to noise level of amide peaks, as well as the ratio of the standard deviation to the average. NMR-profile analysis revealed diverse effects of additives on the dynamic properties of PB2 627. Based on such criteria, we found that small osmolytes such as glycine and L-α-alanine reduced structural fluctuations and improved the quality of spectral data, which is likely to facilitate a detailed NMR-based structural analysis. The methodology developed here may also be more generally useful for evaluating the effects of chemical chaperones on the structural integrity of proteins.

  20. Rice black streaked dwarf virus P7-2 forms a SCF complex through binding to Oryza sativa SKP1-like proteins, and interacts with GID2 involved in the gibberellin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Zhou, Cui-Ji; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiang-Ru; Sun, Qian; Zhao, Tian-Yu; Ye, Jian-Chun; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zong-Ying; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Guo, Ze-Jian; Wang, Xian-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin; Han, Cheng-Gui

    2017-01-01

    As a core subunit of the SCF complex that promotes protein degradation through the 26S proteasome, S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1) plays important roles in multiple cellular processes in eukaryotes, including gibberellin (GA), jasmonate, ethylene, auxin and light responses. P7-2 encoded by Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a devastating viral pathogen that causes severe symptoms in infected plants, interacts with SKP1 from different plants. However, whether RBSDV P7-2 forms a SCF complex and targets host proteins is poorly understood. In this study, we conducted yeast two-hybrid assays to further explore the interactions between P7-2 and 25 type I Oryza sativa SKP1-like (OSK) proteins, and found that P7-2 interacted with eight OSK members with different binding affinity. Co-immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed the interaction of P7-2 with OSK1, OSK5 and OSK20. It was also shown that P7-2, together with OSK1 and O. sativa Cullin-1, was able to form the SCF complex. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that P7-2 interacted with gibberellin insensitive dwarf2 (GID2) from rice and maize plants, which is essential for regulating the GA signaling pathway. It was further demonstrated that the N-terminal region of P7-2 was necessary for the interaction with GID2. Overall, these results indicated that P7-2 functioned as a component of the SCF complex in rice, and interaction of P7-2 with GID2 implied possible roles of the GA signaling pathway during RBSDV infection.

  1. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Dragnea, Bogdan; Ma, Xiang; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2017-07-01

    A virus binding to a surface causes stress of the virus cage near the contact area. Here, we investigate the potential role of substrate-induced structural perturbation in the mechanical response of virus particles to adsorption. This is particularly relevant to the broad category of viruses stabilized by weak noncovalent interactions. We utilize atomic force microscopy to measure height distributions of the brome mosaic virus upon adsorption from solution on atomically flat substrates and present a continuum model that captures our observations and provides estimates of elastic properties and of the interfacial energy of the virus, without recourse to indentation.

  2. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) coordinates interactions with eIF4A, eIF4B, and eIF4E in binding and translation of the barley yellow dwarf virus 3' cap-independent translation element (BTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Liu, Qiao; Miller, W Allen; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-04-07

    Barley yellow dwarf virus RNA, lacking a 5' cap and a 3' poly(A) tail, contains a cap-independent translation element (BTE) in the 3'-untranslated region that interacts with host translation initiation factor eIF4G. To determine how eIF4G recruits the mRNA, three eIF4G deletion mutants were constructed: (i) eIF4G601-1196, containing amino acids 601-1196, including the putative BTE-binding region, and binding domains for eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4B; (ii) eIF4G601-1488, which contains an additional C-terminal eIF4A-binding domain; and (iii) eIF4G742-1196, which lacks the eIF4E-binding site. eIF4G601-1196 binds BTE tightly and supports efficient translation. The helicase complex, consisting of eIF4A, eIF4B, and ATP, stimulated BTE binding with eIF4G601-1196 but not eIF4G601-1488, suggesting that the eIF4A binding domains may serve a regulatory role, with the C-terminal binding site having negative effects. eIF4E binding to eIF4G601-1196 induced a conformational change, significantly increasing the binding affinity to BTE. A comparison of the binding of eIF4G deletion mutants with BTEs containing mutations showed a general correlation between binding affinity and ability to facilitate translation. In summary, these results reveal a new role for the helicase complex in 3' cap-independent translation element-mediated translation and show that the functional core domain of eIF4G plus an adjacent probable RNA-binding domain mediate translation initiation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Monitoring virus entry into living cells using DiD-labeled dengue virus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of approaches can be applied to investigate the multiple steps and interactions that occur during virus entry into the host cell. Single-virus tracking is a powerful real-time imaging technique that offers the possibility to monitor virus-cell binding, internalization, intracellular

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  5. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  6. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  7. The inhibition of assembly of HIV-1 virus-like particles by 3-O-(3',3'-dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid (DSB is counteracted by Vif and requires its Zinc-binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaziz Serge

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DSB, the 3-O-(3',3'dimethylsuccinyl derivative of betulinic acid, blocks the last step of protease-mediated processing of HIV-1 Gag precursor (Pr55Gag, which leads to immature, noninfectious virions. When administered to Pr55Gag-expressing insect cells (Sf9, DSB inhibits the assembly and budding of membrane-enveloped virus-like particles (VLP. In order to explore the possibility that viral factors could modulate the susceptibility to DSB of the VLP assembly process, several viral proteins were coexpressed individually with Pr55Gag in DSB-treated cells, and VLP yields assayed in the extracellular medium. Results Wild-type Vif (Vifwt restored the VLP production in DSB-treated cells to levels observed in control, untreated cells. DSB-counteracting effect was also observed with Vif mutants defective in encapsidation into VLP, suggesting that packaging and anti-DSB effect were separate functions in Vif. The anti-DSB effect was abolished for VifC133S and VifS116V, two mutants which lacked the zinc binding domain (ZBD formed by the four H108C114C133H139 coordinates with a Zn atom. Electron microscopic analysis of cells coexpressing Pr55Gag and Vifwt showed that a large proportion of VLP budded into cytoplasmic vesicles and were released from Sf9 cells by exocytosis. However, in the presence of mutant VifC133S or VifS116V, most of the VLP assembled and budded at the plasma membrane, as in control cells expressing Pr55Gag alone. Conclusion The function of HIV-1 Vif protein which negated the DSB inhibition of VLP assembly was independent of its packaging capability, but depended on the integrity of ZBD. In the presence of Vifwt, but not with ZBD mutants VifC133S and VifS116V, VLP were redirected to a vesicular compartment and egressed via the exocytic pathway.

  8. Autophagy in Measles Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Rozières

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a biological process that helps cells to recycle obsolete cellular components and which greatly contributes to maintaining cellular integrity in response to environmental stress factors. Autophagy is also among the first lines of cellular defense against invading microorganisms, including viruses. The autophagic destruction of invading pathogens, a process referred to as xenophagy, involves cytosolic autophagy receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 (Sequestosome 1 or NDP52/CALCOCO2 (Nuclear Dot 52 KDa Protein/Calcium Binding And Coiled-Coil Domain 2, which bind to microbial components and target them towards growing autophagosomes for degradation. However, most, if not all, infectious viruses have evolved molecular tricks to escape from xenophagy. Many viruses even use autophagy, part of the autophagy pathway or some autophagy-associated proteins, to improve their infectious potential. In this regard, the measles virus, responsible for epidemic measles, has a unique interface with autophagy as the virus can induce multiple rounds of autophagy in the course of infection. These successive waves of autophagy result from distinct molecular pathways and seem associated with anti- and/or pro-measles virus consequences. In this review, we describe what the autophagy–measles virus interplay has taught us about both the biology of the virus and the mechanistic orchestration of autophagy.

  9. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  10. Tlys, a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and Tind) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA......-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and Tind transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding...... sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the Tind promoter...

  11. Endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilahti, Pirjo; Koskinen, Satu; Heikkilä, Outi; Karelehto, Eveliina; Susi, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9), echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1) has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  12. Endocytosis of Integrin-Binding Human Picornaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Merilahti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9, echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1 has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  13. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  14. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  15. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    MYXV binds human T lymphocytes but does not enter and infect T cells until after activation.MYXV-infected T lymphocytes proliferate less and secrete less inflammatory cytokines but deliver oncolytic virus to augment GVM.

  16. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  17. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  18. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  19. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  20. Increased sensitivity to CD4 binding site-directed neutralization following in vitro propagation on primary lymphocytes of a neutralization-resistant human immunodeficiency virus IIIB strain isolated from an accidentally infected laboratory worker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, Tim; Quakkelaar, Esther; van Nuenen, Ad; Pantophlet, Ralph; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2004-01-01

    We previously described the adaptation of the neutralization-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB to a neutralization-resistant phenotype in an accidentally infected laboratory worker. During long-term propagation of this resistant isolate, designated FF3346, on primary

  1. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  2. The block of adipocyte differentiation by a C-terminally truncated, but not by full-length, simian virus 40 large tumor antigen is dependent on an intact retinoblastoma susceptibility protein family binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, C; Chatterjee, S.; Cherington, V

    1996-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) can promote cell transformation and suppress differentiation. It does this partly by targeting tumor suppressors such as p53 and members of the retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (Rb) family. This work concentrates on mechanisms by which SV40 large tumor antigen (SVLT) suppresses adipocyte differentiation. We created cell lines derived from murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes expressing different versions of SV40 early-region sequences. SVLT-expressing cells failed to exhibi...

  3. The zebrafish galectins Drgal1-L2 and Drgal3-L1 bind in vitro to the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein and reduce viral adhesion to fish epithelial cells

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nita-Lazar, M.; Mancini, J.; Feng, C.; Gonzalez-Montalban, N.; Ravindran, C.; Jackson, S.; Heras-Sanchez, A.D.L.; Giomarelli, B.; Ahmed, H.; Haslam, S.M.; Wu, G.; Dell, A.; Ammayappan, A.; Vakharia, V.N.; Vasta, G.R.

    -6611. Rabinovich, G. A. and M. A. Toscano (2009). "Turning 'sweet' on immunity: galectin-glycan interactions in immune tolerance and inflammation." Nat Rev Immunol 9(5): 338-352. Sato, S. and R. C. Hughes. (1992). "Binding specificity of a baby hamster kidney...

  4. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus major envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakonyi, Gerda; Klein, Michael G; Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Ma, Runlin Z; Asokan, Rengasamy; Holers, V Michael; Chen, Xiaojiang S

    2006-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of B cells is associated with lymphoma and other human cancers. EBV infection is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (gp350) to the cell surface receptor CR2. We determined the X-ray structure of the highly glycosylated gp350 and defined the CR2 binding site on gp350. Polyglycans shield all but one surface of the gp350 polypeptide, and we demonstrate that this glycan-free surface is the receptor-binding site. Deglycosylated gp350 bound CR2 similarly to the glycosylated form, suggesting that glycosylation is not important for receptor binding. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the glycan-free surface disrupted receptor binding as well as binding by a gp350 monoclonal antibody, a known inhibitor of virus-receptor interactions. These results provide structural information for developing drugs and vaccines to prevent infection by EBV and related viruses.

  5. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  6. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  7. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  8. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  9. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. High Levels of Antibody that Neutralize B-cell Infection of Epstein-Barr Virus and that Bind EBV gp350 Are Associated with a Lower Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, Anna E; Bu, Wei; Nguyen, Hanh; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Yu, Kelly J; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hildesheim, Allan; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2016-07-15

    Elevated IgA antibodies indicative of ongoing exposure to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are high-risk biomarkers for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), an EBV-related epithelial tumor. However, protective biomarkers that limit exposure to the virus have not been defined. We evaluated whether antibodies that can neutralize EBV infection by targeting glycoproteins involved in viral cell entry, including EBV vaccine candidate glycoprotein 350 (gp350), were associated with lower NPC risk. In a prospective cohort of 2,557 individuals from 358 high-risk NPC multiplex families in Taiwan, we identified 21 incident NPC cases and 50 disease-free controls. To complement data from high-risk families, we further identified 30 prevalent NPC cases and 50 healthy controls from the general Taiwanese population. We quantified EBV-neutralizing antibody, antibodies against EBV glycoproteins involved in B-cell and epithelial cell entry, and anti-EBNA1 IgA, a high-risk NPC biomarker. EBV-neutralizing antibodies blocking B-cell infection and anti-gp350 antibodies were present at significantly higher levels in disease-free controls compared with incident NPC cases (P gp350 antibody were low-risk biomarkers for NPC. These data suggest that a vaccine that induces potent EBV gp350 and B-cell-neutralizing antibodies could reduce the risk of EBV-related cancers such as NPC. Clin Cancer Res; 22(14); 3451-7. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Some novel insights into the binding of oseltamivir and zanamivir to H5N1 and N9 influenza virus neuraminidases:a homology modeling and flexible docking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA L. MIHAJLOVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the recent pandemic threat by the worldwide spread of H5N1 avian influenza, novel insights into the mechanism of ligand binding and interaction between various inhibitors (zanamivir – ZMV, oseltamivir – OTV, 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid – DANA, peramivir – PMV and neuraminidases (NA are of vital importance for the structure-based design of new anti-viral drugs. To address this issue, three-dimensional models of H5N1-NA and N9-NA were generated by homology modeling. Traditional residues within the active site throughout the family of NA protein structures were found to be highly conserved in H5N1-NA. A subtle variation between lipophilic and hydrophilic environments in H5N1-NA with respect to N9-NA was observed, thus shedding more light on the high resistance of some H5N1 strains to various NA inhibitors. Based on these models, an ArgusLab4/AScore flexible docking study was performed. The conformational differences between OTV bound to H5N1-NA and OTV bound to N9-NA were structurally identified and quantified. A slight difference of less than 1 kcal mol-1 between the OTV-N9 and OTV-N1 binding free energies is in agreement with the experimentally predicted free energy difference. The conformational differences between ZMV and OTV bound to either H5N1-NA or N9-NA were structurally identified. The binding free energies of the ZMV complexes, being slightly higher than those of OTV, are not in agreement with what was previously proposed using homology modeling. The differences between ZMV and OTV are suggested to be ascribed to the presence/absence of Asn166 in the active cavity of ZMV/OTV in H5N1-NA, and to the presence/absence of Ser165 in the binding site of ZMV/OTV in N9-NA. The charge distribution was evaluated using the semi-empirical AM1 method. The trends of the AM1 charges of the ZMV and OTV side chains in the complexes deviate from those previously reported.

  12. Thermal Inactivation of Enteric Viruses and Bioaccumulation of Enteric Foodborne Viruses in Live Oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araud, Elbashir; DiCaprio, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Lou, Fangfei; Gao, Yu; Kingsley, David; Hughes, John H; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-29

    Human enteric viruses are among the main causative agents of shellfish-associated outbreaks. In this study, the kinetics of viral bioaccumulation in live oysters and the heat stabilities of the predominant enteric viruses were determined both in tissue culture and in oyster tissues. A human norovirus (HuNoV) GII.4 strain, HuNoV surrogates (murine norovirus [MNV-1], Tulane virus [TV]), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and human rotavirus (RV) bioaccumulated to high titers within oyster tissues, with different patterns of bioaccumulation for the different viruses. We tested the thermal stability of each virus at 62, 72, and 80°C in culture medium. The viruses can be ranked from the most heat resistant to the least stable as follows: HAV, RV, TV, MNV-1. In addition, we found that oyster tissues provided protection to the viruses during heat treatment. To decipher the mechanism underlying viral inactivation by heat, purified TV was treated at 80°C for increasing time intervals. It was found that the integrity of the viral capsid was disrupted, whereas viral genomic RNA remained intact. Interestingly, heat treatment leading to complete loss of TV infectivity was not sufficient to completely disrupt the receptor binding activity of TV, as determined by the porcine gastric mucin-magnetic bead binding assay. Similarly, HuNoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and a HuNoV GII.4 strain retained some receptor binding ability following heat treatment. Although foodborne viruses have variable heat stability, 80°C for >6 min was sufficient to completely inactivate enteric viruses in oysters, with the exception of HAV. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  14. Serum amyloid P component inhibits influenza A virus infections: in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, A; Andersen, I; Junker, K

    2001-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds in vitro Ca(2+)-dependently to several ligands including oligosaccharides with terminal mannose and galactose. We have earlier reported that SAP binds to human influenza A virus strains, inhibiting hemagglutinin (HA) activity and virus infectivity in vitro. T...

  15. Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Matthew H; McGowan, Eileen; Jadi, Ramesh; Young, Ellen; Lopez, Cesar A; Baric, Ralph S; Lazear, Helen M; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-05-01

    Cross-reactive antibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) infection might affect Zika virus infection and confound serologic tests. Recent data demonstrate neutralization of Zika virus by monoclonal antibodies or human serum collected early after DENV infection. Whether this finding is true in late DENV convalescence (>6 months after infection) is unknown. We studied late convalescent serum samples from persons with prior DENV or Zika virus exposure. Despite extensive cross-reactivity in IgG binding, Zika virus neutralization was not observed among primary DENV infections. We observed low-frequency (23%) Zika virus cross-neutralization in repeat DENV infections. DENV-immune persons who had Zika virus as a secondary infection had distinct populations of antibodies that neutralized DENVs and Zika virus, as shown by DENV-reactive antibody depletion experiments. These data suggest that most DENV infections do not induce durable, high-level Zika virus cross-neutralizing antibodies. Zika virus-specific antibody populations develop after Zika virus infection irrespective of prior DENV immunity.

  16. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  17. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  18. Localization of the nonstructural protein NS1 in bluetongue virus-infected cells and its presence in virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B T; Hyatt, A D; White, J R

    1988-04-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies to the nonstructural protein NS1 of an Australian isolate of bluetongue virus (BTV) have been used in immunofluoresence and immunogold procedures to locate NS1 in virus-infected cells and cytoskeletons. The antibodies fall into three groups indicating that NS1 contains at least three antigenic sites. One group consists of four antibodies which react solely with cytoskeleton-associated virus-specific tubules. A second group contains one antibody which reacts with cytoskeleton-associated virus particles, released viruses, and purified virus and core particles. Two antibodies constituting a third group react with both tubules and cytoskeleton-associated and released virus particles. NS1 was found in [35S]methionine-labeled, purified virus and core particles. Immunofluorescence tests reveal that those antibodies which react with virus particles also bind to cytoskeleton-associated virus inclusion bodies (VIB). The nature of this association was examined by probing cytoskeletons of BTV-infected cells with antibodies to NS1 and protein A-gold. VIB observed in thin sections were not uniformly labeled. Gold was associated with fibrillar arrays found around virus particles either leaving or in close proximity to the VIB. Fibrillar material was not found in association with all virus particles elsewhere in the cell and this suggests that fibril-virus complexes may be intermediate in virus morphogenesis.

  19. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinath, Narayanasamy; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Young

    Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells, is an emerging field in cancer therapy. Some OVs exhibit a specific tropism for cancer cells, whereas others require genetic modification to enhance their binding with and entry into cancer cells. OVs both kill tumor cells and induce the host's immune response against tumor cells. Armed with antitumor cellular molecules, antibodies, and/or in combination with anticancer drugs, OVs can accelerate the lysis of cancer cells. Among the OVs, vaccinia virus has been the focus of preclinical and clinical research because of its many favorable properties. In this review, the basic mechanisms of action of OVs are presented, including their entry, survival, tumor lysis, and immune activation, and the latest research in vaccinia virus-based virotherapy and its status as an anticancer nanomedicine in prospective clinical trials are discussed.

  20. A new class of synthetic peptide inhibitors blocks attachment and entry of human pathogenic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepstakies, Marcel; Lucifora, Julie; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Holstermann, Barbara; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Kowalski, Ina; Gutsmann, Thomas; Baumert, Thomas F; Brandenburg, Klaus; Hauber, Joachim; Protzer, Ulrike

    2012-06-01

    Many enveloped viruses, including herpes viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are among the most important human pathogens and are often responsible for coinfections involving ≥2 types of viruses. However, therapies that are effective against multiple virus classes are rare. Here we present a new class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides (SALPs) that bind to heparan sulfate moieties on the cell surface and inhibit infection with a variety of enveloped viruses. We demonstrate that SALPs inhibit entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, HBV, and HCV to their respective host cells. Despite their high antiviral efficiency, SALPs were well tolerated, and neither toxicity nor measurable inhibitor-induced adverse effects were observed. Since these broad-spectrum antiviral peptides target a host cell rather than a viral component, they may also be useful for suppression of viruses that are resistant to antiviral drugs.

  1. The cellular receptors for infectious bursal disease virus | Zhu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Virus receptors are simplistically defined as cell surface molecules that mediate binding (attachment, adsorption) and/or trigger membrane fusion or entry through other processes. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) entry into host cells occurs by recognition of specific cellular receptor(s) with viral envelope glycoprotein, ...

  2. Extraterrestrial Viruses?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado Hernández, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Life - Origin and Fundamentals of Living Things. Evaluation rubric to evaluate the debate and presentation about the point of view regarding the possibility of viruses from the outer space.

  3. Zika Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especi...

  4. Mediaeval manuscript bindings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedert Vodopivec

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article represents an excerpt from the final chapters of the research study titled "The development of structures in mediaeval manuscript bindings - interdependence with conservatory methods". In it, aims, methods of work, archive and library materials used and directions for conservatory methods are presented. Besides, the research study includes also a historcial overview of book bindings, detailed analysis of separate structural elements in Slovenian mediaeval bindings, comprehensive presentation of separate structures, the techniques of binding and materials of the preserved mediaeval bindings in Slovenian public archives and libraries, terminological dictionary of specific professional terms related to binding as a segment of a book, and a catalogue of all analysed bindings, containing a survey of ajI detectable data, sketches,graphite prints and photographs.

  5. Virus inhibition induced by polyvalent nanoparticles of different sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Sieben, Christian; Wolff, Christopher; Ludwig, Kai; Böttcher, Christoph; Herrmann, Andreas; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the first step in the viral infection cycle. By gradually increasing the size of ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles, up to virus-like dimensions, we are now able to quantify the polyvalent enhancement of virus-cell binding inhibition and to identify varying mechanisms of virus inhibition with different efficacies: by employing a new binding assay we found that surface area-normalized polysulfated gold nanoparticles of diameters equal to and larger than the virus diameter (>50 nm) more efficiently inhibit the binding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to cells than smaller particles. On a per particle basis, larger sized gold nanoparticles were surprisingly shown to inhibit the viral infection up to two orders of magnitude more efficiently than smaller particles, which suggests different mechanisms of virus inhibition. Based on complementary electron microscopic data, we noticed that larger gold nanoparticles act as efficient cross-linkers between virions, whereas smaller gold nanoparticles decorate the surface of individual virus particles. Our systematic study accentuates the need for the design of biodegradable, virus-sized inhibitors capitalizing on polyvalent binding.The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the

  6. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  7. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle disease virus ( ...

  8. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  9. Molecular Characterization of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Budding▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttge, Benjamin G.; Shehu-Xhilaga, Miranda; Demirov, Dimiter G.; Adamson, Catherine S.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Stephen, Andrew G.; Fisher, Robert J.; Freed, Eric O.

    2008-01-01

    Infection of domestic cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important model system for studying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection due to numerous similarities in pathogenesis induced by these two lentiviruses. However, many molecular aspects of FIV replication remain poorly understood. It is well established that retroviruses use short peptide motifs in Gag, known as late domains, to usurp cellular endosomal sorting machinery and promote virus release from infected cells. For example, the Pro-Thr/Ser-Ala-Pro [P(T/S)AP] motif of HIV-1 Gag interacts directly with Tsg101, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport I (ESCRT-I). A Tyr-Pro-Asp-Leu (YPDL) motif in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), and a related sequence in HIV-1, bind the endosomal sorting factor Alix. In this study we sought to identify and characterize FIV late domain(s) and elucidate cellular machinery involved in FIV release. We determined that mutagenesis of a PSAP motif in FIV Gag, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Tsg101 expression, and overexpression of a P(T/S)AP-binding fragment of Tsg101 (TSG-5′) each inhibited FIV release. We also observed direct binding of FIV Gag peptides to Tsg101. In contrast, mutagenesis of a potential Alix-binding motif in FIV Gag did not affect FIV release. Similarly, expression of the HIV-1/EIAV Gag-binding domain of Alix (Alix-V) did not disrupt FIV budding, and FIV Gag peptides showed no affinity for Alix-V. Our data demonstrate that FIV relies predominantly on a Tsg101-binding PSAP motif in the C terminus of Gag to promote virus release in HeLa cells, and this budding mechanism is highly conserved in feline cells. PMID:18094166

  10. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of the Translation Initiation Apparatus in Trypanosomatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zinoviev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are ancient eukaryotic parasites that migrate between insect vectors and mammalian hosts, causing a range of diseases in humans and domestic animals. Trypanosomatids feature a multitude of unusual molecular features, including polycistronic transcription and subsequent processing by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. Regulation of protein coding genes is posttranscriptional and thus, translation regulation is fundamental for activating the developmental program of gene expression. The spliced-leader RNA is attached to all mRNAs. It contains an unusual hypermethylated cap-4 structure in its 5 end. The cap-binding complex, eIF4F, has gone through evolutionary changes in accordance with the requirement to bind cap-4. The eIF4F components in trypanosomatids are highly diverged from their orthologs in higher eukaryotes, and their potential functions are discussed. The cap-binding activity in all eukaryotes is a target for regulation and plays a similar role in trypanosomatids. Recent studies revealed a novel eIF4E-interacting protein, involved in directing stage-specific and stress-induced translation pathways. Translation regulation during stress also follows unusual regulatory cues, as the increased translation of Hsp83 following heat stress is driven by a defined element in the 3 UTR, unlike higher eukaryotes. Overall, the environmental switches experienced by trypanosomatids during their life cycle seem to affect their translational machinery in unique ways.

  11. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  12. Isolation of a Novel Swine Influenza Virus from Oklahoma in 2011 Which Is Distantly Related to Human Influenza C Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M.; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D.; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution. PMID:23408893

  13. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  14. Viruses Avian influenza, bovine herpes, bovine viral diarrhea virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus I, influenza, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, measles, papilloma, rabies, respiratory syncitial virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, simian virus 40. Bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Moraxella bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, ...

  15. Computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, F.B.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protection mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.

  16. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  17. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  18. The immunomodulatory gene products of myxoma virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    vity regulates innate immunity. Moreover, TNF-α is in- volved in the regulation of cell differentiation, prolifera- tion and apoptosis. Rabbit RL-5 T lymphocyte cells in- fected with an M-T2 knock-out myxoma virus undergo apoptosis, resulting in an aborted infection (Macen et al. 1996). These results suggest that the binding of ...

  19. Computational identification of mutually homologous Zika virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with a variety of neuropathologies, including microcephaly. We hypothesize that ZIKV genes activate host microRNAs (miRNAs) causing dysfunctional development of human fetal brains. Objectives/methods A bioinformatics search for miRNA genome-wide binding sites in ...

  20. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α plays roles in Epstein-Barr virus's natural life cycle and tumorigenesis by inducing lytic infection through direct binding to the immediate-early BZLF1 gene promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Kraus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When confronted with poor oxygenation, cells adapt by activating survival signaling pathways, including the oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulators called hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-αs. We report here that HIF-1α also regulates the life cycle of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Incubation of EBV-positive gastric carcinoma AGS-Akata and SNU-719 and Burkitt lymphoma Sal and KemIII cell lines with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, L-mimosine or deferoxamine, or the NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 promoted rapid and sustained accumulation of both HIF-1α and lytic EBV antigens. ShRNA knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduced deferoxamine-mediated lytic reactivation. HIF-1α directly bound the promoter of the EBV primary latent-lytic switch BZLF1 gene, Zp, activating transcription via a consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE located at nt -83 through -76 relative to the transcription initiation site. HIF-1α did not activate transcription from the other EBV immediate-early gene, BRLF1. Importantly, expression of HIF-1α induced EBV lytic-gene expression in cells harboring wild-type EBV, but not in cells infected with variants containing base-pair substitution mutations within this HRE. Human oral keratinocyte (NOK and gingival epithelial (hGET cells induced to differentiate by incubation with either methyl cellulose or growth in organotypic culture accumulated both HIF-1α and Blimp-1α, another cellular factor implicated in lytic reactivation. HIF-1α activity also accumulated along with Blimp-1α during B-cell differentiation into plasma cells. Furthermore, most BZLF1-expressing cells observed in lymphomas induced by EBV in NSG mice with a humanized immune system were located distal to blood vessels in hypoxic regions of the tumors. Thus, we conclude that HIF-1α plays central roles in both EBV's natural life cycle and EBV-associated tumorigenesis. We propose that drugs that induce HIF-1α protein accumulation are good candidates for

  2. Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1976-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, which produced 20 per cent mortality when it first occured during 1967 in Germany and Yugoslavia, recently appeared again in South Africa. The source of the first outbreak was monkeys shipped from Africa; the origin of the second episode is unclear. Because distribution of the virus in nature is unknown, its threat to man cannot be readily determined. Differential laboratory diagnoses of hemorrhagic fevers should be encouraged in order to learn more about the epidemiology of these diseases and to better assess the risks which their etiologic agents may pose for attending medical personnel.

  3. Lectin switching during dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Webb, Andrew I; Chan, Vera; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Davidson, Andrew; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin

    2011-06-15

    Dengue virus receptors are relatively poorly characterized, but there has been recent interest in 2 C-type lectin molecules, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and its close homologue liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3-grabbing integrin (L-SIGN), which can both bind dengue and promote infection. In this report we have studied the interaction of dengue viruses produced in insect cells, tumor cell lines, and primary human dendritic cells (DCs) with DC-SIGN and L-SIGN. Virus produced in primary DCs is unable to interact with DC-SIGN but remains infectious for L-SIGN-expressing cells. Skin-resident DCs may thus be a site of initial infection by insect-produced virus, but DCs will likely not participate in large-scale virus replication during dengue infection. These results reveal that differential glycosylation of dengue virus envelope protein is highly dependent on cell state and suggest that studies of virus tropism using virus prepared in insect cells or tumor cell lines should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  5. THE USE OF DEDICATED PEPTIDE LIBRARIES PERMITS THE DISCOVERY OF HIGH-AFFINITY BINDING PEPTIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEKOSTER, HS; AMONS, R; BENCKHUIJSEN, WE; FEIJLBRIEF, M; SCHELLEKENS, GA; DRIJFHOUT, JW

    1995-01-01

    The motif for peptide binding to monoclonal antibody mAb A16, which is known to be directed against glycoprotein D of Herpes simplex virus type 1, was determined using two dedicated peptide libraries. As a starting point for this study we used an A-16 binding lead sequence, which had previously been

  6. Crystallography, evolution, and the structure of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-03-16

    My undergraduate education in mathematics and physics was a good grounding for graduate studies in crystallographic studies of small organic molecules. As a postdoctoral fellow in Minnesota, I learned how to program an early electronic computer for crystallographic calculations. I then joined Max Perutz, excited to use my skills in the determination of the first protein structures. The results were even more fascinating than the development of techniques and provided inspiration for starting my own laboratory at Purdue University. My first studies on dehydrogenases established the conservation of nucleotide-binding structures. Having thus established myself as an independent scientist, I could start on my most cherished ambition of studying the structure of viruses. About a decade later, my laboratory had produced the structure of a small RNA plant virus and then, in another six years, the first structure of a human common cold virus. Many more virus structures followed, but soon it became essential to supplement crystallography with electron microscopy to investigate viral assembly, viral infection of cells, and neutralization of viruses by antibodies. A major guide in all these studies was the discovery of evolution at the molecular level. The conservation of three-dimensional structure has been a recurring theme, from my experiences with Max Perutz in the study of hemoglobin to the recognition of the conserved nucleotide-binding fold and to the recognition of the jelly roll fold in the capsid protein of a large variety of viruses.

  7. Identification and characterization of novel adeno-associated virus isolates in ATCC virus stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Grot, Emmanuelle; Cervenka, Peter; Wainer, Sandra; Buck, Charles; Chiorini, John A

    2006-05-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) depend on a helper virus for efficient replication. To identify novel AAV isolates, we screened a diverse set of virus isolates for the presence of AAV DNA. AAVs found in 10 simian adenovirus isolates showed greater than 96% homology to AAV1 and AAV6 but had distinct biological properties. Two representatives of this group, AAV(VR-195) and AAV(VR-355), were studied in more detail. While the novel AAVs had high sequence homologies and required sialic acid for cell binding and transduction, differences were observed in lectin competition, resulting in distinct tropisms in human cancer cell lines.

  8. Production of Alexa Fluor 488-labeled reovirus and characterization of target cell binding, competence, and immunogenicity of labeled virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecek, Ronald J; Busch, Ryan; Lin, Hong; Pal, Kasturi; Cunningham, Cynthia A; Cuff, Christopher F

    2006-07-31

    Respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus) has been used to study many aspects of the biology and genetics of viruses, viral infection, pathogenesis, and the immune response to virus infection. This report describes the functional activity of virus labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, a stable fluorescent dye. Matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight analysis indicated that Alexa Fluor 488 labeled the outer capsid proteins of reovirus. Labeled virus bound to murine L929 fibroblasts as determined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the specificity of binding were demonstrated by competitive inhibition with non-labeled virus. Labeled reovirus induced apoptosis and cytopathic effect in infected L929 cells. Mice infected with labeled virus mounted robust serum antibody and CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating that labeled virus retained immunogenicity in vivo. These results indicate that Alexa Fluor 488-labeled virus provides a powerful new tool to analyze reovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

  9. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  10. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  11. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  12. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  13. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  14. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  15. Hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF protein of influenza C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Influenza C virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, causes flu-like disease but typically only with mild symptoms. Humans are the main reservoir of the virus, but it also infects pigs and dogs. Very recently, influenza C-like viruses were isolated from pigs and cattle that differ from classical influenza C virus and might constitute a new influenza virus genus. Influenza C virus is unique since it contains only one spike protein, the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein HEF that possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying and membrane fusion activities, thus combining the functions of Hemagglutinin (HA and Neuraminidase (NA of influenza A and B viruses. Here we briefly review the epidemiology and pathology of the virus and the morphology of virus particles and their genome. The main focus is on the structure of the HEF protein as well as on its co- and post-translational modification, such as N-glycosylation, disulfide bond formation, S-acylation and proteolytic cleavage into HEF1 and HEF2 subunits. Finally, we describe the functions of HEF: receptor binding, esterase activity and membrane fusion.

  16. Aptamer-facilitated Protection of Oncolytic Virus from Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharemagic, Darija; Zamay, Anna; Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M; Evgin, Laura; Savitskaya, Anna; Bell, John C; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2014-06-03

    Oncolytic viruses promise to significantly improve current cancer treatments through their tumor-selective replication and multimodal attack against cancer cells. However, one of the biggest setbacks for oncolytic virus therapy is the intravenous delivery of the virus, as it can be cleared from the bloodstream by neutralizing antibodies before it reaches the tumor cells. We have selected DNA aptamers against an oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, using a competitive binding approach, as well as against the antigen binding fragment (Fab) of antivesicular stomatitis virus polyclonal antibodies, in order to shield the virus from nAbs and enhance its in vivo survival. We used flow cytometry to identify these aptamers and evaluated their efficiency to shield vesicular stomatitis virus in a cell-based plaque forming assay. These oligonucleotides were then modified to obtain multivalent binders, which led to a decrease of viral aggregation, an increase in its infectivity and an increase in its stability in serum. The aptamers were also incubated in nondiluted serum, showing their effectiveness under conditions mimicking those in vivo. With this approach, we were able to increase viral infectivity by more than 70% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, this method has the potential to enhance the delivery of vesicular stomatitis virus through the bloodstream without compromising the patient's immune system.

  17. Mengenal Hanta Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijayanti, Tri

    2009-01-01

    Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).

  18. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  19. Molecular Mechanism for LAMP1 Recognition by Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Cohen, Nadav; Israeli, Hadar; Diskin, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Lassa virus is a notorious human pathogen that infects many thousands of people each year in West Africa, causing severe viral hemorrhagic fevers and significant mortality. The surface glycoprotein of Lassa virus mediates receptor recognition through its GP1 subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of GP1 from Lassa virus, which is the first representative GP1 structure for Old World arenaviruses. We identify a unique triad of histidines that forms a binding site for LAMP1, a known lysosomal protein recently discovered to be a critical receptor for internalized Lassa virus at acidic pH. We demonstrate that mutation of this histidine triad, which is highly conserved among Old World arenaviruses, impairs LAMP1 recognition. Our biochemical and structural data further suggest that GP1 from Lassa virus may undergo irreversible conformational changes that could serve as an immunological decoy mechanism. Together with a variable region that we identify on the surface of GP1, those could be two distinct mechanisms that Lassa virus utilizes to avoid antibody-based immune response. Structural data at atomic resolution for viral proteins is key for understanding their function at the molecular level and can facilitate novel avenues for combating viral infections. Here we used X-ray protein crystallography to decipher the crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain (GP1) from Lassa virus. This is a pathogenic virus that causes significant illness and mortality in West Africa. This structure reveals the overall architecture of GP1 domains from the group of viruses known as the Old World arenaviruses. Using this structural information, we elucidated the mechanisms for pH switch and binding of Lassa virus to LAMP1, a recently identified host receptor that is critical for successful infection. Lastly, our structural analysis suggests two novel immune evasion mechanisms that Lassa virus may utilize to escape antibody-based immune response. Copyright © 2015, American

  20. HCVpro: hepatitis C virus protein interaction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwofie, Samuel K; Schaefer, Ulf; Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava S; Bajic, Vladimir B; Christoffels, Alan

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  3. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  4. Human norovirus binding to select bacteria representative of the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand, Erin A; Moore, Matthew D; Outlaw, Janie; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports describe the ability of select bacterial strains to bind human norovirus, although the specificity of such interactions is unknown. The purpose of this work was to determine if a select group of bacterial species representative of human gut microbiota bind to human norovirus, and if so, to characterize the intensity and location of that binding. The bacteria screened included naturally occurring strains isolated from human stool (Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., Bacillus spp., Enterococcus faecium and Hafnia alvei) and select reference strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae). Binding in PBS was evaluated to three human norovirus strains (GII.4 New Orleans 2009 and Sydney 2012, GI.6) and two surrogate viruses (Tulane virus and Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV)) using a suspension assay format linked to RT-qPCR for quantification. The impact of different overnight culture media prior to washing on binding efficiency in PBS was also evaluated, and binding was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. All bacteria tested bound the representative human norovirus strains with high efficiency (90% binding efficiency) (p>0.05); there was selective binding for Tulane virus and no binding observed for TCV. Binding efficiency was highest when bacteria were cultured in minimal media (90% bound), but notably decreased when cultured in enriched media (1-3 log10 unbound or 0.01 -norovirus-bacteria binding occurred around the outer cell surfaces and pili structures, without apparent localization. The findings reported here further elucidate and inform the dynamics between human noroviruses and enteric bacteria with implications for norovirus pathogenesis.

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  8. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  9. Virus Ebola Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuryadi, Suharyono

    1996-01-01

    Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  11. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  12. Monitoring Physiological Changes in Haloarchaeal Cell during Virus Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Svirskaitė

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The slow rate of adsorption and non-synchronous release of some archaeal viruses have hindered more thorough analyses of the mechanisms of archaeal virus release. To address this deficit, we utilized four viruses that infect Haloarcula hispanica that represent the four virion morphotypes currently known for halophilic euryarchaeal viruses: (1 icosahedral internal membrane-containing SH1; (2 icosahedral tailed HHTV-1; (3 spindle-shaped His1; and (4 pleomorphic His2. To discern the events occurring as the progeny viruses exit, we monitored culture turbidity, as well as viable cell and progeny virus counts of infected and uninfected cultures. In addition to these traditional metrics, we measured three parameters associated with membrane integrity: the binding of the lipophilic anion phenyldicarbaundecaborane, oxygen consumption, and both intra- and extra-cellular ATP levels.

  13. Genetic analysis of the function of the plum pox virus CI RNA helicase in virus movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Osaba, Lourdes; López, Lissett; García, Juan Antonio

    2006-03-01

    The CI protein forms the cylindrical inclusions typical of potyviral infections and is involved in genome replication and virus movement. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of a series of point mutations at the N-terminal region of the CI protein of Plum pox virus (PPV) on the enzymatic activities and the self-interaction ability of the protein, and on virus replication and movement. DD3,4AA mutation, which had no apparent effects on ATPase and RNA helicase activities in vitro, and on virus replication in protoplasts, drastically impaired cell-to-cell spread of the virus. The effect of KK101,102AA mutation was host-specific. While no signals of virus infection were detected in Chenopodium foetidum inoculated with PPV KK101,102AA, the mutation caused a moderate effect on short distance movement in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. clevelandii, which resulted in a more drastic disturbance of systemic spread. None of the mutations analyzed abolished PPV CI self-interaction in the yeast Two-Hybrid system, but they caused a notable reduction in the binding strength, which appears to positively correlate with their effect on virus movement, suggesting that CI-CI interactions required for RNA replication and virus movement could be rather different.

  14. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  15. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  16. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  17. Virions at the gates: receptors and the host-virus arms race.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Coffin

    Full Text Available All viruses need to bind to specific receptor molecules on the surface of target cells to initiate infection. Virus-receptor binding is highly specific, and this specificity determines both the species and the cell type that can be infected by a given virus. In some well-studied cases, the virus-binding region on the receptor has been found to be unrelated to the receptor's normal cellular function. Resistance to virus infection can thus evolve by selection of mutations that alter amino acids in the binding region with minimal effect on normal function. This sort of positive selection can be used to infer the history of the host-virus "arms race" during their coevolution. In a new study, Demogines et al. use a combination of phylogenetic, structural, and virological analysis to infer the history and significance of positive selection on the transferrin receptor TfR1, a housekeeping protein required for iron uptake and the cell surface receptor for at least three different types of virus. The authors show that only two parts of the rodent TfR1 molecule have been subject to positive selection and that these correspond to the binding sites for two of these viruses-the mouse mammary tumor virus (a retrovirus and Machupo virus (an arenavirus. They confirmed this result by introducing the inferred binding site mutations into the wild-type protein and testing for receptor function. Related arenaviruses are beginning to spread in human populations in South America as the cause of often fatal hemorrhagic fevers, and, although Demogines et al. could find no evidence of TfR1 mutations in this region that might have been selected as a consequence of human infection, the authors identified one such mutation in Asian populations that affects infection with these viruses.

  18. Folding upon phosphorylation: translational regulation by a disorder-to-order transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metskas, Lauren Ann; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) play an important role in the regulation of translation by binding to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and inhibiting assembly of the eIF4F complex. While phosphorylation of 4E-BPs is known to disrupt their binding to eIF4E, the mechanism by which this occurs has been unclear. In a recent study, Forman-Kay and coworkers demonstrate that this mechanism is primarily structure-based: phosphorylation of 4E-BPs results in a disorder-to-order transition, bringing them from their binding-competent disordered state to a folded state incompatible with eIF4E binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages as targets of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus: Role of Siglecs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, María; Fernández-Caballero, Teresa; Prieto, Cinta; Álvarez, Belén; Martínez-Lobo, Javier; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José María; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Ángel; Domínguez, Javier; Revilla, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    CD169 and CD163 have been involved in the process of PRRS virus attachment and infection in macrophages, although recent studies have challenged the requirement for CD169. In addition to CD169, macrophages express other siglecs, whose role in PRRS virus infection is so far unknown. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages express Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 but almost undetectable levels of CD169. Hence, we considered this cell population appropriate for analysing the role of these siglecs in the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages. PRRS virus replicated efficiently in these macrophages, yielding even higher titres than in alveolar macrophages. Besides, a recombinant protein consisting in the ectodomain of porcine Siglec-3 fused to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 (Siglec3-Fc) was able to bind PRRS virus, while binding to Siglec-5-Fc was inconsistent. Antibodies to CD169 but not to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 blocked the binding and infection of PRRS virus on alveolar macrophages. Unexpectedly, our antibody to CD169 also blocked the binding of PRRS virus to splenic CD163(+) macrophages, whereas antibodies to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 had no effect. These results show that very low levels of CD169 expression are enough to support the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages, whereas Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 do not seem to contribute to the virus entry in these cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by adlay tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Emiko; Iwai, Miwa; Koketsu, Ritsuko; Sogabe, Riho; Morimoto, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Yuri; Ohta, Yoichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ohshima, Atsushi; Enomoto, Toshiki; Isegawa, Yuji

    2017-09-13

    The present study was conducted aiming to examine the antiviral activity of adlay tea and its components against influenza viruses. We further aimed to clarify the mechanism by which these components regulate virus replication. Adlay tea at a concentration suitable for drinking inhibited the multiplication of influenza viruses. Moreover, our results suggest that individual components of the tea had antiviral activities against the influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. Adlay tea inhibited multiplication of the H1N1, H3N2 and B types of influenza virus, including oseltamivir-resistant viruses. In addition, adlay tea inhibited influenza infection during the periods of virus adsorption to the cell and virus replication. Adlay tea did not suppress hemagglutination inhibition or cell fusion, although it slightly inhibited virus binding to Malin Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the antiviral compounds included in adlay tea were ingredients other than polyphenols and that there were several types of effective compounds in adlay tea inhibiting several steps of viral replication. The results of the present study demonstrate that adlay tea had antiviral effects against influenza viruses. Our findings with respect to adlay tea suggest that the polyphenols might have a small influence on its antiviral activity and that other ingredients might have more influence. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Saccharide binding by intelectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shailza; Ramya, T N C

    2017-11-04

    This communication probes ligand binding by human Intelectin-1 with several saccharides. Human Intelectin-1 was previously reported to bind to microbial glycans via ribofuranoside or galactofuranoside residues, whereas subsequently, a crystal structure of ligand bound hITLN1 indicated that hITLN1 does not bind to ribofuranoside but distinguishes between microbial and human glycans through a glycan motif - a terminal, acyclic 1,2-diol, which is present on galactofuranose and other microbial saccharides. Here, we demonstrate that besides glycerol and glycerol derivatives (which have an acyclic 1,2-diol), and 2-deoxy-d-galactose, d-ribose and 2-deoxy-d-ribose, which have been previously reported as human Intelectin-1 ligands, 2-C-hydroxymethyl-d-ribose, d-talose, d-idose, d-altrose and sorbitol also elute human Intelectin-1 from Sepharose CL-6B. Interestingly, Sepharose, 2-deoxy-d-galactose (in its pyranose form), 2-C-hydroxymethyl-d-ribose, d-ribose and 2-deoxy d-ribose lack a terminal, acyclic 1,2-diol. We discuss the implications of these observations and rationalize the discrepancies in the apparent affinity of saccharide ligands for hITLN1 with different assay formats. We also report the distinct saccharide binding profiles of the hITLN1 homologues, HaloITLN and XL35ITLN, and demonstrate that hITLN1 binding to a saccharide ligand may modulate binding to its protein ligand, lactoferrin and vice versa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vitro Evidence Supports Membrane Alanyl Aminopeptidase N as a Receptor for a Plant Virus in the Pea Aphid Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Linz, Lucas B.; LIU, Sijun; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2015-01-01

    Insect-borne plant viruses cause significant agricultural losses and jeopardize sustainable global food production. Although blocking plant virus transmission would allow for crop protection, virus receptors in insect vectors are unknown. Here we identify membrane alanyl aminopeptidase N (APN) as a receptor for pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) coat protein (CP) in the gut of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a far-Western blot method. Pulldown and immunofluorescence binding assays and ...

  3. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  4. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum......Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  5. Fusion of reconstituted influenza virus envelopes with liposomes mediated by streptavidin/biotin interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, P; Leserman, L; Wilschut, J

    1996-01-01

    Reconstituted influenza virus envelopes (virosomes) containing the viral hemagglutinin (HA) represent an efficient fusogenic cellular delivery system, By interaction of HA with its natural receptors, sialylated lipids (gangliosides) or proteins, virosomes bind to cells and, following endocytic

  6. Candidate Medical Countermeasures Targeting Ebola Virus Cell Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    circumventing infection. Recent significant advances in 3 elucidating the mechanism of Ebola virus (EBOV) host-cell penetration include the involvement 4...marburgvirus and Zaire ebolavirus bind a common receptor. The Journal of 403 biological chemistry 281(23), 15951-15958 (2006). 404 16. Lee JE, Fusco...al. Reversion of advanced Ebola virus disease in nonhuman 572 primates with ZMapp. Nature 514(7520), 47-53 (2014). 573 79. Pettitt J, Zeitlin L

  7. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es ... Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West Nile virus? And why is everyone talking about mosquitoes ? Even ...

  8. Viruses infecting maize

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić, Branka; Stanković, Ivana; Bulajić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Over 40 plant viruses has been known to cause diseases of maize, but economically the most important yield looses, which in certain years can be total, are caused by viruses from Potyvirus genera, known to be aphid-transmitted in a non-persistant maner. The most important viruses, pathogens of maize, sugar cane and sorghum are considered to be Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV). In Serbia, the prese...

  9. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  10. Viruses in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, R

    2013-03-01

    Soon after the discovery that viruses cause human disease, started the idea of using viruses to treat cancer. After the initial indiscriminate use, crude preparations of each novel virus in the early twentieth century, a second wave of virotherapy blossomed in the 60s with purified and selected viruses. Responses were rare and short-lived. Immune rejection of the oncolytic viruses was identified as the major problem and virotherapy was abandoned. During the past two decades virotherapy has re-emerged with engineered viruses, with a trend towards using them as tumor-debulking immunostimulatory agents combined with radio or chemotherapy. Currently, oncolytic Reovirus, Herpes, and Vaccinia virus are in late phase clinical trials. Despite the renewed hope, efficacy will require improving systemic tumor targeting, overcoming stroma barriers for virus spread, and selectively stimulating immune responses against tumor antigens but not against the virus. Virotherapy history, viruses, considerations for clinical trials, and hurdles are briefly overviewed.

  11. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanley, Simon W M; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon - Batenburg, Louise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070944172; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847453; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl

  12. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  13. Binding and Bulgarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schürcks-Grozeva, Lilia Lubomirova

    2003-01-01

    In haar proefschrift analyseert Lilia Schürcks de anaforische verschijnselen in de Bulgaarse taal. Het gaat dan om wederkerende aspecten, uitgedrukt bij woorden als ‘zich’ en ‘elkaar’. De situatie in het Bulgaars blijkt moeilijk in te passen in de klassieke Binding Theory van Noam Chomsky. Bron: RUG

  14. MENGENAL HANTA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wijayanti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS.

  15. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  16. Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Juraszek, Jarek; Brandenburg, Boerries; Buyck, Christophe; Schepens, Wim B. G.; Kesteleyn, Bart; Stoops, Bart; Vreeken, Rob J.; Vermond, Jan; Goutier, Wouter; Tang, Chan; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Goudsmit, Jaap; van Dongen, Maria J. P.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2017-09-28

    Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds and their advantageous biological properties should accelerate the development of new small molecule– and peptide-based therapeutics against influenza virus.

  17. Functional analysis of the complex trans-activating response element RNA structure in simian immunodeficiency virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Centlivre, Mireille; Klaver, Bep; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is activated through binding of the viral Tat protein to the trans-activating response (TAR) element at the 5 ' end of the nascent transcript. Whereas HIV type 1 (HIV-1) TAR folds a simple hairpin structure,

  18. Carbohydrate determinants in ferret conjunctiva are affected by infection with influenza H1N1 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Martel, Cyril; Aasted, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates often accomplish as cell-surface receptors for microorganisms and influenza virus preferentially binds to sialic acid through the viral haemagglutinin. The virus may attach not only to the epithelium in the airways, but also to the surface ocular epithelium....

  19. Fusion of Semliki Forest virus with cholesterol-containing liposomes at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilschut, J; Corver, J; Nieva, J L

    1995-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) utilizes a membrane fusion strategy to introduce its genome into the host cell. After binding to cell-surface receptors, virus particles are internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis and directed to the endosomal cell compartment. Subsequently, triggered by the...

  20. Interaction of extremophilic archaeal viruses with human and mouse complement system and viral biodistribution in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Chen, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    is a necessary prerequisite if their potential for biomedical applications to be realized. Here we show complement activation through lectin (via direct binding of MBL/MASPs) and alternative pathways by two extremophilic archaeal viruses (Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 and Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 2...

  1. Involvement of C4 protein of beet severe curly top virus (family Geminiviridae in virus movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunling Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV is a leafhopper transmitted geminivirus with a monopartite genome. C4 proteins encoded by geminivirus play an important role in virus/plant interaction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To understand the function of C4 encoded by BSCTV, two BSCTV mutants were constructed by introducing termination codons in ORF C4 without affecting the amino acids encoded by overlapping ORF Rep. BSCTV mutants containing disrupted ORF C4 retained the ability to replicate in Arabidopsis protoplasts and in the agro-inoculated leaf discs of N. benthamiana, suggesting C4 is not required for virus DNA replication. However, both mutants did not accumulate viral DNA in newly emerged leaves of inoculated N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis, and the inoculated plants were asymptomatic. We also showed that C4 expression in plant could help C4 deficient BSCTV mutants to move systemically. C4 was localized in the cytosol and the nucleus in both Arabidopsis protoplasts and N. benthamiana leaves and the protein appeared to bind viral DNA and ds/ssDNA nonspecifically, displaying novel DNA binding properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that C4 protein in BSCTV is involved in symptom production and may facilitate virus movement instead of virus replication.

  2. Nanobody-mediated resistance to Grapevine fanleaf virus in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Caroline; Djennane, Samia; Ackerer, Léa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Marmonier, Aurélie; Gersch, Sophie; Garcia, Shahinez; Vigne, Emmanuelle; Komar, Véronique; Perrin, Mireille; Gertz, Claude; Belval, Lorène; Berthold, François; Monsion, Baptiste; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Lemaire, Olivier; Lorber, Bernard; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Muyldermans, Serge; Demangeat, Gérard; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2017-08-10

    Since their discovery, single-domain antigen-binding fragments of camelid-derived heavy-chain-only antibodies, also known as nanobodies (Nbs), have proven to be of outstanding interest as therapeutics against human diseases and pathogens including viruses, but their use against phytopathogens remains limited. Many plant viruses including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), a nematode-transmitted icosahedral virus and causal agent of fanleaf degenerative disease, have worldwide distribution and huge burden on crop yields representing billions of US dollars of losses annually, yet solutions to combat these viruses are often limited or inefficient. Here, we identified a Nb specific to GFLV that confers strong resistance to GFLV upon stable expression in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana and also in grapevine rootstock, the natural host of the virus. We showed that resistance was effective against a broad range of GFLV isolates independently of the inoculation method including upon nematode transmission but not against its close relative, Arabis mosaic virus. We also demonstrated that virus neutralization occurs at an early step of the virus life cycle, prior to cell-to-cell movement. Our findings will not only be instrumental to confer resistance to GFLV in grapevine, but more generally they pave the way for the generation of novel antiviral strategies in plants based on Nbs. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  4. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  5. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  6. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  7. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Avian H7 influenza viruses from both the Eurasian and North American lineage have caused outbreaks in poultry since 2002, with confirmed human infection occurring during outbreaks in The Netherlands, British Columbia, and the United Kingdom. The majority of H7 infections have resulted in self......-limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...

  8. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA bindi