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Sample records for virus agnoprotein inhibits

  1. The human polyoma JC virus agnoprotein acts as a viroporin.

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    Tadaki Suzuki

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections can result in a range of cellular injuries and commonly this involves both the plasma and intracellular membranes, resulting in enhanced permeability. Viroporins are a group of proteins that interact with plasma membranes modifying permeability and can promote the release of viral particles. While these proteins are not essential for virus replication, their activity certainly promotes virus growth. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a fatal demyelinating disease resulting from lytic infection of oligodendrocytes by the polyomavirus JC virus (JCV. The genome of JCV encodes six major proteins including a small auxiliary protein known as agnoprotein. Studies on other polyomavirus agnoproteins have suggested that the protein may contribute to viral propagation at various stages in the replication cycle, including transcription, translation, processing of late viral proteins, assembly of virions, and viral propagation. Previous studies from our and other laboratories have indicated that JCV agnoprotein plays an important, although as yet incompletely understood role in the propagation of JCV. Here, we demonstrate that agnoprotein possesses properties commonly associated with viroporins. Our findings demonstrate that: (i A deletion mutant of agnoprotein is defective in virion release and viral propagation; (ii Agnoprotein localizes to the ER early in infection, but is also found at the plasma membrane late in infection; (iii Agnoprotein is an integral membrane protein and forms homo-oligomers; (iv Agnoprotein enhances permeability of cells to the translation inhibitor hygromycin B; (v Agnoprotein induces the influx of extracellular Ca(2+; (vi The basic residues at amino acid positions 8 and 9 of agnoprotein key are determinants of the viroporin activity. The viroporin-like properties of agnoprotein result in increased membrane permeability and alterations in intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis leading to membrane

  2. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication

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    George Savidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses.

  3. Inhibition of enveloped viruses infectivity by curcumin.

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    Tzu-Yen Chen

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm. These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses.

  4. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

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    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  5. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

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    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  6. Polysulfonate suramin inhibits Zika virus infection.

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    Tan, Chee Wah; Sam, I-Ching; Chong, Wei Lim; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2017-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes newborn microcephaly and Guillian-Barré syndrome in adults. No therapeutics are available to treat ZIKV infection or other flaviviruses. In this study, we explored the inhibitory effect of glycosaminoglycans and analogues against ZIKV infection. Highly sulfated heparin, dextran sulfate and suramin significantly inhibited ZIKV infection in Vero cells. De-sulfated heparin analogues lose inhibitory effect, implying that sulfonate groups are critical for viral inhibition. Suramin, an FDA-approved anti-parasitic drug, inhibits ZIKV infection with 3-5 log 10  PFU viral reduction with IC 50 value of ∼2.5-5 μg/ml (1.93 μM-3.85 μM). A time-of-drug-addition study revealed that suramin remains potent even when administrated at 1-24 hpi. Suramin inhibits ZIKV infection by preventing viral adsorption, entry and replication. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed stronger interaction of suramin with ZIKV NS3 helicase than with the envelope protein. Suramin warrants further investigation as a potential antiviral candidate for ZIKV infection. Heparan sulfate (HS) is a cellular attachment receptor for multiple flaviviruses. However, no direct ZIKV-heparin interaction was observed in heparin-binding analysis, and downregulate or removal of cellular HS with sodium chlorate or heparinase I/III did not inhibit ZIKV infection. This indicates that cell surface HS is not utilized by ZIKV as an attachment receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by adlay tea.

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    Nagai, Emiko; Iwai, Miwa; Koketsu, Ritsuko; Sogabe, Riho; Morimoto, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Yuri; Ohta, Yoichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ohshima, Atsushi; Enomoto, Toshiki; Isegawa, Yuji

    2017-09-13

    The present study was conducted aiming to examine the antiviral activity of adlay tea and its components against influenza viruses. We further aimed to clarify the mechanism by which these components regulate virus replication. Adlay tea at a concentration suitable for drinking inhibited the multiplication of influenza viruses. Moreover, our results suggest that individual components of the tea had antiviral activities against the influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. Adlay tea inhibited multiplication of the H1N1, H3N2 and B types of influenza virus, including oseltamivir-resistant viruses. In addition, adlay tea inhibited influenza infection during the periods of virus adsorption to the cell and virus replication. Adlay tea did not suppress hemagglutination inhibition or cell fusion, although it slightly inhibited virus binding to Malin Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the antiviral compounds included in adlay tea were ingredients other than polyphenols and that there were several types of effective compounds in adlay tea inhibiting several steps of viral replication. The results of the present study demonstrate that adlay tea had antiviral effects against influenza viruses. Our findings with respect to adlay tea suggest that the polyphenols might have a small influence on its antiviral activity and that other ingredients might have more influence. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

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    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  9. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

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    Konowalchuk, Thomas W.; Konowalchuk, Jack

    2017-07-18

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods of inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further includes methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  10. Virus inhibition induced by polyvalent nanoparticles of different sizes

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    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Sieben, Christian; Wolff, Christopher; Ludwig, Kai; Böttcher, Christoph; Herrmann, Andreas; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the first step in the viral infection cycle. By gradually increasing the size of ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles, up to virus-like dimensions, we are now able to quantify the polyvalent enhancement of virus-cell binding inhibition and to identify varying mechanisms of virus inhibition with different efficacies: by employing a new binding assay we found that surface area-normalized polysulfated gold nanoparticles of diameters equal to and larger than the virus diameter (>50 nm) more efficiently inhibit the binding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to cells than smaller particles. On a per particle basis, larger sized gold nanoparticles were surprisingly shown to inhibit the viral infection up to two orders of magnitude more efficiently than smaller particles, which suggests different mechanisms of virus inhibition. Based on complementary electron microscopic data, we noticed that larger gold nanoparticles act as efficient cross-linkers between virions, whereas smaller gold nanoparticles decorate the surface of individual virus particles. Our systematic study accentuates the need for the design of biodegradable, virus-sized inhibitors capitalizing on polyvalent binding.The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the

  11. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

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    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...

  12. Inhibition of influenza virus internalization by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

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    Kim, Meehyein; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Hye Won; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Pilho; Jung, Young-Sik; Jeong, Hyeong-Seop; Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Lee, Chong-Kyo

    2013-11-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major flavonoid components of green tea, is known to have a broad antiviral activity against several enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus. However, its mode of action and the mechanism that allows it to target influenza virus molecules have not been fully elucidated. Thus, this study investigated the molecular mechanism by which EGCG suppresses influenza virus infections. EGCG was found to block an early step in the influenza viral life cycle, but it did not affect viral adsorption to target cells or viral RNA replication. However, EGCG inhibited hemifusion events between virus particles and the cellular membrane by reducing the viral membrane integrity, thereby resulting in the loss of the cell penetration capacity of the influenza virus. EGCG also marginally suppressed the viral and nonviral neuraminidase (NA) activity in an enzyme-based assay system. In conclusion, it is suggested that the anti-influenza viral efficacy of EGCG is attributable to damage to the physical properties of the viral envelope and partial inhibition of the NA surface glycoprotein. These results may facilitate future investigations of the antiviral activity of EGCG against other enveloped viruses as well as influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of multiplication of herpes simplex virus by caffeic acid.

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    Ikeda, Keiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Nishide, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Yukiko; Koyama, A Hajime; Yamasaki, Hisashi

    2011-10-01

    Hot water extracts of coffee grinds and commercial instant coffee solutions have been shown to exhibit marked antiviral and virucidal activities against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Specifically, it has been shown that caffeine and N-methyl-pyridinium formate inhibit the multiplication of HSV-1 in HEp-2 cells. The present study examined the virological properties and the antiviral activity of caffeic acid against HSV-1. Caffeic acid inhibited the multiplication of HSV-1 in vitro, while chlorogenic acid, a caffeic acid ester with quinic acid, did not. These reagents did not have a direct virucidal effect. The one-step growth curve of HSV-1 showed that the addition of caffeic acid at 8 h post infection (h p.i.) did not significantly affect the formation of progeny viruses. An analysis of the influence of the time of caffeic acid addition, revealed that addition at an early time post infection remarkably inhibited the formation of progeny infectious virus in the infected cells, but its addition after 6 h p.i. (i.e., the time of the completion of viral genome replication) did not efficiently inhibit this process. These results indicate that caffeic acid inhibits HSV-1 multiplication mainly before the completion of viral DNA replication, but not thereafter. Although caffeic acid showed some cytotoxicity by prolonged incubation, the observed antiviral activity is likely not the secondary result of the cytotoxic effect of the reagent, because the inhibition of the virus multiplication was observed before appearance of the notable cytotoxicity.

  14. Inhibition of virus replication by RNA interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, P. C. Joost; Cupac, Daniel; Berkhout, Ben

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism in eukaryotes, which is believed to function as a defence against viruses and transposons. Since its discovery, RNAi has been developed into a widely used technique for generating genetic knock-outs and for studying gene

  15. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

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    Milly M Choy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue.

  16. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...... to the mass of the HA1 peptide. Of several monosaccharides tested only D-mannose interfered with SAP's inhibition of both HA and infectivity. The glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate and heparin, which bind SAP, reduced SAPs binding to the virus. The results indicate that the inhibition by SAP is due to steric...

  17. Inhibition of interferon induction and action by the nairovirus Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

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    Barbara Holzer

    Full Text Available The Nairoviruses are an important group of tick-borne viruses that includes pathogens of man (Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and livestock animals (Dugbe virus, Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV. NSDV is found in large parts of East Africa and the Indian subcontinent (where it is known as Ganjam virus. We have investigated the ability of NSDV to antagonise the induction and actions of interferon. Both pathogenic and apathogenic isolates could actively inhibit the induction of type 1 interferon, and also blocked the signalling pathways of both type 1 and type 2 interferons. Using transient expression of viral proteins or sections of viral proteins, these activities all mapped to the ovarian tumour-like protease domain (OTU found in the viral RNA polymerase. Virus infection, or expression of this OTU domain in transfected cells, led to a great reduction in the incorporation of ubiquitin or ISG15 protein into host cell proteins. Point mutations in the OTU that inhibited the protease activity also prevented it from antagonising interferon induction and action. Interestingly, a mutation at a peripheral site, which had little apparent effect on the ability of the OTU to inhibit ubiquitination and ISG15ylation, removed the ability of the OTU to block the induction of type 1 and the action of type 2 interferons, but had a lesser effect on the ability to block type 1 interferon action, suggesting that targets other than ubiquitin and ISG15 may be involved in the actions of the viral OTU.

  18. Inhibition of Monkeypox virus replication by RNA interference

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    Jahrling Peter B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Orthopoxvirus genus of Poxviridae family is comprised of several human pathogens, including cowpox (CPXV, Vaccinia (VACV, monkeypox (MPV and Variola (VARV viruses. Species of this virus genus cause human diseases with various severities and outcome ranging from mild conditions to death in fulminating cases. Currently, vaccination is the only protective measure against infection with these viruses and no licensed antiviral drug therapy is available. In this study, we investigated the potential of RNA interference pathway (RNAi as a therapeutic approach for orthopox virus infections using MPV as a model. Based on genome-wide expression studies and bioinformatic analysis, we selected 12 viral genes and targeted them by small interference RNA (siRNA. Forty-eight siRNA constructs were developed and evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit viral replication. Two genes, each targeted with four different siRNA constructs in one pool, were limiting to viral replication. Seven siRNA constructs from these two pools, targeting either an essential gene for viral replication (A6R or an important gene in viral entry (E8L, inhibited viral replication in cell culture by 65-95% with no apparent cytotoxicity. Further analysis with wild-type and recombinant MPV expressing green fluorescence protein demonstrated that one of these constructs, siA6-a, was the most potent and inhibited viral replication for up to 7 days at a concentration of 10 nM. These results emphasis the essential role of A6R gene in viral replication, and demonstrate the potential of RNAi as a therapeutic approach for developing oligonucleotide-based drug therapy for MPV and other orthopox viruses.

  19. In vitro inhibition of mumps virus by retinoids.

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    Soye, Kaitlin J; Trottier, Claire; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z; Restori, Katherine H; Reichman, Lee; Miller, Wilson H; Ward, Brian J

    2013-11-14

    Mumps virus (MuV) is a highly infectious paramyxovirus closely related to measles virus (MeV). Despite the availability of a mumps vaccine, outbreaks continue to occur and no treatment options are available. Vitamin A and other naturally occurring retinoids inhibit the replication of MeV in vitro. Anti-viral effects of retinoids were observed in cell culture using the myelomonocytic U937, NB4/R4, and Huh7/7.5 cells. Observations of anti-viral effect were quantified using TCID50 analysis. Molecular properties of the antiviral effect were analysed using quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The current work demonstrates that retinoids inhibit MuV in vitro due to up-regulation of type I interferon (IFN) and IFN stimulated genes. This effect is mediated by nuclear retinoid receptor signalling and RIG-I is required. The antiviral retinoid-induced state makes cells less permissive to viral replication from subsequent challenge with either MuV or MeV for less than 12 hours. These results demonstrate that retinoids inhibit MuV replication in uninfected bystander cells through a retinoid inducible gene I (RIG-I), retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and IFN dependent manner making them refractory to subsequent rounds of viral replication. These observations raise the possibility that pharmacological doses of retinoids might have clinical benefit in MuV infection.

  20. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

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    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  1. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication prior to Reverse Transcription by Influenza Virus Stimulation

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    Pinto, Ligia A.; Blazevic, Vesna; Patterson, Bruce K.; Mac Trubey, C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Gene M Shearer

    2000-01-01

    It is now recognized that, in addition to drug-mediated therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the immune system can exert antiviral effects via CD8+ T-cell-generated anti-HIV factors. This study demonstrates that (i) supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza A virus inhibit replication of CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates prior to reverse transcription; (ii) the HIV-suppressive supernatants can be generated by CD4- or CD...

  2. Virus inhibition assay for measurement of acyclovir levels in human plasma and urine.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, D.F.; Taylor, S. C.; Bryson, Y J

    1981-01-01

    A simple microplate virus inhibition assay which measures the levels of acyclovir in plasma and urine samples from patients was developed. The assay is based upon the inhibition of the cytopathic effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 on human fibroblast cells. The extent of inhibition of virus cytopathic effect, caused by dilutions of samples from patients, allowed determination of acyclovir concentrations to be made. The assay, which measured biological activity, could detect acyclovir level...

  3. Inhibition of virus-like particle release of Sendai virus and Nipah virus, but not that of mumps virus, by tetherin/CD317/BST-2.

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    Kong, Weng-Sheng; Irie, Takashi; Yoshida, Asuka; Kawabata, Ryoko; Kadoi, Takahiro; Sakaguchi, Takemasa

    2012-09-01

    Tetherin (also known as BST-2 or CD317) has recently been identified as a potent IFN-induced anti-viral protein that inhibits the release of diverse enveloped virus particles from infected cells. The anti-viral activity of tetherin on a number of enveloped viruses, including retroviruses, filoviruses and arenaviruses, has been examined. Here, we show that tetherin is also capable of blocking the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by the matrix protein of Sendai virus. Together with inhibition of Nipah virus VLP release by tetherin, these results indicate that paramyxoviruses are to be added to the list of viruses that are susceptible to tetherin inhibition. Tetherin co-localized with Nipah virus matrix proteins and accumulated in cells, indicating that it is present at, or recruited to, sites of particle assembly. It should be noted, however, that tetherin was not effective against the release of paramyxovirus mumps VLPs, indicating that certain enveloped viruses may not be sensitive to tetherin activity.

  4. The Acyclic Retinoid Peretinoin Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Infectious Virus Release in Vitro

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    Shimakami, Tetsuro; Honda, Masao; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Takabatake, Riuta; Liu, Fanwei; Murai, Kazuhisa; Shiomoto, Takayuki; Funaki, Masaya; Yamane, Daisuke; Murakami, Seishi; Lemon, Stanley M.; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the oral acyclic retinoid Peretinoin may reduce the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following surgical ablation of primary tumours. Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of HCC, we assessed whether Peretinoin and other retinoids have any effect on HCV infection. For this purpose, we measured the effects of several retinoids on the replication of genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV in vitro. Peretinoin inhibited RNA replication for all genotypes and showed the strongest antiviral effect among the retinoids tested. Furthermore, it reduced infectious virus release by 80-90% without affecting virus assembly. These effects could be due to reduced signalling from lipid droplets, triglyceride abundance, and the expression of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase. These negative effects of Peretinoin on HCV infection may be beneficial in addition to its potential for HCC chemoprevention in HCV-infected patients.

  5. Inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, J.J.; Wagner, R.R.

    1981-04-01

    DNA synthesis in mouse myeloma (MPC-11) cells and L cells was rapidly and progressively inhibited by infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). No significant difference in cellular DNA synthesis inhibition was noted between synchronized and unsynchronized cells, nor did synchronized cells vary in their susceptibility to VSV infection after release from successive thymidine and hydroxyurea blocks. Cellular RNA synthesis was inhibited to about the same extent as DNA synthesis, but cellular protein synthesis was less affected by VSV at the same multiplicity of infection. The effect of VSV on cellular DNA synthesis could not be attributed to degradation of existing DNA or to decreased uptake of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, nor were DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase activities significantly different in VSV-infected and uninfected cell extracts. Analysis by alkaline sucrose gradients of DNA in pulse-labeled uninfected and VSV-infected cells indicated that VSV infection did not appear to influence DNA chain elongation. Cellular DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited by infection with the VSV polymerase mutant tsG114(I) at the restrictive temperature or by infection with defective-interfering VSV DI-011 (5' end of the genome), but DI-HR-LT (3' end of genome) exhibited initially rapid but not prolonged inhibition of MPC-11 cell DNA synthesis. DNA synthesis inhibitory activity of wild-type VSV was only slowly and partially inactivated by very large doses of UV irradiation. These data suggest that, as in the effect of VSV on cellular RNA synthesis inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by VSV requires transcription of a small segment of the viral genome.

  6. Inhibition of dengue virus through suppression of host pyrimidine biosynthesis.

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    Wang, Qing-Yin; Bushell, Simon; Qing, Min; Xu, Hao Ying; Bonavia, Aurelio; Nunes, Sandra; Zhou, Jing; Poh, Mee Kian; Florez de Sessions, Paola; Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Dong, Hongping; Hoffmaster, Keith; Goh, Anne; Nilar, Shahul; Schul, Wouter; Jones, Susan; Kramer, Laura; Compton, Teresa; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2011-07-01

    Viral replication relies on the host to supply nucleosides. Host enzymes involved in nucleoside biosynthesis are potential targets for antiviral development. Ribavirin (a known antiviral drug) is such an inhibitor that suppresses guanine biosynthesis; depletion of the intracellular GTP pool was shown to be the major mechanism to inhibit flavivirus. Along similar lines, inhibitors of the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway could be targeted for potential antiviral development. Here we report on a novel antiviral compound (NITD-982) that inhibits host dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), an enzyme required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. The inhibitor was identified through screening 1.8 million compounds using a dengue virus (DENV) infection assay. The compound contains an isoxazole-pyrazole core structure, and it inhibited DENV with a 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) of 2.4 nM and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC(50)) of >5 μM. NITD-982 has a broad antiviral spectrum, inhibiting both flaviviruses and nonflaviviruses with nanomolar EC(90)s. We also show that (i) the compound inhibited the enzymatic activity of recombinant DHODH, (ii) an NITD-982 analogue directly bound to the DHODH protein, (iii) supplementing the culture medium with uridine reversed the compound-mediated antiviral activity, and (iv) DENV type 2 (DENV-2) variants resistant to brequinar (a known DHODH inhibitor) were cross resistant to NITD-982. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the compound inhibits DENV through depleting the intracellular pyrimidine pool. In contrast to the in vitro potency, the compound did not show any efficacy in the DENV-AG129 mouse model. The lack of in vivo efficacy is likely due to the exogenous uptake of pyrimidine from the diet or to a high plasma protein-binding activity of the current compound.

  7. Dissociation of heterochromatin protein 1 from lamin B receptor induced by human polyomavirus agnoprotein: role in nuclear egress of viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yuki; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sunden, Yuji; Orba, Yasuko; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Takahashi, Hidehiro; Tanaka, Shinya; Hall, William W; Nagashima, Kazuo; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    The nuclear envelope is one of the chief obstacles to the translocation of macromolecules that are larger than the diameter of nuclear pores. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) bound to the lamin B receptor (LBR) is thought to contribute to reassembly of the nuclear envelope after cell division. Human polyomavirus agnoprotein (Agno) has been shown to bind to HP1alpha and to induce its dissociation from LBR, resulting in destabilization of the nuclear envelope. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that Agno increased the lateral mobility of LBR in the inner nuclear membrane. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed that Agno is targeted to the nuclear envelope and facilitates the nuclear egress of polyomavirus-like particles. These results indicate that dissociation of HP1alpha from LBR and consequent perturbation of the nuclear envelope induced by polyomavirus Agno promote the translocation of virions out of the nucleus.

  8. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-04-12

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted.

  9. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted. PMID:27067133

  10. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by RNA interference using long-hairpin RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, P.; de Vries, W.; Haasnoot, J.; ter Brake, O.; de Haan, P.; Berkhout, B.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of virus replication by means of RNA interference has been reported for several important human pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). RNA interference against these pathogens has been accomplished by introduction of virus-specific synthetic small interfering

  11. Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibits influenza virus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    Full Text Available Influenza virus is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, posing a serious health threat worldwide. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of Cryptoporus volvatus extract on influenza virus infection. Our results demonstrated that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibited different influenza virus strain replication in MDCK cells. Time course analysis indicated that the extract exerted its inhibition at earlier and late stages in the replication cycle of influenza virus. Subsequently, we confirmed that the extract suppressed virus internalization into and released from cells. Moreover, the extract significantly reduced H1N1/09 influenza virus load in lungs and dramatically decreased lung lesions in mice. And most importantly, the extract protected mice from lethal challenge with H1N1/09 influenza virus. Our results suggest that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract could be a potential candidate for the development of a new anti-influenza virus therapy.

  12. Cryptoporus volvatus Extract Inhibits Influenza Virus Replication In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jianyong; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Cao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, posing a serious health threat worldwide. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of Cryptoporus volvatus extract on influenza virus infection. Our results demonstrated that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibited different influenza virus strain replication in MDCK cells. Time course analysis indicated that the extract exerted its inhibition at earlier and late stages in the replication cycle of influenza virus. Subsequently, we confirmed that the extract suppressed virus internalization into and released from cells. Moreover, the extract significantly reduced H1N1/09 influenza virus load in lungs and dramatically decreased lung lesions in mice. And most importantly, the extract protected mice from lethal challenge with H1N1/09 influenza virus. Our results suggest that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract could be a potential candidate for the development of a new anti-influenza virus therapy. PMID:25437846

  13. Suramin inhibits Zika virus replication by interfering with virus attachment and release of infectious particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albulescu, Irina C; Kovacikova, Kristina; Tas, Ali; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2017-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that mostly causes asymptomatic infections or mild disease characterized by low-grade fever, rash, conjunctivitis, and malaise. However, the recent massive ZIKV epidemics in the Americas have also linked ZIKV infection to fetal malformations like microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults, and have uncovered previously unrecognized routes of vertical and sexual transmission. Here we describe inhibition of ZIKV replication by suramin, originally an anti-parasitic drug, which was more recently shown to inhibit multiple viruses. In cell culture-based assays, using reduction of cytopathic effect as read-out, suramin had an EC50 of ∼40 μM and a selectivity index of 48. In single replication cycle experiments, suramin treatment also caused a strong dose-dependent decrease in intracellular ZIKV RNA levels and a >3-log reduction in infectious progeny titers. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that suramin inhibits a very early step of the replication cycle as well as the release of infectious progeny. Only during the first 2 h of infection suramin treatment strongly reduced the fraction of cells that became infected with ZIKV, suggesting the drug affects virus binding/entry. Binding experiments at 4 °C using 35S-labeled ZIKV demonstrated that suramin interferes with attachment to host cells. When suramin treatment was initiated post-entry, viral RNA synthesis was unaffected, while both the release of genomes and the infectivity of ZIKV were reduced. This suggests the compound also affects virion biogenesis, possibly by interfering with glycosylation and the maturation of ZIKV during its traffic through the secretory pathway. The inhibitory effect of suramin on ZIKV attachment and virion biogenesis and its broad-spectrum activity warrant further evaluation of this compound as a potential therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro inhibition of monkeypox virus production and spread by Interferon-β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orthopoxvirus genus contains numerous virus species that are capable of causing disease in humans, including variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox, monkeypox virus, cowpox virus, and vaccinia virus (the prototypical member of the genus. Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease that is endemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is characterized by systemic lesion development and prominent lymphadenopathy. Like variola virus, monkeypox virus is a high priority pathogen for therapeutic development due to its potential to cause serious disease with significant health impacts after zoonotic, accidental, or deliberate introduction into a naïve population. Results The purpose of this study was to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of interferon-β (IFN-β for use against monkeypox virus. We found that treatment with human IFN-β results in a significant decrease in monkeypox virus production and spread in vitro. IFN-β substantially inhibited monkeypox virus when introduced 6-8 h post infection, revealing its potential for use as a therapeutic. IFN-β induced the expression of the antiviral protein MxA in infected cells, and constitutive expression of MxA was shown to inhibit monkeypox virus infection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the successful inhibition of monkeypox virus using human IFN-β and suggest that IFN-β could potentially serve as a novel safe therapeutic for human monkeypox disease.

  15. IMMUNE INHIBITION OF VIRUS RELEASE FROM HUMAN AND NONHUMAN CELLS BY ANTIBODY TO VIRAL AND HOST-CELL DETERMINANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHARIFF, DM; DESPERBASQUES, M; BILLSTROM, M; GEERLIGS, HJ; WELLING, GW; WELLINGWESTER, S; BUCHAN, A; SKINNER, GRB

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA virues, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and

  16. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  17. Aeginetia indica Decoction Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lo, Chieh-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Ni; Pan, Ting-Chun; Chen, Pin-Yin; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2018-01-09

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still a global epidemic despite the introduction of several highly effective direct-acting antivirals that are tagged with sky-high prices. The present study aimed to identify an herbal decoction that ameliorates HCV infection. Among six herbal decoctions tested, the Aeginetia indica decoction had the most profound effect on the HCV reporter activity in infected Huh7.5.1 liver cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The Aeginetia indica decoction exerted multiple inhibitory effects on the HCV life cycle. Pretreatment of the cells with the Aeginetia indica decoction prior to HCV infection reduced the HCV RNA and non-structural protein 3 (NS3) protein levels in the infected cells. The Aeginetia indica decoction reduced HCV internal ribosome entry site-mediated protein translation activity. It also reduced the HCV RNA level in the infected cells in association with reduced NS5A phosphorylation at serine 235, a predominant phosphorylation event indispensable to HCV replication. Thus, the Aeginetia indica decoction inhibits HCV infection, translation, and replication. Mechanistically, the Aeginetia indica decoction probably reduced HCV replication via reducing NS5A phosphorylation at serine 235.

  18. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. Legume Lectins Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Infection by Interfering with the Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles O’Brien

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Three lectins with different sugar binding specificities were investigated for anti-viral activity against human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV-2. The lectins, concanavalin A (Con A, lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA and peanut agglutinin (PNA, inhibited cell fusion and hemadsorption induced by hPIV-2. Virus nucleoprotein (NP gene synthesis was largely inhibited, but fusion (F and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene syntheses were not. An indirect immunofluorescence study showed that Con A inhibited virus NP, F and HN protein syntheses, but LCA did not completely inhibit them, and that PNA inhibited only NP protein synthesis. Using a recombinant green fluorescence protein-expressing hPIV-2, without matrix protein (rghPIV-2ΔM, it was found that virus entry into the cells was not completely prevented. The lectins considerably reduced the number of viruses released compared with that of virus infected cells. The lectins bound to cell surface within 10 min, and many aggregates were observed at 30 min. Con A and LCA slightly disrupted actin microfilaments and microtubules, but PNA had almost no effect on them. These results indicated that the inhibitory effects of the lectins were caused mainly by the considerable prevention of virus adsorption to the cells by the lectin binding to their receptors.

  20. Serum amyloid P component inhibits influenza A virus infections: in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, A; Andersen, I; Junker, K

    2001-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds in vitro Ca(2+)-dependently to several ligands including oligosaccharides with terminal mannose and galactose. We have earlier reported that SAP binds to human influenza A virus strains, inhibiting hemagglutinin (HA) activity and virus infectivity in vitro. T...

  1. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4...

  2. Luteolin restricts dengue virus replication through inhibition of the proprotein convertase furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Minhua; Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; He, Qiuyan; Zhao, Ya; Zhang, Zhongde; Lai, Xiaoping; Luo, Dahai; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Li, Geng

    2017-07-01

    In many countries afflicted with dengue fever, traditional medicines are widely used as panaceas for illness, and here we describe the systematic evaluation of a widely known natural product, luteolin, originating from the "heat clearing" class of herbs. We show that luteolin inhibits the replication of all four serotypes of dengue virus, but the selectivity of the inhibition was weak. In addition, ADE-mediated dengue virus infection of human cell lines and primary PBMCs was inhibited. In a time-of-drug-addition study, luteolin was found to reduce infectious virus particle formation, but not viral RNA synthesis, in Huh-7 cells. During the virus life cycle, the host protease furin cleaves the pr moiety from prM protein of immature virus particles in the trans-Golgi network to produce mature virions. Analysis of virus particles from luteolin-treated cells revealed that prM was not cleaved efficiently. Biochemical interrogation of human furin showed that luteolin inhibited the enzyme activity in an uncompetitive manner, with Ki value of 58.6 μM, suggesting that treatment may restrict the virion maturation process. Luteolin also exhibited in vivo antiviral activity in mice infected with DENV, causing reduced viremia. Given the mode of action of luteolin and its widespread source, it is possible that it can be tested in combination with other dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.M.J.W. Baars (Marianne); P. de Lijster; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mouse models. Here we show that replication of influenza A and B viruses in Mabin Darby canine kidney cells is severely impaired by the NO donor,

  4. Xanthones from Polygala karensium inhibit neuraminidases from influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Dang, Thai Trung; Nguyen, Phi Hung

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of the H1N1 swine flu pandemic has the possibility to develop the occurrence of disaster- or drug-resistant viruses by additional reassortments in novel influenza A virus. In the course of an anti-influenza screening program for natural products, 10 xanthone derivatives (1-10) were...

  5. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  6. Evasion of Antiviral Innate Immunity by Theiler's Virus L* Protein through Direct Inhibition of RNase L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Jha, Babal Kant; Silverman, Robert H.; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus. PMID:23825954

  7. Lambda Interferon Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei; Wang,Xu; Ye, Li; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Riedel, Eric; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    The newly identified type III interferon (IFN-λ) has antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. We thus examined whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages that expressed IFN-λ receptors. Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-1 activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-ad...

  8. Avian influenza virus directly infects human natural killer cells and inhibits cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Huawei; Liu, Yinping; Sia, Sin Fun; Peiris, J S Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell is a key component of innate immunity and plays an important role in host defense against virus infection by directly destroying infected cells. Influenza is a respiratory disease transmitted in the early phase of virus infection. Evasion of host innate immunity including NK cells is critical for the virus to expand and establish a successful acute infection. Previously, we showed that human influenza H1N1 virus infects NK cells and induces cell apoptosis, as well as inhibits NK cell activity. In this study, we further demonstrated that avian influenza virus also directly targeted NK cells as an immunoevasion strategy. The avian virus infected human NK cells and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, avian influenza virion and HA protein inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity. This novel strategy has obvious advantages for avian influenza virus, allowing the virus sufficient time to expand and subsequent spread before the onset of the specific immune response. Our findings provide an important clue for the immunopathogenesis of avian influenza, and also suggest that direct targeting NK cells may be a common strategy used by both human and avian influenza viruses to evade NK cell immunity.

  9. Visna virus as an in vitro model for human immunodeficiency virus and inhibition by ribavirin, phosphonoformate, and 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, K B; McKernan, P A; Smith, R A; Smee, D F

    1987-09-01

    Inhibition of visna virus replication in vitro by several compounds previously reported to inhibit replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was examined. Ribavirin concentrations as high as 1 mM reduced virus production by less than 50% relative to controls. The concentration of phosphonoformate reducing virus replication by 50% was 80 microM. 2',3'-Dideoxynucleosides were potent inhibitors of visna virus replication. The 50% inhibitory concentrations for dideoxyguanosine, dideoxyadenosine, and dideoxycytidine were 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 microM, respectively. In contrast, weak inhibition was produced by 100 microM dideoxythymidine. These results are consistent with the reported susceptibility of HIV replication to inhibition by these compounds in vitro. The interaction of visna virus reverse transcriptase with several inhibitors was also examined. Reverse transcriptase was inhibited by phosphonoformate, ribavirin 5'-triphosphate, ddATP, ddCTP, ddGTP, and ddTTP. The last four compounds inhibited incorporation of homologous 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates into polynucleotides by a competitive mechanism. In view of the biological similarities between visna virus and HIV and the similar in vitro susceptibility of visna virus replication to known inhibitors of HIV, visna virus may provide a good model for studying the inhibition of HIV replication in vitro. Because visna virus is not pathogenic to humans, this model may facilitate the identification of compounds for further investigation into the treatment of HIV-induced disease.

  10. Inhibition of influenza A virus infection in vitro by saliphenylhalamide-loaded porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Denisova, Oxana V; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; De Brabander, Jef K; Hirvonen, Jouni; Salonen, Jarno; Kakkola, Laura; Kainov, Denis; Santos, Hélder A

    2013-08-27

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause recurrent epidemics in humans, with serious threat of lethal worldwide pandemics. The occurrence of antiviral-resistant virus strains and the emergence of highly pathogenic influenza viruses have triggered an urgent need to develop new anti-IAV treatments. One compound found to inhibit IAV, and other virus infections, is saliphenylhalamide (SaliPhe). SaliPhe targets host vacuolar-ATPase and inhibits acidification of endosomes, a process needed for productive virus infection. The major obstacle for the further development of SaliPhe as antiviral drug has been its poor solubility. Here, we investigated the possibility to increase SaliPhe solubility by loading the compound in thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles. SaliPhe-loaded nanoparticles were further investigated for the ability to inhibit influenza A infection in human retinal pigment epithelium and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, and we show that upon release from THCPSi, SaliPhe inhibited IAV infection in vitro and reduced the amount of progeny virus in IAV-infected cells. Overall, the PSi-based nanosystem exhibited increased dissolution of the investigated anti-IAV drug SaliPhe and displayed excellent in vitro stability, low cytotoxicity, and remarkable reduction of viral load in the absence of organic solvents. This proof-of-principle study indicates that PSi nanoparticles could be used for efficient delivery of antivirals to infected cells.

  11. Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein Exploits Hsp40 to Inhibit PKR Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Priya; Kumar, Purnima; Garten, Rebecca; Deyde, Varough; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Lal, Renu B.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Double-stranded RNA dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key regulator of the anti-viral innate immune response in mammalian cells. PKR activity is regulated by a 58 kilo Dalton cellular inhibitor (P58IPK), which is present in inactive state as a complex with Hsp40 under normal conditions. In case of influenza A virus (IAV) infection, P58IPK is known to dissociate from Hsp40 and inhibit PKR activation. However the influenza virus component responsible for PKR inhibition through P58IPK activation was hitherto unknown. Principal Findings Human heat shock 40 protein (Hsp40) was identified as an interacting partner of Influenza A virus nucleoprotein (IAV NP) using a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation studies from mammalian cells transfected with IAV NP expressing plasmid. Further, the IAV NP-Hsp40 interaction was validated in mammalian cells infected with various seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza viruses. Cellular localization studies showed that NP and Hsp40 co-localize primarily in the nucleus. During IAV infection in mammalian cells, expression of NP coincided with the dissociation of P58IPK from Hsp40 and decrease PKR phosphorylation. We observed that, plasmid based expression of NP in mammalian cells leads to decrease in PKR phosphorylation. Furthermore, inhibition of NP expression during influenza virus replication led to PKR activation and concomitant increase in eIF2α phosphorylation. Inhibition of NP expression also led to reduced IRF3 phosphorylation, enhanced IFN β production and concomitant reduction of virus replication. Taken together our data suggest that NP is the viral factor responsible for P58IPK activation and subsequent inhibition of PKR-mediated host response during IAV infection. Significance Our findings demonstrate a novel role of IAV NP in inhibiting PKR-mediated anti-viral host response and help us understand P58IPK mediated inhibition of PKR activity during IAV infection

  12. Cholesterol reducing agents inhibit assembly of type I parainfluenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajimaya, Shringkhala; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Frankl, Tünde; Bryk, Peter; Ward, Brian; Takimoto, Toru

    2017-01-15

    Many enveloped RNA viruses utilize lipid rafts for the assembly of progeny virions, but the role of cholesterol, a major component of rafts, on paramyxovirus budding and virion formation is controversial. In this study, we analyzed the effects of FDA-approved cholesterol-reducing agents, gemfibrozil and lovastatin, on raft formation and assembly of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) and Sendai virus (SeV). Treatment of the human airway epithelial A549 cells with the agents, especially when combined, significantly decreased production of infectious hPIV1 and SeV. Mechanistic analysis indicated that depletion of cellular cholesterol reduced cell surface accumulation of envelope glycoproteins and association of viral matrix and nucleocapsids with raft membrane, which resulted in impaired virus budding and release from the cells. These results indicate that cellular cholesterol is required for assembly and formation of type 1 parainfluenza viruses and suggest that cholesterol could be an attractive target for antiviral agents against hPIV1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  14. In vivo inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus by ribavirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hruska, J.F.; Morrow, P.E.; Suffin, S.C.; Douglas, R.G. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Ribavirin reduced the amount of respiratory syncytial virus in nasal turbinates and lung tissues of experimentally infected cotton rats by over 90%. An effect was seen when the drug was given either intraperitoneally or by aerosol; however, the antiviral effect was achieved at much lower doses when delivered by the aerosol route. No animal deaths due to the drug were seen.

  15. Cross-Species Virus-Host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    virus families with know or suspected histories of changes in host-species tropism from animal to humans. In the Paramyxoviridae family, Hendra ...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-79 Cross-species virus -host...Cross-species virus -host protein-protein interactions inhibiting innate immunity What are the major goals of the project? List the major goals of

  16. The cellular endosomal protein stannin inhibits intracellular trafficking of human papillomavirus during virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, Alex; Erden, Asu; Kanaya, Eriko; Zhang, Wei; Crite, Mac; Bradfield, Clinton; MacMicking, John; DiMaio, Daniel; Schoggins, John W; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2017-10-23

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the most common sexually transmitted viruses and one of the most important infectious causes of cancers worldwide. While prophylactic vaccines are effective against certain strains of HPV, established infections still cause deadly cancers in both men and women. HPV traffics to the nucleus via the retrograde transport pathway, but the mechanism of intracellular transport of non-enveloped viruses such as HPV is incompletely understood. Using an overexpression screen, we identify several genes that control HPV16 entry. We focused on the mechanism by which one of the screen hits, stannin, blocks HPV16 infection. Stannin has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Overexpression of stannin specifically inhibits infection by several HPV types, but not other viruses tested. Stannin is constitutively expressed in human keratinocytes, and its basal levels limit entry by HPV16. Stannin is localized to the endolysosomal compartment and does not affect HPV16 binding to cells, virus uptake, or virus uncoating, but inhibits the entry of HPV into the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and stimulates HPV degradation. We further show that stannin interacts with L1 major capsid protein and impairs the interaction of the L2 minor capsid protein with retromer, which is required for virus trafficking to the TGN. Our findings shed light on a novel cellular protein that interferes with HPV entry and highlight the role of retrograde transport in HPV entry.

  17. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhibit....... Consistent with these in vitro findings treatment with vMIP-II inhibited the adoptive transfer of a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vivo, but only when antigen-primed donor cells were transferred via the intravenous route and required to migrate actively, not when the cells were......-induced signals are pivotal in directing antiviral effector cells toward virus-infected organ sites and that vMIP-II is a potent inhibitor of type 1 T-cell-mediated inflammation....

  18. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Plattet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options.

  19. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  20. The human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activity of novel pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuno, Takumi; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko

    2015-08-15

    In the present study, we describe the synthesis of a novel set of pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives. The products were assessed for human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activities. All novel fullerene derivatives showed potent human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition without cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The C, V and W proteins of Nipah virus inhibit minigenome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Katrina; Bankamp, Bettina; Hummel, Kimberly B; Lo, Michael K; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2008-05-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a recently emergent, highly pathogenic, zoonotic paramyxovirus of the genus Henipavirus. Like the phosphoprotein (P) gene of other paramyxoviruses, the P gene of NiV is predicted to encode three additional proteins, C, V and W. When the C, V and W proteins of NiV were tested for their ability to inhibit expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in plasmid-based, minigenome replication assays, each protein inhibited CAT expression in a dose-dependent manner. The C, V and W proteins of NiV also inhibited expression of CAT from a measles virus (MV) minigenome, but not from a human parainfluenzavirus 3 (hPIV3) minigenome. Interestingly, the C and V proteins of MV, which have previously been shown to inhibit MV minigenome replication, also inhibited NiV minigenome replication; however, they were not able to inhibit hPIV3 minigenome replication. In contrast, the C protein of hPIV3 inhibited minigenome replication of hPIV3, NiV and MV. Although there is very limited amino acid sequence similarity between the C, V and W proteins within the paramyxoviruses, the heterotypic inhibition of replication suggests that these proteins may share functional properties.

  2. Inhibition of influenza A virus (H1N1 fusion by benzenesulfonamide derivatives targeting viral hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinin (HA of the influenza virus plays a crucial role in the early stage of the viral life cycle by binding to sialic acid on the surface of host epithelial cells and mediating fusion between virus envelope and endosome membrane for the release of viral genomes into the cytoplasm. To initiate virus fusion, endosome pH is lowered by acidification causing an irreversible conformational change of HA, which in turn results in a fusogenic HA. In this study, we describe characterization of an HA inhibitor of influenza H1N1 viruses, RO5464466. One-cycle time course study in MDCK cells showed that this compound acted at an early step of influenza virus replication. Results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells and trypsin sensitivity assay of isolated HA clearly showed that RO5464466 targeted HA. In cell-based assays involving multiple rounds of virus infection and replication, RO5464466 inhibited an established influenza infection. The overall production of progeny viruses, as a result of the compound's inhibitory effect on fusion, was dramatically reduced by 8 log units when compared with a negative control. Furthermore, RO5487624, a close analogue of RO5464466, with pharmacokinetic properties suitable for in vivo efficacy studies displayed a protective effect on mice that were lethally challenged with influenza H1N1 virus. These results might benefit further characterization and development of novel anti-influenza agents by targeting viral hemagglutinin.

  3. A thiopurine drug inhibits West Nile virus production in cell culture, but not in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yin Lim

    Full Text Available Many viruses within the Flavivirus genus cause significant disease in humans; however, effective antivirals against these viruses are not currently available. We have previously shown that a thiopurine drug, 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr, inhibits replication of distantly related viruses within the Flaviviridae family in cell culture, including bovine viral diarrhea virus and hepatitis C virus replicon. Here we further examined the potential antiviral effect of 6MMPr on several diverse flaviviruses. In cell culture, 6MMPr inhibited virus production of yellow fever virus, dengue virus-2 (DENV-2 and West Nile virus (WNV in a dose-dependent manner, and DENV-2 was significantly more sensitive to 6MMPr treatment than WNV. We then explored the use of 6MMPr as an antiviral against WNV in an immunocompetent mouse model. Once a day treatment of mice with 0.5 mg 6MMPr was just below the toxic dose in our mouse model, and this dose was used in subsequent studies. Mice were treated with 6MMPr immediately after subcutaneous inoculation with WNV for eight consecutive days. Treatment with 6MMPr exacerbated weight loss in WNV-inoculated mice and did not significantly affect mortality. We hypothesized that 6MMPr has low bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS and examined the effect of pre-treatment with 6MMPr on viral loads in the periphery and CNS. Pre-treatment with 6MMPr had no significant effect on viremia or viral titers in the periphery, but resulted in significantly higher viral loads in the brain, suggesting that the effect of 6MMPr is tissue-dependent. In conclusion, despite being a potent inhibitor of flaviviruses in cell culture, 6MMPr was not effective against West Nile disease in mice; however, further studies are warranted to reduce the toxicity and/or improve the bioavailability of this potential antiviral drug.

  4. Aspirin-like molecules that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus 1 replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, Cândida F.; Paridaen, Judith T. M. L.; Rutten, Karla; Huigen, Marleen C. D. G.; van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Middel, Jeena; Beerens, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Schuurman, Rob; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Verhoef, Jan; Nottet, Hans S. L. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some anti-inflammatory molecules are also known to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. We found that o-(acetoxyphenyl)hept-2-ynyl sulfide (APHS), a recently synthesized non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecule can inhibit HIV-1 replication. The aim of this study was to clarify

  5. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus.

  6. Inhibition of Pim1 kinase, new therapeutic approach in virus-induced asthma exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Maaike; Bedke, Nicole; Smithers, Natalie P.; Loxham, Matthew; Howarth, Peter H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Davies, Donna E.

    Therapeutic options to treat virus-induced asthma exacerbations are limited and urgently needed. Therefore, we tested Pim1 kinase as potential therapeutic target in human rhinovirus (HRV) infections. We hypothesised that inhibition of Pim1 kinase reduces HRV replication by augmenting the

  7. Silver nanoparticles inhibit vaccinia virus infection by preventing viral entry through a macropinocytosis-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefry, John C; Wooley, Dawn P

    2013-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been shown to inhibit viruses. However, very little is known about the mechanism of antiviral activity. This study tested the hypothesis that 25-nm silver nanoparticles inhibited Vaccinia virus replication by preventing viral entry. Plaque reduction, confocal microscopy, and beta-galactosidase reporter gene assays were used to examine viral attachment and entry in the presence and absence of silver nanoparticles. To explore the mechanism of inhibition, viral entry experiments were conducted with silver nanoparticles and small interfering RNAs designed to silence the gene coding for p21-activated kinase 1, a key mediator of macropinocytosis. The silver nanoparticles caused a 4- to 5-log reduction in viral titer at concentrations that were not toxic to cells. Virus was capable of adsorbing to cells but could not enter cells in the presence of silver nanoparticles. Virus particles that had adsorbed to cells in the presence of silver nanoparticles were found to be infectious upon removal from the cells, indicating lack of direct virucidal effect. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for viral entry in the presence of silver nanoparticles was 27.4+/-3.3 microg/ml. When macropinocytosis was blocked, this inhibition was significantly reduced. Thus, macropinocytosis was required for the full antiviral effect. For the first time, this study points to the novel result that a cellular process involved in viral entry is responsible for the antiviral effects of silver nanoparticles.

  8. Inhibition of dengue virus 3 in mammalian cell culture by synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the inhibition of Dengue virus 3 by synthetic siRNAs targeting the untranslated regions UTR and structural regions of DENV3 genome in Vero-81 cell line. Methods: Vero-81 cells transfected with synthetic siRNAs were challenged by DENV3. The effectiveness of siRNAs was confirmed by four ...

  9. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N...

  10. Analysis of the Diluents Used for Rubella Virus Hemagglutination and Hemagglutination-Inhibition Tests1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, H. J.; Northrop, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    A new diluent (ADGP) for the rubella virus hemagglutination (HA) and hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests is described. It was found that the HA and HI titers and the erythrocyte agglutination pattern were improved in ADGP compared to previously described diluents. The influence of the components of ADGP and of various test conditions on optimal HA and HI results were examined. PMID:5807157

  11. Virus-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig is inhibited by levodropropizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, G; van der Linde, H J; Omini, C; Nijkamp, F P

    1993-08-01

    Intratracheal Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) virus inoculation of guinea pigs leads to a non-specific airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro which coincides with a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (90% increase, 4 days after inoculation). The activity of the bronchoalveolar cells, as measured by the chemiluminescence production of infected animals is significantly diminished (34.2%, 4 days after inoculation) after renewed stimulation with PI-3 virus in vitro as compared to the chemiluminescence production by bronchoalveolar cells obtained from control guinea pigs. Pretreatment of the guinea-pigs with the antitussive agent levodropropizine, administered intra-peritoneally twice a day for five successive days at a dose of 10 mg/kg, prevents the virus-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits the influx of broncho-alveolar cells. Levodropropizine at a dose of 1 mg/kg did not modulate these responses. Further, the decrease in chemiluminescence production of broncho-alveolar cells obtained from virus-infected animals after PI-3 virus stimulation in vitro was inhibited by levodropropizine (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the ability of levodropropizine to counteract the hyperresponsiveness phenomenon and the associated inflammatory event induced by PI-3 virus, an effect which may be due to its capacity to act on the peptidergic system or may be due to the anti-allergic/bronchoconstrictor property of this compound.

  12. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by targeting broad host cell pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Marois

    Full Text Available Antivirals that are currently used to treat influenza virus infections target components of the virus which can mutate rapidly. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of resistant strains to one or many antivirals in recent years. Here we compared the antiviral effects of lysosomotropic alkalinizing agents (LAAs and calcium modulators (CMs, which interfere with crucial events in the influenza virus replication cycle, against avian, swine, and human viruses of different subtypes in MDCK cells. We observed that treatment with LAAs, CMs, or a combination of both, significantly inhibited viral replication. Moreover, the drugs were effective even when they were administered 8 h after infection. Finally, analysis of the expression of viral acidic polymerase (PA revealed that both drugs classes interfered with early events in the viral replication cycle. This study demonstrates that targeting broad host cellular pathways can be an efficient strategy to inhibit influenza replication. Furthermore, it provides an interesting avenue for drug development where resistance by the virus might be reduced since the virus is not targeted directly.

  13. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Delvecchio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  14. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P; Monteiro, Fábio L; Loiola, Erick C; Dias, André A; Silva, Fábio J M; Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Osorio, Jorge E; Bellio, Maria; O'Connor, David H; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-11-29

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  15. Zika virus infection dysregulates human neural stem cell growth and inhibits differentiation into neuroprogenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devhare, Pradip; Meyer, Keith; Steele, Robert; Ray, Ratna B; Ray, Ranjit

    2017-01-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus-associated diseases in South America and its threat to spread to other parts of the world has emerged as a global health emergency. A strong link between Zika virus and microcephaly exists, and the potential mechanisms associated with microcephaly are under intense investigation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Zika virus infection of Asian and African lineages (PRVABC59 and MR766) in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). These two Zika virus strains displayed distinct infection pattern and growth rates in hNSCs. Zika virus MR766 strain increased serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a known early cellular response proteins to DNA damage. On the other hand, PRVABC59 strain upregulated serine 15 phosphorylation of p53, p21 and PUMA expression. MR766-infected cells displayed poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 cleavage. Interestingly, infection of hNSCs by both strains of Zika virus for 24 h, followed by incubation in astrocyte differentiation medium, induced rounding and cell death. However, astrocytes generated from hNSCs by incubation in differentiation medium when infected with Zika virus displayed minimal cytopathic effect at an early time point. Infected hNSCs incubated in astrocyte differentiating medium displayed PARP cleavage within 24–36 h. Together, these results showed that two distinct strains of Zika virus potentiate hNSC growth inhibition by different mechanisms, but both viruses strongly induce death in early differentiating neuroprogenitor cells even at a very low multiplicity of infection. Our observations demonstrate further mechanistic insights for impaired neuronal homeostasis during active Zika virus infection. PMID:29022904

  16. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  17. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  18. Genetic Inactivation of COPI Coatomer Separately Inhibits Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Entry and Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdeinick-Kerr, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Viruses coopt cellular membrane transport to invade cells, establish intracellular sites of replication, and release progeny virions. Recent genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens revealed that genetically divergent viruses require biosynthetic membrane transport by the COPI coatomer complex for efficient replication. Here we found that disrupting COPI function by RNAi inhibited an early stage of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. To dissect which replication stage(s) was affected by coatomer inactivation, we used visual and biochemical assays to independently measure the efficiency of viral entry and gene expression in hamster (ldlF) cells depleted of the temperature-sensitive ε-COP subunit. We show that ε-COP depletion for 12 h caused a primary block to virus internalization and a secondary defect in viral gene expression. Using brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inhibitor of COPI function, we demonstrate that short-term (1-h) BFA treatments inhibit VSV gene expression, while only long-term (12-h) treatments block virus entry. We conclude that prolonged coatomer inactivation perturbs cellular endocytic transport and thereby indirectly impairs VSV entry. Our results offer an explanation of why COPI coatomer is frequently identified in screens for cellular factors that support cell invasion by microbial pathogens. PMID:22072764

  19. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wuqi [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Kao, Wenping [The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Zhai, Aixia [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun [The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Zhang, Qingmeng [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Zhang, Fengmin, E-mail: fengminzhang@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway.

  20. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  1. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  2. Different effect of proteasome inhibition on vesicular stomatitis virus and poliovirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Neznanov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteasome activity is an important part of viral replication. In this study, we examined the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and poliovirus. We found that the proteasome inhibitors significantly suppressed VSV protein synthesis, virus accumulation, and protected infected cells from toxic effect of VSV replication. In contrast, poliovirus replication was delayed, but not diminished in the presence of the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib. We also found that inhibition of proteasomes stimulated stress-related processes, such as accumulation of chaperone hsp70, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha, and overall inhibition of translation. VSV replication was sensitive to this stress with significant decline in replication process. Poliovirus growth was less sensitive with only delay in replication. Inhibition of proteasome activity suppressed cellular and VSV protein synthesis, but did not reduce poliovirus protein synthesis. Protein kinase GCN2 supported the ability of proteasome inhibitors to attenuate general translation and to suppress VSV replication. We propose that different mechanisms of translational initiation by VSV and poliovirus determine their sensitivity to stress induced by the inhibition of proteasomes. To our knowledge, this is the first study that connects the effect of stress induced by proteasome inhibition with the efficiency of viral infection.

  3. Sequence-specific inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robaczewska, Magdalena; Narayan, Ramamurthy; Seigneres, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) appear as promising new antisense agents, that have not yet been examined as hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors. Our aim was to study the ability of PNAs targeting the duck HBV (DHBV) encapsidation signal epsilon to inhibit reverse transcription (RT...... inhibitor than the PNA targeting only the bulge. Importantly, the inhibition was highly sequence-specific since double-mismatched PNA had no effect on the RT reaction. Moreover, in PDH the PNA coupled to Arg(7) cationic delivery peptide decreased DHBV replication. CONCLUSIONS: We provide the first evidence...

  4. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibition of Lassa Virus Infection through Aberrant GP1 Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Bergeron, Éric; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Albariño, César G; Flint, Mike; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-12-20

    Lassa virus (LASV) infection is a major public health concern due to high fatality rates and limited effective treatment. The interferon-stimulated gene cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC). 25HC is involved in regulating cholesterol biosynthesis and has recently been identified as a potent antiviral targeting enveloped virus entry. Here, we show a previously unrecognized role of CH25H in inhibiting LASV glycoprotein glycosylation and the production of infectious virus. Overexpression of CH25H or treatment with 25HC decreased LASV G1 glycoprotein N-glycan maturation and reduced the production of infectious LASV. Depletion of endogenous CH25H using small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced the levels of fully glycosylated G1 and increased infectious LASV production. Finally, LASV particles produced from 25HC-treated cells were found to be less infectious, to incorporate aberrantly glycosylated GP1 species, and to be defective in binding alpha-dystroglycan, an attachment and entry receptor. Our findings identify a novel role for CH25H in controlling LASV propagation and indicate that manipulation of the expression of CH25H or the administration of 25HC may be a useful anti-LASV therapy. Lassa fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever in humans caused by Lassa virus (LASV). No vaccine for LASV is currently available. Treatment is limited to the administration of ribavirin, which is only effective when given early in the course of illness. Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) is a recently identified interferon-stimulated gene (ISG); it encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), which inhibits several viruses. Here, we identify a novel antiviral mechanism of 25HC that is dependent on inhibiting the glycosylation of Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein and reducing the infectivity of LASV as a means of suppressing viral replication. Since N-linked glycosylation is a

  5. Direct Inhibition of Cellular Fatty Acid Synthase Impairs Replication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohol, Yamini M; Wang, Zhaoti; Kemble, George; Duke, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the de novo synthesis of palmitate, a fatty acid utilized for synthesis of more complex fatty acids, plasma membrane structure, and post-translational palmitoylation of host and viral proteins. We have developed a potent inhibitor of FASN (TVB-3166) that reduces the production of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) progeny in vitro from infected human lung epithelial cells (A549) and in vivo from mice challenged intranasally with RSV. Addition of TVB-3166 to the culture medium of RSV-infected A549 cells reduces viral spread without inducing cytopathic effects. The antiviral effect of the FASN inhibitor is a direct consequence of reducing de novo palmitate synthesis; similar doses are required for both antiviral activity and inhibition of palmitate production, and the addition of exogenous palmitate to TVB-3166-treated cells restores RSV production. TVB-3166 has minimal effect on RSV entry but significantly reduces viral RNA replication, protein levels, viral particle formation and infectivity of released viral particles. TVB-3166 substantially impacts viral replication, reducing production of infectious progeny 250-fold. In vivo, oral administration of TVB-3166 to RSV-A (Long)-infected BALB/c mice on normal chow, starting either on the day of infection or one day post-infection, reduces RSV lung titers 21-fold and 9-fold respectively. Further, TVB-3166 also inhibits the production of RSV B, human parainfluenza 3 (PIV3), and human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16) progeny from A549, HEp2 and HeLa cells respectively. Thus, inhibition of FASN and palmitate synthesis by TVB-3166 significantly reduces RSV progeny both in vitro and in vivo and has broad-spectrum activity against other respiratory viruses. FASN inhibition may alter the composition of regions of the host cell membrane where RSV assembly or replication occurs, or change the membrane composition of RSV progeny particles, decreasing their infectivity.

  6. Induction of cell-cell fusion by ectromelia virus is not inhibited by its fusion inhibitory complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Pinhas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectromelia virus, a member of the Orthopox genus, is the causative agent of the highly infectious mousepox disease. Previous studies have shown that different poxviruses induce cell-cell fusion which is manifested by the formation of multinucleated-giant cells (polykaryocytes. This phenomenon has been widely studied with vaccinia virus in conditions which require artificial acidification of the medium. Results We show that Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion under neutral pH conditions and requires the presence of a sufficient amount of viral particles on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This could be achieved by infection with a replicating virus and its propagation in infected cells (fusion "from within" or by infection with a high amount of virus particles per cell (fusion "from without". Inhibition of virus maturation or inhibition of virus transport on microtubules towards the plasma membrane resulted in a complete inhibition of syncytia formation. We show that in contrast to vaccinia virus, Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion irrespectively of its hemagglutination properties and cell-surface expression of the orthologs of the fusion inhibitory complex, A56 and K2. Additionally, cell-cell fusion was also detected in mice lungs following lethal respiratory infection. Conclusion Ectromelia virus induces spontaneous cell-cell fusion in-vitro and in-vivo although expressing an A56/K2 fusion inhibitory complex. This syncytia formation property cannot be attributed to the 37 amino acid deletion in ECTV A56.

  7. Honokiol, a Lignan Biphenol Derived from the Magnolia Tree, Inhibits Dengue Virus Type 2 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Yeu Fang; Siang-Jyun Chen; Huey-Nan Wu; Yueh-Hsin Ping; Ching-Yen Lin; David Shiuan; Chi-Long Chen; Ying-Ray Lee; Kao-Jean Huang

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most widespread arbovirus infection and poses a serious health and economic issue in tropical and subtropical countries. Currently no licensed vaccine or compounds can be used to prevent or manage the severity of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Honokiol, a lignan biphenol derived from the Magnolia tree, is commonly used in Eastern medicine. Here we report that honokiol has profound antiviral activity against serotype 2 DENV (DENV-2). In addition to inhibiting the intracellular DE...

  8. Evidence for the Inhibition of Dengue Virus Binding in the Presence of Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    treatment methods [8]. In this suspended form, DENV would not be infectious and requires parenteral transmission. Dengue is only infectious... Dengue : guidelines for diagnosis, treatment , prevention, and control,” Spec. Program. Res. Train. Trop. Dis., pp. x, 147, 2009. [7] R. V Gibbons...protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-089 EVIDENCE FOR INHIBITION OF DENGUE VIRUS BINDING IN THE PRESENCE OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES THESIS

  9. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection. PMID:14638512

  10. A peptide-based viral inactivator inhibits Zika virus infection in pregnant mice and fetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yufeng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zou, Peng; Wang, Qian; Dai, Yanyan; Yu, Fei; Du, Lanying; Zhang, Na-Na; Tian, Min; Hao, Jia-Nan; Meng, Yu; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaohui; Fuk-Woo Chan, Jasper; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a re-emerging flavivirus associated with neurological disorders, has spread rapidly to more than 70 countries and territories. However, no specific vaccines or antiviral drugs are currently available to prevent or treat ZIKV infection. Here we report that a synthetic peptide derived from the stem region of ZIKV envelope protein, designated Z2, potently inhibits infection of ZIKV and other flaviviruses in vitro. We show that Z2 interacts with ZIKV surface protein and disrupt...

  11. Structural basis of influenza virus fusion inhibition by the antiviral drug Arbidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-12-21

    The broad-spectrum antiviral drug Arbidol shows efficacy against influenza viruses by targeting the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion machinery. However, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying fusion inhibition by Arbidol has remained obscure, thereby hindering its further development as a specific and optimized influenza therapeutic. We determined crystal structures of Arbidol in complex with influenza virus HA from pandemic 1968 H3N2 and recent 2013 H7N9 viruses. Arbidol binds in a hydrophobic cavity in the HA trimer stem at the interface between two protomers. This cavity is distal to the conserved epitope targeted by broadly neutralizing stem antibodies and is ~16 Å from the fusion peptide. Arbidol primarily makes hydrophobic interactions with the binding site but also induces some conformational rearrangements to form a network of inter- and intraprotomer salt bridges. By functioning as molecular glue, Arbidol stabilizes the prefusion conformation of HA that inhibits the large conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion in the low pH of the endosome. This unique binding mode compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of other class I fusion proteins enhances our understanding of how small molecules can function as fusion inhibitors and guides the development of broad-spectrum therapeutics against influenza virus.

  12. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Inhibits Pediatric Brain Tumor Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Cockle

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade glioma (pHGG and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG are invasive tumors with poor survival. Oncolytic virotherapy, initially devised as a direct cytotoxic treatment, is now also known to act via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we investigate a previously unreported mechanism of action: the inhibition of migration and invasion in pediatric brain tumors. We evaluated the effect of oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1716 (HSV1716 on the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG both in vitro using 2D (scratch assay, live cell imaging and 3D (spheroid invasion in collagen assays and in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft model of DIPG invasion. HSV1716 inhibited migration and invasion in pHGG and DIPG cell lines. pHGG cells demonstrated reduced velocity and changed morphology in the presence of virus. HSV1716 altered pHGG cytoskeletal dynamics by stabilizing microtubules, inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3, and preventing localized clustering of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC to the leading edge of cells. HSV1716 treatment also reduced tumor infiltration in a mouse orthotopic xenograft DIPG model. Our results demonstrate that HSV1716 targets the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG and indicates the potential of an oncolytic virus (OV to be used as a novel anti-invasive treatment strategy for pediatric brain tumors.

  13. Human transbodies to VP40 inhibit cellular egress of Ebola virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimoori, Salma; Seesuay, Watee; Jittavisutthikul, Surasak; Chaisri, Urai; Sookrung, Nitat; Densumite, Jaslan; Saelim, Nawannaporn; Chulanetra, Monrat; Maneewatch, Santi; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-10-14

    A direct acting anti-Ebola agent is needed. VP40, a conserved protein across Ebolavirus (EBOV) species has several pivotal roles in the virus life cycle. Inhibition of VP40 functions would lessen the virion integrity and interfere with the viral assembly, budding, and spread. In this study, cell penetrable human scFvs (HuscFvs) that bound to EBOV VP40 were produced by phage display technology. Gene sequences coding for VP40-bound-HuscFvs were subcloned from phagemids into protein expression plasmids downstream to a gene of cell penetrating peptide, i.e., nonaarginine (R9). By electron microscopy, transbodies from three clones effectively inhibited egress of the Ebola virus-like particles from human hepatic cells transduced with pseudo-typed-Lentivirus particles carrying EBOV VP40 and GP genes. Computerized simulation indicated that the effective HuscFvs bound to multiple basic residues in the cationic patch of VP40 C-terminal domain which are important in membrane-binding for viral matrix assembly and virus budding. The transbodies bound also to VP40 N-terminal domain and L domain peptide encompassed the PTAPPEY (WW binding) motif, suggesting that they might confer VP40 function inhibition through additional mechanism(s). The generated transbodies are worthwhile tested with authentic EBOV before developing to direct acting anti-Ebola agent for preclinical and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  15. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  16. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 inhibits hepatitis A virus replication in Huh7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Saito, Kengo; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Sakamoto, Naoya; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-03-20

    The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 has been reported to inhibit La protein expression. We previously demonstrated that the inhibition of La expression could inhibit hepatitis A virus (HAV) internal ribosomal entry-site (IRES)-mediated translation and HAV replication in vitro. In this study, we analyzed the effects of AZD1480 on HAV IRES-mediated translation and replication. HAV IRES-mediated translation in COS7-HAV-IRES cells was inhibited by 0.1-1 μM AZD1480, a dosage that did not affect cell viability. Results showed a significant reduction in intracellular HAV HA11-1299 genotype IIIA RNA levels in Huh7 cells treated with AZD1480. Furthermore, AZD1480 inhibited the expression of phosphorylated-(Tyr-705)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and La in Huh7 cells. Therefore, we propose that AZD1480 can inhibit HAV IRES activity and HAV replication through the inhibition of the La protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adeno-associated viruses serotype 2-mediated RNA interference efficiently inhibits rabies virus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Hua-Lei; Guo, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Yu-Jiao; Ma, Jin-Zhu; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zhao, Yong-Kun; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the potential of adeno-associated viruses serotype 2 (AAV2)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) as an antiviral agent against rabies, recombinant AAV2 vectors expressing siRNA targeting the nucleoprotein (N) gene of rabies virus (RABV) (rAAV-N796) were constructed and evaluated. When NA cells pretreated with rAAV-N796 were challenged with RABV, there was a 37.8 ± 3.4% to 55.1 ± 5.3% reduction in RABV virus titer. When cells pre-challenged with RABV were treated with rAAV-N796, there was a 4.4 ± 1.4 to 28.8 ± 3.2% reduction in RABV virus titer. Relative quantification of RABV transcripts using real-time PCR and Western blot revealed that the knockdown of RABV-N gene transcripts was based on the rAAV-N796 inoculation titer. When any NA cells were treated with rAAV-N796 before or after challenged with RABV, significant reduction in virus titer was observed in both administrations. Mice treated intracerebrally with rAAV-N796 exhibited 50 ± 5.3 and 62.5 ± 4.7% protection when challenged intracerebrally or intramuscally, respectively, with lethal RABV. When mice treated intramuscularly with rAAV-N796 were challenged intramuscularly with lethal RABV, they exhibited 37.5 ± 3.7% protection. When mice were intracerebrally and intramuscularly with rAAV-N796 24 hr after exposure to RABV infection, they exhibited 25 ± 4.1% protection The N gene mRNA levels in the brains of challenged mice with three different administrations were reduced (55, 68, 32 and 25%, respectively). These results indicated that AAV2 vector-mediated siRNA delivery in vitro in NA cells inhibited RABV multiplication, inhibited RABV multiplication in vivo in the mice brain and imparted partial protection against lethal rabies. So, it may have a potential to be used as an alternative antiviral approach against rabies.

  18. Investigation of the salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone scaffold for inhibition of influenza virus PA endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogolino, Dominga; Bacchi, Alessia; De Luca, Laura; Rispoli, Gabriele; Sechi, Mario; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve; Carcelli, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-influenza virus therapeutics, which are urgently needed because of the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Reported PA inhibitors are assumed to chelate the divalent metal ion(s) (Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺) in the enzyme's catalytic site, which is located in the N-terminal part of PA (PA-Nter). In the present work, a series of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the PA-Nter catalytic activity. Compounds 1-6 have been evaluated against influenza virus, both in enzymatic assays with influenza virus PA-Nter and in virus yield assays in MDCK cells. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the hydrazone analogue of the most active thiosemicarbazone has also been evaluated. Since chelation may represent a mode of action of such class of molecules, we studied the interaction of two of them, one with and one without biological activity versus the PA enzyme, towards Mg²⁺, the ion that is probably involved in the endonuclease activity of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase complex. The crystal structure of the magnesium complex of the o-vanillin thiosemicarbazone ligand 1 is also described. Moreover, docking studies of PA endonuclease with compounds 1 and 2 were performed, to further analyse the possible mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors.

  19. [Protein kinase inhibitor flavopiridol inhibits the replication of influenza virus in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixiong; Zhang, Junjie; Ye, Xin

    2012-09-04

    To investigate the antiviral effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol on influenza A virus and explore its antiviral mechanism. The A549 or Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were infected with influenza A virus A/WSN/33 and treated with flavopiridol. The viral proteins were determined by immunolotting and immunofluorescence. The virus titer was measured by plaque assay. To verify whether the activity of host RNA polymerase II was affected by flavopiridol, the phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II CTD domain was analyzed by immunoblotting with phosphor-specific antibody. The amount of viral mRNA, vRNA and cRNA was measured by reverse transcription and PCR. The amount of viral proteins was significantly decreased and the titer of virus was greatly reduced in cells treated with flavopiridol. Further analysis showed that the phosphorylation of Ser-2 in the heptad repeat of the CTD domain in RNA polymerase II was decreased in falvopiridol treated cell. This result indicated that the transcription elongation activity of RNA pol II was impaired upon treatment with flavopiridol. Then we found that the amount of viral vRNA was significantly decreased in flavopiridol treated cells while only moderate decrease of mRNA was observed and almost no reduction of cRNA was detected. Flavopiridol can greatly suppress the replication of influenza virus. We propose that the inhibition of the transcription elongation activity of host RNA polymerase II would cause the decrease of viral mRNA transcription.

  20. Amiodarone and metabolite MDEA inhibit Ebola virus infection by interfering with the viral entry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Baritussio, Aldo; Munegato, Denis; Calistri, Arianna; Ha, Huy Riem; Bigler, Laurent; Fabris, Fabrizio; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is one of the most lethal transmissible infections characterized by a high fatality rate, and a treatment has not been developed yet. Recently, it has been shown that cationic amphiphiles, among them the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, inhibit filovirus infection. In the present work, we investigated how amiodarone interferes with Ebola virus infection. Wild-type Sudan ebolavirus and recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus, pseudotyped with the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein, were used to gain further insight into the ability of amiodarone to affect Ebola virus infection. We show that amiodarone decreases Ebola virus infection at concentrations close to those found in the sera of patients treated for arrhythmias. The drug acts by interfering with the fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membrane. We also show that MDEA, the main amiodarone metabolite, contributes to the antiviral activity. Finally, studies with amiodarone analogues indicate that the antiviral activity is correlated with drug ability to accumulate into and interfere with the endocytic pathway. Considering that it is well tolerated, especially in the acute setting, amiodarone appears to deserve consideration for clinical use in EVD. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Inhibition of RNA recruitment and replication of an RNA virus by acridine derivatives with known anti-prion activities.

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    Zsuzsanna Sasvari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small molecule inhibitors of RNA virus replication are potent antiviral drugs and useful to dissect selected steps in the replication process. To identify antiviral compounds against Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV, a model positive stranded RNA virus, we tested acridine derivatives, such as chlorpromazine (CPZ and quinacrine (QC, which are active against prion-based diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that CPZ and QC compounds inhibited TBSV RNA accumulation in plants and in protoplasts. In vitro assays revealed that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were manifested at different steps of TBSV replication. QC was shown to have an effect on multiple steps, including: (i inhibition of the selective binding of the p33 replication protein to the viral RNA template, which is required for recruitment of viral RNA for replication; (ii reduction of minus-strand synthesis by the tombusvirus replicase; and (iii inhibition of translation of the uncapped TBSV genomic RNA. In contrast, CPZ was shown to inhibit the in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase, likely due to binding of CPZ to intracellular membranes, which are important for RNA virus replication. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Since we found that CPZ was also an effective inhibitor of other plant viruses, including Tobacco mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus, it seems likely that CPZ has a broad range of antiviral activity. Thus, these inhibitors constitute effective tools to study similarities in replication strategies of various RNA viruses.

  2. Inhibition of RNA Recruitment and Replication of an RNA Virus by Acridine Derivatives with Known Anti-Prion Activities

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    Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Bach, Stéphane; Blondel, Marc; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Small molecule inhibitors of RNA virus replication are potent antiviral drugs and useful to dissect selected steps in the replication process. To identify antiviral compounds against Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a model positive stranded RNA virus, we tested acridine derivatives, such as chlorpromazine (CPZ) and quinacrine (QC), which are active against prion-based diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report that CPZ and QC compounds inhibited TBSV RNA accumulation in plants and in protoplasts. In vitro assays revealed that the inhibitory effects of these compounds were manifested at different steps of TBSV replication. QC was shown to have an effect on multiple steps, including: (i) inhibition of the selective binding of the p33 replication protein to the viral RNA template, which is required for recruitment of viral RNA for replication; (ii) reduction of minus-strand synthesis by the tombusvirus replicase; and (iii) inhibition of translation of the uncapped TBSV genomic RNA. In contrast, CPZ was shown to inhibit the in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase, likely due to binding of CPZ to intracellular membranes, which are important for RNA virus replication. Conclusion/Significance Since we found that CPZ was also an effective inhibitor of other plant viruses, including Tobacco mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus, it seems likely that CPZ has a broad range of antiviral activity. Thus, these inhibitors constitute effective tools to study similarities in replication strategies of various RNA viruses. PMID:19823675

  3. Alpha-mangostin inhibits both dengue virus production and cytokine/chemokine expression.

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    Tarasuk, Mayuri; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Chimma, Pattamawan; Sratongno, Panudda; Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2017-08-15

    Since severe dengue virus (DENV) infection in humans associates with both high viral load and massive cytokine production - referred to as "cytokine storm", an ideal drug for treatment of DENV infection should efficiently inhibit both virus production and cytokine expression. In searching for such an ideal drug, we discovered that α-mangostin (α-MG), a major bioactive compound purified from the pericarp of the mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana Linn), which has been used in traditional medicine for several conditions including trauma, diarrhea, wound infection, pain, fever, and convulsion, inhibits both DENV production in cultured hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh-7 cells, and cytokine/chemokine expression in HepG2 cells. α-MG could also efficiently inhibit all four serotypes of DENV. Treatment of DENV-infected cells with α-MG (20μM) significantly reduced the infection rates of four DENV serotypes by 47-55%. α-MG completely inhibited production of DENV-1 and DENV-3, and markedly reduced production of DENV-2 and DENV-4 by 100 folds. Furthermore, it could markedly reduce cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (RANTES, MIP-1β, and IP-10) transcription. These actions of α-MG are more potent than those of antiviral agent (ribavirin) and anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone). Thus, α-MG is potential to be further developed as therapeutic agent for DENV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway.

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    Song, Wuqi; Kao, Wenping; Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-09-06

    The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1-IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

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    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses.

  6. Spironolactone blocks Epstein–Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  7. Peretinoin, an Acyclic Retinoid, Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Suppressing Sphingosine Metabolic Pathway In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Murai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC frequently develops from hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. We previously reported that peretinoin, an acyclic retinoid, inhibits HCV replication. This study aimed to examine the influence of peretinoin on the HBV lifecycle. HBV-DNA and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA were evaluated by a qPCR method in HepG2.2.15 cells. Peretinoin significantly reduced the levels of intracellular HBV-DNA, nuclear cccDNA, and HBV transcript at a concentration that did not induce cytotoxicity. Conversely, other retinoids, such as 9-cis, 13-cis retinoic acid (RA, and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA, had no effect or rather increased HBV replication. Mechanistically, although peretinoin increased the expression of HBV-related transcription factors, as observed for other retinoids, peretinoin enhanced the binding of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 to cccDNA in the nucleus and negatively regulated HBV transcription. Moreover, peretinoin significantly inhibited the expression of SPHK1, a potential inhibitor of HDAC activity, and might be involved in hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, and HCC. SPHK1 overexpression in cells cancelled the inhibition of HBV replication induced by peretinoin. This indicates that peretinoin activates HDAC1 and thereby suppresses HBV replication by inhibiting the sphingosine metabolic pathway. Therefore, peretinoin may be a novel therapeutic agent for HBV replication and chemoprevention against HCC.

  8. 5-(Perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), an arabino-based rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitor, targets virion envelope lipids to inhibit fusion of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus, and other enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Ustinov, Alexey V; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Korshun, Vladimir A; Schang, Luis M

    2013-04-01

    Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Fusion requires the formation of an intermediate stalk structure, in which only the outer leaflets are fused. The stalk structure, in turn, requires the lipid bilayer of the envelope to bend into negative curvature. This process is inhibited by enrichment in the outer leaflet of lipids with larger polar headgroups, which favor positive curvature. Accordingly, phospholipids with such shape inhibit viral fusion. We previously identified a compound, 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-2'-deoxy-uridine (dUY11), with overall shape and amphipathicity similar to those of these phospholipids. dUY11 inhibited the formation of the negative curvature necessary for stalk formation and the fusion of a model enveloped virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We proposed that dUY11 acted by biophysical mechanisms as a result of its shape and amphipathicity. To test this model, we have now characterized the mechanisms against influenza virus and HCV of 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), which has shape and amphipathicity similar to those of dUY11 but contains an arabino-nucleoside. aUY11 interacted with envelope lipids to inhibit the infectivity of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2), and other enveloped viruses. It specifically inhibited the fusion of influenza virus, HCV, VSV, and even protein-free liposomes to cells. Furthermore, aUY11 inhibited the formation of negative curvature in model lipid bilayers. In summary, the arabino-derived aUY11 and the deoxy-derived dUY11 act by the same antiviral mechanisms against several enveloped but otherwise unrelated viruses. Therefore, chemically unrelated compounds of appropriate shape and amphipathicity target virion envelope lipids to inhibit formation of the negative curvature required for fusion, inhibiting infectivity by biophysical, not biochemical, mechanisms.

  9. Inhibition of influenza A virus infection in vitro by peptides designed in silico.

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    Rogelio López-Martínez

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are enveloped, segmented negative single-stranded RNA viruses, capable of causing severe human respiratory infections. Currently, only two types of drugs are used to treat influenza A infections, the M2 H(+ ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI (oseltamivir and zanamivir. Moreover, the emergence of drug-resistant influenza A virus strains has emphasized the need to develop new antiviral agents to complement or replace the existing drugs. Influenza A virus has on the surface a glycoprotein named hemagglutinin (HA which due to its important role in the initial stage of infection: receptor binding and fusion activities of viral and endosomal membranes, is a potential target for new antiviral drugs. In this work we designed nine peptides using several bioinformatics tools. These peptides were derived from the HA1 and HA2 subunits of influenza A HA with the aim to inhibit influenza A virus infection. The peptides were synthetized and their antiviral activity was tested in vitro against several influenza A viral strains: Puerto Rico/916/34 (H1N1, (H1N1pdm09, swine (H1N1 and avian (H5N2. We found these peptides were able to inhibit the influenza A viral strains tested, without showing any cytotoxic effect. By docking studies we found evidence that all the peptides were capable to bind to the viral HA, principally to important regions on the viral HA stalk, thus could prevent the HA conformational changes required to carry out its membranes fusion activity.

  10. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Kai [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Maoyun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Jin, Fujun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xiao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Yifei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  11. Aptamers targeting rabies virus-infected cells inhibit street rabies virus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-Ru; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Li, Ling; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Rabies is a viral infection of the CNS that is almost always fatal once symptoms occur. No effective treatment of the disease is available and novel antiviral strategies are urgently required. Street rabies viruses are field isolates known to be highly neurotropic. Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind their targets with high affinity and specificity and thus have potential for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this study, we demonstrate that the aptamers FO24 and FO21, which target RABV-infected cells, can significantly protect mice from a lethal dose of the street rabies virus FJ strain in vivo. Groups receiving preexposure prophylaxis had higher survival rates than the groups receiving postexposure prophylaxis. When mice were inoculated with aptamers (4 nmol) for 24h by intracranial or intramuscular injection prior to intramuscular inoculation with the FJ strain, approximately 60% of the mice survived. These results indicate that the FO21 and FO24 aptamers may be used to develop preventative antiviral therapy against rabies disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. β-Thujaplicinol inhibits hepatitis B virus replication by blocking the viral ribonuclease H activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Huang, Ailong; Tavis, John E

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription. It chronically infects >350 million people and kills about 1 million patients annually. Therapy primarily employs nucleos(t)ide analogs that suppress viral DNA synthesis by the viral reverse transcriptase very well but that rarely cure the infection, so additional therapies are needed. Reverse transcription requires the viral ribonuclease H (RNAseH) to destroy the viral RNA after it has been copied into DNA. We recently produced active recombinant HBV RNAseH and demonstrated that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) RNAseH antagonists could inhibit the HBV enzyme at a high frequency. Here, we extended these results to β-thujaplicinol, a hydroxylated tropolone which inhibits the HIV RNAseH. β-Thujaplicinol inhibited RNAseHs from HBV genotype D and H in biochemical assays with IC₅₀ values of 5.9±0.7 and 2.3±1.7 μM, respectively. It blocked replication of HBV genotypes A and D in culture by inhibiting the RNAseH activity with an estimated EC₅₀ of ∼5 μM and a CC₅₀ of 10.1±1. 7 μM. Activity of β-thujaplicinol against RNAseH sequences from multiple HBV genotypes implies that if chemical derivatives of β-thujaplicinol with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity can be identified, they would have promise as anti-HBV agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide inhibits subgroup J avian leucosis virus infection by directly blocking virus infection and improving immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuilian; Wei, Kai; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Hu, Liping; Zhao, Peng; Meng, Xiuyan; Shao, Mingxu; Wang, Chuanwen; Zhu, Lijun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yang; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2017-03-13

    Subgroup J avian leucosis virus (ALV-J) generally causes neoplastic diseases, immunosuppression and subsequently increases susceptibility to secondary infection in birds. The spread of ALV-J mainly depends on congenital infection and horizontal contact. Although ALV-J infection causes enormous losses yearly in the poultry industry worldwide, effective measures to control ALV-J remain lacking. In this study, we demonstrated that Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), a natural polysaccharide extracted from Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen, can significantly inhibit ALV-J replication in vitro by blocking viral adsorption to host cells. Electron microscopy and blocking ELISA tests revealed that TPPPS possibly blocks viral adsorption to host cells by interacting with the glycoprotein 85 protein of ALV-J. Furthermore, we artificially established a congenitally ALV-J-infected chicken model to examine the anti-viral effects of TPPPS in vivo. TPPPS significantly inhibited viral shedding and viral loads in immune organs and largely eliminated the immunosuppression caused by congenital ALV-J infection. Additionally, pre-administration of TPPPS obviously reduced the size and delayed the occurrence of tumors induced by acute oncogenic ALV-J infection. This study revealed the prominent effects and feasible mechanisms of TPPPS in inhibiting ALV-J infection, thereby providing a novel prospect to control ALV-J spread.

  14. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  15. Inhibition of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha production by Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Wolfram J; Wagner, Hans J; Maurmann, Susanne; Hennig, Holger; Kreft, Burkhard

    2002-03-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) exerts substantially immunomodulating activities in vitro and in vivo. In this context, EBV-induced chemokine production and the influence of EBV on this highly redundant system of inflammatory proteins have hardly been investigated. This study analyzed the production of interleukin-8, RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) on EBV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immune EBV-seropositive (EBV(+)) and noninfected EBV-seronegative (EBV(-)) individuals. EBV failed to induce the production of MIP-1 alpha in EBV(+) as well as EBV(-) individuals, whereas the other chemokines studied were readily expressed. Moreover, EBV completely down-regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and phytohemagglutinin-induced MIP-1 alpha production up to 4 hours after induction. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of EBV- and LPS-stimulated cultures revealed that EBV inhibited MIP-1 alpha production on the transcriptional level. This effect was abolished by addition of antiglycoprotein (gp)350/220, a monoclonal antibody against EBV's major envelope glycoprotein, which mediates binding of the virus to the EBV receptor, CD21. However, recombinant gp350/220 protein alone did not inhibit the LPS-induced MIP-1 alpha production, indicating that infection of the target cell is indispensable for this effect. In summary, we demonstrate a new immunomodulating activity of EBV on the chemokine system that probably helps the virus to evade the host's immune system favoring lifelong infection.

  16. Triptolide-mediated inhibition of interferon signaling enhances vesicular stomatitis virus-based oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yebdri, Fethia; Van Grevenynghe, Julien; Tang, Vera A; Goulet, Marie-Line; Wu, Jian Hui; Stojdl, David F; Hiscott, John; Lin, Rongtuan

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical trials demonstrated that use of oncolytic viruses (OVs) is a promising new therapeutic approach to treat multiple types of cancer. To further improve their viral oncolysis, experimental strategies are now combining OVs with different cytotoxic compounds. In this study, we investigated the capacity of triptolide - a natural anticancer molecule - to enhance vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) oncolysis in OV-resistant cancer cells. Triptolide treatment increased VSV replication in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 and in other VSV-resistant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, triptolide (TPL) inhibited the innate antiviral response by blocking type I interferon (IFN) signaling, downstream of IRF3 activation. Furthermore, triptolide-enhanced VSV-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion in VSV-resistant cells, as measured by annexin-V, cleaved caspase-3, and B-cell lymphoma 2 staining. In vivo, using the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and PC3 mouse xenograft models, combination treatment with VSV and triptolide delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals by enhancing viral replication. Together, these results demonstrate that triptolide inhibition of IFN production sensitizes prostate cancer cells to VSV replication and virus-mediated apoptosis.

  17. MAVS-mediated host cell defense is inhibited by Borna disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujun; Song, Wuqi; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qingmeng; He, Junming; Li, Aimei; Qian, Jun; Zhai, Aixia; Hu, Yunlong; Kao, Wenping; Wei, Lanlan; Zhang, Fengmin; Xu, Dakang

    2013-08-01

    Viruses often have strategies for preventing host cell apoptosis, which antagonizes viral replication. Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus that establishes a non-cytolytic persistent infection. Although BDV suppresses type I Interferon (IFN) through (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1) associated BDV P protein, it is still unclear how BDV can survive in the host cell and establish a persistent infection. Recently, it has been recognized that mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway is a crucial component of the innate immune response. In this work we show that BDV X protein colocalizes and interacts with MAVS in the mitochondria to block programmed cell death. BDV X protein-mediated inhibition of apoptosis was independent of type I IFN production and NF-κB activity. The reduction of BDV X expression with RNA interference (RNAi) or the mutation of BDV X enhanced MAVS-induced cell death. Collectively, our data provide novel insights into how BDV X protein inhibits antiviral-associated programmed cell death, through its action of MAVS function. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication.We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor.Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  19. Nanostructured glycan architecture is important in the inhibition of influenza A virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Joon; Na, Dong Hee; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Douaisi, Marc; Zhang, Fuming; Park, Eun Ji; Park, Jong-Hwan; Youn, Hana; Song, Chang-Seon; Kane, Ravi S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Lee, Kyung Bok; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid change and zoonotic transmission to humans have enhanced the virulence of the influenza A virus (IAV). Neutralizing antibodies fail to provide lasting protection from seasonal epidemics. Furthermore, the effectiveness of anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitors has declined because of drug resistance. Drugs that can block viral attachment and cell entry independent of antigenic evolution or drug resistance might address these problems. We show that multivalent 6‧-sialyllactose-polyamidoamine (6SL-PAMAM) conjugates, when designed to have well-defined ligand valencies and spacings, can effectively inhibit IAV infection. Generation 4 (G4) 6SL-PAMAM conjugates with a spacing of around 3 nm between 6SL ligands (S3-G4) showed the strongest binding to a hemagglutinin trimer (dissociation constant of 1.6 × 10-7 M) and afforded the best inhibition of H1N1 infection. S3-G4 conjugates were resistant to hydrolysis by H1N1 neuraminidase. These conjugates protected 75% of mice from a lethal challenge with H1N1 and prevented weight loss in infected animals. The structure-based design of multivalent nanomaterials, involving modulation of nanoscale backbone structures and number and spacing between ligands, resulted in optimal inhibition of IAV infection. This approach may be broadly applicable for designing effective and enduring therapeutic protection against human or avian influenza viruses.

  20. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retain their resistance to all VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. PMID:25965802

  1. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-09-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retained their resistance to all tested VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between Haemagglutination inhibiting antibodies and protection against clade 6B viruses in 2013 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sophia; Saborio, Saira; Kuan, Guillermina; Gresh, Lionel; Sanchez, Nery; Ojeda, Sergio; Harris, Eva; Balmaseda, Angel; Gordon, Aubree

    2017-10-27

    The epidemiology of the pandemic A(H1N1) virus has been changing as population immunity continues to co-evolve with the virus. The impact of genetic changes in the virus on human's susceptibility is an outstanding important question in vaccine design. In a community-based study, we aim to (1) determine the genetic characteristics of 2009-2015 pandemic H1N1 viruses, (2) assess antibody response following natural infections and (3) assess the correlation of A/California/07/09 antibody titers to protection in the 2013 and 2015 epidemics. In a household transmission study, serum specimens from 253 individuals in Managua, Nicaragua were analyzed. Combined nose and throat swabs were collected to detect RT-PCR confirmed influenza infection and virus sequencing. Hemagglutination inhibition assays were performed and the protective titer for circulating H1N1pdm was determined. Clade 6B pandemic H1N1 viruses predominated in Nicaragua during the 2013 and 2015 seasons. Our household transmission study detected a household secondary attack rate of 17% in 2013 and 33% in 2015. Infected individuals, including vaccinees, showed an apparent antibody response to A/California/07/09. Baseline titers of A/California/07/09 antibodies were found to associate with protection in both seasons. A titer of ≥1:40 correlated to a 44% protection in children, a 29% protection in adults 15-49years old and a 51% protection in adults 50-85years old. In 2013 and 2015, antibody titers to A/California/07/09 associated with an infection risk reduction amongst exposed household contacts. This is consistent with a detectable vaccine effectiveness reported in a number of studies. Genetic changes in clade 6B viruses might have led to a reduced immunity in some whereas others might have been less affected. The use of human serologic data is important in virus characterization and if performed in a timely manner, could assist in vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R; Echegoyen, Luis; Llano, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4(+) T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Ribavirin inhibits Borna disease virus proliferation and fatal neurological diseases in neonatally infected gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-Jae; Matsunaga, Hidenori; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2008-12-01

    By using neonatal gerbils, we assessed the effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of Borna disease virus (BDV) in the brain. The intracranial inoculation of ribavirin reduced viral propagation in the acutely infected brain, resulting in protection from fatal neurological disorders. We found that the treatment with ribavirin markedly reduces the numbers of OX-42-positive microglial cells, but does not activate expression of Th1 cytokines, in BDV-infected gerbil brains. Our results suggested that ribavirin directly inhibits BDV replication and might be a potential tool for the treatment of BDV infection.

  5. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV.Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition

  6. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavla Strnadova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169 replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity.

  7. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnadova, Pavla; Ren, Hongwei; Valentine, Robert; Mazzon, Michela; Sweeney, Trevor R; Brierley, Ian; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169) replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity.

  8. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe......-1 infection, the most potent inhibition was found with the lectin HPA. These results indicate that lectins may have a broad antiviral effect on enveloped viruses only limited by types of oligosaccharides present on individual viruses....

  9. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus in a human larynx carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo Chih; Chang, Jung San; Chiang, Lien Chai; Lin, Chun Ching

    2009-09-01

    4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde, an active constituent of Agastache rugosa, was examined for its cytoprotective activity against RSV by XTT method in human larynx carcinoma cell line. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde could effectively inhibit cytopathic effect of RSV (p<0.0001) with an estimated IC(50) of 0.055microg/ml and a selectivity index (SI) of 898.2. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.03microg/ml) could inhibit viral entrance by interfering viral attachment (IC(50) of 0.06microg/ml; p<0.0001) and internalization (IC(50) of 0.01microg/ml; p<0.0001). 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde significantly increased the basal production of IFN (p=0.0015), but not the virus-induced IFN production. Therefore, its cytoprotective activity against RSV was not mediated by interferon. In conclusion, 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde might be helpful to manage the disease induced by RSV infection.

  10. Lycorine reduces mortality of human enterovirus 71-infected mice by inhibiting virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years old and this infection occasionally induces severe neurological complications. No vaccines or drugs are clinical available to control EV71 epidemics. In present study, we show that treatment with lycorine reduced the viral cytopathic effect (CPE on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells by inhibiting virus replication. Analysis of this inhibitory effect of lycorine on viral proteins synthesis suggests that lycorine blocks the elongation of the viral polyprotein during translation. Lycorine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of EV71 resulted in reduction of mortality, clinical scores and pathological changes in the muscles of mice, which were achieved through inhibition of viral replication. When mice were infected with a moderate dose of EV71, lycorine treatment was able to protect them from paralysis. Lycorine may be a potential drug candidate for the clinical treatment of EV71-infected patients.

  11. The hepatitis B virus x protein inhibits thymine DNA glycosylase initiated base excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten A A van de Klundert

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus (HBV genome encodes the X protein (HBx, a ubiquitous transactivator that is required for HBV replication. Expression of the HBx protein has been associated with the development of HBV infection-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Previously, we generated a 3D structure of HBx by combined homology and ab initio in silico modelling. This structure showed a striking similarity to the human thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG, a key enzyme in the base excision repair (BER pathway. To further explore this finding, we investigated whether both proteins interfere with or complement each other's functions. Here we show that TDG does not affect HBV replication, but that HBx strongly inhibits TDG-initiated base excision repair (BER, a major DNA repair pathway. Inhibition of the BER pathway may contribute substantially to the oncogenic effect of HBV infection.

  12. A peptide-based viral inactivator inhibits Zika virus infection in pregnant mice and fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zou, Peng; Wang, Qian; Dai, Yanyan; Yu, Fei; Du, Lanying; Zhang, Na-Na; Tian, Min; Hao, Jia-Nan; Meng, Yu; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaohui; Fuk-Woo Chan, Jasper; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2017-07-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a re-emerging flavivirus associated with neurological disorders, has spread rapidly to more than 70 countries and territories. However, no specific vaccines or antiviral drugs are currently available to prevent or treat ZIKV infection. Here we report that a synthetic peptide derived from the stem region of ZIKV envelope protein, designated Z2, potently inhibits infection of ZIKV and other flaviviruses in vitro. We show that Z2 interacts with ZIKV surface protein and disrupts the integrity of the viral membrane. Z2 can penetrate the placental barrier to enter fetal tissues and is safe for use in pregnant mice. Intraperitoneal administration of Z2 inhibits vertical transmission of ZIKV in pregnant C57BL/6 mice and protects type I or type I/II interferon receptor-deficient mice against lethal ZIKV challenge. Thus, Z2 has potential to be further developed as an antiviral treatment against ZIKV infection in high-risk populations, particularly pregnant women.

  13. Derivatives of amphotericin inhibit infection with human immunodeficiency virus in vitro by different modes of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Witzke, N M; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Three water-soluble derivatives of amphotericin B were tested for inhibition of HIV infection in vitro. The compounds amphotericin B methyl ester (AME) and N-(N'-(2-(4'-methylmorpholinio)ethyl)N"-cyclohexyl guanyl) amphotericin B methyl ester (MCG) inhibited HIV infection by 50% at 1 microgram....../ml; N-(N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)N"-ethyl guanyl) amphotericin B (DAPEG) did so at 5-11 micrograms/ml. While the virus-inhibitory effect of AME was due to an interaction with target lymphocytes, the effect of MCG was due to a direct anti-viral action. AME increased the potential of infected cells...... to fuse with uninfected cells, but MCG had no significant effect on cell fusion. All compounds had a lower cellular toxicity than amphotericin B and were not toxic at concentrations below 20 micrograms/ml....

  14. Post-transcriptional inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication through small interference RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Sidra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is a major health problem throughout world that causes acute and chronic infection which resulted in liver fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. The only therapy currently available for HCV infection is the combination of pegylated interferon alpha (PEG-IFN α and ribavirin. This therapy can effectively clear the virus infection in only 50% of infected individuals. Hence, there is a dire need to develop antiviral agents against HCV. Results This study was design to examine the ability of exogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to block the replication of HCV in human liver cells. In the present study six 21-bp siRNAs were designed against different regions of HCV non-structural genes (NS2, NS3 serine protease/helicase, NS4Band NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase. siRNAs were labeled as NS2si241, NS3si-229, NS3si-858, NS4Bsi-166, NS5Bsi-241 and NS5Bsi-1064. We found that siRNAs against HCV NS2- NS5B efficiently inhibit HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Our results demonstrated that siRNAs directed against HCV NS3 (NS3si-229 and NS3si-858 showed 58% and 88% reduction in viral titer respectively. Moreover, NS4Bsi-166 and NS5Bsi-1064 exhibited a dramatic reduction in HCV viral RNA and resulted in greater than 90% inhibition at a 20 μM concentration, while NS2si-241 showed 27% reduction in viral titer. No significant inhibition was detected in cells transfected with the negative control siRNA. Conclusion Our results suggest that siRNAs targeting against HCV non-structural genes (NS2-NS5B efficiently inhibit HCV replication and combination of these siRNAs of different targets and interferon will be better option to treat HCV infection throughout the world.

  15. Miltefosine inhibits Chikungunya virus replication in human primary dermal fibroblasts [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

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    Anuj Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging pathogen that has caused widespread outbreaks affecting millions of people around the globe. Currently, there is no specific therapeutic drug against CHIKV, with symptomatic treatment only to manage the disease. Pi3-akt signaling has been implicated in infection of several viruses including that of CHIKV. Effect of Pi3-akt signaling inhibitors on CHIKV replication was evaluated in this study. Methods: Human primary dermal fibroblast cells were treated with inhibitors of the Pi3-akt signaling pathway. Suppression of CHIKV replication was evaluated as reduction in virus titer in cell supernatants. Effect of miltefosine (MF on CHIKV replication was evaluated in pre and post treatment regimen. Inhibition of virus replication was determined by cell growth, virus titer and western blot. Results: Inhibition of Akt-phosphorylation significantly inhibited CHIKV replication. No effect on CHIKV replication was observed after treatment with Pi3-kinase and mTOR activation inhibitors. Further, MF, an FDA-approved Akt-inhibitor, inhibited CHIKV replication in pre- and post-infection treatment regimens. Conclusion: Data suggests that Akt-phosphorylation can be an amenable target of therapy against CHIKV infection. This is the first study to show inhibition of CHIKV replication by MF, and presents a case for further development of MF as an anti-CHIKV drug.

  16. Niclosamide inhibits lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus by disrupting mTOR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Yang, Mengtian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the oncogenic γ-herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) cause several severe malignancies in humans. Inhibition of the lytic replication of EBV and KSHV eliminates the reservoir of persistent infection and transmission, consequently preventing the occurrence of diseases from the sources of infection. Antiviral drugs are limited in controlling these viral infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that niclosamide, an old anthelmintic drug, inhibits mTOR activation during EBV lytic replication. Consequently, niclosamide effectively suppresses EBV lytic gene expression, viral DNA lytic replication and virion production in EBV-infected lymphoma cells and epithelial cells. Niclosamide exhibits cytotoxicity toward lymphoma cells and induces irreversible cell cycle arrest in lytically EBV-infected cells. The ectopic overexpression of mTOR reverses the inhibition of niclosamide in EBV lytic replication. Similarly, niclosamide inhibits KSHV lytic replication. Thus, we conclude that niclosamide is a promising candidate for chemotherapy against the acute occurrence and transmission of infectious diseases of oncogenic γ-herpesviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Retinoids inhibit measles virus in vitro via nuclear retinoid receptor signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Claire; Chabot, Sophie; Mann, Koren K; Colombo, Myrian; Chatterjee, Avijit; Miller, Wilson H; Ward, Brian J

    2008-10-01

    Measles virus (MV) infects 30 million children every year, resulting in more than half a million deaths. Vitamin A (retinol) treatment of acute measles can reduce measles-associated mortality by 50-80%. We sought to determine whether or not retinoids can act directly to limit MV output from infected cells. Physiologic concentrations of retinol were found to inhibit MV output in PBMC and a range of cell lines of epithelial and endothelial origin (40-50%). Near complete inhibition of viral output was achieved in some cells/lines treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis RA (9cRA). Important attenuation of the anti-MV effect of retinoids in R4 cells, a subclone of a retinoid-responsive cell line (NB4) deficient in RAR signaling, demonstrates that this effect is mediated at least in part by nuclear retinoid receptor signaling pathways. Inhibition of MV replication could not be fully explained as a result of retinoid effects on cell differentiation, proliferation or viability, particularly at low retinoid concentrations (1-10nM). These data provide the first evidence that retinoids can directly inhibit MV in vitro, and raise the possibility that retinoids may have similar actions in vivo.

  18. A Short Double-Stapled Peptide Inhibits Respiratory Syncytial Virus Entry and Spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Vanessa; Galloux, Marie; Garcin, Dominique; Eléouët, Jean-François; Le Goffic, Ronan; Larcher, Thibaut; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Héritier, Julien; Segura, Jean-Manuel; Baechler, Elodie; Arrell, Miriam; Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Nyanguile, Origène

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic peptides derived from the heptad repeat (HR) of fusion (F) proteins can be used as dominant negative inhibitors to inhibit the fusion mechanism of class I viral F proteins. Here, we have performed a stapled-peptide scan across the HR2 domain of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F protein with the aim to identify a minimal domain capable of disrupting the formation of the postfusion six-helix bundle required for viral cell entry. Constraining the peptides with a single staple was not sufficient to inhibit RSV infection. However, the insertion of double staples led to the identification of novel short stapled peptides that display nanomolar potency in HEp-2 cells and are exceptionally robust to proteolytic degradation. By replacing each amino acid of the peptides by an alanine, we found that the substitution of residues 506 to 509, located in a patch of polar contacts between HR2 and HR1, severely affected inhibition. Finally, we show that intranasal delivery of the most potent peptide to BALB/c mice significantly decreased RSV infection in upper and lower respiratory tracts. The discovery of this minimal HR2 sequence as a means for inhibition of RSV infection provides the basis for further medicinal chemistry efforts toward developing RSV fusion antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Gaillard et al.

  19. The C protein of measles virus inhibits the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Jessica A; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2003-10-25

    Type I interferons (IFNalpha/beta) are an important part of innate immunity to viral infections because they induce an antiviral response and limit viral replication until the adaptive response clears the infection. Since the nonstructural proteins of several paramyxoviruses inhibit the IFNalpha/beta response, we chose to explore the role of the C protein of measles virus (MV) in such inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that the MV C protein may serve as a virulence factor, but its role in the pathogenesis of MV remains undefined. In the present study, a recombinant MV strain that does not express the C protein (MV C-) and its parental strain (Ed Tag) were used. Growth of MV C- was restricted in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HeLa cells, but in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFNalpha/beta, MV C- produced titers that were equivalent to those of Ed Tag. In addition, expression of the MV C protein from plasmid DNA inhibited the production of an IFNalpha/beta responsive reporter gene and, to a lesser extent, inhibited an IFNgamma responsive reporter gene. The ability of the MV C protein to suppress the IFNalpha/beta response was confirmed using a biologic assay. After IFNbeta stimulation, HeLa cells infected with Ed Tag produced five-fold less IFNalpha/beta than cells infected with MV C-. While the mechanism of inhibition remains unclear, these data suggest that the MV C protein plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MV by inhibiting IFNalpha/beta signaling.

  20. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction.

  1. (4R,6S)-2-Dihydromenisdaurilide is a Butenolide that Efficiently Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chueh-Yao; Liu, Ching-Hsuan; Wang, Guey-Horng; Jassey, Alagie; Li, Chia-Lin; Chen, Lei; Yen, Ming-Hong; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lin, Liang-Tzung

    2016-07-18

    Without a vaccine, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a significant threat, putting 170-300 million carriers worldwide at risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the direct-acting antivirals targeting HCV replication have revolutionized the treatment of hepatitis C, several obstacles persist, including resistance development, potential side-effects, and the prohibitive cost that limits their availability. Furthermore, treatment of HCV re-infection in liver transplantation remains a significant challenge. Developing novel antivirals that target viral entry could help expand the scope of HCV therapeutics and treatment strategies. Herein, we report (4R,6S)-2-dihydromenisdaurilide (DHMD), a natural butenolide, as an efficient inhibitor of HCV entry. Specifically, DHMD potently inhibited HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentration. Examination on the viral life cycle demonstrated that DHMD selectively targeted the early steps of infection while leaving viral replication/translation and assembly/release unaffected. Furthermore, DHMD did not induce an antiviral interferon response. Mechanistic dissection of HCV entry revealed that DHMD could inactivate cell-free virus, abrogate viral attachment, and inhibit viral entry/fusion, with the most pronounced effect observed against the viral adsorption phase as validated using ELISA and confocal microscopy. Due to its potency, DHMD may be of value for further development as an entry inhibitor against HCV, particularly for application in transplant setting.

  2. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by activation of the cGAS-STING pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Hao, Ruidong; Liu, Dan; Liu, Xing; Wu, Shaoshuai; Guo, Shuting; Wang, Yuan; Tien, Po; Guo, Deyin

    2016-12-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyses synthesis of the second messenger cGAMP, which activates the downstream signalling adaptor protein STING, leading to the expression of type I interferons. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus, and the cGAS-STING pathway may inhibit HBV RNA synthesis and viral assembly in cell culture, but the exact roles of the cGAS pathway in the restriction of HBV replication in infection systems remain to be elucidated. In this study, replication of HBV was significantly inhibited both in cell culture and in vivo in a mouse model when the cGAS-STING pathway was activated by dsDNA or cGAMP. In contrast, the presence of enzymatically inactive cGAS mutant did not influence HBV replication. Moreover, knockdown of cGAS in human peripheral blood monocytes led to a higher level of intracellular HBV DNA. Collectively, our data indicate that the cGAS-STING pathway plays a role in the surveillance of HBV infection and may be exploited for development of novel anti-HBV strategies.

  3. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibition of Lassa Virus Infection through Aberrant GP1 Glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punya Shrivastava-Ranjan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV infection is a major public health concern due to high fatality rates and limited effective treatment. The interferon-stimulated gene cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC. 25HC is involved in regulating cholesterol biosynthesis and has recently been identified as a potent antiviral targeting enveloped virus entry. Here, we show a previously unrecognized role of CH25H in inhibiting LASV glycoprotein glycosylation and the production of infectious virus. Overexpression of CH25H or treatment with 25HC decreased LASV G1 glycoprotein N-glycan maturation and reduced the production of infectious LASV. Depletion of endogenous CH25H using small interfering RNA (siRNA enhanced the levels of fully glycosylated G1 and increased infectious LASV production. Finally, LASV particles produced from 25HC-treated cells were found to be less infectious, to incorporate aberrantly glycosylated GP1 species, and to be defective in binding alpha-dystroglycan, an attachment and entry receptor. Our findings identify a novel role for CH25H in controlling LASV propagation and indicate that manipulation of the expression of CH25H or the administration of 25HC may be a useful anti-LASV therapy.

  4. Varicella Viruses Inhibit Interferon-Stimulated JAK-STAT Signaling through Multiple Mechanisms.

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    Marieke C Verweij

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV causes chickenpox in humans and, subsequently, establishes latency in the sensory ganglia from where it reactivates to cause herpes zoster. Infection of rhesus macaques with simian varicella virus (SVV recapitulates VZV pathogenesis in humans thus representing a suitable animal model for VZV infection. While the type I interferon (IFN response has been shown to affect VZV replication, the virus employs counter mechanisms to prevent the induction of anti-viral IFN stimulated genes (ISG. Here, we demonstrate that SVV inhibits type I IFN-activated signal transduction via the JAK-STAT pathway. SVV-infected rhesus fibroblasts were refractory to IFN stimulation displaying reduced protein levels of IRF9 and lacking STAT2 phosphorylation. Since previous work implicated involvement of the VZV immediate early gene product ORF63 in preventing ISG-induction we studied the role of SVV ORF63 in generating resistance to IFN treatment. Interestingly, SVV ORF63 did not affect STAT2 phosphorylation but caused IRF9 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner, suggesting that SVV employs multiple mechanisms to counteract the effect of IFN. Control of SVV ORF63 protein levels via fusion to a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR-degradation domain additionally confirmed its requirement for viral replication. Our results also show a prominent reduction of IRF9 and inhibition of STAT2 phosphorylation in VZV-infected cells. In addition, cells expressing VZV ORF63 blocked IFN-stimulation and displayed reduced levels of the IRF9 protein. Taken together, our data suggest that varicella ORF63 prevents ISG-induction both directly via IRF9 degradation and indirectly via transcriptional control of viral proteins that interfere with STAT2 phosphorylation. SVV and VZV thus encode multiple viral gene products that tightly control IFN-induced anti-viral responses.

  5. Cigarette smoke inhibits BAFF expression and mucosal immunoglobulin A responses in the lung during influenza virus infection.

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    Wang, Jianmiao; Li, Qinghai; Xie, Jungang; Xu, Yongjian

    2015-03-14

    It is incompletely understood how cigarette smoke (CS) exposure affects lung mucosal immune responses during viral respiratory infections. B cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) plays an important role in the induction of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) which is the main effector of the mucosal immune system. We therefore investigated the effects of CS exposure on BAFF expression and S-IgA responses in the lung during influenza virus infection. Mice were exposed to CS and/or infected with influenza virus. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung compartments were analyzed for BAFF expression, influenza-specific S-IgA level and histological changes. Lung B cells were isolated and the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) expression was determined. BEAS-2B cells were treated with CS extract (CSE), influenza virus, interferon beta or N-acetylcysteine and BAFF expression was measured. CS inhibited BAFF expression in the lung, particularly after long-term exposure. BAFF and S-IgA levels were increased during influenza virus infection. Three-month CS exposure prior to influenza virus infection resulted in reduced BAFF and S-IgA levels in the lung as well as augmented pulmonary inflammation on day 7 after infection. Prior CS exposure also caused decreased Aicda expression in lung B cells during infection. Neutralization of BAFF in the lung resulted in reduced S-IgA levels during influenza virus infection. CSE inhibited virus-mediated BAFF induction in a dose-dependent manner in BEAS-2B cells, while this inhibition of BAFF by CSE was prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Our findings indicate that CS may hinder early mucosal IgA responses in the lung during influenza virus infection through oxidative inhibition of BAFF, which might contribute to the increased incidence and severity of viral infections in smokers.

  6. Inhibition of full length Hepatitis C Virus particles of 1a genotype through small interference RNA

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    Rehman Sidra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family of viruses, is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only treatment available consists of a combination of Pegylated interferon alpha (INF-α and ribavirin, but only half of the patients treated show a sufficient antiviral response. Thus there is a great need for the development of new treatments for HCV infections. RNA interference (RNAi represents a new promising approach to develop effective antiviral drugs and has been extremely effective against HCV infection. Results This study was design to assess or explore the silencing effect of small interference RNAs (siRNAs against full length HCV particles of genotype 1a. In the present study six 21-bp siRNAs were designed against different regions of HCV structural genes (Core, E1 and E2. Selected siRNAs were labeled as Csi 301, Csi 29, E1si 52, E1si 192, E2si 86 and E2si 493. Our results demonstrated that siRNAs directed against HCV core gene showed 70% reduction in viral titer in HCV infected liver cells. Moreover, siRNAs against E1 and E2 envelop genes showed a dramatic reduction in HCV viral RNA, E2si 86 exhibited 93% inhibition, while E1si 192, E2si 493 and E1si 52 showed 87%, 80%, and 66% inhibition respectively. No significant inhibition was detected in cells transfected with the negative control siRNA. Conclusion Our results suggested that siRNAs targeted against HCV structural genes efficiently silence full length HCV particles and provide an effective therapeutic option against HCV infection.

  7. Replication Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus in Co-Infected Patients in Chinese Population.

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    Ge Yu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infections contributes to a substantial proportion of liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and virological features of HBV-HCV co-infection.Demographic data were collected for 3238 high-risk people from an HCV-endemic region in China. Laboratory tests included HCV antibody and HBV serological markers, liver function tests, and routine blood analysis. Anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed for HCV RNA levels and subgenotypes. HBsAg-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA.A total of 1468 patients had chronic HCV and/or HBV infections. Among them, 1200 individuals were classified as HCV mono-infected, 161 were classified as HBV mono-infected, and 107 were classified as co-infected. The HBV-HCV co-infected patients not only had a lower HBV DNA positive rate compared to HBV mono-infected patients (84.1% versus 94.4%, respectively; P < 0.001. The median HCV RNA levels in HBV-HCV co-infected patients were significantly lower than those in the HCV mono-infected patients (1.18[Interquartile range (IQR 0-5.57] versus 5.87[IQR, 3.54-6.71] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. Furthermore, co-infected patients were less likely to have detectable HCV RNA levels than HCV mono-infected patients (23.4% versus 56.5%, respectively; P < 0.001. Those HBV-HCV co-infected patients had significantly lower median HBV DNA levels than those mono-infected with HBV (1.97[IQR, 1.3-3.43] versus 3.06[IQR, 2-4.28] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. The HBV-HCV co-infection group had higher ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, APRI and FIB-4 levels, but lower ALB and total platelet compared to the HBV mono-infection group, and similar to that of the HCV mono-infected group.These results suggest that co-infection with HCV and HBV inhibits the replication of both viruses. The serologic results of HBV-HCV co-infection in patients suggests more liver injury compared to HBV mono-infected patients, but is

  8. Development of RNA aptamer that inhibits methyltransferase activity of dengue virus.

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    Jung, Jae In; Han, Seung Ryul; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2018-02-01

    To develop an RNA aptamer specific for the methyltransferase (MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) which is essential for viral genome replication and translation acting directly on N-7 and 2'-O-methylation of the type-I cap structure of the viral RNA. We identified 2'-fluoro-modified RNA aptamers that can specifically bind DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) MTase using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technology. We truncated the chosen aptamer into a 45-mer RNA sequence that can bind DENV2 MTase with K d  ~ 28 nM and inhibit N-7 methylation activity of the protein. Moreover, the 45-mer truncated aptamer could not only bind with an K d  ~ 15.6 nM but also inhibit methylation activity of DENV serotype 3 (DENV3) MTase. The 45-mer aptamer competitively impeded binding of both DENV2 and DENV3 genomic RNA to MTase of each serotype. The selected 45-mer truncated RNA aptamer specifically and avidly bound DENV MTase and competitively inhibited its methylation activity, and thus could be useful for the development of anti-DENV agents.

  9. GB virus C particles inhibit T cell activation via envelope E2 protein-mediated inhibition of T cell receptor signaling

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    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H.; Xiang, Jinhua; Landay, Alan L.; Chivero, Ernest T.; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses enter into complex interactions within human hosts leading to facilitation or suppression of each other's replication. Upon coinfection, GB virus C (GBV-C) suppresses HIV-1 replication in vivo and in vitro, and GBV-C coinfection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected people. GBV-C is a lymphotropic virus capable of persistent infection. GBV-C infection is associated with reduced T cell activation in HIV-infected humans, and immune activation is a critical component of HIV disease pathogenesis. We demonstrate that serum GBV-C particles inhibited activation of primary human T cells. T cell activation inhibition was mediated by the envelope glycoprotein E2, as expression of E2 inhibited T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of tyrosine kinase (Lck). The region on the E2 protein was characterized and revealed a highly conserved peptide motif sufficient to inhibit TCR-mediated signaling. The E2 region contained a predicted Lck substrate site, and substitution of an alanine or histidine for the tyrosine reversed TCR signaling inhibition. GBV-C E2 protein and a synthetic peptide representing the inhibitory amino acid sequence were phosphorylated by Lck in vitro. The synthetic peptide also inhibited TCR-mediated activation of primary human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Extracellular microvesicles from GBV-C E2-expressing cells contained E2 protein and inhibited TCR signaling in bystander T cells not expressing E2. Thus, GBV-C reduced global T cell activation via competition between its envelope protein E2 and Lck following TCR engagement. This novel inhibitory mechanism of T cell activation may provide new approaches for HIV and immunoactivation therapy. PMID:23686495

  10. Inhibition of viral RNA polymerases by nucleoside and nucleotide analogs: therapeutic applications against positive-strand RNA viruses beyond hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deval, Jerome; Symons, Julian A; Beigelman, Leo

    2014-12-01

    A number of important human infections are caused by positive-strand RNA viruses, yet almost none can be treated with small molecule antiviral therapeutics. One exception is the chronic infection caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV), against which new generations of potent inhibitors are being developed. One of the main molecular targets for anti-HCV drugs is the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, NS5B. This review summarizes the search for nucleoside and nucleotide analogs that inhibit HCV NS5B, which led to the FDA approval of sofosbuvir in 2013. Advances in anti-HCV therapeutics have also stimulated efforts to develop nucleoside analogs against other positive-strand RNA viruses. Although it remains to be validated in the clinic, the prospect of using nucleoside analogs to treat acute infections caused by RNA viruses represents an important paradigm shift and a new frontier for future antiviral therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of cdk9 during herpes simplex virus 1 infection impedes viral transcription.

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    Mark Ou

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection there is a loss of the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II found in elongation complexes. This occurs in part because RNAP II undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation during times of highly active viral transcription, which may result from stalled elongating complexes. In addition, a viral protein, ICP22, was reported to trigger a loss of serine-2 RNAP II. These findings have led to some speculation that the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNAP II may not be required for HSV-1 transcription, although this form is required for cellular transcription elongation and RNA processing. Cellular kinase cdk9 phosphorylates serine-2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNAP II. To determine if serine-2 phosphorylated RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription, we inhibited cdk9 during HSV-1 infection and measured viral gene expression. Inhibition was achieved by adding cdk9 inhibitors 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazone-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (DRB or flavopiridol (FVP or by expression of a dominant-negative cdk9 or HEXIM1, which in conjunction with 7SK snRNA inhibits cdk9 in complex with cyclin 1. Here we report that inhibition of cdk9 resulted in decreased viral yields and levels of late proteins, poor formation of viral transcription-replication compartments, reduced levels of poly(A+ mRNA and decreased RNA synthesis as measured by uptake of 5-bromouridine into nascent RNA. Importantly, a global reduction in viral mRNAs was seen as determined by microarray analysis. We conclude that serine-2 phosphorylation of the CTD of RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription.

  12. Borna disease virus encoded phosphoprotein inhibits host innate immunity by regulating miR-155.

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    Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Kao, Wenping; Li, Aimei; Li, Yujun; He, Junming; Zhang, Qingmeng; Song, Wuqi; Fu, Yingmei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Xiaobei; Li, Hui; Zhong, Zhaohua; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-04-01

    It has been reported that the Borna disease virus (BDV) encoded phosphoprotein (P protein) can inhibit the activity of Traf family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1), thus preventing the induction of type I interferon (IFN). However, the effects of microRNA on the regulation of BDV infection and the host's immune response have not been characterized. miR-155 was predicted to be complementary to the BDV P mRNA by RNAhybrid software. Here, we showed that miR-155 was down-regulated in BDV persistently infected human oligodendroglial (OL/BDV) cells and that the BDV P protein, but not the X protein, directly inhibited miR-155 expression in cells. When miR-155 was over-expressed, the inhibition of type I IFNs by BDV in cells was reversed, and the expression of type I IFNs was increased. When miR-155 expression was specifically blocked, cellular IFN expression and the induction of IFN by poly I:C treatment were suppressed. Furthermore, miR-155 promoted type I IFN production by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3. Mutations in the nt1138-nt1158 region of SOCS3 abandoned the impact of miR-155 on the expression of SOCS3-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The levels of BDV P mRNA and protein were significantly decreased in OL/BDV cells when miR-155 was over-expressed; however, miR-155-mutation did not affect the expression of BDV P-EGFP. Thus, BDV persistent infection inhibited the expression of type I IFNs through the suppression of miR-155, and miR-155 played an important immune regulatory role in BDV persistent infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuanghu; Chen, Ren; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid's structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation.

  14. Monocytes inhibit hepatitis C virus-induced TRAIL expression on CD56bright NK cells.

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    Mele, Dalila; Mantovani, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Grossi, Giulia; Lombardi, Andrea; Mondelli, Mario U; Varchetta, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously shown that culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) enhance tumor necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on healthy NK cells, but not on those from patients infected with HCV, which was likely dependent on accessory cells. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved in altered TRAIL upregulation in this setting. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from controls and patients infected with HCV were exposed to HCVcc. Cell depletions were performed to identify cells responsible for NK cell activation. Flow cytometry and ELISA were used to identify the cytokines involved in the NK activation process. In patients infected with HCV, soluble factors secreted by control PBMC restored the ability of NK cells to express TRAIL. Of note, CD14+ cell depletion had identical effects upon virus exposure and promoted increased degranulation. Moreover, increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein a (IL-18BPa) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36RA) were observed after PBMC exposure to HCVcc in patients with HCV. HCVcc-induced NK cell TRAIL expression was inhibited by IL-18BPa and IL-36RA in control subjects. There were statistically significant correlations between IL-18BPa and indices of liver inflammation and fibrosis, supporting a role for this protein in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, monocytes play a key role in negative regulation of NK cell activation, predominantly via secretion of inhibitors of IL-18 and IL-36. Coordination and collaboration between immune cells are essential to fight pathogens. Herein we show that during HCV infection monocytes secrete IL-18 and IL-36 inhibitory proteins, reducing NK cell activation, and consequently inhibiting their ability to express TRAIL and kill target cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the

  15. Autophagy and the Effects of Its Inhibition on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein Biosynthesis and Infectivity

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    Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Jackson, Wallen

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and the effects of its inhibition or induction were investigated during the entire infectious cycle of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a human herpesvirus. As a baseline, we first enumerated the number of autophagosomes per cell after VZV infection compared with the number after induction of autophagy following serum starvation or treatment with tunicamycin or trehalose. Punctum induction by VZV was similar in degree to punctum induction by trehalose in uninfected cells. Treatment of infected cells with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) markedly reduced the viral titer, as determined by assays measuring both cell-free virus and infectious foci (P < 0.0001). We next examined a virion-enriched band purified by density gradient sedimentation and observed that treatment with 3-MA decreased the amount of VZV gE, while treatment with trehalose increased the amount of gE in the same band. Because VZV gE is the most abundant glycoprotein, we selected gE as a representative viral glycoprotein. To further investigate the role of autophagy in VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis as well as confirm the results obtained with 3-MA inhibition, we transfected cells with ATG5 small interfering RNA to block autophagosome formation. VZV-induced syncytium formation was markedly reduced by ATG5 knockdown (P < 0.0001). Further, we found that both expression and glycan processing of VZV gE were decreased after ATG5 knockdown, while expression of the nonglycosylated IE62 tegument protein was unchanged. Taken together, our cumulative results not only documented abundant autophagy within VZV-infected cells throughout the infectious cycle but also demonstrated that VZV-induced autophagy facilitated VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and processing. PMID:24198400

  16. Interferon Lambda Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type I Infection of Human Astrocytes and Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, JIELIANG; HU, SHUXIAN; ZHOU, LIN; YE, LI; WANG, XU; HO, JIE; HO, WENZHE

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that is capable of infecting not only neurons, but also microglia and astrocytes and can establish latent infection in the central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether IFN lambda (IFN-λ), a newly identified member of IFN family, has the ability to inhibit HSV-1 infection of primary human astrocytes and neurons. Both astrocytes and neurons were found to be highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. However, upon IFN-λ treatment, HSV-1 replication in both astrocytes and neurons was significantly suppressed, which was evidenced by the reduced expression of HSV-1 DNA and proteins. This IFN-λ-mediated action on HSV-1 could be partially neutralized by antibody to IFN-λ receptor. Investigation of the mechanisms showed that IFN-λ treatment of astrocytes and neurons resulted in the upregulation of endogenous IFN-α/β and several IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). To block IFN-α/β receptor by a specific antibody could compromise the IFN-λ actions on HSV-1 inhibition and ISG induction. In addition, IFN-λ treatment induced the expression of IFN regulatory factors (IRFs) in astrocytes and neurons. Furthermore, IFN-λ treatment of astrocytes and neurons resulted in the suppression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1), a key negative regulator of IFN pathway. These data suggest that IFN-λ possesses the anti-HSV-1 function by promoting type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral immune response in the CNS cells. PMID:20878770

  17. Effective inhibition of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus by RNA interference in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiyan; Zhang, Chunhong; Guo, Pengju; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2015-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a member of the coronaviridae family, which can cause acute and highly contagious enteric disease of swine characterized by severe entero-pathogenic diarrhea in piglets. Currently, the vaccines of PEDV are only partially effective and there is no specific drug available for treatment of PEDV infection. To exploit the possibility of using RNA interference (RNAi) as a strategy against PEDV infection, five shRNA-expressing plasmids targeting the N, M, and S genes of PEDV were constructed and transfected into Vero cells. The cytopathic effect and MTS assays demonstrated that two shRNAs (pSilencer4.1-M1 and pSilencer4.1-N) were capable of protecting cells against PEDV invasion with very high specificity and efficiency. The two shRNA expression plasmids were also able to inhibit the PEDV replication significantly, as shown by detection of virus titers (TCID50/mL). A real-time quantitative RT-PCR further confirmed that the amounts of viral RNAs in cell cultures pre-transfected with these two plasmids were reduced by 95.0 %. Our results suggest that RNAi might be a promising new strategy against PEDV infection.

  18. Selective inhibition of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein synthesis by a benz-amidinohydrazone derivative

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    Campadelli-Fiume, G.; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P.; Mannini-Palenzona, A. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Microbiologia e Virologia); Cavrini, V. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica)

    1980-01-01

    1 H-benz(f)indene-1.3(2H)dione-bis-amidinohydrazone (benzhydrazone) inhibited incorporation of /sup 14/C-glucosamine, /sup 14/C-fucose and /sup 14/C-mannose into glycoproteins of HEp-2 cells infected with various strains of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and impaired RNA and protein synthesis to a low extent. These biochemical effects are very similar to those induced by glycosylation inhibitors such as tunicamycin, D-glucosamine and 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In contrast to these inhibitors, benzhydrazone reduced HSV glycoprotein synthesis selectively since it did not significantly modify i) the saccharide uptake into glycoproteins of uninfected and of Sindbis virus-infected cells, ii) viral growth and cell fusion in paramyxovirus-infected cells, two activities which depend on viral glycoprotein synthesis. Benzhydrazone had only minor effects on the overall metabolism of uninfected cells, since it did not alter cell growth rate, and amino acid, uridine, and hexose incorporations were about 80 per cent those of untreated cells.

  19. Inhibition of West Nile virus multiplication in cell culture by anti-parkinsonian drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Blazquez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and birds, but it can also infect other vertebrates, including humans, in which it can cause neuroinvasive diseases. To date, no licensed vaccine or therapy for human use against this pathogen is yet available. A recent approach to search for new antiviral agent candidates is the assessment of long-used drugs commonly administered by clinicians to treat human disorders in drug antiviral development. In this regard, as patients with West Nile encephalitis frequently develop symptoms and features of parkinsonism, and cellular factors altered in parkinsonism, such as alpha-synuclein, have been shown to play a role on WNV infection, we have assessed the effect of four drugs (L-dopa, Selegiline, Isatin and Amantadine, that are used as therapy for Parkinson´s disease in the inhibition of WNV multiplication. L-dopa, Isatin, and Amantadine treatments significantly reduced the production of infectious virus in all cell types tested, but only Amantadine reduced viral RNA levels. These results point to antiparkinsonian drugs as possible therapeutic candidates for the development of antiviral strategies against WNV infection.

  20. Inhibition of West Nile Virus Multiplication in Cell Culture by Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Ana B; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and birds, but it can also infect other vertebrates, including humans, in which it can cause neuroinvasive diseases. To date, no licensed vaccine or therapy for human use against this pathogen is yet available. A recent approach to search for new antiviral agent candidates is the assessment of long-used drugs commonly administered by clinicians to treat human disorders in drug antiviral development. In this regard, as patients with West Nile encephalitis frequently develop symptoms and features of parkinsonism, and cellular factors altered in parkinsonism, such as alpha-synuclein, have been shown to play a role on WNV infection, we have assessed the effect of four drugs (L-dopa, Selegiline, Isatin, and Amantadine), that are used as therapy for Parkinson's disease in the inhibition of WNV multiplication. L-dopa, Isatin, and Amantadine treatments significantly reduced the production of infectious virus in all cell types tested, but only Amantadine reduced viral RNA levels. These results point to antiparkinsonian drugs as possible therapeutic candidates for the development of antiviral strategies against WNV infection.

  1. West Nile virus envelope protein inhibits dsRNA-induced innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Ledizet, Michel; Anthony, Karen; Bonafé, Nathalie; Modis, Yorgo; Town, Terrence; Fikrig, Erol

    2007-12-15

    The immune response against viral infection relies on the early production of cytokines that induce an antiviral state and trigger the activation of immune cells. This response is initiated by the recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns such as dsRNA, a viral replication intermediate recognized by TLR3 and certain RNA helicases. Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) can lead to lethal encephalitis in susceptible individuals and constitutes an emerging health threat. In this study, we report that WNV envelope protein (WNV-E) specifically blocks the production of antiviral and proinflammatory cytokines induced by dsRNA in murine macrophages. This immunosuppressive effect was not dependent on TLR3 or its adaptor molecule Trif. Instead, our experiments show that WNV-E acts at the level of receptor-interacting protein 1. Our results also indicate that WNV-E requires a certain glycosylation pattern, specifically that of dipteran cells, to inhibit dsRNA-induced cytokine production. In conclusion, these data show that the major structural protein of WNV impairs the innate immune response and suggest that WNV exploits differential vector/host E glycosylation profiles to evade antiviral mechanisms.

  2. Bovine lactoferrin peptidic fragments involved in inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, R; Rega, B; Marchetti, M; Seganti, L; Antonini, G; Valenti, P

    1999-10-14

    Bovine lactoferrin (BLf) prevents the infection of some enveloped and naked viruses. To identify BLf sequences responsible for the antiviral activity, we tested 31 HPLC fractions, derived from tryptic digestion of BLf, toward herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Only a few HPLC purified fragments were active against HSV-1, even if at lower extent than the native undigested BLf. Two large fragments, one corresponding to the C-lobe (amino acid sequence 345-689) and the other corresponding to a large portion of the N-lobe (1-280), were inhibitors of HSV-1 infection, while a smaller part of the N-lobe (86-258) was ineffective. Among the low-molecular-weight fragments, only two small peptides, which coeluted in a single chromatographic peak, were effective towards HSV-1. These peptides, both present in the N-lobe, were identified as peptides 222-230 (ADRDQYELL) and 264-269 (EDLIWK). The same peptides, chemically synthesised, were able to inhibit HSV-1 infection only when they were assayed in association. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Apelin, the natural ligand of the orphan seven-transmembrane receptor APJ, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayabyab, M.; Hinuma, S.; Farzan, M.; Choe, H.; Fukusumi, S.; Kitada, C.; Nishizawa, N.; Hosoya, M.; Nishimura, O.; Messele, T.; Pollakis, G.; Goudsmit, J.; Fujino, M.; Sodroski, J.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to the CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, a subset of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates can also use the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor APJ as a coreceptor. A previously identified ligand of APJ, apelin, specifically inhibited the entry of primary

  4. INHIBITION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV)-INDUCED INFLAMMATION BY 3-NITROTYROSINE IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)-Induced Inflammation by 3-Nitrotyrosine in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells. J. M. Soukup, MPH 1, ZW. Li, MD 2 and YC. T. Huang, MD 1. 1 NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, University of North Carolina,...

  5. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  6. A Novel Benzodiazepine Compound Inhibits Yellow Fever Virus Infection by Specifically Targeting NS4B Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Wu, Shuo; Julander, Justin; Ma, Julia; Zhang, Xuexiang; Kulp, John; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Du, Yanming; Guo, Ju-Tao; Chang, Jinhong

    2016-09-21

    Although a highly effective vaccine is available, the number of yellow fever cases has increased over the past two decades, which highlights the pressing need for antiviral therapeutics. In a high throughput screening campaign, we identified an acetic acid benzodiazepine (BDAA) compound, which potently inhibits yellow fever virus (YFV). Interestingly, while treatment of YFV infected cultures with 2 μM of BDAA reduced the virion production by greater than 2 logs, the compound is not active against 21 other viruses from 14 different viral families. Selection and genetic analysis of drug resistant viruses revealed that substitution of proline at amino acid 219 (P219) of the nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) with serine, threonine or alanine confers YFV resistance to BDAA without apparent loss of replication fitness in cultured mammalian cells. However, substitution of P219 with glycine confers BDAA resistance with significant loss of replication ability. Bioinformatics analysis predicts that the P219 localizes at the endoplasmic reticulum lumen side of the fifth putative trans-membrane domain of NS4B and the mutation may render the viral protein incapable of interacting with BDAA. Our studies thus revealed important role and structural basis for NS4B protein in supporting YFV replication. Moreover, in YFV-infected hamsters, oral administration of BDAA protected 90% of the animals from death, significantly reduced viral load by greater than 2 logs and attenuated viral infection-induced liver injury and body weight loss. The encouraging preclinical results thus warrant further development of BDAA or its derivatives as antiviral agents to treat yellow fever. Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease which threatens approximately one billion people living in tropical areas of Africa and Latin America. Although a highly effective yellow fever vaccine has been available for more than seven decades, the low vaccination rate fails to prevent outbreaks in at

  7. Inhibition of Virus Growth by Ouabain: Effect of Ouabain on the Growth of HVJ in Chick Embryo Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Maeno, Koichiro; Iinuma, Masao; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Toshisada

    1972-01-01

    The effect of ouabain (g-strophanthin), a cardiac glycoside, on the growth of several enveloped viruses was examined. It was found that the growth of HVJ (Sendai virus) in chick embryo cells was markedly inhibited by the drug at a concentration as low as 5 × 10−5m. A virus-inhibitory concentration of ouabain did not cause morphological changes in uninfected cells, nor did it have the capacity to inactivate virus infectivity. Ouabain interfered with the intracellular synthesis of viral macromolecules. Although viral ribonucleic acid and viral antigens were synthesized by the ouabain-treated cells, the rate of synthesis was slower, and the total amounts of these macromolecules were smaller than those in the untreated control cells. It is suggested that ouabain inhibits the function of membrane-bound Na, K-adenosine triphosphatase of the chick embryo cells and thus prevents accumulation of K ion in them. Accumulation of intracellular K ion to a certain level would be needed for events of exponential growth of virus to proceed, and ouabain might inhibit this step by preventing such accumulation of K ion. This view was supported by the finding that the concentration of K ion in the HVJ-infected cells was rapidly reduced by the treatment with ouabain, and that, when the ouabain-treated culture was shifted to a medium containing a higher concentration of K ion than normal medium, virus production started in parallel with the increase of intracellular K ion. The fact that the concentration of K ion in BHK-21 cells, which support virus growth in the presence of ouabain, is not reduced by the treatment with the drug also suggested this possibility. Images PMID:4335518

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Inhibits Autophagy through Transcription Factor EB Sequestration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV Nef acts as an anti-autophagic maturation factor through interaction with beclin-1 (BECN1. We report that exposure of macrophages to infectious or non-infectious purified HIV induces toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8 and BECN1 dependent dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB and that this correlates with an increase in autophagy markers. RNA interference for ATG13, TFEB, TLR8, or BECN1 inhibits this HIV-induced autophagy. However, once HIV establishes a productive infection, TFEB phosphorylation and cytoplasmic sequestration are increased resulting in decreased autophagy markers. Moreover, by 7 d post-infection, autophagy levels are similar to mock infected controls. Conversely, although Nef deleted HIV similarly induces TFEB dephosphorylation and nuclear localization, and increases autophagy, these levels remain elevated during continued productive infection. Thus, the interaction between HIV and TLR8 serves as a signal for autophagy induction that is dependent upon the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB. During permissive infection, Nef binds BECN1 resulting in mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR activation, TFEB phosphorylation and cytosolic sequestration, and the inhibition of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a virus modulating TFEB localization and helps to explain how HIV modulates autophagy to promote its own replication and cell survival.

  9. Honokiol, a Lignan Biphenol Derived from the Magnolia Tree, Inhibits Dengue Virus Type 2 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chih-Yeu; Chen, Siang-Jyun; Wu, Huey-Nan; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Lin, Ching-Yen; Shiuan, David; Chen, Chi-Long; Lee, Ying-Ray; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2015-09-10

    Dengue is the most widespread arbovirus infection and poses a serious health and economic issue in tropical and subtropical countries. Currently no licensed vaccine or compounds can be used to prevent or manage the severity of dengue virus (DENV) infection. Honokiol, a lignan biphenol derived from the Magnolia tree, is commonly used in Eastern medicine. Here we report that honokiol has profound antiviral activity against serotype 2 DENV (DENV-2). In addition to inhibiting the intracellular DENV-2 replicon, honokiol was shown to suppress the replication of DENV-2 in baby hamster kidney (BHK) and human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells. At the maximum non-toxic dose of honokiol treatment, the production of infectious DENV particles was reduced >90% in BHK and Huh7 cells. The underlying mechanisms revealed that the expression of DENV-2 nonstructural protein NS1/NS3 and its replicating intermediate, double-strand RNA, was dramatically reduced by honokiol treatment. Honokiol has no effect on the expression of DENV putative receptors, but may interfere with the endocytosis of DENV-2 by abrogating the co-localization of DENV envelope glycoprotein and the early endosomes. These results indicate that honokiol inhibits the replication, viral gene expression, and endocytotic process of DENV-2, making it a promising agent for chemotherapy of DENV infection.

  10. Honokiol, a Lignan Biphenol Derived from the Magnolia Tree, Inhibits Dengue Virus Type 2 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yeu Fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most widespread arbovirus infection and poses a serious health and economic issue in tropical and subtropical countries. Currently no licensed vaccine or compounds can be used to prevent or manage the severity of dengue virus (DENV infection. Honokiol, a lignan biphenol derived from the Magnolia tree, is commonly used in Eastern medicine. Here we report that honokiol has profound antiviral activity against serotype 2 DENV (DENV-2. In addition to inhibiting the intracellular DENV-2 replicon, honokiol was shown to suppress the replication of DENV-2 in baby hamster kidney (BHK and human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells. At the maximum non-toxic dose of honokiol treatment, the production of infectious DENV particles was reduced >90% in BHK and Huh7 cells. The underlying mechanisms revealed that the expression of DENV-2 nonstructural protein NS1/NS3 and its replicating intermediate, double-strand RNA, was dramatically reduced by honokiol treatment. Honokiol has no effect on the expression of DENV putative receptors, but may interfere with the endocytosis of DENV-2 by abrogating the co-localization of DENV envelope glycoprotein and the early endosomes. These results indicate that honokiol inhibits the replication, viral gene expression, and endocytotic process of DENV-2, making it a promising agent for chemotherapy of DENV infection.

  11. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus gene expression and replication by ribonuclease P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Gong, Hao; Zeng, Wenbo; Vu, Gia-Phong; Trang, Phong; Lu, Sangwei; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2013-05-01

    Nucleic acid-based gene interfering approaches, such as those mediated by RNA interference and RNase P-associated external guide sequence (EGS), have emerged as promising antiviral strategies. The RNase P-based technology is unique, because a custom-designed EGS can bind to any complementary mRNA sequence and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target mRNA. In this study, a functional EGS was constructed to target hepatitis B virus (HBV) essential transcripts. Furthermore, an attenuated Salmonella strain was constructed and used for delivery of anti-HBV EGS in cells and in mice. Substantial reduction in the levels of HBV gene expression and viral DNA was detected in cells treated with the Salmonella vector carrying the functional EGS construct. Furthermore, oral inoculation of Salmonella carrying the EGS construct led to an inhibition of ~95% in the levels of HBV gene expression and a reduction of ~200,000-fold in viral DNA level in the livers and sera of the treated mice transfected with a HBV plasmid. Our results suggest that EGSs are effective in inhibiting HBV replication in cultured cells and mammalian livers, and demonstrate the use of Salmonella-mediated delivery of EGS as a promising therapeutic approach for human diseases including HBV infection.

  12. A Preliminary Assessment of Silver Nanoparticle Inhibition of Monkeypox Virus Plaque Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speshock Janice

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe use of nanotechnology and nanomaterials in medical research is growing. Silver-containing nanoparticles have previously demonstrated antimicrobial efficacy against bacteria and viral particles. This preliminary study utilized an in vitro approach to evaluate the ability of silver-based nanoparticles to inhibit infectivity of the biological select agent, monkeypox virus (MPV. Nanoparticles (10–80 nm, with or without polysaccharide coating, or silver nitrate (AgNO3 at concentrations of 100, 50, 25, and 12.5 μg/mL were evaluated for efficacy using a plaque reduction assay. Both Ag-PS-25 (polysaccharide-coated, 25 nm and Ag-NP-55 (non-coated, 55 nm exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.05 dose-dependent effect of test compound concentration on the mean number of plaque-forming units (PFU. All concentrations of silver nitrate (except 100 μg/mL and Ag-PS-10 promoted significant (P ≤ 0.05 decreases in the number of observed PFU compared to untreated controls. Some nanoparticle treatments led to increased MPV PFU ranging from 1.04- to 1.8-fold above controls. No cytotoxicity (Vero cell monolayer sloughing was caused by any test compound, except 100 μg/mL AgNO3. These results demonstrate that silver-based nanoparticles of approximately 10 nm inhibit MPV infection in vitro, supporting their potential use as an anti-viral therapeutic.

  13. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  14. Inhibition of measles virus infections in cell cultures by peptide-conjugated morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Katrina; Stein, David A; Tamin, Azaibi; Reddish, Michael; Iversen, Patrick L; Rota, Paul A

    2009-03-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious human pathogen. Despite the success of measles vaccination programs, measles is still responsible for an estimated 245,000 deaths each year. There are currently no antiviral compounds available for the treatment of measles. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMO) are antisense compounds that enter cells readily and can interfere with mRNA function by steric blocking. A panel of PPMO was designed to target various sequences of MeV RNA that are known to be important for viral replication. Five PPMO, targeting MeV genomic RNA or mRNA, inhibited the replication of MeV, in a dose-responsive and sequence-specific manner in cultured cells. One of the highly active PPMO (PPMO 454), targeting a conserved sequence in the translation start site of the mRNA coding for the nucleocapsid protein, inhibited multiple genotypes of MeV. This report provides evidence that PPMO treatment represents a promising approach for developing antiviral agents against measles and other paramyxoviruses.

  15. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  16. Daclatasvir inhibits hepatitis C virus NS5A motility and hyper-accumulation of phosphoinositides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Berger, Kristi L.; Kelly, Sean M.; Thomas, Meryl; Deiters, Alexander; Randall, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have the potential to revolutionize the HCV therapeutic regime. An integral component of DAA combination therapies are HCV NS5A inhibitors. It has previously been proposed that NS5A DAAs inhibit two functions of NS5A: RNA replication and virion assembly. In this study, we characterize the impact of a prototype NS5A DAA, daclatasvir (DCV), on HCV replication compartment formation. DCV impaired HCV replicase localization and NS5A motility. In order to characterize the mechanism behind altered HCV replicase localization, we examined the impact of DCV on the interaction of NS5A with its essential cellular cofactor, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase III α (PI4KA). We observed that DCV does not inhibit PI4KA directly, nor does it impair early events of the NS5A-PI4KA interaction that can occur when NS5A is expressed alone. NS5A functions that are unaffected by DCV include PI4KA binding, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and a basal accumulation of the PI4KA product, PI4P. However, DCV impairs late steps in PI4KA activation that requires NS5A expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein. These NS5A functions include hyper-stimulation of PI4P levels and appropriate replication compartment formation. The data are most consistent with a model wherein DCV inhibits conformational changes in the NS5A protein or protein complex formations that occur in the context of HCV polyprotein expression and stimulate PI4P hyper-accumulation and replication compartment formation. PMID:25546252

  17. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  18. Inhibition of Henipavirus fusion and infection by heptad-derived peptides of the Nipah virus fusion glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N; Mungall, Bruce A; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Eaton, Bryan T; Broder, Christopher C

    2005-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of four new members of the paramyxovirus family has heightened the awareness of and re-energized research on new and emerging diseases. In particular, the high mortality and person to person transmission associated with the most recent Nipah virus outbreaks, as well as the very recent re-emergence of Hendra virus, has confirmed the importance of developing effective therapeutic interventions. We have previously shown that peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR-2) of the fusion envelope glycoprotein of Hendra virus and Nipah virus were potent inhibitors of both Hendra virus and Nipah virus-mediated membrane fusion using recombinant expression systems. In the current study, we have developed shorter, second generation HR-2 peptides which include a capped peptide via amidation and acetylation and two poly(ethylene glycol)-linked (PEGylated) peptides, one with the PEG moity at the C-terminus and the other at the N-terminus. Here, we have evaluated these peptides as well as the corresponding scrambled peptide controls in Nipah virus and Hendra virus-mediated membrane fusion and against infection by live virus in vitro. Results Unlike their predecessors, the second generation HR-2 peptides exhibited high solubility and improved synthesis yields. Importantly, both Nipah virus and Hendra virus-mediated fusion as well as live virus infection were potently inhibited by both capped and PEGylated peptides with IC50 concentrations similar to the original HR-2 peptides, whereas the scrambled modified peptides had no inhibitory effect. These data also indicate that these chemical modifications did not alter the functional properties of the peptides as inhibitors. Conclusion Nipah virus and Hendra virus infection in vitro can be potently blocked by specific HR-2 peptides. The improved synthesis and solubility characteristics of the second generation HR-2 peptides will facilitate peptide synthesis for pre-clinical trial

  19. Inhibition of Henipavirus fusion and infection by heptad-derived peptides of the Nipah virus fusion glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Bryan T

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of four new members of the paramyxovirus family has heightened the awareness of and re-energized research on new and emerging diseases. In particular, the high mortality and person to person transmission associated with the most recent Nipah virus outbreaks, as well as the very recent re-emergence of Hendra virus, has confirmed the importance of developing effective therapeutic interventions. We have previously shown that peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR-2 of the fusion envelope glycoprotein of Hendra virus and Nipah virus were potent inhibitors of both Hendra virus and Nipah virus-mediated membrane fusion using recombinant expression systems. In the current study, we have developed shorter, second generation HR-2 peptides which include a capped peptide via amidation and acetylation and two poly(ethylene glycol-linked (PEGylated peptides, one with the PEG moity at the C-terminus and the other at the N-terminus. Here, we have evaluated these peptides as well as the corresponding scrambled peptide controls in Nipah virus and Hendra virus-mediated membrane fusion and against infection by live virus in vitro. Results Unlike their predecessors, the second generation HR-2 peptides exhibited high solubility and improved synthesis yields. Importantly, both Nipah virus and Hendra virus-mediated fusion as well as live virus infection were potently inhibited by both capped and PEGylated peptides with IC50 concentrations similar to the original HR-2 peptides, whereas the scrambled modified peptides had no inhibitory effect. These data also indicate that these chemical modifications did not alter the functional properties of the peptides as inhibitors. Conclusion Nipah virus and Hendra virus infection in vitro can be potently blocked by specific HR-2 peptides. The improved synthesis and solubility characteristics of the second generation HR-2 peptides will facilitate peptide synthesis for pre

  20. The Effectiveness and Mechanism of Toona sinensis Extract Inhibit Attachment of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Ling You

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TSL-1 is a fraction of the aqueous extract from the tender leaf of Toona sinensis Roem, a nutritious vegetable. The pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus is a recently described, rapidly contagious respiratory pathogen which can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and poses a major public health threat. In this study, we found that TSL-1 inhibited viral yields on MDCK plaque formation by pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus on infected A549 cells with high selectivity index. Meanwhile, TSL-1 also suppressed viral genome loads in infected A549 cells, quantified by qRT-PCR. This study further demonstrated that TSL-1 inhibited pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus activity through preventing attachment of A549 cells but not penetration. TSL-1 inhibited viral attachment through significant downregulation of adhesion molecules and chemokines (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin, IL-8, and fractalkine compared to Amantadine. Our results suggest that TSL-1 may be used as an alternative treatment and prophylaxis against pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus.

  1. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Padmanava; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Prakash, Anil; Gothalwal, Ragini; Dubey, Shiv Chandra; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Tosh, Chakradhar

    2015-06-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a threat to animal and public health worldwide. Till date, the H5N1 virus has claimed 402 human lives, with a mortality rate of 58 percent and has caused the death or culling of millions of poultry since 2003. In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in MDCK cells. The siRNAs caused 8- to 16-fold reduction in virus HA titers at 24 h after challenged with 100TCID50 of virus. Among these siRNAs, PB2-2235 offered the highest inhibition of virus replication with 16-fold reduction in virus HA titer, 80 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and 94 percent inhibition in expression of specific RNA at 24 h. The other two siRNAs had 68-73 percent and 87-88 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and RNA copy number, respectively. The effect of siRNA on H5N1 virus replication continued till 48h (maximum observation period). These findings suggest that PB2-2235 could efficiently inhibit HPAI H5N1 virus replication.

  2. Characterization of a peptide domain within the GB virus C envelope glycoprotein (E2) that inhibits HIV replication☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H.; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Mohr, Emma L.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Chang, Qing; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected cohorts, and GBV-C E2 protein inhibits HIV entry when added to CD4+ T cells. To further characterize E2 effects on HIV replication, stably transfected Jurkat cell lines expressing GBV-C E2 or control sequences were infected with HIV and replication was measured. HIV replication (all 6 isolates studied) was inhibited in all cell lines expressing a region of 17 amino acids of GBV-C E2, but not in cell lines expressing E2 without this region. In contrast, mumps and yellow fever virus replication was not inhibited by E2 protein expression. Synthetic GBV-C E2 17mer peptides did not inhibit HIV replication unless they were fused to a tat-protein-transduction-domain (TAT) for cellular uptake. These data identify the region of GBV-C E2 protein involved in HIV inhibition, and suggest that this GBV-C E2 peptide must gain entry into the cell to inhibit HIV. PMID:22608061

  3. Zinc ionophores pyrithione inhibits herpes simplex virus replication through interfering with proteasome function and NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Chu, Ying; Song, Siwei; Yang, Na; Gao, Jie; Wu, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    Pyrithione (PT), known as a zinc ionophore, is effective against several pathogens from the Streptococcus and Staphylococcus genera. The antiviral activity of PT was also reported against a number of RNA viruses. In this paper, we showed that PT could effectively inhibit herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PT inhibited HSV late gene (Glycoprotein D, gD) expression and the production of viral progeny, and this action was dependent on Zn(2+). Further studies showed that PT suppressed the expression of HSV immediate early (IE) gene, the infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4), but had less effect on another regulatory IE protein, ICP0. It was found that PT treatment could interfere with cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), leading to the inhibition of HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) stability in nucleus. However, PT did not show direct inhibition of 26S proteasome activity. Instead, it induced Zn(2+) influx, which facilitated the dysregulation of UPS and the accumulation of intracellular ubiquitin-conjugates. UPS inhibition by PT caused disruption of IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation thus leading to marked reduction of viral titer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepatitis B virus inhibition in mice by lentiviral vector mediated short hairpin RNA

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    Wang Xuehao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is an important cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The major challenges for current therapies are the low efficacy of current drugs and the occurrence of drug resistant HBV mutations. RNA interference (RNAi of virus-specific genes offers the possibility of developing a new anti-HBV therapy. Recent reports have shown that lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their ability to integrate transgenes into non-dividing cells. Herein, a lentivirus-based RNAi system was developed to drive expression and delivery of HBV-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA in a mouse model for HBV replication. Methods Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg in the sera of the mice were analyzed by quantitative sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique, hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg and HBsAg in the livers of the mice were detected by immunohistochemical assay, HBV DNA and HBV mRNA were measured by fluorogenic quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR respectively. Results Co-injection of HBV plasmids together with the lentivirus targeting HBV shRNA induced an RNAi response. Secreted HBsAg was reduced by 89% in mouse serum, and HBeAg was also significantly inhibited, immunohistochemical detection of HBcAg or HBsAg in the liver tissues also revealed substantial reduction. Lentiviral mediated shRNA caused a significant suppression in the levels of viral mRNA and DNA synthesis compared to the control group. Conclusion Lentivirus-based RNAi can be used to suppress HBV replication in vivo, it might become a potential therapeutic strategy for treating HBV and other viral infections.

  5. A Scorpion Defensin BmKDfsin4 Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Vitro

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    Zhengyang Zeng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major worldwide health problem which can cause acute and chronic hepatitis and can significantly increase the risk of liver cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Nowadays, clinical therapies of HBV infection still mainly rely on nucleotide analogs and interferons, the usage of which is limited by drug-resistant mutation or side effects. Defensins had been reported to effectively inhibit the proliferation of bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Here, we screened the anti-HBV activity of 25 scorpion-derived peptides most recently characterized by our group. Through evaluating anti-HBV activity and cytotoxicity, we found that BmKDfsin4, a scorpion defensin with antibacterial and Kv1.3-blocking activities, has a comparable high inhibitory rate of both HBeAg and HBsAg in HepG2.2.15 culture medium and low cytotoxicity to HepG2.2.15. Then, our experimental results further showed that BmKDfsin4 can dose-dependently decrease the production of HBV DNA and HBV viral proteins in both culture medium and cell lysate. Interestingly, BmKDfsin4 exerted high serum stability. Together, this study indicates that the scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 also has inhibitory activity against HBV replication along with its antibacterial and potassium ion channel Kv1.3-blocking activities, which shows that BmKDfsin4 is a uniquely multifunctional defensin molecule. Our work also provides a good molecule material which will be used to investigate the link or relationship of its antiviral, antibacterial and ion channel–modulating activities in the future.

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  7. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glycoprotein (E2) of two GBV-Ccpz isolates obtained from the sera of captive chimpanzees. The deduced GBV-Ccpz E2 protein differed from human GBV-C by 31 % at the amino acid level. Similar to human GBV-C E2, expression of GBV-Ccpz E2 in a tet-off human CD4+ Jurkat T-cell line significantly inhibited the replication of diverse HIV-1 isolates. This anti-HIV-replication effect of GBV-Ccpz E2 protein was reversed by maintaining cells in doxycycline to reduce E2 expression. Previously, we found a 17 aa region within human GBV-C E2 that was sufficient to inhibit HIV-1. Although GBV-Ccpz E2 differed by 3 aa differences in this region, the chimpanzee GBV-C 17mer E2 peptide inhibited HIV-1 replication. Similarly, the GBV-A peptide that aligns with this GBV-C E2 region inhibited HIV-1 replication despite sharing only 5 aa with the human GBV-C E2 sequence. Thus, despite amino acid differences, the peptide region on both the GBV-Ccpz and the GBV-A E2 protein inhibit HIV-1 replication similar to human GBV-C. Consequently, GBV-Ccpz or GBV-A infection of non-human primates may provide an animal model to study GB virus–HIV interactions. PMID:23288422

  8. [Targeted inhibition of Rabies virus gene expression by a chimeric multidomain protein mediated shRNA delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruimei; Wang, Hualei; Shan, Hu; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-04

    In this study, a new chimeric protein SEG expressed in previous work was applied to evaluate its translocating efficiency of shRNA to rabies virus infected cells in mice, meanwhile, the capability of anti-rabies virus was investigated. Rabies virus strain CVS-24 was inoculated into the hind leg to establish a mouse model of rabies in a dose of 50 LD₅₀; 12 h thereafter the mice were injected intravenously with shRNA-producing plasmid mixed with SEG. To test shRNA delivery, single-cell suspensions from brain, spleen and liver were examined by flow cytometry. Rabies virus in brain tissue of mice was detected by qRT-PCR, RT-PCR, western blot and directed immunofluorescence assay. Mice were monitored for survival and serum samples were tested for IFN-α levels. No green fluorescent protein (GFP) was seen in the spleen or liver, suggesting that SEG allows specific targeting of RV-infected cells. RT-PCR and western blot showed that mice treated with SEG-shRNA had lower rabies virus RNA and protein levels than the controls. Real-time PCR showed that rabies virus was reduced 4.88 fold compared to the mock cells. Survival of RV-infected mouse showed a significant protection from rabies virus infection by SEG-shRNA treatment. The survival was up to 50% whereas the control group all died. IFN was not induced in SEG-shRNA treated animals. shRNA-producing plasmid was specifically delivered into rabies virus infected cells using the SEG protein, and effectively inhibited rabies virus geneexpression and replication in vivo. SEG-shRNA can be used for adjuvant treatment for rabies.

  9. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  10. RIG-I is required for the inhibition of measles virus by retinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soye, Kaitlin J; Trottier, Claire; Richardson, Chris D; Ward, Brian J; Miller, Wilson H

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A can significantly decrease measles-associated morbidity and mortality. Vitamin A can inhibit the replication of measles virus (MeV) in vitro through an RARα- and type I interferon (IFN)-dependent mechanism. Retinoid-induced gene I (RIG-I) expression is induced by retinoids, activated by MeV RNA and is important for IFN signaling. We hypothesized that RIG-I is central to retinoid-mediated inhibition of MeV in vitro. We demonstrate that RIG-I expression is increased in cells treated with retinoids and infected with MeV. The central role of RIG-I in the retinoid-anti-MeV effect was demonstrated in the Huh-7/7.5 model; the latter cells having non-functional RIG-I. RAR-dependent retinoid signaling was required for the induction of RIG-I by retinoids and MeV. Retinoid signaling was also found to act in combination with IFN to induce high levels of RIG-I expression. RIG-I promoter activation required both retinoids and MeV, as indicated by markers of active chromatin. IRF-1 is known to be regulated by retinoids and MeV, but we found recruitment of IRF-1 to the RIG-I promoter by retinoids alone. Using luciferase expression constructs, we further demonstrated that the IRF-1 response element of RIG-I was required for RIG-I activation by retinoids or IFN. These results reveal that retinoid treatment and MeV infection induces significant RIG-I. RIG-I is required for the retinoid-MeV antiviral response. The induction is dependent on IFN, retinoids and IRF-1.

  11. Interleukin-34 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Tang, Hua; Ren, Ji-Hua; Chen, Xiang; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection could activate the immune system and induce extensive inflammatory response. As the most important inflammatory factor, interleukins are critical for anti-viral immunity. Here we investigated whether interleukin-34 (IL-34) play a role in HBV infection. In this study, we first found that both serum IL-34 and IL-34 mRNA in PBMCs in chronic HBV patients was significantly decreased compared to the healthy controls. Furthermore, both IL-34 protein and mRNA levels were declined hepatoma cells expressing HBV. In addition, the clinical parameters analysis found that serum IL-34 was significantly associated with HBV DNA (P = 0.0066), ALT (P = 0.0327), AST (P = 0.0435), TB (P = 0.0406), DB (P = 0.0368) and AFP (P = 0.0225). Correlation analysis also found that serum IL-34 negatively correlated with HBV DNA copies, ALT and AST. In vitro studies found that IL-34 treatment in HepAD38 and HepG2.2.15 cells markedly inhibited HBV DNA, total RNA, 3.5kb mRNA and HBc protein. In vivo studies further demonstrated IL-34 treatment in HBV transgenic mice exhibited greater inhibition on HBV DNA, total RNA, 3.5kb mRNA and HBc protein, suggesting the effect to IL-34 on HBV is likely due to host innate or adaptive immune response. Our study identified a novel interleukin, IL-34, which has anti-viral activity in HBV replication in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest a rationale for the use of IL-34 in the HBV treatment.

  12. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallen B Triana-Baltzer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase, a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI strain (H5N1. Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe......-1 infection, the most potent inhibition was found with the lectin HPA. These results indicate that lectins may have a broad antiviral effect on enveloped viruses only limited by types of oligosaccharides present on individual viruses.......Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV...... infection in nanomolar-micromolar concentrations, but no anti-HIV effect was found with the lectin HPA, mainly reacting with O-linked oligosaccharides. HSV-1 infectivity was measured in a plaque reduction assay using Vero cells, and while both N- and O-linked oligosaccharide -specific lectins inhibited HSV...

  14. Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus Extracts Effectively Inhibit BK Virus and JC Virus Infection of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, San-Yuan; Teng, Ru-Hsiou; Wang, Meilin; Chen, Pei-Lain; Lin, Mien-Chun; Chao, Chun-Nun; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2017-01-01

    The human polyomaviruses BK (BKPyV) and JC (JCPyV) are ubiquitous pathogens long associated with severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis, whereas JCPyV is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. No effective therapies targeting these viruses are currently available. The goal of this study was to identify Chinese medicinal herbs with antiviral activity against BKPyV and JCPyV. We screened extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit hemagglutination by BKPyV and JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) and the ability to inhibit BKPyV and JCPyV binding and infection of host cells. Two of the 40 herbal extracts screened, Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus, had hemagglutination inhibition activity on BKPyV and JCPyV VLPs and further inhibited infection of the cells by BKPyV and JCPyV, as evidenced by reduced expression of viral proteins in BKPyV-infected and JCPyV-infected cells after treatment with Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma or Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus extract. The results in this work show that both Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus may be sources of potential antiviral compounds for treating BKPyV and JCPyV infections. PMID:28757888

  15. Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus Extracts Effectively Inhibit BK Virus and JC Virus Infection of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human polyomaviruses BK (BKPyV and JC (JCPyV are ubiquitous pathogens long associated with severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis, whereas JCPyV is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. No effective therapies targeting these viruses are currently available. The goal of this study was to identify Chinese medicinal herbs with antiviral activity against BKPyV and JCPyV. We screened extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit hemagglutination by BKPyV and JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs and the ability to inhibit BKPyV and JCPyV binding and infection of host cells. Two of the 40 herbal extracts screened, Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus, had hemagglutination inhibition activity on BKPyV and JCPyV VLPs and further inhibited infection of the cells by BKPyV and JCPyV, as evidenced by reduced expression of viral proteins in BKPyV-infected and JCPyV-infected cells after treatment with Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma or Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus extract. The results in this work show that both Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus may be sources of potential antiviral compounds for treating BKPyV and JCPyV infections.

  16. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Inhibition of West Nile virus by calbindin-D28k.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Siddharthan

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that West Nile virus (WNV employs Ca(2+ influx for its replication. Moreover, calcium buffer proteins, such as calbindin D28k (CB-D28k, may play an important role mitigating cellular destruction due to disease processes, and more specifically, in some neurological diseases. We addressed the hypothesis that CB-D28k inhibits WNV replication in cell culture and infected rodents. WNV envelope immunoreactivity (ir was not readily co-localized with CB-D28k ir in WNV-infected Vero 76 or motor neuron-like NSC34 cells that were either stably or transiently transfected with plasmids coding for CB-D28k gene. This was confirmed in cultured cells fixed on glass coverslips and by flow cytometry. Moreover, WNV infectious titers were reduced in CB-D28k-transfected cells. As in cell culture studies, WNV env ir was not co-localized with CB-D28k ir in the cortex of an infected WNV hamster, or in the hippocampus of an infected mouse. Motor neurons in the spinal cord typically do not express CB-D28k and are susceptible to WNV infection. Yet, CB-D28k was detected in the surviving motor neurons after the initial phase of WNV infection in hamsters. These data suggested that induction of CB-D28k elicit a neuroprotective response to WNV infection.

  18. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Saket; Ely, Abdullah; Bloom, Kristie; Weinberg, Marc S. [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa); Arbuthnot, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Arbuthnot@wits.ac.za [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2009-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  19. 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterases inhibit hepatitis B virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    Full Text Available 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP is a member of the interferon-stimulated genes, which includes isoforms CNP1 and CNP2. CNP1 is locally expressed in the myelin sheath but CNP2 is additionally expressed at low levels outside the nervous system. CNPs regulate multiple cellular functions and suppress protein production by association with polyadenylation of mRNA. Polyadenylation of Hepatitis B virus (HBV RNAs is crucial for HBV replication. Whether CNPs interact with polyadenylation signal of HBV RNAs and interfere HBV replication is unknown. In this study, we evaluated expressions of CNP isoforms in hepatoma cell lines and their effects on HBV replication. We found that CNP2 is moderately expressed and gently responded to interferon treatment in HepG2, but not in Huh7 cells. The CNP1 and CNP2 potently inhibited HBV production by blocking viral proteins synthesis and reducing viral RNAs, respectively. In chronic hepatitis B patients, CNP was expressed in most of HBV-infected hepatocytes of liver specimens. Knockdown of CNP expression moderately improved viral production in the HepG2.2.15 cells treated with IFN-α. In conclusion, CNP might be a mediator of interferon-induced response against HBV.

  20. Scutellaria polysaccharide inhibits the infectivity of Newcastle disease virus to chicken embryo fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaona, Zhao; Jianzhu, Liu

    2014-03-15

    To select the antiviral active site of Scutellaria polysaccharide (SPS), safe concentrations of crude total Scutellaria polysaccharide (SPS(t)) and fractional polysaccharide SPS₅₀, SPS₆₀, SPS₇₀ and SPS₈₀ on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) were first compared using the MTT method. Then, SPS(t), SPS₅₀, SPS₆₀, SPS₇₀, and SPS₈₀ at five concentrations within the safe concentration, together with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), were added to the cultivating system of CEF in three models: pre-addition of polysaccharide, post-addition of polysaccharide, and simultaneous addition of polysaccharides and NDV after mixing. The effects of SPS on the cellular infectivity of NDV (A₅₇₀ value and the highest viral inhibitory rate) were compared using the MTT method. At appropriate concentrations, the five polysaccharides could significantly inhibit the infectivity of NDV on CEF. Among the five polysaccharide groups, the SPS₈₀ group exhibited the highest viral inhibitory rate in the three sample-addition modes. This finding indicates that SPS₈₀ possesses the best efficacy as a component of antiviral polysaccharide drug. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Dengue Virus Infectivity by Interacting with Heparan Sulfate, Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor, and DC-SIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Mei Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine lactoferrin (bLF presents in milk and has been shown to inhibit several viral infections. Effective drugs are unavailable for the treatment of dengue virus (DENV infection. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral effect of bLF against DENV infection in vivo and in vitro. Bovine LF significantly inhibited the infection of the four serotypes of DENV in Vero cells. In the time-of-drug addition test, DENV-2 infection was remarkably inhibited when bLF was added during or prior to the occurrence of virus attachment. We also revealed that bovine LF blocks binding between DENV-2 and the cellular membrane by interacting with heparan sulfate (HS, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, and low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR. In addition, bLF inhibits DENV-2 infection and decreases morbidity in a suckling mouse challenge model. This study supports the finding that bLF may inhibit DENV infection by binding to the potential DENV receptors.

  2. A peptide derived from hepatitis C virus E2 envelope protein inhibits a post-binding step in HCV entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Tewari, M; Kong, R; Zhang, R; Ingravallo, P; Ralston, R

    2010-05-01

    The HCV envelope proteins E1 and E2 are required for virus binding to cellular receptors and pH-dependent fusion with endosomal membranes. Envelope protein interactions within this multistep process may provide novel targets for development of antiviral agents. To identify E1 and E2 regions involved in critical steps of HCV entry, we screened an E1E2 overlapping peptide library for inhibition of infection using a lentiviral reporter vector pseudotyped with E1E2 envelope proteins. A 16-residue polypeptide containing a portion of the E2 transmembrane domain (Peptide 75) inhibited HCV pseudoparticle infection with an IC50 of approximately 0.3microM and did not inhibit infection by VSV-g pseudoparticles at concentrations up to 50microM. Structure-activity analysis of Peptide 75 showed that antiviral activity was dependent upon L-configuration and hydrophobic character, and that the native sequence was required for maximal activity. Peptide 75 did not show virocidal activity against HCV pseudoparticles or other viruses. Temperature-shift experiments showed that the peptide acted at a post-binding step and that inhibition was further increased when used in combination with an anti-CD81 antibody previously shown to inhibit pseudoparticle entry at a post-binding step. These data suggest that interactions involving the C terminal region of E2 may play an important role in the HCV entry process.

  3. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kang, Myung-Soo, E-mail: mkang@skku.edu [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  4. Inhibition of Human Cytomegalovirus pUL89 Terminase Subunit Blocks Virus Replication and Genome Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mao, Lili; Kankanala, Jayakanth; Wang, Zhengqiang; Geraghty, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    The human cytomegalovirus terminase complex cleaves concatemeric genomic DNA into unit lengths during genome packaging and particle assembly. This process is an attractive drug target because cleavage of concatemeric DNA is not required in mammalian cell DNA replication, indicating that drugs targeting the terminase complex could be safe and selective. One component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex, pUL89, provides the endonucleolytic activity for genome cleavage, and the domain responsible is reported to have an RNase H-like fold. We hypothesize that the pUL89 endonuclease activity is inhibited by known RNase H inhibitors. Using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format as a screening assay, we found that a hydroxypyridonecarboxylic acid compound, previously reported to be an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus RNase H, inhibited pUL89 endonuclease activity at low-micromolar concentrations. Further characterization revealed that this pUL89 endonuclease inhibitor blocked human cytomegalovirus replication at a relatively late time point, similarly to other reported terminase complex inhibitors. Importantly, this inhibitor also prevented the cleavage of viral genomic DNA in infected cells. Taken together, these results substantiate our pharmacophore hypothesis and validate our ligand-based approach toward identifying novel inhibitors of pUL89 endonuclease. Human cytomegalovirus infection in individuals lacking a fully functioning immune system, such as newborns and transplant patients, can have severe and debilitating consequences. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-human cytomegalovirus drugs mainly target the viral polymerase, and resistance to these drugs has appeared. Therefore, anti-human cytomegalovirus drugs from novel targets are needed for use instead of, or in combination with, current polymerase inhibitors. pUL89 is a viral ATPase and endonuclease and is an attractive target for anti-human cytomegalovirus

  5. Retinoids irreversibly inhibit in vitro growth of Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponi, F; Cariati, R; Zancai, P; De Paoli, P; Rizzo, S; Tedeschi, R M; Pivetta, B; De Vita, S; Boiocchi, M; Dolcetti, R

    1996-10-15

    Natural and synthetic retinoids have proved to be effective in the treatment and prevention of various human cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effect of retinoids on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), since these cells closely resemble those that give rise to EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders in the immunosuppressed host. All six compounds tested inhibited LCL proliferation with no significant direct cytotoxicity, but 9-cis-retinoic acid (RA), 13-cis-RA, and all-trans-RA (ATRA) were markedly more efficacious than Ro40-8757, Ro13-6298, and etretinate. The antiproliferative action of the three most effective compounds was confirmed in a large panel of LCLs, thus appearing as a generalized phenomenon in these cells. LCL growth was irreversibly inhibited even after 2 days of treatment at drug concentrations corresponding to therapeutically achievable plasma levels. Retinoid-treated cells showed a marked downregulation of CD71 and a decreased S-phase compartment with a parallel accumulation in Gzero/ G1 phases. These cell cycle perturbations were associated with the upregulation of p27 Kip1, a nuclear protein that controls entrance and progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting several cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. Unlike what is observed in other systems, the antiproliferative effect exerted by retinoids on LCLs was not due to the acquisition of a terminally differentiated status. In fact, retinoid-induced modifications of cell morphology, phenotype (downregulation of CD19, HLA-DR, and s-Ig, and increased expression of CD38 and c-Ig), and IgM production were late events, highly heterogeneous, and often slightly relevant, being therefore only partially indicative of a drug-related differentiative process. Moreover, EBV-encoded EBV nuclear antigen-2 and latent membrane protein-1 proteins were inconstantly downregulated by retinoids, indicating that their growth-inhibitory effect is not mediated

  6. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus surface gene expression by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in a human hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinis, M; Reinisová, M; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the inhibitory effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on the expression of hepatitis B virus surface antigens. Human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5 harbors several integrated copies of the HBV genome and produces and secretes hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) to the medium. Synthetic antisense oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to various regions of the surface antigen gene were synthesized and their ability to block its expression was tested. Oligodeoxynucleotides (17- and 21-mers) complementary to regions covering ATG codons of both preS2 and S genes significantly inhibited preS2 and S protein production. Less efficient inhibition was achieved when the oligonucleotide complementary to the inside S gene region was assayed.

  7. Significant Growth Inhibition of Canine Mammary Carcinoma Xenografts following Treatment with Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Ehrig, Klaas; Donat, Ulrike; Hess, Michael; Rudolph, Stephan; Chen, Nanhai; Yu, Yong A.; Zhang, Qian; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Nolte, Ingo; Stritzker, Jochen; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2010-01-01

    Canine mammary carcinoma is a highly metastatic tumor that is poorly responsive to available treatment. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify novel agents for therapy of this disease. Recently, we reported that the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 could be a useful tool for therapy of canine mammary adenoma in vivo. In this study we analyzed the therapeutic effect of GLV-1h68 against canine mammary carcinoma. Cell culture data demonstrated that GLV-1h68 efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the mammary carcinoma cell line MTH52c. Furthermore, after systemic administration, this attenuated vaccinia virus strain primarily replicated in canine tumor xenografts in nude mice. Finally, infection with GLV-1h68 led to strong inflammatory and oncolytic effects resulting in significant growth inhibition of the tumors. In summary, the data showed that the GLV-1h68 virus strain has promising potential for effective treatment of canine mammary carcinoma. PMID:20631910

  8. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Tomas; Kann, Nina; Adamiak, Beata; Hannoun, Charles; Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R.; Muth, Doreen; Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria; Müller, Marcel A.; Drosten, Christian; Thiel, Volker; Trybala, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6), a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS–CoV), and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections. PMID:24874215

  9. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Eckert

    Full Text Available Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  10. Inhibition Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid on the Propagation of Influenza A Virus in MDCK Cells

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    Si-Wei Bai§, Cui-Ying Chen§, Jun Ji, Qing-Mei Xie*, Yun Ma1, Bao-Li Sun, Chun-Yi Xue1, Yong-Chang Cao1, Jing-Yun Ma and Ying-Zuo Bi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAV still pose a threat to animals and humans. Currently, M2 protein ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors are the two main drugs for treating IAV infections by interrupting virus assembly or release respectively, but the emergence of viral resistance was a concern for their long term uses. In this study, the inhibition effect of alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA on IAV propagation has been evaluated in vitro. The results showed that α-LA inhibited IAV replication in MDCK cells at 2mM, and also reduced nucleus translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB p65 at the concentration above 1mM. Additionally, it was found that caspase-3 activity was remarkably inhibited and type I interferons (IFNs were up-regulated following α-LA treatment. This study indicated that α-LA might be a potential anti-influenza virus agent worthy of further investigations.

  11. C1q binding to Dengue Virus inhibits infection of THP-1 and cellular inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P.; de Melo, Klecia M. Soares; Smith, Amanda P.; Krishna, Neel K.; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M.; Evans, Jared D.; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T. A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to Dengue Virus Envelope protein and to whole Dengue Virus serotype 2. Incubation of Dengue Virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses. PMID:24246304

  12. Glycyrrhizin inhibits porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection and attenuates the proinflammatory responses by inhibition of high mobility group box-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Chang-Chao; Wang, Hua-Xia; Sheng, Xiang-Xiang; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xin; Mao, Xiang

    2017-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED), caused by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection, leads to significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. In our studies, we found that glycyrrhizin, the major component of licorice root extracts, could moderately inhibit PEDV infection in Vero cells, when analyzed by western blot, qRT-PCR and a plaque formation assay. We also revealed that glycyrrhizin inhibited the entry and replication of PEDV. In addition, we demonstrated that glycyrrhizin decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Since glycyrrhizin is a competitive inhibitor of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), we confirmed that TLR4 and RAGE (£ associated with PEDV pathogenesis during the infection in Vero cells. In summary, our studies provide a molecular basis for developing novel therapeutic methods to control PEDV infection, based on glycyrrhizin and its derivatives.

  13. Inhibition of the NOD-Like Receptor Protein 3 Inflammasome Is Protective in Juvenile Influenza A Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bria M. Coates

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant cause of life-threatening lower respiratory tract infections in children. Antiviral therapy is the mainstay of treatment, but its effectiveness in this age group has been questioned. In addition, damage inflicted on the lungs by the immune response to the virus may be as important to the development of severe lung injury during IAV infection as the cytotoxic effects of the virus itself. A crucial step in the immune response to IAV is activation of the NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome and the subsequent secretion of the inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and interleukin-18 (IL-18. The IAV matrix 2 proton channel (M2 has been shown to be an important activator of the NLRP3 inflammasome during IAV infection. We sought to interrupt this ion channel-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome through inhibition of NLRP3 or the cytokine downstream from its activation, IL-1β. Using our juvenile mouse model of IAV infection, we show that inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome with the small molecule inhibitor, MCC950, beginning 3 days after infection with IAV, improves survival in juvenile mice. Treatment with MCC950 reduces NLRP3 levels in lung homogenates, decreases IL-18 secretion into the alveolar space, and inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation in alveolar macrophages. Importantly, inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome with MCC950 does not impair viral clearance. In contrast, inhibition of IL-1β signaling with the IL-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra, is insufficient to protect juvenile mice from IAV. Our findings suggest that targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome in juvenile IAV infection may improve disease outcomes in this age group.

  14. Evaluation of single and dual siRNAs targeting rabies virus glycoprotein and nucleoprotein genes for inhibition of virus multiplication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Chetan D; Singh, Niraj K; Sonwane, Arvind A; Pawar, Sachin S; Mishra, B P; Chaturvedi, V K; Saini, Mohini; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2013-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) and nucleoprotein (N) genes were evaluated as antiviral agents against rabies virus in vitro in BHK-21 cells. To select effective siRNAs targeting RV-G, a plasmid-based transient co-transfection approach was used. In this, siRNAs were expressed as short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and their ability to inhibit RV-G gene expression was evaluated in cells transfected with a plasmid expressing RV-G. The nine different siRNAs designed to target RV-G exhibited varying degrees of knockdown of RV-G gene expression. One siRNA (si-G7) with considerable effect in knockdown of RV-G expression also demonstrated significant inhibition of RV multiplication in BHK-21 cells after in vitro challenge with the RV Pasteur virus-11 (PV-11) strain. A decrease in the number of fluorescent foci in siRNA-treated cells and a reduction (86.8 %) in the release of RV into infected cell culture supernatant indicated the anti-rabies potential of siRNA. Similarly, treatment with one siRNA targeting RV-N resulted in a decrease in the number of fluorescent foci and a reduction (85.9 %) in the release of RV. As a dual gene silencing approach where siRNAs targeting RV-G and RV-N genes were expressed from single construct, the anti-rabies-virus effect was observed as an 87.4 % reduction in the release of RV. These results demonstrate that siRNAs targeting RV-G and N, both in single and dual form, have potential as antiviral agent against rabies.

  15. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  16. Inhibition of STAT Pathway Impairs Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Effect of Interferon Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Juan Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT pathway plays an important role in antiviral efficacy of interferon alpha (IFN-α. IFN-α is the main therapeutic against hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. We explored effects of IFN-α on HCV replication and antiviral gene expression by targeting STAT. Methods: In response to IFN-α, STAT status, HCV replication, and antiviral gene expression were analyzed in human hepatoma Huh7.5.1 cells before and after cell culture-derived HCV infection. Results: IFN-α treatment induced expression and phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 in Huh7.5.1 cells. Pretreatment of Huh7.5.1 cells with a mAb to IFN alpha receptor (IFNAR 2 decreased IFN-α-dependent phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2, whereas pretreatment with an IFNAR1 mAb increased such phosphorylation, suggesting that IFNAR mediates IFN-α-triggered STAT signaling. During HCV infection, STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation could be rescued by IFN-α and IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 was impaired. Inhibition of STAT pathway by Jak inhibitor I significantly enhanced HCV RNA replication and viral protein expression. Antiviral genes coding for IFN regulatory factor 9 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 were up-regulated by IFN-α during HCV infection but such up-regulation was abrogated by Jak inhibitor I. Conclusion: These results establish that activation of STAT pathway is essential for anti-HCV efficacy of IFN-α. Impairment of IFN-α-triggered STAT signaling by HCV may account for evading IFN-α response.

  17. [Hepatitis C virus F protein-mediated inhibition of hepatoma cell proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Liu, Jiao; Chen, Qing-mei; Shan, Xiao-ling; Chen, Lin-lin; Quan, Hui-qin; Tang, Ni

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the biological function of the hepatitis C virus (HCV)-encoded F protein in hepatocytes. The full-length F gene was amplified by PCR from HCV genotype 1a and cloned into plasmid pSEB-3Flag by restriction enzyme digestion and ligation. Hepatoma cell lines, Huh7 and SMMC7721, were transfected with the resultant recombinant pSEB-3Flag-F or the original pSEB-3Flag (negative control) and screened with the selective antibiotic, blasticidin. Stable F gene and protein expression was verified by RT-PCR analysis. Analysis of cell growth and cell cycle was carried out by MTS assay, crystal violet staining and flow cytometry. Huh7 and SMMC7721 cells transfected with pSEB-3Flag-F plasmid (Huh7-F and SMMC7721-F, respectively) uniquely expressed the F gene and protein. The Huh7-F and SMMC7721-F cells showed significantly decreased proliferation rates, compared to the respective control groups. A similar HCV F-mediated growth-inhibiting activity was observed by the cell viability assay. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that the S-phase distribution was much lower in Huh7-F (47.12%) and SMMC7721-F (30.75%) cells than in the respective controls (55.35% and 33.23%, respectively) (P less than 0.05). Stable expression of the HCV F gene reduced the in vitro proliferation rate of hepatoma cell lines, indicating that the F protein may function as a growth inhibitor of infected cells.

  18. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhen [The State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and The MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Chen, Zhi [The State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease, Institute of Infectious Disease, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuwei666@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Lu, Daru, E-mail: drlu@fudan.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and The MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  19. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease nowadays and is caused by dengue virus (DENV). The flavivirus NS1 glycoprotein has been characterized functionally as a complement evasion protein that can attenuate the activation of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which DENV NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV NS1 binding partner, and the NS1-VN complex was detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the NS1-VN complex inhibited membrane attack complex (MAC) formation, thus interfering with the complement terminal pathway. Interestingly

  20. Non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit NF-κB promoter activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohari Siamak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus infection activates NF-κB and is a general prerequisite for a productive influenza virus infection. On the other hand, non-structural protein 1 (NS1 suppresses this viral activated NF-κB, presumably to prevent expression of NF-κB mediated anti-viral response. NS1 proteins of influenza A viruses are divided into two groups, known as allele A and allele B. The possible functional relevance of this NS1 division to viral pathogenicity is lacking. Findings The ability of NS1 protein from two avian influenza subtypes, H6N8 and H4N6, to inhibit NF-κB promoter activation was assessed. Further, efforts were made to characterize the genetic basis of this inhibition. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are significantly better in preventing dsRNA induced NF-κB promoter activation compared to allele B of corresponding subtypes, in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the ability to suppress NF-κB promoter activation was mapped to the effector domain while the RNA binding domain alone was unable to suppress this activation. Chimeric NS1 proteins containing either RNA binding domain of allele A and effector domain of allele B or vice versa, were equally potent in preventing NF-κB promoter activation compared to their wt. NS1 protein of allele A and B from both subtypes expressed efficiently as detected by Western blotting and predominantly localized in the nucleus in both A549 and MiLu cells as shown by in situ PLA. Conclusions Here, we present another aspect of NS1 protein in inhibiting dsRNA induced NF-κB activation in an allele dependent manner. This suggests a possible correlation with the virus's pathogenic potential.

  1. Non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit NF-κB promoter activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad; Zohari, Siamak; Berg, Mikael

    2011-08-02

    Influenza virus infection activates NF-κB and is a general prerequisite for a productive influenza virus infection. On the other hand, non-structural protein 1 (NS1) suppresses this viral activated NF-κB, presumably to prevent expression of NF-κB mediated anti-viral response. NS1 proteins of influenza A viruses are divided into two groups, known as allele A and allele B. The possible functional relevance of this NS1 division to viral pathogenicity is lacking. The ability of NS1 protein from two avian influenza subtypes, H6N8 and H4N6, to inhibit NF-κB promoter activation was assessed. Further, efforts were made to characterize the genetic basis of this inhibition. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are significantly better in preventing dsRNA induced NF-κB promoter activation compared to allele B of corresponding subtypes, in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the ability to suppress NF-κB promoter activation was mapped to the effector domain while the RNA binding domain alone was unable to suppress this activation. Chimeric NS1 proteins containing either RNA binding domain of allele A and effector domain of allele B or vice versa, were equally potent in preventing NF-κB promoter activation compared to their wt. NS1 protein of allele A and B from both subtypes expressed efficiently as detected by Western blotting and predominantly localized in the nucleus in both A549 and MiLu cells as shown by in situ PLA. Here, we present another aspect of NS1 protein in inhibiting dsRNA induced NF-κB activation in an allele dependent manner. This suggests a possible correlation with the virus's pathogenic potential.

  2. Method of inhibiting plant virus pathogen infections by crispr/cas9-mediated interference

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy Mahmoud

    2016-11-24

    A genetically modified tobacco plant or tomato plant resistant to at least one pathogenic geminiviridae virus species is provided. The plant comprises a heterologous CRISPR/Cas9 system and at least one heterologous nucleotide sequence that is capable of hybridizing to a nucleotide sequence of the pathogenic virus and that directs inactivation of the pathogenic virus species or plurality of viral species by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The heterologous nucleotide sequence can be complementary to, but not limited to an Intergenic Region (IR) of the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), Further provided are methods of generating a genetically modified plant that is resistant to a virus pathogen by a heterologous CRISPR/Cas9 system and expression of a gRNA specifically targeting the virus.

  3. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Evgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody.

  4. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BISSELL, MINA J; HATIE, CARROLL; FARSON, DEBORAH A.; SCHWARZ, RICHARD I.; SOO, WHAI-JEN

    1980-04-01

    Ascorbic acid, at nontoxic concentrations, causes a substantial reduction in the ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both primary avian tendon cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be less transformed in the presence of ascorbic acid by the criteria of morphology, reduced glucose uptake, and increased collagen synthesis. The vitamin does not act by altering the susceptibility of the cells to initial infection and transformation, but instead appears to interfere with the spread of infection through a reduction in virus replication and virus infectivity. The effect is reversible and requires the continuous presence of the vitamin in the culture medium.

  5. Inhibition of Polyamine Biosynthesis Is a Broad-Spectrum Strategy against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounce, Bryan C; Cesaro, Teresa; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Yakovleva, Anna; Werneke, Scott W; Smith, Everett Clinton; Poirier, Enzo Z; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Prot, Matthieu; Tamietti, Carole; Vitry, Sandrine; Volle, Romain; Khou, Cécile; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Delpeyroux, Francis; Pardigon, Nathalie; Flamand, Marie; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Lafon, Monique; Denison, Mark R; Albert, Matthew L; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2016-11-01

    RNA viruses present an extraordinary threat to human health, given their sudden and unpredictable appearance, the potential for rapid spread among the human population, and their ability to evolve resistance to antiviral therapies. The recent emergence of chikungunya virus, Zika virus, and Ebola virus highlights the struggles to contain outbreaks. A significant hurdle is the availability of antivirals to treat the infected or protect at-risk populations. While several compounds show promise in vitro and in vivo, these outbreaks underscore the need to accelerate drug discovery. The replication of several viruses has been described to rely on host polyamines, small and abundant positively charged molecules found in the cell. Here, we describe the antiviral effects of two molecules that alter polyamine levels: difluoromethylornithine (DFMO; also called eflornithine), which is a suicide inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase 1 (ODC1), and diethylnorspermine (DENSpm), an activator of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SAT1). We show that reducing polyamine levels has a negative effect on diverse RNA viruses, including several viruses involved in recent outbreaks, in vitro and in vivo These findings highlight the importance of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway to viral replication, as well as its potential as a target in the development of further antivirals or currently available molecules, such as DFMO. RNA viruses present a significant hazard to human health, and combatting these viruses requires the exploration of new avenues for targeting viral replication. Polyamines, small positively charged molecules within the cell, have been demonstrated to facilitate infection for a few different viruses. Our study demonstrates that diverse RNA viruses rely on the polyamine pathway for replication and highlights polyamine biosynthesis as a promising drug target. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Macrophages by Targeting Both the Virus and the Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Volotskova

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is a specific type of partially ionized gas that is less than 104°F at the point of application. It was recently shown that CAP can be used for decontamination and sterilization, as well as anti-cancer treatment. Here, we investigated the effects of CAP on HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. We demonstrate that pre-treatment of MDM with CAP reduced levels of CD4 and CCR5, inhibiting virus-cell fusion, viral reverse transcription and integration. In addition, CAP pre-treatment affected cellular factors required for post-entry events, as replication of VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1, which by-passes HIV receptor-mediated fusion at the plasma membrane during entry, was also inhibited. Interestingly, virus particles produced by CAP-treated cells had reduced infectivity, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of CAP extended to the second cycle of infection. These results demonstrate that anti-HIV activity of CAP involves the effects on target cells and the virus, and suggest that CAP may be considered for potential application as an anti-HIV treatment.

  7. Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Inhibits the Pulmonary T-Cell Response to Influenza Virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Kong, Ying; Barnes, Peter F.; Huang, Fang-Fang; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Xisheng; Samten, Buka; Sengupta, Mayami; Machona, Bruce; Donis, Ruben; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Shams, Homayoun

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is associated with increased susceptibility to tuberculosis and influenza. However, little information is available on the mechanisms underlying this increased susceptibility. Mice were left unexposed or were exposed to cigarette smoke and then infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis by aerosol or influenza A by intranasal infection. Some mice were given a DNA vaccine encoding an immunogenic M. tuberculosis protein. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production by T cells from the lungs and spleens was measured. Cigarette smoke exposure inhibited the lung T-cell production of IFN-γ during stimulation in vitro with anti-CD3, after vaccination with a construct expressing an immunogenic mycobacterial protein, and during infection with M. tuberculosis and influenza A virus in vivo. Reduced IFN-γ production was mediated through the decreased phosphorylation of transcription factors that positively regulate IFN-γ expression. Cigarette smoke exposure increased the bacterial burden in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and increased weight loss and mortality in mice infected with influenza virus. This study provides the first demonstration that cigarette smoke exposure directly inhibits the pulmonary T-cell response to M. tuberculosis and influenza virus in a physiologically relevant animal model, increasing susceptibility to both pathogens. PMID:20974820

  8. The ORF61 Protein Encoded by Simian Varicella Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus Inhibits NF-κB Signaling by Interfering with IκBα Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Travis; Malouli, Daniel; Uebelhoer, Luke S; DeFilippis, Victor R; Früh, Klaus; Verweij, Marieke C

    2015-09-01

    macaques by simian varicella virus (SVV) is used as an animal model of VZV infection, we characterized the molecular mechanism by which SVV interferes with innate immune activation. Specifically, we studied how SVV prevents activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, a central factor in eliciting proinflammatory responses. The identification of molecular mechanisms that counteract innate immunity might ultimately lead to better vaccines and treatments for VZV, since overcoming these mechanisms, either by small-molecule inhibition or by genetic modification of vaccine strains, is expected to reduce the pathogenic potential of VZV. Moreover, using SVV infection of rhesus macaques, it will be possible to study how increasing the vulnerability of varicella viruses to innate immunity will impact viral pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Adenosine triphosphate analogs can efficiently inhibit the Zika virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hercík, Kamil; Kozák, Jaroslav; Šála, Michal; Dejmek, Milan; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Zborníková, Eva; Smola, Miroslav; Růžek, Daniel; Nencka, Radim; Bouřa, Evžen

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 137, Jan (2017), s. 131-133 ISSN 0166-3542 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09310S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : hepatitis C virus * borne encephalitis virus * crystal structure Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.271, year: 2016

  10. Hepatitis b virus lacks immune activating capacity, but actively inhibits plasmacytoid dendritic cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Woltman (Andrea); M.L.O. den Brouw; P.J. Biesta (Paula); C.C. Shi (Cui); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractChronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is caused by inadequate anti-viral immunity. Activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) leading to IFNα production is important for effective anti-viral immunity. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection lacks IFNα induction in animal models and

  11. In vitro inhibition of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus by the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum (basil) and monoterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiça, Thaís F; Alves, Sydney H; Weiblen, Rudi; Lovato, Luciane T

    2014-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is suggested as a model for antiviral studies of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The antiviral activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum and the monoterpenes camphor, thymol and 1,8-cineole against BVDV was investigated. The cytotoxicities of the compounds were measured by the MTT (3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) test, and the antiviral activities were tested by the plaque reduction assay. The oil or compounds were added to the assay in three different time points: a) pre-treatment of the virus (virucidal assay); b) pre-treatment of the cells; or c) post-treatment of the cells (after virus inoculation). The percentage of plaques inhibition for each compound was determined based on the number of plaques in the viral control. The results were expressed by CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration), IC50 (inhibitory concentration for 50% of plaques) and SI (selectivity index = CC50/IC50). Camphor (CC50 = 4420.12 μg mL(-1)) and 1,8-cineole (CC50 = 2996.10 μg mL(-1)) showed the lowest cytotoxicities and the best antiviral activities (camphor SI = 13.88 and 1,8-cineol SI = 9.05) in the virucidal assay. The higher activities achieved by the monoterpenes in the virucidal assay suggest that these compounds act directly on the viral particle.

  12. In vitro inhibition of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus by the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum (basil and monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís F. Kubiça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV is suggested as a model for antiviral studies of the hepatitis C virus (HCV. The antiviral activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum and the monoterpenes camphor, thymol and 1,8-cineole against BVDV was investigated. The cytotoxicities of the compounds were measured by the MTT (3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test, and the antiviral activities were tested by the plaque reduction assay. The oil or compounds were added to the assay in three different time points: a pre-treatment of the virus (virucidal assay; b pre-treatment of the cells; or c post-treatment of the cells (after virus inoculation. The percentage of plaques inhibition for each compound was determined based on the number of plaques in the viral control. The results were expressed by CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration, IC50 (inhibitory concentration for 50% of plaques and SI (selectivity index = CC50/IC50. Camphor (CC50 = 4420.12 µgmL-1 and 1,8-cineole (CC50 = 2996.10 µgmL-1 showed the lowest cytotoxicities and the best antiviral activities (camphor SI = 13.88 and 1,8-cineol SI = 9.05 in the virucidal assay. The higher activities achieved by the monoterpenes in the virucidal assay suggest that these compounds act directly on the viral particle.

  13. Nonspecific Factors in Monkey Tissues and Serum Causing Inhibition of Plaque Formation and Hemagglutination by Dengue Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Donald R.; Halstead, Scott B.; Stenhouse, Andrew C.; McCue, Carolyn

    1971-01-01

    Normal monkey serum and the supernatant fluid from different triturated monkey tissues have been studied for the presence of nonspecific arbovirus hemagglutination and plaque forming inhibitors of dengue viruses types 1, 2, 3, and 4. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) activity was present in most tissue specimens and demonstrated a significant gradient of effectiveness starting with, respectively, serum, spleen, adrenal, and lung having a high degree of activity, whereas skin, heart, muscle, brain, and liver demonstrated low HI titers. A slightly reversed gradient of effectiveness was obtained for the case of dengue virus inhibition of plaque formation with bile, liver, thymus, spleen, and adrenal giving high 50% plaque reduction titers and heart, muscle, serum, skin, and fat demonstrating little or no activity. Analysis by Sephadex G-200 chromatography and sucrose density gradient centrifugation suggests that HI and plaque formation inhibition are independent activities of normal serum or tissue constituents or both. Also, in addition to the physical methods of characterization, chemical treatment by absorption with kaolin or acetone extraction indicate both phenomena to be the result of the action of lipids or lipoproteins. PMID:16557953

  14. Interleukin-10 blocks in vitro replication of human cytomegalovirus by inhibiting the virus-induced autophagy in MRC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Wang, Kanqing; Zhu, Jianxing

    2014-06-13

    Interleukin-10 is an important cytokine that regulates immune response. Previous studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus can trigger cell autophagy during the early stages of infection. To our knowledge, whether IL-10 inhibits HCMV-induced autophagy and virus replication has not been studied previously. We investigated whether IL-10 affects cell viability and autophagy under the conditions of starvation and HCMV infection by using the MRC5 cell line. We also explored the role of IL-10-mediated autophagy on HCMV replication. Our data showed that IL-10 inhibited the autophagic flux of the MRC5 cells irrespective of starvation or HCMV infection, and suppressed HCMV replication. The promotion of autophagy with either a pharmacological inducer (rapamycin), or a technique to over-express the BECN1 gene reversed the effect of IL-10 on virus replication. Furthermore, the PI3K/Akt signal pathway was activated when the cells were pretreated with IL-10. Our results indicated that IL-10 can suppress HCMV replication by inhibiting autophagy in host cells during the early stages of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  16. The binding of a novel bisheteroarylpiperazine mediates inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueweke, T J; Kézdy, F J; Waszak, G A; Deibel, M R; Tarpley, W G

    1992-01-05

    The bisheteroarylpiperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and specifically block HIV-1 replication (Romero, D. L., Busso, M., Tan, C.-K., Reusser, F., Palmer, J. R., Poppe, S. M., Aristoff, P. A., Downey, K. M., So, A. G., Resnick, L., and Tarpley, W. G. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 8806-8810). Here we show that the radiolabeled BHAP [3H]U-88204 binds specifically to HIV-1 RT with high affinity (KD of 50 nM) and a stoichiometry of 1 mol of U-88204 per 1 mol of p66/p51 RT heterodimer. Binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT is unaffected by the presence of saturating poly(rC).oligo (dG)12-18 template-primer. Direct measurement of competition between [3H]U-88204 and other RT inhibitors for binding to RT reveals mutually exclusive competition between [3H]U-88204 and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor BI-RG-587 (Kopp, E. B., Miglietta, J. J., Shrutkowski, A. G., Shih, C.-K., Grob, P. M. and Skoog, M.T. (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 3035-3039), indicating that both share the same binding site. Phosphonoformate in concentrations up to 50 microM shows no competition with [3H]U-88204 for binding to RT either alone or in the presence of template-primer. Dideoxynucleotide RT inhibitors affect the binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT when complementary template-primer is present. [3H]U-88204 and the dideoxynucleotide ddGTP can bind RT simultaneously, but the presence of one ligand decreases the affinity of RT for the second. Inasmuch as ddGTP approximates the nucleotide substrate of RT, the direct demonstration of an RT-dideoxynucleotide-[3H]U-88204 complex validates the use of indirect kinetic methods to assess the strength of BHAP interaction with RT and suggests that RT inhibition by U-88204 is achieved via effects on nucleotide substrate binding.

  17. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

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    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  18. Inhibition of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus RNA Synthesis by Thiosemicarbazone Derived from 5,6-Dimethoxy-1-Indanone▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eliana F.; Fabian, Lucas E.; Caputto, María E.; Gagey, Dolores; Finkielsztein, Liliana M.; Moltrasio, Graciela Y.; Moglioni, Albertina G.; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we described the activity of the thiosemicarbazone derived from 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone (TSC), which we previously characterized as a new compound that inhibits bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection. We showed that TSC acts at a point of time that coincides with the onset of viral RNA synthesis and that it inhibits the activity of BVDV replication complexes (RCs). Moreover, we have selected five BVDV mutants that turned out to be highly resistant to TSC but still susceptible to ribavirin (RBV). Four of these resistant mutants carried an N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The remaining mutant showed an A392E mutation within the same protein. Some of these mutants replicated slower than the wild-type (wt) virus in the absence of TSC, whereas others showed a partial reversion to the wt phenotype over several passages in the absence of the compound. The docking of TSC in the crystal structure of the BVDV RdRp revealed a close contact between the indane ring of the compound and several residues within the fingers domain of the enzyme, some hydrophobic contacts, and hydrogen bonds with the thiosemicarbazone group. Finally, in the mutated RdRp from resistant BVDV, these interactions with TSC could not be achieved. Interestingly, TSC inhibited BVDV replication in cell culture synergistically with RBV. In conclusion, TSC emerges as a new nonnucleoside inhibitor of BVDV RdRp that is synergistic with RBV, a feature that turns it into a potential compound to be evaluated against hepatitis C virus (HCV). PMID:21430053

  19. Calcium spirulan derived from Spirulina platensis inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 attachment to human keratinocytes and protects against herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julia; Gallo, Antonio; Schommartz, Tim; Handke, Wiebke; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Günther, Patrick; Brune, Wolfram; Reich, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 are highly prevalent in populations worldwide and cause recurrent oral lesions in up to 40% of infected subjects. We investigated the antiviral activity of a defined Spirulina platensis microalga extract and of purified calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a sulfated polysaccharide contained therein. The inhibitory effects of HSV-1 were assessed by using a plaque reduction assay and quantitative PCR in a susceptible mammalian epithelial cell line and confirmed in human keratinocytes. Time-of-addition and attachment experiments and fluorescence detection of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 were used to analyze the mechanism of HSV-1 inhibition. Effects of Ca-SP on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 replication and uptake of the ORF45 tegument protein were tested in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. In an observational trial the prophylactic effects of topically applied Ca-SP were compared with those of systemic and topical nucleoside analogues in 198 volunteers with recurrent herpes labialis receiving permanent lip makeup. Ca-SP inhibited HSV-1 infection in vitro with a potency at least comparable to that of acyclovir by blocking viral attachment and penetration into host cells. Ca-SP also inhibited entry of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8. In the clinical model of herpes exacerbation, the prophylactic effect of a Ca-SP and microalgae extract containing cream was superior to that of acyclovir cream. These data indicate a potential clinical use of Ca-SP containing Spirulina species extract for the prophylactic treatment of herpes labialis and suggest possible activity of Ca-SP against infections caused by other herpesviruses. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geraniin extracted from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum binds to dengue virus type-2 envelope protein and inhibits early stage of virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Ahmad, Siti Aisyah; Palanisamy, Uma D; Tejo, Bimo A; Chew, Miaw Fang; Tham, Hong Wai; Syed Hassan, Sharifah

    2017-11-21

    The rapid rise and spread in dengue cases, together with the unavailability of safe vaccines and effective antiviral drugs, warrant the need to discover and develop novel anti-dengue treatments. In this study the antiviral activity of geraniin, extracted from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum, against dengue virus type-2 (DENV-2) was investigated. Geraniin was prepared from Nephelium lappaceum rind by reverse phase C-18 column chromatography. Cytotoxicity of geraniin towards Vero cells was evaluated using MTT assay while IC 50 value was determined by plaque reduction assay. The mode-of-action of geraniin was characterized using the virucidal, attachment, penetration and the time-of-addition assays'. Docking experiments with geraniin molecule and the DENV envelope (E) protein was also performed. Finally, recombinant E Domain III (rE-DIII) protein was produced to physiologically test the binding of geraniin to DENV-2 E-DIII protein, through ELISA competitive binding assay. Cytotoxicity assay confirmed that geraniin was not toxic to Vero cells, even at the highest concentration tested. The compound exhibited DENV-2 plaque formation inhibition, with an IC 50 of 1.75 μM. We further revealed that geraniin reduced viral infectivity and inhibited DENV-2 from attaching to the cells but had little effect on its penetration. Geraniin was observed to be most effective when added at the early stage of DENV-2 infection. Docking experiments showed that geraniin binds to DENV E protein, specifically at the DIII region, while the ELISA competitive binding assay confirmed geraniin's interaction with rE-DIII with high affinity. Geraniin from the rind of Nephelium lappaceum has antiviral activity against DENV-2. It is postulated that the compound inhibits viral attachment by binding to the E-DIII protein and interferes with the initial cell-virus interaction. Our results demonstrate that geraniin has the potential to be developed into an effective antiviral treatment, particularly for

  1. An Approach for Zika Virus Inhibition Using Homology Structure of the Envelope Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernando, S.; Fernando, T.; Štefánik, M.; Eyer, Luděk; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 12 (2016), s. 801-806 ISSN 1073-6085 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Zika virus * homology model * druggability * drug discovery Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.634, year: 2016

  2. Mechanism of inhibition of herpes simplex virus replication by delta 7-prostaglandin A1 and delta 12-prostaglandin J2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Fukushima, M; Tsurumi, T; Maeno, K; Nishiyama, Y

    1987-08-14

    We studied the effect of prostaglandins (PGs) A1, delta 7-A1, A2, D2, E1, E2, F2 alpha, J2 and delta 12-J2 on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Of nine PGs we tested, delta 7-PGA1 was found to have the most potent inhibitory effect; 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) was 0.35 microgram/ml in the plaque reduction assays and HSV-2 induced protein synthesis was strongly suppressed at 0.5 microgram/ml whereas at this dose, the protein synthesis of uninfected cells was not inhibited. Dot blot hybridization analysis revealed that delta 7-PGA1 and delta 12-PGJ2 inhibited the primary transcription of HSV-2. Thus we suggest that those PGs are primarily active at the level of mRNA synthesis.

  3. Inhibition of H9N2 virus invasion into dendritic cells by the S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signalling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention.

  4. GB virus type C E2 protein inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag assembly by downregulating human ADP-ribosylation factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenliang; Timmons, Christine L; Shao, Qiujia; Kinlock, Ballington L; Turner, Tiffany M; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Huanliang; Liu, Bindong

    2015-12-22

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) glycoprotein E2 protein disrupts HIV-1 assembly and release by inhibiting Gag plasma membrane targeting, however the mechanism by which the GBV-C E2 inhibits Gag trafficking remains unclear. In the present study, we identified ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) contributed to the inhibitory effect of GBV-C E2 on HIV-1 Gag membrane targeting. Expression of GBV-C E2 decreased ARF1 expression in a proteasomal degradation-dependent manner. The restoration of ARF1 expression rescued the HIV-1 Gag processing and membrane targeting defect imposed by GBV-C E2. In addition, GBV-C E2 expression also altered Golgi morphology and suppressed protein traffic through the secretory pathway, which are all consistent with a phenotype of disrupting the function of ARF1 protein. Thus, our results indicate that GBV-C E2 inhibits HIV-1 assembly and release by decreasing ARF1, and may provide insights regarding GBV-C E2's potential for a new therapeutic approach for treating HIV-1.

  5. Ethanol extracts of Cassia grandis and Tabernaemontana cymosa inhibit the in vitro replication of dengue virus serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hernández-Castro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antiviral activity of ethanol extracts derived from Cassia grandis leaves and Tabernaemontana cymosa bark against two dengue virus (DENV serotype 2 strains DENV-2/NG and DENV-2/1 6681 in two cell lines susceptible to infection, VERO and U937. Methods: The cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50 was assessed using the MTT method, and the effective concentration 50 (EC50 was determined using the technique of inhibiting the production of infectious viral particles by the plating method. Further testing of dose-response inhibition was performed, and three experimental approaches were evaluated (pre-, trans- and posttreatment to determine the effect of the extracts according to the time of administration. Finally, a preliminary phytochemical analysis for both extracts was performed. Results: The cytotoxicity of the extracts was low (CC50>300 µg/mL, and the U937 cell line was more sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of both extracts. When the virus strain-dependent selectivities of the extracts were compared, it was found that both extracts were more selective in cultures infected with the DENV-2/NG strain than in those infected with the DENV-2/16681 strain. A dose-dependent inhibitory effect of the extracts was not observed in any of the evaluations. Finally, the highest inhibition was detected with the post-treatment approach with the Tabernaemontana cymosa extract (99.9% in both cell lines. Conclusions: A therapy with compounds derived from these extracts would inhibit viral replication and affect steps after viral internalization.

  6. Multiple cationic amphiphiles induce a Niemann-Pick C phenotype and inhibit Ebola virus entry and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J Shoemaker

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Infection requires internalization from the cell surface and trafficking to a late endocytic compartment, where viral fusion occurs, providing a conduit for the viral genome to enter the cytoplasm and initiate replication. In a concurrent study, we identified clomiphene as a potent inhibitor of EBOV entry. Here, we screened eleven inhibitors that target the same biosynthetic pathway as clomiphene. From this screen we identified six compounds, including U18666A, that block EBOV infection (IC(50 1.6 to 8.0 µM at a late stage of entry. Intriguingly, all six are cationic amphiphiles that share additional chemical features. U18666A induces phenotypes, including cholesterol accumulation in endosomes, associated with defects in Niemann-Pick C1 protein (NPC1, a late endosomal and lysosomal protein required for EBOV entry. We tested and found that all six EBOV entry inhibitors from our screen induced cholesterol accumulation. We further showed that higher concentrations of cationic amphiphiles are required to inhibit EBOV entry into cells that overexpress NPC1 than parental cells, supporting the contention that they inhibit EBOV entry in an NPC1-dependent manner. A previously reported inhibitor, compound 3.47, inhibits EBOV entry by blocking binding of the EBOV glycoprotein to NPC1. None of the cationic amphiphiles tested had this effect. Hence, multiple cationic amphiphiles (including several FDA approved agents inhibit EBOV entry in an NPC1-dependent fashion, but by a mechanism distinct from that of compound 3.47. Our findings suggest that there are minimally two ways of perturbing NPC1-dependent pathways that can block EBOV entry, increasing the attractiveness of NPC1 as an anti-filoviral therapeutic target.

  7. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    protein- protein interactions inhibiting innate immunity Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. July 2016...protein interactions inhibiting innate immunity Sb. GRANT NUMBER HDTRA1-13-1-0017 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Timothy...first-line innate immunity response against viral infection. The inhibition or avoidance of this initial innate immune response is a commonly occurring

  8. Water extract of Cinnamomum cassia Blume inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus by preventing viral attachment, internalization, and syncytium formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia Feng; Chang, Jung San; Wang, Kuo Chih; Shieh, Den En; Chiang, Lien Chai

    2013-05-20

    Cinnamomum cassia Blume is a popular traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been used to manage respiratory tract disease, including common cold and chronic bronchitis for thousand years. Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is one of the leading causes of severe lower respiratory tract illness worldwide. No effective therapeutic modality against HRSV infection has been proved. It is unknown whether Cinnamomum cassia is effective against HRSV. This study tested the hypothesis that Cinnamomum cassia can effectively decrease HRSV-induced plaque formation and syncytium formation in respiratory mucosal cell lines. Antiviral activity of the hot water extract of Cinnamomum cassia against HRSV was tested by plaque reduction assay in both human upper (HEp-2) and low (A549) respiratory tract cell lines. Its ability to inhibit the synthesis of viral fusion (F) protein was examined by Western blot assay. Cinnamomum cassia dose-dependently inhibited HRSV-induced plaque formation in both HEp-2 and A549 cell lines (pCinnamomum cassia was more effective when given before viral infection (pCinnamomum cassia could inhibit F protein production and syncytium formation to interfere with HRSV spreading. Cinnamomum cassia prevented airway epithelia from HRSV infection through inhibiting viral attachment, internalization and syncytium formation. Cinnamomum cassia could be a candidate to develop therapeutic modalities to manage HRSV infection in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biliverdin inhibits hepatitis C virus nonstructural 3/4A protease activity: mechanism for the antiviral effects of heme oxygenase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Wilson, Anne T; Luxon, Bruce A; Brown, Kyle E; Mathahs, M Meleah; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; McCaffrey, Anton P; Schmidt, Warren N

    2010-12-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Of the products of the reaction catalyzed by HO-1, iron has been shown to inhibit HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase, but little is known about the antiviral activity of biliverdin (BV). Herein, we report that BV inhibits viral replication and viral protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in replicons and cells harboring the infectious J6/JFH construct. Using the SensoLyte 620 HCV Protease Assay with a wide wavelength excitation/emission (591 nm/622 nm) fluorescence energy transfer peptide, we found that both recombinant and endogenous nonstructural 3/4A (NS3/4A) protease from replicon microsomes are potently inhibited by BV. Of the tetrapyrroles tested, BV was the strongest inhibitor of NS3/4A activity, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 9 μM, similar to that of the commercial inhibitor, AnaSpec (Fremont, CA) #25346 (IC(50) 5 μM). Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated mixed competitive and noncompetitive inhibition of the protease by BV. In contrast, the effects of bilirubin (BR) on HCV replication and NS3/4A were much less potent. Because BV is rapidly converted to BR by biliverdin reductase (BVR) intracellularly, the effect of BVR knockdown on BV antiviral activity was assessed. After greater than 80% silencing of BVR, inhibition of viral replication by BV was enhanced. BV also increased the antiviral activity of α-interferon in replicons. BV is a potent inhibitor of HCV NS3/4A protease, which likely contributes to the antiviral activity of HO-1. These findings suggest that BV or its derivatives may be useful in future drug therapies targeting the NS3/4A protease. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Biliverdin Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Activity: Mechanism for the Antiviral Effects of Heme Oxygenase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Wilson, Anne T.; Luxon, Bruce A.; Brown, Kyle E.; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; McCaffrey, Anton P.; Schmidt, Warren N.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase -1 (HO-1) inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Of the products of the reaction catalyzed by HO-1 iron has been shown to inhibit HCV RNA polymerase, but little is known about the antiviral activity of biliverdin (BV). Herein, we report that BV inhibits viral replication and viral protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in replicons and cells harboring the infectious J6/JFH construct. Using the SensoLyte 620 HCV Protease Assay with a wide wavelength excitation/emission (591nm/622nm) fluorescence energy transfer peptide, we found that both recombinant and endogenous NS3/4A protease from replicon microsomes are potently inhibited by BV. Of the tetrapyrroles tested, BV was the strongest inhibitor of NS3/4A activity with an IC50 of 9 uM, similar to that of the commercial inhibitor, AnaSpec #25346 (IC50 5 uM). Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated mixed competitive and non-competitive inhibition of the protease by BV. In contrast, the effects of bilirubin (BR) on HCV replication and NS3/4A were much less potent. Because BV is rapidly converted to BR by biliverdin reductase (BVR) intracellularly, the effect of BVR knockdown on BV antiviral activity was assessed. After >80% silencing of BVR, inhibition of viral replication by BV was enhanced. BV also increased the antiviral activity of α-interferon in replicons. Conclusion BV is a potent inhibitor of HCV NS3/4A protease, which likely contributes to the antiviral activity of HO-1. These findings suggest that BV or its derivatives may be useful future drug therapies targeting the NS3/4A protease. PMID:21105106

  11. Quantifying the Protection of Activating and Inhibiting NK Cell Receptors during Infection with a CMV-Like Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-01-01

    The responsiveness of natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by balancing signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. The most important ligands of inhibitory NK cell receptors are the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, which allow NK cells to screen the cellular health of target cells. Although these inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions have been well characterized, the ligands for most activating receptors are still unknown. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) represents a helpful model to study NK cell-driven immune responses. Many studies have demonstrated that CMV infection can be controlled by NK cells via their activating receptors, but the exact contribution of the different signaling potential (i.e., activating vs. inhibiting) remains puzzling. In this study, we have developed a probabilistic model, which predicts the optimal specificity of inhibitory and activating NK cell receptors needed to offer the best protection against a CMV-like virus. We confirm our analytical predictions with an agent-based model of an evolving host population. Our analysis quantifies the degree of protection of each receptor type, revealing that mixed haplotypes (i.e., haplotypes composed of activating and inhibiting receptors) are most protective against CMV-like viruses, and that the protective effect depends on the number of MHC loci per individual.

  12. Inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by an endogenous bornavirus-like element in the ground squirrel genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Kan; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Merriman, Dana K; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2014-09-09

    Animal genomes contain endogenous viral sequences, such as endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons. Recently, we and others discovered that nonretroviral viruses also have been endogenized in many vertebrate genomes. Bornaviruses belong to the Mononegavirales and have left endogenous fragments, called "endogenous bornavirus-like elements" (EBLs), in the genomes of many mammals. The striking features of EBLs are that they contain relatively long ORFs which have high sequence homology to the extant bornavirus proteins. Furthermore, some EBLs derived from bornavirus nucleoprotein (EBLNs) have been shown to be transcribed as mRNA and probably are translated into proteins. These features lead us to speculate that EBLs may function as cellular coopted genes. An EBLN element in the genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), itEBLN, encodes an ORF with 77% amino acid sequence identity to the current bornavirus nucleoprotein. In this study, we cloned itEBLN from the ground squirrel genome and investigated its involvement in Borna disease virus (BDV) replication. Interestingly, itEBLN, but not a human EBLN, colocalized with the viral factory in the nucleus and appeared to affect BDV polymerase activity by being incorporated into the viral ribonucleoprotein. Our data show that, as do certain endogenous retroviruses, itEBLN potentially may inhibit infection by related exogenous viruses in vivo.

  13. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  14. Targeting the pseudorabies virus DNA polymerase processivity factor UL42 by RNA interference efficiently inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Li-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved gene-silencing mechanism in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) induce the sequence-specific degradation of homologous RNAs. It has been shown to be a novel and effective antiviral therapy against a wide range of viruses. The pseudorabies virus (PRV) processivity factor UL42 can enhance the catalytic activity of the DNA polymerase and is essential for viral replication, thus it may represent a potential drug target of antiviral therapy against PRV infection. Here, we synthesized three siRNAs (siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849) directed against UL42 and determined their antiviral activities in cell culture. We first examined the kinetics of UL42 expression and found it was expressed with early kinetics during PRV replication. We verified that siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849 efficiently inhibited UL42 expression in an in vitro transfection system, thereby validating their inhibitory effects. Furthermore, we confirmed that these three siRNAs induced potent inhibitory effects on UL42 expression after PRV infection, comparable to the positive control siRNA, siR-1046, directed against the PRV DNA polymerase, the UL30 gene product, which is essential for virus replication. In addition, PRV replication was markedly reduced upon downregulation of UL42 expression. These results indicate that UL42-targeted RNAi efficiently inhibits target gene expression and impairs viral replication. This study provides a new clue for the design of an intervention strategy against herpesviruses by targeting their processivity factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) replication is transiently inhibited by Atlantic salmon type I interferon in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingerud, Tina; Holand, Jenni Kristin; Robertsen, Børre

    2013-11-06

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is a piscine orthomyxovirus, which causes multisystemic disease in farmed Atlantic salmon that may result in large losses. Previous work has suggested that ISAV is able to resist the antiviral state induced in cells by type I interferon (IFN). These studies were, however, mainly based on cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assays. Here we have investigated the antiviral activity of Atlantic salmon IFNa1, IFNb and IFNc against ISAV using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of segment 6, Western blot analysis of ISAV proteins and viral yield reduction assays, in addition to CPE reduction assays. Antiviral effects of IFNs were tested against the high virulent strain ISAV4 and the low virulent strain ISAV7 both at the optimum growth temperature 15°C and at 20°C. As expected, IFNa1 showed little protection against CPE development in cells after infection with both strains at 15°C. However, the qPCR and Western blot analysis clearly showed strong inhibition of replication of the virus strains by IFNa1 between 24 and 72h after infection. The inhibitory effect declined four to five days post-infection, which explains the low protection against CPE development 7-10 days later. At 20°C, IFNa1 showed strong protection against CPE development, probably due to slower virus growth. IFNc showed similar antiviral activity as IFNa1 against ISAV4 while IFNb showed lower activity. There were observed differences between ISAV4 and ISAV7 both with respect inhibition by IFNa1 and ability to induce the two IFN-inducible antiviral effector proteins, Mx and ISG15, which may be related to differences in virulence properties and/or adaption to growth in cell culture. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deu John M Cruz

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne arthrogenic alphavirus that causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting weeks to years. The re-emergence of CHIKV has resulted in numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere, and threatens to expand in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the use of resazurin in a cell-based high-throughput assay, and an image-based high-content assay to identify and characterize inhibitors of CHIKV-infection in vitro. CHIKV is a highly cytopathic virus that rapidly kills infected cells. Thus, cell viability of HuH-7 cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of compounds was determined by measuring metabolic reduction of resazurin to identify inhibitors of CHIKV-associated cell death. A kinase inhibitor library of 4,000 compounds was screened against CHIKV infection of HuH-7 cells using the resazurin reduction assay, and the cell toxicity was also measured in non-infected cells. Seventy-two compounds showing ≥50% inhibition property against CHIKV at 10 µM were selected as primary hits. Four compounds having a benzofuran core scaffold (CND0335, CND0364, CND0366 and CND0415, one pyrrolopyridine (CND0545 and one thiazol-carboxamide (CND3514 inhibited CHIKV-associated cell death in a dose-dependent manner, with EC50 values between 2.2 µM and 7.1 µM. Based on image analysis, these 6 hit compounds did not inhibit CHIKV replication in the host cell. However, CHIKV-infected cells manifested less prominent apoptotic blebs typical of CHIKV cytopathic effect compared with the control infection. Moreover, treatment with these compounds reduced viral titers in the medium of CHIKV-infected cells by up to 100-fold. In conclusion, this cell-based high-throughput screening assay using resazurin, combined with the image-based high content assay approach identified compounds against

  17. Influenza A virus inhibits type I IFN signaling via NF-kappaB-dependent induction of SOCS-3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-K Pauli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN system is a first line of defense against viral infections. Viruses have developed various mechanisms to counteract this response. So far, the interferon antagonistic activity of influenza A viruses was mainly observed on the level of IFNbeta gene induction via action of the viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1. Here we present data indicating that influenza A viruses not only suppress IFNbeta gene induction but also inhibit type I IFN signaling through a mechanism involving induction of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3 protein. Our study was based on the observation that in cells that were infected with influenza A virus and subsequently stimulated with IFNalpha/beta, phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 1 (STAT1 was strongly reduced. This impaired STAT1 activation was not due to the action of viral proteins but rather appeared to be induced by accumulation of viral 5' triphosphate RNA in the cell. SOCS proteins are potent endogenous inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK/STAT signaling. Closer examination revealed that SOCS-3 but not SOCS-1 mRNA levels increase in an RNA- and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB-dependent but type I IFN-independent manner early in the viral replication cycle. This direct viral induction of SOCS-3 mRNA and protein expression appears to be relevant for suppression of the antiviral response since in SOCS-3 deficient cells a sustained phosphorylation of STAT1 correlated with elevated expression of type I IFN-dependent genes. As a consequence, progeny virus titers were reduced in SOCS-3 deficient cells or in cells were SOCS-3 expression was knocked-down by siRNA. These data provide the first evidence that influenza A viruses suppress type I IFN signaling on the level of JAK/STAT activation. The inhibitory effect is at least in part due to the induction of SOCS-3 gene expression, which results in an impaired antiviral response.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Srirupa; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Leung, Daisy W.

    2016-08-01

    The host innate immune system serves as the first line of defense against viral infections. Germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors detect molecular patterns associated with pathogens and activate innate immune responses. Of particular relevance to viral infections are those pattern recognition receptors that activate type I interferon responses, which establish an antiviral state. The order Mononegavirales is composed of viruses that possess single-stranded, non-segmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA genomes and are important human pathogens that consistently antagonize signaling related to type I interferon responses. NNS viruses have limited encoding capacity compared to many DNA viruses, and as a likely consequence, most open reading frames encode multifunctional viral proteins that interact with host factors in order to evade host cell defenses while promoting viral replication. In this review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of innate immune evasion by select NNS viruses. A greater understanding of these interactions will be critical in facilitating the development of effective therapeutics and viral countermeasures.

  19. Derivatives of amphotericin inhibit infection with human immunodeficiency virus in vitro by different modes of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Witzke, N M; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    /ml; N-(N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)N"-ethyl guanyl) amphotericin B (DAPEG) did so at 5-11 micrograms/ml. While the virus-inhibitory effect of AME was due to an interaction with target lymphocytes, the effect of MCG was due to a direct anti-viral action. AME increased the potential of infected cells...

  20. Serum amyloid P component inhibits influenza A virus infections: in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, A; Andersen, I; Junker, K

    2001-01-01

    that SAP bound to HA trimers, monomers and HA1 and HA2 subunits of influenza A virus. Binding studies indicated that galactose, mannose and fucose moieties contributed to the SAP reacting site(s). Intranasal administration of human SAP to mice induced no demonstrable toxic reactions, and circulating...

  1. Selective inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication by alpha-zam, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection became curable because of the development of direct acting antivirals (DAAs). However, the high cost of DAAs has greatly impeded their potential impact on the treatment of HCV infection. As a result, hepatitis C will continue to cause substantial morbidity, and mortality among ...

  2. Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection is inhibited by SA-17, a doxorubicin derivative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Jarupathirun, Patsaporn; Kaptein, Suzanne; Neyts, Johan; Smit, Jolanda

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to play a critical role in the exacerbation of dengue virus (DENV)-induced disease during a heterologous re-infection. Despite ADE's clinical impact, only a few antiviral compounds have been assessed for their anti-ADE activity. We reported earlier

  3. Antidiarrheal activity of extracts from Maytenus gonoclada and inhibition of Dengue virus by lupeol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO C. SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diarrhea is an infectious disease caused by bacterial, virus, or protozoan, and dengue is caused by virus, included among the neglected diseases in several underdeveloped and developing countries, with an urgent demand for new drugs. Considering the antidiarrheal potential of species of Maytenus genus, a phytochemical investigation followed by antibacterial activity test with extracts of branches and heartwood and bark of roots from Maytenus gonoclada were conducted. Moreover, due the frequency of isolation of lupeol from Maytenus genus the antiviral activity against Dengue virus and cytotoxicity of lupeol and its complex with β-cyclodextrins were also tested. The results indicated the bioactivity of ethyl acetate extract from branches and ethanol extract from heartwood of roots of M. gonoclada against diarrheagenic bacteria. The lupeol showed potent activity against Dengue virus and low cytotoxicity in LLC-MK2 cells, but its complex with β-cyclodextrin was inactive. Considering the importance of novel and selective antiviral drug candidates the results seem to be promising.

  4. The Us3 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Inhibits T Cell Signaling by Confining Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) Activation via TRAF6 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Wu, Songfang; Wang, Yu; Pan, Shuang; Lan, Bei; Liu, Yaohui; Zhang, Liming; Leng, Qianli; Chen, Da; Zhang, Cuizhu; He, Bin; Cao, Youjia

    2015-06-19

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the most prevalent human virus and causes global morbidity because the virus is able to infect multiple cell types. Remarkably, HSV infection switches between lytic and latent cycles, where T cells play a critical role. However, the precise way of virus-host interactions is incompletely understood. Here we report that HSV-1 productively infected Jurkat T-cells and inhibited antigen-induced T cell receptor activation. We discovered that HSV-1-encoded Us3 protein interrupted TCR signaling and interleukin-2 production by inactivation of the linker for activation of T cells. This study unveils a mechanism by which HSV-1 intrudes into early events of TCR-mediated cell signaling and may provide novel insights into HSV infection, during which the virus escapes from host immune surveillance. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubrie O’Rourke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH, hymenialdisine (HD, and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  6. Inhibition of MLC phosphorylation restricts replication of influenza virus--a mechanism of action for anti-influenza agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Haidari

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are a severe threat worldwide, causing large epidemics that kill thousands every year. Prevention of influenza infection is complicated by continuous viral antigenic changes. Newer anti-influenza agents include MEK/ERK and protein kinase C inhibitors; however, the downstream effectors of these pathways have not been determined. In this study, we identified a common mechanism for the inhibitory effects of a significant group of anti-influenza agents. Our studies showed that influenza infection activates a series of signaling pathways that converge to induce myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Inhibiting MLC phosphorylation by blocking RhoA/Rho kinase, phospholipase C/protein kinase C, and HRas/Raf/MEK/ERK pathways with the use of genetic or chemical manipulation leads to the inhibition of influenza proliferation. In contrast, the induction of MLC phosphorylation enhances influenza proliferation, as does activation of the HRas/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. This effect is attenuated by inhibiting MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, in intracellular trafficking studies, we found that the nuclear export of influenza ribonucleoprotein depends on MLC phosphorylation. Our studies provide evidence that modulation of MLC phosphorylation is an underlying mechanism for the inhibitory effects of many anti-influenza compounds.

  7. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    KAUST Repository

    O’Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  8. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C.; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C.; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognitio...

  9. Borna disease virus blocks potentiation of presynaptic activity through inhibition of protein kinase C signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Borna disease virus (BDV enables the study of the molecular mechanisms whereby a virus can persist in the central nervous system and lead to altered brain function in the absence of overt cytolysis and inflammation. This neurotropic virus infects a wide variety of vertebrates and causes behavioral diseases. The basis of BDV-induced behavioral impairment remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether BDV infection of neurons affected synaptic activity, by studying the rate of synaptic vesicle (SV recycling, a good indicator of synaptic activity. Vesicular cycling was visualized in cultured hippocampal neurons synapses, using an assay based on the uptake of an antibody directed against the luminal domain of synaptotagmin I. BDV infection did not affect elementary presynaptic functioning, such as spontaneous or depolarization-induced vesicular cycling. In contrast, infection of neurons with BDV specifically blocked the enhancement of SV recycling that is observed in response to stimuli-induced synaptic potentiation, suggesting defects in long-term potentiation. Studies of signaling pathways involved in synaptic potentiation revealed that this blockade was due to a reduction of the phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC of proteins that regulate SV recycling, such as myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS and Munc18-1/nSec1. Moreover, BDV interference with PKC-dependent phosphorylation was identified downstream of PKC activation. We also provide evidence suggesting that the BDV phosphoprotein interferes with PKC-dependent phosphorylation. Altogether, our results reveal a new mechanism by which a virus can cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to neurobehavioral disorders.

  10. Borna Disease Virus Blocks Potentiation of Presynaptic Activity through Inhibition of Protein Kinase C Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer, Romain; Monnet, Céline; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Infection by Borna disease virus (BDV) enables the study of the molecular mechanisms whereby a virus can persist in the central nervous system and lead to altered brain function in the absence of overt cytolysis and inflammation. This neurotropic virus infects a wide variety of vertebrates and causes behavioral diseases. The basis of BDV-induced behavioral impairment remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether BDV infection of neurons affected synaptic activity, by studying the rate of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, a good indicator of synaptic activity. Vesicular cycling was visualized in cultured hippocampal neurons synapses, using an assay based on the uptake of an antibody directed against the luminal domain of synaptotagmin I. BDV infection did not affect elementary presynaptic functioning, such as spontaneous or depolarization-induced vesicular cycling. In contrast, infection of neurons with BDV specifically blocked the enhancement of SV recycling that is observed in response to stimuli-induced synaptic potentiation, suggesting defects in long-term potentiation. Studies of signaling pathways involved in synaptic potentiation revealed that this blockade was due to a reduction of the phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) of proteins that regulate SV recycling, such as myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) and Munc18–1/nSec1. Moreover, BDV interference with PKC-dependent phosphorylation was identified downstream of PKC activation. We also provide evidence suggesting that the BDV phosphoprotein interferes with PKC-dependent phosphorylation. Altogether, our results reveal a new mechanism by which a virus can cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to neurobehavioral disorders. PMID:16552443

  11. Inhibition of West Nile Virus Multiplication in Cell Culture by Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Belen Blazquez; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Juan-Carlos eSaiz

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and birds, but it can also infect other vertebrates, including humans, in which it can cause neuroinvasive diseases. To date, no licensed vaccine or therapy for human use against this pathogen is yet available. A recent approach to search for new antiviral agent candidates is the assessment of long-used drugs commonly administered by clinicians to treat human disorders in drug antiviral ...

  12. Inhibition of influenza A virus matrix and nonstructural gene expression using RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Cynthia M; Beezhold, Donald H; Blachere, Francoise M; Othumpangat, Sreekumar; Kashon, Michael L; Noti, John D

    2016-10-01

    Influenza antiviral drugs that use protein inhibitors can lose their efficacy as resistant strains emerge. As an alternative strategy, we investigated the use of small interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs) by characterizing three siRNAs (M747, M776 and M832) targeting the influenza matrix 2 gene and three (NS570, NS595 and NS615) targeting the nonstructural protein 1 and 2 genes. We also re-examined two previously reported siRNAs, M331 and M950, which target the matrix 1 and 2 genes. Treatment with M331-, M776-, M832-, and M950-siRNAs attenuated influenza titer. M776-siRNA treated cells had 29.8% less infectious virus than cells treated with the previously characterized siRNA, M950. NS570-, NS595- and NS615-siRNAs reduced nonstructural protein 1 and 2 expression and enhanced type I interferon expression by 50%. Combination siRNA treatment attenuated 20.9% more infectious virus than single siRNA treatment. Our results suggest a potential use for these siRNAs as an effective anti-influenza virus therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The GB virus C (GBV-C NS3 serine protease inhibits HIV-1 replication in a CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line without decreasing HIV receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L George

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Persistent infection with GBV-C (GB Virus C, a non-pathogenic virus related to hepatitis C virus (HCV, prolongs survival in HIV infection. Two GBV-C proteins, NS5A and E2, have been shown previously to inhibit HIV replication in vitro. We investigated whether the GBV-C NS3 serine protease affects HIV replication. RESULTS: GBV-C NS3 protease expressed in a human CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line significantly inhibited HIV replication. Addition of NS4A or NS4A/4B coding sequence to GBV-C NS3 increased the effect on HIV replication. Inhibition of HIV replication was dose-dependent and was not mediated by increased cell toxicity. Mutation of the NS3 catalytic serine to alanine resulted in loss of both HIV inhibition and protease activity. GBV-C NS3 expression did not measurably decrease CD4 or CXCR4 expression. CONCLUSION: GBV-C NS3 serine protease significantly inhibited HIV replication without decreasing HIV receptor expression. The requirement for an intact catalytic serine at the active site indicates that inhibition was mediated by proteolytic cleavage of an unidentified target(s.

  14. The GB virus C (GBV-C) NS3 serine protease inhibits HIV-1 replication in a CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line without decreasing HIV receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah L; Varmaz, Dino; Tavis, John E; Chowdhury, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection with GBV-C (GB Virus C), a non-pathogenic virus related to hepatitis C virus (HCV), prolongs survival in HIV infection. Two GBV-C proteins, NS5A and E2, have been shown previously to inhibit HIV replication in vitro. We investigated whether the GBV-C NS3 serine protease affects HIV replication. GBV-C NS3 protease expressed in a human CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line significantly inhibited HIV replication. Addition of NS4A or NS4A/4B coding sequence to GBV-C NS3 increased the effect on HIV replication. Inhibition of HIV replication was dose-dependent and was not mediated by increased cell toxicity. Mutation of the NS3 catalytic serine to alanine resulted in loss of both HIV inhibition and protease activity. GBV-C NS3 expression did not measurably decrease CD4 or CXCR4 expression. GBV-C NS3 serine protease significantly inhibited HIV replication without decreasing HIV receptor expression. The requirement for an intact catalytic serine at the active site indicates that inhibition was mediated by proteolytic cleavage of an unidentified target(s).

  15. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion by immunor (IM28

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akoume Marie-Yvonne

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunor (IM28, an analog of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 by inhibiting reverse transcriptase. We assessed the ability of IM28 to inhibit the cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV envelope glycoprotein in an in vitro system. For this purpose, we co-cultured TF228.1.16, a T-cell line expressing stably HIV-1 glycoprotein envelopes, with an equal number of 293/CD4+, another T cell line expressing CD4, and with the SupT1 cell line with or without IM28. Results In the absence of IM28, TF228.1.16 fused with 293/CD4+, inducing numerous large syncytia. Syncytia appeared more rapidly when TF228.1.16 was co-cultured with SupT1 cells than when it was co-cultured with the 293/CD4+ cell line. IM28 (1.6 – 45 μg/ml completely inhibits cell-cell fusion. IM28 also prevented the development of new syncytia in infected cells and protected naive SupT1 cells from HIV-1 infection. Evaluation of 50% inhibitory dose (IC50 of IM28 revealed a decrease in HIV-1 replication with an IC50 of 22 mM and 50% cytotoxicity dose (CC50 as determined on MT2 cells was 75 mM giving a selectivity index of 3.4 Conclusions These findings suggest that IM28 exerts an inhibitory action on the env proteins that mediate cell-cell fusion between infected and healthy cells. They also suggest that IM28 interferes with biochemical processes to stop the progression of existing syncytia. This property may lead to the development of a new class of therapeutic drug.

  16. [Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by RNA interference in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cai; Fan, Xue-Gong; Li, Ning; Ying, Ruo-Su

    2004-09-01

    To design pSilencer3.1-H1hygro plasmid expressing short interfering RNAs (siRNA) that targets HBV core gene region, and to evaluate inhibitory effect of this siRNA on HBV in vitro. HepG2 2.2.15 was used as target cells. The plasmid and liposome metafectene were cotransfected into the cultured cells, HBV DNA were analyzed by fluorogenic quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR), HBV C-mRNA was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The plasmid expressing siRNA was successfully constructed. The two constructed siRNAs could effectively inhibit HBV replication, and their inhibitive effect on HBV was dose-dependent. These results showed that siRNA could substantially inhibit HBV replication in the infected cells

  17. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus and induction of hepatoma cell apoptosis by ASGPR-directed delivery of shRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Ma

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a worldwide liver disease and nearly 25% of chronic HBV infections terminate in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Currently, there is no effective therapy to inhibit HBV replication and to eliminate hepatoma cells, making it highly desired to develop novel therapies for these two stages of the HBV-caused detrimental disease. Recently, short hairpin RNA (shRNA has emerged as a potential therapy for virus-infected disease and cancer. Here, we have generated a shRNA, pGenesil-siHBV4, which effectively inhibits HBV replication in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.2.15. The inhibitory effects of pGenesil-siHBV4 are manifested by the decrease of both the HBV mRNA level and the protein levels of the secreted HBV surface antigen (HBsAg and HBV e antigen (HBeAg, and by the reduction of secreted HBV DNA. Using mouse hydrodynamic tail vein injection, we demonstrate that pGenesil-siHBV4 is effective in inhibiting HBV replication in vivo. Because survivin plays a key role in cancer cell escape from apoptosis, we further generated pGenesil-siSurvivin, a survivin-silencing shRNA, and showed its effect of triggering apoptosis of HBV-containing hepatoma cells. To develop targeted shRNA therapy, we have identified that as a specific binder of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR, jetPEI-Hepatocyte delivers pGenesil-siHBV4 and pGenesil-siSurvivin specifically to hepatocytes, not other types of cells. Finally, co-transfection of pGenesil-siHBV4 and pGenesil-siSurvivin exerts synergistic effects in inducing hepatoma cell apoptosis, a novel approach to eliminate hepatoma by downregulating survivin via multiple mechanisms. The application of these novel shRNAs with the jetPEI-Hepatocyte targeting strategy demonstrates the proof-of-principle for a promising approach to inhibit HBV replication and eliminate hepatoma cells with high specificity.

  18. Synergistic inhibition of influenza A virus replication by a plant polyphenol-rich extract and epsilon-aminocaproic acid in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkedjieva, J; Nikolova, E; Kirilov, N

    2010-01-01

    A combined antiviral effect of a polyphenol-rich extract of the medicinal plant Geranium sanguineum L. (PC) and a protease inhibitor, epsilon-aminocaproic acid (ACA) was examined in Influenza A virus (IAV)-infected MDCK cell cultures and mice. Synergistic, antagonistic, or indifferent antiviral effects were distinguished on the basis of virus yields, namely fractional yields of individual compounds and yields of both compounds in combination. Combinations of PC and ACA in particular concentrations proved synergistic in the inhibition of virus replication in MDCK cells and in protection of mice against virus infection as determined by virus titers, lung weight, mean survival time (MST), mortality rate, and protection rate (PR). Following the application of a combination of PC and ACA to the virus-infected mice, the levels of the lung protease and protease-inhibitory activity, which were increased due to the virus infection, were brought to normal. These results demonstrate the rationale for a combined application of viral inhibitors with different modes of action to the treatment of IAV infection, in particular PC as a natural inhibitor of early viral transcription and translation and ACA as a synthetic inhibitor of cellular proteases. Influenza A virus; antiviral effect; synergism; plant polyphenol extract; epsilon-aminocaproic acid; protease inhibitors.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2)O(2) levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD.

  20. An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif in varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein B regulates cell fusion and skin pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stefan L; Brady, Jennifer J; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Sung, Phillip; Blau, Helen M; Arvin, Ann M

    2013-01-29

    Herpesvirus entry functions of the conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL have been delineated, but their role in regulating cell-cell fusion is poorly understood. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection provides a valuable model for investigating cell-cell fusion because of the importance of this process for pathogenesis in human skin and sensory ganglia. The present study identifies a canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) in the gB cytoplasmic domain (gBcyt) and demonstrates that the gBcyt is a tyrosine kinase substrate. Orbitrap mass spectrometry confirmed that Y881, central to the ITIM, is phosphorylated. To determine whether the gBcyt ITIM regulates gB/gH-gL-induced cell-cell fusion in vitro, tyrosine residues Y881 and Y920 in the gBcyt were substituted with phenylalanine separately or together. Recombinant viruses with these substitutions were generated to establish their effects on syncytia formation in replication in vitro and in the human skin xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. The Y881F substitution caused significantly increased cell-cell fusion despite reduced cell-surface gB. Importantly, the Y881F or Y881/920F substitutions in VZV caused aggressive syncytia formation, reducing cell-cell spread. These in vitro effects of aggressive syncytia formation translated to severely impaired skin infection in vivo. In contrast, the Y920F substitution did not affect virus replication in vitro or in vivo. These observations suggest that gB modulates cell-cell fusion via an ITIM-mediated Y881 phosphorylation-dependent mechanism, supporting a unique concept that intracellular signaling through this gBcyt motif regulates VZV syncytia formation and is essential for skin pathogenesis.

  1. Aptamer That Binds to the gD Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Efficiently Inhibits Viral Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hayashi, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    The ectodomain of the gD protein of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) plays an important role in viral entry by binding to specific cellular coreceptors and mediating viral entry to the host cells. In the present study, we isolated RNA aptamers (aptamer-1 and aptamer-5) that specifically bind to the gD protein of HSV-1 with high affinity and are able to discriminate the gD protein of a different virus, HSV-2. Aptamer-1 efficiently interfered with the interaction between the gD protein and the HSV-1 target cell receptor (HVEM) in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of aptamer-1 was estimated to be in the nanomolar range (60 nM). Furthermore, aptamer-1 was analyzed for anti-HSV-1 activity by using plaque assays, and it efficiently inhibited viral entry with an estimated Ki of 0.8 μM. To expand the future applications of aptamer-1, a shorter variant was designed by using both mapping and boundary analyses, resulting in the mini-1 aptamer (44-mer). Compared to the full-length aptamer, mini-1 had at least as high an affinity, specificity, and ability to interfere with gD-HVEM interactions. These studies suggest that the mini-1 aptamer could be explored further as an anti-HSV-1 topical therapy designed to prevent the risk of acquiring HSV-1 infection through physical contact. PMID:22514343

  2. Short interfering RNA inhibits Rift Valley fever virus replication and degradation of protein kinase R in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonto Faburay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing severe outbreaks in humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human infections are characterized by fever, sometimes leading to encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever and occasionally death. There are currently no fully licensed vaccines or effective therapies for human use. Gene silencing mediated by double-stranded short interfering RNA (siRNA is a sequence-specific, highly conserved mechanism in eukaryotes, which serves as an antiviral defence mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes directed against the RVFV nucleoprotein can effectively inhibit RVFV replication in human (MRC5 cells and African green monkey cells (Vero E6 cells. Using these cells, we demonstrate that individual or complex siRNAs, targeting the RVFV nucleoprotein gene completely abrogate viral protein expression and prevent degradation of the host innate antiviral factor, protein kinase R (PKR. Importantly, pre-treatment of cells with the nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs markedly reduces the virus titer. The antiviral effect of the siRNAs was not attributable to interferon or the interferon response effector molecule, protein kinase R. Thus, the antiviral activity of RVFV nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs may provide novel therapeutic strategy against RVFV infections in animals and humans.

  3. The viral capping enzyme nsP1: a novel target for the inhibition of chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delang, L; Li, C; Tas, A; Quérat, G; Albulescu, I C; De Burghgraeve, T; Guerrero, N A Segura; Gigante, A; Piorkowski, G; Decroly, E; Jochmans, D; Canard, B; Snijder, E J; Pérez-Pérez, M J; van Hemert, M J; Coutard, B; Leyssen, P; Neyts, J

    2016-08-22

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has become a substantial global health threat due to its massive re-emergence, the considerable disease burden and the lack of vaccines or therapeutics. We discovered a novel class of small molecules ([1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-7(6H)-ones) with potent in vitro activity against CHIKV isolates from different geographical regions. Drug-resistant variants were selected and these carried a P34S substitution in non-structural protein 1 (nsP1), the main enzyme involved in alphavirus RNA capping. Biochemical assays using nsP1 of the related Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus revealed that the compounds specifically inhibit the guanylylation of nsP1. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that the alphavirus capping machinery is an excellent antiviral drug target. Considering the lack of options to treat CHIKV infections, this series of compounds with their unique (alphavirus-specific) target offers promise for the development of therapy for CHIKV infections.

  4. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by a dual CCR5/CXCR4 antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    - or CXCR4-transfected cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and monocytes/macrophages. AMD3451 also inhibited R5, R5/X4, and X4 HIV-1 primary clinical isolates in PBMCs (IC(50), 1.8 to 7.3 microM). A PCR-based viral entry assay revealed that AMD3451 blocks R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection...... not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca(2+) signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca(2+) signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 microM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca(2+) flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4...... but not that induced by CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, and CCL7. The CXCL12- and CCL3-induced chemotaxis was also dose-dependently inhibited by AMD3451. Furthermore, AMD3451 inhibited CXCL12- and CCL3L1-induced endocytosis in CXCR4- and CCR5-transfected cells. AMD3451, in contrast to the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, did...

  6. Ribavirin inhibits in vitro hepatitis E virus replication through depletion of cellular GTP pools and is moderately synergistic with alpha interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Debing (Yannick); B. Emerson; Y. Wang (Yijin); Q. Pan (Qiuwei); J. Balzarini; K. Dallmeier (Kai); J. Neyts

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute hepatitis that results in high mortality in pregnant women and may establish chronic infections in immunocompromised patients. We demonstrate for the first time that alpha interferon (IFN-α) and ribavirin inhibit in vitro HEV replication

  7. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of rabies virus replication by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Durymanova Ono

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a zoonotic disease that affects all mammals and leads to more than 55,000 human deaths every year, caused by rabies virus (RABV (Mononegavirales: Rhabdoviridae: Lyssavirus. Currently, human rabies treatment is based on the Milwaukee Protocol which consists on the induction of coma and massive antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the decrease in the titer of rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo using short-interfering RNAs. To this end, three siRNAs were used with antisense strands complementary to rabies virus nucleoprotein (N mRNA. BHK-21 cells monolayers were infected with 1000 to 0.1 TCID50 of PV and after 2 hours the cells were transfected with each of tree RNAs in separate using Lipofectamine-2000. All three siRNAs reduced the titer of PV strain in a least 0.72 logTCID50/mL and no cytotoxic effect was observed in the monolayers treated with Lipofectamine-2000. Swiss albino mice infected with 10.000 to 1 LD of PV strain by the intracerebral route were also transfected after two hours of infection with a pool 3 siRNAs with Lipofectamine-2000 by the intracerebral route, resulting in a survival rate of 30% in mice inoculated with 100 LD50, while the same dose led to 100% mortality in untreated animals. Lipofectamine-2000 showed no toxic effect in control mice. These results suggest that intracerebral administration of siRNAs might be an effective antiviral strategy for rabies.

  8. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of rabies virus replication by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durymanova Ono, Ekaterina A; Iamamoto, Keila; Castilho, Juliana G; Carnieli, Pedro; de Novaes Oliveira, Rafael; Achkar, Samira M; Carrieri, Maria L; Kotait, Ivanete; Brandão, Paulo E

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic disease that affects all mammals and leads to more than 55,000 human deaths every year, caused by rabies virus (RABV) (Mononegavirales: Rhabdoviridae: Lyssavirus). Currently, human rabies treatment is based on the Milwaukee Protocol which consists on the induction of coma and massive antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the decrease in the titer of rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo using short-interfering RNAs. To this end, three siRNAs were used with antisense strands complementary to rabies virus nucleoprotein (N) mRNA. BHK-21 cells monolayers were infected with 1000 to 0.1 TCID50 of PV and after 2 hours the cells were transfected with each of tree RNAs in separate using Lipofectamine-2000. All three siRNAs reduced the titer of PV strain in a least 0.72 logTCID50/mL and no cytotoxic effect was observed in the monolayers treated with Lipofectamine-2000. Swiss albino mice infected with 10.000 to 1 LD of PV strain by the intracerebral route were also transfected after two hours of infection with a pool 3 siRNAs with Lipofectamine-2000 by the intracerebral route, resulting in a survival rate of 30% in mice inoculated with 100 LD50, while the same dose led to 100% mortality in untreated animals. Lipofectamine-2000 showed no toxic effect in control mice. These results suggest that intracerebral administration of siRNAs might be an effective antiviral strategy for rabies.

  9. The use of homologous virus in the haemagglutination-inhibition assay after vaccination with Newcastle disease virus strain La Sota or clone30 leads to an over estimation of protective serum antibody titres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, R.A.; Oei, H.L.; Kemper, S.; Koch, G.; Visser, L.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of the use of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-strains Ulster and La Sota in the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for the measurement of antibody titres after NDV vaccination. The use of the homologous La Sota antigen in the HI assay after Clone30 and La Sota

  10. Stage-specific inhibition of MHC class I presentation by the Epstein-Barr virus BNLF2a protein during virus lytic cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Croft

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The gamma-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV persists for life in infected individuals despite the presence of a strong immune response. During the lytic cycle of EBV many viral proteins are expressed, potentially allowing virally infected cells to be recognized and eliminated by CD8+ T cells. We have recently identified an immune evasion protein encoded by EBV, BNLF2a, which is expressed in early phase lytic replication and inhibits peptide- and ATP-binding functions of the transporter associated with antigen processing. Ectopic expression of BNLF2a causes decreased surface MHC class I expression and inhibits the presentation of indicator antigens to CD8+ T cells. Here we sought to examine the influence of BNLF2a when expressed naturally during EBV lytic replication. We generated a BNLF2a-deleted recombinant EBV (DeltaBNLF2a and compared the ability of DeltaBNLF2a and wild-type EBV-transformed B cell lines to be recognized by CD8+ T cell clones specific for EBV-encoded immediate early, early and late lytic antigens. Epitopes derived from immediate early and early expressed proteins were better recognized when presented by DeltaBNLF2a transformed cells compared to wild-type virus transformants. However, recognition of late antigens by CD8+ T cells remained equally poor when presented by both wild-type and DeltaBNLF2a cell targets. Analysis of BNLF2a and target protein expression kinetics showed that although BNLF2a is expressed during early phase replication, it is expressed at a time when there is an upregulation of immediate early proteins and initiation of early protein synthesis. Interestingly, BNLF2a protein expression was found to be lost by late lytic cycle yet DeltaBNLF2a-transformed cells in late stage replication downregulated surface MHC class I to a similar extent as wild-type EBV-transformed cells. These data show that BNLF2a-mediated expression is stage-specific, affecting presentation of immediate early and early proteins, and

  11. Alpha interferon inhibits early stages of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Y; Pitha, P M

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) on a single replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the lymphocytic cell line CEM-174, which is highly sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN. Pretreatment of cells with 50 to 500 U of recombinant human IFN-alpha per ml resulted in a marked reduction in viral RNA and protein synthesis. The effect of IFN-alpha was dose dependent and was amplified in multiple infection cycle...

  12. RNA-seq detects pharmacological inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus late transcription during spontaneous reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An T. Phan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise and sequential expression of viral genes underlies progression of the infectious life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is both a tractable model for elucidating principles of transcription as well as a global health threat. We describe an experimental protocol and bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification of EBV true late genes, the last step of transcription prior to virion packaging and egress. All data have been uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession code GSE96689. The key improvement over previous approaches is leveraging the sensitivity of RNA-seq to detect gene expression changes during spontaneous reactivation.

  13. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  14. Baicalin inhibits TLR7/MYD88 signaling pathway activation to suppress lung inflammation in mice infected with influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAN, QIAOFENG; WANG, HAO; HAN, XUEBO; LIN, YUAN; YANG, YANHUI; GU, LIGANG; ZHAO, JIAQING; WANG, LI; HUANG, LING; LI, YANBIN; YANG, YURONG

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of baicalin on imprinting control region mice infected with influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) virus. Oral administration of baicalin into mice infected with H1N1 prevented death, increased the mean time to death and inhibited lung index and lung consolidation. Subsequently, fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the mRNA expression of toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88), and western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of phosphorylated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-P65 and c-jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was applied to test for the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, in the lung tissue. The findings indicated that baicalin downregulated the mRNA expression of TLR7 and MYD88, significantly downregulated the protein expression of NF-κB-P65 and AP-1 and also inhibited the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, baicalin effectively reduced the pathological damage and inflammation of the lungs by downregulating the TLR7/MYD88-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:24748990

  15. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression and replication by RNase P-associated external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Shao, Luyao; Trang, Phong; Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Sun, Xu; Vu, Gia-Phong; Wang, Yu; Li, Hongjian; Zheng, Congyi; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2016-06-09

    An external guide sequence (EGS) is a RNA sequence which can interact with a target mRNA to form a tertiary structure like a pre-tRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, to degrade target mRNA. Previously, an in vitro selection procedure has been used by us to engineer new EGSs that are more robust in inducing human RNase P to cleave their targeted mRNAs. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the mRNA encoding herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) major transcription regulator ICP4, which is essential for the expression of viral early and late genes and viral growth. The EGS variant induced human RNase P cleavage of ICP4 mRNA sequence 60 times better than the EGS generated from a natural pre-tRNA. A decrease of about 97% and 75% in the level of ICP4 gene expression and an inhibition of about 7,000- and 500-fold in viral growth were observed in HSV infected cells expressing the variant and the pre-tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. This study shows that engineered EGSs can inhibit HSV-1 gene expression and viral growth. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the potential for engineered EGS RNAs to be developed and used as anti-HSV therapeutics.

  16. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus

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    Yu-Chuen Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg. Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B and integrated (Huh7 HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes.

  17. Epigallocatechin gallate, an active green tea compound inhibits the Zika virus entry into host cells via binding the envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nitin; Murali, Aarthy; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-11-01

    Emerging infections of Zika virus (ZIKV) are associated with serious consequences like microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It leads to a situation of global health emergency and demand an intensive research investigation to develop safe and effective therapeutics. Various efforts have been made to reduce the pathological pressure of ZIKV, but no effective drug has been introduced against ZIKV infections. A recent study has reported the inhibition of ZIKV entry into the host cells by an active green tea ingredient, Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) in Vero E6cells. The effect of EGCG seems remarkable but lacking the information of the mechanism of action. In this study, we have investigated the binding site (Site1) of EGCG on envelope protein and provided the insights into various interactions of molecule with the binding site using molecular docking studies. Further, using molecular dynamics approaches we proposed the possible associated mechanism of inhibition of ZIKV entry by EGCG molecule. EGCG has found to interact with several residues and providing stability to the protein conformations up to 50ns simulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simian virus 40 inhibits differentiation and maturation of rhesus macaque DC-SIGN+-dendritic cells

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    Changyong G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are the initiators and modulators of the immune responses. Some species of pathogenic microorganisms have developed immune evasion strategies by controlling antigen presentation function of DC. Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA tumor virus of rhesus monkey origin. It can induce cell transformation and tumorigenesis in many vertebrate species, but often causes no visible effects and persists as a latent infection in rhesus monkeys under natural conditions. To investigate the interaction between SV40 and rhesus monkey DC, rhesus monkey peripheral blood monocyte-derived DC were induced using recombinant human Interleukin-4 (rhIL-4 and infective SV40, the phenotype and function of DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN+ DC were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results showed that SV40 can down-regulate the expression of CD83 and CD86 on DC and impair DC-induced activation of T cell proliferation. These findings suggest that SV40 might also cause immune suppression by influencing differentiation and maturation of DC.

  19. Potent inhibition of Hendra virus infection via RNA interference and poly I:C immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskill, Jana L; Marsh, Glenn A; Monaghan, Paul; Wang, Lin-Fa; Doran, Timothy; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes fatal disease in a wide range of species, including humans. HeV was first described in Australia in 1994, and has continued to re-emerge with increasing frequency. HeV is of significant concern to human health due to its high mortality rate, increasing emergence, absence of vaccines and limited post exposure therapies. Here we investigate the use of RNA interference (RNAi) based therapeutics targeting HeV in conjunction with the TLR3 agonist Poly I:C and show that they are potent inhibitors of HeV infection in vitro. We found that short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the abundantly expressed N, P and M genes of HeV caused over 95% reduction of HeV virus titre, protein and mRNA. Furthermore, we found that the combination of HeV targeting siRNA and Poly I:C had an additive effect in suppressing HeV infection. Our results demonstrate for the first time that RNAi and type I interferon stimulation are effective inhibitors of HeV replication in vitro and may provide an effective therapy for this highly lethal, zoonotic pathogen.

  20. Potent inhibition of Hendra virus infection via RNA interference and poly I:C immune activation.

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    Jana L McCaskill

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes fatal disease in a wide range of species, including humans. HeV was first described in Australia in 1994, and has continued to re-emerge with increasing frequency. HeV is of significant concern to human health due to its high mortality rate, increasing emergence, absence of vaccines and limited post exposure therapies. Here we investigate the use of RNA interference (RNAi based therapeutics targeting HeV in conjunction with the TLR3 agonist Poly I:C and show that they are potent inhibitors of HeV infection in vitro. We found that short interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting the abundantly expressed N, P and M genes of HeV caused over 95% reduction of HeV virus titre, protein and mRNA. Furthermore, we found that the combination of HeV targeting siRNA and Poly I:C had an additive effect in suppressing HeV infection. Our results demonstrate for the first time that RNAi and type I interferon stimulation are effective inhibitors of HeV replication in vitro and may provide an effective therapy for this highly lethal, zoonotic pathogen.

  1. Structural Basis for the Function and Inhibition of an Influenze Virus Proton Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stouffer,A.; Acharya, R.; Salom, D.; Levine, A.; Di Costanzo, L.; Soto, C.; Tershko, V.; Nanda, V.; Stayrook, S.; DeGrado, W.

    2008-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A virus is a pH-activated proton channel that mediates acidification of the interior of viral particles entrapped in endosomes. M2 is the target of the anti-influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine; recently, resistance to these drugs in humans, birds and pigs has reached more than 90% (ref. 1). Here we describe the crystal structure of the transmembrane-spanning region of the homotetrameric protein in the presence and absence of the channel-blocking drug amantadine. pH-dependent structural changes occur near a set of conserved His and Trp residues that are involved in proton gating2. The drug-binding site is lined by residues that are mutated in amantadine-resistant viruses3, 4. Binding of amantadine physically occludes the pore, and might also perturb the pKa of the critical His residue. The structure provides a starting point for solving the problem of resistance to M2-channel blockers.

  2. Inhibition of equine arteritis virus by an antimicrobial peptide produced by Bacillus sp. P34

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    D. Scopel e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Bacillus sp. P34, isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish from the Amazon basin. This peptide showed antibacterial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and was characterized as a bacteriocin like substance. It was demonstrated that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against feline herpesvirus type 1 in vitro. The aim of this work was to evaluate P34 for its antiviral properties in vitro, using RK 13 cells, against the equine arteritis virus, since it has no specific treatment and a variable proportion of stallions may become persistently infected. The results obtained show that P34 exerts antiviral and virucidal activities against equine arteritis virus, probably in the viral envelope. The antiviral assays performed showed that P34 reduces significantly the viral titers of treated cell cultures. The mechanism of action of P34 seems to be time/temperature-dependent. This peptide tends to be a promising antiviral compound for the prevention and treatment of arteriviral infections since it has a high therapeutic index. However, more detailed studies must be performed to address the exact step of viral infection where P34 acts, in order to use this peptide as an antiviral drug in vivo in the future.

  3. Zika virus inhibits eIF2α-dependent stress granule assembly.

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    Raquel Amorim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV, a member of the Flaviviridae family, is the most recent emerging arbovirus with pandemic potential. During infection, viruses trigger the host cell stress response, leading to changes in RNA translation and the assembly of large aggregates of stalled translation preinitiation complexes, termed stress granules (SGs. Several reports demonstrate that flaviviruses modulate the assembly of stress granules (SG. As an emerging pathogen, little is known however about how ZIKV modulates the host cell stress response. In this work, we investigate how ZIKV modulates SG assembly. We demonstrate that ZIKV negatively impacts SG assembly under oxidative stress conditions induced by sodium arsenite (Ars, a treatment that leads to the phosphorylation of eIF2α. By contrast, no measurable difference in SG assembly was observed between mock and ZIKV-infected cells treated with sodium selenite (Se or Pateamine A (PatA, compounds that trigger eIF2α-independent SG assembly. Interestingly, ZIKV infection markedly impaired the phosphorylation of eIF2α triggered in Ars-treated infected cells, and the abrogation of SG assembly in ZIKV-infected cells is, at least in part, dependent on eIF2α dephosphorylation. These data demonstrate that ZIKV elicits mechanisms to counteract host anti-viral stress responses to promote a cellular environment propitious for viral replication.

  4. Activation Pathway of a Nucleoside Analog Inhibiting Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul C; Stevens, Sarah K; Tam, Yuen; Pemberton, Ryan P; Chaudhuri, Shuvam; Stoycheva, Antitsa D; Dyatkina, Natalia; Wang, Guangyi; Symons, Julian A; Deval, Jerome; Beigelman, Leo

    2017-01-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a negative-sense RNA virus and a significant cause of respiratory infection in infants and the elderly. No effective vaccines or antiviral therapies are available for the treatment of RSV. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside prodrug inhibitor of RSV replication currently under clinical evaluation. ALS-8112, the parent molecule of ALS-8176, undergoes intracellular phosphorylation, yielding the active 5'-triphosphate metabolite. The host kinases responsible for this conversion are not known. Therefore, elucidation of the ALS-8112 activation pathway is key to further understanding its conversion mechanism, particularly given its potent antiviral effects. Here, we have identified the activation pathway of ALS-8112 and show it is unlike other antiviral cytidine analogs. The first step, driven by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), is highly efficient, while the second step limits the formation of the active 5'-triphosphate species. ALS-8112 is a 2'- and 4'-modified nucleoside analog, prompting us to investigate dCK recognition of other 2'- and 4'-modified nucleosides. Our biochemical approach along with computational modeling contributes to an enhanced structure-activity profile for dCK. These results highlight an exciting potential to optimize nucleoside analogs based on the second activation step and increased attention toward nucleoside diphosphate and triphosphate prodrugs in drug discovery.

  5. Easily accessible polycyclic amines that inhibit the wild-type and amantadine-resistant mutants of the M2 channel of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Carrizo, Matias; Barniol-Xicota, Marta; Ma, Chunlong; Frigolé-Vivas, Marta; Torres, Eva; Naesens, Lieve; Llabrés, Salomé; Juárez-Jiménez, Jordi; Luque, Francisco J; DeGrado, William F; Lamb, Robert A; Pinto, Lawrence H; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-07-10

    Amantadine inhibits the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, yet most of the currently circulating strains of the virus carry mutations in the M2 protein that render the virus amantadine-resistant. While most of the research on novel amantadine analogues has revolved around the synthesis of novel adamantane derivatives, we have recently found that other polycyclic scaffolds effectively block the M2 proton channel, including amantadine-resistant mutant channels. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized a series of pyrrolidine derivatives designed as analogues of amantadine. Inhibition of the wild-type M2 channel and the A/M2-S31N, A/M2-V27A, and A/M2-L26F mutant forms of the channel were measured in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp assays. Most of the novel compounds inhibited the wild-type ion channel in the low micromolar range. Of note, two of the compounds inhibited the amantadine-resistant A/M2-V27A and A/M2-L26F mutant ion channels with submicromolar and low micromolar IC50, respectively. None of the compounds was found to inhibit the S31N mutant ion channel.

  6. Cyclic and acyclic defensins inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication by different mechanisms.

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    Aprille Seidel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed by plants and animals. In mammals there are three subfamilies of defensins, distinguished by structural features: alpha, beta and theta. Alpha and beta-defensins are linear peptides with broad anti-microbial activity that are expressed by many mammals including humans. In contrast, theta-defensins are cyclic anti-microbial peptides made by several non-human primates but not humans. All three defensin types have anti-HIV-1 activity, but their mechanisms of action differ. We studied the anti-HIV-1 activity of one defensin from each group, HNP-1 (alpha, HBD-2 (beta and RTD-1 (theta. We examined how each defensin affected HIV-1 infection and demonstrated that the cyclic defensin RTD-1 inhibited HIV-1 entry, while acyclic HNP-1 and HBD-2 inhibited HIV-1 replication even when added 12 hours post-infection and blocked viral replication after HIV-1 cDNA formation. We further found that all three defensins downmodulated CXCR4. Moreover, RTD-1 inactivated X4 HIV-1, while HNP-1 and HBD-2 inactivated both X4 and R5 HIV-1. The data presented here show that acyclic and cyclic defensins block HIV-1 replication by shared and diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we found that HNP-1 and RTD-1 directly inhibited firefly luciferase enzymatic activity, which may affect the interpretation of previously published data.

  7. Retinoids and rexinoids inhibit hepatitis C virus independently of retinoid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuko; Fukasawa, Masayoshi; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Fukazawa, Hidesuke

    2014-02-01

    Using a high-throughput screening system involving HCV JFH-1-Huh 7.5.1 cells, we determined that the ligands of class II nuclear receptors, retinoids and rexinoids inhibit HCV infection. Retinoids, ligands of retinoic acid receptor (RAR), and rexinoids, ligands of retinoid X receptor (RXR), reduced extracellular HCV RNA of HCV infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% effective concentrations were below 10 nM, and the 50% cytotoxic concentrations were over 10 μM. Both agonists and antagonists demonstrated inhibition, which indicates that the effect is not dependent on retinoic acid signaling. These chemicals reduced HCV RNA and NS5A protein levels in cells harboring the subgenomic HCV replicon RNA, which suggests that the chemicals affect HCV RNA replication. These compounds were also effective against persistently infected cells, although the reduction in the intracellular HCV RNA was smaller than that of the extracellular HCV RNA, suggesting that viral post-replication step is also inhibited. In combination with interferon (IFN), retinoid exhibited a synergistic effect. Retinoids did not enhance expression of the IFN effector molecule PKR. These series of compounds warrant further investigation as new class of HCV drugs, for the clinical translation of our observation may lead to increased anti-HCV efficacy. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication and expression by RNA interference in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cai; Fan, Xue-gong; Li, Ning; Ying, Ruo-su; Tian, Xue-fei

    2005-09-14

    To design pSilencer3.1-H1hygro plasmid expressing short interfering RNAs (siRNA) that target HBV S gene region, and to evaluate inhibitory effect of this siRNA on HBV in vitro. HepG2.2.15 was used as target cell. The plasmid expressing small interfering RNA was transfected into the cultured cells via liposome metafectene, HBsAg and HBeAg were analyzed by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay, HBV DNA were analyzed by fluorogenic quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR), HBV S-mRNA was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The plasmid expressing siRNA was successfully constructed. The S region siRNAs could effectively inhibit both antigens secretion and HBV replication compared with controls, HBsAg levels decreased by 75%, 82%, 89%; HBeAg levels decreased by 32%, 38%, 43%; HBV DNA production decreased by 30%, 43%, 49%; The HBV mRNA species was reduced by 30%, 70%, 90% when transfected with 1 microg, 2 microg, 4 microg HBV S-siRNA, respectively. These results demonstrate that RNAi can substantially inhibit HBV replication and the antigens expression in the infected cells. These inhibitive effect of siRNA on HBV was dose-dependent and sequence-specific.

  9. Two Small RNAs Encoded within the First 1.5 Kilobases of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Can Inhibit Productive Infection and Cooperate To Inhibit Apoptosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenwen; Sa e Silva, Mariana; Jaber, Tareq; Vitvitskaia, Olga; Li, Sumin; Henderson, Gail; Jones, Clinton

    2009-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) is abundantly expressed in latently infected trigeminal ganglionic sensory neurons. Expression of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences is sufficient for the wild-type reactivation phenotype in small animal models of infection. The ability of the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences to inhibit apoptosis is important for the latency-reactivation cycle. Several studies have also concluded that LAT inhibits productive infection. To date, a functional LAT protein has not been identified, suggesting that LAT is a regulatory RNA. Two small RNAs (sRNAs) were previously identified within the first 1.5 kb of LAT coding sequences. In this study, we demonstrated that both LAT sRNAs were expressed in the trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with an HSV-1 strain that expresses LAT but not when mice were infected with a LAT null mutant. LAT sRNA1 and sRNA2 cooperated to inhibit cold shock-induced apoptosis in mouse neuroblastoma cells. LAT sRNA1, but not LAT sRNA2, inhibited apoptosis less efficiently than both sRNAs. When rabbit skin cells were cotransfected with plasmids that express LAT sRNA1 and HSV-1 genomic DNA, the amount of infectious virus released was reduced approximately 3 logs. Although LAT sRNA2 was less effective at inhibiting virus production, it inhibited expression of infected cell protein 4 (ICP4). Neither LAT sRNA had an obvious effect on ICP0 expression. These studies suggested that expression of two LAT sRNAs plays a role in the latency-reactivation cycle by inhibiting apoptosis and productive infection. PMID:19587058

  10. Wolbachia-Based Dengue Virus Inhibition Is Not Tissue-Specific in Aedes aegypti.

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    Hilaria E Amuzu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, caused by the dengue virus (DENV, is now the most common arbovirus transmitted disease globally. One novel approach to control DENV is to use the endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, to limit DENV replication inside the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Wolbachia that is naturally present in a range of insects reduces the capacity for viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi to replicate inside insects. Wolbachia's mode of action is not well understood but may involve components of immune activation or competition with pathogens for limited host resources. The strength of Wolbachia-based anti DENV effects appear to correlate with bacterial density in the whole insect and in cell culture. Here we aimed to determine whether particular tissues, especially those with high Wolbachia densities or immune activity, play a greater role in mediating the anti DENV effect.Ae. aegypti mosquito lines with and without Wolbachia (Wildtype were orally fed DENV 3 and their viral loads subsequently measured over two time points post infection in the midgut, head, salivary glands, Malpighian tubules, fat body and carcass. We did not find correlations between Wolbachia densities and DENV loads in any tissue, nor with DENV loads in salivary glands, the endpoint of infection. This is in contrast with strong positive correlations between DENV loads in a range of tissues and salivary gland loads for Wildtype mosquitoes. Lastly, there was no evidence of a heightened role for tissues with known immune function including the fat body and the Malpighian tubules in Wolbachia's limitation of DENV.We conclude that the efficacy of DENV blocking in Wolbachia infected mosquitoes is not reliant on any particular tissue. This work therefore suggests that the mechanism of Wolbachia-based antiviral effects is either systemic or acts locally via processes that are fundamental to diverse cell types. We further conclude that the relationship between DENV

  11. Alkaloids from sponge, scaffolds for the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)

    KAUST Repository

    O'Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-05-06

    Anti-viral compounds with low cytotoxicity are identified from screening of products found in Red Sea sponges, including the sponge Stylissa carteri. The identified compounds can be brominated pyrrole-2- aminoimidazole alkaloids and derivatives thereof. Specific examples of identified compounds include oroidin, hymenialdisine, and debromohymenialdisine, as well as derivatives thereof. The compounds also can be useful scaffolds or pharmacores for further chemical modification and derivatization. Selected compounds, particularly oroidin, show selective anti-viral HIV-1 activity coupled with reduced cytotoxicity. The compounds can function as HIV reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and molecular modeling can be used to confirm inhibition.

  12. Gene modulation associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B virus X transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkiewicz, Malgorzata; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Tralhao, Guilherme; Morosan, Serban; Giannini, Carlo; Brezillon, Nicolas; Soussan, Patrick; Delpuech, Oona; Kremsdorf, Dina

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the modulation of gene expression profile associated with inhibition of liver regeneration in hepatitis B X (HBx)-expressing transgenic mice. METHODS: Microarray technology was performed on liver tissue obtained from 4 control (LacZ) and 4 transgenic mice (HBx-LacZ), 48 h after partial hepatectomy. The significance of the normalized log-ratios was assessed for each gene, using robust t-tests under an empirical Bayes approach. Microarray hybridization data was verified on selected genes by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: The comparison of gene expression patterns showed a consistent modulation of the expression of 26 genes, most of which are implicated in liver regeneration. Up-regulated genes included DNA repair proteins (Rad-52, MSH6) and transmembrane proteins (syndecan 4, tetraspanin), while down-regulated genes were connected to the regulation of transcription (histone deacetylase, Zfp90, MyoD1) and were involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway and isoprenoid biosynthesis (farnesyl diphosphate synthase, Cyp7b1, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, SAA3). CONCLUSION: Our results provide a novel insight into the biological activities of HBx, implicated in the inhibition of liver regeneration. PMID:18203290

  13. Zn(2+ inhibits coronavirus and arterivirus RNA polymerase activity in vitro and zinc ionophores block the replication of these viruses in cell culture.

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    Aartjan J W te Velthuis

    Full Text Available Increasing the intracellular Zn(2+ concentration with zinc-ionophores like pyrithione (PT can efficiently impair the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including poliovirus and influenza virus. For some viruses this effect has been attributed to interference with viral polyprotein processing. In this study we demonstrate that the combination of Zn(2+ and PT at low concentrations (2 µM Zn(2+ and 2 µM PT inhibits the replication of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and equine arteritis virus (EAV in cell culture. The RNA synthesis of these two distantly related nidoviruses is catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is the core enzyme of their multiprotein replication and transcription complex (RTC. Using an activity assay for RTCs isolated from cells infected with SARS-CoV or EAV--thus eliminating the need for PT to transport Zn(2+ across the plasma membrane--we show that Zn(2+ efficiently inhibits the RNA-synthesizing activity of the RTCs of both viruses. Enzymatic studies using recombinant RdRps (SARS-CoV nsp12 and EAV nsp9 purified from E. coli subsequently revealed that Zn(2+ directly inhibited the in vitro activity of both nidovirus polymerases. More specifically, Zn(2+ was found to block the initiation step of EAV RNA synthesis, whereas in the case of the SARS-CoV RdRp elongation was inhibited and template binding reduced. By chelating Zn(2+ with MgEDTA, the inhibitory effect of the divalent cation could be reversed, which provides a novel experimental tool for in vitro studies of the molecular details of nidovirus replication and transcription.

  14. Zn(2+) inhibits coronavirus and arterivirus RNA polymerase activity in vitro and zinc ionophores block the replication of these viruses in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; van den Worm, Sjoerd H E; Sims, Amy C; Baric, Ralph S; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2010-11-04

    Increasing the intracellular Zn(2+) concentration with zinc-ionophores like pyrithione (PT) can efficiently impair the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including poliovirus and influenza virus. For some viruses this effect has been attributed to interference with viral polyprotein processing. In this study we demonstrate that the combination of Zn(2+) and PT at low concentrations (2 µM Zn(2+) and 2 µM PT) inhibits the replication of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and equine arteritis virus (EAV) in cell culture. The RNA synthesis of these two distantly related nidoviruses is catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is the core enzyme of their multiprotein replication and transcription complex (RTC). Using an activity assay for RTCs isolated from cells infected with SARS-CoV or EAV--thus eliminating the need for PT to transport Zn(2+) across the plasma membrane--we show that Zn(2+) efficiently inhibits the RNA-synthesizing activity of the RTCs of both viruses. Enzymatic studies using recombinant RdRps (SARS-CoV nsp12 and EAV nsp9) purified from E. coli subsequently revealed that Zn(2+) directly inhibited the in vitro activity of both nidovirus polymerases. More specifically, Zn(2+) was found to block the initiation step of EAV RNA synthesis, whereas in the case of the SARS-CoV RdRp elongation was inhibited and template binding reduced. By chelating Zn(2+) with MgEDTA, the inhibitory effect of the divalent cation could be reversed, which provides a novel experimental tool for in vitro studies of the molecular details of nidovirus replication and transcription.

  15. Zn2+ Inhibits Coronavirus and Arterivirus RNA Polymerase Activity In Vitro and Zinc Ionophores Block the Replication of These Viruses in Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.; van den Worm, Sjoerd H. E.; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Snijder, Eric J.; van Hemert, Martijn J.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the intracellular Zn2+ concentration with zinc-ionophores like pyrithione (PT) can efficiently impair the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including poliovirus and influenza virus. For some viruses this effect has been attributed to interference with viral polyprotein processing. In this study we demonstrate that the combination of Zn2+ and PT at low concentrations (2 µM Zn2+ and 2 µM PT) inhibits the replication of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and equine arteritis virus (EAV) in cell culture. The RNA synthesis of these two distantly related nidoviruses is catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is the core enzyme of their multiprotein replication and transcription complex (RTC). Using an activity assay for RTCs isolated from cells infected with SARS-CoV or EAV—thus eliminating the need for PT to transport Zn2+ across the plasma membrane—we show that Zn2+ efficiently inhibits the RNA-synthesizing activity of the RTCs of both viruses. Enzymatic studies using recombinant RdRps (SARS-CoV nsp12 and EAV nsp9) purified from E. coli subsequently revealed that Zn2+ directly inhibited the in vitro activity of both nidovirus polymerases. More specifically, Zn2+ was found to block the initiation step of EAV RNA synthesis, whereas in the case of the SARS-CoV RdRp elongation was inhibited and template binding reduced. By chelating Zn2+ with MgEDTA, the inhibitory effect of the divalent cation could be reversed, which provides a novel experimental tool for in vitro studies of the molecular details of nidovirus replication and transcription. PMID:21079686

  16. Comparison of a Micro-Neutralization Test with the Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test for Measuring Rabies Virus Neutralizing Antibodies

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    Todd G. Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT is routinely used in the United States to measure rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA. RFFIT has a long history of reproducible and reliable results. The test has been modified over the years to use smaller volumes of reagents and samples, but requires a 50 μL minimum volume of test serum. To conduct pathogenesis studies, small laboratory animals such as mice are regularly tested for rVNA, but the minimum volume for a standard RFFIT may be impossible to obtain, particularly in scenarios of repeated sampling. To address this problem, a micro-neutralization test was developed previously. In the current study, the micro-neutralization test was compared to the RFFIT using 129 mouse serum samples from rabies vaccine studies. Using a cut-off value of 0.1 IU/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, and concordance of the micro-neutralization test were 100%, 97.5%, and 98%, respectively. The geometric mean titer of all samples above the cut-off was 2.0 IU/mL using RFFIT and 3.4 IU/mL using the micro-neutralization test, indicating that titers determined using the micro-neutralization test are not equivalent to RFFIT titers. Based on four rVNA-positive hamster serum samples, the intra-assay coefficient of variability was 24% and inter-assay coefficient of variability was 30.4%. These results support continued use of the micro-neutralization test to determine rabies virus neutralizing antibody titers for low-volume serum samples.

  17. Inhibition of ERK and proliferation in NK cell lines by soluble HLA-E released from Japanese encephalitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetank; Date, Onkar Sanjay; Carbone, Ennio; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram

    2014-11-01

    Productive infection of human endothelial cells with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a single stranded RNA virus induces shedding of sHLA-E. We show here that sHLA-E that is released upon infection with this flavivirus can inhibit IL-2 and PMA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in two NK cell lines, Nishi and NKL. Virus infected or IFN-γ treated cell culture supernatants containing sHLA-E were found to partially inhibit IL-2 mediated induction of CD25 molecules on NKL cells. It was also found that sHLA-E could inhibit IL-2 induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation suggesting that, similar to cell surface expressed HLA-E, sHLA-E could also inhibit NK cell responses. Hence JEV-induced shedding of sHLA-E needs further investigation to better understand immune responses in JEV infections since it may have a role in viral evasion of NK cell responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Triterpenoid Saponins Isolated from Platycodon grandiflorum Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Woo; Park, Sang Jin; Lim, Jong Hwan; Yang, Jae Won; Shin, Jung Cheul; Lee, Sang Wook; Suh, Joo Won; Hwang, Soon B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to significant adverse effects and emergence of resistant strains of currently developed anti-HCV agents, plant extracts have been considered to be potential sources of new bioactive compounds against HCV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of triterpenoid saponins contained in the root extract of Platycodon grandiflorum (PG) on viral enzyme activities and replication in both HCV replicon cells and cell culture grown HCV- (HCVcc-) infected cells. Inhibitory activities of triterpenoid saponins from PG were verified by NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assay and were further confirmed in the context of HCV replication. Six triterpenoid saponins (platycodin D, platycodin D2, platycodin D3, deapioplatycodin D, deapioplatycodin D2, and platyconic acid A), PG saponin mixture (PGSM), were identified as active components exerting anti-HCV activity. Importantly, PGSM exerted synergistic anti-HCV activity in combination with either interferon-α or NS5A inhibitors. We demonstrated that combinatorial treatment of PGSM and IFN-α efficiently suppressed colony formation with significant reduction in drug resistant variant of HCV. These data suggest that triterpenoid saponin may represent a novel anti-HCV therapeutic agent. PMID:24489585

  19. Poly (I:C, an agonist of toll-like receptor-3, inhibits replication of the Chikungunya virus in BEAS-2B cells

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    Li Yong-Gang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and its mimic, polyinosinic acid: polycytidylic acid [Poly (I:C], are recognized by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and induce interferon (IFN-β in many cell types. Poly (I:C is the most potent IFN inducer. In in vivo mouse studies, intraperitoneal injection of Poly (I:C elicited IFN-α/β production and natural killer (NK cells activation. The TLR3 pathway is suggested to contribute to innate immune responses against many viruses, including influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus 2, and murine cytomegalovirus. In Chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection, the viruses are cleared within 7–10 days postinfection before adaptive immune responses emerge. The innate immune response is important for CHIKV clearance. Results The effects of Poly (I:C on the replication of CHIKV in human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B, were studied. Poly (I:C suppressed cytopathic effects (CPE induced by CHIKV infection in BEAS-2B cells in the presence of Poly (I:C and inhibited the replication of CHIKV in the cells. The virus titers of Poly (I:C-treated cells were much lower compared with those of untreated cells. CHIKV infection and Poly (I:C treatment of BEAS-2B cells induced the production of IFN-β and increased the expression of anti-viral genes, including IFN-α, IFN-β, MxA, and OAS. Both Poly (I:C and CHIKV infection upregulate the expression of TLR3 in BEAS-2B cells. Conclusions CHIKV is sensitive to innate immune response induced by Poly (I:C. The inhibition of CHIKV replication by Poly (I:C may be through the induction of TLR3, which triggers the production of IFNs and other anti-viral genes. The innate immune response is important to clear CHIKV in infected cells.

  20. Human but Not Laboratory Borna Disease Virus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendrocytes In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Lei, Yang; Deng, Jing; Zhou, Chanjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wenjuan; Huang, Hua; Cheng, Shigang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Rongzhong; Liu, Xia; Ma, Lihua; Wang, Xiao; Li, Juan; Xie, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic virus that produces neuropsychiatric dysfunction in a wide range of warm-blooded species. Several studies have associated BDV with human psychiatric illness, but the findings remain controversial. Although oligodendrocytes are a major glial component of brain white matter and play a pivotal role in neuronal cell function, BDV's effects on human oligodendrocytes have not been clarified. Here, the effects of two BDV strains, Hu-H1 (isolated from a bipolar patient) and Strain V (a laboratory strain), on the proliferation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes were investigated. Three experimental cell lines were constructed: Hu-H1-infected oligodendroglioma (Hu-H1) cells, Strain V-infected oligodendroglioma (Strain V) cells, and non-infected oligodendroglioma (control) cells. BDV infection was assayed by BDV nucleoprotein (p40) immunofluorescence, cell proliferation was assayed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), and cell cycle phases and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Expressions of the apoptosis-related proteins Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by Western blotting. p40 expression was confirmed in Hu-H1 and Strain V on and after day three post-infection. Strain V cells showed significantly greater cellular proliferation than Hu-H1 cells on and after day three post-infection. In Hu-H1 cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In contrast, in Strain V cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In conclusion, Hu-H1 inhibits cellular proliferation and promotes apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax upregulation and Bcl-2 downregulation. In contrast, Strain V promotes cellular proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax downregulation and Bcl-2 upregulation. The effects of the Hu-H1 strain (isolated from a bipolar patient) are

  1. Human but Not Laboratory Borna Disease Virus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendrocytes In Vitro.

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    Dan Li

    Full Text Available Borna disease virus (BDV is a neurotropic virus that produces neuropsychiatric dysfunction in a wide range of warm-blooded species. Several studies have associated BDV with human psychiatric illness, but the findings remain controversial. Although oligodendrocytes are a major glial component of brain white matter and play a pivotal role in neuronal cell function, BDV's effects on human oligodendrocytes have not been clarified. Here, the effects of two BDV strains, Hu-H1 (isolated from a bipolar patient and Strain V (a laboratory strain, on the proliferation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes were investigated. Three experimental cell lines were constructed: Hu-H1-infected oligodendroglioma (Hu-H1 cells, Strain V-infected oligodendroglioma (Strain V cells, and non-infected oligodendroglioma (control cells. BDV infection was assayed by BDV nucleoprotein (p40 immunofluorescence, cell proliferation was assayed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8, and cell cycle phases and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Expressions of the apoptosis-related proteins Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by Western blotting. p40 expression was confirmed in Hu-H1 and Strain V on and after day three post-infection. Strain V cells showed significantly greater cellular proliferation than Hu-H1 cells on and after day three post-infection. In Hu-H1 cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In contrast, in Strain V cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In conclusion, Hu-H1 inhibits cellular proliferation and promotes apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax upregulation and Bcl-2 downregulation. In contrast, Strain V promotes cellular proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax downregulation and Bcl-2 upregulation. The effects of the Hu-H1 strain (isolated from a bipolar

  2. Fusion of protegrin-1 and plectasin to MAP30 shows significant inhibition activity against dengue virus replication.

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    Hussin A Rothan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV broadly disseminates in tropical and sub-tropical countries and there are no vaccine or anti-dengue drugs available. DENV outbreaks cause serious economic burden due to infection complications that requires special medical care and hospitalization. This study presents a new strategy for inexpensive production of anti-DENV peptide-fusion protein to prevent and/or treat DENV infection. Antiviral cationic peptides protegrin-1 (PG1 and plectasin (PLSN were fused with MAP30 protein to produce recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein (PG1-MAP30-PLSN as inclusion bodies in E. coli. High yield production of PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein was achieved by solubilization of inclusion bodies in alkaline buffer followed by the application of appropriate refolding techniques. Antiviral PG1-MAP30-PLSN protein considerably inhibited DENV protease (NS2B-NS3pro with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 0.5±0.1 μM. The real-time proliferation assay (RTCA and the end-point proliferation assay (MTT assay showed that the maximal-nontoxic dose of the peptide-fusion protein against Vero cells is approximately 0.67±0.2 μM. The cell-based assays showed considerable inhibition of the peptide-fusion protein against binding and proliferating stages of DENV2 into the target cells. The peptide-fusion protein protected DENV2-challeged mice with 100% of survival at the dose of 50 mg/kg. In conclusion, producing recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein by combining short antiviral peptide with a central protein owning similar activity could be useful to minimize the overall cost of short peptide production and take advantage of its synergistic antiviral activities.

  3. Orf virus 002 protein targets ovine protein S100A4 and inhibits NF-kappa B signaling

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    Daxiang Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Orf virus (ORFV, a member of Parapoxvirus, has evolved various strategies to modulate the immune responses of host cells. The ORFV-encoded protein ORFV002, a regulator factor, has been found to inhibit the acetylation of NF-κB-p65 by blocking phosphorylation of NF-kB-p65 at Ser276 and also to disrupt the binding of NF-kB-p65 and p300. To explore the mechanism by which ORFV002 regulates NF-κB signaling, the understanding of ORFV002 potential binding partners in host cells is critical. In this study, ovine S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4, prolylendopeptidase-like (PREPL and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 alpha subcomplex 8 (NDUFA8 were found to interact with ORFV002 based on the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H assay using a cDNA library derived from primary ovine fetal turbinate cells (OFTu. GST pull-down and bidirectional co-immunoprecipitation assay results demonstrate that ORFV002 interacts with S100A4 directly. Following the pEGFP-ORFV002 (p002GFP transfection, we found that cytoplasmic S100A4 translocates into the nucleus and co-localizes with ORFV002. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of ORFV002 on NF-κB signaling was significantly restored by S100A4 knock-down phenotype, suggesting ovine S100A4 participating in the ORFV002-mediated NF-κB signaling. These data demonstrate that ORFV002 inhibits the NF-κB activation through its interaction with S100A4 along with its nucleus translocation.

  4. The antiviral protein viperin inhibits hepatitis C virus replication via interaction with nonstructural protein 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Karla J; Eyre, Nicholas S; Yip, Evelyn; Narayana, Sumudu; Li, Kui; Fiches, Guillaume; McCartney, Erin M; Jangra, Rohit K; Lemon, Stanley M; Beard, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    The interferon-stimulated gene, viperin, has been shown to have antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the context of the HCV replicon, although the molecular mechanisms responsible are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that viperin plays an integral part in the ability of interferon to limit the replication of cell-culture-derived HCV (JFH-1) that accurately reflects the complete viral life cycle. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis, we demonstrate that viperin localizes and interacts with HCV nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) at the lipid-droplet (LD) interface. In addition, viperin also associates with NS5A and the proviral cellular factor, human vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein subtype A (VAP-A), at the HCV replication complex. The ability of viperin to limit HCV replication was dependent on residues within the C-terminus, as well as an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Removal of the amphipathic helix-redirected viperin from the cytosolic face of the endoplasmic reticulum and the LD to a homogenous cytoplasmic distribution, coinciding with a loss of antiviral effect. C-terminal viperin mutants still localized to the LD interface and replication complexes, but did not interact with NS5A proteins, as determined by FRET analysis. In conclusion, we propose that viperin interacts with NS5A and the host factor, VAP-A, to limit HCV replication at the replication complex. This highlights the complexity of the host control of viral replication by interferon-stimulated gene expression. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Methanolic soluble fractions of lingzhi or reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) extract inhibit neuraminidase activity in Newcastle disease virus (LaSota).

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    Shamaki, Bala U; Sandabe, Umar K; Ogbe, Adamu O; Abdulrahman, Fanna I; El-Yuguda, Abdul-Dahiru

    2014-01-01

    The antineuraminidase activity of different organic soluble fractions of Ganoderma lucidum extract was investigated using inhibition of hemagglutination and elution of chicken erythrocytes by Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Fractions of methanol, ethylacetate, and normal butanol (n-butanol) of the G. lucidum were tested against neuraminidase producing NDV as antigen. Different dilutions of the organic soluble fractions inhibited elution of 1% red blood cells by neuraminidase of NDV While the methanolic and n-butanol extracts inhibited neuraminidase activity even at a dilution of 1:16 and that of ethylacetate fraction inhibited even at 1:32 respectively. This finding indicates that G. lucidum has some antineuraminidase activity against NDV and may be exploited in the management of NDV infection.

  6. Vaccinia virus protein C6 is a virulence factor that binds TBK-1 adaptor proteins and inhibits activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

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    Leonie Unterholzner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs causes interferon-β (IFN-β induction, a key event in the anti-viral innate immune response, and also a target of viral immune evasion. Here the vaccinia virus (VACV protein C6 is identified as an inhibitor of PRR-induced IFN-β expression by a functional screen of select VACV open reading frames expressed individually in mammalian cells. C6 is a member of a family of Bcl-2-like poxvirus proteins, many of which have been shown to inhibit innate immune signalling pathways. PRRs activate both NF-κB and IFN regulatory factors (IRFs to activate the IFN-β promoter induction. Data presented here show that C6 inhibits IRF3 activation and translocation into the nucleus, but does not inhibit NF-κB activation. C6 inhibits IRF3 and IRF7 activation downstream of the kinases TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 and IκB kinase-ε (IKKε, which phosphorylate and activate these IRFs. However, C6 does not inhibit TBK1- and IKKε-independent IRF7 activation or the induction of promoters by constitutively active forms of IRF3 or IRF7, indicating that C6 acts at the level of the TBK1/IKKε complex. Consistent with this notion, C6 immunoprecipitated with the TBK1 complex scaffold proteins TANK, SINTBAD and NAP1. C6 is expressed early during infection and is present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutant viruses in which the C6L gene is deleted, or mutated so that the C6 protein is not expressed, replicated normally in cell culture but were attenuated in two in vivo models of infection compared to wild type and revertant controls. Thus C6 contributes to VACV virulence and might do so via the inhibition of PRR-induced activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

  7. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glyc...

  8. miR-194 Inhibits Innate Antiviral Immunity by Targeting FGF2 in Influenza H1N1 Virus Infection

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    Keyu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 or basic FGF regulates a wide range of cell biological functions including proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, differentiation, and injury repair. However, the roles of FGF2 and the underlying mechanisms of action in influenza A virus (IAV-induced lung injury remain largely unexplored. In this study, we report that microRNA-194-5p (miR-194 expression is significantly decreased in A549 alveolar epithelial cells (AECs following infection with IAV/Beijing/501/2009 (BJ501. We found that miR-194 can directly target FGF2, a novel antiviral regulator, to suppress FGF2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of miR-194 facilitated IAV replication by negatively regulating type I interferon (IFN production, whereas reintroduction of FGF2 abrogated the miR-194-induced effects on IAV replication. Conversely, inhibition of miR-194 alleviated IAV-induced lung injury by promoting type I IFN antiviral activities in vivo. Importantly, FGF2 activated the retinoic acid-inducible gene I signaling pathway, whereas miR-194 suppressed the phosphorylation of tank binding kinase 1 and IFN regulatory factor 3. Our findings suggest that the miR-194-FGF2 axis plays a vital role in IAV-induced lung injury, and miR-194 antagonism might be a potential therapeutic target during IAV infection.

  9. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Compounds that Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Targeting the Prohibitin-CRaf Pathway

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    Shufeng Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification of novel drug targets and affordable therapeutic agents remains a high priority in the fight against chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Here, we report that the cellular proteins prohibitin 1 (PHB1 and 2 (PHB2 are pan-genotypic HCV entry factors functioning at a post-binding step. While predominantly found in mitochondria, PHBs localize to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes through their transmembrane domains and interact with both EGFR and CRaf. Targeting PHB by rocaglamide (Roc-A, a natural product that binds PHB1 and 2, reduced cell surface PHB1 and 2, disrupted PHB-CRaf interaction, and inhibited HCV entry at low nanomolar concentrations. A structure-activity analysis of 32 synthetic Roc-A analogs indicated that the chiral, racemic version of aglaroxin C, a natural product biosynthetically related to Roc-A, displayed improved potency and therapeutic index against HCV infection. This study reveals a new class of HCV entry inhibitors that target the PHB1/2-CRaf pathway.

  10. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model.

  11. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

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    Masahiro Watanabe

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1, a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model.

  12. Inability of NS1 protein from an H5N1 influenza virus to activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway correlates to the enhanced virus replication upon PI3K inhibition

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    Li Weizhong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, activated during influenza A virus infection, can promote viral replication via multiple mechanisms. Direct binding of NS1 protein to p85β subunit of PI3K is required for activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. Binding and subsequent activation of PI3K is believed to be a conserved character of influenza A virus NS1 protein. Sequence variation of NS1 proteins in different influenza A viruses led us to investigate possible deviation from the conservativeness. Results In the present study, NS1 proteins from four different influenza A virus subtypes/strains were tested for their ability to bind p85β subunit of PI3K and to activate PI3K/Akt. All NS1 proteins efficiently bound to p85β and activated PI3K/Akt, with the exception of NS1 protein from an H5N1 virus (A/Chicken/Guangdong/1/05, abbreviated as GD05, which bound to p85β but failed to activate PI3K/Akt, implying that as-yet-unidentified domain(s in NS1 may alternatively mediate the activation of PI3K. Moreover, PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, did not suppress but significantly increased the replication of GD05 virus. Conclusions Our study indicates that activation of PI3K/Akt by NS1 protein is not highly conserved among influenza A viruses and inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway as an anti-influenza strategy may not work for all influenza A viruses.

  13. Baicalein, Ethyl Acetate, and Chloroform Extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis Inhibit the Neuraminidase Activity of Pandemic 2009 H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza A Viruses

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    Mann-Jen Hour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study rated antiviral activity of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (S. baicalensis extracts against influenza A virus subtypes, for example, pandemic 2009 H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc and chloroform extracts inhibited in vitro neuraminidase (NA enzymatic activity and viral replication more than methanol (MeOH extract. EtOAc extract demonstrated NA inhibition IC50 values ranging from 73.16 to 487.40 μg/mL and plaque reduction IC50 values ranging from 23.7 to 27.4 μg/mL. Chloroform extract showed antiviral activities with plaque reduction IC50 values ranging from 14.16 to 41.49 μg/mL Time-of-addition assay indicated that EtOAc and chloroform extracts also significantly inhibited virus yields after infection. HPLC analysis demonstrated that baicalin was dominant in the MeOH extract; baicalein and chrysin were rich in the EtOAc and chloroform extracts. Molecular simulation revealed baicalein hydrogen bonding with Glu277 as well as hydrophobic and Van der Waals interactions with Ile222, Arg224, Ser246, and Tyr347 in NA1 active sites of NA1. Baicalein inhibited in vitro replication of influenza A viruses pandemic 2009 H1N1 (IC50 = 0.018 μM and seasonal 2007 H1N1 using plaque reduction assays. A combination of low-dose baicalein with other anti-influenza agents could be applicable for development of alternative remedies treating influenza A virus infection.

  14. Neutralizing antibodies induced by recombinant virus-like particles of enterovirus 71 genotype C4 inhibit infection at pre- and post-attachment steps.

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    Zhiqiang Ku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, which has been prevalent in Asia-Pacific regions, causing significant morbidity and mortality in young children. Antibodies elicited by experimental EV71 vaccines could neutralize infection in vitro and passively protect animal models from lethal challenge, indicating that neutralizing antibodies play an essential role in protection. However, how neutralizing antibodies inhibit infection in vitro remains unclear. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies against EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs. Recombinant VLPs of EV71 genotype C4 were produced in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. Immunization with the VLPs elicited a high-titer, EV71-specific antibody response in mice. Anti-VLP mouse sera potently neutralized EV71 infection in vitro. The neutralizing antibodies in the anti-VLP mouse sera were found to target mainly an extremely conserved epitope (FGEHKQEKDLEYGAC located at the GH loop of the VP1 protein. The neutralizing anti-VLP antisera were able to inhibit virus binding to target cells efficiently. In addition, post-attachment treatment of virus-bound cells with the anti-VLP antisera also neutralized virus infection, although the antibody concentration required was higher than that of the pre-attachment treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our findings represent a valuable addition to the understanding of mechanisms of EV71 neutralization and have strong implications for EV71 vaccine development.

  15. Comparison of neutralizing and hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody responses to influenza A virus vaccination of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benne, CA; Harmsen, M; Tavares, L; Kraaijeveld, CA; De Jong, JC

    A neutralization enzyme immunoassay (N-EIA) was used to determine the neutralizing serum antibody titers to influenza A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1) and Beijing/353/89 (H3N2) viruses after vaccination of 51 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected individuals and 10 healthy noninfected controls

  16. The inhibition of mouse L-cell 45 S ribosomal RNA processing is a highly uv-resistant property of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zan, M.; Evans, P.; Lucas-Lenard, J. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (USA))

    1990-07-01

    In mouse L cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), the synthesis of 45 S rRNA and its conversion to 28 S and 18 S rRNA are inhibited during the course of infection. Evidence is presented that the lack of accumulation of stable rRNA species results not only from the decreased transcription and processing of 45 S rRNA, but also from an increased breakdown of pre-rRNA or stable rRNA during processing. In cells prelabeled with (3H)uridine and then infected, the 28 S and 18 S rRNA species remain unaffected. Studies using uv-irradiated VSV indicate that the viral function involved in rRNA synthesis inhibition is slightly more sensitive to uv irradiation than the function involved in processing inhibition. These results suggest that the VSV functions involved in 45 S rRNA synthesis and processing inhibition may be related, or overlapping, but not identical. In cells infected by VSV mutant T1026R1, total RNA synthesis is inhibited, but the distribution of precursor and stable rRNA species remains nearly normal for up to 5 hr after infection. The function of the mutant virus involved in the inhibition of rRNA processing appears to be defective. In mengovirus-infected L cells, 45 S rRNA synthesis, but not processing, is severely inhibited soon after infection, indicating that a decrease in rRNA transcription is not necessarily accompanied by a decrease in processing.

  17. NK cells inhibit humoral immunity by reducing the abundance of CD4+ T follicular helper cells during a chronic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin D; Kline, Hannah C; Whitmire, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    There is a need to understand better how to improve B cell responses and immunity to persisting virus infections, which often cause debilitating illness or death. People with chronic virus infection show evidence of improved virus control when there is a strong neutralizing antibody response, and conversely, B cell dysfunction is associated with higher viral loads. We showed previously that NK cells inhibit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to disseminating LCMV infection and that depletion of NK cells attenuates chronic infection. Here, we examined the effect of NK cell depletion on B cell responses to LCMV infection in mice. Whereas mice infected acutely generated a peak level of antibody soon after the infection was resolved, mice infected chronically showed a continued increase in antibody levels that exceeded those after acute infection. We found that early NK cell depletion rapidly increased virus-specific antibody levels to chronic infection, and this effect depended on CD4(+) T cells and was associated with elevated numbers of CXCR5(+)CD4(+) TFH cells. However, the NK cell-depleted mice controlled the infection and by 1 mo pi, had lower TFH cell numbers and antibody levels compared with mice with sustained infection. Finally, we show that NK cell depletion improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses only when B cells and virus-specific antibody were present. Our data indicate that NK cells diminish immunity to chronic infection, in part, by suppressing TFH cell and antibody responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Interleukin-27 Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection by Activating STAT1 and 3, Interleukin-6, and Chemokines IP-10 and MIG.

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    Heikkilä, Outi; Nygårdas, Michaela; Paavilainen, Henrik; Ryödi, Elina; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2016-11-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) inhibits the replication of many viruses, but the mechanism differs according to virus and cell type. In this study, we observed that IL-27 expression was upregulated in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected SJL/J mice, which led us to further investigate the role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection using epithelial, glioma, and immunological cells as cell models. We showed that in all studied cell lines, the IL-27 messenger RNA (mRNA) level was upregulated due to the HSV-1 infection. When the cells were primed with IL-27 before the virus infection, the virus release was prevented, indicating an antiviral role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, we observed that IL-27 secretion to the culture medium was reduced in infected epithelial and immunological cells, but not in glioma cells. Not surprisingly, HSV-1 induced type I, II, and III interferons regardless of cell line, but IL-27 itself caused varying interferon responses dependent on cell type. However, common to all cell types was the IL-27-stimulated secretion of IL-6 and chemokines IP-10 and MIG. In addition, IL-27 stimulation activated STAT1 and STAT3 in HeLa and T98G cells, suggesting that IL-27 engages the STAT1/3 pathway, which then leads to the upregulation of IL-6, IP-10, and MIG.

  19. Selective inhibition of the reverse transcription of duck hepatitis B virus by binding of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate to the viral polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A Y; Robins, M J; Wilson, J S; Tyrrell, D L

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is mediated by the viral polymerase that possesses three functional domains: primer, DNA polymerase/reverse transcriptase, and RNase H. Using the Pekin duck as an animal model, we demonstrate a novel mechanism of inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by 2,6-diaminopurine 2',3'-dideoxyriboside (ddDAPR), a prodrug of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine (ddG). A selective and irreversible inhibition of DHBV DNA replication is found in ducklings treated with high doses of ddDAPR (20 to 50 mg/kg), but not with similar doses of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC). The inhibition mediated by ddDAPR occurs at a very early stage of the reverse transcription. Despite the inhibition of DHBV DNA replication by ddDAPR, the DNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activities of the polymerase are found to remain active when tested on exogenous templates in activity gels. We have demonstrated direct binding of [alpha-32P]ddGTP to the DHBV polymerase expressed in an in vitro transcription and translation system. These results suggest that the binding of ddGTP to the polymerase blocks the initial DNA replication.

  20. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-08-22

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  1. Engineered external guide sequences are highly effective in inhibiting gene expression and replication of hepatitis B virus in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Vu, Gia-Phong; Gong, Hao; Xia, Chuan; Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Liu, Fenyong; Wu, Jianguo; Lu, Sangwei

    2013-01-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are RNA molecules that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific degradation of the target mRNA. We have previously used an in vitro selection procedure to generate EGS variants that efficiently induce human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the S mRNA, pre-S/L mRNA, and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which are essential for viral replication and infection. The EGS variant was about 50-fold more efficient in inducing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Following Salmonella-mediated gene delivery, the EGSs were expressed in cultured HBV-carrying cells. A reduction of about 97% and 75% in the level of HBV RNAs and proteins and an inhibition of about 6,000- and 130-fold in the levels of capsid-associated HBV DNA were observed in cells treated with Salmonella vectors carrying the expression cassette for the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HBV gene expression and DNA replication than the tRNA-derived EGS. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the feasibility of developing Salmonella-mediated gene delivery of highly active EGS RNA variants as a novel approach for gene-targeting applications such as anti-HBV therapy.

  2. Engineered external guide sequences are highly effective in inhibiting gene expression and replication of hepatitis B virus in cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zhang

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs are RNA molecules that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme, for specific degradation of the target mRNA. We have previously used an in vitro selection procedure to generate EGS variants that efficiently induce human RNase P to cleave a target mRNA in vitro. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the overlapping region of the S mRNA, pre-S/L mRNA, and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV, which are essential for viral replication and infection. The EGS variant was about 50-fold more efficient in inducing human RNase P to cleave the mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA. Following Salmonella-mediated gene delivery, the EGSs were expressed in cultured HBV-carrying cells. A reduction of about 97% and 75% in the level of HBV RNAs and proteins and an inhibition of about 6,000- and 130-fold in the levels of capsid-associated HBV DNA were observed in cells treated with Salmonella vectors carrying the expression cassette for the variant and the tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that the EGS variant is more effective in blocking HBV gene expression and DNA replication than the tRNA-derived EGS. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the feasibility of developing Salmonella-mediated gene delivery of highly active EGS RNA variants as a novel approach for gene-targeting applications such as anti-HBV therapy.

  3. VIRsiRNApred: a web server for predicting inhibition efficacy of siRNAs targeting human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Abid; Thakur, Nishant; Kumar, Manoj

    2013-12-11

    Selection of effective viral siRNA is an indispensable step in the development of siRNA based antiviral therapeutics. Despite immense potential, a viral siRNA efficacy prediction algorithm is still not available. Moreover, performances of the existing general mammalian siRNA efficacy predictors are not satisfactory for viral siRNAs. Therefore, we have developed "VIRsiRNApred" a support vector machine (SVM) based method for predicting the efficacy of viral siRNA. In the present study, we have employed a new dataset of 1725 viral siRNAs with experimentally verified quantitative efficacies tested under heterogeneous experimental conditions and targeting as many as 37 important human viruses including HIV, Influenza, HCV, HBV, SARS etc. These siRNAs were divided into training (T1380) and validation (V345) datasets. Important siRNA sequence features including mono to penta nucleotide frequencies, binary pattern, thermodynamic properties and secondary structure were employed for model development. During 10-fold cross validation on T1380 using hybrid approach, we achieved a maximum Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) of 0.55 between predicted and actual efficacy of viral siRNAs. On V345 independent dataset, our best model achieved a maximum correlation of 0.50 while existing general siRNA prediction methods showed PCC from 0.05 to 0.18. However, using leave one out cross validation PCC was improved to 0.58 and 0.55 on training and validation datasets respectively. SVM performed better than other machine learning techniques used like ANN, KNN and REP Tree. VIRsiRNApred is the first algorithm for predicting inhibition efficacy of viral siRNAs which is developed using experimentally verified viral siRNAs. We hope this algorithm would be useful in predicting highly potent viral siRNA to aid siRNA based antiviral therapeutics development. The web server is freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/virsirnapred/.

  4. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  5. Insertions in the gG Gene of Pseudorabies Virus Reduce Expression of the Upstream Us3 Protein and Inhibit Cell-to-Cell Spread of Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Demmin, Gretchen L.; Clase, Amanda C.; Randall, Jessica A.; Enquist, L.W.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2001-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirus Us4 gene encodes glycoprotein G (gG), which is conserved in most viruses of the alphaherpesvirus subfamily. In the swine pathogen pseudorabies virus (PRV), mutant viruses with internal deletions and insertions in the gG gene have shown no discernible phenotypes. We report that insertions in the gG locus of the attenuated PRV strain Bartha show reduced virulence in vivo and are defective in their ability to spread from cell to cell in a cell-type-specific manner. Similar i...

  6. Dengue virus induces expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, which competitively inhibits viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Perng; Lu, Hsin-Lin; Lai, Szu-Liang; Campanella, Gabriele S; Sung, Jui-Ming; Lu, Mei-Yi; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Lin, Yi-Ling; Lane, Thomas E; Luster, Andrew D; Liao, Fang

    2006-09-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes a mild febrile illness, dengue fever, or a potentially fatal syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of viral infection, which makes them critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the induction and function of chemokines in mice early after infection with dengue virus in vivo. We found that CXCL10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) expression was rapidly and transiently induced in liver following infection. The expressed CXCL10/IP-10 likely mediates the recruitment of activated NK cells, given that anti-CXCL10/IP-10-treated mice showed diminished NK cell infiltration and reduced hepatic expression of effector molecules in activated NK cells after dengue virus infection. Of particular interest, we found that CXCL10/IP-10 also was able to inhibit viral binding to target cells in vitro. Further investigation revealed that various CXCL10/IP-10 mutants, in which the residues that mediate the interaction between the chemokine and heparan sulfate were substituted, failed to exert the inhibitory effect on dengue binding, which suggests that CXCL10/IP-10 competes with dengue virus for binding to heparan sulfate on the cell surface. Moreover, subsequent plaque assays showed that this inhibition of dengue binding blocked viral uptake and replication. The inhibitory effect of CXCL10/IP-10 on the binding of dengue virus to cells may represent a novel contribution of this chemokine to the host defense against viral infection.

  7. Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition Assay: A Novel Functional Assessment of Blocking Virus Attachment by Vaccine-Induced Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asati, Atul; Kachurina, Olga; Karol, Alex; Dhir, Vipra; Nguyen, Michael; Parkhill, Robert; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Chumakov, Konstantin; Warren, William; Kachurin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    .... Neutralizing capacity of antibodies is typically evaluated by virus neutralization assays that assess reduction of viral infectivity to the target cells in the presence of functional antibodies...

  8. An interferon-alpha-induced tethering mechanism inhibits HIV-1 and Ebola virus particle release but is counteracted by the HIV-1 Vpu protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Stuart J D; Sandrin, Virginie; Sundquist, Wesley I; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2007-09-13

    Type 1 interferon (IFN) inhibits the release of HIV-1 virus particles via poorly defined mechanisms. Here, we show that IFNalpha induces retention of viral particles on the surface of fibroblasts, T cells, or primary lymphocytes infected with HIV-1 lacking the Vpu protein. Retained particles are tethered to cell surfaces, can be endocytosed, appear fully assembled, exhibit mature morphology, and can be detached by protease. Strikingly, expression of the HIV-1 Vpu protein attenuates the ability of human cells to adhere to, and thereby retain, nascent HIV-1 particles upon IFNalpha treatment. Vpu also counteracts the IFNalpha-induced retention of virus-like particles assembled from the Ebola virus matrix protein. Furthermore, levels of IFNalpha that suppress replication of Vpu-defective HIV-1 have little effect on wild-type HIV-1. Thus, we propose that HIV-1 expresses Vpu to counteract an IFNalpha-induced, general host defense that inhibits dissemination of enveloped virions from the surface of infected cells.

  9. Antiviral effect of PmRab7 knock-down on inhibition of Laem-Singh virus replication in black tiger shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongvarrasopone, Chalermporn; Chomchay, Ekapol; Panyim, Sakol

    2010-10-01

    PmRab7 is a Penaeus monodon small GTPase protein possibly involved in replication of several shrimp viruses. In this study RNA interference (RNAi) using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting PmRab7 gene (dsRNA-PmRab7) was employed to silence the expression of PmRab7 to investigate the inhibitory effect on Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) replication. Injection of dsRNA-PmRab7 24h before challenge with the virus resulted in a drastic decrease of PmRab7 mRNA and complete inhibition of LSNV replication at 3 days post-challenge. In a therapeutic mode, shrimp injected with dsRNA-PmRab7 1 day but not at 3 or 5 days post-LSNV challenge resulted in inhibition of LSNV replication. These results pave the way to use dsRNA-PmRab7 to prevent or cure LSNV infection in shrimp. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Myxoma virus protein M029 is a dual function immunomodulator that inhibits PKR and also conscripts RHA/DHX9 to promote expanded host tropism and viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmudur M Rahman

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR and RNA helicase A (RHA/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication

  11. Myxoma virus protein M029 is a dual function immunomodulator that inhibits PKR and also conscripts RHA/DHX9 to promote expanded host tropism and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Liu, Jia; Chan, Winnie M; Rothenburg, Stefan; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID) and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR) and RNA helicase A (RHA)/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication specifically in myeloid

  12. SJ-3366, a unique and highly potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that also inhibits HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckheit, R W; Watson, K; Fliakas-Boltz, V; Russell, J; Loftus, T L; Osterling, M C; Turpin, J A; Pallansch, L A; White, E L; Lee, J W; Lee, S H; Oh, J W; Kwon, H S; Chung, S G; Cho, E H

    2001-02-01

    We have identified and characterized a potent new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that also is active against HIV-2 and which interferes with virus replication by two distinct mechanisms. 1-(3-Cyclopenten-1-yl)methyl-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzoyl)-5-ethyl-2,4-pyrimidinedione (SJ-3366) inhibits HIV-1 replication at concentrations of approximately 1 nM, with a therapeutic index of greater than 4 x 10(6). The efficacy and toxicity of SJ-3366 are consistent when evaluated with established or fresh human cells, and the compound is equipotent against all strains of HIV-1 evaluated, including syncytium-inducing, non-syncytium-inducing, monocyte/macrophage-tropic, and subtype virus strains. Distinct from other members of the pharmacologic class of NNRTIs, SJ-3366 inhibited laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-2 at a concentration of approximately 150 nM, yielding a therapeutic index of approximately 20,000. Like most NNRTIs, the compound was less active when challenged with HIV-1 strains possessing the Y181C, K103N, and Y188C amino acid changes in the RT and selected for a virus with a Y181C amino acid change in the RT after five tissue culture passages in the presence of the compound. In combination anti-HIV assays with nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT and protease inhibitors, additive interactions occurred with all compounds tested with the exception of dideoxyinosine, with which a synergistic interaction was found. Biochemically, SJ-3366 exhibited a K(i) value of 3.2 nM, with a mixed mechanism of inhibition against HIV-1 RT, but it did not inhibit HIV-2 RT. SJ-3366 also inhibited the entry of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 into target cells. On the basis of its therapeutic index and multiple mechanisms of anti-HIV action, SJ-3366 represents an exciting new compound for use in HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway by Ly294002 does not prevent establishment of persistent Junín virus infection in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linero, Florencia N; Fernández Bell-Fano, Pablo M; Cuervo, Eugenia; Castilla, Viviana; Scolaro, Luis A

    2015-02-01

    In previous work, we demonstrated that the arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is able to activate Akt by means of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) survival pathway during virus entry. This work extends our study, emphasizing the relevance of this pathway in the establishment and maintenance of persistent infection in vitro. During the course of infection, JUNV-infected Vero cells showed a typical cytopathic effect that may be ascribed to apoptotic cell death. Treatment of infected cultures with Ly294002, an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway, produced an apoptotic response similar to that observed for uninfected cells treated with the drug. This result suggests that virus-induced activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway does not deliver a strong enough anti-apoptotic signal to explain the low proportion of apoptotic cells observed during infection. Also, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway during the acute stage of infection did not prevent the establishment of persistence. Furthermore, treatment of persistently JUNV-infected cells with Ly294002 did not alter viral protein expression. These findings indicate that despite the positive modulation of the PI3/Akt pathway during Junín virus entry, this would not play a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of JUNV persistence in Vero cells.

  14. A novel monoclonal anti-CD81 antibody produced by genetic immunization efficiently inhibits Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fofana

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenge to prevent and treat because of the rapid development of drug resistance and escape. Viral entry is required for initiation, spread, and maintenance of infection, making it an attractive target for antiviral strategies.Using genetic immunization, we produced four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the HCV host entry factor CD81. The effects of antibodies on inhibition of HCV infection and dissemination were analyzed in HCV permissive human liver cell lines.The anti-CD81 mAbs efficiently inhibited infection by HCV of different genotypes as well as a HCV escape variant selected during liver transplantation and re-infecting the liver graft. Kinetic studies indicated that anti-CD81 mAbs target a post-binding step during HCV entry. In addition to inhibiting cell-free HCV infection, one antibody was also able to block neutralizing antibody-resistant HCV cell-cell transmission and viral dissemination without displaying any detectable toxicity.A novel anti-CD81 mAb generated by genetic immunization efficiently blocks HCV spread and dissemination. This antibody will be useful to further unravel the role of virus-host interactions during HCV entry and cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, this antibody may be of interest for the development of antivirals for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  15. A novel monoclonal anti-CD81 antibody produced by genetic immunization efficiently inhibits Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fofana, Isabel; Xiao, Fei; Thumann, Christine; Turek, Marine; Zona, Laetitia; Tawar, Rajiv G; Grunert, Fritz; Thompson, John; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a challenge to prevent and treat because of the rapid development of drug resistance and escape. Viral entry is required for initiation, spread, and maintenance of infection, making it an attractive target for antiviral strategies. Using genetic immunization, we produced four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the HCV host entry factor CD81. The effects of antibodies on inhibition of HCV infection and dissemination were analyzed in HCV permissive human liver cell lines. The anti-CD81 mAbs efficiently inhibited infection by HCV of different genotypes as well as a HCV escape variant selected during liver transplantation and re-infecting the liver graft. Kinetic studies indicated that anti-CD81 mAbs target a post-binding step during HCV entry. In addition to inhibiting cell-free HCV infection, one antibody was also able to block neutralizing antibody-resistant HCV cell-cell transmission and viral dissemination without displaying any detectable toxicity. A novel anti-CD81 mAb generated by genetic immunization efficiently blocks HCV spread and dissemination. This antibody will be useful to further unravel the role of virus-host interactions during HCV entry and cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, this antibody may be of interest for the development of antivirals for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  16. African swine fever virus blocks the host cell antiviral inflammatory response through a direct inhibition of PKC-theta-mediated p300 transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Aitor G; Sánchez, Elena G; Sabina, Prado; Fresno, Manuel; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    During a viral infection, reprogramming of the host cell gene expression pattern is required to establish an adequate antiviral response. The transcriptional coactivators p300 and CREB binding protein (CBP) play a central role in this regulation by promoting the assembly of transcription enhancer complexes to specific promoters of immune and proinflammatory genes. Here we show that the protein A238L encoded by African swine fever virus counteracts the host cell inflammatory response through the control of p300 transactivation during the viral infection. We demonstrate that A238L inhibits the expression of the inflammatory regulators cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by preventing the recruitment of p300 to the enhanceosomes formed on their promoters. Furthermore, we report that A238L inhibits p300 activity during the viral infection and that its amino-terminal transactivation domain is essential in the A238L-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory response. Importantly, we found that the residue serine 384 of p300 is required for the viral protein to accomplish its inhibitory function and that ectopically expressed PKC-theta completely reverts this inhibition, thus indicating that this signaling pathway is disrupted by A238L during the viral infection. Furthermore, we show here that A238L does not affect PKC-theta enzymatic activity, but the molecular mechanism of this viral inhibition relies on the lack of interaction between PKC-theta and p300. These findings shed new light on how viruses alter the host cell antiviral gene expression pattern through the blockade of the p300 activity, which represents a new and sophisticated viral mechanism to evade the inflammatory and immune defense responses.

  17. Kinetic and mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibition by inophyllums, a novel class of non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P B; Culp, J S; Debouck, C; Johnson, R K; Patil, A D; Woolf, D J; Brooks, I; Hertzberg, R P

    1994-03-04

    Inophyllums are novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 reverse transcriptase identified through an enzyme screening program and isolated from the plant Calophyllum inophyllum. The kinetics of reverse transcriptase inhibition by inophyllum B were characterized using recombinant purified enzyme, a heteropolymeric RNA template, and a scintillation proximity assay. Preincubation of inhibitor with the enzyme-template-primer complex for 11 min was required for maximal inhibition of reverse transcriptase to occur, suggesting that inophyllum B had a slow on-rate and that template-primer must bind to reverse transcriptase prior to inhibitor binding. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase by inophyllums was shown to be reversible. When thymidine triphosphate was the variable substrate, inophyllum B inhibited reverse transcriptase noncompetitively with a Ki of 42 nM. Enzyme inhibition with respect to template-primer was uncompetitive with a Ki of 26 nM. Reverse transcriptase enzymes containing point mutations in which tyrosine 181 was changed to either cysteine or isoleucine exhibited marginal resistance to inophyllums but were resistant to (+)-(5S)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-9-chloro-5-methyl-6- (3-methyl-2-butenyl)-imidazo[4,5,1-j,k][1,4]benzodiazepin-2-(1H)-t hione (TIBO R82913). A mutant enzyme in which tyrosine 188 was changed to leucine was cross-resistant to both inophyllum B and TIBO R82913, as was HIV type 2 reverse transcriptase. These studies suggest that inophyllum B and TIBO R82913 bind to distinct but overlapping sites. Inhibition of avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase and Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase by inophyllum B was detectible, suggesting that these inhibitors may be more promiscuous than other previously described non-nucleoside inhibitors. Inophyllums were active against HIV type 1 in cell culture with IC50 values of approximately 1.5 microM. These studies imply that the inophyllums have a

  18. Varicella-Zoster Virus Activates CREB, and Inhibition of the pCREB-p300/CBP Interaction Inhibits Viral Replication In Vitro and Skin Pathogenesis In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Sylvie; Sen, Nandini; Mitton, Bryan; Xiao, Xiangshu; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Arvin, Ann

    2016-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and zoster upon reactivation from latency in sensory ganglion neurons. The replication of herpesviruses requires manipulation of cell signaling pathways. Notably, CREB, a factor involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, is activated upon infection of T cells with VZV. Here, we report that VZV infection also induced CREB phosphorylation in fibroblasts and that XX-650-23, a newly identified inhibitor of the phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) interaction with p300/CBP, restricted cell-cell spread of VZV in vitro CREB phosphorylation did not require the viral open reading frame 47 (ORF47) and ORF66 kinases encoded by VZV. Evaluating the biological relevance of these observations during VZV infection of human skin xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis showed both that pCREB was upregulated in infected skin and that treatment with XX-650-23 reduced infectious-virus production and limited lesion formation compared to treatment with a vehicle control. Thus, processes of CREB activation and p300/CBP binding are important for VZV skin infection and may be targeted for antiviral drug development. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a common pathogen that causes chicken pox and shingles. As with all herpesviruses, the infection is acquired for life, and the virus can periodically reactivate from latency. Although VZV infection is usually benign with few or no deleterious consequences, infection can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. Otherwise healthy elderly individuals who develop zoster as a consequence of viral reactivation are at risk for postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a painful and long-lasting complication. Current vaccines use a live attenuated virus that is usually safe but cannot be given to many immunodeficient patients and retains the capacity to establish latency and reactivate, causing zoster. Antiviral drugs are effective against

  19. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-22

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm. Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection. PMID:26953343

  1. [Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus replication in chicken embryos by miRNAs delivered by recombinant avian adeno-associated viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pengpeng; Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli

    2011-02-01

    We studied the inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication in chicken embryos by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV)-delivered VP1- and VP2-specific microRNAs (miRNAs). We co-transfected AAV-293 cells with the VP1- or VP2 gene-specific miRNA expression vector pAITR-RFPmiVP1 or AITR-RFPmiVP2E, AAAV packaging vector pcDNA-ARC and adenovirus helper vector pHelper, resulting in recombinant virus rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E. We also generated the recombinant viruses rAAAV-RFP (without miRNA expression cassette) and rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con (expressing control miRNA) using the same method as the control purpose. Electron microscopy showed that the recombinant viruses had a typical morphology of AAV. We confirmed the presence of miRNA expression cassette in the recombinant viral genomes by using PCR. Our poly (A)-tailed RT-PCR showed correct expression of the miRNAs in the rAAAV-transduced DF-1 cells. We inoculated the recombinant viruses individually into 8-day-old SPF chicken embryos and then challenged them using Lukert strain IBDV on day 2 after inoculation. Our IBDV titration assay showed that the 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of rAAAV-RFP- or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con-inoculated group was 8.0 log10, whereas the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP1-inoculated group decreased to 1.0 and 0.8 log10 on day 3 and 6 after challenge, respectively. Similarly, the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E-inoculated group decreased to 1.5 and 2.0 log10, respectively. These data suggest that rAAAV can transduce efficiently chicken embryos and the expressed VP1- and VP2-specific miRNAs can inhibit the replication of IBDV efficiently.

  2. Analysis of Anti-Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Antibodies in Children, Adults, and the Elderly by ELISA and Enzyme Inhibition: Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Madhusudan; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Ermler, Megan E; Bunduc, Paul; Amanat, Fatima; Izikson, Ruvim; Cox, Manon; Palese, Peter; Eichelberger, Maryna; Krammer, Florian

    2017-03-21

    Antibody responses to influenza virus hemagglutinin provide protection against infection and are well studied. Less is known about the human antibody responses to the second surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase. Here, we assessed human antibody reactivity to a panel of N1, N2, and influenza B virus neuraminidases in different age groups, including children, adults, and the elderly. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we determined the breadth, magnitude, and isotype distribution of neuraminidase antibody responses to historic, current, and avian strains, as well as to recent isolates to which these individuals have not been exposed. It appears that antibody levels against N1 neuraminidases were lower than those against N2 or B neuraminidases. The anti-neuraminidase antibody levels increased with age and were, in general, highest against strains that circulated during the childhood of the tested individuals, providing evidence for "original antigenic sin." Titers measured by ELISA correlated well with titers measured by the neuraminidase inhibition assays. However, in the case of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we found evidence of interference from antibodies binding to the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin. In conclusion, we found that antibodies against the neuraminidase differ in magnitude and breadth between subtypes and age groups in the human population. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00336453, NCT00539981, and NCT00395174.)IMPORTANCE Anti-neuraminidase antibodies can afford broad protection from influenza virus infection in animal models and humans. However, little is known about the breadth and magnitude of the anti-neuraminidase response in the human population. Here we assessed antibody levels of children, adults, and the elderly against a panel of N1, N2, and type B influenza virus neuraminidases. We demonstrated that antibody levels measured by ELISA correlate well with functional

  3. A dominant negative mutant of rab5 inhibits infection of cells by foot-and-mouth disease virus; implications for virus entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johns, Helen; Berryman, Stephen; Monaghan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can use a number of different integrins (alphavβ1, alphavβ3, alphavβ6, and alphavβ8) as receptors to initiate infection. Infection mediated by alphavβ6 is known to occur by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is dependent on the acidic pH within endosomes...

  4. Non-genotype-specific role of the hepatitis C virus 5' untranslated region in virus production and in inhibition by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M

    2011-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is structured into four domains (I-IV) with numerous genotype-specific nucleotides. It is unknown whether the polymorphisms confer genotype-specific functions to the 5'UTR. Using viable JFH1-based Core-NS2 recombinants, we developed...

  5. Inhibition of RNA Viruses In Vitro and in Rift Valley Fever-Infected Mice by Didemnins A and B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity inactivated fetal bovine serum, 0.25% (wt/vol] (3). Of current interest are the didemnins, a new...significant activity against RVF (median inhibi- virus, and parainfluenza virus 3). We now report tion dose [ID5o] for didemnins A and B was 1.37...piperazine-N’-2-ethanesulfonic acid) plus 2% respectively), a representative arenavirus, was 6 (vol/vol) heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (4% less

  6. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle by an Ethyl Acetate Subfraction Separated from Polygonum cuspidatum Root and Its Major Component, Emodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Yiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum cuspidatum is widely used as a medicinal herb in Asia. In this study, we examined the ethyl acetate subfraction F3 obtained from P. cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin, for their capacity to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic cycle. The cell viability was determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The expression of EBV lytic proteins was analyzed by immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to assess the EBV DNA replication and the transcription of lytic genes, including BRLF1 and BZLF1. Results showed that the F3 and its major component emodin inhibit the transcription of EBV immediate early genes, the expression of EBV lytic proteins, including Rta, Zta, and EA-D and reduces EBV DNA replication, showing that F3 and emodin are potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug.

  7. The cricket paralysis virus suppressor inhibits microRNA silencing mediated by the Drosophila Argonaute-2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Besnard-Guérin

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are potent regulators of gene expression. They also act in defense pathways against invading nucleic acids such as transposable elements or viruses. To counteract these defenses, viruses have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs. Plant viruses encoded VSRs interfere with siRNAs or miRNAs by targeting common mediators of these two pathways. In contrast, VSRs identified in insect viruses to date only interfere with the siRNA pathway whose effector Argonaute protein is Argonaute-2 (Ago-2. Although a majority of Drosophila miRNAs exerts their silencing activity through their loading into the Argonaute-1 protein, recent studies highlighted that a fraction of miRNAs can be loaded into Ago-2, thus acting as siRNAs. In light of these recent findings, we re-examined the role of insect VSRs on Ago-2-mediated miRNA silencing in Drosophila melanogaster. Using specific reporter systems in cultured Schneider-2 cells and transgenic flies, we showed here that the Cricket Paralysis virus VSR CrPV1-A but not the Flock House virus B2 VSR abolishes silencing by miRNAs loaded into the Ago-2 protein. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that insect VSR have the potential to directly interfere with the miRNA silencing pathway.

  8. Triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes by down-regulating expression of a viral protein LMP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Heng [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Pathology and Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Long, Cong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jingchao [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Xiaoping, E-mail: xsun6@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Triptolide inhibits proliferation of EBV-positive lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. • Triptolide reduces expression of LMP1 by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide inhibits ED-L1 promoter activity. - Abstract: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects various types of cells and mainly establishes latent infection in B lymphocytes. The viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) plays important roles in transformation and proliferation of B lymphocytes infected with EBV. Triptolide is a compound of Tripterygium extracts, showing anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, it is determined whether triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes. The CCK-8 assays were performed to examine cell viabilities of EBV-positive B95-8 and P3HR-1 cells treated by triptolide. The mRNA and protein levels of LMP1 were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activities of two LMP1 promoters (ED-L1 and TR-L1) were determined by Dual luciferase reportor assay. The results showed that triptolide inhibited the cell viability of EBV-positive B lymphocytes, and the over-expression of LMP1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Triptolide decreased the LMP1 expression and transcriptional levels in EBV-positive B cells. The activity of LMP1 promoter ED-L1 in type III latent infection was strongly suppressed by triptolide treatment. In addition, triptolide strongly reduced growth of B95-8 induced B lymphoma in BALB/c nude mice. These results suggest that triptolide decreases proliferation of EBV-induced B lymphocytes possibly by a mechanism related to down-regulation of the LMP1 expression.

  9. Computationally Optimized Broadly Reactive Hemagglutinin Elicits Hemagglutination Inhibition Antibodies against a Panel of H3N2 Influenza Virus Cocirculating Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terianne M; Allen, James D; Bebin-Blackwell, Anne-Gaelle; Carter, Donald M; Alefantis, Timothy; DiNapoli, Joshua; Kleanthous, Harold; Ross, Ted M

    2017-12-15

    Each influenza season, a set of wild-type viruses, representing one H1N1, one H3N2, and one to two influenza B isolates, are selected for inclusion in the annual seasonal influenza vaccine. In order to develop broadly reactive subtype-specific influenza vaccines, a methodology called computationally optimized broadly reactive antigens (COBRA) was used to design novel hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine immunogens. COBRA technology was effectively used to design HA immunogens that elicited antibodies that neutralized H5N1 and H1N1 isolates. In this report, the development and characterization of 17 prototype H3N2 COBRA HA proteins were screened in mice and ferrets for the elicitation of antibodies with HA inhibition (HAI) activity against human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were isolated over the last 48 years. The most effective COBRA HA vaccine regimens elicited antibodies with broader HAI activity against a panel of H3N2 viruses than wild-type H3 HA vaccines. The top leading COBRA HA candidates were tested against cocirculating variants. These variants were not efficiently detected by antibodies elicited by the wild-type HA from viruses selected as the vaccine candidates. The T-11 COBRA HA vaccine elicited antibodies with HAI and neutralization activity against all cocirculating variants from 2004 to 2007. This is the first report demonstrating broader breadth of vaccine-induced antibodies against cocirculating H3N2 strains compared to the wild-type HA antigens that were represented in commercial influenza vaccines. IMPORTANCE There is a need for an improved influenza vaccine that elicits immune responses that recognize a broader number of influenza virus strains to prevent infection and transmission. Using the COBRA approach, a set of vaccines against influenza viruses in the H3N2 subtype was tested for the ability to elicit antibodies that neutralize virus infection against not only historical vaccine strains of H3N2 but also a set of cocirculating variants that circulated

  10. Different Culture Metabolites of the Red Sea Fungus Fusarium equiseti Optimize the Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease (HCV PR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawas, Usama W; Al-Farawati, Radwan; Abou El-Kassem, Lamia T; Turki, Adnan J

    2016-10-20

    The endophytic fungus Fusarium equiseti was isolated from the brown alga Padina pavonica, collected from the Red Sea. The fungus was identified by its morphology and 18S rDNA. Cultivation of this fungal strain in biomalt-peptone medium led to isolation of 12 known metabolites of diketopeprazines and anthraquinones. The organic extract and isolated compounds were screened for their inhibition of hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease (HCV PR). As a result, the fungal metabolites showed inhibition of HCV protease (IC50 from 19 to 77 μM), and the fungus was subjected to culture on Czapek's (Cz) media, with a yield of nine metabolites with potent HCV protease inhibition ranging from IC50 10 to 37 μM. The Cz culture extract exhibited high-level inhibition of HCV protease (IC50 27.6 μg/mL) compared to the biomalt culture extract (IC50 56 μg/mL), and the most potent HCV PR isolated compound (Griseoxanthone C, IC50 19.8 μM) from the bio-malt culture extract showed less of an inhibitory effect compared to isolated ω-hydroxyemodin (IC50 10.7 μM) from the optimized Cz culture extract. Both HCV PR active inhibitors ω-hydroxyemodin and griseoxanthone C were considered as the lowest selective safe constituents against Trypsin inhibitory effect with IC50 48.5 and 51.3 μM, respectively.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 2 antibody detection performance in Kisumu, Kenya, using the Herpeselect ELISA, Kalon ELISA, Western blot and inhibition testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J S; Bailey, R C; Westreich, D J; Maclean, I; Agot, K; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Hogrefe, W; Morrow, R A; Moses, S

    2009-04-01

    In certain parts of Africa, type-specific herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) ELISAs may have limited specificity. To date, no study has been conducted to validate HerpeSelect and Kalon type-specific HSV-2 ELISAs using both the Western blot and recombinant gG ELISA inhibition testing as reference standards. A total of 120 men who were HIV seronegative (aged 18-24 years) provided blood samples. HSV-2 IgG serum antibodies were detected using four different methods: HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA (n = 120), Kalon HSV-2 ELISA (n = 120), University of Washington Western blot (n = 101) and a recombinant inhibition test (n = 93). HSV-2 seroprevalence differed significantly by HSV-2 detection method, ranging from 24.8% with the Western blot to 69.8% with the HerpeSelect ELISA. Using the Western blot as the reference standard, the HerpesSelect had the highest sensitivity for HSV-2 antibody detection (100%) yet lowest specificity (40%). Similar results were obtained using the inhibition test as the reference standard. The sensitivity and specificity of the Kalon test versus the Western blot were 92% and 79%, respectively, and 80% and 82% versus the inhibition test. Using the inhibition test as the reference standard, the sensitivity of the Western blot appeared low (49%). In men in western Kenya who were HIV seronegative, the HerpeSelect and Kalon type-specific ELISAs had high sensitivities yet limited specificities using the Western blot as reference standard. Overall, the Kalon ELISA performed better than the HerpeSelect ELISA in these young men from Kisumu. Further understanding is needed for the interpretation of HSV-2 inhibition or ELISA test positive/ Western blot seronegative results. Before HSV-2 seropositivity may be reliably reported in selected areas of Africa, performance studies of HSV-2 serological assays in individual geographical areas are recommended.

  12. Vaccinia virus proteins A52 and B14 Share a Bcl-2-like fold but have evolved to inhibit NF-kappaB rather than apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Graham

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototype poxvirus, encodes numerous proteins that modulate the host response to infection. Two such proteins, B14 and A52, act inside infected cells to inhibit activation of NF-kappaB, thereby blocking the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We have solved the crystal structures of A52 and B14 at 1.9 A and 2.7 A resolution, respectively. Strikingly, both these proteins adopt a Bcl-2-like fold despite sharing no significant sequence similarity with other viral or cellular Bcl-2-like proteins. Unlike cellular and viral Bcl-2-like proteins described previously, A52 and B14 lack a surface groove for binding BH3 peptides from pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-like proteins and they do not modulate apoptosis. Structure-based phylogenetic analysis of 32 cellular and viral Bcl-2-like protein structures reveals that A52 and B14 are more closely related to each other and to VACV N1 and myxoma virus M11 than they are to other viral or cellular Bcl-2-like proteins. This suggests that a progenitor poxvirus acquired a gene encoding a Bcl-2-like protein and, over the course of evolution, gene duplication events have allowed the virus to exploit this Bcl-2 scaffold for interfering with distinct host signalling pathways.

  13. Dengue virus infection of SK Hep1 cells: inhibition of in vitro angiogenesis and altered cytomorphology by expressed viral envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Atanu; Jain, Preksha; Sarkar, Payel; Gangodkar, Shobha; Deshpande, Divija; Ganti, Ketaki; Shetty, Shrimati; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection of human endothelial cells has been implicated in the pathobiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which DENV infections alter the functional physiology of endothelial cells remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of a human liver sinusoidal endothelial cell line SK Hep1 to all four serotypes of DENV and studied the effect of the virus on in vitro angiogenesis. All four serotypes of DENV could infect the SK Hep1 cells, but showed variable cytopathic effects, the most pronounced being that of DENV-2. Electron microscopy of the infected cells showed significant ultrastructural changes. In vitro angiogenesis assays on DENV-2 exposed SK Hep1 cells in the matrigel system showed inhibition compared with the controls. Importantly, transfection and transient expression of the DENV-2 envelope glycoprotein (E) in these cells showed drastic alterations in cell shapes and the E protein could be localized by fluorescence microscopy in terminal knob-like structures. Therefore, SK Hep1, a human hepatic sinusoid-derived endothelial cell line, may constitute a potential model to study DENV-endothelial cell interactions in vitro, especially towards understanding the possible virus-induced changes in hepatic endothelium and its role in disease pathogenesis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The K186E Amino Acid Substitution in the Canine Influenza Virus H3N8 NS1 Protein Restores Its Ability To Inhibit Host Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Chauché, Caroline; DeDiego, Marta L; Topham, David J; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-11-15

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) are the causative agents of canine influenza, a contagious respiratory disease in dogs, and include the equine-origin H3N8 and the avian-origin H3N2 viruses. Influenza A virus (IAV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a virulence factor essential for counteracting the innate immune response. Here, we evaluated the ability of H3N8 CIV NS1 to inhibit host innate immune responses. We found that H3N8 CIV NS1 was able to efficiently counteract interferon (IFN) responses but was unable to block general gene expression in human or canine cells. Such ability was restored by a single amino acid substitution in position 186 (K186E) that resulted in NS1 binding to the 30-kDa subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA processing. We also examined the frequency distribution of K186 and E186 among H3N8 CIVs and equine influenza viruses (EIVs), the ancestors of H3N8 CIV, and experimentally determined the impact of amino acid 186 in the ability of different CIV and EIV NS1s to inhibit general gene expression. In all cases, the presence of E186 was responsible for the control of host gene expression. In contrast, the NS1 protein of H3N2 CIV harbors E186 and blocks general gene expression in canine cells. Altogether, our results confirm previous studies on the strain-dependent ability of NS1 to block general gene expression. Moreover, the observed polymorphism on amino acid 186 between H3N8 and H3N2 CIVs might be the result of adaptive changes acquired during long-term circulation of avian-origin IAVs in mammals.IMPORTANCE Canine influenza is a respiratory disease of dogs caused by two CIV subtypes, the H3N8 and H3N2 viruses, of equine and avian origins, respectively. Influenza NS1 is the main viral factor responsible for the control of host innate immune responses, and changes in NS1 can play an important role in host adaptation. Here we assessed the ability of H3N8 CIV NS1 to inhibit

  15. The NS3 and NS4A genes as the targets of RNA interference inhibit replication of Japanese encephalitis virus in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-12-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that can cause acute encephalitis with a high fatality rate. RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to silence gene expression and a potential therapy for virus infection. In this study, the antiviral ability of eight shRNA expression plasmids targeting different sites of the NS3 and NS4A genes of JEV was determined in BHK21 cells and mice. The pGP-NS3-3 and pGP-NS4A-4 suppressed 93.9% and 82.0% of JEV mRNA in cells, respectively. The virus titer in cells was reduced approximately 950-fold by pretreating with pGP-NS3-4, and 640-fold by pretreating with pGP-NS4A-4. The results of western blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed JEV E protein and viral load in cells were remarkably inhibited by shRNA expression plasmids. The viral load in brains of mice pretreated with pGP-NS3-4 or pGP-NS4A-4 were reduced approximately 2400-fold and 800-fold, respectively, and the survival rate of mice challenged with JEV were 70% and 50%, respectively. However, the antiviral ability of shRNA expression plasmids was decreased over time. This study indicates that RNAi targeting of the NS3 and NS4A genes of JEV can sufficiently inhibit the replication of JEV in vitro and in vivo, and NS3 and NS4A genes might be potential targets of molecular therapy for JEV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An amantadine-sensitive chimeric BM2 ion channel of influenza B virus has implications for the mechanism of drug inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, Yuki; Ma, Chunlong; Jing, Xianghong; Balannick, Victoria; Pinto, Lawrence H.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus M2 (A/M2) and the influenza B virus BM2 are both small integral membrane proteins that form proton-selective ion channels. Influenza A virus A/M2 channel is the target of the antiviral drug amantadine (and its methyl derivative rimantadine), whereas BM2 channel activity is not affected by the drug. The atomic structure of the pore–transmembrane (TM) domain peptide has been determined by x-ray crystallography [Stouffer et al. (2008) Nature 451:596–599] and of a larger M2 peptide by NMR methods [Schnell and Chou (2008) Nature 451:591–595]. The crystallographic data show electron density (at 3.5 Å resolution) in the channel pore, consistent with amantadine blocking the pore of the channel. In contrast, the NMR data show 4 rimantadine molecules bound on the outside of the helices toward the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Drug binding includes interactions with residues 40–45 and a polar hydrogen bond between rimantadine and aspartic acid residue 44 (D44). These 2 distinct drug-binding sites led to 2 incompatible drug inhibition mechanisms. We have generated chimeric channels between amantadine-sensitive A/M2 and amantadine-insensitive BM2 designed to define the drug-binding site. Two chimeras containing 5 residues of the A/M2 ectodomain and residues 24–36 of the A/M2 TM domain show 85% amantadine/rimantadine sensitivity and specific activity comparable to that of WT BM2. These functional data suggest that the amantadine/rimantadine binding site identified on the outside of the 4 helices is not the primary site associated with the pharmacologic inhibition of the A/M2 ion channel. PMID:19841275

  17. Protein X of Borna disease virus inhibits apoptosis and promotes viral persistence in the central nervous systems of newborn-infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenisch, Marion; Burger, Nils; Staeheli, Peter; Bauer, Georg; Schneider, Urs

    2009-05-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic member of the order Mononegavirales with noncytolytic replication and obligatory persistence in cultured cells and animals. Here we show that the accessory protein X of BDV represents the first mitochondrion-localized protein of an RNA virus that inhibits rather than promotes apoptosis induction. Rat C6 astroglioma cells persistently infected with wild-type BDV were significantly more resistant to death receptor-dependent and -independent apoptotic stimuli than uninfected cells or cells infected with a BDV mutant expressing reduced amounts of X. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that X colocalizes with mitochondria and expression of X from plasmid DNA rendered human 293T and mouse L929 cells resistant to apoptosis induction. A recombinant virus encoding a mutant X protein unable to associate with mitochondria (BDV-X(A6A7)) failed to block apoptosis in C6 cells. Furthermore, Lewis rats neonatally infected with BDV-X(A6A7) developed severe neurological symptoms and died around day 30 postinfection, whereas all animals infected with wild-type BDV remained healthy and became persistently infected. TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) staining revealed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the brain of BDV-X(A6A7)-infected animals, whereas the numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes were comparable to those detected in animals infected with wild-type BDV. Our data thus indicate that inhibition of apoptosis by X promotes noncytolytic viral persistence and is required for the survival of cells in the central nervous system of BDV-infected animals.

  18. Type I interferon inhibits varicella-zoster virus replication by interfering with the dynamic interaction between mediator and IE62 within replication compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chia-Chi; Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Chien, Yun; Lee, Tsung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and zoster. The immediate-early protein, IE62 is the predominant VZ virion tegument protein, transactivating the expression of all kinetic classes of VZV genes. IE62 is localized to punctae that form DNA replication compartments in the nuclei of VZV infected cells. The morphological changes and the increase in the size of replication compartments that express IE62 are correlated with production of VZ virions. Mammalian Mediator serves as a coactivator of IE62 and functions by bridging DNA-binding transcription factors¸ RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and their target DNAs for VZV replication. While VZV is highly sensitive to type I interferons (IFNs), how IFN-α inhibits early events during VZV replication is poorly understood. In this study, we performed in situ analysis to investigate the effects of IFN-α on the dynamic interactions of IE62 with the Mediator MED25 subunit and the RNAP II negative regulator cycle-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) in VZV infected cells by confocal immunofluorescence. We found that in addition to dose-dependent inhibition of the yields of infectious virus by IFN treatment, IFN-α prominently impeded the development of large IE62(+) nuclear compartments and significantly decreased transcription of VZV genes. Both the expression level and stable recruitment of MED25 to IE62(+) replication compartments were inhibited by IFN-α. While IFN-α treatment upregulated CDK8 expression, redistribution and recruitment of CDK8 to IE62(+) replication compartments in infected cells was not affected by VZV. IFN-α exerts multiple inhibitory activities against virus infections. In this study, we provide visionary demonstration that continuous translocation of MED25 into VZV replication compartments ensures production of virions. IFN-α greatly impedes the formation of a stable complex between IE62 and the Mediator complex thereby suppresses VZV gene transcription. Our demonstration that IFN

  19. Aptamers that bind to the hemagglutinin of the recent pandemic influenza virus H1N1 and efficiently inhibit agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates both receptor (glycan) binding and membrane fusion for cell entry and has been the basis for typing influenza A viruses. In this study we have selected RNA aptamers (D-12 and D-26) that specifically target the HA protein of the recent pandemic influenza virus pdmH1N1 (A/California/07/2009). Among the selected aptamers the D-26 aptamer showed higher affinity for the HA of pdmH1N1 and was able to distinguish HA derived from other sub-types of influenza A viruses. The affinity of the D-26 aptamer was further improved upon incorporation of 2'-fluoropyrimidines to a level of 67 fM. Furthermore, the high affinity D-12 and D-26 aptamers were tested for their ability to interfere with HA-glycan interactions using a chicken red blood cell (RBC) agglutination assay. At a concentration of 200 nM the D-26 aptamer completely abolished the agglutination of RBCs, whereas D-12 only did so at 400 nM. These studies suggest that the selected aptamer D-26 not only has a higher affinity and specificity for the HA of pdmH1N1 but also has a better ability to efficiently interfere with HA-glycan interactions compared with the D-12 aptamer. The D-26 aptamer warrants further study regarding its application in developing topical virucidal products against the pdmH1N1 virus and also in surveillance of the pdmH1N1 influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Broad-spectrum inhibition of common respiratory RNA viruses by a pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with involvement of the host antiviral response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nam Nam; Lai, Kin Kui; Dai, Jun; Kok, Kin Hang; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2017-05-01

    Our previous screening of 50 240 structurally diverse compounds led to the identification of 39 influenza A virus infection inhibitors (Kao R.Y., Yang D., Lau L.S., Tsui W.H., Hu L. et al. Nat Biotechnol 2010;28:600-605). Further screening of these compounds against common respiratory viruses led to the discovery of compound FA-613. This inhibitor exhibited low micromolar antiviral activity against various influenza A and B virus strains, including the highly pathogenic influenza A strains H5N1 and H7N9, enterovirus A71, respiratory syncytial virus, human rhinovirus A, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus. No significant cellular toxicity was observed at the effective concentrations. Animal studies showed an improved survival rate in BALB/c mice that received intranasal FA-613 treatments against a lethal dose infection of A/HK/415742Md/2009 (H1N1). Further cell-based assays indicated that FA-613 interfer with the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway by targeting the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Surprisingly, FA-613 lost its antiviral potency in the interferon-deficient Vero cell line, while maintaining its inhibitory activity in an interferon-competent cell line which showed elevated expression of host antiviral genes when infected in the presence of FA-613. Further investigation of the specific connection between pyrimidine synthesis inhibition and the induction of host innate immunity might aid clinical development of this type of drug in antiviral therapies. Therefore, in acute cases of respiratory tract infections, when rapid diagnostics of the causative agent are not readily available, an antiviral drug with properties like FA-613 could prove to be very valuable.

  1. Effective inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication in vitro by vector-delivered microRNAs targeting the 3D gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xuepeng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNAi triggered by small RNA molecules, including siRNAs and miRNAs, offers a new approach for controlling viral infections. There is no report available for FMDV inhibition by vector-delivered miRNA, although miRNA is believed to have more potential than siRNA. In this study, the inhibitory effects of vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene on FMDV replication were examined. Results Four pairs of oligonucleotides encoding 3D-specific miRNA of FMDV were designed and selected for construction of miRNA expression plasmids. In the reporter assays, two of four miRNA expression plasmids were able to significantly silence the expression of 3D-GFP fusion proteins from the reporter plasmid, p3D-GFP, which was cotransfected with each miRNA expression plasmid. After detecting the silencing effects of the reporter genes, the inhibitory effects of FMDV replication were determined in the miRNA expression plasmid-transfected and FMDV-infected cells. Virus titration and real-time RT-PCR assays showed that the p3D715-miR and p3D983-miR plasmids were able to potently inhibit the replication of FMDV when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. Conclusion Our results indicated that vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. This finding provides evidence that miRNAs could be used as a potential tool against FMDV infection.

  2. Alleles A and B of non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit beta interferon production in human and mink lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad; Zohari, Siamak; Metreveli, Giorgi; Baule, Claudia; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Mikael

    2011-09-01

    Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) counteracts the production of host type I interferons (IFN-α/β) for the efficient replication and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses. Here, we reveal another dimension of the NS1 protein of avian influenza A viruses in suppressing IFN-β production in cultured cell lines. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 have a strong capacity to inhibit the activation of IFN-β production, compared with allele B from corresponding subtypes, as measured by IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE) promoter activation, IFN-β mRNA transcription and IFN-β protein expression. Furthermore, the ability to suppress IFN-β promoter activation was mapped to the C-terminal effector domain (ED), while the RNA-binding domain (RBD) alone was unable to suppress IFN-β promoter activation. Chimeric studies indicated that when the RBD of allele A was fused to the ED of allele B, it was a strong inhibitor of IFN-β promoter activity. This shows that well-matched ED and RBD are crucial for the function of the NS1 protein and that the RBD could be one possible cause for this differential IFN-β inhibition. Notably, mutagenesis studies indicated that the F103Y and Y103F substitutions in alleles A and B, respectively, do not influence the ISRE promoter activation. Apart from dsRNA signalling, differences were observed in the expression pattern of NS1 in transfected human and mink lung cells. This study therefore expands the versatile nature of the NS1 protein in inhibiting IFN responses at multiple levels, by demonstrating for the first time that it occurs in a manner dependent on allele type.

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) agonist CYM5442 inhibits expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) in endothelial cells infected with influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Shen, Si-Mei; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Peng-Peng; Shi, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus infection and its complications effect a large population worldwide. Endothelial cells are an important component in lung inflammation caused by influenza A virus infection. The roles of endothelial sphingosine 1-phophate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in the regulation of molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment during influenza A virus infection still remain unknown. In this report, we tested our hypothesis that S1PR1 agonist CYM5442 inhibits expression of intracellular adhesion molecules 1 (ICAM1) in endothelial cells infected with influenza A virus. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were infected with influenza A virus H1N1. Expression of cytokines, chemokines, interferons, and cellular adhesion molecules was measured by q-PCR. Expression of ICAM1 was further tested by Western Blotting. A S1PR1 agonist CYM5442 was added to the culture media to assess CYM5442's inhibitory effects during virus infection. HPMEC could be infected with H1N1 and responded to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, type I interferons, and cellular adhesion molecules. Addition of CYM5442 in culture media reduced the production of ICAM1 via a dosage- and time-dependent manner. CYM5442 inhibited the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The regulatory effects of CYM5442 were β-arrestin2-dependent. Activated S1PR1 signaling regulates the production of cellular adhesion molecules by inhibiting NF- κB activation via a β-arrestin2-dependent manner.

  4. hTERT inhibition triggers Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle and apoptosis in immortalized and transformed B cells: a basis for new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunco, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Keppel, Sonia; Celeghin, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Dal Col, Jessica; Mastorci, Katy; De Rossi, Anita

    2013-04-15

    Induction of viral lytic cycle, which induces death of host cells, may constitute a useful adjunct to current therapeutic regimens for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven malignancies. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), essential for the oncogenic process, may modulate the switch from latent to lytic infection. The possible therapeutic role of hTERT inhibition combined with antiviral drugs was investigated. EBV-negative BL41 and convertant EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were infected with retroviral vector encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA) anti-hTERT and cultured with or without the prodrug ganciclovir. The effects on EBV lytic replication, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were characterized. hTERT silencing by shRNA induced the expression of BZLF1, EA-D, and gp350 EBV lytic proteins and triggered a complete lytic cycle. This effect was associated with downregulation of BATF, a negative regulator of BZLF1 transcription. hTERT silencing also resulted in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. In particular, hTERT inhibition induced an accumulation of cells in the S-phase, an effect likely due to the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1, an AKT1-dependent substrate, which results in a decreased availability of proteins needed for cell-cycle progression. Besides inducing cell death through activation of complete EBV lytic replication, hTERT inhibition triggered AKT1/FOXO3/NOXA-dependent apoptosis in EBV-positive and -negative Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Finally, ganciclovir enhanced the apoptotic effect induced by hTERT inhibition in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphomas and LCLs. These results suggest that combination of antiviral drugs with strategies able to inhibit hTERT expression may result in therapeutically relevant effects in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

  5. Validation of the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test for rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostense, Stefan; Moore, Susan; Companjen, Arjen; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; Marissen, Wilfred E.; von Eyben, Rie; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Hanlon, Cathleen; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are successful biologics in treating a variety of diseases, including the prevention or treatment of viral infections. CL184 is a 1:1 combination of two human monoclonal IgG1 antibodies (CR57 and CR4098) against rabies virus, produced in the PER.C6 human cell line. The two

  6. GADD45ß, an anti-tumor gene, inhibits avian leukosis virus subgroup J replication in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a retrovirus that induces neoplasia, hepatomegaly, immunosuppression and poor performance in chickens. The tumorigenic and pathogenic mechanisms of ALV-J remain a hot topic. To explore anti-tumor genes that confer genetic resistance to ALV-J infection in ch...

  7. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus E2 protein bind discontinuous epitopes and inhibit infection at a postattachment step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Prentoe, Jannick

    2011-01-01

    The E2 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) mediates viral attachment and entry into target hepatocytes and elicits neutralizing antibodies in infected patients. To characterize the structural and functional basis of HCV neutralization, we generated a novel panel of 78 monoclonal antibodies (M...

  8. Sorafenib impedes Rift Valley fever virus egress by inhibiting Valosin containing protein function in the cellular secretory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    arboviral zoonosis that can cause 56 severe disease in humans and livestock. In ruminants, the disease is characterized by 57 spontaneous abortion rate...Molecule FISH Reveals Non- selective 433 Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments. PLoS Pathog 12. 434 TR-17-166 Distribution Statement

  9. Multiple Cationic Amphiphiles Induce a Niemann-Pick C Phenotype and Inhibit Ebola Virus Entry and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-18

    infection of Vero cells (IC50 = 2.42 mM). Clomi- phene also inhibits EBOV in a mouse model of infection, providing 90% survival at day 28 post-infection... Vero cells . The maximal % inhibition and the IC50 (mM) for their effects on EBOV infection are indicated. Data for clomiphene are presented in...FBS, Gibco Invitrogen), 1% antibiotic/ antimycotic, 1% L-Glutamine, and 1% Sodium Pyruvate. Vero E6 cells (ATCC: CRL-1586) were maintained in

  10. Characterization of a peptide domain within the GB virus C NS5A phosphoprotein that inhibits HIV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Xiang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available GBV-C infection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected people and GBV-C inhibits HIV replication in co-infection models. Expression of the GBV-C nonstructural phosphoprotein 5A (NS5A decreases surface levels of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4, induces the release of SDF-1 and inhibits HIV replication in Jurkat CD4+ T cell lines.Jurkat cell lines stably expressing NS5A protein and peptides were generated and HIV replication in these cell lines assessed. HIV replication was significantly inhibited in all cell lines expressing NS5A amino acids 152-165. Substitution of an either alanine or glycine for the serine at position 158 (S158A or S158G resulted in a significant decrease in the HIV inhibitory effect. In contrast, substituting a phosphomimetic amino acid (glutamic acid; S158E inhibited HIV as well as the parent peptide. HIV inhibition was associated with lower levels of surface expression of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4 and increased release of the CXCR4 ligand, SDF-1 compared to control cells. Incubation of CD4+ T cell lines with synthetic peptides containing amino acids 152-167 or the S158E mutant peptide prior to HIV infection resulted in HIV replication inhibition compared to control peptides.Expression of GBV-C NS5A amino acids 152-165 are sufficient to inhibit HIV replication in vitro, and the serine at position 158 appears important for this effect through either phosphorylation or structural changes in this peptide. The addition of synthetic peptides containing 152-167 or the S158E substitution to Jurkat cells resulted in HIV replication inhibition in vitro. These data suggest that GBV-C peptides or a peptide mimetic may offer a novel, cellular-based approach to antiretroviral therapy.

  11. Endothelial galectin-1 binds to specific glycans on nipah virus fusion protein and inhibits maturation, mobility, and function to block syncytia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omai B Garner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus targets human endothelial cells via NiV-F and NiV-G envelope glycoproteins, resulting in endothelial syncytia formation and vascular compromise. Endothelial cells respond to viral infection by releasing innate immune effectors, including galectins, which are secreted proteins that bind to specific glycan ligands on cell surface glycoproteins. We demonstrate that galectin-1 reduces NiV-F mediated fusion of endothelial cells, and that endogenous galectin-1 in endothelial cells is sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation. Galectin-1 regulates NiV-F mediated cell fusion at three distinct points, including retarding maturation of nascent NiV-F, reducing NiV-F lateral mobility on the plasma membrane, and directly inhibiting the conformational change in NiV-F required for triggering fusion. Characterization of the NiV-F N-glycome showed that the critical site for galectin-1 inhibition is rich in glycan structures known to bind galectin-1. These studies identify a unique set of mechanisms for regulating pathophysiology of NiV infection at the level of the target cell.

  12. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus by the CRISPR/Cas9 system via targeting the conserved regions of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Hao, Ruidong; Chen, Shuliang; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a global health threat as chronic HBV infection may lead to liver cirrhosis or cancer. Current antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues can inhibit the replication of HBV, but do not disrupt the already existing HBV covalently closed circular DNA. The newly developed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a powerful tool to target cellular genome DNA for gene editing. In order to investigate the possibility of using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to disrupt the HBV DNA templates, we designed eight guide RNAs (gRNAs) that targeted the conserved regions of different HBV genotypes, which could significantly inhibit HBV replication both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the HBV-specific gRNA/Cas9 system could inhibit the replication of HBV of different genotypes in cells, and the viral DNA was significantly reduced by a single gRNA/Cas9 system and cleared by a combination of different gRNA/Cas9 systems.

  13. The Matrix Protein of Nipah Virus Targets the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM6 to Inhibit the IKKε Kinase-Mediated Type-I IFN Antiviral Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Bharaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For efficient replication, viruses have developed mechanisms to evade innate immune responses, including the antiviral type-I interferon (IFN-I system. Nipah virus (NiV, a highly pathogenic member of the Paramyxoviridae family (genus Henipavirus, is known to encode for four P gene-derived viral proteins (P/C/W/V with IFN-I antagonist functions. Here we report that NiV matrix protein (NiV-M, which is important for virus assembly and budding, can also inhibit IFN-I responses. IFN-I production requires activation of multiple signaling components including the IκB kinase epsilon (IKKε. We previously showed that the E3-ubiquitin ligase TRIM6 catalyzes the synthesis of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are not covalently attached to any protein, and activate IKKε for induction of IFN-I mediated antiviral responses. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays and confocal microscopy we show here that the NiV-M protein interacts with TRIM6 and promotes TRIM6 degradation. Consequently, NiV-M expression results in reduced levels of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains associated with IKKε leading to impaired IKKε oligomerization, IKKε autophosphorylation and reduced IFN-mediated responses. This IFN antagonist function of NiV-M requires a conserved lysine residue (K258 in the bipartite nuclear localization signal that is found in divergent henipaviruses. Consistent with this, the matrix proteins of Ghana, Hendra and Cedar viruses were also able to inhibit IFNβ induction. Live NiV infection, but not a recombinant NiV lacking the M protein, reduced the levels of endogenous TRIM6 protein expression. To our knowledge, matrix proteins of paramyxoviruses have never been reported to be involved in innate immune antagonism. We report here a novel mechanism of viral innate immune evasion by targeting TRIM6, IKKε and unanchored polyubiquitin chains. These findings expand the universe of viral IFN antagonism strategies and provide a new

  14. Carbon Monoxide Inhibits Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication by the Cyclic GMP/Protein Kinase G and NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Angke; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Na; Duan, Hong; Liu, Hongliang; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes significant economic losses to the pork industry worldwide each year. Our previous research demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can suppress PRRSV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. In this study, inhibition of PRRSV replication was demonstrated to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO), a downstream metabolite of HO-1. Using several approaches, we demonstrate that CO significantly inhibited PRRSV replication in both a PRRSV permissive cell line, MARC-145, and the predominant cell type targeted during in vivo PRRSV infection, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Our results showed that CO inhibited intercellular spread of PRRSV; however, it did not affect PRRSV entry into host cells. Furthermore, CO was found to suppress PRRSV replication via the activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G (cGMP/PKG) signaling pathway. CO significantly inhibits PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation, a required step for PRRSV replication. Moreover, CO significantly reduced PRRSV-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that CO exerts its anti-PRRSV effect by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF-κB signaling. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of PRRSV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future PRRSV outbreaks. PRRSV causes great economic losses each year to the swine industry worldwide. Carbon monoxide (CO), a metabolite of HO-1, has been shown to have antimicrobial and antiviral activities in infected cells. Our previous research demonstrated that HO-1 can suppress PRRSV replication. Here we show that endogenous CO produced through HO-1 catalysis mediates the antiviral effect of HO-1. CO inhibits PRRSV replication by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF

  15. Comparison of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with indirect hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition for determination of rubella virus antibody: evaluation of immune status with commercial reagents in a clinical laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Truant, A L; Barksdale, B L; Huber, T. W.; Elliott, L B

    1983-01-01

    Comparative evaluations of immune status for rubella virus are described for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, hemagglutination inhibition, and indirect hemagglutination. A 92.1% agreement between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect hemagglutination assay was demonstrated for rubella immune status. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemagglutination inhibition demonstrated a 92.6% agreement and were compared in an attempt to define the quantitative usefulness of comparisons of ...

  16. Alpha/Beta Interferon Promotes Transcription and Inhibits Replication of Borna Disease Virus in Persistently Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeheli, Peter; Sentandreu, Maria; Pagenstecher, Axel; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic RNA virus that can replicate in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. This study shows that BDV multiplication was efficiently blocked in transgenic mice that express mouse alpha-1 interferon (IFN-α1) in astrocytes. To investigate whether endogenous virus-induced IFN might similarly restrict BDV, we used IFNAR0/0 mice, which lack a functional alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β) receptor. As would be expected if virus-induced IFN were important to control BDV infection, we found that cultured embryo cells of IFNAR0/0 mice supported viral multiplication, whereas cells from wild-type mice did not. Unexpectedly, however, BDV spread through the CNSs of IFNAR0/0 and wild-type mice with similar kinetics, suggesting that activation of endogenous IFN-α/β genes in BDV-infected brains was too weak or occurred too late to be effective. Surprisingly, Northern blot analysis showed that the levels of the most abundant viral mRNAs in the brains of persistently infected IFNAR0/0 mice were about 20-fold lower than those in wild-type mice. In contrast, genomic viral RNA was produced in about a 10-fold excess in the brains of IFNAR0/0 mice. Human IFN-α2 similarly enhanced transcription and simultaneously repressed replication of the BDV genome in persistently infected Vero cells. Thus, in persistently infected neurons and cultured cells, IFN-α/β appears to freeze the BDV polymerase in the transcriptional mode, resulting in enhanced viral mRNA synthesis and suppressing viral genome replication. PMID:11483767

  17. Deletion of the NSm virulence gene of Rift Valley fever virus inhibits virus replication in and dissemination from the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kading, Rebekah C; Crabtree, Mary B; Bird, Brian H; Nichol, Stuart T; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Miller, Barry R

    2014-02-01

    Previously, we investigated the role of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) virulence genes NSs and NSm in mosquitoes and demonstrated that deletion of NSm significantly reduced the infection, dissemination, and transmission rates of RVFV in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The specific aim of this study was to further characterize midgut infection and escape barriers of RVFV in Ae. aegypti infected with reverse genetics-generated wild type RVFV (rRVF-wt) or RVFV lacking the NSm virulence gene (rRVF-ΔNSm) by examining sagittal sections of infected mosquitoes for viral antigen at various time points post-infection. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were fed an infectious blood meal containing either rRVF-wt or rRVF-ΔNSm. On days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 post-infection, mosquitoes from each experimental group were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, paraffin-embedded, sectioned, and examined for RVFV antigen by immunofluorescence assay. Remaining mosquitoes at day 14 were assayed for infection, dissemination, and transmission. Disseminated infections were observed in mosquitoes as early as three days post infection for both virus strains. However, infection rates for rRVF-ΔNSm were statistically significantly less than for rRVF-wt. Posterior midgut infections in mosquitoes infected with rRVF-wt were extensive, whereas midgut infections of mosquitoes infected with rRVF-ΔNSm were confined to one or a few small foci. Deletion of NSm resulted in the reduced ability of RVFV to enter, replicate, and disseminate from the midgut epithelial cells. NSm appears to have a functional role in the vector competence of mosquitoes for RVFV at the level of the midgut barrier.

  18. Deletion of the NSm virulence gene of Rift Valley fever virus inhibits virus replication in and dissemination from the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah C Kading

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously, we investigated the role of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV virulence genes NSs and NSm in mosquitoes and demonstrated that deletion of NSm significantly reduced the infection, dissemination, and transmission rates of RVFV in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The specific aim of this study was to further characterize midgut infection and escape barriers of RVFV in Ae. aegypti infected with reverse genetics-generated wild type RVFV (rRVF-wt or RVFV lacking the NSm virulence gene (rRVF-ΔNSm by examining sagittal sections of infected mosquitoes for viral antigen at various time points post-infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were fed an infectious blood meal containing either rRVF-wt or rRVF-ΔNSm. On days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 post-infection, mosquitoes from each experimental group were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, paraffin-embedded, sectioned, and examined for RVFV antigen by immunofluorescence assay. Remaining mosquitoes at day 14 were assayed for infection, dissemination, and transmission. Disseminated infections were observed in mosquitoes as early as three days post infection for both virus strains. However, infection rates for rRVF-ΔNSm were statistically significantly less than for rRVF-wt. Posterior midgut infections in mosquitoes infected with rRVF-wt were extensive, whereas midgut infections of mosquitoes infected with rRVF-ΔNSm were confined to one or a few small foci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deletion of NSm resulted in the reduced ability of RVFV to enter, replicate, and disseminate from the midgut epithelial cells. NSm appears to have a functional role in the vector competence of mosquitoes for RVFV at the level of the midgut barrier.

  19. PC61 (anti-CD25) treatment inhibits influenza A virus-expanded regulatory T cells and severe lung pathology during a subsequent heterologous lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Anke R M; Wlodarczyk, Myriam F; Kenney, Laurie L; Selin, Liisa K

    2013-12-01

    Prior immunity to influenza A virus (IAV) in mice changes the outcome to a subsequent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection and can result in severe lung pathology, similar to that observed in patients that died of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic. This pathology is induced by IAV-specific memory CD8(+) T cells cross-reactive with LCMV. Here, we discovered that IAV-immune mice have enhanced CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells in their lungs, leading us to question whether a modulation in the normal balance of Treg and effector T-cell responses also contributes to enhancing lung pathology upon LCMV infection of IAV-immune mice. Treg cell and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels remained elevated in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes (mLNs) throughout the acute LCMV response of IAV-immune mice. PC61 treatment, used to decrease Treg cell levels, did not change LCMV titers but resulted in a surprising decrease in lung pathology upon LCMV infection in IAV-immune but not in naive mice. Associated with this decrease in pathology was a retention of Treg in the mLN and an unexpected partial clonal exhaustion of LCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses only in IAV-immune mice. PC61 treatment did not affect cross-reactive memory CD8(+) T-cell proliferation. These results suggest that in the absence of IAV-expanded Treg cells and in the presence of cross-reactive memory, the LCMV-specific response was overstimulated and became partially exhausted, resulting in a decreased effector response. These studies suggest that Treg cells generated during past infections can influence the characteristics of effector T-cell responses and immunopathology during subsequent heterologous infections. Thus, in humans with complex infection histories, PC61 treatment may lead to unexpected results.

  20. Recruitment of Tat to heterochromatin protein HP1 via interaction with CTIP2 inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Olivier; Lecestre, Dominique; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Marban, Céline; Avram, Dorina; Aunis, Dominique; Leid, Mark; Schaeffer, Evelyne

    2003-05-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a key role as inducer of viral gene expression. We report that Tat function can be potently inhibited in human microglial cells by the recently described nuclear receptor cofactor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor-interacting protein 2 (CTIP2). Overexpression of CTIP2 leads to repression of HIV-1 replication, as a result of inhibition of Tat-mediated transactivation. In contrast, the related CTIP1 was unable to affect Tat function and viral replication. Using confocal microscopy to visualize Tat subcellular distribution in the presence of the CTIPs, we found that overexpression of CTIP2, and not of CTIP1, leads to disruption of Tat nuclear localization and recruitment of Tat within CTIP2-induced nuclear ball-like structures. In addition, our studies demonstrate that CTIP2 colocalizes and associates with the heterochromatin-associated protein HP1alpha. The CTIP2 protein harbors two Tat and HP1 interaction interfaces, the 145-434 and the 717-813 domains. CTIP2 and HP1alpha associate with Tat to form a three-protein complex in which the 145-434 CTIP2 domain interacts with the N-terminal region of Tat, while the 717-813 domain binds to HP1. The importance of this Tat binding interface and of Tat subnuclear relocation was confirmed by analysis of CTIP2 deletion mutants. Our findings suggest that inhibition of HIV-1 expression by CTIP2 correlates with recruitment of Tat within CTIP2-induced structures and relocalization within inactive regions of the chromatin via formation of the Tat-CTIP2-HP1alpha complex. These data highlight a new mechanism of Tat inactivation through subnuclear relocalization that may ultimately lead to inhibition of viral pathogenesis.

  1. Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma inhibits Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Tulane virus in Romaine lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sea C; Roh, Si Hyeon; Niemira, Brendan A; Sites, Joseph E; Boyd, Glenn; Lacombe, Alison

    2016-11-21

    The present study investigated the effects of dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DACP) treatment on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Tulane virus (TV) on Romaine lettuce, assessing the influences of moisture vaporization, modified atmospheric packaging (MAP), and post-treatment storage on the inactivation of these pathogens. Romaine lettuce was inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. monocytogenes (~6logCFU/g lettuce), or TV (~2logPFU/g lettuce) and packaged in either a Petri dish (diameter: 150mm, height: 15mm) or a Nylon/polyethylene pouch (152×254mm) with and without moisture vaporization. Additionally, a subset of pouch-packaged leaves was flushed with O2 at 5% or 10% (balance N2). All of the packaged lettuce samples were treated with DACP at 34.8kV for 5min and then analyzed either immediately or following post-treatment storage for 24h at 4°C to assess the inhibition of microorganisms. DACP treatment inhibited E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, L. monocytogenes, and TV by 1.1±0.4, 0.4±0.3, 1.0±0.5logCFU/g, and 1.3±0.1logPFU/g, respectively, without environmental modifications of moisture or gas in the packages. The inhibition of the bacteria was not significantly affected by packaging type or moisture vaporization (p>0.05) but a reduced-oxygen MAP gas composition attenuated the inhibition rates of E. coli O157:H7 and TV. L. monocytogenes continued to decline by an additional 0.6logCFU/g in post-treatment cold storage for 24h. Additionally, both rigid and flexible conventional plastic packages appear to be suitable for the in-package decontamination of lettuce with DACP. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The B-Cell Specific Transcription Factor, Oct-2, Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Latency by Inhibiting the Viral Immediate-Early Protein, BZLF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Amanda R.; Kwek, Swee Sen; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-lytic switch is mediated by the BZLF1 immediate-early protein. EBV is normally latent in memory B cells, but cellular factors which promote viral latency specifically in B cells have not been identified. In this report, we demonstrate that the B-cell specific transcription factor, Oct-2, inhibits the function of the viral immediate-early protein, BZLF1, and prevents lytic viral reactivation. Co-transfected Oct-2 reduces the ability of BZLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in two different latently infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, Oct-2 inhibits BZLF1 activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays, and attenuates BZLF1 binding to lytic viral promoters in vivo. Oct-2 interacts directly with BZLF1, and this interaction requires the DNA-binding/dimerization domain of BZLF1 and the POU domain of Oct-2. An Oct-2 mutant (Δ262–302) deficient for interaction with BZLF1 is unable to inhibit BZLF1-mediated lytic reactivation. However, an Oct-2 mutant defective for DNA-binding (Q221A) retains the ability to inhibit BZLF1 transcriptional effects and DNA-binding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Oct-2 expression in several EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines increases the level of lytic EBV gene expression, while decreasing EBNA1 expression. Moreover, treatments which induce EBV lytic reactivation, such as anti-IgG cross-linking and chemical inducers, also decrease the level of Oct-2 protein expression at the transcriptional level. We conclude that Oct-2 potentiates establishment of EBV latency in B cells. PMID:22346751

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  4. Inhibition of microtubules and dynein rescues human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from owl monkey TRIMCyp-mediated restriction in a cellular context-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlica, Paulina; Dufour, Caroline; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    IFN-induced restriction factors can significantly affect the replicative capacity of retroviruses in mammals. TRIM5α (tripartite motif protein 5, isoform α) is a restriction factor that acts at early stages of the virus life cycle by intercepting and destabilizing incoming retroviral cores. Sensitivity to TRIM5α maps to the N-terminal domain of the retroviral capsid proteins. In several New World and Old World monkey species, independent events of retrotransposon-mediated insertion of the cyclophilin A (CypA)-coding sequence in the trim5 gene have given rise to TRIMCyp (also called TRIM5-CypA), a hybrid protein that is active against some lentiviruses in a species-specific fashion. In particular, TRIMCyp from the owl monkey (omkTRIMCyp) very efficiently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Previously, we showed that disrupting the integrity of microtubules (MTs) and of cytoplasmic dynein complexes partially rescued replication of retroviruses, including HIV-1, from restriction mediated by TRIM5α. Here, we showed that efficient restriction of HIV-1 by omkTRIMCyp was similarly dependent on the MT network and on dynein complexes, but in a context-dependent fashion. When omkTRIMCyp was expressed in human HeLa cells, restriction was partially counteracted by pharmacological agents targeting MTs or by small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of dynein. The same drugs (nocodazole and paclitaxel) also rescued HIV-1 from restriction in cat CRFK cells, although to a lesser extent. Strikingly, neither nocodazole, paclitaxel nor depletion of the dynein heavy chain had a significant effect on the restriction of HIV-1 in an owl monkey cell line. These results suggested the existence of cell-specific functional interactions between MTs/dynein and TRIMCyp. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Short Communication: Inhibition of DC-SIGN-Mediated HIV-1 Infection by Complementary Actions of Dendritic Cell Receptor Antagonists and Env-Targeting Virus Inactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustylnikov, Sergey; Dave, Rajnish S; Khan, Zafar K; Porkolab, Vanessa; Rashad, Adel A; Hutchinson, Matthew; Fieschi, Frank; Chaiken, Irwin; Jain, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    The DC-SIGN receptor on human dendritic cells interacts with HIV gp120 to promote both infection of antigen-presenting cells and transinfection of T cells. We hypothesized that in DC-SIGN-expressing cells, both DC-SIGN ligands such as dextrans and gp120 antagonists such as peptide triazoles would inhibit HIV infection with potential complementary antagonist effects. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of dextran (D66), isomaltooligosaccharides (D06), and several peptide triazoles (HNG156, K13, and UM15) on HIV infection of B-THP-1/DC-SIGN cells. In surface plasmon resonance competition assays, D66 (IC50 = 35.4 μM) and D06 (IC50 = 3.4 mM) prevented binding of soluble DC-SIGN to immobilized mannosylated bovine serum albumin (BSA). An efficacious dose-dependent inhibition of DC-SIGN-mediated HIV infection in both pretreatment and posttreatment settings was observed, as indicated by inhibitory potentials (EC50) [D66 (8 μM), D06 (48 mM), HNG156 (40 μM), UM15 (100 nM), and K13 (25 nM)]. Importantly, both dextrans and peptide triazoles significantly decreased HIV gag RNA levels [D66 (7-fold), D06 (13-fold), HNG156 (7-fold), K-13 (3-fold), and UM15 (6-fold)]. Interestingly, D06 at the highest effective concentration showed a 14-fold decrease of infection, while its combination with 50 μM HNG156 showed a 26-fold decrease. Hence, these compounds can combine to inactivate the viruses and suppress DC-SIGN-mediated virus-cell interaction that as shown earlier leads to dendritic cell HIV infection and transinfection dependent on the DC-SIGN receptor.

  6. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Sahana

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya. We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome, associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54, which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  7. Inhibition of the Host Proteasome Facilitates Papaya Ringspot Virus Accumulation and Proteosomal Catalytic Activity Is Modulated by Viral Factor HcPro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahana, Nandita; Kaur, Harpreet; Basavaraj; Tena, Fatima; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Palukaitis, Peter; Canto, Tomas; Praveen, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant–pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya). We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome), but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome), associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54), which impaired the HcPro – PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation. PMID:23300704

  8. Inhibition of replication of hepatitis B virus in transgenic mice following administration of hepatotropic lipoplexes containing guanidinopropyl-modified siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimani, Musa D; Ely, Abdullah; Buff, Maximilian C R; Bernhardt, Stefan; Engels, Joachim W; Scherman, Daniel; Escriou, Virginie; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2015-07-10

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) occurs commonly and complications that arise from persistence of the virus are associated with high mortality. Available licensed drugs have modest curative efficacy and advancing new therapeutic strategies to eliminate the virus is therefore a priority. HBV is susceptible to inactivation by exogenous gene silencers that harness RNA interference (RNAi) and the approach has therapeutic potential. To advance RNAi-based treatment for HBV infection, use in vivo of hepatotropic lipoplexes containing siRNAs with guanidinopropyl (GP) modifications is reported here. Lipoplexes contained polyglutamate, which has previously been shown to facilitate formulation and improve efficiency of the non-viral vectors. GP moieties were included in a previously described anti-HBV siRNA that effectively targeted the conserved viral X sequence. Particles had physical properties that were suitable for use in vivo: average diameter was approximately 50-200 nm and surface charge (zeta potential) was +65 mV. Efficient hepatotropic delivery of labeled siRNA was observed following systemic intravenous injection of the particles into HBV transgenic mice. Good inhibition of markers of viral replication was observed without evidence of toxicity. Efficacy of the GP-modified siRNAs was significantly more durable and formulations made up with chemically modified siRNAs were less immunostimulatory. An RNAi-mediated mechanism was confirmed by demonstrating that HBV mRNA cleavage occurred in vivo at the intended target site. Collectively these data indicate that GP-modified siRNAs formulated in anionic polymer-containing lipoplexes are effective silencers of HBV replication in vivo and have therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of cellular protein secretion by norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 requires a mimic of an endoplasmic reticulum export signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Sharp

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus is central to cellular homeostasis. ER export signals are utilized by a subset of proteins to rapidly exit the ER by direct uptake into COPII vesicles for transport to the Golgi. Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 contains a YXΦESDG motif that mimics a di-acidic ER export signal in both sequence and function. However, unlike normal ER export signals, the ER export signal mimic of p22 is necessary for apparent inhibition of normal COPII vesicle trafficking, which leads to Golgi disassembly and antagonism of Golgi-dependent cellular protein secretion. This is the first reported function for p22. Disassembly of the Golgi apparatus was also observed in cells replicating Norwalk virus, which may contribute to pathogenesis by interfering with cellular processes that are dependent on an intact secretory pathway. These results indicate that the ER export signal mimic is critical to the antagonistic function of p22, shown herein to be a novel antagonist of ER/Golgi trafficking. This unique and well-conserved human norovirus motif is therefore an appealing target for antiviral drug development.

  10. Interferon regulatory factor-1 protects from fatal neurotropic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus by specific inhibition of viral replication in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Nair

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system protects cells against invading viral pathogens by the auto- and paracrine action of type I interferon (IFN. In addition, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 can induce alternative intrinsic antiviral responses. Although both, type I IFN and IRF-1 mediate their antiviral action by inducing overlapping subsets of IFN stimulated genes, the functional role of this alternative antiviral action of IRF-1 in context of viral infections in vivo remains unknown. Here, we report that IRF-1 is essential to counteract the neuropathology of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. IFN- and IRF-1-dependent antiviral responses act sequentially to create a layered antiviral protection program against VSV infections. Upon intranasal infection, VSV is cleared in the presence or absence of IRF-1 in peripheral organs, but IRF-1-/- mice continue to propagate the virus in the brain and succumb. Although rapid IFN induction leads to a decline in VSV titers early on, viral replication is re-enforced in the brains of IRF-1-/- mice. While IFN provides short-term protection, IRF-1 is induced with delayed kinetics and controls viral replication at later stages of infection. IRF-1 has no influence on viral entry but inhibits viral replication in neurons and viral spread through the CNS, which leads to fatal inflammatory responses in the CNS. These data support a temporal, non-redundant antiviral function of type I IFN and IRF-1, the latter playing a crucial role in late time points of VSV infection in the brain.

  11. An in vitro experimental model of neuroinflammation: the induction of interleukin-6 in murine astrocytes infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, and its inhibition by oestrogenic receptor modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Nazario; Cerciat, Marie; Unkila, Mikko; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Arevalo, Maria-Angeles

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of neuroinflammation based on the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by neural glial cells infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). Production of IL-6 mRNA in mock-infected and TMEV-infected SJL/J murine astrocytes was examined using the Affymetrix murine genome U74v2 DNA microarray. The IL-6 mRNA from infected cells showed an eightfold increase in hybridization to a sequence encoding IL-6 located on chromosome number 5. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) was used to study the regulation of IL-6 expression. The presence of IL-6 in the supernatants of TMEV-infected astrocyte cultures was quantified by ELISA and found to be weaker than in cultures of infected macrophages. The IL-6 was induced by whole TMEV virions, but not by Ad.βGal adenovirus, purified TMEV capsid proteins, or UV-inactivated virus. Two recombinant inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and tumour necrosis factor-α were also found to be potent inducers of IL-6. The secreted IL-6 was biologically active because it fully supported B9 hybridoma proliferation in a [3H]thymidine incorporation bioassay. The cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice contained IL-6 during the acute encephalitis phase, peaking at days 2–4 post-infection. Finally, this in vitro neuroinflammation model was fully inhibited, as demonstrated by ELISA and qPCR, by five selective oestrogen receptor modulators. PMID:21564094

  12. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus inhibits dsRNA-induced interferon-β production in porcine intestinal epithelial cells by blockade of the RIG-I-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyan; Ge, Xuying; Gao, Yu; Herrler, Georg; Ren, Yudong; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-08-18

    The lack of optimal porcine cell lines has severely impeded the study and progress in elucidation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) pathogenesis. Vero cell, an African green monkey kidney cell line, was often used to isolate and propagate PEDV. Nonetheless, the target cells of PEDV in vivo are intestinal epithelial cells, during infection, intestinal epithelia would be damaged and resulted in digestive disorders. The immune functions of porcine epithelial cells and interactions with other immune cell populations display a number of differences compared to other species. Type I interferon (IFN) plays an important role in antiviral immune response. Limited reports showed that PEDV could inhibit type I interferon production. In this study, porcine small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), the target cells of PEDV, were used as the infection model in vitro to identify the possible molecular mechanisms of PEDV-inhibition IFN-β production. PEDV not only failed to induce IFN-β expression, but also inhibited dsRNA-mediated IFN-β production in IECs. As the key IFN-β transcription factors, we found that dsRNA-induced activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) was inhibited after PEDV infection, but not nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). To identify the mechanism of PEDV intervention with dsRNA-mediated IFN-β expression more accurately, the role of individual molecules of RIG-I signaling pathway were investigated. In the upstream of IRF-3, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1)-or inhibitor of κB kinase-ε (IKKε)-mediated IFN-β production was not blocked by PEDV, while RIG-I-and its adapter molecule IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1)-mediated IFN-β production were completely inhibited after PEDV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrated for the first time that PEDV infection of its target cell line, IECs, inhibited dsRNA-mediated IFN-β production by blocking the activation of IPS-1 in RIG-I-mediated pathway. Our studies offered new visions in understanding of

  13. Poly(I:C) inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication in MARC-145 cells via activation of IFIT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Liu, Jie; Bai, Juan; Du, Yijun; Wang, Xiaoye; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Ping

    2013-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major cause of heavy economic losses in many swine-producing regions. Current vaccination strategies and antiviral drugs provide only limited protection. Interferon (IFN)-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3 (IFIT3) has been characterized as the product of a novel antiviral gene and as an important modulator in innate immunity. However, the role of IFIT3 in PRRSV infection is scarcely understood. In this study, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) inhibited PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells, following the appearance of increased IFIT3. Overexpression of porcine IFIT3 resulted in a decrease of PRRSV. Knockdown of IFIT3 in MARC-145 cells increased PRRSV replication and impaired the antiviral activity mediated by poly(I:C). Moreover, in the presence or absence of IFIT3, poly(I:C)-induced IFN-β promoter activity was significantly boosted or crippled, respectively. IFIT3, TBK1 and phosphorylation of IRF3 were activated in poly(I:C)-transfected MARC-145 cells. It demonstrated that IFIT3 plays an important role in IFN-β induction in MARC-145 cells, and, when activated, it can inhibit PRRSV replication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  15. Chinese herbal medicine compound Yi-Zhi-Hao pellet inhibits replication of influenza virus infection through activation of heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiu Yin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a leading cause of respiratory disease, influenza A virus (IAV presents a pandemic threat in annual seasonal outbreaks. Given the limitation of existing anti-influenza therapies, there remains to be a requirement for new drugs. Compound Yi-Zhi-Hao pellet (CYZH is a famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM used in the clinic, whose formula has been recorded in Complication of National Standard for Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat common cold. In this study, we found that CYZH exhibited a broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity and inhibited the expression of viral RNA and proteins in vitro. Mechanistically, CYZH had no inhibitory activities against viral protein hemagglutinin and IAV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Instead, it induced activation of erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, which subsequently upregulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression. Also, CYZH protected cells from oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen series. In conclusions, CYZH inhibits IAV replication in vitro, at least partly by activating expression of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  16. Defective heat shock factor 1 inhibits the growth of fibrosarcoma derived from simian virus 40/T antigen‑transformed MEF cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiying; Zhang, Zhi; Li, Shulian; Wang, Zhaoyang; Ma, Yuanfang; Hu, Yanzhong

    2015-11-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) serves an important role in regulating the proliferation of human tumor cell lines in vitro and tissue specific tumorigenesis in certain mouse models. However, its role in viral‑oncogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of Hsf1 in fibroblastoma derived from simian virus 40/T antigen (SV40/TAG)‑transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines was investigated. Knockout of Hsf1 inhibited MEF cell proliferation in vitro and fibroblastoma growth and metastasis to the lungs in vivo in nude mice. Knockout of Hsf1 increased the protein expression levels of p53 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb), however reduced the expression of heat shock protein 25 (Hsp25) in addition to the expression of the angiogenesis markers vascular endothelial growth factor, cluster of differentiation 34 and factor VIII related antigen. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation indicated that knockout of Hsf1 inhibited the association between SV40/TAG and p53 or pRb. These data suggest that Hsf1 is involved in the regulation of SV40/TAG‑derived fibroblastoma growth and metastasis by modulating the association between SV40/TAG and tumor suppressor p53 and pRb. The current study provides further evidence that Hsf1 may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer.

  17. Additive protection by antioxidant and apoptosis-inhibiting effects on mosquito cells with dengue 2 virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Huang Chen

    Full Text Available Cytopathic effects (CPEs in mosquito cells are generally trivial compared to those that occur in mammalian cells, which usually end up undergoing apoptosis during dengue virus (DENV infection. However, oxidative stress was detected in both types of infected cells. Despite this, the survival of mosquito cells benefits from the upregulation of genes related to antioxidant defense, such as glutathione S transferase (GST. A second defense system, i.e., consisting of antiapoptotic effects, was also shown to play a role in protecting mosquito cells against DENV infection. This system is regulated by an inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP that is an upstream regulator of caspases-9 and -3. DENV-infected C6/36 cells with double knockdown of GST and the IAP showed a synergistic effect on activation of these two caspases, causing a higher rate of apoptosis (> 20% than those with knockdown of each single gene (-10%. It seems that the IAP acts as a second line of defense with an additional effect on the survival of mosquito cells with DENV infection. Compared to mammalian cells, residual hydrogen peroxide in DENV-infected C6/36 cells may signal for upregulation of the IAP. This novel finding sheds light on virus/cell interactions and their coevolution that may elucidate how mosquitoes can be a vector of DENV and probably most other arboviruses in nature.

  18. Nuclear import inhibitor N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide targets Zika virus (ZIKV) nonstructural protein 5 to inhibit ZIKV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Yang, Sundy N Y; Smith, Kate; Forwood, Jade K; Jans, David A

    2017-12-02

    In the absence of approved therapeutics, Zika virus (ZIKV)'s recent prolific outbreaks in the Americas, together with impacts on unborn fetuses of infected mothers, make it a pressing human health concern worldwide. Although a key player in viral replication in the infected host cell cytoplasm, ZIKV non-structural protein 5 (NS5) appears to contribute integrally to pathogenesis by localising in the host cell nucleus, in similar fashion to NS5 from Dengue virus (DENV). We show here for the first time that ZIKV NS5 is recognized with high nanomolar affinity by the host cell importin α/β1 heterodimer, and that this interaction can be blocked by the novel DENV NS5 targeting inhibitor N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR). Importantly, we show that 4-HPR has potent anti-ZIKV activity at low μM concentrations. With an established safety profile for human use, 4-HPR represents an exciting possibility as an anti-ZIKV agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GB virus C envelope protein E2 inhibits T cell receptor induced IL-2 production and alters IL-2 signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H.; Xiang, Jinhua; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) viremia is associated with reduced CD4+ T cell expansion following Interleukin 2 (IL-2) therapy and with a reduction in T cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. Mechanism(s) by which GBV-C might alter T-cell activation or IL-2 signaling have not been studied. Here, we assess IL-2 release, IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression, IL-2 signaling, and cell proliferation in Tet-off Jurkat cells expressing the GBV-C envelope glycoprotein (E2) following activation through the T cell receptor (TCR). TCR activation was induced by incubation in anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies. IL-2 release was measured by ELISA, STAT5 phosphorylation was assessed by immunoblot, and IL-2Rα (CD25) expression and cell proliferation were determined by flow cytometry. IL-2 and IL-2Rα steady-state mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR. GBV-C E2 expression significantly inhibited IL-2 release, CD25 expression, STAT5 phosphorylation and cellular proliferation in Jurkat cells following activation through the TCR compared to control cell lines. Reducing E2 expression by doxycycline reversed the inhibitory effects observed in the E2-expressing cells. The N-terminal 219 a.a of E2 was sufficient to inhibit IL-2 signaling. Addition of purified recombinant GBV-C E2 protein to primary human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells inhibited TCR activation-induced IL-2 release and upregulation of IL-2Rα expression. These data provide evidence that the GBV-C E2 protein may contribute to the block in CD4+ T cell expansion following IL-2 therapy in HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, the effects of GBV-C on IL-2 and IL-2 signaling pathways may contribute to the reduction in chronic immune activation observed in GBV-C/HIV co-infected individuals. PMID:22844114

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein-induced upregulation of CAT-1 stimulates proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Rongjuan; Peng, Feng; Xiao, Xinqiang; Gong, Xing; Jiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Min; Tian, Yi; Xu, Yun; Ma, Jing; Li, Mingming; Luo, Yue; Gong, Guozhong

    2017-09-22

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is widely recognized to be a critical oncoprotein contributing to the development of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT-1) gene is a target of miR-122. In this study, we found that CAT-1 protein levels were higher in HBV-related HCC carcinomatous tissues than in para-cancerous tumor tissues, and that CAT-1 promoted HCC cell growth, proliferation, and metastasis. Moreover, HBx-induced decreases in Gld2 and miR-122 levels that contributed to the upregulation of CAT-1 in HCC. These results indicate that a Gld2/miR-122/CAT-1 pathway regulated by HBx likely participates in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  1. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  2. Antibiotic-Mediated Inhibition of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection: A Novel Quinolone Function Which Potentiates the Antiviral Cytokine Response in MARC-145 Cells and Pig Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Cafruny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an economically significant agent for which there currently are no effective treatments. Development of antiviral agents for PRRSV as well as many other viruses has been limited by toxicity of known antiviral compounds. In contrast, antibiotics for non-virus microbial infections have been widely useful, in part because of their acceptable toxicity in animals. We report here the discovery that the quinolonecontaining compound Plasmocin™, as well as the quinolones nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, have potent anti-PRRSV activity in vitro. PRRSV replication was inhibited by these antibiotics in both cultured MARC-145 cells and cultured primary alveolar porcine macrophages (PAMs. Furthermore, sub-optimal concentrations of nalidixic acid synergized with antiviral cytokines (AK-2 or IFN-γ to quantitatively and qualitatively inhibit PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells or PAMs. The antiviral activity of Plasmocin and nalidixic acid correlated with reduced actin expression in MARC-145 cells. Replication of the related lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV was also inhibited in primary mouse macrophages by Plasmocin. These results are significant to the development of antiviral strategies with potentially reduced toxicity, and provide a model system to better understand regulation of arterivirus replication.

  3. Primary biliary acids inhibit hepatitis D virus (HDV entry into human hepatoma cells expressing the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Veloso Alves Pereira

    Full Text Available The sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP is both a key bile acid (BA transporter mediating uptake of BA into hepatocytes and an essential receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV. In this study we aimed to characterize to what extent and through what mechanism BA affect HDV cell entry.HuH-7 cells stably expressing NTCP (HuH-7/NTCP and primary human hepatocytes (PHH were infected with in vitro generated HDV particles. Infectivity in the absence or presence of compounds was assessed using immunofluorescence staining for HDV antigen, standard 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 assays and quantitative PCR.Addition of primary conjugated and unconjugated BA resulted in a dose dependent reduction in the number of infected cells while secondary, tertiary and synthetic BA had a lesser effect. This effect was observed both in HuH-7/NTCP and in PHH. Other replication cycle steps such as replication and particle assembly and release were unaffected. Moreover, inhibitory BA competed with a fragment from the large HBV envelope protein for binding to NTCP-expressing cells. Conversely, the sodium/BA-cotransporter function of NTCP seemed not to be required for HDV infection since infection was similar in the presence or absence of a sodium gradient across the plasma membrane. When chenodeoxycolic acid (15 mg per kg body weight was administered to three chronically HDV infected individuals over a period of up to 16 days there was no change in serum HDV RNA.Primary BA inhibit NTCP-mediated HDV entry into hepatocytes suggesting that modulation of the BA pool may affect HDV infection of hepatocytes.

  4. Mutation of Asn-475 in the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus nsP2 Cysteine Protease Leads to a Self-Inhibited State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jaimee R; Mickey, Matthew J; Hu, Xin; Marugan, Juan J; Legler, Patricia M

    2017-11-28

    The alphaviral nsP2 cysteine protease of the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a validated antiviral drug target. Clan CN proteases contain a cysteine protease domain that is intimately packed with an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. Within a cleft formed at the interface of these two domains, the peptide substrate is thought to bind. The nucleophilic cysteine can be found within a conserved motif, 475NVCWAK480, which differs from that of papain (22CGSCWAFS29). Mutation of the motif residue, N475, to alanine unexpectedly produced a self-inhibited state in which the N-terminal residues flipped into the substrate-binding cleft. Notably, the N-terminal segment was not hydrolyzed-consistent with a catalytically incompetent state. The N475A mutation resulted in a 70-fold decrease in kcat/Km. A side chain-substrate interaction was predicted by the structure; the S701A mutation led to a 17-fold increase in Km. An Asn at the n-2 position relative to the Cys was also found in the coronaviral papain-like proteases/deubiquitinases (PLpro) of the SARS and MERS viruses, and in several papain-like human ubiquitin specific proteases (USP). The large conformational change in the N475A variant suggests that Asn-475 plays an important role in stabilizing the N-terminal residues and in orienting the carbonyl during nucleophilic attack but does not directly hydrogen bond the oxyanion. The state trapped in crystallo is an unusual result of site-directed mutagenesis but reveals the role of this highly conserved Asn and identifies key substrate-binding contacts that may be exploited by peptide-like inhibitors.

  5. Influenza A Virus Virulence Depends on Two Amino Acids in the N-Terminal Domain of Its NS1 Protein To Facilitate Inhibition of the RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierhorn, Kristina L.; Jolmes, Fabian; Bespalowa, Julia; Saenger, Sandra; Peteranderl, Christin; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Mielke, Maja; Budt, Matthias; Pleschka, Stephan; Herrmann, Andreas; Herold, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has broad antiviral activity inducing translational shutdown of viral and cellular genes and is therefore targeted by various viral proteins to facilitate pathogen propagation. The pleiotropic NS1 protein of influenza A virus acts as silencer of PKR activation and ensures high-level viral replication and virulence. However, the exact manner of this inhibition remains controversial. To elucidate the structural requirements within the NS1 protein for PKR inhibition, we generated a set of mutant viruses, identifying highly conserved arginine residues 35 and 46 within the NS1 N terminus as being most critical not only for binding to and blocking activation of PKR but also for efficient virus propagation. Biochemical and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based interaction studies showed that mutation of R35 or R46 allowed formation of NS1 dimers but eliminated any detectable binding to PKR as well as to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using in vitro and in vivo approaches to phenotypic restoration, we demonstrated the essential role of the NS1 N terminus for blocking PKR. The strong attenuation conferred by NS1 mutation R35A or R46A was substantially alleviated by stable knockdown of PKR in human cells. Intriguingly, both NS1 mutant viruses did not trigger any signs of disease in PKR+/+ mice, but replicated to high titers in lungs of PKR−/− mice and caused lethal infections. These data not only establish the NS1 N terminus as highly critical for neutralization of PKR's antiviral activity but also identify this blockade as an indispensable contribution of NS1 to the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus inhibits activation of the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) by means of its nonstructural NS1 protein, but the underlying mode of inhibition is debated. Using mutational analysis, we identified arginine residues 35 and 46 within the N-terminal NS1 domain as highly critical for binding to and functional

  6. Inhibition of G1P3 expression found in the differential display study on respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis and lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. The respiratory epithelium is the primary initiator of pulmonary inflammation in RSV infections, which cause significant perturbations of global gene expression controlling multiple cellular processes. In this study, differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed to examine mRNA expression in a human alveolar cell line (SPC-A1 infected with RSV. Results Of the 2,500 interpretable bands on denaturing polyacrylamide gels, 40 (1.6% cDNA bands were differentially regulated by RSV, in which 28 (70% appeared to be upregulated and another 12 (30% appeared to be downregulated. Forty of the expressed sequence tags (EST were isolated, and 20 matched homologs in GenBank. RSV infection upregulated the mRNA expression of chemokines CC and CXC and interfered with type α/β interferon-inducible gene expression by upregulation of MG11 and downregulation of G1P3. Conclusion RSV replication could induce widespread changes in gene expression including both positive and negative regulation and play a different role in the down-regulation of IFN-α and up-regulation of IFN-γ inducible gene expression, which suggests that RSV interferes with the innate antiviral response of epithelial cells by multiple mechanisms.

  7. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits extracellular IFN-α-mediated signal transduction by downregulation of type I IFN receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Il-Rae; Oh, Myungju; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Jhun, Byung Hak; Pellegrini, Sandra; Fuchs, Serge Y; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-04-01

    We have previously shown that hepatitis B virus (HBV) protein X (HBX), a regulatory protein of HBV, activates Stat1, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. Type I IFN secreted from HBX-expressing hepatic cells enforces antiviral signals through its binding to the cognate type I IFN receptor. We therefore investigated how cells handle this detrimental situation. Interestingly, compared to Chang cells stably expressing an empty vector (Chang-Vec), Chang cells stably expressing HBX (Chang-HBX) showed lower levels of IFN-α receptor 1 (IFNAR1) protein, a subunit of type I IFN receptor. The levels of IFNAR1 transcripts detected in Chang-HBX cells were lower than the levels in Chang-Vec cells, indicating that HBX regulates IFNAR1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we observed that HBX induced the translocation of IFNAR1 to the cytoplasm. Consistent with these observations, HBX also downregulated Tyk2, which is required for the stable expression of IFNAR1 on the cell surface. Eventually, Chang-HBX cells consistently maintained a lower level of IFNAR1 expression and displayed no proper response to IFN-α, while Chang-Vec cells exhibited a proper response to IFN-α treatment. Taken together, we propose that HBX downregulates IFNAR1, leading to the avoidance of extracellular IFN-α signal transduction.

  8. Hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 3 interacts with cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase and partially inhibits its activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Ping Fang

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is etiologically involved in liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and B-cell lymphomas. It has been demonstrated previously that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3 is involved in cell transformation. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment was conducted to identify cellular proteins interacting with HCV NS3 protein. Cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase (cdN, dNT-1 was found to interact with HCV NS3 protein. Binding domains of HCV NS3 and cellular cdN proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions between HCV NS3 and cdN proteins were further demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis in cultured cells. The cellular cdN activity was partially repressed by NS3 protein in both the transiently-transfected and the stably-transfected systems. Furthermore, HCV partially repressed the cdN activity while had no effect on its protein expression in the systems of HCV sub-genomic replicons and infectious HCV virions. Deoxyribonucleotidases are present in most mammalian cells and involve in the regulation of intracellular deoxyribonucleotides pools by substrate cycles. Control of DNA precursor concentration is essential for the maintenance of genetic stability. Reduction of cdN activity would result in the imbalance of DNA precursor concentrations. Thus, our results suggested that HCV partially reduced the cdN activity via its NS3 protein and this may in turn cause diseases.

  9. Hepatitis B virus inhibits insulin receptor signaling and impairs liver regeneration via intracellular retention of the insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Sebastian Robert; Medvedev, Regina; Heinrich, Thekla; Büchner, Sarah Manon; Kettern, Nadja; Hildt, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes severe liver disease but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. During chronic HBV infection, the liver is recurrently injured by immune cells in the quest for viral elimination. To compensate tissue injury, liver regeneration represents a vital process which requires proliferative insulin receptor signaling. This study aims to investigate the impact of HBV on liver regeneration and hepatic insulin receptor signaling. After carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury, liver regeneration is delayed in HBV transgenic mice. These mice show diminished hepatocyte proliferation and increased expression of fibrosis markers. This is in accordance with a reduced activation of the insulin receptor although HBV induces expression of the insulin receptor via activation of NF-E2-related factor 2. This leads to increased intracellular amounts of insulin receptor in HBV expressing hepatocytes. However, intracellular retention of the receptor simultaneously reduces the amount of functional insulin receptors on the cell surface and thereby attenuates insulin binding in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular retention of the insulin receptor is caused by elevated amounts of α-taxilin, a free syntaxin binding protein, in HBV expressing hepatocytes preventing proper targeting of the insulin receptor to the cell surface. Consequently, functional analyses of insulin responsiveness revealed that HBV expressing hepatocytes are less sensitive to insulin stimulation leading to delayed liver regeneration. This study describes a novel pathomechanism that uncouples HBV expressing hepatocytes from proliferative signals and thereby impedes compensatory liver regeneration after liver injury.

  10. Biosurveillance of avian influenza and Newcastle disease viruses in the Barda region of Azerbaijan using real time RT-PCR and hemagglutination inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalala eZeynalova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Azerbaijan State Veterinary Control Service (SVCS has conducted active serological surveillance for avian influenza (AI in poultry since 2006, when the first outbreak of AI H5N1 occurred in Azerbaijan. Samples are collected from September to May annually and tested using a hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay to detect antibodies against H5 AI viruses. HI testing is also performed for Newcastle disease virus (NDV upon request, but since this method cannot distinguish between natural infections and immune responses to vaccination, all positive results require follow-up epidemiological investigations. Furthermore, blood collection for the surveillance program is time-intensive and can be stressful to birds. In order to improve the national surveillance program, alternative sampling and testing methodologies were applied among a population of birds in the Barda region and compared with results of the national surveillance program. Tracheal and cloacal swabs were collected instead of blood. Rather than testing individual samples, RNA was pooled to conserve resources and time, and pools were tested by real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR. Environmental sampling at a live bird market was also introduced as another surveillance mechanism. A total of 1,030 swabs were collected, comprising tracheal and cloacal samples from 441 birds and 148 environmental surface samples from farms or the live bird market. During the same time, 3,890 blood samples were collected nationally for the surveillance program; 400 of these samples originated in the Barda region. Birds sampled for rRT-PCR were likely different than those tested as part of national surveillance. All swab samples tested negative by rRT-PCR for both AI and NDV. All blood samples tested negative for H5 by HI, while 6.2% of all samples and 5% of the Barda samples tested positive for exposure to NDV. Follow-up investigations found that positive samples were from birds vaccinated in the

  11. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  12. miR-29c targets TNFAIP3, inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-Mei [Department of Microbiology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathophysiology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Yan; Fan, Chun-Guang; Xu, Fei-Fei [Department of Pathophysiology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China); Sun, Wen-Sheng [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China); Liu, Yu-Gang, E-mail: liu.yugang@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China); Jia, Ji-Hui, E-mail: jiajihui@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} miR-29c was significantly downregulated in HBV-related HCC. {yields} TNFAIP3 was found to be inversely correlated with miR-29c levels and identified as a target of miR-29c. {yields} Overexpression of miR-29c suppressed TNFAIP3. {yields} miR-29c inhibited HBV DNA replication, cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that microRNA-29c (miR-29c) is involved in a variety of biological processes including carcinogenesis. Here, we report that miR-29c was significantly downregulated in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines as well as in clinical tissues compared with their corresponding controls. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), a key regulator in inflammation and immunity, was found to be inversely correlated with miR-29c levels and was identified as a target of miR-29c. Overexpression of miR-29c in HepG2.2.15 cells effectively suppressed TNFAIP3 expression and HBV DNA replication as well as inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. We conclude that miR-29c may play an important role as a tumor suppressive microRNA in the development and progression of HBV-related HCC by targeting TNFAIP3. Thus miR-29c and TNFAIP3 represent key diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of HBV infection.

  13. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition suppresses hepatitis B virus X protein-induced transformation in an in vitro model of liver cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studach, Leo L; Rakotomalala, Lova; Wang, Wen-Horng; Hullinger, Ronald L; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2009-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (pX) is implicated in HCC pathogenesis acting as a weak oncogene or a cofactor in hepatocarcinogenesis. pX induces DNA re-replication, DNA damage, and partial polyploidy in a poorly differentiated, immortalized hepatocyte cell line. In this study we employed sorted, pX-induced polyploid cells to investigate their growth and oncogenic transformation potential over the course of 70 cell doublings. Immediately after live cell-sorting, nearly 40% of pX-induced polyploid cells undergo apoptosis, whereas the surviving cells exhibit proliferation sensitive to p53. After 40 cell generations the pX-expressing polyploid cultures exhibit loss of p53 function and become growth factor- and anchorage-independent, indicative of oncogenic transformation. The pX-induced polyploid cultures in the course of 70 cell generations undergo progressively increasing DNA damage, propagate damaged DNA to daughter cells, and display increased expression of a cluster of proliferation genes shown to be elevated in human HCC, including HBV-HCC. One of these genes is the mitotic kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). Oncogenic transformation is suppressed in the absence of pX expression, and significantly, by inhibition of Plk1. These results identify Plk1 as crucial in pX-mediated oncogenic transformation. Partial polyploidy induced by pX is not immediately associated with oncogenic transformation. Continued DNA damage for 40 cell generations is reproducibly associated with loss of p53 function, enhanced expression of Plk1, and oncogenic transformation. Because Plk1 expression is also elevated in HBV-HCC tumors, this in vitro cellular model simulates liver cancer progression and pathogenesis in chronic HBV patients. Inhibition of Plk1 activity suppresses pX-mediated oncogenic transformation, identifying Plk1 as a promising therapeutic target for HBV-mediated HCC.

  14. Mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase p51 subunit defines residues contributing to vinylogous urea inhibition of ribonuclease H activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Suhman; Miller, Jennifer T; Johnson, Barry C; Hughes, Stephen H; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2012-02-03

    The vinylogous urea, NSC727447, was proposed to allosterically inhibit ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) by interacting with the thumb subdomain of its non-catalytic p51 subunit. Proximity of the p51 thumb to the p66 RNase H domain implied that inhibitor binding altered active site geometry, whereas protein footprinting suggested a contribution from α-helix I residues Cys-280 and Lys-281. To more thoroughly characterize the vinylogous urea binding site, horizontal alanine scanning mutagenesis between p51 residues Lys-275 and Thr-286 (comprising α-helix I and portions of the neighboring αH/αI and αI/αJ connecting loops) was combined with a limited vertical scan of Cys-280. A contribution from Cys-280 was strengthened by our observation that all substitutions at this position rendered selectively mutated, reconstituted p66/p51 heterodimers ∼45-fold less sensitive to inhibition. An ∼19-fold reduced IC(50) for p51 mutant T286A coupled with a 2-8-fold increased IC(50) when intervening residues were substituted supports our original proposal of p51 α-helix I as the vinylogous urea binding site. In contrast to these allosteric inhibitors, mutant enzymes retained equivalent sensitivity to the natural product α-hydroxytropolone inhibitor manicol, which x-ray crystallography has demonstrated functions by chelating divalent metal at the p66 RNase H active site. Finally, reduced DNA strand-transfer activity together with increased vinylogous urea sensitivity of p66/p51 heterodimers containing short p51 C-terminal deletions suggests an additional role for the p51 C terminus in nucleic acid binding that is compromised by inhibitor binding.

  15. Aqueous extracts of the marine brown alga Lobophora variegata inhibit HIV-1 infection at the level of virus entry into cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kremb

    Full Text Available In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs. Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  16. The microbiome composition of Aedes aegypti is not critical for Wolbachia-mediated inhibition of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Michelle D; Ye, Yixin H; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is primarily vectored by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is estimated to cause 390 million human infections annually. A novel method for DENV control involves stable transinfection of Ae. aegypti with the common insect endosymbiont Wolbachia, which mediates an antiviral effect. However, the mechanism by which Wolbachia reduces the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to DENV is not fully understood. In this study we assessed the potential of resident microbiota, which can play important roles in insect physiology and immune responses, to affect Wolbachia-mediated DENV blocking. The microbiome of Ae. aegypti stably infected with Wolbachia strain wMel was compared to that of Ae. aegypti without Wolbachia, using 16s rDNA profiling. Our results indicate that although Wolbachia affected the relative abundance of several genera, the microbiome of both the Wolbachia-infected and uninfected mosquitoes was dominated by Elizabethkingia and unclassified Enterobacteriaceae. To assess the potential of the resident microbiota to affect the Wolbachia-mediated antiviral effect, we used antibiotic treatment before infection with DENV by blood-meal. In spite of a significant shift in the microbiome composition in response to the antibiotics, we detected no effect of antibiotic treatment on DENV infection rates, or on the DENV load of infected mosquitoes. Our findings indicate that stable infection with Wolbachia strain wMel produces few effects on the microbiome of laboratory-reared Ae. aegypti. Moreover, our findings suggest that the microbiome can be significantly altered without affecting the fundamental DENV blocking phenotype in these mosquitoes. Since Ae. aegypti are likely to encounter diverse microbiota in the field, this is a particularly important result in the context of using Wolbachia as a method for DENV control.

  17. Preliminary studies on the use of solid-phase immunosorbent techniques for the rapid detection of Wesselsbron virus (WSLV) IgM by haemagglutination-inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S S; Fagbami, A H; Ojeh, C K

    1999-01-01

    Serum samples from 446 randomly selected persons belonging to different age groups and locations in Nigeria were tested for the presence of WSLV IgM using the flavivirus haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test adopted to the solid-phase immunosorbent technique (SPIT). 61 (14%) persons had IgM to WSLV only, while 9 (2%) persons had heterologous IgM to WSLV and two other flaviviruses, namely yellow fever and Uganda S viruses. There was a high prevalence of IgM in people of younger age groups than those in older groups. The majority of the IgM positive sera (67 (96%) of the 70 positive sera reacted to high titres (>21:80). With the conventional HI tests, 314 (70%) of the total sera tested had HI antibodies to one or more flaviviruses (yellow fever, West Nile, Potiskum, Zika and Uganda S) out of which 305/314 (97%) had antibodies to 3 or more flaviviruses used in the tests. Although SPIT may not be as sensitive as the conventional HI test, it was found to be more specific and could be adopted for the detection of early WSLV infections in flavivirus hyperendemic environments.

  18. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth by human papillomavirus virus-like particles packaged with human papillomavirus oncoprotein short hairpin RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousarghin, Latifa; Touze, Antoine; Gaud, Guillaume; Iochmann, Sophie; Alvarez, Eva; Reverdiau, Pascale; Gaitan, Julien; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Sizaret, Pierre-Yves; Coursaget, Pierre L

    2009-02-01

    Overexpression of human papillomavirus (HPV E6 and HPV E7) oncogenes in human cervical cells results in the development of cancer, and E6 and E7 proteins are therefore targets for preventing cervical cancer progression. Here, we describe the silencing of E6 and E7 expression in cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference. In order to increase the efficacy of the RNA interference, HPV pseudovirions coding for a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence were produced. The results indicated the degradation of E6 and E7 mRNAs when shRNA against E6 or E7 were delivered by pseudovirions in HPV-positive cells (CaSki and TC1 cells). E6 silencing resulted in the accumulation of cellular p53 and reduced cell viability. More significant cell death was observed when E7 expression was suppressed. Silencing E6 and E7 and the consequences for cancer cell growth were also investigated in vivo in mice using the capacity of murine TC1 cells expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes to induce fast-growing tumors. Treatment with lentiviruses and HPV virus-like particle vectors coding for an E7 shRNA sequence both resulted in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth. These results show the ability of pseudovirion-delivered shRNA to produce specific gene suppression and provide an effective means of reducing HPV-positive tumor growth.

  19. Study of the inhibition capacity of an 18-mer peptide domain of GBV-C virus on gp41-FP HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, I; Gómara, M J; Galatola, R; Domènech, O; Prat, J; Girona, V; Busquets, M A

    2011-06-01

    The peptide sequence (175-192) RFPFHRCGAGPKLTKDLE (P59) of the E2 envelope protein of GB virus C (GBV-C) has been proved to decrease cellular membrane fusion and interfere with the HIV-1 infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these previous results, the main objective of this study was to deepen in the physicochemical aspects involved in this interaction. First, we analyzed the surface activity of P59 at the air-water interface as well as its interaction with zwitterionic or negatively charged lipid monolayers. Then we performed the same experiments with mixtures of P59/gp41-FP. Studies on lipid monolayers helped us to understand the lipid-peptide interaction and the influence of phospholipids on peptide penetration into lipid media. On another hand, studies with lipid bilayers showed that P59 decreased gp41-FP binding to anionic Large Unilamellar Vesicles. Results can be attributed to the differences in morphology of the peptides, as observed by Atomic Force Microscopy. When P59 and gp41-FP were incubated together, annular structures of about 200 nm in diameter appeared on the mica surface, thus indicating a peptide-peptide interaction. All these results confirm the gp41-FP-P59 interaction and thus support the hypothesis that gp41-FP is inhibited by P59. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of sulodexide might be associated with inhibition of complement system in hepatitis B virus-associated membranous nephropathy: An inspiration from a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Lu; Wang, Chao; Kong, Deyang; Wang, YaPing; Mei, Changlin

    2016-07-01

    The activation of complement system is associated with the development of hepatitis B virus-associated membranous nephropathy (HBV-MN) and heparin could inhibit the activation of complement system. This was a three-center trial. Seventy-nine patients with HBV-MN participated in the study. The follow-up of the study consisted of two periods: Stage 1 (S1) and Stage 2 (S2). All patients received 0.5mg entecavir plus 150-300mg/day of irbesartan but sulodexide was prescribed during S1. They were randomized into 4 groups according to sulodexide dose: blank (Group 1), 250 lipasemic unit (lsu)/day for 1year (Group 2), 500 lsu/day for 1year (Group 3) and 1000 lsu/day for 6months followed by 250 lsu/day for 6months (Group 4). Major clinical outcomes were valid remission (VR): (1) urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) 50% decline of baseline; (2) albumin >35g/L; (3) glomerular filtration rate (GFR) >90ml/(min*1.73m(2)). (1) Groups 3 and 4 had significantly lower UACR and higher albumin than did Groups 1 and 2 at major visits; (2) Groups 3 and 4 achieved more VR compared with Group 1 (42.1% and 60.0% vs. 9.1%, p bothcomplement system. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Seroprevalence of the swine influenza virus in fattening pigs in Argentina in the 2002 season: evaluation by hemagglutination-inhibition and ELISA tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeyro, P E; Baumeister, E; Cappuccio, J A; Machuca, M A; Quiroga, M A; Tedoroff, T; Perfumo, C J

    2010-01-01

    The seroprevalence of the Influenza virus against H1N1 and H3N2 was determined by the hemagglutination-inhibition test (HI) and a commercial swine influenza ELISA kit, in 13 Argentinean swine herds. The results of within-herd and between-herd prevalence obtained by both tests were statistically correlated. The within-herd prevalence observed by the HI test varied from 38.46 to 100% against H1 and 7.69 to 100% for H3. When the within-herd prevalence was measured with the ELISA test, it varied from 2.33 to 6.9% for H1 and 9.65 to 48% for H3. No statistical differences were observed at herd level between HI and ELISA (H1: p = 0. 20; H3: p=0.11). No agreement between HI and ELISA detected prevalence was observed when the within-herd prevalence was compared (H1: 0.005; H3: 0.070), while the agreement at herd level was considered poor (H1: 0,350; H3: 0,235). The high within-herd prevalence values observed with the HI test and the high sensibility of this test might show that human strains or swine strains phylogenetically closely related to the humans strains used in the HI test in this study have been affecting the swine population since 2002.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and human DNA polymerase interactions with 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate analogues. Kinetics of incorporation into DNA and induction of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, J E

    1989-11-15

    The ability of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA polymerase, HeLa polymerase alpha, and HeLa polymerase beta to utilize several dGTP analogues has been investigated using a defined synthetic template primer. The relative efficiencies of the triphosphates of 9-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]guanine (acyclovir triphosphate, ACVTP), 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine (ganciclovir triphosphate, DHPGTP), and 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine (ddGTP) as substrates for the three polymerases were: HSV-1 polymerase, dGTP greater than ACVTP approximately equal to DHPGTP greater than ddGTP; polymerase alpha, dGTP greater than ACVTP approximately equal to DHPGTP much greater than ddGTP; polymerase beta, ddGTP greater than dGTP much greater than ACVTP approximately equal to DHPGTP. The potent inhibition of HSV-1 polymerase by ACVTP has been shown previously to be due to the formation of a dead-end complex upon binding of the next 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate encoded by the template after incorporation of acyclovir monophosphate into the 3' end of the primer (Reardon, J. E., and Spector, T. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 7405-7411). This mechanism was shown here to be a general mechanism for inhibition of polymerases by the obligate chain terminators, ACVTP and ddGTP. The ACVTP-induced inhibition was 30-fold more potent with HSV-1 polymerase than with polymerase alpha. This difference may contribute to the antiviral selectivity of this nucleotide analogue. The effect of ganciclovir monophosphate incorporation (a nonobligate chain terminator) on subsequent primer extension was also evaluated. With HSV-1 polymerase and polymerase alpha, although there was a considerable reduction in the efficiency of utilization of the 3'-DHPGMP-terminal primer, contrasting kinetic behavior was observed. With HSV-1 polymerase, insertion of DHPGTP resulted in a significant reduction in Vmax for subsequent nucleotide incorporations. In contrast, with polymerase alpha, a relatively small decrease in

  3. An alpha-helical domain within the carboxyl terminus of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is associated with cell fusion and resistance to heparin inhibition of cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T P; Melancon, J M; Kousoulas, K G

    2001-08-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that a 28-amino-acid carboxyl-terminal truncation of gB caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion (Baghian et al., 1993, J Virol 67, 2396-2401). We tested the ability of additional truncations and mutations within gB to cause cell fusion in the recently established virus-free cell fusion assay (Turner et al., 1998, J. Virol. 72, 873-875). Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB (gBDelta28), which removed part of the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b, caused extensive cell fusion. A gB truncation specified by gBDelta36, which removed the entire H17b domain, caused as much cell fusion as the gBDelta28 truncation. Similarly, gB(A874P) containing a substitution of an Ala with Pro within H17b caused cell fusion. Heparin, a gB-specific inhibitor of virus-induced cell fusion, inhibited both wild-type gB and gB(syn3)-mediated cell fusion. In contrast, fusion of cells transfected with gB(Delta28), gB(Delta36), or gB(A874P) was resistant to heparin inhibition of cell fusion. We concluded the following: (1) The predicted alpha-helical structure of H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB is involved in both virus-induced and virus-free cell fusion. (2) Heparin is a specific inhibitor of gB-mediated fusion in both systems. (3) Resistance to heparin inhibition of gB-mediated cell fusion is associated with the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. The inhibition of cultured myoblast differentiation by the simian virus 40 large T antigen occurs after myogenin expression and Rb up-regulation and is not exerted by transformation-competent cytoplasmic mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Tedesco, D; Caruso, M; Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism by which the simian virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT) interferes with the differentiation of C2 myoblasts. SVLT mutants, defective either in the Rb binding site, near the N-terminal end, in a region that affects binding to p53, or in the nuclear transport signal, were also employed to determine whether the interference was especially dependent on these functional domains. It was found that wild-type (wt) SVLT strongly inhibited the terminal differentiation of ...

  5. Nipah and Hendra Virus Nucleoproteins Inhibit Nuclear Accumulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 by Interfering with Their Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Takayama, Ikuyo; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2017-11-01

    Henipaviruses, such as Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses, are highly pathogenic zoonotic agents within the Paramyxoviridae family. The phosphoprotein (P) gene products of the paramyxoviruses have been well characterized for their interferon (IFN) antagonist activity and their contribution to viral pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrated that the nucleoprotein (N) of henipaviruses also prevents the host IFN signaling response. Reporter assays demonstrated that the NiV and HeV N proteins (NiV-N and HeV-N, respectively) dose-dependently suppressed both type I and type II IFN responses and that the inhibitory effect was mediated by their core domains. Additionally, NiV-N prevented the nuclear transport of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2. However, NiV-N did not associate with Impα5, Impβ1, or Ran, which are members of the nuclear transport system for STATs. Although P protein is known as a binding partner of N protein and actively retains N protein in the cytoplasm, the IFN antagonist activity of N protein was not abolished by the coexpression of P protein. This suggests that the IFN inhibition by N protein occurs in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the complex formation of STATs was hampered in the N protein-expressing cells. As a result, STAT nuclear accumulation was reduced, causing a subsequent downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) due to low promoter occupancy by STAT complexes. This novel route for preventing host IFN responses by henipavirus N proteins provides new insight into the pathogenesis of these viruses. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are well known for suppressing interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity with their phosphoprotein (P) gene products, and the henipaviruses also possess P, V, W, and C proteins for evading host antiviral responses. There are numerous studies providing evidence for the relationship between viral pathogenicity and antagonistic activities against IFN

  6. Nuclear factor-kappa B family member RelB inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 Tat-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kiebala

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND is likely neuroinflammatory in origin, believed to be triggered by inflammatory and oxidative stress responses to cytokines and HIV protein gene products such as the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat. Here we demonstrate increased messenger RNA for nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB family member, transcription factor RelB, in the brain of doxycycline-induced Tat transgenic mice, and increased RelB synthesis in Tat-exposed microglial cells. Since genetic ablation of RelB in mice leads to multi-organ inflammation, we hypothesized that Tat-induced, newly synthesized RelB inhibits cytokine production by microglial cells, possibly through the formation of transcriptionally inactive RelB/RelA complexes. Indeed, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha production in monocytes isolated from RelB deficient mice was significantly higher than in monocytes isolated from RelB expressing controls. Moreover, RelB overexpression in microglial cells inhibited Tat-induced TNFalpha synthesis in a manner that involved transcriptional repression of the TNFalpha promoter, and increased phosphorylation of RelA at serine 276, a prerequisite for increased RelB/RelA protein interactions. The Rel-homology-domain within RelB was necessary for this interaction. Overexpression of RelA itself, in turn, significantly increased TNFalpha promoter activity, an effect that was completely blocked by RelB overexpression. We conclude that RelB regulates TNFalpha cytokine synthesis by competitive interference binding with RelA, which leads to downregulation of TNFalpha production. Moreover, because Tat activates both RelB and TNFalpha in microglia, and because Tat induces inflammatory TNFalpha synthesis via NF-kappaB, we posit that RelB serves as a cryoprotective, anti-inflammatory, counter-regulatory mechanism for pathogenic NF-kappaB activation. These findings identify a novel regulatory pathway for

  7. A novel rapid direct haemagglutination-inhibition assay for measurements of humoral immune response against non-haemagglutinating Fowlpox virus strains in vaccinated chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon N. Wambura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fowlpox (FP is a serious disease in chickens caused by Fowlpox virus (FPV. One method currently used to control FPV is vaccination followed by confirmation that antibody titres are protective using the indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA. The direct haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is not done because most FPV strains do not agglutinate chicken red blood cells (RBCs. A novel FPV strain TPV-1 which agglutinates chicken RBCs was discovered recently and enabled a direct HI assay to be conducted using homologous sera. This study is therefore aimed at assessing the direct HI assay using a recently discovered novel haemagglutinating FPV strain TPV-1 in chickens vaccinated with a commercial vaccine containing a non-haemagglutinating FPV.Chicks vaccinated with FPV at 1 day-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT of log2 3.7 at 7 days after vaccination and log2 8.0 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. Chickens vaccinated at 6 weeks-old had antibody geometric mean titres (GMT of log2 5.0 at 7 days after vaccination and log2 8.4 at 28 days after vaccination when tested in the direct HI. The GMT recorded 28 days after vaccination was slightly higher in chickens vaccinated at 6-week-old than in chicks vaccinated at one-day-old. However, this difference was not significant (P > 0.05. All vaccinated chickens showed “takes”. No antibody response to FPV and “takes” were detected in unvaccinated chickens (GMT 0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a simple and rapid direct HI assay using the FPV TPV-1 strain as antigen may be used to measure antibody levels in chickens vaccinated with non-haemagglutinating strains of FPV, and that the titres are comparable to those obtained by indirect IHA. Keywords: Veterinary medicine, Veterinary science, Vaccines, Immunology, Zoology

  8. Hydrolyzable Tannins (Chebulagic Acid and Punicalagin) Target Viral Glycoprotein-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions To Inhibit Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Entry and Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S.; Grindley, T. Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues. PMID:21307190

  9. Hydrolyzable tannins (chebulagic acid and punicalagin) target viral glycoprotein-glycosaminoglycan interactions to inhibit herpes simplex virus 1 entry and cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S; Grindley, T Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues.

  10. Non-hydrolyzed in digestive tract and blood natural L-carnosine peptide ("bioactivated Jewish penicillin") as a panacea of tomorrow for various flu ailments: signaling activity attenuating nitric oxide (NO) production, cytostasis, and NO-dependent inhibition of influenza virus replication in macrophages in the human body infected with the virulent swine influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2013-01-01

    in excessive amounts mediate the overreaction of the host's immune response against the organs or tissues in which viruses are replicating, and this may explain the mechanism of tissue injuries observed in influenza virus infection of various types. In this article, the types of protection of carnosine in its bioavailable non-hydrolyzed forms in formulations are considered against reactive oxygen radical species-dependent injury, peroxynitrite damage, and other types of viral injuries in which impaired immune responses to viral pathogens are usually involved. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) shows the pharmacological intracellular correction of NO release, which might be one of the important factors of natural immunity in controlling the initial stages of influenza A virus infection (inhibition of virus replication) and virus-induced regulation of cytokine gene expression. The protective effects of orally applied non-hydrolyzed formulated species of carnosine include at least the direct interaction with NO, inhibition of cytotoxic NO-induced proinflammatory condition, and attenuation of the effects of cytokines and chemokines that can exert profound effects on inflammatory cells. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that natural products, such as chicken soup and chicken breast extracts rich in carnosine and its derivative anserine (β-alanyl-1-methyl-L-histidine), could contribute to the pathogenesis and prevention of influenza virus infections and cold but have a limitation due to the susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis of dipeptides with serum carnosinase and urine excretion after oral ingestion of a commercial chicken extract. The formulations of non-hydrolyzed in digestive tract and blood natural carnosine peptide and isopeptide (γ-glutamyl-carnosine) products, manufactured at the cGMP-certified facility and patented by the authors, have promise in the control and prevention of influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, cough, and cold.

  11. Inhibition of rabies virus multiplication by siRNA delivered through adenoviral vector in vitro in BHK-21 cells and in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Arvind A; Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Chaturvedi, V K; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate antiviral potential of adenoviral vector-delivered small interfering RNA (siRNA) against rabies, recombinant, replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAdV) encoding siRNAs targeting rabies virus (RV) polymerase (L) and nucleoprotein (N) genes were developed. The siRNAs were delivered as small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) through these vectors. Treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV expressing siRNA targeting L gene (rAdV-L) and N gene (rAdV-N) (100 MOI) and their subsequent infection with RV (0.001 MOI, RV PV-11), reduced RV fluorescent foci by 48.2% (mean±SEM; 48.17±0.6540, N=6) and 41.8% (mean±SEM; 41.83±0.3073, N=6), respectively, with respect to that of BHK-21 cells treated with rAdV expressing negative control siRNA (rAdV-Neg) indicating inhibition of multiplication of RV in BHK-21 cells in response to adenoviral vector mediated siRNA delivery. Also, the similar treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV-L and rAdV-N and similar subsequent infection of them with RV resulted in reduction