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Sample records for virulent bacteria effects

  1. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  2. Effect of Punica granatum on the virulence factors of cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulube, Zandiswa; Patel, Mrudula

    2016-09-01

    Dental caries is caused by acids produced by biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans from fermentable carbohydrates and bacterial byproducts. Control of these bacteria is important in the prevention of dental caries. This study investigated the effect of the fruit peel of Punica granatum on biofilm formation, acid and extracellular polysaccharides production (EPS) by S. mutans. Pomegranate fruit peels crude extracts were prepared. The Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined against S. mutans. At 3 sub-bactericidal concentrations, the effect on the acid production, biofilm formation and EPS production was determined. The results were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Tests. The lowest MBC was 6.25 mg/mL. Punica granatum significantly inhibited acid production (p mutans. The crude extract of P. granatum killed cariogenic S. mutans at high concentrations. At sub-bactericidal concentrations, it reduced biofilm formation, acid and EPS production. This suggests that P. granatum extract has the potential to prevent dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins.

  4. Virulence of entomopathogenic bacteria in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Jose E; Liang, Dangsheng

    2017-10-24

    Due in part to the development of insecticide resistance, the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has overcome human intervention efforts to make a global resurgence. The failure of chemical pesticides has created a need for novel strategies to combat bed bugs. While a number of insect pests are susceptible to the use of entomopathogenic microbes or microbial-derived toxins, biological control methods have not been thoroughly explored in bed bugs. Here, we tested the virulence of three entomopathogenic bacterial species in C. lectularius to determine their potential for bed bug control. We examined bed bug survival after inoculation with live or heat-killed Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis at varying temperatures. We also analyzed the viability and growth of the same bacteria in infected bed bugs. All three bacterial species were pathogenic to bed bugs. However, the effects of S. marcescens and P. fluorescens were temperature-dependent while the lethality of B. thuringiensis israelensis was not. In addition, bacterial virulence was partly dependent on the route of infection but was not strongly associated with proliferation. Thus, our results suggest multiple possible mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity in the bed bug and indicate that entomopathogenic bacteria, or products derived from them, may have useful applications for bed bug control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Specific and functional diversity of endophytic bacteria from pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus with different virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Yuan, Wei-Min; Tian, Xiao-Jing; Fan, Ben; Fang, Xin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Ding, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the most devastating diseases of Pinus spp. The PWN was therefore listed as one of the most dangerous forest pests in China meriting quarantine. Virulence of the PWN is closely linked with the spread of PWD. However, main factors responsible for the virulence of PWNs are still unclear. Recently epiphytic bacteria carried by PWNs have drawn much attention. But little is known about the relationship between endophytic bacteria and virulence of B. xylophilus. In this research, virulence of ten strains of B. xylophilus from different geographical areas in six provinces of China and four pine species were tested with 2-year-old seedlings of Pinus thunbergii. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from PWNs with different virulence to investigate the relationship between the bacteria and PWN virulence. Meanwhile, the carbon metabolism of endophytic bacteria from highly and low virulent B. xylophilus was analyzed using Biolog plates (ECO). The results indicated that ten strains of PWNs showed a wide range of virulence. Simultaneously, endophytic bacteria were isolated from 90% of the B. xylophilus strains. The dominant endophytic bacteria in the nematodes were identified as species of Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, Ewingella, Leifsonia, Rhizobium, and Pseudomonas using molecular and biochemical methods. Moreover, S. maltophilia, and A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans were the predominant strains. Most of the strains (80%) from P. massoniana contained either S. maltophilia, A. xylosoxidans, or both species. There was a difference between the abilities of the endophytic bacteria to utilize carbon sources. Endophytic bacteria from highly virulent B. xylophilus had a relatively high utilization rate of carbohydrate and carboxylic acids, while bacteria from low virulent B. xylophilus made better use of amino acids. In conclusion, endophytic bacteria widely exist in B. xylophilus

  6. Structure of PlcR: Insights into virulence regulation and evolution of quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Declerck, Nathalie; Bouillaut, Laurent; Chaix, Denis; Rugani, Nathalie; Slamti, Leyla; Hoh, François; Lereclus, Didier; Arold, Stefan T.

    2007-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria use a wealth of extracellular signaling peptides, so-called autoinducers, to regulate gene expression according to population densities. These “quorum sensing” systems control vital processes such as virulence, sporulation, and gene transfer. Using x-ray analysis, we determined the structure of PlcR, the major virulence regulator of the Bacillus cereus group, and obtained mechanistic insights into the effects of autoinducer binding. Our structural and phylogenetic analy...

  7. Antibiotics resistance phenomenon and virulence ability in bacteria from water environment

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    Mohamed I. Azzam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the impact of five main drains as sources of antibiotics resistant bacteria in River Nile at Rosetta branch, and to generate a baseline data on their virulence ability. Out of 212 bacterial isolates, 39.2% and 60.8% were recovered from drains and Rosetta branch, respectively. Susceptibility of bacteria to different antibiotics showed multiple antibiotics resistances (MAR for the majority of isolates. Meanwhile, sensitivity was mostly directed to ofloxacin and norfloxacin antibiotics. Calculated MAR index values (>0.25 classified area of study as potentially health risk environment. Testing virulence ability of bacteria from drains showed positive results (65%. Contrastively, virulent strains in Rosetta branch were mostly lacking in this study. Concluding remarks justify the strong correlation (r = +0.82 between MAR and virulence of bacteria in polluted aquatic ecosystems, and highlight the potential of drains as reactors for their amplification and dissemination. The study suggests regular monitoring for antibiotics resistance in native bacteria of River Nile, prohibition of unregulated use of antibiotics, and proper management for wastes disposal.

  8. P-Ser-HPr-a link between carbon metabolism and the virulence of some pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    HPr kinase/phosphorylase phosphorylates HPr, a phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, at serine-46. P-Ser-HPr is the central regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria, but also plays a role in virulence development of certain...

  9. Eugenol in combination with lactic acid bacteria attenuates Listeria monocytogenes virulence in vitro and in invertebrate model Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human enteric pathogen that causes severe foodborne illness in high-risk populations. Crossing the intestinal barrier is the first critical step for Listeria monocytogenes infection. Therefore, reducing L. monocytogenes colonization and invasion of intestinal epithelium and production of virulence factors could potentially control listeriosis in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentration (SIC) of the plant-derived antimicrobial eugenol, either alone, or in combination with five lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely Bifidobacterium bifidum (NRRL-B41410), Lactobacillus reuteri (B-14172), Lactobacillus fermentum (B-1840), Lactobacillus plantarum (B-4496) and Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis (B-633) in reducing Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Additionally, the effect of the aforementioned treatments on Listeria monocytogenes listeriolysin production, epithelial E-cadherin binding and expression of virulence genes was investigated. Moreover, the in vivo efficacy of eugenol-LAB treatments in reducing Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the invertebrate model Galleria mellonella was studied. Eugenol and LAB, either alone or in combination, significantly reduced Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of intestinal cells (P Listeria monocytogenes haemolysin production, E-cadherin binding and virulence gene expression (P Listeria monocytogenes (P < 0.05). The results highlight the antilisterial effect of eugenol either alone or in combination with LAB, and justify further investigations in a mammalian model.

  10. Penicillin V acylases from gram-negative bacteria degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones and attenuate virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunder, Avinash Vellore; Utari, Putri Dwi; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; van Merkerk, Ronald; Quax, Wim J.; Pundle, Archana

    Virulence pathways in gram-negative pathogenic bacteria are regulated by quorum sensing mechanisms, through the production and sensing of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Enzymatic degradation of AHLs leading to attenuation of virulence (quorum quenching) could pave the way for the

  11. Virulence blockers as alternatives to antibiotics: type III secretion inhibitors against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, P; Elofsson, M; Rosell, S; Wolf-Watz, H

    2008-07-01

    In recent years mounting problems related to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have resulted in the prediction that we are entering the preantibiotic era. A way of preventing such a development would be to introduce novel antibacterial medicines with modes of action distinct from conventional antibiotics. Recent studies of bacterial virulence factors and toxins have resulted in increased understanding of the way in which pathogenic bacteria manipulate host cellular processes. This knowledge may now be used to develop novel antibacterial medicines that disarm pathogenic bacteria. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is known to be a potent virulence mechanism shared by a broad spectrum of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria that interact with human, animal and plant hosts by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Diseases, such as bubonic plague, shigellosis, salmonellosis, typhoid fever, pulmonary infections, sexually transmitted chlamydia and diarrhoea largely depend on the bacterial proteins injected by the T3SS machinery. Recently a number of T3SS inhibitors have been identified using screening-based approaches. One class of inhibitors, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been subjected to chemical optimization and evaluation in several in vitro and ex vivo assays in multiple bacterial species including Yersinia spp., Chlamydia spp., Salmonella spp. and Pseudotuberculosis aeruginosa. Reports published up to date indicate that T3SS inhibitors have the potential to be developed into novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  12. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

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    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  13. Effects of plant antimicrobial phenolic compounds on virulence of the genus Pectobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium spp. are among the most devastating necrotrophs, attacking more than 50% of angiosperm plant orders. Their virulence strategy is based mainly on the secretion of exoenzymes that degrade the cell walls of their hosts, providing nutrients to the bacteria, but conversely, exposing the bacteria to plant defense compounds. In the present study, we screened plant-derived antimicrobial compounds, mainly phenolic acids and polyphenols, for their ability to affect virulence determinants including motility, biofilm formation and extracellular enzyme activities of different Pectobacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum, P. brasiliensis, P. atrosepticum and P. aroidearum. In addition, virulence assays were performed on three different plant hosts following exposure of the bacteria to selected phenolic compounds. These experiments showed that cinnamic, coumaric, syringic and salicylic acids and catechol can considerably reduce disease severity, ranging from 20 to 100%. The reduced disease severity was not only the result of reduced bacterial growth, but also of a direct effect of the compounds on important bacterial virulence determinants, including pectolytic and proteolytic exoenzyme activities, that were reduced by 50-100%. This is the first report revealing a direct effect of phenolic compounds on virulence factors in a wide range of Pectobacterium strains. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of the phytopathogenic effect for studies of Burkholderia virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, E V; Ageeva, N P

    2015-02-01

    The phytopathogenic effect of the pseudomallei group Burkholderia is demonstrated on the Peireskia aculeata model. A method for evaluation of the effect is suggested. The effect correlates with the levels of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia thailandensis virulence for laboratory animals. P. aculeata can be used as a model for preliminary studies of the virulence of the above species.

  15. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-05-07

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  16. Effect of photodynamic therapy on the virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Maria eBartolomeu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium who integrates the human microbiota. Nevertheless, these bacteria can be pathogenic to the humans. Due to the increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus strains, new approaches to control this pathogen are necessary. The antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI process is based in the combined use of light, oxygen and an intermediary agent (a photosensitizer. These three components interact to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that irreversibly damage vital constituents of the microbial cells and ultimately lead to cell death. Although PDI is being shown to be a promising alternative to the antibiotic approach for the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms, information on effects of photosensitization on particular virulence factors is strikingly scarce. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of PDI on virulence factors of S. aureus and to assess the potential development of resistance of this bacterium as well as the recovery of the expression of the virulence factors after successive PDI cycles. For this, the photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-ylporphyrin tetra-iodide (Tetra-Py+-Me and six strains of S. aureus (one reference strain, one strain with 1 enterotoxin, two strains with 3 enterotoxins and two strains methicillin resistant (MRSA – one with 5 enterotoxins and the other without enterotoxins were used. The effect of photosensitization on catalase activity, beta hemolysis, lipases, thermonuclease, enterotoxins, coagulase production and resistance/susceptibility to methicillin was tested. To assess the development of resistance after successive cycles of treatment, three strains of S. aureus (ATCC 6538, 2065 MA and SA 3 MRSA were used. The surviving colonies of a first cycle of PDI were collected from the solid medium and subjected to further nine consecutive cycles of PDI. The results indicate that the expression of some

  17. Whole-genome comparative analysis of virulence genes unveils similarities and differences between endophytes and other symbiotic bacteria

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    Sebastian eLòpez-Fernàndez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens and endophytes co-exist and often interact with the host plant and within its microbial community. The outcome of these interactions may lead to healthy plants through beneficial interactions, or to disease through the inducible production of molecules known as virulence factors. Unravelling the role of virulence in endophytes may crucially improve our understanding of host-associated microbial communities and their correlation with host health.Virulence is the outcome of a complex network of interactions, and drawing the line between pathogens and endophytes has proven to be conflictive, as strain-level differences in niche overlapping, ecological interactions, state of the host’s immune system and environmental factors are seldom taken into account. Defining genomic differences between endophytes and plant pathogens is decisive for understanding the boundaries between these two groups. Here we describe the major differences at the genomic level between seven grapevine endophytic test bacteria, and twelve reference strains. We describe the virulence factors detected in the genomes of the test group, as compared to endophytic and non-endophytic references, to better understand the distribution of these traits in endophytic genomes. To do this, we adopted a comparative whole-genome approach, encompassing BLAST-based searches through the GUI-based tools Mauve and BRIG as well as calculating the core and accessory genomes of three genera of enterobacteria. We outline divergences in metabolic pathways of these endophytes and reference strains, with the aid of the online platform RAST. We present a summary of the major differences that help in the drawing of the boundaries between harmless and harmful bacteria, in the spirit of contributing to a microbiological definition of endophyte.

  18. Altered virulence potential of Salmonella Enteritidis cultured in different foods: A cumulative effect of differential gene expression and immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sangeeta; Sahoo, Prakash Kumar; Ryan, Daniel; Das, Jugal Kishore; Chakraborty, Eesha; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-08-02

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most common causes of food borne illness. Bacterial growth environment plays an important role in regulating gene expression thereby affecting the virulence profile of the bacteria. Different foods present diverse growth conditions which may affect the pathogenic potential of the bacteria. In the present study, the effect of food environments on the pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis has been evaluated. S. Enteritidis was grown in different foods e.g. egg white, peanut butter and milk, and virulent phenotypes were compared to those grown in Luria Bertani broth. In-vivo experiments in C57BL/6 mice revealed S. Enteritidis grown in egg white did not induce significant (panalysis revealed SPI-1 effectors were downregulated in bacteria grown in egg white. Interestingly, bacteria grown in egg white showed reversal of phenotype upon change in growth media to LB. Additionally, bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter showed different degrees of virulence in mice as compared to those grown in LB media. Thus, the present study demonstrates that, S. Enteritidis grown in egg white colonizes systemic sites without causing colitis in a mouse model, while bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter show different pathogenicity profiles suggesting that food environments significantly affect the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of dietary monosaccharides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ryan K; Poroyko, Valeriy; Morowitz, Michael J; Liu, Don; Alverdy, John C

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic, gram-negative pathogen associated with many hospital-acquired infections and disease states. In particular, P. aeruginosa has been identified as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). This condition presents more frequently in infants fed a formula-based diet, which may be a result of the specific monosaccharide content of this diet. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa would express virulence genes differentially when exposed to monosaccharides present in formula versus those in human milk. Using the results of a metabolomics study on infant diets and their resulting fecal samples, we identified several monosaccharides that distinguished milk from formula diets. Of these compounds, four were found to be metabolized by P. aeruginosa. We subsequently grew P. aeruginosa in tryptic soy broth (TSB) supplemented with these four monosaccharides and used quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to measure the expression of 59 major P. aeruginosa virulence genes. The results were standardized to an external control of P. aeruginosa grown in TSB alone. P. aeruginosa did not respond differentially to the monosaccharides after 6 h of growth. However, after 24 h, the organism grown in arabinose (present in formula), xylose (present in human milk), and galactose (present in both formula and feces from milk-fed infants) displayed a significant increase in the expression of virulence genes in all categories. In contrast, P. aeruginosa grown in mannose (present in the feces of milk-fed infants) displayed a significant decrease in virulence gene expression. These results demonstrate the importance of nutrient content on the relative expression of virulence genes in pathogens that colonize commonly the gut of infants. Understanding the effect of current dietary formulas on virulence gene expression in various gut-colonizing pathogens may present a new approach to elucidating the

  20. Can Clays in Livestock Feed Promote Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Pathogenic Bacteria?

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    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry has long been associated with the appearance of antibiotic resistance and virulence factor determinants. Nonetheless, the number of cases of human infection involving resistant or virulent microorganisms that originate in farms is increasing. While many antibiotics have been banned as dietary supplements in some countries, other additives thought to be innocuous in terms of the development and spread of antibiotic resistance are used as growth promoters. In fact, several clay materials are routinely added to animal feed with the aim of improving growth and animal product quality. However, recent findings suggest that sepiolite, a clay additive, mediates the direct transfer of plasmids between different bacterial species. We therefore hypothesize that clays present in animal feed facilitate the horizontal transfer of resistance determinants in the digestive tract of farm animals.

  1. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

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    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Epigallocatechin gallate against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei; Tan, Kai Soo

    2015-03-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant polyphenol in green tea (Camellia sinesis) has been shown to exert antimicrobial effects on numerous bacterial pathogens. However its efficacy against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm, which is associated with persistent root canal infection is unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of EGCG against E. faecalis biofilm and virulence. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of EGCG on E. faecalis were determined. The efficacy of EGCG on E. faecalis biofilms was tested by exposing 7-day old E. faecalis biofilm to EGCG. Flow cytometry analysis of hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) labelled E. faecalis was used to determine if EGCG induced intracellular hydroxyl radical formation. Co-treatment of EGCG with the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl (DIP) was carried out to determine if hydroxyl radical generated through Fenton reaction played a role in EGCG-mediated killing of E. faecalis. Furthermore, the effects of EGCG on the expression of virulence genes in E. faecalis were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGCG exhibited a MIC and MBC of 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL respectively and effectively eradicated E. faecalis biofilms. EGCG induced the formation of hydroxyl radicals in E. faecalis. The addition of DIP protected E. faecalis against EGCG-mediated antibacterial effects. At sub-MIC, EGCG induced significant down-regulation of E. faecalis virulence genes. EGCG is an effective antimicrobial agent against both the planktonic and biofilm forms of E. faecalis, inhibiting bacterial growth and suppressing the expression of specific genes related to virulence and biofilm formation. The antimicrobial action of EGCG on E. faecalis occurred through the generation of hydroxyl radical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of common urinary bacteria from asymptomatic students of Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

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    Adebola Onanuga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asymptomatic bacteriuria frequently occurs among all ages with the possibility of developing into urinary tract infections, and the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the etiologic organisms are essential for appropriate therapy. Thus, we investigated the virulence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of common urinary bacteria in asymptomatic students of Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria in a cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Clean catch mid-stream early morning urine samples collected from 200 asymptomatic University students of aged ranges 15–30 years were cultured, screened and common bacteria were identified using standard microbiological procedures. The isolates were screened for hemolysin production and their susceptibility to antibiotics was determined using standard disc assay method. Results: A total prevalence rate of 52.0% significant bacteriuria was detected and it was significantly higher among the female with a weak association (χ2 = 6.01, phi = 0.173, P = 0.014. The Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus isolates were most frequently encountered among the isolated bacteria and 18 (12.7% of all the bacterial isolates produced hemolysins. All the bacterial isolates exhibited 50–100% resistance to the tested beta-lactam antibiotics, tetracycline and co-trimoxazole. The isolated bacteria were 85-100% multi-drug resistant. However, most of the isolates were generally susceptible to gentamicin and ofloxacin. The phenotypic detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases was 9 (9.6% among the tested Gram-negative bacterial isolates. Conclusions: The observed high proportions of multidrug resistant urinary bacteria among asymptomatic University students call for the need of greater control of antibiotic use in this study area.

  4. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

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    Iqbal Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%, total protease (56%, pyocyanin (89%, chitinase (55%, exopolysaccharide production (58% and swarming motility (74% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82% over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    N’Diaye, Awa R.; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence. PMID:27739485

  6. The Role of CRISPR-Cas Systems in Virulence of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staals, Raymond H. J.; Endtz, Hubert P.; van Baarlen, Peter; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes are present in many bacterial and archaeal genomes. Since the discovery of the typical CRISPR loci in the 1980s, well before their physiological role was revealed, their variable sequences have been used as a complementary typing tool in diagnostic, epidemiologic, and evolutionary analyses of prokaryotic strains. The discovery that CRISPR spacers are often identical to sequence fragments of mobile genetic elements was a major breakthrough that eventually led to the elucidation of CRISPR-Cas as an adaptive immunity system. Key elements of this unique prokaryotic defense system are small CRISPR RNAs that guide nucleases to complementary target nucleic acids of invading viruses and plasmids, generally followed by the degradation of the invader. In addition, several recent studies have pointed at direct links of CRISPR-Cas to regulation of a range of stress-related phenomena. An interesting example concerns a pathogenic bacterium that possesses a CRISPR-associated ribonucleoprotein complex that may play a dual role in defense and/or virulence. In this review, we describe recently reported cases of potential involvement of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacterial stress responses in general and bacterial virulence in particular. PMID:24600041

  7. Antimicrobial Effects of Blueberry, Raspberry, and Strawberry Aqueous Extracts and their Effects on Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Hazim O; Kamimoto, Maki; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial effects of aqueous extracts of blueberry, raspberry, and strawberry on 13 pathogenic bacteria were evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the extracts were determined before and after neutralization to pH 7.03 ± 0.15. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria were selectively inhibited by the non-neutralized berries. Blueberry was the best inhibitor, and Vibrio and Listeria were the most sensitive bacteria. After neutralization, blueberry affected only Vibrio and Listeria, whereas the antimicrobial activities of raspberry and strawberry were abolished. The total contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins in the extracts were measured with colorimetric methods and were highest in strawberry, followed by raspberry, and then blueberry. We also studied the effects of sub-bactericidal concentrations of the three berry extracts on virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the three berry extracts effectively repressed the transcription of the tcpA gene. Raspberry also repressed the transcription of the ctxA gene, whereas blueberry and strawberry did not. However, the three berry extracts did not affect the transcription of toxT. These results suggest that the three berry extracts exert potent antimicrobial effects and inhibit the expression of the virulence factors of V. cholerae. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lipoproteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria: Key Players in the Immune Response and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Thu; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery in 1973 of the first of the bacterial lipoproteins (Lpp) in Escherichia coli, Braun's lipoprotein, the ever-increasing number of publications indicates the importance of these proteins. Bacterial Lpp belong to the class of lipid-anchored proteins that in Gram-negative bacteria are anchored in both the cytoplasmic and outer membranes and in Gram-positive bacteria are anchored only in the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast to the case for Gram-negative bacteria, in Gram-positive bacteria lipoprotein maturation and processing are not vital. Physiologically, Lpp play an important role in nutrient and ion acquisition, allowing particularly pathogenic species to better survive in the host. Bacterial Lpp are recognized by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) of the innate immune system. The important role of Lpp in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly in the phylum Firmicutes, as key players in the immune response and pathogenicity has emerged only in recent years. In this review, we address the role of Lpp in signaling and modulating the immune response, in inflammation, and in pathogenicity. We also address the potential of Lpp as promising vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Sialic acid mediated transcriptional modulation of a highly conserved sialometabolism gene cluster in Haemophilus influenzae and its effect on virulence

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    Moxon Richard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acid has been shown to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of otitis media caused by the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae. This study aimed to characterise the expression of genes required for the metabolism of sialic acid and to investigate the role of these genes in virulence. Results Using qRT-PCR, we observed decreased transcriptional activity of genes within a cluster that are required for uptake and catabolism of 5-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac, when bacteria were cultured in the presence of the sugar. We show that these uptake and catabolic genes, including a sialic acid regulatory gene (siaR, are highly conserved in the H. influenzae natural population. Mutant strains were constructed for seven of the nine genes and their influence upon LPS sialylation and resistance of the bacteria to the killing effect of normal human serum were assessed. Mutations in the Neu5Ac uptake (TRAP transporter genes decreased virulence in the chinchilla model of otitis media, but the attenuation was strain dependent. In contrast, mutations in catabolism genes and genes regulating sialic acid metabolism (siaR and crp did not attenuate virulence. Conclusion The commensal and pathogenic behaviour of H. influenzae involves LPS sialylation that can be influenced by a complex regulatory interplay of sialometabolism genes.

  10. Resuscitation effects of catalase on airborne bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Shaffer, B T; Lighthart, B; Ganio, L

    1991-01-01

    Catalase incorporation into enumeration media caused a significant increase (greater than 63%) in the colony-forming abilities of airborne bacteria. Incubation for 30 to 60 min of airborne bacteria in collection fluid containing catalase caused a greater than 95% increase in colony-forming ability. However, catalase did not have any effects on enumeration at high relative humidities (80 to 90%).

  11. Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in Pakistan. H Bux, M Ashraf, X Chen, S Mumtaz. Abstract. Virulence patterns of wheat stripe rust were studied under the field conditions across four environmentally different locations: Quaid-i-Azam University (Islamabad), Pirsabak ...

  12. Effects of contact structure on the transient evolution of HIV virulence.

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    Sang Woo Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Early in an epidemic, high densities of susceptible hosts select for relatively high parasite virulence; later in the epidemic, lower susceptible densities select for lower virulence. Thus over the course of a typical epidemic the average virulence of parasite strains increases initially, peaks partway through the epidemic, then declines again. However, precise quantitative outcomes, such as the peak virulence reached and its timing, may depend sensitively on epidemiological details. Fraser et al. proposed a model for the eco-evolutionary dynamics of HIV that incorporates the tradeoffs between transmission and virulence (mediated by set-point viral load, SPVL and their heritability between hosts. Their model used implicit equations to capture the effects of partnership dynamics that are at the core of epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases. Our models combine HIV virulence tradeoffs with a range of contact models, explicitly modeling partnership formation and dissolution and allowing for individuals to transmit disease outside of partnerships. We assess summary statistics such as the peak virulence (corresponding to the maximum value of population mean log10 SPVL achieved throughout the epidemic across models for a range of parameters applicable to the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Although virulence trajectories are broadly similar across models, the timing and magnitude of the virulence peak vary considerably. Previously developed implicit models predicted lower virulence and slower progression at the peak (a maximum of 3.5 log10 SPVL compared both to more realistic models and to simple random-mixing models with no partnership structure at all (both with a maximum of ≈ 4.7 log10 SPVL. In this range of models, the simplest random-mixing structure best approximates the most realistic model; this surprising outcome occurs because the dominance of extra-pair contact in the realistic model swamps the effects of partnership structure.

  13. Effects of contact structure on the transient evolution of HIV virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Woo; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2017-03-01

    Early in an epidemic, high densities of susceptible hosts select for relatively high parasite virulence; later in the epidemic, lower susceptible densities select for lower virulence. Thus over the course of a typical epidemic the average virulence of parasite strains increases initially, peaks partway through the epidemic, then declines again. However, precise quantitative outcomes, such as the peak virulence reached and its timing, may depend sensitively on epidemiological details. Fraser et al. proposed a model for the eco-evolutionary dynamics of HIV that incorporates the tradeoffs between transmission and virulence (mediated by set-point viral load, SPVL) and their heritability between hosts. Their model used implicit equations to capture the effects of partnership dynamics that are at the core of epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases. Our models combine HIV virulence tradeoffs with a range of contact models, explicitly modeling partnership formation and dissolution and allowing for individuals to transmit disease outside of partnerships. We assess summary statistics such as the peak virulence (corresponding to the maximum value of population mean log10 SPVL achieved throughout the epidemic) across models for a range of parameters applicable to the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Although virulence trajectories are broadly similar across models, the timing and magnitude of the virulence peak vary considerably. Previously developed implicit models predicted lower virulence and slower progression at the peak (a maximum of 3.5 log10 SPVL) compared both to more realistic models and to simple random-mixing models with no partnership structure at all (both with a maximum of ≈ 4.7 log10 SPVL). In this range of models, the simplest random-mixing structure best approximates the most realistic model; this surprising outcome occurs because the dominance of extra-pair contact in the realistic model swamps the effects of partnership structure.

  14. Identification of anti-biofilm components in Withania somnifera and their effect on virulence of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, S; Cai, J N; Song, K Y; Jeon, J G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify components of the Withania somnifera that could show anti-virulence activity against Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The anti-acidogenic activity of fractions separated from W. somnifera was compared, and then the most active anti-acidogenic fraction was chemically characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The effect of the identified components on the acidogenicity, aciduricity and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formation of S. mutans UA159 biofilms was evaluated. The change in accumulation and acidogenicity of S. mutans UA159 biofilms by periodic treatments (10 min per treatment) with the identified components was also investigated. Of the fractions, n-hexane fraction showed the strongest anti-acidogenic activity and was mainly composed of palmitic, linoleic and oleic acids. Of the identified components, linoleic and oleic acids strongly affected the acid production rate, F-ATPase activity and EPS formation of the biofilms. Periodic treatment with linoleic and oleic acids during biofilm formation also inhibited the biofilm accumulation and acid production rate of the biofilms without killing the biofilm bacteria. These results suggest that linoleic and oleic acids may be effective agents for restraining virulence of S. mutans biofilms. Linoleic and oleic acids may be promising agents for controlling virulence of cariogenic biofilms and subsequent dental caries formation. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Seafood a potential source of some zoonotic bacteria in Zagazig, Egypt, with the molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes

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    Heba A. Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results of a study conducted on 71 fresh seafood samples (fish and shellfish marketed in Zagazig city, Sharkia province, Egypt, as well as on 50 human stool samples collected at the Zagazig University Hospital. The samples were examined for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. The investigation of L. monocytogenes virulence genes was performed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, while the microbiological quality of the seafood samples was evaluated using the coliform count and aerobic plate count (APC as indicators. Out of the examined 71 seafood samples, 20 (28.2% were identified as L. monocytogenes, 15 (75% of which were confirmed as virulent strains. Also, out of 50 human stool samples, only 1 (2% was identified as virulent L. monocytogenes. E. coli serotypes were isolated from only 11.3% of seafood and 30% of human stool samples. In shellfish, the APC and most probable number of coliforms (MPC were higher than those obtained from other fish samples. Multiplex PCR targeting internalin genes allowed simultaneous identification of L. monocytogenes and differentiation of virulent strains, thus enabling more timely detection of cases and sources of food borne listeriosis. The article concludes by stressing that the isolation of potentially virulent L. monocytogenes and E. coli from both seafood samples and humans emphasises the potential public health hazard caused by eating raw or undercooked shellfish.

  16. Seafood a potential source of some zoonotic bacteria in Zagazig, Egypt, with the molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Heba A; Hussein, Mohamed A; El-Ashram, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study conducted on 71 fresh seafood samples (fish and shellfish) marketed in Zagazig city, Sharkia province, Egypt, as well as on 50 human stool samples collected at the Zagazig University Hospital. The samples were examined for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. The investigation of L. monocytogenes virulence genes was performed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), while the microbiological quality of the seafood samples was evaluated using the coliform count and aerobic plate count (APC) as indicators. Out of the examined 71 seafood samples, 20 (28.2%) were identified as L. monocytogenes, 15 (75%) of which were confirmed as virulent strains. Also, out of 50 human stool samples, only 1 (2%) was identified as virulent L. monocytogenes. E. coli serotypes were isolated from only 11.3% of seafood and 30% of human stool samples. In shellfish, the APC and most probable number of coliforms (MPC) were higher than those obtained from other fish samples. Multiplex PCR targeting internalin genes allowed simultaneous identification of L. monocytogenes and differentiation of virulent strains, thus enabling more timely detection of cases and sources of food borne listeriosis. The article concludes by stressing that the isolation of potentially virulent L. monocytogenes and E. coli from both seafood samples and humans emphasises the potential public health hazard caused by eating raw or undercooked shellfish.

  17. Pore-forming virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus destabilize epithelial barriers-effects of alpha-toxin in the early phases of airway infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Peter Hildebrandt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a human commensal and an opportunistic pathogen that may affect the gastrointestinal tract, the heart, bones, skin or the respiratory tract. S. aureus is frequently involved in hospital- or community-acquired lung infections. The pathogenic potential is associated with its ability to secrete highly effective virulence factors. Among these, the pore-forming toxins Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL and hemolysin A (Hla are the important virulence factors determining the prognosis of pneumonia cases. This review focuses on the structure and the functions of S. aureus hemolysin A and its sub-lethal effects on airway epithelial cells. The hypothesis is developed that Hla may not just be a tissue-destructive agent providing the bacteria with host-derived nutrients, but may also play complex roles in the very early stages of interactions of bacteria with healthy airways, possibly paving the way for establishing acute infections.

  18. Effect of subinhibitory doses of clindamycin on the virulence of Bacteroides fragilis: role of lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleznik, D F; Zhang, Z L; Onderdonk, A B; Kasper, D L

    1986-07-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Bacteroides fragilis is an important virulence factor in the formation of experimental intraabdominal abscesses. Incubation of this organism with subinhibitory doses of clindamycin induced morphological changes in the bacteria, including elongation and loss of CP, detected by ferritin-labeled antibody to capsule. Pretreatment of bacteria with subinhibitory doses of clindamycin, however, did not affect the ability of live or heat-killed organisms to produce intraabdominal abscesses in a mouse model of intraabdominal sepsis. Dose-response experiments with purified CP as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from B. fragilis ATCC strain 23745 mixed with sterile cecal contents as adjuvant revealed that both surface components of the organism were capable of causing abscesses in the mouse model. The dose of LPS required to induce abscesses was five times higher than the required dose of CP. Nevertheless, these studies suggested that B. fragilis LPS is another virulence factor in the formation of intraabdominal abscesses.

  19. The effect of γ radiation on the expression of the virulence genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Kim, Dongho

    2007-11-01

    The principle benefit of food irradiation is the reduction of food-borne bacteria in food products. However, the microbiological safety with respect to increased virulence of surviving pathogens after irradiation remains an important issue with regard to the effectiveness of food irradiation. In this study, the transcriptional changes of virulence genes of Salmonella and Vibrio spp. after γ radiation were investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Samonella typhimurium is dependent upon the products of a large number of genes located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) on the chromosome. The expressions of seven genes including four SPI genes, hilD, ssrB, pipB, and sopD, were measured at 1 h after 1 kGy irradiation. Compared with non-irradiated controls, the expression of hilD encoded within SPI1 and sopD encoding SPI1-related effector proteins was reduced about 4- and 16-fold, respectively. The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes, vvhA, ctxA, and tdh, were also monitored during the course of a growth cycle after re-inoculation of irradiated Vibrio spp. (0.5 and 1.0 kGy). The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes tested did not increase compared with non-irradiated counterparts. Results from this study indicate that γ radiation is much more likely to reduce the virulence gene expression of surviving pathogens.

  20. A novel antisense RNA from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT expressed by non-growing bacteria inside eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús; Ortega, Alvaro D; Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory molecules playing relevant roles in response to environmental changes, stressful conditions and pathogenesis. The intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is known to regulate expression of some sRNAs during colonization of fibroblasts. Here, we characterize a previously unknown sRNA encoded in the S. Typhimurium pSLT virulence plasmid that is specifically up-regulated by non-growing dormant bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts. This sRNA was inferred in microarray expression analyses, which unraveled enhanced transcriptional activity in the PSLT047- PSLT046 (mig5) intergenic region. The sRNA transcript was further identified as a 597-nucleotide molecule, which we named IesR-1, for 'Intracellular-expressed-sRNA-1'. IesR-1 expression is low in bacteria growing in axenic cultures across a variety of experimental conditions but displays a marked increase (∼200-300 fold) following bacterial entry into fibroblasts. Remarkably, induction of IesR-1 expression is not prominent in bacteria proliferating within epithelial cells. IesR-1 deletion affects the control of bacterial growth in defined fibroblast cell lines and impairs virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression analyses performed in the PSLT047-iesR-1-PSLT046 (mig5) region support a cis-acting regulatory mechanism of IesR-1 as antisense RNA over the PSLT047 transcript involving interaction at their respective 3' ends and modulation of PSLT047 protein levels. This model is sustained by the scarce production of PSLT047 protein observed in non-growing intracellular bacteria and the high amount of PSLT047 protein produced by bacteria carrying a truncated IesR-1 version with separated 5' and 3' regions. Taken together, these data reveal that S. Typhimurium sRNAs encoded in the pSLT virulence plasmid respond to a state of persistence inside the host cell. As exemplified by IesR-1, some of these sRNAs may contribute to

  1. Inhibitory effect of zingiber officinale towards Streptococcus mutans virulence and caries development: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Sadaf; Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Asad U

    2015-01-16

    Streptococcus mutans is known as a key causative agent of dental caries. It metabolizes dietary carbohydrate to produce acids which reduce the environmental pH leading to tooth demineralization. The ability of this bacterium to tolerate acids coupled with acid production, allows its effective colonization in the oral cavity leading to the establishment of highly cariogenic plaque. For this reason, S. mutans is the only bacterium found in significantly higher numbers than other bacteria in the dental plaque. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of crude extract and methanolic fraction of Z. officinale against S. mutans virulence properties. We investigated in vitro and in vivo activity of crude extract and methanolic fraction at sub- MIC levels against cariogenic properties of S. mutans. We found that these extracts strongly inhibited a variety of virulence properties which are critical for its pathogenesis. The biofilm formation in S. mutans was found to be reduced during critical growth phases. Furthermore, the glucan synthesis and adherence was also found to be inhibited. Nevertheless, the insoluble glucan synthesis and sucrose dependent adherence were apparently more reduced as compared to soluble glucan synthesis and sucrose- independent adherence. Biofilm architecture inspected with the help of confocal and scanning electron microscopy, showed dispersion of cells in the treated group as compared to the control. The Quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) data had shown the down regulation of the virulence genes, which is believed to be one of the major reasons responsible for the observed reduction in the virulence properties. The incredible reduction of caries development was found in treated group of rats as compared to the untreated group which further validate our in vitro data. The whole study concludes a prospective role of crude extract and methanolic fraction of Z. officinale in targeting complete array of cariogenic properties of S. mutans

  2. The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae

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    Schneiker-Bekel Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella petrii is the only environmental species hitherto found among the otherwise host-restricted and pathogenic members of the genus Bordetella. Phylogenetically, it connects the pathogenic Bordetellae and environmental bacteria of the genera Achromobacter and Alcaligenes, which are opportunistic pathogens. B. petrii strains have been isolated from very different environmental niches, including river sediment, polluted soil, marine sponges and a grass root. Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described. Results In this manuscript we present the results of the analysis of the completely annotated genome sequence of the B. petrii strain DSMZ12804. B. petrii has a mosaic genome of 5,287,950 bp harboring numerous mobile genetic elements, including seven large genomic islands. Four of them are highly related to the clc element of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, which encodes genes involved in the degradation of aromatics. Though being an environmental isolate, the sequenced B. petrii strain also encodes proteins related to virulence factors of the pathogenic Bordetellae, including the filamentous hemagglutinin, which is a major colonization factor of B. pertussis, and the master virulence regulator BvgAS. However, it lacks all known toxins of the pathogenic Bordetellae. Conclusion The genomic analysis suggests that B. petrii represents an evolutionary link between free-living environmental bacteria and the host-restricted obligate pathogenic Bordetellae. Its remarkable metabolic versatility may enable B. petrii to thrive in very different ecological niches.

  3. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children: a contribution to get insight into the virulence of the bacteria.

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    Inês Vitoriano

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA "on" status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence

  4. Ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Children: A Contribution to Get Insight into the Virulence of the Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoriano, Inês; Saraiva-Pava, Kathy D.; Rocha-Gonçalves, Alexandra; Santos, Andrea; Lopes, Ana I.; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major cause for the development of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). In children, with no other etiology for the disease, this rare event occurs shortly after infection. In these young patients, habits of smoking, diet, consumption of alcohol and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and stress, in addition to the genetic susceptibility of the patient, represent a minor influence. Accordingly, the virulence of the implicated H. pylori strain should play a crucial role in the development of PUD. Corroborating this, our in vitro infection assays comparing a pool of five H. pylori strains isolated from children with PUD to a pool of five other pediatric clinical isolates associated with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) showed the greater ability of PUD strains to induce a marked decrease in the viability of gastric cells and to cause severe damage in the cells cytoskeleton as well as an impairment in the production/secretion of mucins. To uncover virulence features, we compared the proteome of these two groups of H. pylori strains. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry allowed us to detect 27 differentially expressed proteins between them. In addition to the presence of genes encoding well established virulence factors, namely cagA, vacAs1, oipA “on” status, homB and jhp562 genes, the pediatric ulcerogenic strains shared a proteome profile characterized by changes in the abundance of: motility-associated proteins, accounting for higher motility; antioxidant proteins, which may confer increased resistance to inflammation; and enzymes involved in key steps in the metabolism of glucose, amino acids and urea, which may be advantageous to face fluctuations of nutrients. In conclusion, the enhanced virulence of the pediatric ulcerogenic H. pylori strains may result from a synergy between their natural ability to better adapt to the hostile human stomach and the expression of the established virulence factors. PMID

  5. Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika C Nwugo

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii persists in the medical environment and causes severe human nosocomial infections. Previous studies showed that low-level ethanol exposure increases the virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978. To better understand the mechanisms involved in this response, 2-D gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate differential protein production in bacteria cultured in the presence or absence of ethanol. This approach showed that the presence of ethanol significantly induces and represses the production of 22 and 12 proteins, respectively. Although over 25% of the ethanol-induced proteins were stress-response related, the overall bacterial viability was uncompromised when cultured under these conditions. Production of proteins involved in lipid and carbohydrate anabolism was increased in the presence of ethanol, a response that correlates with increased carbohydrate biofilm content, enhanced biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and decrease bacterial motility on semi-solid surfaces. The presence of ethanol also induced the acidification of bacterial cultures and the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, a ubiquitous plant hormone that signals bacterial stress-tolerance and promotes plant-bacteria interactions. These responses could be responsible for the significantly enhanced virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 cells cultured in the presence of ethanol when tested with the Galleria mellonella experimental infection model. Taken together, these observations provide new insights into the effect of ethanol in bacterial virulence. This alcohol predisposes the human host to infections by A. baumannii and could favor the survival and adaptation of this pathogen to medical settings and adverse host environments.

  6. Phage-mediated dissemination of virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria facilitated by antibiotic growth promoters in animals: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Migma Dorji; Sunwoo, Hoon; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2017-11-29

    Addition of sub-therapeutic antibiotics to the feed of food-producing animals for growth promotion and disease prevention has become a common agricultural practice in many countries. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is a looming concern associated with the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) around the world. In addition, some studies have shown that AGPs may not only affect antibiotic resistance but may also stimulate the dissemination of virulence factors via bacteriophages. Although only a few studies are currently available in the literature regarding this topic, in this article we endeavor to provide a perspective about how AGPs would impact the transmission of virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer via phages in a few pathogenic bacterial species significant to livestock production.

  7. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A. Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p<0.01. Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes.

  8. Stress hormone epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) effects on the anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila

    2017-04-01

    Microbial endocrinology is a relatively new research area that already encompasses the anaerobes. Stress hormones, epinephrine and norepinephrine, can affect the growth of anaerobic bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella spp., Porhyromonas spp., Tanerella forsythia and Propionibacterium acnes and can increase virulence gene expression, iron acquisition and many virulence factors of some anaerobic species such as Clostridium perfringens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Brachyspira pilosicoli. Epinephrine and norepinephrine effects can lead to a growth increase or decrease, or no effect on the growth of the anaerobes. The effects are species-specific and perhaps strain-specific. Discrepancies in the results of some studies can be due to the different methods and media used, catecholamine concentrations, measurement techniques and the low number of strains tested. Biological effects of the stress hormones on the anaerobes may range from halitosis and a worsening of periodontal diseases to tissue damages and atherosclerotic plaque ruptures. Optimizations of the research methods and a detailed assessment of the catecholamine effects in conditions mimicking those in affected organs and tissues, as well as the effects on the quorum sensing and virulence of the anaerobes and the full spectrum of biological consequences of the effects are interesting topics for further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Oxygen on Virulence Traits of Streptococcus mutans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Wen, Zezhang T.; Burne, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen profoundly affects the composition of oral biofilms. Recently, we showed that exposure of Streptococcus mutans to oxygen strongly inhibits biofilm formation and alters cell surface biogenesis. To begin to dissect the underlying mechanisms by which oxygen affects known virulence traits of S. mutans, transcription profiling was used to show that roughly 5% of the genes of this organism are differentially expressed in response to aeration. Among the most profoundly upregulated genes were autolysis-related genes and those that encode bacteriocins, the ClpB protease chaperone subunit, pyruvate dehydrogenase, the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, NADH oxidase enzymes, and certain carbohydrate transporters and catabolic pathways. Consistent with our observation that the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms was severely impaired by oxygen exposure, transcription of the gtfB gene, which encodes one of the primary enzymes involved in the production of water-insoluble, adhesive glucan exopolysaccharides, was down-regulated in cells growing aerobically. Further investigation revealed that transcription of gtfB, but not gtfC, was responsive to oxygen and that aeration causes major changes in the amount and degree of cell association of the Gtf enzymes. Moreover, inactivation of the VicK sensor kinase affected the expression and localization the GtfB and GtfC enzymes. This study provides novel insights into the complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks used by S. mutans to modulate virulence gene expression and exopolysaccharide production in response to changes in oxygen availability. PMID:17921307

  10. Effects of oxygen on virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Wen, Zezhang T; Burne, Robert A

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen profoundly affects the composition of oral biofilms. Recently, we showed that exposure of Streptococcus mutans to oxygen strongly inhibits biofilm formation and alters cell surface biogenesis. To begin to dissect the underlying mechanisms by which oxygen affects known virulence traits of S. mutans, transcription profiling was used to show that roughly 5% of the genes of this organism are differentially expressed in response to aeration. Among the most profoundly upregulated genes were autolysis-related genes and those that encode bacteriocins, the ClpB protease chaperone subunit, pyruvate dehydrogenase, the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, NADH oxidase enzymes, and certain carbohydrate transporters and catabolic pathways. Consistent with our observation that the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms was severely impaired by oxygen exposure, transcription of the gtfB gene, which encodes one of the primary enzymes involved in the production of water-insoluble, adhesive glucan exopolysaccharides, was down-regulated in cells growing aerobically. Further investigation revealed that transcription of gtfB, but not gtfC, was responsive to oxygen and that aeration causes major changes in the amount and degree of cell association of the Gtf enzymes. Moreover, inactivation of the VicK sensor kinase affected the expression and localization the GtfB and GtfC enzymes. This study provides novel insights into the complex transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks used by S. mutans to modulate virulence gene expression and exopolysaccharide production in response to changes in oxygen availability.

  11. Metabolic effects of sucralose on environmental bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Arthur; Ahearn, Gregory; Bowers, Doria; Swenson, Janice; Coughlin, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Sucralose was developed as a low cost artificial sweetener that is nonmetabolizable in humans. Sucralose can withstand changes in pH and temperature and is not degraded by the wastewater treatment process. Since the molecule can withstand heat, acidification, and microbial degradation, it is accumulating in the environment and has been found in wastewater, estuaries, rivers, and the Gulf Stream. Environmental isolates were cultured in the presence of sucralose looking for potential sucralose metabolism or growth acceleration responses. Sucralose was found to be nonnutritive and demonstrated bacteriostatic effects on all six isolates. This growth inhibition was directly proportional to the concentration of sucralose exposure, and the amount of the growth inhibition appeared to be species-specific. The bacteriostatic effect may be due to a decrease in sucrose uptake by bacteria exposed to sucralose. We have determined that sucralose inhibits invertase and sucrose permease. These enzymes cannot catalyze hydrolysis or be effective in transmembrane transport of the sugar substitute. Current environmental concentrations should not have much of an effect on environmental bacteria since the bacteriostatic effect seems to be consecration based; however, as sucralose accumulates in the environment, we must consider it a contaminant, especially for microenvironments.

  12. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Beneficial effects of antioxidative lactic acid bacteria

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    Hisako Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by exposure to reactive oxygen intermediates. The oxidative damage of cell components such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids one of the important factors associated with diabetes mellitus, cancers and cardiovascular diseases. This occurs as a result of imbalance between the generations of oxygen derived radicals and the organism’s antioxidant potential. The amount of oxidative damage increases as an organism ages and is postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. To date, many studies have focused on food sources, nutrients, and components that exert antioxidant activity in worms, flies, mice, and humans. Probiotics, live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts provide many beneficial effects on the human health, have been attracting growing interest for their health-promoting effects, and have often been administered in fermented milk products. In particular, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are known to conferre physiologic benefits. Many studies have indicated the antioxidative activity of LAB. Here we review that the effects of lactic acid bacteria to respond to oxidative stress, is connected to oxidative-stress related disease and aging.

  14. Effect of cyclophosphamide on infections produced by Escherichia coli of high and low virulence in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Imada, Y; Abe, F

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cyclophosphamide (Cy) on infections caused by Escherichia coli strains of high (Expt 1) and low (Expt 2) virulence was examined in 4-week-old specified-pathogen-free chickens. In Expt 1 the mortalities of Cy-treated and non-treated chickens given 5 x 10(7) cfu of a strain of E. coli of high virulence were both 100%. In the groups given 5 x 10(5) cfu, the mortality of Cy-treated chickens was 90% and that of non-treated chickens was 10%. In Expt 2 the groups given 1 x 10(9) cfu of an E. coli strain of low virulence showed a mortality of 30% when treated with Cy and 0% when non-treated. The chickens given 5 x 10(7) or 5 x 10(5) cfu showed no mortality, clinical signs or histological lesions. Cy-treated chickens showed severe hypoplasia of granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. Haematological examination of Cy-treated chickens revealed leukopenia, especially lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. This study suggests that Cy treatment may enhance infection caused by E. coli strain of high virulence and manifest signs of infection caused by E. coli strain of low virulence in the chickens.

  15. Mixed infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in a murine lesion model: potential synergistic effects on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuille, F; Ebersole, J L; Kesavalu, L; Stepfen, M J; Holt, S C

    1996-06-01

    These studies determined the characteristics of tissue destruction in a murine abscess model elicited by mixed infection with the periodontopathogens Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The interbacterial effects of this synergism, the kinetics of the relationship of the bacterial interaction, and the characteristics of the bacteria required for the tissue destruction were studied. Infection of mice with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum strains elicited lesions of various sizes as a function of infective dose. Primary infection with F. nucleatum plus P. gingivalis at various ratios (i.e., or = 1:1, spreading lesion formation and progression were significantly (P < 0.001) decreased, suggesting that bacterial interaction (i.e., coaggregation) may have inhibited the spread of the P. gingivalis infection to a site distant from the initial injection. Infection with F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis simultaneously (at different sites) or F. nucleatum administered within 4 h prior to or 1 h following P. gingivalis infection significantly enhanced the ability of P. gingivalis to form large phlegmonous lesions. Chemical inhibition of the P. gingivalis trypsin-like protease activity or the use of a trypsin-negative P. gingivalis strain abrogated tissue destruction either alone or in combination with F. nucleatum. Therefore, it was possible to examine aspects of virulence of these pathogens in a murine lesion model by either altering bacterial ratios, manipulating the time of infection, or targeting vital bacterial virulence factors.

  16. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  17. Hyaluronate lyase activity of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 and modulatory effects of hyaluronic acid on the bacterium's virulence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Bruno; Vaillancourt, Katy; Bonifait, Laetitia; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-11-26

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is a major swine pathogen and zoonotic agent worldwide causing mainly meningitis and septicemia. Hyaluronate lyases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronic acid, a major constituent of animal tissues, and have been reported as virulence factors in various bacterial species. Since the hyaluronate lyase of S. suis has been considered ambiguously as a virulence factor, we screened 50 isolates from the three major clonal complexes found in North America (sequence type [ST] 1, ST25, and ST28) known to differ in their degree of virulence in order to link the presence or absence of this activity with the degree of virulence. Moreover, the effect of exogenous hyaluronic acid on S. suis virulence factor gene expression and the pro-inflammatory response of brain macrovascular endothelial cells (BMEC) was also investigated. We found that all but one ST1 isolates (high virulence) were devoid of hyaluronate lyase activity whereas all ST25 (intermediate virulence) and ST28 (low virulence) isolates possessed the activity. A 2 bp insertion was responsible for the lack of activity in ST1 strains. Since the most virulent isolates did not degrade hyaluronic acid, this tissue component may be found during the infectious process. Therefore, we investigated its effect on S. suis and host cells. Hyaluronic acid was found to modulate S. suis adhesion to BMEC, to increase S. suis virulence factor expression, and to enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by BMEC. These findings suggest that S. suis hyaluronate lyase does not represent a critical virulence factor in its active form. However, exogenous hyaluronic acid that is likely to interact with S. suis and host cells during the course of infection appears to modulate several virulence determinants of the bacterium, in addition to promote inflammation.

  18. Virulence Effects and Signaling Partners Modulated by Brucella melitensis Light-sensing Histidine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Christopher R.

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis utilizes diverse virulence factors. A Brucella light sensing histidine kinase can influence in vitro virulence of the bacteria during intracellular infection. First, we demonstrated that the B. melitensis light sensing kinase (BM-LOV-HK) affects virulence in an IRF-1-/- mouse model of infection. Infection with a Δ BM-LOV-HK strain resulted in less bacterial colonization of IRF-1-/- spleens and extended survivorship compared to mice infected with wild type B. melitensis 16M. Second, using PCR arrays, we observed less expression of innate and adaptive immune system activation markers in ΔBM-LOV-HK infected mouse spleens than wild type B. melitensis 16M infected mouse spleens 6 days after infection. Third, we demonstrated by microarray analysis of B. melitensis that deletion of BM-LOV-HK alters bacterial gene expression. Downregulation of genes involved in control of the general stress response system included the alternative sigma factor RpoE1 and its anti-anti sigma factor PhyR. Conversely, genes involved in flagella production, quorum sensing, and the type IV secretion system (VirB operon) were upregulated in the Δ BM-LOV-HK strain compared to the wild type B. melitensis 16M. Analysis of genes differentially regulated in Δ BM-LOV-HK versus the wild type strain indicated an overlap of 110 genes with data from previous quorum sensing regulator studies of Δ vjbR and/ΔblxR(babR) strains. Also, several predicted RpoE1 binding sites located upstream of genes were differentially regulated in the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain. Our results suggest BM-LOV-HK is important for in vivo Brucella virulence, and reveals that BM-LOV-HK directly or indirect regulates members of the Brucella quorum sensing, type IV secretion, and general stress systems.

  19. Delineating the effect of host environmental signals on a fully virulent strain of Bacillus anthracis using an integrated transcriptomics and proteomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panda, G.; Basak, T.; Tanwer, P.; Sengupta, S.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Bhatnagar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria sense the host environment and regulate expression of virulence-related genes. Environmental signals like temperature, bicarbonate/CO2 and glucose induce toxin production in Bacillus anthracis, but the mechanisms by which these signals contribute to virulence and overall

  20. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Araújo, Carlos; Campanero, Cristina; del Campo, Rosa; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2013-01-24

    The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci) isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86%) (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%). Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%), Pediococcus (44%), Lactobacillus (33%), but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5%) and Weissella (6.7%). One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E), and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A) conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively), while a low number of E. faecalis (5%) and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E) in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A) in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of putatively safe LAB intended for use as probiotics

  1. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C.

    2017-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis. c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become an

  2. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci) isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. Results These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86%) (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%). Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%), Pediococcus (44%), Lactobacillus (33%), but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5%) and Weissella (6.7%). One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E), and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A) conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively), while a low number of E. faecalis (5%) and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E) in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A) in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of putatively safe LAB

  3. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-Atienza Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. Results These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86% (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%. Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%, Pediococcus (44%, Lactobacillus (33%, but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5% and Weissella (6.7%. One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E, and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively, while a low number of E. faecalis (5% and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of

  4. Effect of subinhibitory concentrations of chlorogenic acid on reducing the virulence factor production by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Qiao, Mingyu; Guo, Yan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Yunfeng; Xia, Xiaodong

    2014-09-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CA) has been reported to inhibit several pathogens, but the influence of subinhibitory concentrations of CA on virulence expression of pathogens has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of CA on the virulence factor production of Staphylococcus aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CA against S. aureus was determined using a broth microdilution method. Hemolysin assays, coagulase titer assays, adherence to solid-phase fibrinogen assays, Western blot, and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of CA on the virulence factors of S. aureus. MIC of CA against S. aureus ATCC29213 was found to be 2.56 mg/mL. At subinhibitory concentrations, CA significantly inhibited the hemolysis and dose-dependently decreased coagulase titer. Reduced binding to fibrinogen and decreased production of SEA were observed with treatment of CA at concentrations ranging from 1/16MIC to 1/2MIC. CA markedly inhibited the expression of hla, sea, and agr genes in S. aureus. These data demonstrate that the virulence expression of S. aureus could be reduced by CA and suggest that CA could be potentially developed as a supplemental strategy to control S. aureus infection and to prevent staphylococcal food poisoning.

  5. Effective immunosuppression with dexamethasone phosphate in the Galleria mellonella larva infection model resulting in enhanced virulence of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Miquel Perez; Entwistle, Frances; Coote, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether immunosuppression with dexamethasone 21-phosphate could be applied to the Galleria mellonella in vivo infection model. Characterised clinical isolates of Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae were employed, and G. mellonella larvae were infected with increasing doses of each strain to investigate virulence in vivo. Virulence was then compared with larvae exposed to increasing doses of dexamethasone 21-phosphate. The effect of dexamethasone 21-phosphate on larval haemocyte phagocytosis in vitro was determined via fluorescence microscopy and a burden assay measured the growth of infecting bacteria inside the larvae. Finally, the effect of dexamethasone 21-phosphate treatment on the efficacy of ceftazidime after infection was also noted. The pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae or E. coli in G. mellonella larvae was dependent on high inoculum numbers such that virulence could not be attributed specifically to infection by live bacteria but also to factors associated with dead cells. Thus, for these strains, G. mellonella larvae do not constitute an ideal infection model. Treatment of larvae with dexamethasone 21-phosphate enhanced the lethality induced by infection with E. coli or K. pneumoniae in a dose- and inoculum size-dependent manner. This correlated with proliferation of bacteria in the larvae that could be attributed to dexamethasone inhibiting haemocyte phagocytosis and acting as an immunosuppressant. Notably, prior exposure to dexamethasone 21-phosphate reduced the efficacy of ceftazidime in vivo. In conclusion, demonstration of an effective immunosuppressant regimen can improve the specificity and broaden the applications of the G. mellonella model to address key questions regarding infection.

  6. Identification of the crp gene in avian Pasteurella multocida and evaluation of the effects of crp deletion on its phenotype, virulence and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Kangpeng; Hu, Yunlong; Liu, Xueyan; Li, Yanyan; Kong, Qingke

    2016-06-24

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an important veterinary pathogen that can cause severe diseases in a wide range of mammals and birds. The global regulator crp gene has been found to regulate the virulence of some bacteria, and crp mutants have been demonstrated to be effective attenuated vaccines against Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica. Here, we first characterized the crp gene in P. multocida, and we report the effects of a crp deletion. The P. multocida crp mutant exhibited a similar lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein profile but displayed defective growth and serum complement resistance in vitro compared with the parent strain. Furthermore, crp deletion decreased virulence but did not result in full attenuation. The 50 % lethal dose (LD50) of the Δcrp mutant was 85-fold higher than that of the parent strain for intranasal infection. Transcriptome sequencing analysis showed that 92 genes were up-regulated and 94 genes were down-regulated in the absence of the crp gene. Finally, we found that intranasal immunization with the Δcrp mutant triggered both systematic and mucosal antibody responses and conferred 60 % protection against virulent P. multocida challenge in ducks. The deletion of the crp gene has an inhibitory effect on bacterial growth and bacterial resistance to serum complement in vitro. The P. multocida crp mutant was attenuated and conferred moderate protection in ducks. This work affords a platform for analyzing the function of crp and aiding the formulation of a novel vaccine against P. multocida.

  7. Factor H specifically capture novel Factor H-binding proteins of Streptococcus suis and contribute to the virulence of the bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Ma, Caifeng; Fu, Yang; He, Yanan; Yu, Yanfei; Du, Dechao; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Factor H (FH), a regulatory protein of the complement system, can bind specifically to factor H-binding proteins (FHBPs) of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2), which contribute to evasion of host innate immune defenses. In the present study, we aimed to identify novel FHBPs and characterize the biological functions of FH in SS2 pathogenesis. Here, a method that combined proteomics and Far-western blotting was developed to identify the surface FHBPs of SS2. With this method, fourteen potential novel FHBPs were identified among SS2 surface proteins. We selected eight newly identified proteins and further confirmed their binding activity to FH. The binding of SS2 to immobilized FH decreased dramatically after pre-incubation with anti-FHBPs polyclonal antibodies. We showed for the first time that SS2 also interact specifically with mouse FH. Furthermore, we found that FH play an important role in adherence and invasion of SS2 to HEp-2 cells. Additionally, using a mouse model of intraperitoneal challenge, we confirmed that SS2 pre-incubated with FH enhanced bacteremia and brain invasion, compared with SS2 not pretreated with FH. Taken together, this study provides a useful method to characterize the host-bacteria interactions. These results first indicated that binding of FH to the cell surface improved the adherence and invasion of SS2 to HEp-2 cells, promoting SS2 to resist killing and leading to enhance virulence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting and alteration of tight junctions by bacteria and their virulence factors such as Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Miriam; Protze, Jonas; Piontek, Anna; Krause, Gerd; Piontek, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The integrity of tight junctions, which regulate paracellular permeability, is challenged by many bacterial pathogens. This is caused by inflammatory responses triggered by pathogens and direct interaction of bacteria or their toxins with host epithelial cells. In some cases, tight junction proteins represent receptors for cell surface proteins or toxins of the pathogen, such as Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). CPE causes diarrhea and cramps-the symptoms of a common foodborne illness, caused by C. perfringens type A. It uses a subgroup of the claudin family of tight junction proteins as receptors and forms pores in the membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. Ca(2+) influx through these pores finally triggers cell damage. In this review, we summarize tight junction targeting and alteration by a multitude of different microorganisms such as C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, protozoan parasites, and their proteins. A focus is drawn towards CPE, the interaction with its receptors, cellular, and pathophysiological consequences for the intestinal epithelium. In addition, we portend to the use of CPE-based claudin modulators for drug delivery as well as diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  9. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Araújo, Carlos; Campanero, Cristina; del Campo, Rosa; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    .... The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental...

  10. Biofilm formation and virulence expression by Streptococcus mutans are altered when grown in dual-species model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wen, Zezhang T; Yates, David; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    .... The effects of other species of oral bacteria on biofilm formation and virulence gene expression by Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, were evaluated using a dual...

  11. Expression of virulence factors by Staphylococcus aureus grown in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oogai, Yuichi; Matsuo, Miki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Kato, Fuminori; Sugai, Motoyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2011-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces many virulence factors, including toxins, immune-modulatory factors, and exoenzymes. Previous studies involving the analysis of virulence expression were mainly performed by in vitro experiments using bacterial medium. However, when S. aureus infects a host, the bacterial growth conditions are quite different from those in a medium, which may be related to the different expression of virulence factors in the host. In this study, we investigated the expression of virulence factors in S. aureus grown in calf serum. The expression of many virulence factors, including hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, and iron acquisition factors, was significantly increased compared with that in bacterial medium. In addition, the expression of RNA III, a global regulon for virulence expression, was significantly increased. This effect was partially restored by the addition of 300 μM FeCl₃ into serum, suggesting that iron depletion is associated with the increased expression of virulence factors in serum. In chemically defined medium without iron, a similar effect was observed. In a mutant with agr inactivated grown in serum, the expression of RNA III, psm, and sec4 was not increased, while other factors were still induced in the mutant, suggesting that another regulatory factor(s) is involved. In addition, we found that serum albumin is a major factor for the capture of free iron to prevent the supply of iron to bacteria grown in serum. These results indicate that S. aureus expresses virulence factors in adaptation to the host environment.

  12. The Effects of Insulin and Glucose on Different Characteristics of a UPEC: Alterations in Growth Rate and Expression Levels of some Virulence Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Defne; Yoruk, Emre; Kalayci-Yuksek, Fatma; Uz, Gulsen; Topal-Sarikaya, Aysegul; Ang-Kucuker, Mine

    2017-10-01

    Host factors are known to modulate virulence, antibiotic susceptibility, and growth rate of bacteria. The effect of human insulin and glucose on growth rate and expression of virulence genes (usp, sfa/foc, cnf1) of a uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain were investigated in this study. E. coli C7 was grown in tryptic soy broth (TSB-control) and TSB containing 20 µU/mL insulin, 200 µU/mL insulin, 0.1% glucose, and 200 µU/mL insulin + 0.1% glucose. Growth rates were determined via optical density measurement in a spectrophotometer. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the gene expression levels. Statistical analyses were performed via Tukey's post hoc-test. Differences were found to be not statistically significant for bacterial growth rate in TSB and TSB with insulin and/or glucose. The expression levels of all three virulence genes were shown to be reduced significantly in the presence of insulin and/or glucose. The highest degree of repression was observed in 200 µU/mL insulin added to TSB. Also, the repression level of the gene expression was revealed to be reduced in 0.1% glucose supplemented TSB. In the present study, it was shown that insulin and glucose can modulate UPEC's gene expression while the growth rate was not affected.

  13. Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes to Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar: Effects of Strain, Temperature, and Soil Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Leskey, Tracy C; Wright, Starker E

    2011-09-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a major pest of stone and pome fruit (e.g., apples, pears, peaches, cherries, etc.). Entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp.) may be used to control the larval stage of C. nenuphar following fruit drop. Indeed, certain entomopathogenic nematodes species have previously been shown to be highly effective in killing C. nenuphar larvae in laboratory and field trials. In field trials conducted in the Southeastern, USA, Steinernema riobrave has thus far been shown to be the most effective species. However, due to lower soil temperatures, other entomopathogenic nematode strains or species may be more appropriate for use against C. nenuphar in the insect's northern range. Thus, the objective of this study was to conduct a broad screening of entomopathogenic nematodes. Under laboratory conditions, we determined the virulence of 13 nematode strains (comprising nine species) in two different soils (a loam and clay-loam) and three different temperatures (12°C, 18°C, and 25°C). Superior virulence was observed in S. feltiae (SN strain), S. rarum (17 C&E strain), and S. riobrave (355 strain). Promising levels of virulence were also observed in others including H. indica (HOM1 strain), H. bacteriophora (Oswego strain), S. kraussei, and S. carpocapsae (Sal strain). All nematode treatments were affected by temperature with the highest virulence observed at the highest temperature (25°C). In future research, field tests will be used to further narrow down the most suitable nematode species for C. nenuphar control.

  14. Effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on growth, survival, immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on the growth, survival, immune response and viral prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in white shrimp was evaluated. Presumptive bacilli and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were characterized for hemolytic and enzymatic activity, hydrophobicity and antagonism against ...

  15. Effect of Neem Extracts (Azadirachta indica) on Bacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Dept. of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto. 3Department of Biological ... i. To isolate and characterize bacteria from adult human oral cavity. ii. To test the effect of different neem extracts on the bacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Sample Collection.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Shahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT, histopathological exam (HE and polymerase chain reaction (PCR and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05. In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05. The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and Its Virulence Factors' Effect on Serum Oxidative DNA Damages in Adults With Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Bahreiny, Rasoul; Reiisi, Somayeh

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter Pylori infection is a common gastrointestinal infection that can cause pathological effects, increase oxidative stress and induce an inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Inflammatory aspects may prompt the production of radical oxygen substance (ROS) which may damage cells and release 8-hydroxydyoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) to serum. In this study, we evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors and the association between serum level of 8-OHdG, H. pylori infection, and its various virulence factors. The presence of H. pylori and prevalence of cagA, babA and oipA genes in samples were determined by rapid urease test (RUT), histopathological exam (HE) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oxidative DNA damage situation were assessed by using serum level of 8-OHdG. There was not any direct relation between H. pylori negative and H. pylori oipA+specimens by 8-OHdG serum level (P>0.05). In all clinical observations, the presence of cagA and oipA genes was common. There was a statistical relationship between the presence of cagA, babA factors, and high serum level of 8-OHdG (P<0.05). The presence of cagA and babA virulence factors may be associated with increased serum 8-OHdG in dyspeptic patients and may induce the damage to gastric cells.

  18. Antimicrobial effect of Malaysian vegetables against enteric bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Al-Talib

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Garlic had excellent antimicrobial effects against enteric bacteria and was recommended to be given to patients with gastroenteritis. The other vegetables (pennywort, mint, parsley and celery showed no inhibitory effects on enteric bacteria but still can be used for its richness in vitamins and fibers. The performance of the well diffusion method was better than that of the disc diffusion method in detecting the antibacterial effects of green vegetables.

  19. Bacillus anthracis-like bacteria and other B. cereus group members in a microbial community within the International Space Station: a challenge for rapid and easy molecular detection of virulent B. anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra P van Tongeren

    Full Text Available For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods.

  20. Bacillus anthracis-like bacteria and other B. cereus group members in a microbial community within the International Space Station: a challenge for rapid and easy molecular detection of virulent B. anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P; Roest, Hendrik I J; Degener, John E; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods.

  1. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Nehrke, Keith; Blaser, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria occurs in the intestinal tract of their animal hosts and facilitates both virulence and antibiotic resistance. A model in which both the pathogen and the host are genetically tractable facilitates developing insight into mechanistic processes enabling or restricting the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Here we develop an in vivo experimental system to study HGT in bacteria using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Using a thermosensitive conjugative system, we provide evidence that conjugation between two Escherichia coli strains can take place in the intestinal lumen of N2 wild-type worms at a rate of 10−3 and 10−2 per donor. We also show that C. elegans age and genotype are important determinants of the frequency of conjugation. Whereas ∼1 transconjugant for every 100 donor cells could be recovered from the intestine of N2 C. elegans, for the age-1 and tol-1 mutants, the detected rate of transconjugation (10−3 and 10−4 per donor cell, respectively) was significantly lower. This work demonstrates that increased recombination among lumenal microbial populations is a phenotype associated with host aging, and the model provides a framework to study the dynamics of bacterial horizontal gene transfer within the intestinal environment.—Portal-Celhay, C., Nehrke, K., Blaser, M. J. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria. PMID:23085995

  2. EFFECT OF SODIUM PHOSPHATES ON SELECTED FOOD GRADE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Kráčmar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect in vitro of selected sodium phosphates (under the corporate names Hexa 68, Hexa 70, Trikrystal, FST, Pyro 52, KPS, Didi on selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Seven different concentrations of each phosphate were used. Sensitivity of the bacterial strains to phosphates was observed in broth supplemented with salts. In vitro was showed a negative effect of various phosphates on growth of selected gram-positive bacteria. Orthophosphates and diphosphates (pyrophosphates did not have significant inhibitory effect on tested bacteria at neutral pH. With the exception of phosphate Trikrystal has not been found in vitro significant inhibitory effects on gram-negative bacteria.doi:10.5219/141

  3. Effect of Ibicella lutea on uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis growth, virulence, and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Vanessa; Zunino, Pablo

    2009-12-15

    Proteus mirabilis, an important uropathogen that can cause complicated urinary tract infections (UTI), has emerged as a therapeutic problem following mutations that compromise the use of antimicrobial drugs. Due to the serious effects associated with uropathogenic P. mirabilis and the problems related to the use of antibiotics, it is necessary to develop alternative strategies for its control. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Ibicella lutea extract, a South American indigenous plant, on growth, virulence and biofilm production of uropathogenic P. mirabilis. This study was based on the extract generation and the assessment of its effect on bacterial features related to virulence. These assays involved determination of antibacterial activity, swarming motility, Western blot to assess expression of fimbriae and flagella, biofilms formation, haemagglutination, haemolysis, and electron microscopy. I. lutea extract had an effect on bacterial growth rate and bacterial morphology. It also affected P. mirabilis swarming differentiation, hemagglutination and biofilm formation on glass and polystyrene. These findings suggest that I. lutea may have a role as an agent for the control of P. mirabilis UTI.

  4. Antimicrobial and Virulence-Modulating Effects of Clove Essential Oil on the Foodborne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Judit K; Felső, Péter; Makszin, Lilla; Pápai, Zoltán; Horváth, Györgyi; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Palkovics, Tamás; Böszörményi, Andrea; Emődy, Levente; Schneider, György

    2016-10-15

    Our study investigated the antimicrobial action of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) essential oil (EO) on the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni After confirming the clove essential oil's general antibacterial effect, we analyzed the reference strain Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168. Phenotypic, proteomic, and transcriptomic methods were used to reveal changes in cell morphology and functions when exposed to sublethal concentrations of clove EO. The normally curved cells showed markedly straightened and shrunken morphology on the scanning electron micrographs as a result of stress. Although, oxidative stress, as a generally accepted response to essential oils, was also present, the dominance of a general stress response was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The results of RT-PCR and two-dimensional (2D) PAGE revealed that clove oil perturbs the expression of virulence-associated genes taking part in the synthesis of flagella, PEB1, PEB4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and serine protease. Loss of motility was also detected by a phenotypic test. Bioautographic analysis revealed that besides its major component, eugenol, at least four other spots of clove EO possessed bactericidal activity against C. jejuni Our findings show that clove EO has a marked antibacterial and potential virulence-modulating effect on C. jejuni IMPORTANCE: This study demonstrates that the components of clove essential oil influence not only the expression of general stress genes but also the expression of virulence-associated genes. Based on this finding, alternative strategies can be worked on to control this important foodborne pathogen. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Effect of bovine apo-lactoferrin on the growth and virulence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Castro, Sarahí; Aguilar-Romero, Francisco; Samaniego-Barrón, Luisa; Godínez-Vargas, Delfino; de la Garza, Mireya

    2014-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes porcine pleuropneumonia, leading to economic losses in the swine industry. Due to bacterial resistance to antibiotics, new treatments for this disease are currently being sought. Lactoferrin (Lf) is an innate immune system glycoprotein of mammals that is microbiostatic and microbicidal and affects several bacterial virulence factors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bovine iron-free Lf (BapoLf) has an effect on the growth and virulence of App. Two serotype 1 strains (reference strain S4074 and the isolate BC52) and a serotype 7 reference strain (WF83) were analyzed. First, the ability of App to grow in iron-charged BLf was discarded because in vivo, BapoLf sequesters iron and could be a potential source of this element favoring the infection. The minimum inhibitory concentration of BapoLf was 14.62, 11.78 and 10.56 µM for the strain BC52, S4074 and WF83, respectively. A subinhibitory concentration (0.8 µM) was tested by assessing App adhesion to porcine buccal epithelial cells, biofilm production, and the secretion and function of toxins and proteases. Decrease in adhesion (24-42 %) was found in the serotype 1 strains. Biofilm production decreased (27 %) for only the strain 4074 of serotype 1. Interestingly, biofilm was decreased (60-70 %) in the three strains by BholoLf. Hemolysis of erythrocytes and toxicity towards HeLa cells were not affected by BapoLf. In contrast, proteolytic activity in all strains was suppressed in the presence of BapoLf. Finally, oxytetracycline produced synergistic effect with BapoLf against App. Our results suggest that BapoLf affects the growth and several of the virulence factors in App.

  6. Isolation of Crude Oil from Polluted Waters Using Biosurfactants Pseudomonas Bacteria: Assessment of Bacteria Concentration Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khalifeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biological decomposition techniques and isolation of environmental pollutions using biosurfactants bacteria are effective methods of environmental protection. Surfactants are amphiphilic compounds that are produced by local microorganisms and are able to reduce the surface and the stresses between surfaces. As a result, they will increase solubility, biological activity, and environmental decomposition of organic compounds. This study analyzes the effects of biosurfactants on crude oil recovery and its isolation using pseudomonas sea bacteria species. Preparation of biosurfactants was done in glass flasks and laboratory conditions. Experiments were carried out to obtain the best concentration of biosurfactants for isolating oil from water and destroying oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions in two pH ranges and four saline solutions of different concentrations. The most effective results were gained when a concentration of 0.1% biosurfactants was applied.

  7. Entamoeba histolytica: effect on virulence, growth and gene expression in response to monoxenic culture with Escherichia coli 055.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Macías, Claudia Leticia; Barrios-Ceballos, Minerva Paola; de la Peña, Lydia Patricia Cárdenas; Rangel-Serrano, Angeles; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Mirelman, David; Padilla-Vaca, Felipe

    2009-02-01

    Monoxenic cultivation of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites with Escherichia coli serotype 055 which binds strongly to the Gal/GalNAc amoebic lectin, markedly improved the growth of E. histolytica and produced a significant decrease in cysteine proteinase activity and a lower cytopathic activity on monolayer cells after 3 months of monoxenic culture. However, after long term monoxenic culture (12 months) the proteolytic and cytopathic activities were recovered and the amoebic growth reached the maximum yield. Employing the GeneFishing(R) technology and DNA macroarrays we detected differentially gene expression related to the amoebic interaction with bacteria. A number of differentially expressed genes encoding metabolic enzymes, ribosomal proteins, virulence factors and proteins related with cytoskeletal and vesicle trafficking were found. These results suggest that E. coli 055 has a nutritional role that strongly supports the amoebic growth, and is also able to modulate some biological activities related with amoebic virulence.

  8. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa extract on virulence factors of Candida albicans and human neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2017-12-10

    Candida albicans has become a major problem of oral candidiasis due to increase in antibiotic resistance. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, a medicinal plant possessing several phytochemical constituents, has been considered as a potential source of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory agents. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-virulence and immunostimulatory activity of R. tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract against C. albicans. The effects of the extract on C. albicans were assessed on germ tube production, adherence of the organisms to surfaces, and biofilm. In addition, the effects of the extract on phagocytosis and killing activity of neutrophils against the pathogen were investigated. Suppression of germ tube production following 30 min exposure to the extract at 256 μg/mL was significantly increased in comparison with that of the unexposed cells (p extract at 512-1024 μg/mL significantly reduced biofilm forming ability of the organisms up to 42.31-64.58% (p extract at 256 μg/mL was observed (p extract at 50 μg/mL significantly enhanced phagocytosis and killing activity of neutrophils against the organism, compared with the control (p extract displayed a dual mode of action, inhibiting virulence factors of C. albicans and enhancing neutrophil functions. Further pharmaceutical development of the extract might be useful as an alternative therapeutic agent against oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. In vitro markers for virulence in Yersinia ruckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobback, E; Decostere, A; Hermans, K; Van den Broeck, W; Haesebrouck, F; Chiers, K

    2010-03-01

    In this study, different traits that have been associated with bacterial virulence were studied in Yersinia ruckeri. Two isolates that had been shown to cause disease and mortality in experimentally infected rainbow trout were compared with five avirulent isolates. Both virulent isolates showed high adhesion to gill and intestinal mucus of rainbow trout, whereas the majority of non-virulent strains demonstrated significantly lower adhesion. A decrease in adherence capability following bacterial treatment with sodium metaperiodate and proteolytic enzymes suggested the involvement of carbohydrates and proteins. All strains were able to adhere to and invade chinook salmon embryo cell line (CHSE-214), fathead minnow epithelial cell line (FHM) and rainbow trout liver cell line (R1). One non-virulent strain was highly adhesive and invasive in the three cell lines, whereas the virulent strains showed moderate adhesive and invasive capacity. The internalization of several isolates was inhibited by colchicine and cytochalasin-D, suggesting that microtubules and microfilaments play a role. For all strains, intracellular survival assays showed a decrease of viable bacteria in the cells 6 h after inoculation, suggesting that Y. ruckeri is not able to multiply or survive inside cultured cells. Analysis of the susceptibility to the bactericidal effect of rainbow trout serum demonstrated that virulent Y. ruckeri strains were serum resistant, whereas non-virulent strains were generally serum sensitive.

  10. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN. It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems.

  11. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan; McDermott, Catherine; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McFarland, Amelia J; Forbes, Amanda; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K; Chess-Williams, Russ; Kiefel, Milton J; Arora, Devinder; Grant, Gary D

    2016-08-09

    Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN). It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems.

  12. Antibacterial Effect of Teucrium polium on the Bacteria Causing Urinary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Shahba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present investigation was conducted to study the antibacterial effect of aqueous, ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of Teucrium polium plant on the bacteria isolated from urine samples of those with UTI and to compare it with the effect of commonly used antibiotics in treating UTIs. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic resistance of 147 strains of bacteria causing UTIs to the antibiotics selected through Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was determined. In the meantime, the aqueous, ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of T. polium plant were prepared. The antibacterial activity of these extracts was examined using Disk Diffusion Method. Finally, Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of antibacterial were determined using serial dilution method. Results: T. polium extracts were merely effective in enterococcus and pseudomonas bacteria. In general, the MIC rate of aqueous extract in enterococcus was 1.25-5 mg/ml. The MIC rate of ethanolic extract for enterococcus was calculated as 10 mg/ml. The MIC of aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts for pseudomonas bacteria were achieved as 5 and 20 mg/ml, respectively. The MBC contents of aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts of teucrium for pseudomonas bacteria was 10 mg/ml in aqueous and 20 mg/ml in ethyl acetate extracts. The MBC content of extracts for enterococcus bacteria were 10 mg/ml in aqueous extract and 20 mg/ml in ethanolic extract. Conclusion: T. polium extract can be effective in some bacteria causing urinary tract infection, especially enterococcus.

  13. Biophysical Evaluation of Food Decontamination Effects on Tissue and Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Duelund, Lars; Brewer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    in both food surface and bacteria upon surface decontamination by SonoSteam®. SonoSteam® is a recently developed method of food surface decontamination, which employs steam and ultrasound for effective heat transfer and short treatment times, resulting in significant reduction in surface bacteria. We...... employ differential scanning calorimetry, second harmonics generation imaging microscopy, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and green fluorescence protein-expressing bacteria and compare our results with those obtained by traditional methods of food quality and safety evaluations. Our results show......Traditionally, the effects and efficiency of food surface decontamination processes, such as chlorine washing, radiation, or heating, have been evaluated by sensoric analysis and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of surface swabs or carcass rinses. These methods suffice when determining probable...

  14. Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin on human urothelial cell function and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Catherine; Chess-Williams, Russ; Grant, Gary D; Perkins, Anthony V; McFarland, Amelia J; Davey, Andrew K; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra

    2012-03-01

    We determined the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin on human urothelial cell viability and function in vitro. RT4 urothelial cells were treated with pyocyanin (1 to 100 μM) for 24 hours. After exposure the treatment effects were measured according to certain end points, including changes in urothelial cell viability, reactive oxygen species formation, caspase-3 activity, basal and stimulated adenosine triphosphate release, SA-β-gal activity and detection of acidic vesicular organelles. The 24-hour pyocyanin treatment resulted in a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability at concentrations of 25 μM or greater, and increases in reactive oxygen species formation and caspase-3 activity at 25 μM or greater. Basal adenosine triphosphate release was significantly decreased at all tested pyocyanin concentrations while stimulated adenosine triphosphate release was significantly inhibited at pyocyanin concentrations of 12.5 μM or greater with no significant stimulated release at 100 μM. Pyocyanin treated RT4 cells showed morphological characteristics associated with cellular senescence, including SA-β-gal expression. This effect was not evident at 100 μM pyocyanin and may have been due to apoptotic cell death, as indicated by increased caspase-3 activity. An increase in acridine orange stained vesicular-like organelles was observed in RT4 urothelial cells after pyocyanin treatment. Exposure to pyocyanin alters urothelial cell viability, reactive oxygen species production and caspase-3 activity. Treatment also results in cellular senescence, which may affect the ability of urothelium to repair during infection. The virulence factor depressed stimulated adenosine triphosphate release, which to our knowledge is a novel finding with implications for awareness of bladder filling in patients with P. aeruginosa urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  15. Quorum sensing in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes and the effect of the autoinducer synthase AsaI on bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwenteit, Johanna; Gram, Lone; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida possesses the LuxIRtype quorum sensing (QS) system, termed AsaIR. In this study the role of QS in A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes virulence and pigment production was investigated. Five wild-type Asa strains induced the N......Ideficient mutant was 20-fold higher than that of the isogenic wt strain and the mean day to death of the mutant was significantly prolonged. Furthermore, the expression of two virulence factors (a toxic protease, AsaP1, and a cytotoxic factor) and a brown pigment were reduced in the mutant. AsaP1 productionwas...... an important virulence factor, AsaP1, without affecting bacterial growth, makes A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes an interesting target organism to study the effects of QS in disease development and QSI in disease control....

  16. Effect of salt and acidic pH on the stability of virulence plasmid (pYV) in Yersinia enterocolitica and expression of virulence-associated characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of the Yersinia enterocolitica virulence plasmid (pYV) under different NaCl concentrations and under acidic pH conditions was investigated. Exposure of five strains representing five serotypes of pYV-bearing virulent Y. enterocolitica to 0.5, 2 and 5% NaCl and under conditions of pH 4...

  17. Antimicrobial effect of natural dyes on some pathogenic bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P. granatum dye was most effective against the test bacteria except E. coli and S. epidermidis. The textile material impregnated with four natural dyes and maximum inhibition rates (respectivelly, 80, 86, 52%) were obtained against B. subtilis of wool samples dyed with P. granatum, A. cepa and R. tinctorum while maximum ...

  18. Effects of lactic acid bacteria contamination on lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slower fermentation rates, mixed sugar compositions, and lower sugar concentrations may make lignocellulosic fermentations more susceptible to contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which is a common and costly problem to the corn-based fuel ethanol industry. To examine the effects of LAB con...

  19. Effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on growth, survival, immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usuario

    Carmen Flores-Miranda and Héctor A. González-Ocampo. Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo Integral Regional-Instituto Politécnico Nacional,. Unidad Sinaloa, Sinaloa, Mexico. Accepted 17 December, 2012. The effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on the growth, survival, immune response and ...

  20. Effect of calcifying bacteria on permeation properties of concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, V; Mukherjee, A; Reddy, M S

    2011-09-01

    Microbially enhanced calcite precipitation on concrete or mortar has become an important area of research regarding construction materials. This study examined the effect of calcite precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii (Bp M-3) on parameters affecting the durability of concrete or mortar. An inexpensive industrial waste, corn steep liquor (CSL), from starch industry was used as nutrient source for the growth of bacteria and calcite production, and the results obtained with CSL were compared with those of the standard commercial medium. Bacterial deposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of the specimens resulted in substantial decrease of water uptake, permeability, and chloride penetration compared with control specimens without bacteria. The results obtained with CSL medium were comparable to those obtained with standard medium, indicating the economization of the biocalcification process. The results suggest that calcifying bacteria play an important role in enhancing the durability of concrete structures.

  1. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis strains virulent to Varroa destructor on larvae and adults of Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquisira-Ramírez, Eva Vianey; Peña-Chora, Guadalupe; Hernández-Velázquez, Víctor Manuel; Alvear-García, Andrés; Arenas-Sosa, Iván; Suarez-Rodríguez, Ramón

    2017-08-01

    The sublethal effects of two strains of Bacillus thuringiensis, which were virulent in vitro to Varroa destructor, were measured on Apis mellifera. The effects of five concentrations of total protein (1, 5, 25, 50 and 100μg/mL) from the EA3 and EA26.1 strains on larval and adult honey bees were evaluated for two and seven days under laboratory conditions. Based on the concentrations evaluated, total protein from the two strains did not affect the development of larvae, the syrup consumption, locomotor activity or proboscis extension response of adults. These same parameters were also tested for the effects of three concentrations (1, 10 and 15μg/kg) of cypermethrin as a positive control. Although no significant differences were observed after two days of treatment with cypermethrin, a dose-response relationship in syrup consumption and locomotor activity was observed. A significant reduction in the proboscis extension response of the bees treated with cypermethrin was also observed. Therefore, in contrast to cypermethrin, our results indicate that the EA3 and EA26.1 strains of B. thuringiensis can be used in beehives to control V. destructor and reduce the negative effects of this mite on colonies without adverse effects on the larvae and adults of A. mellifera. Additionally, the overuse of synthetic miticides, which produce both lethal and sublethal effects on bees, can be reduced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Influences of Bacillus subtilis on the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila and Expression of luxS Gene of Both Bacteria Under Co-cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuwei; Li, Sisi; Wu, Zhixin; Zhou, Chengchong; Zhang, Ding; Chen, Xiaoxuan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of Bacillus subtilis CH9 on Aeromonas hydrophila SC2005. The transcription level of virulence genes of A. hydrophila SC2005 and its hemolysin activity as well as its cytotoxicity were analyzed when B. subtilis CH9 and A. hydrophila SC2005 were co-cultured. The results indicated that the transcription levels of four virulence genes of A. hydrophila, including aer, ahyB, hcp, and emp, decreased when A. hydrophila was cultured with B. subtilis CH9. Furthermore, the extracellular products of A. hydrophila showed attenuated hemolysin activity as well as cytotoxicity when A. hydrophila was cultured with B. subtilis CH9. Finally, the transcriptional levels of luxS genes of B. subtilis CH9 and A. hydrophila SC2005 were determined when these two species were co-cultured. RT-qPCR results suggested that the transcription level of A. hydrophila was down-regulated significantly. On the contrary, the transcription level of B. subtilis CH9 was up-regulated significantly. These results suggested that the probiotic role of B. subtilis CH9 is related to the inhibition of growth and virulence of A. hydrophila SC2005, and quorum sensing may be involved.

  3. Biophysical Evaluation of Food Decontamination Effects on Tissue and Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Duelund, Lars; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, the effects and efficiency of food surface decontamination processes, such as chlorine washing, radiation, or heating, have been evaluated by sensoric analysis and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of surface swabs or carcass rinses. These methods suffice when determining probable...... in both food surface and bacteria upon surface decontamination by SonoSteam®. SonoSteam® is a recently developed method of food surface decontamination, which employs steam and ultrasound for effective heat transfer and short treatment times, resulting in significant reduction in surface bacteria. We...... that there are no contradictions between data obtained by either approach. However, the biophysical methods draw a much more nuanced picture of the effects and efficiency of the investigated decontamination method, revealing, e.g., an exponential dose/response relationship between SonoSteam® treatment time and changes in collagen...

  4. Antibacterial Effect of Juglans Regia Bark against Oral Pathologic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Zakavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study antimicrobial effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Juglans regia bark in Iran was evaluated on four different oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Juglans regia bark were prepared by using disk diffusion technique and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC methods. Tetracycline 30 μg and Erythromycin 15 μg were used as positive control and water as negative control in disk diffusion and MIC methods. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test. Results. The results showed that S. sanguis and S. mutans were the most sensitive and the most resistant bacteria against ethanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Ethanolic extract had significant antibacterial effect against all tested bacteria. Aqueous extract did not show antibacterial effect on S. mutans, in contrast to ethanolic extract. Aqueous extract had significantly antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, S. salivarius, and S. sanguis compared to control (P<0.0001, but it did not show effect on S. mutans when compared with Erythromycin. According to the obtained MIC values, ethanol extract of Juglans regia bark had the lowest rate. Conclusion. The results may provide the basis for using natural antimicrobial substance for oral hygiene prophylaxis purposes.

  5. The effect of seeding with bacteria on biogas production rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangoggo, S.M. [Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemistry; Aliyu, M.; Atiku, A.T. [Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto (Nigeria). Energy Research Centre

    1996-09-01

    Biogas as a clean and cheap fuel is studied with the aim of determining the effect of seeding with bacteria on its production rate using four different substrates. The seeding with four different digesters was carried out with 5g of digested cowdung sludge obtained from a working digester. Results indicate that of all the substrates used for the studies, ipomea asarifobia produced the highest amount of biogas over a period of 40 days. (Author)

  6. Effect of bacteria and dissolved organics on mineral dissolution kinetics:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Zabelina, Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Quantification of the effect of microorganisms and associated organic ligands on mineral dissolution rate is one among the last remaining challenges in modeling of water-rock interactions under earth surface and subsurface environments. This is especially true for deep underground settings within the context of CO2 capture, sequestration and storage. First, elevated CO2 pressures create numerous experimental difficulties for performing robust flow-through experiments at a given saturation state. Second, reactivity of main rock-forming minerals in abiotic systems at pCO2 >> 1 atm and circumneutral pH is still poorly constrained. And third, most of microbial habitats of the subsurface biosphere are not suitable for routine culturing in the laboratory, many of them are anaerobic and even strictly anaerobic, and many bacteria and archae cultures can live only in the consortium of microorganisms which is very hard to maintain at a controlled and stable biomass concentration. For experimental modeling of bio-mineral interactions in the laboratory, two other main conceptual challenges exist. Typical concentration of dissolved organic carbon that serves as a main nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria in underground waters rarely exceeds 3-5 mg/L. Typical concentration of DOC in nutrient media used for bacteria culturing is between 100 and 10,000 mg/L. Therefore, performing mineral-bacteria interactions in the laboratory under environmentally-sound conditions requires significant dilution of the nutrient media or the use of flow-through reactors. Concerning the effect of organic ligands and bacterial excudates on rock-forming mineral dissolution, at the present time, mostly empirical (phenomenological) approach can be used. Indeed, the pioneering studies of Stumm and co-workers have established a firm basis for modeling the catalyzing and inhibiting effects of ligands on metal oxide dissolution rate. This approach, very efficient for studying the interaction of organic and

  7. Effect of co-culture with enterocinogenic E. faecium on L. monocytogenes key virulence gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios H. Drosinos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of key virulence genes during co-culture of L. monocytogenes with a bacteriocinogenic E. faecium strain in liquid growth medium. For that purpose, BHI broth was inoculated with 7 log CFU·mL–1 L. monocytogenes and 4, 5 or 6 log CFU·mL–1 E. faecium. Sampling took place after 8 and 24 h of incubation, corresponding to the maximum and minimum of enterocin production, respectively. The RNA was extracted, stabilized and expression of prfA, sigB, hly, plcA, plcB, inlA, inlB, inlC and inlJ, was assessed by RT-qPCR. Most of the genes were downregulated during co-culture at 5 °C. Moreover, a statistically significant effect of the inoculum level was evident in most of the cases. On the contrary, no effect on the transcription level of most of the genes was observed during co-culture at 37 °C.

  8. The effect of Zuccagnia punctata, an Argentine medicinal plant, on virulence factors from candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriela, Nuño; Rosa, Alberto María; Catiana, Zampini Iris; Soledad, Cuello; Mabel, Ordoñez Roxana; Esteban, Sayago Jorge; Veronica, Baroni; Daniel, Wunderlin; Ines, Isla María

    2014-07-01

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. has been used as a traditional medicine in Argentina for the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Z. punctata extract (ZpE) and compounds isolated from it to inhibit the growth and virulence factors of Candida species. ZpE showed inhibitory activity against planktonic cells of all assayed Candida species with MIC values of 400 microg/mL and with MFC values between 400 and 1,200 microg/mL. The principal identified compounds by HPLC-MS/MS and UV-VIS were chalcones (2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxychalcone, 2',4'- dihydroxychalcone), flavones (galangin, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone and chrysin) and flavanones (naringenin, 7-hydroxyflavanone and pinocembrine). These compounds were more effective as inhibitors than the extracts upon biofilm formation as well as on preformed Candida biofilm and yeast germ tube formation. Furthermore, ZpE and chalcones are able to inhibit exoenzymes, which are responsible for the invasion mechanisms of the pathogens. All these effects could moderate colonization, thereby suppressing the pathogen invasive potential. Our results indicate that ZpE and chalcones could be used in antifungal therapy.

  9. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, M; Rozhko, T; Vydryakova, G; Kudryasheva, N

    2011-04-01

    The effect of americium-241 ((241)Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of (241)Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 °C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the (241)Am is discussed. The effect of (241)Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in (241)Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of (241)Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  11. Antibacterial effect of Gracilaria verrucosa bioactive on fish pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maftuch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria verrucosa seaweed is a type of seaweed commonly found in water. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of G. verrucosa on fish pathogenic bacteria to support fish farming. The method used in this research was the separation of G. verrucosa fractions using column chromatography. The active antibacterial fraction of G. verrucosa which is obtained from column chromatography indicated fractions containing antibacterial compounds. It was fraction number 3 by using an eluent 16 (ethanol: 4 (ethyl acetate. Furthermore, based on phytochemical screening, ultraviolet spectrophotometer and LC–MS analysis, antibacterial compounds contained in those fraction number 3 are Alkaloid, Flavonoid, Tannin, Phenolic compound. Based on LC–MS and UV–Vis analysis, flavonoid group, Quercetin-7-methyl-ether is a dominant group of the antibacterial compound on fraction no. 3. This fraction had moderate antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and had weak antibacterial activity against Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio algynoliticus bacteria.

  12. Effect of virulence factors on the photodynamic inactivation of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A Prates

    Full Text Available Opportunistic fungal pathogens may cause an array of superficial infections or serious invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogen causing cryptococcosis in HIV/AIDS patients, but treatment is limited due to the relative lack of potent antifungal agents. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI uses the combination of non-toxic dyes called photosensitizers and harmless visible light, which produces singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species that produce cell inactivation and death. We report the use of five structurally unrelated photosensitizers (methylene blue, Rose Bengal, selenium derivative of a Nile blue dye, a cationic fullerene and a conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6 combined with appropriate wavelengths of light to inactivate C. neoformans. Mutants lacking capsule and laccase, and culture conditions that favoured melanin production were used to probe the mechanisms of PDI and the effect of virulence factors. The presence of cell wall, laccase and melanin tended to protect against PDI, but the choice of the appropriate photosensitizers and dosimetry was able to overcome this resistance.

  13. Effect of Different Filling Materials in Anammox Bacteria Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek ÖZGÜN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox is a process that ammonium as electron donor is oxidized to nitrogen gas using nitrite as electron acceptor. Compared to conventional nitrification-denitrification processes, this process is used less oxygen and no organic material (methanol, glucose. However, the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria (11-30 days is disadvantages. Therefore, batch reactors have been carried out in these bacteria enrichment. In this study continuously operated upflow anaerobic sludge reactor (UASB using different filling materials disposing of sensitive and slow-growing Anammox bacteria out of the system is purposed. Design and Methods: System is operated up-flow column reactor at 2 days hydraulic retention time (HRT in 45 days. In this study, ceramic stones and Linpor filling material are used. Using synthetic wastewater containing ammonium and nitrite, Ar/CO2 anaerobic conditions (95/5% supplied with gas. System is operated at a temperature 253 C in UASB. Temperature, pH, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen are measured. Results: Both filling material reactors are operated in 45 days. Ceramic stones filling reactor is observed quickly reaches 90% were used reactor ammonium removal. The ammonium nitrogen removal was slower in Linpor filling materials reactor. Nitrite removal is reached up to 90% in both the reactor. When compared to the stoichiometric equation in Linpor was composed of large amounts of nitrate. At the end of 25 days the results were similar to ceramic stone filling reactor with Linpor filling material reactors. Conclusions and Original Value: Anammox process as from nitrogen removal processes was discovered in 1995. Anammox bacteria that make up this process due to very low growth rates of microbial bacteria in the system must be kept in the system. Most of the studies in the literature, these bacteria enrichment stage is started instead of a continuous batch reactor system. In this study

  14. Fast and effective: intense pulse light photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Tim; Spannberger, Franz; Regensburger, Johannes; Felgenträger, Ariane; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the photodynamic toxicity of TMPyP (5, 10, 15, 20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-porphyrin tetra p-toluenesulfonate) in combination with short pulses (ms) of an intense pulse light source within 10 s against Bacillus atrophaeus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Escherichia coli, major pathogens in food industry and in health care, respectively. Bacteria were incubated with a photoactive dye (TMPyP) that is subsequently irradiated with visible light flashes of 100 ms to induce oxidative damage immediately by generation of reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen. A photodynamic killing efficacy of up to 6 log(10) (>99.9999%) was achieved within a total treatment time of 10 s using a concentration range of 1-100 μmol TMPyP and multiple light flashes of 100 ms (from 20 J cm(-2) up to 80 J cm(-2)). Both incubation of bacteria with TMPyP alone or application of light flashes only did not have any negative effect on bacteria survival. Here we could demonstrate for the first time that the combination of TMPyP as the respective photosensitizer and a light flash of 100 ms of an intense pulsed light source is enough to generate sufficient amounts of reactive oxygen species to kill these pathogens within a few seconds. Increasing antibiotic resistance requires fast and efficient new approaches to kill bacteria, therefore the photodynamic process seems to be a promising tool for disinfection of horizontal surfaces in industry and clinical purposes where savings in time is a critical point to achieve efficient inactivation of microorganisms.

  15. The Effects of Low-Shear Mechanical Stress on Yersinia pestis Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Abidat; Jejelowo, Olufisayo A.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.

    2010-11-01

    Manned space exploration has created a need to evaluate the effects of spacelike stress on pathogenic and opportunistic microbes astronauts could carry with them to the International Space Station and beyond. Yersinia pestis (YP) causes bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague and is capable of killing infected patients within 3-7 days. In this study, low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), a spacelike stress, was used to physically stress YP; and its effects on proliferation, cold growth, and type III secretion system (T3SS) function were evaluated. YP was grown to saturation in either LSMMG or normal gravity (NG) conditions prior to being used for RAW 246.7 cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and Yop secretion assays. A mutant strain of YP (ΔyopB) that lacks the ability to inject Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops) into the host cell was used as a negative control in cell infection experiments. Our experimental results indicate that YP cultivated under LSMMG resulted in reduced YopM production and secretion compared to its NG-grown counterpart. Similarly, NG-grown YP induced more cell rounding in HeLa cells than did the LSMMG-grown YP, which suggests that LSMMG somehow impairs T3SS optimum function. Also, LSMMG-grown YP used to infect cultured RAW 246.7 cells showed a similar pattern of dysfunction in that it proliferated less than did its NG-grown counterpart during an 8-hour infection period. This study suggests that LSMMG can attenuate bacterial virulence contrary to previously published data that have demonstrated LSMMG-induced hypervirulence of other Gram-negative enterics.

  16. The effect of burdock leaf fraction on adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Z; Wang, H; Tang, Y; Chen, X

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a fraction of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaf on the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antibiofilm activity of the burdock leaf fraction was studied by the method of crystal violet staining. When the concentration of the burdock leaf fraction was 2·0 mg ml -1 , the inhibition rates on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa were 100%. The burdock leaf fraction was found to inhibit the formation of biofilm by reducing bacterial surface hydrophobicity, decreasing bacterial aggregation ability and inhibiting swarming motility. Interestingly, the burdock leaf fraction inhibited the secretion of quorum-sensing (QS) signalling molecule 3-oxo-C12-HSL and interfered quorum sensing. Moreover, the QS-regulated pyocyanin and elastase were also inhibited. Chemical composition analysis by UPLC-MS showed 11 active compounds in the burdock leaf fraction. The burdock leaf fraction significantly inhibited the formation of biofilm and quorum sensing, as well as significantly decreased the content of virulence factors. This study introduces a natural and effective bacterial biofilm inhibitor, which could also significantly decrease the content of virulence factors and the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Effect of sunlight on survival of indicator bacteria in seawater.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka, R S; Hashimoto, H H; Siwak, E B; Young, R H

    1981-01-01

    The stability of the natural populations of fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci in raw sewage diluted 1:1,000 in seawater or phosphate-buffered water at 24 +/- 2 degrees C was markedly affected by the absence or presence of sunlight. In the absence of sunlight, these bacteria survived for days, whereas in the presence of sunlight 90% of the fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci were inactivated within 30 to 90 min and 60 to 180 min, respectively. The bactericidal effect of sunlight was sh...

  18. Effect of infectious bursal disease virus on infections produced by Escherichia coli of high and low virulence in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Yuasa, N; Abe, H; Narita, M

    1990-10-01

    The effect of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) on the infections caused by Escherichia coli strains of high (Expt 1) and low (Expt 2) virulence was examined in specific-pathogen-free chickens. The chickens were inoculated orally with IBDV at 1 day of age and via the air sac with E. coli at 1 week of age. In the groups given 1 x 10(5) cfu of E.coli of high virulence (Expt 1), mortality of IBDV-inoculated group (90%) was significantly higher than that in the non-IBDV-inoculated group (40%). The septicaemic lesions (splenic necrosis with fibrinous exudation) in the IBDV-inoculated-group were of significantly greater severity than those in the non-IBDV-inoculated group. The lymphocytic depletion in the bursa of Fabricius was most severe in the group inoculated with both IBDV and E. coli, then in descending order, in the group inoculated with IBDV alone and with E. coli alone. Lymphocytic depletion of the thymus was caused mainly by E. coli infection while IBDV induced mild lymphocytic depletion of the thymus. In Expt 2. the groups given 1 x 10(9) cfu of E. coli of low virulence revealed mortality of 50% when inoculated with IBDV and 10% when non-IBDV-inoculated. This study suggests that IBDV may increase the chickens' susceptibility to septicaemic infections produced by E. coli strains of high and low virulence and that IBDV and E. coli may induce additively marked lymphocytic depletion in the bursa of Fabricius and thymus.

  19. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare essential oils on virulence factors of phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carezzano, M E; Sotelo, J P; Primo, E; Reinoso, E B; Paletti Rovey, M F; Demo, M S; Giordano, W F; Oliva, M de Las M

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes lesions in leaves during the colonisation process. The damage is associated with production of many virulence factors, such as biofilm and phytotoxins. The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) have been demonstrated to inhibit P. syringae. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils on production of virulence factors of phytopathogenic P. syringae strains, including anti-biofilm and anti-toxins activities. The broth microdilution method was used for determination of MIC and biofilm inhibition assays. Coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were pheno- and genotypically evaluated. Both oils showed good inhibitory activity against P. syringae, with MIC values from 1.43 to 11.5 mg·ml -1 for thyme and 5.8 to 11.6 mg·ml -1 for oregano. Biofilm formation, production of coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were inhibited by thyme and oregano essential oil in most strains. The results presented here are promising, demonstrating the bactericidal activity and reduction of virulence factor production after treatment with thyme and oregano oil, providing insight into how they exert their antibacterial activity. These natural products could be considered in the future for the control of diseases caused by P. syringae. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie

    Bacteria selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery. Bacteria can plug the water-bearing zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. It is known that the bacteria can penetrate deeply...... into reservoirs, however, a complete understanding of the penetration behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where the pore throat sizes are almost comparable with the sizes of bacteria vegetative cells. This study investigates the penetration of bacteria into chalk. Two bacteria types......, the spore forming Bacillus licheniformis 421 and the non-spore forming Pseudomonas putida K12, were used. The core plugs were Stevns Klint outcrop with initial permeability at 2-4 mD. The results revealed that bacteria were able to penetrate and to be transported through the chalk. Furthermore, a higher...

  1. Effect of tritium on luminous marine bacteria and enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, M A; Mogilnaya, O A; Badun, G A; Vydryakova, G A; Kuznetsov, A M; Kudryasheva, N S

    2013-06-01

    The paper studies chronic effect of tritiated water, HTO, (0.0002-200 MBq/L) on bioluminescent assay systems: marine bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum (intact and lyophilized) and coupled enzyme reactions. Bioluminescence intensity serves as a marker of physiological activity. Linear dependencies of bioluminescent intensity on exposure time or radioactivity were not revealed. Three successive stages in bacterial bioluminescence response to HTO were found: (1) absence of the effect, (2) activation, and (3) inhibition. They were interpreted in terms of reaction of organisms to stress-factor i.e. stress recognition, adaptive response/syndrome, and suppression of physiological function. In enzyme system, in contrast, the kinetic stages mentioned above were not revealed, but the dependence of bioluminescence intensity on HTO specific radioactivity was found. Damage of bacteria cells in HTO (100 MBq/L) was visualized by electron microscopy. Time of bioluminescence inhibition is suggested as a parameter to evaluate the bacterial sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Rosa rugosa petals on intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, Manjiro; Kanazawa, Tsutomu; Funaki, Minoru; Nishizawa, Makoto; Yamagishi, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    The effects of pulverized petal of Rosa rugosa on the growth of 10 species of intestinal and pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Growth of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli was not affected by the addition of the petal in plate cultivation. However, the growth of Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus was completely inhibited by the addition of 0.1, 0.5, 0.1, and 0.05% (w/v) of the petal respectively. In liquid cultivation, the addition of the petal (0.5%) stimulated the growth of Bifidobacterium breve and slightly inhibited the growth of Lactobacillus salivarius. But the growth of E. coli, S. aureus, B. cereus, and Salmonella sp. was inhibited by nearly 50%. Hydrolyzable tannins isolated from R. rugosa, rugosin D, and tellimagradin II showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, B. cereus, and Salmonella sp., but little or no effect against Bif. breve and L. salivarius. R. rugosa petal showed selective antibacterial activities against intestinal and pathogenic bacteria, and the selectivity resembled that of prebiotics such as oligosaccharides and dietary fiber. Hydrolyzable tannins in R. rugosa, such as rugosin D and tellimagradin II, must be active constituents.

  3. The salicylidene acylhydrazide INP0341 attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, Pia; Hägglund, Ulrik; Rhöös, Elin; Scherman Norberg, Henrik; Elofsson, Mikael; Sundin, Charlotta

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can be very hard to treat because of high resistance to different antibiotics and alternative treatment regimens are greatly needed. An alternative or a complement to traditional antibiotic is to inhibit virulence of the bacteria. The salicylidene acylhydrazide, INP0341, belongs to a class of compounds that has previously been shown to inhibit virulence in a number of Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the virulence blocking effect of INP0341 on P. aeruginosa was studied in vitro and in vivo. Two important and closely related virulence system were examined, the type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates virulence effectors into the cytosol of the host cell to evade immune defense and facilitate colonization and the flagella system, needed for motility and biofilm formation. INP0341 was shown to inhibit expression and secretion of the T3SS toxin exoenzyme S (ExoS) and to prevent bacterial motility on agar plates and biofilm formation. In addition, INP0341 showed an increased survival of P. aeruginosa-infected mice. In conclusion, INP0341 attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence.

  4. Detailing profiles of Lawsonia intracellularis specific lymphocytes in the immune response to a challenge inoculation after oral vaccination or primary inoculation with virulent bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the intracellular porcine enteric pathogen Lawsonia intracellularis remains a challenge as the commercially available vaccine does not provide full protection. In an experimental challenge study, the Enterisol® Ileitis attenuated live vaccine against Lawsonia intracellularis did...... not induce measurable primary humoral or cell-mediated immune responses, nor was it able to reduce faecal shedding of bacteria from eight vaccinated pigs compared to seven age-matched naïve challenge-control pigs. Vaccinated pigs did, however, respond to vaccination with an acute phase protein response...

  5. Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Gram

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathea 3 expedition, a strain collection was established comprising bacteria that express antimicrobial activity against Vibrio anguillarum and/or Staphylococcus aureus. Within this collection we searched colony material, culture supernatants, and cell extracts for virulence modulating activity showing that 68 out of 83 marine bacteria (affiliated with the Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonas sp. influenced expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin toxin and/or spa encoding Protein A. The isolate that upon initial screening showed the highest degree of interference (crude ethyl acetate extract was a Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Extraction, purification and structural elucidation revealed a novel siderophore, designated nigribactin, which induces spa transcription. The effect of nigribactin on spa expression is likely to be independent from its siderophore activity, as another potent siderophore, enterobactin, failed to influence S. aureus virulence gene expression. This study shows that marine microorganisms produce compounds with potential use in therapeutic strategies targeting virulence rather than viability of human pathogens.

  6. An orphan chemotaxis sensor regulates virulence and antibiotic tolerance in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pearl McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The synthesis of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria is highly regulated and occurs in response to diverse environmental cues. An array of two component systems (TCSs serves to link perception of different cues to specific changes in gene expression and/or bacterial behaviour. Those TCSs that regulate functions associated with virulence represent attractive targets for interference in anti-infective strategies for disease control. We have previously identified PA2572 as a putative response regulator required for full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the opportunistic human pathogen, to Galleria mellonella (Wax moth larvae. Here we have investigated the involvement of candidate sensors for signal transduction involving PA2572. Mutation of PA2573, encoding a probable methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, gave rise to alterations in motility, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, functions which are also controlled by PA2572. Comparative transcriptome profiling of mutants revealed that PA2572 and PA2573 regulate expression of a common set of 49 genes that are involved in a range of biological functions including virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis indicated a REC-dependent interaction between PA2572 and PA2573 proteins. Finally expression of PA2572 in the PA2573 mutant background restored virulence to G. mellonella towards wild-type levels. The findings indicate a role for the orphan chemotaxis sensor PA2573 in the regulation of virulence and antibiotic tolerance in P. aeruginosa and indicate that these effects are exerted in part through signal transduction involving PA2572.

  7. Higher resource level promotes virulence in an environmentally transmitted bacterial fish pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, Hanna; Mappes, Johanna; Valkonen, Janne K; Pulkkinen, Katja; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina

    2017-06-01

    Diseases have become a primary constraint to sustainable aquaculture, but remarkably little attention has been paid to a broad class of pathogens: the opportunists. Opportunists often persist in the environment outside the host, and their pathogenic features are influenced by changes in the environment. To test how environmental nutrient levels influence virulence, we used strains of Flavobacterium columnare, an environmentally transmitted fish pathogen, to infect rainbow trout and zebra fish in two different nutrient concentrations. To separate the effects of dose and nutrients, we used three infective doses and studied the growth of bacteria in vitro. High nutrient concentration promoted both the virulence and the outside-host growth of the pathogen, most notably in a low-virulence strain. The increase in virulence could not be exhaustively explained by the increased dose under higher nutrient supply, suggesting virulence factor activation. In aquaculture settings, accumulation of organic material in rearing units can locally increase water nutrient concentration and therefore increase disease risk as a response to elevated bacterial density and virulence factor activation. Our results highlight the role of increased nutrients in outside-host environment as a selective agent for higher virulence and faster evolutionary rate in opportunistic pathogens.

  8. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  9. Inhibitory effect of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria against histamine-forming bacteria isolated from Myeolchi-jeot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Seo Lim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this study were to identify the histamine-forming bacteria and bacteriocin- producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from Myeolchi-jeot according to sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, to evaluate the inhibitory effects of the bacteriocin on the growth and histamine accumulation of histamine-forming bacteria, and to assess the physico-chemical properties of the bacteriocin. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, histamine-forming bacteria were identified as Bacillus licheniformis MCH01, Serratia marcescens MCH02, Staphylococcus xylosus MCH03, Aeromonas hydrophila MCH04, and Morganella morganii MCH05. The five LAB strains identified as Pediococcus acidilactici MCL11, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MCL12, Enterococcus faecium MCL13, Lactobacillus sakei MCL14, and Lactobacillus acidophilus MCL15 were found to produce an antibacterial compound with inhibitory activity against the tested histamine-producing bacteria. The inhibitory activity of these bacteriocins obtained from the five LAB remained stable after incubation at pH 4.0–8.0 and heating for 10 min at 80 °C; however, the bacteriocin activity was destroyed after treatment with papain, pepsin, proteinase K, α-chymotrypsin, or trypsin. Meanwhile, these bacteriocins produced by the tested LAB strains also exhibited histamine-degradation ability. Therefore, these antimicrobial substances may play a role in inhibiting histamine formation in the fermented fish products and preventing seafood-related food-borne disease caused by bacterially generated histamine.

  10. Anti-bacteria Effect of Active Ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi on the Spoilage Bacteria of Sauced Pork Head Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Xu, Lingyi; Cui, Yuqian; Pang, Meixia; Wang, Fang; Qi, Jinghua

    2017-12-01

    Extraction and anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi were studied in this paper. Extraction combined with ultrasonic was adopted. The optimum extraction condition was determined by single factor test; the anti-bacteria effect of active ingredients and minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) were valued by Oxford-cup method. The results indicated that kaempferol was the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi whose optimum extraction condition for ethanol concentrations were sixty-five percent and twenty minutes with ultrasonic assisted extraction.; the active ingredients of Cacumen Platycladi had anti-bacteria effect on Staphylococcus, Proteus, Bacillus, Serratia and MIC was 0.5 g/mL,0.5 g/mL,0.0313 g/mL and 0.0625 g/mL. The active constituent of Cacumen Platycladi is kaempferol which has obvious anti-bacteria effect and can be used to prolong the shelf-life of Low-temperature meat products.

  11. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens.......26, 3, 5 and 7 g NH4+-N L−1. The results showed that some hydrogenotrophic methanogens were equally, or in some cases, more tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAOB. Furthermore, a mesophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogen was more sensitive to ammonia toxicity compared to thermophilic methanogens...... tested in the study; which is contradicting to the general belief that thermophilic methanogens are more vulnerable to high ammonia loads compared to mesophilic. This unexpected finding underlines the fact that the complete knowledge of ammonia inhibition effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens is still...

  12. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water on bacteria invading dentinal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Masato; Kitamura, Chiaki; Fukuizumi, Takaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Terashita, Masamichi

    2004-11-01

    Ozone is known to act as a strong antimicrobial agent against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. In the present study, we examined the effect of ozonated water against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptcoccus mutans infections in vitro in bovine dentin. After irrigation with ozonated water, the viability of E. faecalis and S. mutans invading dentinal tubules significantly decreased. Notably, when the specimen was irrigated with sonication, ozonated water had nearly the same antimicrobial activity as 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). We also compared the cytotoxicity against L-929 mouse fibroblasts between ozonated water and NaOCl. The metabolic activity of fibroblasts was high when the cells were treated with ozonated water, whereas that of fibroblasts significantly decreased when the cells were treated with 2.5% NaOCl. These results suggest that ozonated water application may be useful for endodontic therapy.

  13. Effect of lactic acid bacteria on growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C T; Frazier, W C

    1966-03-01

    Cultures of lactic acid bacteria, mostly from foods, were tested for their effect on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Trypticase Soy Broth (BBL). Some of the effectors, e.g., Streptococcus faecalis, S. faecium, Lactobacillus lactis, L. brevis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, stimulated growth of S. aureus during early hours of growth, especially at higher temperatures of incubation, but most cultures were inhibitory, and some (S. faecium and L. mesenteroides) were even killing by the time of attainment of the maximal phase of growth of the Staphylococcus. Low-temperature meat lactobacilli and Leuconostoc dextranicum inhibited S. aureus at 10, 15, 20, and 25 C throughout its growth. Streptococcus faecalis var. liquefaciens inhibited at these temperatures and at 30 and 37 C, as well. When the ratio of effectors to staphylococci in the inoculum was 100:1, the three enterococci, the meat Lactobacillus, and L. dextranicum prevented the attainment of 5 x 10(6) staphylococci per milliliter at 15 C, and all but the meat Lactobacillus did so at 22 C. A ratio of 1:1 accomplished similar results at 15 C, except that S. aureus was only delayed for 12 hr by S. faecalis. A ratio of 1:100 usually was ineffective. In general, the more effector bacteria there were in the inoculum, the greater was the overall inhibition (or stimulation) of S. aureus. Inhibition was most effective at 10 or 15 C, less so at 20 or 25 C, and least at 30 or 37 C, whereas stimulation during early growth was greater at the higher temperatures. Results with different strains of the effectors and with two strains of S. aureus were similar, for the most part.

  14. Effect of Neem Extracts ( Azadirachta indica ) on Bacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial activity of the bark, Leaf, Seed and fruit extracts of Azadirachta indica (neem) on bacteria isolated from adult mouth was carried out using agar- well diffusion method. The test bacteria were isolated from patients attending Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. The bark and leaf extracts ...

  15. Effect of environmental factors on nitrifying bacteria isolated from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... oil on Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter isolated from the rhizosphere of foxtail millet, Setaria italica, were examined. The optimum temperature for the growth of both nitrifying bacteria is 30°C. Nitrobacter is less tolerant to low temperature than Nitrosomonas but the optimum pH for both bacteria is 8.0. Neem oil, when applied ...

  16. Effects of temperature on biochemical reactions and drug resistance of virulent and avirulent Aeromonas salmonicida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, G.B.; Gould, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Incubation temperatures of 11°, 18° and 28° did not substantially affect biochemical reactions of either virulent or avirulent forms of Aeromonas salmonicida subspecies salmonicida. The only change observed, amygdalin fermentation, was positive at 11° and 18° but negative at 28°C. Several isolates utilized sucrose, a characteristic not normally recognized for A. salmonicida subspecies salmonicida.Antimicrobial susceptibility screening indicated resistance to novobiocin increased at the higher incubation temperatures. Standardized drug sensitivity testing procedures and precise zone diameter interpretive standards for bacterial fish pathogens are needed.

  17. Effect of Preexposure to Triazoles on Susceptibility and Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Albert, Nathaniel D; Lewis, Russell E; Walsh, Thomas J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2015-12-01

    Triazole prophylaxis has become the norm in patients with hematological malignancies. Breakthrough infections caused by Mucorales during triazole prophylaxis remain a challenging problem. We found that preexposure of Rhizopus oryzae to antifungal triazoles (fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole) did not modify the in vitro susceptibility of Rhizopus oryzae to posaconazole. In contrast, preexposure of Rhizopus to triazoles was associated with the enhanced in vitro susceptibility of R. oryzae to amphotericin B. Preexposure to posaconazole did not alter the virulence of R. oryzae in the fly model of mucormycosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Effect of chitosan coating on a bacteria-based alginate microrobot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jun; Lee, Yu Kyung; Cho, Sunghoon; Uthaman, Saji; Park, In-Kyu; Min, Jung-Joon; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-04-01

    To develop an efficient bacteria-based microrobot, first, therapeutic bacteria should be encapsulated into microbeads using biodegradable and biocompatible materials; second, the releasing rate of the encapsulated bacteria for theragnostic function should be regulated; and finally, flagellated bacteria should be attached on the microbeads to ensure the motility of the microrobot. For the therapeutic bacteria encapsulation, an alginate can be a promising candidate as a biodegradable and biocompatible material. Owing to the non-regulated releasing rate of the encapsulated bacteria in alginate microbeads and the weak attachment of flagellated bacteria on the surface of alginate microbeads, however, the alginate microbeads cannot be used as effective cargo for a bacteria-based microrobot. In this paper, to enhance the stability of the bacteria encapsulation and the adhesion of flagellated bacteria in alginate microbeads, we performed a surface modification of alginate microbeads using chitosan coating. The bacteria-encapsulated alginate microbeads with 1% chitosan coating maintained their structural integrity up to 72 h, whereas the control alginate microbead group without chitosan coating showed severe degradations after 24 h. The chitosan coating in alginate microbeads shows the enhanced attachment of flagellated bacteria on the surface of alginate microbeads. The bacteria-actuated microrobot with the enhanced flagellated bacteria attachment could show approximately 4.2 times higher average velocities than the control bacteria-actuated microrobot without chitosan coating. Consequently, the surface modification using chitosan coating enhanced the structural stability and the motility of the bacteria-based alginate microrobots. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Chrysanthemum boreale Essential Oil on Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factor Expression of Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom-Su Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of essential oil extracted from Chrysanthemum boreale (C. boreale on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans. To investigate anticariogenic properties, and bacterial growth, acid production, biofilm formation, bacterial adherence of S. mutans were evaluated. Then gene expression of several virulence factors was also evaluated. C. boreale essential oil exhibited significant inhibition of bacterial growth, adherence capacity, and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations 0.1–0.5 mg/mL and 0.25–0.5 mg/mL, respectively. The safranin staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the biofilm formation was also inhibited. The result of live/dead staining showed the bactericidal effect. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of some virulence factors such as gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, spaP, brpA, relA, and vicR of S. mutans was significantly decreased in a dose dependent manner. In GC and GC-MS analysis, seventy-two compounds were identified in the oil, representing 85.42% of the total oil. The major components were camphor (20.89%, β-caryophyllene (5.71%, α-thujone (5.46%, piperitone (5.27%, epi-sesquiphellandrene (5.16%, α-pinene (4.97%, 1,8-cineole (4.52%, β-pinene (4.45%, and camphene (4.19%. These results suggest that C. boreale essential oil may inhibit growth, adhesion, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation of S. mutans through the partial inhibition of several of these virulence factors.

  20. Inhibitory Effects of Chrysanthemum boreale Essential Oil on Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factor Expression of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Park, Sun-Ju; Kim, Myung-Kon; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Sang-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Lee, Young-Eun; You, Yong-Ouk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of essential oil extracted from Chrysanthemum boreale (C. boreale) on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). To investigate anticariogenic properties, and bacterial growth, acid production, biofilm formation, bacterial adherence of S. mutans were evaluated. Then gene expression of several virulence factors was also evaluated. C. boreale essential oil exhibited significant inhibition of bacterial growth, adherence capacity, and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations 0.1-0.5 mg/mL and 0.25-0.5 mg/mL, respectively. The safranin staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the biofilm formation was also inhibited. The result of live/dead staining showed the bactericidal effect. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of some virulence factors such as gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, spaP, brpA, relA, and vicR of S. mutans was significantly decreased in a dose dependent manner. In GC and GC-MS analysis, seventy-two compounds were identified in the oil, representing 85.42% of the total oil. The major components were camphor (20.89%), β-caryophyllene (5.71%), α-thujone (5.46%), piperitone (5.27%), epi-sesquiphellandrene (5.16%), α-pinene (4.97%), 1,8-cineole (4.52%), β-pinene (4.45%), and camphene (4.19%). These results suggest that C. boreale essential oil may inhibit growth, adhesion, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation of S. mutans through the partial inhibition of several of these virulence factors.

  1. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus phages: effect of translation initiation efficiency on differential codon adaptation mediated by virulent and temperate lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya; Xia, Xuhua

    2015-05-01

    Rapid biosynthesis is key to the success of bacteria and viruses. Highly expressed genes in bacteria exhibit a strong codon bias corresponding to the differential availability of tRNAs. However, a large clade of lambdoid coliphages exhibits relatively poor codon adaptation to the host translation machinery, in contrast to other coliphages that exhibit strong codon adaptation to the host. Three possible explanations were previously proposed but dismissed: (1) the phage-borne tRNA genes that reduce the dependence of phage translation on host tRNAs, (2) lack of time needed for evolving codon adaptation due to recent host switching, and (3) strong strand asymmetry with biased mutation disrupting codon adaptation. Here, we examined the possibility that phages with relatively poor codon adaptation have poor translation initiation which would weaken the selection on codon adaptation. We measured translation initiation by: (1) the strength and position of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence, and (2) the stability of the secondary structure of sequences flanking the SD and start codon known to affect accessibility of the SD sequence and start codon. Phage genes with strong codon adaptation had significantly stronger SD sequences than those with poor codon adaptation. The former also had significantly weaker secondary structure in sequences flanking the SD sequence and start codon than the latter. Thus, lambdoid phages do not exhibit strong codon adaptation because they have relatively inefficient translation initiation and would benefit little from increased elongation efficiency. We also provided evidence suggesting that phage lifestyle (virulent versus temperate) affected selection intensity on the efficiency of translation initiation and elongation. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to polystyrene plates, effect of serum on adhesion, and virulence in the gerbil otitis media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelves, Lorena; del Prado, Gema; Rodriguez-Cerrato, Violeta; Gracia, Matilde; Cenjor, Carlos; Granizo, Juan J; Ponte, Carmen; Soriano, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The adherence of 11 pneumococcal strains to polystyrene was studied and expressed as the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered per 10(6)CFU of initial inoculum. Three strains were considered as strong adherent (>100CFU/10(6)), three as medium adherent (10-100CFU/10(6)), and five as low adherent (<10CFU/10(6)). All serotype 3 strains were low adherent whilst serotypes 23F and 19F behaved as strong or medium adherent. The impact of gerbil sera on adherence of six selected pneumococcal strains (one strong adherent, one medium adherent, and four low adherents) to abiotic material was also studied under two experimental conditions. In the presence of sera, the adherence ability of the strong, medium, and one low adherent strains decreased significantly. On the other hand, the adherence significantly increased in all strains when sera were removed following preincubation of bacteria exposed to sera, although such increase was statistically significant for five of them. Finally, the ability of two (one strong adherent and one low adherent) strains to induce otitis media in gerbils was also evaluated; the strong adherent strain behaved significantly more virulent than the less adherent in terms of ear damage and animal weight loss.

  3. Effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchley, E. R.; Gong, W.-L.; Alleman, J.E.; Rose, J.B.; Huffman, D.E.; Otaki, M.; Lisle, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater disinfection is practiced with the goal of reducing risks of human exposure to pathogenic microorganisms. In most circumstances, the efficacy of a wastewater disinfection process is regulated and monitored based on measurements of the responses of indicator bacteria. However, inactivation of indicator bacteria does not guarantee an acceptable degree of inactivation among other waterborne microorganisms (e.g., microbial pathogens). Undisinfected effluent samples from several municipal wastewater treatment facilities were collected for analysis. Facilities were selected to provide a broad spectrum of effluent quality, particularly as related to nitrogenous compounds. Samples were subjected to bench-scale chlorination and dechlorination and UV irradiation under conditions that allowed compliance with relevant discharge regulations and such that disinfectant exposures could be accurately quantified. Disinfected samples were subjected to a battery of assays to assess the immediate and long-term effects of wastewater disinfection on waterborne bacteria and viruses. In general, (viable) bacterial populations showed an immediate decline as a result of disinfectant exposure; however, incubation of disinfected samples under conditions that were designed to mimic the conditions in a receiving stream resulted in substantial recovery of the total bacterial community. The bacterial groups that are commonly used as indicators do not provide an accurate representation of the response of the bacterial community to disinfectant exposure and subsequent recovery in the environment. UV irradiation and chlorination/dechlorination both accomplished measurable inactivation of indigenous phage; however, the extent of inactivation was fairly modest under the conditions of disinfection used in this study. UV irradiation was consistently more effective as a virucide than chlorination/dechlorination under the conditions of application, based on measurements of virus (phage

  4. Anti-bacterial effects of the essential oil of Teucrium polium L. on human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mohammad; Hassan Salari; Armita Farahmand

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pathogenic bacteria are important causes of disease in humans and agricultural products contamination. Side effects of chemical preservatives necessitate research on the use of a special blend of natural oils to prevent the growth of bacteria. The aim of this study was elucidating the antibacterial effect of the essential oil of Teucrium polium on human pathogenic bacteria in the Kerman province. Materials and Methods: In order to investigate the chemical composition and antiba...

  5. Combinatorial Effects of Arginine and Fluoride on Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Cheng, X.; Wang, L.; Qiu, W.; Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Li, M.; Li, Y.; Cheng, L.; Li, J.; Zhou, X.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicating synergy between fluoride and arginine in caries management. Here, we hypothesize that arginine may augment the ecological benefit of fluoride by enriching alkali-generating bacteria in the plaque biofilm and thus synergizes with fluoride in controlling dental caries. Specifically, we assessed the combinatory effects of NaF/arginine on planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis with checkerboard microdilution assays. The optimal NaF/arginine combinations were selected, and their combinatory effects on microbial composition were further examined in single-, dual-, and 3-species biofilm using bacterial species–specific fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that arginine synergized with fluoride in suppressing acidogenic S. mutans in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. In addition, the NaF/arginine combination synergistically reduced S. mutans but enriched S. sanguinis within the multispecies biofilms. More importantly, the optimal combination of NaF/arginine maintained a “streptococcal pressure” against the potential growth of oral anaerobe P. gingivalis within the alkalized biofilm. Taken together, we conclude that the combinatory application of fluoride and arginine has a potential synergistic effect in maintaining a healthy oral microbial equilibrium and thus represents a promising ecological approach to caries management. PMID:25477312

  6. Relative Effectiveness of Water Hyacinth, Bacteria and Fungi in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phytoremedian), bacteria and fungi (bioremedians) used for the purification of domestic sewage was carried out using Completely Randomised Design (CRD) replicated three times. Physical, bacteriological and chemical properties of domestic sewage ...

  7. Mechanistic, genomic and proteomic study on the effects of BisGMA-derived biodegradation product on cariogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghinejad, Lida; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Siqueira, Walter L; Merritt, Justin; Santerre, J Paul; Finer, Yoav

    2017-02-01

    Investigate the effects of a Bis-phenyl-glycidyl-dimethacrylate (BisGMA) biodegradation product, bishydroxypropoxyphenyl-propane (BisHPPP), on gene expression and protein synthesis of cariogenic bacteria. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate the effects of BisHPPP on the expression of specific virulence-associated genes, i.e. gtfB, gtfC, gbpB, comC, comD, comE and atpH in Streptococcus mutans UA159. Possible mechanisms for bacterial response to BisHPPP were explored using gene knock-out and associated complemented strains of the signal peptide encoding gene, comC. The effects of BisHPPP on global gene and protein expression was analyzed using microarray and quantitative proteomics. The role of BisHPPP in glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme activity of S. mutans biofilms was also measured. BisHPPP (0.01, 0.1mM) up-regulated gtfB/C, gbpB, comCDE, and atpH most pronounced in biofilms at cariogenic pH (5.5). The effects of BisHPPP on the constructed knock-out and complemented strains of comC from quorum-sensing system, implicated this signaling pathway in up-regulation of the virulence-associated genes. Microarray and proteomics identified BisHPPP-regulated genes and proteins involved in biofilm formation, carbohydrate transport, acid tolerance and stress-response. GTF activity was higher in BisHPPP-exposed biofilms when compared to no-BisHPPP conditions. These findings provide insight into the genetic and physiological pathways and mechanisms that help explain S. mutans adaptation to restorative conditions that are conducive to increased secondary caries around resin composite restorations and may provide guidance to clinicians' decision on the selection of dental materials when considering the long term oral health of patients and the interactions of composite resins with oral bacteria. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Soluble Sulfide on the Activity of Luminescent Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide is an important water pollutant widely found in industrial waste water that has attracted much attention. S2−, as a weak acidic anion, is easy hydrolyzed to HS and H2S in aqueous solution. In this study, biological tests were performed to establish the toxicity of sulfide solutions on luminescent bacteria. Considering the sulfide solution was contained three substances—S2−, HS and H2S—the toxicity test was performed at different pH values to investigate which form of sulfide increased light emission and which reduced light emission. It was shown that the EC50 values were close at pH 7.4, 8.0 and 9.0 which were higher than pH 5 and 10. The light emission and sulfide concentrations displayed an inverse exponential dose-response relationship within a certain concentration range at pH 5, 6.5 and 10. The same phenomenon occurred for the high concentration of sulfide at pH 7.4, 8 and 9, in which the concentration of sulfide was HS >> H2S > S2−. An opposite hormesis-effect appeared at the low concentrations of sulfide.

  9. Effect of Antarctic solar radiation on sewage bacteria viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A

    2005-06-01

    The majority of coastal Antarctic research stations discard untreated sewage waste into the near-shore marine environment. However, Antarctic solar conditions are unique, with ozone depletion increasing the proportion of potentially damaging ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the marine environment. This study assessed the influence of Antarctic solar radiation on the viability of Escherichia coli and sewage microorganisms at Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Cell viability decreased with increased exposure time and with exposure to shorter wavelengths of solar radiation. Cell survival also declined with decreasing cloud cover, solar zenith angle and ozone column depth. However, particulates in sewage increased the persistence of viable bacteria. Ultraviolet radiation doses over Rothera Point were highest during the austral summer. During this time, solar radiation may act to partially reduce the number of viable sewage-derived microorganisms in the surface seawater around Antarctic outfalls. Nevertheless, this effect is not reliable and every effort should be made to fully treat sewage before release into the Antarctic marine environment.

  10. Bacillus anthracis-like bacteria and other B. cereus group members in a microbial community within the international space station: a challenge for rapid and easy molecular detection of virulent B. anthracis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tongeren, van S.P.; Roest, H.I.J.; Degener, J.E.; Harmsen, H.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order

  11. Bacillus anthracis-Like Bacteria and Other B. cereus Group Members in a Microbial Community Within the International Space Station : A Challenge for Rapid and Easy Molecular Detection of Virulent B. anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Roest, Hendrik I. J.; Degener, John E.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order

  12. Inactivation of pyocyanin synthesis genes has no effect on the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 toward the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieda, Yuuka; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa; Shimizu, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of pyocyanin to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against the silkworm Bombyx mori was studied. First, purified pyocyanin was injected into the hemocoel of B. mori. Acute toxicity was observed only when a high dose of pyocyanin was injected. The lethal dose 50% value of pyocyanin was found to be 9.52 microg per larva. Next, mutant strains of phzM and phzS, which encode putative phenazine-specific methytransferase and flavin-containing monooxygenase, respectively, were created, and their virulence was compared with that of the PAO1 parent strain. Although the ability to produce pyocyanin was completely lost in the phz-mutant strains, they maintained the same level of virulence as the PAO1 parent strain. In addition, the complementation of the corresponding gene in trans in the mutant strains did not have any effect on the virulence of those mutant strains. These results indicated that pyocyanin does not act as a virulence factor in B. mori after invasion, which was different from the results obtained in other Lepidopteran host models.

  13. Virulence Attributes of Low-Virulence Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Larsen

    1994-01-01

    virulence organisms present in the female lower genital tract, we are beginning to identify some of their virulence attributes. Examples from the work of our laboratory include the hemolysin of Gardnerella vaginalis and an immunosuppressive mycotoxin produced by Candida albicans. Demonstrating the coordinate expression (or other control mechanisms of virulence factors in these sometimes innocuous and sometimes inimical organisms represents the next frontier in the study of normal vaginal microbiology.

  14. Effect of teenage smoking on the prevalence of periodontal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Kari, Kirsti; Pajukanta, Riitta; Elonheimo, Outi; Koskenvuo, Markku; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate how teenage smoking affects the prevalence of periodontal bacteria and periodontal health with the hypothesis that smoking increases the prevalence of the bacteria. Oral health of 264 adolescents (15- to 16-year-olds) was clinically examined, and their smoking history was recorded. The participants also filled in a structured questionnaire recording their general health and health habits. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were taken for polymerase chain reaction analysis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Treponema denticola. The prevalence of P. intermedia (21% vs. 4%, p = 0.01) and T. forsythia and T. denticola (23% vs. 8%, p teenage smokers. Smoking girls harbored more frequently certain periodontal bacteria than non-smokers, but this was not seen in boys. Hence, our study hypothesis was only partly confirmed.

  15. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... 2001). Therefore, activities of AAB during cocoa fermentation are essential for the production of high-quality cocoa (Quesnel, 1965). On the other hand, cocoa fermentation remains difficult to .... Afoakwa et al., 2013 ; Ardhana and Fleet, 2003; Guehi et al., 2010). On the other hand, acetic acid bacteria.

  16. Effect of metalloporphyrins on red autofluorescence from oral bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.; van der Veen, M.H.; de Soet, J.J.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the red autofluorescence from bacterial species related to dental caries and periodontitis in the presence of different nutrients in the growth medium. Bacteria were grown anaerobically on tryptic soy agar (TSA) supplemented with nutrients, including

  17. Effective but costly, evolved mechanisms of defense against a virulent opportunistic pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin H Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila harbor substantial genetic variation for antibacterial defense, and investment in immunity is thought to involve a costly trade-off with life history traits, including development, life span, and reproduction. To understand the way in which insects invest in fighting bacterial infection, we selected for survival following systemic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster over 10 generations. We then examined genome-wide changes in expression in the selected flies relative to unselected controls, both of which had been infected with the pathogen. This powerful combination of techniques allowed us to specifically identify the genetic basis of the evolved immune response. In response to selection, population-level survivorship to infection increased from 15% to 70%. The evolved capacity for defense was costly, however, as evidenced by reduced longevity and larval viability and a rapid loss of the trait once selection pressure was removed. Counter to expectation, we observed more rapid developmental rates in the selected flies. Selection-associated changes in expression of genes with dual involvement in developmental and immune pathways suggest pleiotropy as a possible mechanism for the positive correlation. We also found that both the Toll and the Imd pathways work synergistically to limit infectivity and that cellular immunity plays a more critical role in overcoming P. aeruginosa infection than previously reported. This work reveals novel pathways by which Drosophila can survive infection with a virulent pathogen that may be rare in wild populations, however, due to their cost.

  18. Near-surface effects on the controlled motion of magnetotactic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, Islam S.M.; Tabak, Ahmet Fatih; Hageman, Tijmen; Ewis, Mohamed; Pichel, Marc; Mitwally, Mohamed E.; El-Din, Nermeen Serag; Abelmann, Leon; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have the potential to controllably reach stagnant fluids inside the human body and achieve targeted drug delivery. In this application, motion of the magnetotactic bacteria is influenced by the near-surface effects such as the background flows and surface interactions. Here,

  19. Effect of lactic acid bacteria on the textural properties of an edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rodrigo

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of different components and the addition of probiotic bacteria of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Lactobacillus casei) on the physicochemical and textural characteristics of edible films using a response surface Box-Behnken design. The edible films were made of the ...

  20. Identification of a secreted casein kinase 1 in Leishmania donovani: effect of protein over expression on parasite growth and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Dan-Goor

    Full Text Available Casein kinase 1 (CK1 plays an important role in eukaryotic signaling pathways, and their substrates include key regulatory proteins involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and chromosome segregation. The Leishmania genome encodes six potential CK1 isoforms, of which five have orthologs in other trypanosomatidae. Leishmania donovani CK1 isoform 4 (Ldck1.4, orthologous to LmjF27.1780 is unique to Leishmania and contains a putative secretion signal peptide. The full-length gene and three shorter constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli as His-tag proteins. Only the full-length 62.3 kDa protein showed protein kinase activity indicating that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are essential for protein activity. LdCK1.4-FLAG was stably over expressed in L. donovani, and shown by immunofluorescence to be localized primarily in the cytosol. Western blotting using anti-FLAG and anti-CK1.4 antibodies showed that this CK1 isoform is expressed and secreted by promastigotes. Over expression of LdCK1.4 had a significant effect on promastigote growth in culture with these parasites growing to higher cell densities than the control parasites (wild-type or Ld:luciferase, P<0.001. Analysis by flow cytometry showed a higher percentage, ∼4-5-fold, of virulent metacyclic promastigotes on day 3 among the LdCK1.4 parasites. Finally, parasites over expressing LdCK1.4 gave significantly higher infections of mouse peritoneal macrophages compared to wild-type parasites, 28.6% versus 6.3%, respectively (p = 0.0005. These results suggest that LdCK1.4 plays an important role in parasite survival and virulence. Further studies are needed to validate CK1.4 as a therapeutic target in Leishmania.

  1. Bee Venom (Apis Mellifera an Effective Potential Alternative to Gentamicin for Specific Bacteria Strains Bee Venom an Effective Potential for Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mellitine, a major component of bee venom (BV, Apis mellifera, is more active against gram positive than gram negative bacteria. Moreover, BV has been reported to have multiple effects, including antibacterial, antivirus, and anti-inflammation effects, in various types of cells. In addition, wasp venom has bee

  2. Microgravity effect on endophytic bacteria communities of Triticum aestivum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Youcai; Fu, Yuming; Chen, Huiwen; Liu, Hong; Sun, Yi

    2018-02-01

    Under normal gravity conditions, endophytic bacteria, one of the key bacterial community that inhabit in plant tissues, are well-known in promoting the plant growth and health, which are essential for long-term and long-distance manned microgravity space exploration. Here, we report how the Triticum aestivum endophytic bacterial communities behave differently under the simulated microgravity conditions. We demonstrate that, under simulated microgravity conditions, the microbial diversity in wheat seedling leaf increases while that in root decreases, compared to that cultivated under normal gravity conditions. We found that the dominant bacteria genus such as Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus and Bacillus significantly changes with gravity. The findings of this study provide important insight for space research, especially in terms of the Triticum aestivum cultivation in space.

  3. The effect of species diversity on metal adsorption onto bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Brian R.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we measure proton, Pb, and Cd adsorption onto the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans, Thermus thermophilus, Acidiphlium angustum, Flavobacterium aquatile, and Flavobacterium hibernum, and we calculate the thermodynamic stability constants for the important surface complexes. These bacterial species represent a wide genetic diversity of bacteria, and they occupy a wide range of habitats. All of the species, except for A. angustum, exhibit similar proton and metal uptake. The only species tested that exhibits significantly different protonation behavior is A. angustum, an acidophile that grows at significantly lower pH than the other species of this study. We demonstrate that a single, metal-specific, surface complexation model can be used to reasonably account for the acid/base and metal adsorption behaviors of each species. We use a four discrete site non-electrostatic model to describe the protonation of the bacterial functional groups, with averaged p Ka values of 3.1 ± 0.3, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.1, and 9.2 ± 0.3, and site concentrations of (1.0 ± 0.17) × 10 -4, (9.0 ± 3.0) × 10 -5, (4.6 ± 1.8) × 10 -5, and (6.1 ± 2.3) × 10 -5 mol of sites per gram wet mass of bacteria, respectively. Adsorption of Cd and Pb onto the bacteria can be accounted for by the formation of complexes with each of the bacterial surface sites. The average log stability constants for Cd complexes with Sites 1-4 are 2.4 ± 0.4, 3.2 ± 0.1, 4.4 ± 0.1, and 5.3 ± 0.1, respectively. The average log stability constants for Pb complexes with Sites 1-4 are 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.5 ± 0.3, 6.5 ± 0.1, and 7.9 ± 0.5, respectively. This study demonstrates that a wide range of bacteria exhibit similar proton and metal adsorption behaviors, and that a single set of averaged acidity constants, site concentrations, and stability constants for metal-bacterial surface complexes yields a reasonable model for the adsorption behavior of many of these species. The differences in adsorption

  4. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Nehrke, Keith; Blaser, Martin J

    2013-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria occurs in the intestinal tract of their animal hosts and facilitates both virulence and antibiotic resistance. A model in which both the pathogen and the host are genetically tractable facilitates developing insight into mechanistic processes enabling or restricting the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Here we develop an in vivo experimental system to study HGT in bacteria using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Using a thermosensitive conjugative system, we provide evidence that conjugation between two Escherichia coli strains can take place in the intestinal lumen of N2 wild-type worms at a rate of 10(-3) and 10(-2) per donor. We also show that C. elegans age and genotype are important determinants of the frequency of conjugation. Whereas ∼1 transconjugant for every 100 donor cells could be recovered from the intestine of N2 C. elegans, for the age-1 and tol-1 mutants, the detected rate of transconjugation (10(-3) and 10(-4) per donor cell, respectively) was significantly lower. This work demonstrates that increased recombination among lumenal microbial populations is a phenotype associated with host aging, and the model provides a framework to study the dynamics of bacterial horizontal gene transfer within the intestinal environment.

  5. Effects of Fungicides on Aquatic Fungi and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, D. E.; Rosemond, A. D.; Black, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Aquatic microorganisms play an important role in conditioning leaf litter that enters streams and serves as an important base of production for consumers. Contamination of streams by fungicides may adversely affect microorganisms and alter leaf litter processing rates. Unfortunately, microorganisms are rarely used in acute toxicity tests for fungicide evaluation and registration. We adapted the resazurin reduction assay, which is used in medical microbiology, to assess the acute toxicity of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and chlorothalonil) to aquatic fungi (Articulospora tetracladia) and bacteria (Cytophaga spp.), and investigated the ability of the toxicants to inhibit leaf breakdown in microcosms. Fungi were more sensitive to fungicides than many standard test organisms (cladocerans, green algae, trout), while bacteria were often the least sensitive. All of the fungicides except kresoxim-methyl, when added to microcosms at concentrations that inhibited the fungi by 90 percent in acute tests, reduced leaf breakdown rates by an average of 14.7 percent. Thus, aquatic fungi and their associated functions in streams may be relatively sensitive to fungicides applied terrestrially that enter streams through non-point sources. These data highlight the importance of including aquatic fungi in safety assessments of pesticides for protection of microbial function.

  6. Evaluation of Galleria mellonella larvae for studying the virulence of Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikova, Nadya; Kavanagh, Kevin; Wells, Jerry M

    2016-12-15

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs, resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. S. suis is considered an emerging zoonotic agent with increasing numbers of human cases over the last years. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, with no evidence for consistent adapatation of virulent strains to the human host. Currently, there is an urgent need for a convenient, reliable and standardised animal model to rapidly assess S. suis virulence. Wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae have successfully been used in human and animal infectious disease studies. Here, we developed G. mellonella larvae as a model to assess virulence of S. suis strains. Fourteen isolates of S. suis belonging to different serotypes killed G. mellonella larvae in a dose-dependent manner. Larvae infected with the virulent serotype 2 strain, S. suis S3881/S10, were rescued by antibiotic therapy. Crucially, the observed virulence of the different serotypes and mutants was in agreement with virulence observed in piglets (Sus scrofa) and the zebrafish larval infection model. Infection with heat-inactivated bacteria or bacteria-free culture supernatants showed that in most cases live bacteria are needed to cause mortality in G. mellonella. The G. mellonella model is simple, cost-efficient, and raises less ethical issues than experiments on vertebrates and reduces infrastructure requirements. Furthermore, it allows experiments to be performed at the host temperature (37 °C). The results reported here, indicate that the G. mellonella model may aid our understanding of veterinary microbial pathogens such as the emerging zoonotic pathogen S. suis and generate hypotheses for testing in the target animal host. Ultimately, this might lead to the timely introduction of new effective remedies for infectious diseases. Last but not least, use of the G. mellonella

  7. The effect of vacuum pump oil on the chemotactic behavior of soil bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunifon, R.E.; Hazen, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    The use of biodegradation in the cleanup and transformation of waste materials is an economical and environmentally safe practice. Using chemotaxis, or the movement of bacteria toward or away from compounds, in biodegradation is an area that is being studied at the Savannah River Laboratory. This study investigates the inhibition of vacuum pump oil on the chemotaxis of soil bacteria. It was found that vacuum pump oil does have an inhibitory effect on the movement of bacteria. This inhibition will have to be considered when studying the possibility of using chemotaxis to degrade vacuum pump oil, or any other petroleum products. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Role of lysozyme inhibitors in the virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Vanderkelen

    Full Text Available Lysozymes are key effectors of the animal innate immunity system that kill bacteria by hydrolyzing peptidoglycan, their major cell wall constituent. Recently, specific inhibitors of the three major lysozyme families occuring in the animal kingdom (c-, g- and i-type have been discovered in Gram-negative bacteria, and it has been proposed that these may help bacteria to evade lysozyme mediated lysis during interaction with an animal host. Escherichia coli produces two inhibitors that are specific for c-type lysozyme (Ivy, Inhibitor of vertebrate lysozyme; MliC, membrane bound lysozyme inhibitor of c-type lysozyme, and one specific for g-type lysozyme (PliG, periplasmic lysozyme inhibitor of g-type lysozyme. Here, we investigated the role of these lysozyme inhibitors in virulence of Avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC using a serum resistance test and a subcutaneous chicken infection model. Knock-out of mliC caused a strong reduction in serum resistance and in in vivo virulence that could be fully restored by genetic complementation, whereas ivy and pliG could be knocked out without effect on serum resistance and virulence. This is the first in vivo evidence for the involvement of lysozyme inhibitors in bacterial virulence. Remarkably, the virulence of a ivy mliC double knock-out strain was restored to almost wild-type level, and this strain also had a substantial residual periplasmic lysozyme inhibitory activity that was higher than that of the single knock-out strains. This suggests the existence of an additional periplasmic lysozyme inhibitor in this strain, and indicates a regulatory interaction in the expression of the different inhibitors.

  9. Role of Indole Production on Virulence of Vibrio cholerae Using Galleria mellonella Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Kongreung, Jetnaphang; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-09-01

    Cell to cell communication facilitated by chemical signals plays crucial roles in regulating various cellular functions in bacteria. Indole, one such signaling molecule has been demonstrated to control various bacterial phenotypes such as biofilm formation and virulence in diverse bacteria including Vibrio cholerae. The present study explores some key factors involved in indole production and the subsequent pathogenesis of V. cholerae. Indole production was higher at 37 °C than at 30 °C, although the growth at 37 °C was slightly higher. A positive correlation was observed between indole production and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. Maximum indole production was detected at pH 7. There was no significant difference in indole production between clinical and environmental V. cholerae isolates, although indole production in one environmental isolate was significantly different. Both growth and indole production showed relevant changes with differences in salinity. An indole negative mutant strain was constructed using transposon mutagenesis and the direct effect of indole on the virulence of V. cholerae was evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae model. Comparison to the wild type strain, the mutant significantly reduced the mortality of G. mellonella larvae which regained its virulence after complementation with exogenous indole. A gene involved in indole production and the virulence of V. cholerae was identified.

  10. Effect of air pollution on the total bacteria and pathogenic bacteria in different sizes of particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Xiangwu; Zhou, Meng; Wang, Jiaqi; He, Zhanfei; Zhang, Huihui; Lou, Liping; Mao, Weihua; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Baolan

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, air pollution events have occurred frequently in China during the winter. Most studies have focused on the physical and chemical composition of polluted air. Some studies have examined the bacterial bioaerosols both indoors and outdoors. But few studies have focused on the relationship between air pollution and bacteria, especially pathogenic bacteria. Airborne PM samples with different diameters and different air quality index values were collected in Hangzhou, China from December 2014 to January 2015. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA was used to categorize the airborne bacteria. Based on the NCBI database, the "Human Pathogen Database" was established, which is related to human health. Among all the PM samples, the diversity and concentration of total bacteria were lowest in the moderately or heavily polluted air. However, in the PM2.5 and PM10 samples, the relative abundances of pathogenic bacteria were highest in the heavily and moderately polluted air respectively. Considering the PM samples with different particle sizes, the diversities of total bacteria and the proportion of pathogenic bacteria in the PM10 samples were different from those in the PM2.5 and TSP samples. The composition of PM samples with different sizes range may be responsible for the variances. The relative humidity, carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations were the main factors, which affected the diversity of total bacteria and the proportion of pathogenic bacteria. Among the different environmental samples, the compositions of the total bacteria were very similar in all the airborne PM samples, but different from those in the water, surface soil, and ground dust samples. Which may be attributed to that the long-distance transport of the airflow may influence the composition of the airborne bacteria. This study of the pathogenic bacteria in airborne PM samples can provide a reference for environmental and public health researchers. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  11. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  12. Identification of the Avian Pasteurella multocida phoP Gene and Evaluation of the Effects of phoP Deletion on Virulence and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangpeng Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida is an animal pathogen of worldwide economic significance that causes fowl cholera in poultry and wild birds. Global gene regulators, including PhoP are important in regulating bacterial virulence and are good targets for developing attenuated vaccines against many pathogenic bacteria. However, the biological significance of phoP gene has not been identified in P. multocida. Here, we identified the phoP gene in P. multocida, and we evaluated the roles of phoP in P. multocida by deleting the phoP gene. The P. multocida phoP mutant exhibited similar growth curves and lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein profiles but displayed defective polymyxin resistance in vitro compared with the parent strain. Additionally, the phoP deletion resulted in decreased virulence. The LD50 of the ΔphoP mutant was 32- and 154-fold higher than the parent strain via the oral and intranasal routes, respectively. Transcriptome sequencing analysis showed that 161 genes were up-regulated and 173 genes were down-regulated in the absence of the phoP gene. Finally, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the ΔphoP mutant were evaluated. Immunized ducks produced significantly higher levels of serum IgY and bile IgA compared to the control ducks, and immunization with the ΔphoP mutant conferred 54.5% protection efficiency against challenge with the virulent P. multocida. This work provides a platform to dissect the function of phoP and develop a new vaccine against P. multocida.

  13. Identification of the Avian Pasteurella multocida phoP Gene and Evaluation of the Effects of phoP Deletion on Virulence and Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kangpeng; Liu, Qing; Liu, Xueyan; Hu, Yunlong; Zhao, Xinxin; Kong, Qingke

    2015-12-23

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an animal pathogen of worldwide economic significance that causes fowl cholera in poultry and wild birds. Global gene regulators, including PhoP are important in regulating bacterial virulence and are good targets for developing attenuated vaccines against many pathogenic bacteria. However, the biological significance of phoP gene has not been identified in P. multocida. Here, we identified the phoP gene in P. multocida, and we evaluated the roles of phoP in P. multocida by deleting the phoP gene. The P. multocida phoP mutant exhibited similar growth curves and lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein profiles but displayed defective polymyxin resistance in vitro compared with the parent strain. Additionally, the phoP deletion resulted in decreased virulence. The LD50 of the ΔphoP mutant was 32- and 154-fold higher than the parent strain via the oral and intranasal routes, respectively. Transcriptome sequencing analysis showed that 161 genes were up-regulated and 173 genes were down-regulated in the absence of the phoP gene. Finally, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the ΔphoP mutant were evaluated. Immunized ducks produced significantly higher levels of serum IgY and bile IgA compared to the control ducks, and immunization with the ΔphoP mutant conferred 54.5% protection efficiency against challenge with the virulent P. multocida. This work provides a platform to dissect the function of phoP and develop a new vaccine against P. multocida.

  14. Stress conditions triggering mucoid morphotype variation in Burkholderia species and effect on virulence in Galleria mellonella and biofilm formation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês N Silva

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc bacteria are opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections particularly among cystic fibrosis patients. During these chronic infections, mucoid-to-nonmucoid morphotype variation occurs, with the two morphotypes exhibiting different phenotypic properties. Here we show that in vitro, the mucoid clinical isolate Burkholderia multivorans D2095 gives rise to stable nonmucoid variants in response to prolonged stationary phase, presence of antibiotics, and osmotic and oxidative stresses. Furthermore, in vitro colony morphotype variation within other members of the Burkholderia genus occurred in Bcc and non-Bcc strains, irrespectively of their clinical or environmental origin. Survival to starvation and iron limitation was comparable for the mucoid parental isolate and the respective nonmucoid variant, while susceptibility to antibiotics and to oxidative stress was increased in the nonmucoid variants. Acute infection of Galleria mellonella larvae showed that, in general, the nonmucoid variants were less virulent than the respective parental mucoid isolate, suggesting a role for the exopolysaccharide in virulence. In addition, most of the tested nonmucoid variants produced more biofilm biomass than their respective mucoid parental isolate. As biofilms are often associated with increased persistence of pathogens in the CF lungs and are an indicative of different cell-to-cell interactions, it is possible that the nonmucoid variants are better adapted to persist in this host environment.

  15. The Effect of Low Shear Force on the Virulence Potential of Yersinia pestis: New aspects that Space-Like Growth Conditions and the Final Frontier can teach us about a Formidable Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Rosenzweig

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Manned space exploration has created a need to evaluate the effects of space-like stress (SLS on pathogenic and opportunistic microbes. Interestingly, several Gram-negative enteric pathogens, e.g., Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, have revealed a transient hyper-virulent phenotype following simulated microgravity (SMG or actual space flight exposures. We have explored the virulence potential of Yersinia pestis KIM/D27 (YP following exposure to mechanical low shear forces associated with SMG in various bodily fluids of an infected host which could provide new insights into its pathogenesis. In our seminal studies, the effects of low shear force on YP KIM/D27 proliferation and the type three secretion system (T3SS functions were evaluated. For most studies, a KIM/D27 ΔyopB mutant strain lacking the ability to inject Yersinia outer proteins (Yops into the targeted host cell was used as an internal negative control. Our experimental results demonstrated that SMG-grown YP was decreased in its induced magnitude of host cell rounding when employing HeLa cells in a cytotoxicity assay than did the NG-grown bacteria, suggesting that SMG somehow compromises T3SS functions. This was confirmed by an actual reduced amount of effector protein production and secretion through the T3SS injectisome. Also, SMG-grown YP used to infect cultured RAW 246.7 macrophages proliferated less than their NG-grown counterparts during the 8-hour infection period. Presently, we are evaluating the influence of SMG on various KIM/D27 mutant strains to further understanding of our initial phenomenology described above. Taken together, characterizing YP grown under the low shear forces of SMG can provide new insights into its pathogenesis and potentially uncover new targets that could be exploited for the development of novel antimicrobials as well as potential live-attenuated vaccines.

  16. Effects of Ethanolic Ferolagu angulata Extract on Pathogenic Gastrointestinal Bacteria and Probiotic Bacteria in Skimmed Milk Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Naghiha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:    Due to excessive consumption of synthetic drugs, drug resistance rate of pathogenic bacteria is increasing and there is an ever-increasing need to find new safe compounds to tackle this problem. This study was conducted to investigate the consequences of chavill extract on the growth and viability of gastrointestinal pathogenic bacterium and probiotics bacteria. Methods:    The experiment contained three levels of the chavill extract concentrations (0, 1 and 3% which were added to the milk free fat in accompany with three probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and lactobacillus plantaram and a pathogenic gastrointestinal bacterium (Salmonella typhimurium. Bacterial inoculums (1×107 CFU/ml with different concentrations of chavill extract were added to skimmed milk medium and bacteria growth were enumerated. Results:  The concentration of 1% chavill extract significantly increased the total count of probiotic bacteria compared to the control group, while the number of pathogenic bacteria was decreased. At 3% chavill extract the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantaram were increased. On the other hand, it prevented the growth of Salmonella typhimurium Conclusion:   Chavill extracts would play as an alternative to antibiotics in pharmacological studies to decreases harmful bacteria and increase probiotic bacteria.

  17. Effects of Ethanolic Ferolagu angulata Extract on Pathogenic Gastrointestinal Bacteria and Probiotic Bacteria in Skimmed Milk Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Naghiha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:    Due to excessive consumption of synthetic drugs, drug resistance rate of pathogenic bacteria is increasing and there is an ever-increasing need to find new safe compounds to tackle this problem. This study was conducted to investigate the consequences of chavill extract on the growth and viability of gastrointestinal pathogenic bacterium and probiotics bacteria. Methods:    The experiment contained three levels of the chavill extract concentrations (0, 1 and 3% which were added to the milk free fat in accompany with three probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and lactobacillus plantaram and a pathogenic gastrointestinal bacterium (Salmonella typhimurium. Bacterial inoculums (1×107 CFU/ml with different concentrations of chavill extract were added to skimmed milk medium and bacteria growth were enumerated. Results:  The concentration of 1% chavill extract significantly increased the total count of probiotic bacteria compared to the control group, while the number of pathogenic bacteria was decreased. At 3% chavill extract the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantaram were increased. On the other hand, it prevented the growth of Salmonella typhimurium Conclusion:   Chavill extracts would play as an alternative to antibiotics in pharmacological studies to decreases harmful bacteria and increase probiotic bacteria.

  18. Integrating fluid dynamic and biologic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Endres, Jennifer; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. In previous work on biofilm growth and evolution in steady, laminar microchannel flows, it has been established that tower formation occurs around a very limited range of applied shear stresses centered on 0.6 dynes/cm2. Quantifying cell density characteristics as a function of time during biofilm formation reveals indicators of tower development hours before towers actually form and become visible. The next step in this research is to explore biological factors that might explain why this specific shear is so important. Additional studies with mutants, e.g. ica-A, that have been tied to tower formation have been conducted. The shear dependence of these mutants and their correlation to the behavior of wild type S. aureus is examined.

  19. Effect of volatile organic compounds from bacteria on nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, You-Yao; Lu, Hao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Li, Guo-Hong

    2015-09-01

    The five studied bacterial strains could produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that kill nematodes. Based on their 16S rRNA sequences, these strains were identified as Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Wautersiella falsenii, Proteus hauseri, Arthrobacter nicotianae, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The bacterial VOCs were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and subsequently identified by GC/MS analysis. The VOCs covered a wide range of aldehydes, ketones, alkyls, alcohols, alkenes, esters, alkynes, acids, ethers, as well as heterocyclic and phenolic compounds. Among the 53 VOCs identified, 19 candidates, produced by different bacteria, were selected to test their nematicidal activity (NA) against Caenorhabditis elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. The seven compounds with the highest NAs were acetophenone, S-methyl thiobutyrate, dimethyl disulfide, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, nonan-2-one, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate. Among them, S-methyl thiobutyrate showed a stronger NA than the commercial insecticide dimethyl disulfide. It was reported for the first time here that the five bacterial strains as well as S-methyl thiobutyrate, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate possess NA. These strains and compounds might provide new insights in the search for novel nematicides. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  20. Virulence of Fusarium species to alfalfa seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaja Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In in vitro conditions, virulence of 91 isolates of species Fusarium genus (F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. acuminatum, F. equiseti, F. arthrosporioides, F. prolifera- tum, F. avenaceum, F. semitectum, F. tricinctum, F. sporotrichioides and F. graminearum towards alfalfa seedlings was investigated. Isolates of investigated species originated from diseased alfalfa plants collected at four locations in Serbia based on symptoms of wilting caused by Fusarium and root rotting. Pathogenicity and virulence of investigated isolates of Fusarium spp. were determined by visual evaluation of inoculated seedlings of cultivar K28 in laboratory conditions. All isolated of investigated species had pathogenic effect on alfalfa seedlings which expressed symptoms such as necrosis of root, moist rotting and "melting of seedlings". Colour of necrotic root tissue varied from light brown, brown lipstick red to explicit black, depending on the Fusarium species. Strong virulence was established in 48 isolates, medium virulence in 31 and weak virulence in 12 isolates.

  1. Virulence of Fusarium species to alfalfa seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaja Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In in vitro conditions, virulence of 91 isolates of species Fusarium genus (F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. acuminatum, F. equiseti, F. arthrosporioides, F. proliferatum, F. avenaceum, F. semitectum, F. tricinctum, F. sporotrichioides and F. graminearum towards alfalfa seedlings was investigated. Isolates of investigated species originated from diseased alfalfa plants collected on four locations in Serbia based on symptoms of wilting caused by fusarium and root rotting. Pathogenicity and virulence of investigated isolates of Fusarium spp. were determined by visual evaluation of inoculated seedlings of cultivars K28 in laboratory conditions. All isolated of investigated species had pathogenic effect on alfalfa seedlings, which expressed symptoms such as necrosis of root, moist rotting and "melting of seedlings". Colour of necrotic root tissue varied from light brown, brown, lipstick red to explicit black, depending on the Fusarium species. Strong virulence was established in 48 isolates, medium virulence in 31 and weak virulence in 12 isolates.

  2. Plasma effects on the bacteria Escherichia coli via two evaluation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujošević, Danijela; Cvelbar, Uroš; Repnik, Urška,; Modic, Martina; Lazović, Saša; Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Puač, Nevena; Mugša, Boban; Gogolides, Evangelos; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; Mozetič, Miran

    2017-07-01

    The degradation of Escherichia coli bacteria by treatment with cold, weakly ionised, highly dissociated oxygen plasma, with an electron temperature of 3 eV, a plasma density of 8 × 1015 m-3 and a neutral oxygen atom density of 3.5 × 1021 m-3 was studied. To determine the ‘real’ plasma effects, two methods were used for evaluation and determination, as well as a comparison of the number of bacteria that had survived: the standard plate count technique (PCT) and advanced fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Bacteria were deposited onto glass substrates and kept below 50 °C during the experiments with oxygen plasma. The results showed that the bacteria had fully degraded after about 2 min of plasma treatment, depending slightly on the amount of bacteria that had been deposited on the substrates. The very precise determination of the O flux on the substrates and the two-method comparison allowed for the determination of the critical dose of oxygen atoms required for the destruction of a bacterial cell wall—about 6 × 1024 m-2—as well as deactivation of the substrates—about 8 × 1025 m-2. These results were taken in order to discuss other results obtained by comparable studies and scientific method evaluations in the determination of plasma effects on bacteria.

  3. The double positive effect of the swimming strategy of E-Coli bacteria in a flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, Adama; Auradou, Harold; Clement, Eric; Douarche, Carine; D'Angelo, Veronica; Fluide Automatique Et Systèmes Thermiques (Fast) Team; Ecole Supérieure de Physique Et de Chimie Industrielle (Espci) Team; Laboratoire de Physique Du Solide (Lps) Team; Conicet Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Active matters have been studied extensively in various regimes (from diluted to dense) in recent decades. More recently, it has been shown that the activity of the bacteria induces a rather significant measurable effect on the reduction of the viscosity of the carrier fluid. This effect is explained by the reorientation of the bacteria under the effect of shearing, the rheotaxis. In diluted regime, studies have shown the accumulation of microorganisms on the walls by an hydrodynamic mechanism. The experimental studies on the subject therefore consisted in putting the microorganisms under flow in tubes of circular or rectangular section. On the other hand, few is known about the effect of this coupling between their swimming and the flow in a more complex flow. In order to do this, we have developed a channel with random obstacles of different sizes in which the E. coli strain RP437 has been flowed with different velocities. At the scale of a porous medium, our experiments show that the fluid-bacterial coupling has a double effect (i) the activity of motile (active) bacteria favors trapping between and around the grains which is not the case for non-motile (inactive) bacteria and (ii) as a bonus some motile bacteria progressing more rapidly in the medium. This work is supported by a public Grant from the french Agence Nationale de la Recherche (reference: ANR-15-CE30-0013).

  4. CRISPR interference can prevent natural transformation and virulence acquisition during in vivo bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Mucida, Daniel; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-08-16

    Pathogenic bacterial strains emerge largely due to transfer of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria, a process known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci of bacteria and archaea encode a sequence-specific defense mechanism against bacteriophages and constitute a programmable barrier to HGT. However, the impact of CRISPRs on the emergence of virulence is unknown. We programmed the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae with CRISPR sequences that target capsule genes, an essential pneumococcal virulence factor, and show that CRISPR interference can prevent transformation of nonencapsulated, avirulent pneumococci into capsulated, virulent strains during infection in mice. Further, at low frequencies bacteria can lose CRISPR function, acquire capsule genes, and mount a successful infection. These results demonstrate that CRISPR interference can prevent the emergence of virulence in vivo and that strong selective pressure for virulence or antibiotic resistance can lead to CRISPR loss in bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole genome transcriptomics reveals global effects including up-regulation of Francisella pathogenicity island gene expression during active stringent response in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis SCHU S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, Amber L; Skipp, Paul J; Roach, Peter L; Oyston, Petra C F

    2017-11-01

    During conditions of nutrient limitation bacteria undergo a series of global gene expression changes to survive conditions of amino acid and fatty acid starvation. Rapid reallocation of cellular resources is brought about by gene expression changes coordinated by the signalling nucleotides' guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate, collectively termed (p)ppGpp and is known as the stringent response. The stringent response has been implicated in bacterial virulence, with elevated (p)ppGpp levels being associated with increased virulence gene expression. This has been observed in the highly pathogenic Francisella tularensis sub spp. tularensis SCHU S4, the causative agent of tularaemia. Here, we aimed to artificially induce the stringent response by culturing F. tularensis in the presence of the amino acid analogue l-serine hydroxamate. Serine hydroxamate competitively inhibits tRNAser aminoacylation, causing an accumulation of uncharged tRNA. The uncharged tRNA enters the A site on the translating bacterial ribosome and causes ribosome stalling, in turn stimulating the production of (p)ppGpp and activation of the stringent response. Using the essential virulence gene iglC, which is encoded on the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) as a marker of active stringent response, we optimized the culture conditions required for the investigation of virulence gene expression under conditions of nutrient limitation. We subsequently used whole genome RNA-seq to show how F. tularensis alters gene expression on a global scale during active stringent response. Key findings included up-regulation of genes involved in virulence, stress responses and metabolism, and down-regulation of genes involved in metabolite transport and cell division. F. tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen capable of causing debilitating or fatal disease at extremely low infectious doses. However, virulence mechanisms are still poorly understood. The stringent response is widely

  6. Beneficial Effects of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors on Fonsecaea pedrosoi: Promising Compounds to Arrest Key Fungal Biological Processes and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira, Vanila F.; Kneipp, Lucimar F.; Rozental, Sonia; Alviano, Celuta S.; Santos, André L. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the principal etiologic agent of chromoblastomycosis, a fungal disease whose pathogenic events are poorly understood. Current therapy for chromoblastomycosis is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the fact that endemic countries and regions are economically poor. Purpose and Principal Findings In the present work, we have investigated the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) peptidase inhibitors (PIs) on the F. pedrosoi conidial secreted peptidase, growth, ultrastructure and interaction with different mammalian cells. All the PIs impaired the acidic conidial-derived peptidase activity in a dose-dependent fashion, in which nelfinavir produced the best inhibitory effect. F. pedrosoi growth was also significantly reduced upon exposure to PIs, especially nelfinavir and saquinavir. PIs treatment caused profound changes in the conidial ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including invaginations in the cytoplasmic membrane, disorder and detachment of the cell wall, enlargement of fungi cytoplasmic vacuoles, and abnormal cell division. The synergistic action on growth ability between nelfinavir and amphotericin B, when both were used at sub-inhibitory concentrations, was also observed. PIs reduced the adhesion and endocytic indexes during the interaction between conidia and epithelial cells (CHO), fibroblasts or macrophages, in a cell type-dependent manner. Moreover, PIs interfered with the conidia into mycelia transformation when in contact with CHO and with the susceptibility killing by macrophage cells. Conclusions/Significance Overall, by providing the first evidence that HIV PIs directly affects F. pedrosoi development and virulence, these data add new insights on the wide-spectrum efficacy of HIV PIs, further arguing for the potential chemotherapeutic targets for aspartyl-type peptidase produced by this human

  7. The combined effects of starvation and pH on the virulence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shigella sonnei encounter numerous different stresses during their growth, survival and infection. In this study, the effect of stress response to pH and starvation was investigated. We studied the survival, adhesion and the morphology of Shigella after its incubation in several pH. Our results show that after 2 h of incubation, ...

  8. Effect of biofilm formation on virulence factor secretion via the general secretory pathway in Streptococcus mutans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Meng, L.; Fan, M.; Hu, P.; Bian, Z.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of SecA in protein secretion, and to evaluate the effect of biofilm formation on protein secretion in Streptococcus mutans. DESIGN: S. mutans strains UA159 and GS-5 were used in this study. Cells grown in biofilm and planktonic conditions were observed using

  9. The combined effects of starvation and pH on the virulence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACER

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... this study, the effect of stress response to pH and starvation was investigated. We studied the survival, ... for pathogens to survive in natural environment or invade hosts. ..... morphological change of foodborne pathogens following exposure to hydrostatic ... mutants defective in survival or recovery. Microbiol ...

  10. Anti-bacterial effects of the essential oil of Teucrium polium L. on human pathogenic bacteria

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    Mohammad Mohammad

    2013-09-01

    Results: The total oil content of Teucrium polium plant was 0.75%. Twenty eight compounds were identified in the essential oil that included 99.75% of the total oil. The major components were α-pinene (12.52%, Linalool (10.63% and Caryophyllene oxide (9.69%. For study of antimicrobial activity of the oil sample, the essential oil was tested against 9 bacteria by disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial effects of this essential oil was determined against three Gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus areous (PTCC 1431, Staphylococcus epidermidis (PTCC 1436, Streptococcus faecalis (PTCC 1237; as well as six Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeroginosa (PTCC 11430, Shigella flexneri (PTCC 1716, Kellebsiella pneuomonae(PTCC=1053, Salmonella typhi (PTCC=1609, Serratia marcescens (PTCC 1187 and Escherichia coli (PTCC 1533. The antimicrobial effects of this essential oil on the Gram positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis and on all the Gram negative bacteria tested was much higher than those observed by tetracycline. Conclusions: The results showed the essential oil of Teucrium polium had strong anti-bacterial effects. The relatively high contents of α-pinene and Linalool in the essential oil may be the cause of its potential medicinal effects

  11. Different growth promoting effects of endophytic bacteria on invasive and native clonal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Cong eDai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of W. trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets' growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion.

  12. Effect of decreased BCAA synthesis through disruption of ilvC gene on the virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyu-Lee; Lee, Seungyeop; Luong, Truc Thanh; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Park, Sang-Sang; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. It causes a variety of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. In bacterial physiology, the metabolic pathway of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) plays an important role in virulence. Nonetheless, the function of IlvC, one of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of BCAAs, in S. pneumoniae remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of BCAA biosynthesis by ilvC ablation can diminish BCAA concentration and expression of pneumolysin (Ply) and LytA, and subsequently attenuate virulence. Infection with an ilvC mutant showed significantly reduced mortality and colonization in comparison with strain D39 (serotype 2, wild type), suggesting that ilvC can potentiate S. pneumoniae virulence due to adequate BCAA synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that the function of ilvC in BCAA synthesis is essential for virulence factor and could play an important role in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections.

  13. Synergistic Effect of Different Plant Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes Is Important for Virulence of Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccanaro, Maria Chiara; Sella, Luca; Castiglioni, Carla; Giacomello, Francesca; Martínez-Rocha, Ana Lilia; D'Ovidio, Renato; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Favaron, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Endo-polygalacturonases (PGs) and xylanases have been shown to play an important role during pathogenesis of some fungal pathogens of dicot plants, while their role in monocot pathogens is less defined. Pg1 and xyr1 genes of the wheat pathogen Fusarium graminearum encode the main PG and the major regulator of xylanase production, respectively. Single- and double-disrupted mutants for these genes were obtained to assess their contribution to fungal infection. Compared with wild-type strain, the ∆pg mutant showed a nearly abolished PG activity, slight reduced virulence on soybean seedlings, but no significant difference in disease symptoms on wheat spikes; the ∆xyr mutant was strongly reduced in xylanase activity and moderately reduced in cellulase activity but was as virulent as wild type on both soybean and wheat plants. Consequently, the ΔpgΔxyr double mutant was impaired in xylanase, PG, and cellulase activities but, differently from single mutants, was significantly reduced in virulence on both plants. These findings demonstrate that the concurrent presence of PG, xylanase, and cellulase activities is necessary for full virulence. The observation that the uronides released from wheat cell wall after a F. graminearum PG treatment were largely increased by the fungal xylanases suggests that these enzymes act synergistically in deconstructing the plant cell wall.

  14. Modification of a virulence-associated phenotype after growth of Listeria monocytogenes on food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midelet-Bourdin, G; Leleu, G; Copin, S; Roche, S M; Velge, P; Malle, P

    2006-08-01

    To assess the effect of different foods, which have been implicated or not in cases of listeriosis, on the in vitro virulence-associated phenotype level of different Listeria monocytogenes strains. The virulence-associated phenotype level of L. monocytogenes was studied with the in vitro cell test based on a plaque-forming assay with a human adenocarcinoma cell line (HT-29) monolayer. Three strains of L. monocytogenes were grown in preparations (homogenate, 1-mum filtrate or 0.2-mum filtrate) of different food extracts ['rillettes' (potted minced pork), milk, raw salmon and cold-smoked salmon] or in a control medium, brain heart infusion (BHI). The bacterial suspensions grown in food extracts or in BHI at 37 degrees C were diluted with their growth medium (food extract or BHI) or with minimum essential medium before seeding on confluent HT-29 cell monolayers. Filtration of food extracts had no significant effect on the plaque numbers formed by the bacteria. A significant decrease in the plaque numbers was noted for the three strains when they grew in the rillettes extracts, compared with the other food extracts and BHI. The levels of in vitro virulence-associated phenotype of the strains after growth in the rillettes extract were similar to or lower than that of the hypovirulent internal reference strain L. monocytogenes 442. After growth in milk and cold-smoked salmon, the impact on virulence-associated phenotype depended on the strain. In contrast, plaque-forming assay indicated increased virulence-associated phenotype when the strains were switched from a nutrient-rich medium (food extract or BHI) to a minimum essential medium. In vitro virulence-associated phenotype level of the studied strains grown in BHI or cold-smoked salmon was the same as the control virulent strain EGD. In contrast, the nutrients present in rillettes may therefore substantially reduce the number of plaques but not the growth of L. monocytogenes. The utilization of minimum essential

  15. Phage-driven loss of virulence in a fish pathogenic bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Laanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasites provide a selective pressure during the evolution of their hosts, and mediate a range of effects on ecological communities. Due to their short generation time, host-parasite interactions may also drive the virulence of opportunistic bacteria. This is especially relevant in systems where high densities of hosts and parasites on different trophic levels (e.g. vertebrate hosts, their bacterial pathogens, and virus parasitizing bacteria co-exist. In farmed salmonid fingerlings, Flavobacterium columnare is an emerging pathogen, and phage that infect F. columnare have been isolated. However, the impact of these phage on their host bacterium is not well understood. To study this, four strains of F. columnare were exposed to three isolates of lytic phage and the development of phage resistance and changes in colony morphology were monitored. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio as a model system, the ancestral rhizoid morphotypes were associated with a 25-100% mortality rate, whereas phage-resistant rough morphotypes that lost their virulence and gliding motility (which are key characteristics of the ancestral types, did not affect zebrafish survival. Both morphotypes maintained their colony morphologies over ten serial passages in liquid culture, except for the low-virulence strain, Os06, which changed morphology with each passage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effects of phage-host interactions in a commercially important fish pathogen where phage resistance directly correlates with a decline in bacterial virulence. These results suggest that phage can cause phenotypic changes in F. columnare outside the fish host, and antagonistic interactions between bacterial pathogens and their parasitic phage can favor low bacterial virulence under natural conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that phage-based therapies can provide a disease management strategy for columnaris disease in aquaculture.

  16. Effect of Residual Bacteria on the Outcome of Pulp Regeneration In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P; Nosrat, A; Kim, J R; Price, J B; Wang, P; Bair, E; Xu, H H; Fouad, A F

    2017-01-01

    It is not known to what extent residual infection may interfere with the success of pulp regeneration procedures. The aim of this study was to determine, radiographically and histologically, the effect of residual bacteria on the outcome of pulp regeneration mediated by a tissue-engineered construct as compared with traditional revascularization. Periapical lesions were induced in 24 canine teeth of 6 ferrets. After disinfection with 1.25% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste, ferret dental pulp stem cells, encapsulated in a hydrogel scaffold, were injected into half the experimental teeth. The other half were treated with the traditional revascularization protocol with a blood clot scaffold. After 3 mo, block sections of the canine teeth were imaged radiographically and processed for histologic and histobacteriologic analyses. Associations between variables of interest were evaluated through mixed effects regression models. There were no significant differences between the 2 experimental groups in radiographic root development ( P > 0.05). There was a significant association between the presence of persistent periapical radiolucency and root wall thickness ( P = 0.02). There was also no significant difference in histologic findings between the 2 experimental groups ( P > 0.05). The presence of residual bacteria was significantly associated with lack of radiographic growth ( P bacteria was significantly less than in teeth with no residual bacteria ( P bacteria have a critical negative effect on the outcome of regenerative endodontic procedures.

  17. The effects of dsRNA mycoviruses on growth and murine virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Muhammad F; Jamal, Atif; Petrou, Michael A; Cairns, Timothy C; Bignell, Elaine M; Coutts, Robert H A

    2011-11-01

    Some isolates of the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are known to be infected with mycoviruses. The dsRNA genomes of two of these mycoviruses, which include a chrysovirus and a partitivirus, have been completely sequenced and an RT-PCR assay for the viruses has been developed. Through curing virus-infected A. fumigatus isolates by cycloheximide treatment and transfecting virus-free isolates with purified virus, as checked by RT-PCR, isogenic virus-free and virus-infected lines of the fungus were generated whose phenotypes and growth have been directly compared. Mycovirus infection of A. fumigatus with either the chrysovirus or the partitivirus resulted in significant aberrant phenotypic alterations and attenuation of growth of the fungus but had no effect on susceptibility to common antifungals. Chrysovirus infection of A. fumigatus caused no significant alterations to murine pathogenicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-04-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission.

  19. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Mauricio H.; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  20. Differential effects of dissolved organic carbon upon re-entrainment and surface properties of groundwater bacteria and bacteria-sized microspheres during transport through a contaminated, sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Mohanram, A.; Gao, X.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Injection-and-recovery studies involving a contaminated, sandy aquifer (Cape Cod, Massachusetts) were conducted to assess the relative susceptibility for in situ re-entrainment of attached groundwater bacteria (Pseudomonas stuzeri ML2, and uncultured, native bacteria) and carboxylate-modified microspheres (0.2 and 1.0 μm diameters). Different patterns of re-entrainment were evident for the two colloids in response to subsequent injections of groundwater (hydrodynamic perturbation), deionized water (ionic strength alteration), 77 μM linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS, anionic surfactant), and 76 μM Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, a very hydrophobic nonionic surfactant). An injection of deionized water was more effective in causing detachment of micrsopheres than were either of the surfactants, consistent with the more electrostatic nature of microsphere’s attachment, their extreme hydrophilicity (hydrophilicity index, HI, of 0.99), and negative charge (zeta potentials, ζ, of −44 to −49 mv). In contrast, Tween 80 was considerably more effective in re-entraining the more-hydrophobic native bacteria. Both the hydrophilicities and zeta potentials of the native bacteria were highly sensitive to and linearly correlated with levels of groundwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which varied modestly from 0.6 to 1.3 mg L−1. The most hydrophilic (0.52 HI) and negatively charged (ζ −38.1 mv) indigenous bacteria were associated with the lowest DOC. FTIR spectra indicated the latter community had the highest average density of surface carboxyl groups. In contrast, differences in groundwater (DOC) had no measurable effect on hydrophilicity of the bacteria-sized microspheres and only a minor effect on their ζ. These findings suggest that microspheres may not be very good surrogates for bacteria in field-scale transport studies and that adaptive (biological) changes in bacterial surface characteristics may need to be considered where there is longer

  1. Effects of fenpropimorph on bacteria and fungi during decomposition of barley roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirup, L.; Johnsen, K.; Torsvik, V.

    2001-01-01

    The study examined the effects of the fungicide fenpropimorph (in the formulation Corbel) on primary decomposer organisms in soil. Bacterial and fungal succession was followed on dead young barley roots buried in fungicide-treated or untreated soil, Fenpropimorph was added to the soil...... and non-treated root samples. The number of total culturable bacteria was significantly lowered by fenpropimorph at day 17 and stimulated at day 56, indicating a possible indirect effect of the fungicide on the culturable bacteria as a whole. Nevertheless, culturable Pseudomonas and actinomycetes were...

  2. Inhibitory effects of oral Actinomyces on the proliferation, virulence and biofilm formation of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiqing; Wei, Changlei; Liu, Chuanxia; Li, Duo; Sun, Jun; Huang, Haiyun; Zhou, Hongmei

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Candida-associated stomatitis involves the dysfunction of flora antagonistic to Candida. Oral Actinomyces species play an important role in regulating the oral microecological balance. The objective of this study was to investigate the antagonism of three oral Actinomyces against Candida albicans. Suspensions, culture supernatants and bacterial lysates of Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces odontolyticus were investigated for their actions upon C. albicans. In addition to a commercial strain, six clinical strains of C. albicans were also tested. The proliferation of C. albicans was assessed using a liquid co-cultivation assay. The adhesion, acid protease and extracellular phospholipase activity, hyphae growth, and biofilm formation of C. albicans were measured. The results showed that the suspensions, culture supernatants and cell lysates of 10(8) colony forming units/ml oral Actinomyces significantly inhibited the proliferation of C. albicans (all PActinomyces have inhibitory effects on the proliferation, adhesion, metabolic enzyme activity, hyphae formation and biofilm development of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods Ninety-six samples were obtained from vaginal discharge of women with bacterial vaginosis by a gynecologist with a Dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth. Then were immediately sent to the laboratory in cold chain for further assessment. Afterward, culture was transferred on blood agar, EMB, Palcam and differential diagnosis environments. Then cultures were incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C. Lactobacillus reuteri strains were cultured in MRS environment and transferred to laboratory. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus reuteri inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and antibiogram. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software v.16. Results The results of this study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of most Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use, contraceptive methods and douching were 61%, 55%, 42% and 13%, respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial. Conclusions Our findings indicated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria that

  4. Effects of acivicin on growth, mycotoxin production and virulence of phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, K; Nakajima, Y; Motoyama, T; Kitou, Y; Kosaki, T; Saito, T; Nishiuchi, T; Kanamaru, K; Osada, H; Kobayashi, T; Kimura, M

    2014-10-01

    Acivicin is an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and glutamine amidotransferase. When grown on a synthetic minimal agar medium, acivicin strongly inhibited the growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Alternaria brassicicola, and to a lesser extent, Botrytis cinerea. However, only partial or marginal growth inhibition was observed with regard to Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum. The growth retardation caused by acivicin was significantly alleviated by cultivating the fungus on a nutrient-rich medium. The inhibition of M. oryzae growth caused by 1 μmol l(-1) of acivicin on minimal agar medium was subdued by the addition of specific single amino acids, including His, a branched-chain amino acid (Leu, Ile or Val), an aromatic amino acid (Trp, Tyr or Phe), Met or Gln, at a concentration of 0·4 mmol l(-1). Trichothecene production by F. graminearum in trichothecene-inducing liquid medium was reduced significantly in the presence of acivicin despite its inability to inhibit growth in the trichothecene-inducing liquid medium. Foliar application of conidia in the presence of acivicin reduced the severity of rice blast disease caused by M. oryzae. These results suggest the usefulness of this modified amino acid natural product to mitigate agricultural problems caused by some phytopathogenic fungi. Significance and impact of the study: Fusarium head blight or scab disease and rice blast, caused by Fusarium graminearum and Magnaporthe oryzae, respectively, are major diseases of cereal crops that cause a significant loss of yield and deterioration in the quality of the grain. The present study investigated the effects of acivicin, a glutamine amino acid analog, on the physiology of various phytopathogenic fungi. Application of acivicin to a fungal culture and conidial suspension reduced mycotoxin production by the wheat scab fungus and the severity of rice blast, respectively. These results suggest the possibility that acivicin may serve as a lead compound to

  5. [The effect of left bacteria in the root canal on prognosis of the root canal therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin-mei; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Ming-wen; Fan, Bing

    2004-06-01

    To study the effect of the left bacteria on the root canal therapy. 50 single-rooted teeth with chronic apical periodontitis were divided into two groups, one was instrumented with step-back technique and 2.5%NaOCl ultrasonic irrigation for 3 min, then filled with Thermafil. Samples were taken after instrumentation to culture. The other was treated with traditional RCT at three visits. In 24 months the apical radiolucency were greatly reduced in all cases. There weren't significant relationship among the postoperative pain and the left bacteria, the degree of the obturation or the pre-operative symptoms (P > 0.05). The effect of left bacteria in root canal filled with Thermafil wasn't observed.

  6. Antimicrobial compounds targeting Gram-negative bacteria in food: Their mode of action and combinational effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are a major cause of food spoilage and foodborne illnesses. However, finding effective solutions against Gram-negative bacteria are complicated because of increasing consumer demands for more natural, minimally processed, and fresh high quality food products without...... they interact with bacterial cells to exert their mechanism of inhibition or killing. Furthermore, natural antimicrobials are often not potent enough as single compounds, and may cause unwanted sensory side-effects, which limit the quantities that can be applied to food. These problems might be circumvented...... by combining antimicrobials to decrease the concentrations needed without compromising their antimicrobial activity. The work described in this dissertation presents two projects concerning the mechanism of action of selected natural antimicrobial compounds primarily against Gram-negative bacteria, and two...

  7. Insights into the Synergistic Effect of Fungi and Bacteria for Reactive Red Decolorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contamination is a prevalent problem in fungal dye wastewater decolorization that prevents the development of this technology in practical engineering. New insight into the relationship between fungi and bacteria is given in terms of settleability, bioadsorption, and biodegradation, which all confirm their synergistic effect. Sterilization is implied to be not the only mechanism for fungi decolorization. When the fungi and bacteria isolated from the activated sludge were cocultured, fungi removed more than 70% of the reactive red through sole bioadsorption in 5 min and enhanced the settleability of the bacteria group from 7.7 to 18.4 in the aggregation index. Subsequently, the bacteria played a more significant role in dye biodegradation according to the ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis. They further enhanced the decolorization efficiency to over 80% when cocultured with fungi. Therefore, the advanced bioadsorption and settleability of fungi, combined with the good dye biodegradation ability of bacteria, results in the synergistic effect of the coculture microorganisms.

  8. Effects of lactic bacteria on immunological activation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Hajime; Yuki, Rumio [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan). Graduate School

    2003-03-01

    Although some studies have suggested that certain substances, such as vitamins and glucan, found in natural food products may have protective effect against radiation injuries, no substance is used practically as radioprotectors. Safe radioprotectors without side effects are, however, yet to see. Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) in intestines is known to enhance immunity of the host as a biological response modifier. In this report, we have examined the radiation protection effect of Ef using C3H mice and assessed the effect of Ef on the natural killer (NK) cells activity of the splenic cells in the mice. Less body weight losses after irradiation were observed among Ef injection groups, in comparison with control groups. Our data showed a strong tendency to prolong the surviving fraction among the groups with the Ef injection. Hence, the Ef treatment appeared to have protected mucosal damage caused by the X-ray irradiation. The NK cells activities were markedly enhanced after the Ef injection as well. With the evidence mentioned above, we conclude that the Ef may have positive effect on patients who undergo a radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Modified-atmosphere packaging of hen table eggs: effects on pathogen and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, F; Manfreda, G; Olivi, P; Rocculi, P; Sirri, F; Meluzzi, A

    2012-12-01

    As part of a more comprehensive research activity on the use of modified-atmosphere packaging for the improvement of quality and functional properties of table eggs, the effects of air, 100% CO(2), and 100% O(2) packaging were also evaluated on the survival of experimentally inoculated pathogen bacteria (Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes) as well as on spoilage bacteria (total aerobic mesophilic bacteria) on table eggs during 30 d of storage at 4, 25, and 37°C by colony count method. In general, temperatures played a major role, rather than gasses, in influencing the bacterial survival. In particular, the lowest microbial loads were registered at 4°C on E. coli and spoilage bacteria, whereas 37°C was the best storage temperature to avoid the psychrotropic microorganism L. monocytogenes development regardless of the gas used. One hundred percent CO(2) packaging, in association with a low storage temperature (4°C), had a significant positive effect in reducing Salmonella loads. On eggs inoculated with L. monocytogenes and stored at 4°C as well as on eggs containing only spoilage bacteria and stored at 25°C, 100% CO(2) resulted the best gas in comparison with air and O(2). One hundred percent CO(2) packaging showed no negative effect on pathogen survival compared with air. Although further improvements are required to control RH within packaging to limit bacteria growth/survival, in view of the positive effects of CO(2) packaging on quality traits of table eggs, 100% CO(2) packaging might represent a promising innovative technique for the maintenance of egg characteristics during transport, retail, and domestic storage.

  10. The extinction differential induced virulence macroevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Xu, Liufang; Wang, Jin

    2014-04-01

    We apply the potential-flux landscape theory to deal with the large fluctuation induced extinction phenomena. We quantify the most probable extinction pathway on the landscape and measure the extinction risk by the landscape topography. In this Letter, we investigate the disease extinction through an epidemic model described by a set of chemical reaction. We found the virulence-differential-dependent symbioses between mother and daughter pathogen species: mutualism and parasitism. The symbioses, whether mutualism or parasitism, benefit the higher virulence species. This implies that speciation towards lower virulence is an effective strategy for a pathogen species to reduce its extinction risk.

  11. Effects of rhizobia and plant growth promoting bacteria inoculation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to observe the effect of PGPR and Rhizobial inoculation on seed germination, seedling emergence, growth and development of lowland rice variety MR219. The experiment was conducted under laboratory condition using filter paper in Petri dish. The design of the experiment was ...

  12. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study investigates the acidification capacity under various culture conditions of high acetic acid producer AAB strains previously isolated from Ivoirian cocoa beans fermentation. Methodology and Results: Effect of culture conditions was studied in agar medium and acid production was monitored by ...

  13. Effects of supplementing lactic acid bacteria on fecal microbiota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Probiotics (LAB) are normal components of the intestinal micro-flora in both humans and animals and its ingestion in decreasing the risk of atherosclerosis. In addition, the potential health effects of LAB were investigated by monitoring changes in intestinal micro-flora and lipid metabolism in a rat model.

  14. Brucella spp. Virulence Factors and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byndloss, Mariana X; Tsolis, Renee M

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella, is an important zoonotic infection that causes reproductive disease in domestic animals and chronic debilitating disease in humans. An intriguing aspect of Brucella infection is the ability of these bacteria to evade the host immune response, leading to pathogen persistence. Conversely, in the reproductive tract of infected animals, this stealthy pathogen is able to cause an acute severe inflammatory response. In this review, we discuss the different mechanisms used by Brucella to cause disease, with emphasis on its virulence factors and the dichotomy between chronic persistence and reproductive disease.

  15. Metal acquisition and virulence in Brucella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roop, R. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Similar to other bacteria, Brucella strains require several biologically essential metals for their survival in vitro and in vivo. Acquiring sufficient levels of some of these metals, particularly iron, manganese and zinc, is especially challenging in the mammalian host, where sequestration of these micronutrients is a well-documented component of both the innate and acquired immune responses. This review describes the Brucella metal transporters that have been shown to play critical roles in the virulence of these bacteria in experimental and natural hosts. PMID:22632611

  16. Microbial virulence and interactions with metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    German, N.; Lüthje, F.; Hao, X

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals, such as iron, copper, zinc, and manganese play an important role in many bacterial biological processes that add to an overall evolutional fitness of bacteria. They are often involved in regulation of bacterial virulence as a mechanism of host invasion. However, the same transi...... reconstruction of Fe-S clusters and the use of Mn as a protectant against reactive oxygen species. Therefore, tight regulation of transition metal distribution in bacteria and hosts is a vital part of host-pathogen interactions....

  17. Genetic diversity and virulence genes in Streptococcus uberis strains isolated from bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ambrósio Loures

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is one of the most common and costly infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. This is a multifactorial illness caused by different microorganisms, including virus, yeasts, algae, parasites, and several species of bacteria. Among these bacteria, Streptococcus uberis is an important environmental pathogen that is responsible for a large range of clinical and subclinical mammary infections, especially in intensively managed herds. Despite the increasing importance of this pathogen in the etiology of bovine mastitis, data on its virulence and diversity in Brazilian dairy herds are scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate the virulence characteristics of S. uberis isolated from bovine mastitis and to assess the molecular epidemiology of the Brazilian isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. In this work, 46 strains of S. uberis isolated from bovine mastitis from 26 Brazilian dairy herds were evaluated regarding their genetic diversity by PFGE using with the SmaI enzyme. Additionally, the presence of the virulence genes skc and pauA, which encode plasminogen activators, and the gene sua, which encodes an adhesion molecule in mammary epithelial cells, were assessed by PCR. Our results showed a high genetic diversity in the population, displaying many different patterns in the PFGE analysis. A high proportion of strains was positive for virulence genes in the sampled population (sua [100%], pauA [91%], and skc [91%]. The high frequency of skc, pauA, and sua genes among the studied strains suggests the importance of these virulence factors, possibly helping S. uberis in the colonization of the bovine mammary gland. Surveys of the genetic and molecular characteristics of this pathogen can improve our knowledge of bacterial activity and identify molecules that have roles in the establishment of the infection. This might help in the development of more effective measures to control and prevent bovine mastitis.

  18. Insight into Biological Effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoflowers on Bacteria: Why Morphology Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Gao, Yangyang; Gao, Tianyi; Lan, Shi; Simalou, Oudjaniyobi; Zhou, Xinyue; Zhang, Yanling; Harnoode, Chokto; Gao, Ge; Dong, Alideertu

    2016-04-27

    Zinc oxides have gained exciting achievements in antimicrobial fields because of their advantageous properties, whereas their biological effects on bacteria are currently underexplored. In this study, biological effects of flower-shaped nano zinc oxides on bacteria were systematically investigated. Zinc oxide nanoflowers with controllable morphologies (viz., rod flowers, fusiform flowers, and petal flowers) were synthesized by modulating merely base type and concentration using the hydrothermal process. Their antibacterial power is in an order of petal flowers > fusiform flowers > rod flowers because of their differences in microscopic parameters such as specific surface area, pore size, and Zn-polar plane, etc. More importantly, the role of morphology in influencing biological effect on bacteria was examined, focusing on the morphology-induced effect on integrality of cell wall, permeability of cell membrane, DNA cleavage, etc. As for cytotoxicity, all petal flowers, fusiform flowers, and rod flowers show trivial cytotoxicity to the Hela cells. This work provides a guide for enhancing biological effect of the biocides on pathogenic bacteria by the morphological modulation.

  19. Combinatorial Effects of Arginine and Fluoride on Oral Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, X.; Cheng, X.; Wang, L.; Qiu, W.; Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Li, M.; Li, Y.; Cheng, L.; Li, J.; Zhou, X.; Xu, X.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicati...

  20. Effect of sludges on bacteria in agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntz, Jérôme; Nassr-Amellal, Najat; Lollier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    (TTGE). At the laboratory scale, DS and especially LRS modified the composition of the bacterial communities (irrespective of the addition of BaPYR, DBP or NP or not). Sludges, especially LRS, very probably acted both as a bacterial inoculum and a nutrient source. The combined effect was transient...... in the laboratory conditions probably due to the favorable conditions of mineralization. The results observed with soil amended with the same sludges and cultivated or not with carrots in outdoor lysimeters were similar to those observed in the laboratory experiments. Thus, this bioassay allowed predicting...

  1. Coagulase-negative staphylococci: pathogenesis, occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes and in vitro effects of antimicrobial agents on biofilm-growing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczuka, Ewa; Jabłońska, Lucyna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens that particularly cause infections in patients with implanted medical devices. The present research was performed to study the virulence potential of 53 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus auricularis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus cohnii and Staphylococcus caprae. All clinical strains were clonally unrelated. Isolates carried genes encoding resistance to β-lactam (mecA) (15 %), aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)(11 %), aph (3')-IIIa (15 %), ant(4')-Ia (19 %)] and macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) [erm(A) (4 %), erm(B) (13 %), erm(C) (41 %), msr(A) (11 %)] antibiotics. CoNS isolates (64 %) were able to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that these biofilms formed a three-dimensional structure composed mainly of living cells. All biofilm-positive strains carried the ica operon. In vitro studies demonstrated that a combination treatment with tigecycline and rifampicin was more effective against biofilms than one with ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration values were 0.062-0.5 µg ml-1 for tigecycline/rifampicin and 0.250-2 µg ml-1 for ciprofloxacin/rifampicin. All CoNS strains adhered to the human epithelial cell line HeLa, and more than half of the isolates were able to invade the HeLa cells, although most invaded relatively poorly. The virulence of CoNS is also attributed to their cytotoxic effects on HeLa cells. Incubation of HeLa cells with culture supernatant of the CoNS isolates resulted in cell death. The results indicate that the pathogenicity of S. capitis, S. auricularis, S. lugdunensis, S. cohnii and S. caprae is multi-factorial, involving the ability of these bacteria to adhere to human epithelial cells, form biofilms and invade and destroy human cells.

  2. The influence of temperature on the effectiveness of filamentous bacteria removal from activated sludge by rotifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Fiałkowska, Edyta

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the feeding of the rotifer Lecane inermis on filamentous bacteria to determine if the ability of rotifers to remove filaments depends on temperature. The bacteria originated from two treatment plants, one of which was dominated by Microthrix parvicella and the other by Nostocoida limicola-like organisms. The experiments showed that the number of rotifers increased with temperature, and thus the ability of rotifers to reduce the number of filaments also increased with temperature. At 8 degrees C, their removal effectiveness was low, but the rotifers were able to survive at this temperature. When presented with sludge containing N. limicola-like microorganisms at 20 degrees C, the rotifers reduced the number of bacteria by 95%. In the case of M. parvicella, the reduction reached 50%. The results confirmed that Lecane are capable of controlling the growth of bacteria responsible for sludge bulking. This is the first report indicating that the seasonality of bulking may be the result of the activity of filamentous bacteria grazers, which is temperature dependent.

  3. The effect of presence of facultative bacteria species on semen and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Infections of male urogenital tracts may contribute to male infertility. However, the effects of bacterial presence on sperm quality and fertility are controversial. Objectives: We investigated the occurrence of non-specific bacteria and quality/quantity of semen of infertile and fertile control groups in Nigeria. Subjects ...

  4. Effect of water hyacinth on distribution of sulphate-reducing bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laub, on the distribution of populations of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sediments from various stations on the shores of Lake Victoria around Mwanza Municipality, Tanzania, was studied. Lactate-utilising SRB were observed to be the dominant ...

  5. Effect of biochanin A on corn grain (Zea mays) fermentation by bovine rumen amylolytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, B E; Flythe, M D; Aiken, G E

    2017-04-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of biochanin A (BCA), an isoflavone produced by red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), on corn fermentation by rumen micro-organisms. When bovine rumen bacterial cell suspensions (n = 3) were incubated (24 h, 39°C) with ground corn, amylolytic bacteria including group D Gram-positive cocci (GPC; Streptococcus bovis; enterococci) proliferated, cellulolytic bacteria were inhibited, lactate accumulated and pH declined. Addition of BCA (30 μg ml -1 ) inhibited lactate production, and pH decline. BCA had no effect on total amylolytics, but increased lactobacilli and decreased GPC. The initial rate and total starch disappearance was decreased by BCA addition. BCA with added Strep. bovis HC5 supernatant (containing bacteriocins) inhibited the amylolytic bacteria tested (Strep. bovis JB1; Strep. bovis HC5; Lactobacillus reuteri, Selenemonas ruminatium) to a greater extent than either addition alone. BCA increased cellulolytics and dry matter digestibility of hay with corn starch. These results indicate that BCA mitigates changes associated with corn fermentation by bovine rumen bacteria ex vivo. BCA could serve as an effective mitigation strategy for rumen acidosis. Future research is needed to evaluate the effect of BCA on mitigating rumen acidosis in vivo. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Antimicrobial effects of positively charged surfaces on adhering Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottenbos, B; Grijpma, DW; van der Mei, HC; Feijen, J; Busscher, HJ

    The infection of biomaterials is determined by an interplay of adhesion and surface growth of the infecting organisms. In this study, the antimicrobial effects on adhering bacteria of a positively charged poly(methacrylate) surface ( potential +12 mV) were compared with those of negatively charged

  7. Effect of lactic acid bacteria on the textural properties of an edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of lactic acid bacteria on the textural properties of an edible film based on whey, inulin and gelatin. Imelda García-Argueta, Octavio Dublán-García, Baciliza Quintero-Salazar, Aurelio Dominguez-Lopez, Leobardo Manuel Gómez-Oliván, Abdel-Fattah ZM Salem ...

  8. Effect of fumarate reducing bacteria on in vitro rumen fermentation, methane mitigation and microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuad, Lovelia; Kim, Seon Ho; Jeong, Chang Dae; Choi, Yeon Jae; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2014-02-01

    The metabolic pathways involved in hydrogen (H(2)) production, utilization and the activity of methanogens are the important factors that should be considered in controlling methane (CH(4)) emissions by ruminants. H(2) as one of the major substrate for CH(4) production is therefore should be controlled. One of the strategies on reducing CH(4) is through the use of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms such as fumarate reducing bacteria. This study determined the effect of fumarate reducing bacteria, Mitsuokella jalaludinii, supplementation on in vitro rumen fermentation, CH(4) production, diversity and quantity. M. jalaludinii significantly reduced CH(4) at 48 and 72 h of incubation and significantly increased succinate at 24 h. Although not significantly different, propionate was found to be highest in treatment containing M. jalaludinii at 12 and 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that supplementation of fumarate reducing bacteria to ruminal fermentation reduces CH(4) production and quantity, increases succinate and changes the rumen microbial diversity.

  9. BIOLOGY OF BACTERIUM LEPISEPTICUM : IV. VIRULENCE OF DIFFUSE AND MUCOID TYPES AND THEIR VARIANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, L T; Burn, C G

    1926-08-31

    As a preface to a general discussion of these experiments, we wish to refer again briefly to the titrations of virulence described in this paper. None of them was carried out in an altogether proper manner,- it was necessary to employ rabbits of mixed breed, to use small numbers, and in some instances, to compare the results of titrations done at different times of the year. Furthermore, many tests were made in the mouse, a foreign host, and by means of artificial injection into the peritoneal cavity. Hence, if our results had shown fluctuations and wide differences, we should have experienced difficulty in interpreting their significance. Fortunately, however, the control measures which we were able to employ,-namely the utilization of animals of similar age and weight, bred at the Rockefeller Institute under uniform environmental conditions, and free of previous exposure to Bact. lepisepticum, together with the technique of intranasal instillation of similar doses,-were sufficient to give consistent and relatively uniform effects. These we have regarded as presumptive evidence of the following: (1) that of the three types of Bact. lepisepticum described, "D" strains are the most virulent or pathogenic, mucoid forms less so, and "Grdquo; types little or not at all virulent; (2) that different strains of the same type are of similar virulence; and (3) that passage of type-pure strains through non-toxic, nutrient media, or through animals, does not modify their virulence. The experiments described in the present communications were planned to investigate certain microbic factors which seem to influence the spread of Bact. lepisepticum infection. Accordingly, we studied the types encountered in nature, their behavior in the rabbit host, and other qualities which might possibly be related to their parasitic activities. At the outset we discovered that very little is known about the "Pasteurella" or "hemorrhagic septicemia" organisms. Every small, blunt bacillus with

  10. Effect of the environment on horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, Clara A; Collins, Roy Eric; Rocap, Gabrielle; Brazelton, William J

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the transfer and incorporation of genetic material between different species of organisms, has an important but poorly quantified role in the adaptation of microbes to their environment. Previous work has shown that genome size and the number of horizontally transferred genes are strongly correlated. Here we consider how genome size confuses the quantification of horizontal gene transfer because the number of genes an organism accumulates over time depends on its evolutionary history and ecological context (e.g., the nutrient regime for which it is adapted). We investigated horizontal gene transfer between archaea and bacteria by first counting reciprocal BLAST hits among 448 bacterial and 57 archaeal genomes to find shared genes. Then we used the DarkHorse algorithm, a probability-based, lineage-weighted method (Podell & Gaasterland, 2007), to identify potential horizontally transferred genes among these shared genes. By removing the effect of genome size in the bacteria, we have identified bacteria with unusually large numbers of shared genes with archaea for their genome size. Interestingly, archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share unusually large numbers of genes. However, high salt was not found to significantly affect the numbers of shared genes. Numbers of shared (genome size-corrected, reciprocal BLAST hits) and transferred genes (identified by DarkHorse) were strongly correlated. Thus archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share horizontally transferred genes. These horizontally transferred genes are over-represented by genes involved in energy conversion as well as the transport and metabolism of inorganic ions and amino acids. Anaerobic and thermophilic bacteria share unusually large numbers of genes with archaea. This is mainly due to horizontal gene transfer of genes from the archaea to the bacteria. In

  11. Tropical Atlantic marine macroalgae with bioactivity against virulent and antibiotic resistant Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Cristina Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of ethanol, methanol, hexane and acetone-based extracts of the macroalgae Padina gymnospora (PG, Hypnea musciformes (HM, Ulva fasciata (UF and Caulerpa prolifera (CP was investigated. The disk diffusion method was used to evaluate the algae antimicrobial effect against standard strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica and five virulent antibiotic-resistant strains of V. brasiliensis, V. xuii and V. navarrensis (isolated from the hemolymph of Litopenaeus vannamei. Ethanol extracts of PG and HM inhibited all Vibrio strains. E. coli and P. aeruginosa were only susceptible to ethanol extracts of PG. Among the methanol extracts, only UF was bioactive, inhibiting V. navarrensis. The observed inhibitory effect of ethanol extracts of PG, HM and UF against virulent antibiotic-resistant bacteria suggests these macroalgal species constitute a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  12. Effects of gamma ray and electron-beam irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Michiko; Miyahara, Makoto [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    An extension of the approval for food irradiation is desired due to the increase in the incidence of food poisoning in the world. One anaerobic (Clostridium perfringens) and four facultatively anaerobic (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis) bacteria irradiated with gamma ray or electron beam (E-beam) were tested in terms of survival on agar under packaging atmosphere. Using pouch pack, effects of two irradiations on survival of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were evaluated comparatively. E-beam irradiation was more effective than gamma ray irradiation in decreasing the lethal dose 10% (D{sub 10}) value of B. cereus at 4 deg C, slightly more effective in that of E. coli O157, and similarly effective in that of the other three bacteria at 4 deg C. The gamma irradiation of the bacteria without incubation at 4 deg C before irradiation was more effective than that of the bacteria with incubation overnight at 4 deg C before irradiation in decreasing the D10 values of these bacteria (B. cereus, E. coli O157, and L. monocytogenes). Furthermore, ground beef patties inoculated with bacteria were irradiated with 1 kGy by E-beam (5 MeV) at 4 deg C. The inoculated bacteria in the 1-9 mm beef patties were killed by 1 kGy E-beam irradiation and some bacteria in more than 9 mm beef patties were not killed by the irradiation. (author)

  13. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  14. Comparison between the effect of Jaman and Biotene solutions on some of the dental plaque bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Poureslami DDS, MSc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM:Bacterial plaque is a biofilm which is related toits host and its exact role is proved in cariesand periodontal disease. These days people brush their teeth and use mouthwash. In this research the effect of Jamansolution (Hezar Co., Iran was compared withBiotene mouth rinse in an in-vitro study.METHODS:Biotene mouth rinse (Laclede Co., US contains 4 antibacterial enzymes.Four different bacteria such asStreptococcus (S. salivarius, S.sobrinus, S.sanguis and Actinomyces viscosus were cultured in the lab. The effects ofJaman, Biotene and penicillin on these bacteria were tested by using disc diffusion method.RESULTS:The antibacterial effects of Jaman and Biotene did not show any significant differences. Both of Jaman andBiotene showed significant differences with blank disc and penicillin.CONCLUSIONS:According to the results, the antibacterial effect of Biotene is not better than Jaman

  15. Differential effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Supplementation of minimal medium inoculated with bacterial cultures with norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, or isoproterenol resulted in marked increases in growth compared to controls. Norepinephrine and dopamine had the greatest enhancing effects on growth of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, while epinephrine and isoproterenol also enhanced growth to a lesser extent. The growth of Escherichia coli in the presence of norepinephrine was greater than growth in the presence of the three other neurochemicals used in the study. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus was also enhanced in the presence of norepinephrine, but not to the same degree as was the growth of gram negative bacteria. Addition of culture supernatants from E. coli cultures that had been grown in the presence of norepinephrine was able to enhance the growth of K. pneumoniae. Addition of the culture supernatant fluid culture from E. coli cultures that had been grown in the presence of norepinephrine did not enhance growth of P. aeruginosa or S. aureus. Culture supernatant fluids from bacteria other than E. coli grown in the presence of norepinephrine were not able to enhance the growth of any bacteria tested. The results suggest that catecholamines can enhance growth of pathogenic bacteria, which may contribute to development of pathogenesis; however, there is no uniform effect of catecholamines on bacterial growth.

  16. Effectiveness of periurethral cleaning solution to bacteria colonization count at periurethral area prior to urinary catheterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kristina lisum

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction :Patient safety is an important element that must be notice when providing care to patients, including nurse. The incidence of catheterized patient increasingly 25 % from total patients that hospitalized can lead urinary tract infection.  The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cleaning periurethral with povidone iodine 10 %, povidone iodine 2 % and normal saline to bacteria colonization prior to catetherization. Methods : This study used quasi-experimental, pre and post intervention design with control group.  Result : Periurethral swabs were obtained from a total 60 patients ( povidone iodine 10 % as control group , 20;  povidone iodine 2 %, 20; normal saline, 20.  Through paired t-test ,there  was significant decreased  (p value : .00; p .05 in bacteria colonization count. While, a simple linear regression result that povidone iodine 2% is the most effective solution on reducing bacteria colonization in periurethral area rather than other solution. In addition, recommendation needed to test bacteria colonization in urine culture using those periuretral cleaning solutions.   Keyword: periurethral cleaning, patient safety, povidone iodine 2%, povidone iodine 10%, normal saline

  17. Effects of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea, lipid metabolism, and carcinogenesis: a review of papers published between 1988 and 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de N.M.; Katan, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence from human intervention studies for the health effects of probiotic bacteria, ie, live bacteria that survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and have beneficial effects on the host. Of the 49 studies reviewed, 26 dealt with the prevention or treatment of diarrheal

  18. Low-shear modelled microgravity alters expression of virulence determinants of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Helena; Doyle, Marie; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2010-02-01

    Microbiological monitoring of air and surfaces within the ISS indicate that bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are found with high frequency. Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic pathogen with the capacity to cause severe debilitating infection, constitutes a significant proportion of these isolates. Experiments conducted during short-term flight suggest that growth in microgravity leads to increases in bacterial antibiotic resistance and to cell wall changes. Growth under low-shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) indicated that a reduced gravitational field acts as an environmental signal for expression of enhanced bacterial virulence in gram-negative pathogens. We therefore examined the effect of simulated microgravity on parameters of antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates RF1, RF6 and RF11; these strains were grown in a high aspect ratio vessel under LSMMG and compared with cells grown under normal gravity (NG). There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci grown under LSMMG compared to NG. LSMMG-induced reductions in synthesis of the pigment staphyloxanthin and the major virulence determinant α-toxin were noted. Significant changes in global gene expression were identified by DNA microarray analysis; with isolate RF6, the expression of hla and genes of the regulatory system saeR/saeS were reduced approximately two-fold. These data provide strong evidence that growth of S. aureus under modelled microgravity leads to a reduction in expression of virulence determinants.

  19. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abu Turab Naqvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP. This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein.

  20. Cold Plasma Inactivation of Bacterial Biofilms and Reduction of Quorum Sensing Regulated Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ziuzina

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this work were to investigate the effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP against a range of microbial biofilms commonly implicated in foodborne and healthcare associated human infections and against P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin, elastase (Las B and biofilm formation capacity post-ACP treatment. The effect of processing factors, namely treatment time and mode of plasma exposure on antimicrobial activity of ACP were also examined. Antibiofilm activity was assessed for E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in terms of reduction of culturability and retention of metabolic activity using colony count and XTT assays, respectively. All samples were treated 'inpack' using sealed polypropylene containers with a high voltage dielectric barrier discharge ACP generated at 80 kV for 0, 60, 120 and 300 s and a post treatment storage time of 24 h. According to colony counts, ACP treatment for 60 s reduced populations of E. coli to undetectable levels, whereas 300 s was necessary to significantly reduce populations of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus biofilms. The results obtained from XTT assay indicated possible induction of viable but non culturable state of bacteria. With respect to P. aeruginosa QS-related virulence factors, the production of pyocyanin was significantly inhibited after short treatment times, but reduction of elastase was notable only after 300 s and no reduction in actual biofilm formation was achieved post-ACP treatment. Importantly, reduction of virulence factors was associated with reduction of the cytotoxic effects of the bacterial supernatant on CHO-K1 cells, regardless of mode and duration of treatment. The results of this study point to ACP technology as an effective strategy for inactivation of established biofilms and may play an important role in attenuation of virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Further investigation is warranted to propose direct evidence

  1. Antibacterial Effects of Citrus aurantium on Bacteria Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Dadashi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background :  Emerging antibacterial resistance rates and beta-lactamase producing bacteria recovered from UTI is an increasing problem in different regions, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, this survey consider to use the extract and essence of the citrus aurantium (which have a so many rate of planting in Iran and also survey on extract on bacteria whose cause urinary tract infections, and compare this with common antibiotics. Methods and Materials: This study was experimental design.We have been isolate the E.coli,Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis from UTI and then determine of antibacterial effect of Citrus aurantium against this bacteria with subculture and put the exact diagnosis on them. Antibacterial effects of the herb extract by well diffusion assay and  nalidixic acid and Co-trimoxazol were evaluated by method of agar disc diffusion. Results:Enterococcus faecalis had 100% sensitivity against of extract,essence and Co-trimoxazole , and 80% against nalidixic acid . E.coli had 100% sensitivity against Co-trimoxazol, nalidixic acid and it was totally resistance to extract and essence.Klebsiella Pneumonie had 80% to Co-trimoxazol, 75% to nalidixic acid and resistance against extract and essence.Streptococcus agalactiae was 100% sensitivity to essence and Co-trimoxazol and 90% against nalidixic acid and shown 80% sensitivity against extract.Staphylococcus aureus MRSA shown 100% sensitivity against Co-trimoxazol and 70% sensitivity against essence, extract and nalidixic acid. Conclusion: Detection of antibiotic resistance among isolates is important in prevention and control of infections. In this study, it was shown that extracts of citrus aurantium have high antibacterial effects on gram positive bacteria compare to gram negative bacteria.

  2. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eManske

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To establish its intracellular niche termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV, L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different effector proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria.Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  3. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called "Legionnaires' disease." To establish its intracellular niche termed the "Legionella-containing vacuole" (LCV), L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different "effector" proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria. Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  4. Bactericidal Effect of Pterostilbene Alone and in Combination with Gentamicin against Human Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wee Xian; Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi

    2017-03-17

    The antibacterial activity of pterostilbene in combination with gentamicin against six strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of pterostilbene were determined using microdilution technique whereas the synergistic antibacterial activities of pterostilbene in combination with gentamicin were assessed using checkerboard assay and time-kill kinetic study. Results of the present study showed that the combination effects of pterostilbene with gentamicin were synergistic (FIC index gentamicin treatment. Furthermore, time-kill study showed that the growth of the tested bacteria was completely attenuated with 2 to 8 h treatment with 0.5 × MIC of pterostilbene and gentamicin. The identified combinations could be of effective therapeutic value against bacterial infections. These findings have potential implications in delaying the development of bacterial resistance as the antibacterial effect was achieved with the lower concentrations of antibacterial agents.

  5. Effects of speckle-like laser irradiation on growth of bacteria in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A. Yu.; Popova, N. A.; Tyurin, A. V.; Grimblatov, V.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the biological effects upon in vitro growth of bacteria and human peripheral blood erythrocytes of the irradiation with speckle-like highly-gradient laser light. Measurements of the growth of Staphylococcus aureus with and without antibiotic irradiated with uniform or interference pattern of intensity spatial distribution have shown strong dependence on the spatial frequency of the irradiation. Maximum inhibition of the bacteria growth was achieved at the frequency 1000 fringes/mm. It was also found that human blood erythrocytes exposure to such radiation at the power density typical for laser phototherapy could damage the erythrocytes. A possible explanation of the photo-biological effects of laser speckle irradiation relying on the electron-ion processes similar to those that occur under inhomogeneous illumination in inorganic media and called photo-stimulated diffusion of ions (Dember effect) is proposed and discussed.

  6. The effect of cell growth phase on the regulatory cross-talk between flagellar and Spi1 virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouslim, Chakib; Hughes, Kelly T

    2014-03-01

    The flagellar regulon controls Salmonella biofilm formation, virulence gene expression and the production of the major surface antigen present on the cell surface: flagellin. At the top of a flagellar regulatory hierarchy is the master operon, flhDC, which encodes the FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional complex required for the expression of flagellar, chemotaxis and Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (Spi1) genes. Of six potential transcriptional start-sites within the flhDC promoter region, only two, P1(flhDC) and P5(flhDC), were functional in a wild-type background, while P6(flhDC) was functional in the absence of CRP. These promoters are transcribed differentially to control either flagellar or Spi1 virulent gene expression at different stages of cell growth. Transcription from P1(flhDC) initiates flagellar assembly and a negative autoregulatory loop through FlhD₄C₂-dependent transcription of the rflM gene, which encodes a repressor of flhDC transcription. Transcription from P1(flhDC) also initiates transcription of the Spi1 regulatory gene, hilD, whose product, in addition to activating Spi1 genes, also activates transcription of the flhDC P5 promoter later in the cell growth phase. The regulators of flhDC transcription (RcsB, LrhA, RflM, HilD, SlyA and RtsB) also exert their control at different stages of the cell growth phase and are also subjected to cell growth phase control. This dynamic of flhDC transcription separates the roles of FlhD₄C₂ transcriptional activation into an early cell growth phase role for flagellar production from a late cell growth phase role in virulence gene expression.

  7. Bactericidal effects of 310 nm ultraviolet light-emitting diode irradiation on oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Ayuko; Matsushita, Kenji; Horioka, Satoru; Furuichi, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori

    2017-06-06

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is used for phototherapy in dermatology, and UVB light (around 310 nm) is effective for treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In addition, it is known that UVC light (around 265 nm) has a bactericidal effect, but little is known about the bactericidal effect of UVB light. In this study, we examined the bactericidal effects of UVB-light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on oral bacteria to explore the possibility of using a 310 nm UVB-LED irradiation device for treatment of oral infectious diseases. We prepared a UVB (310 nm) LED device for intraoral use to examine bactericidal effects on Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sauguinis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and also to examine the cytotoxicity to a human oral epithelial cell line (Ca9-22). We also examined the production of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide from Ca9-22 cells after irradiation with UVB-LED light. Irradiation with the 310 nm UVB-LED at 105 mJ/cm(2) showed 30-50% bactericidal activity to oral bacteria, though 17.1 mJ/cm(2) irradiation with the 265 nm UVC-LED completely killed the bacteria. Ca9-22 cells were strongly injured by irradiation with the 265 nm UVC-LED but were not harmed by irradiation with the 310 nm UVB-LED. Nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide were produced by Ca9-22 cells with irradiation using the 310 nm UVB-LED. P. gingivalis was killed by applying small amounts of those reactive oxygen species (ROS) in culture, but other bacteria showed low sensitivity to the ROS. Narrowband UVB-LED irradiation exhibited a weak bactericidal effect on oral bacteria but showed low toxicity to gingival epithelial cells. Its irradiation also induces the production of ROS from oral epithelial cells and may enhance bactericidal activity to specific periodontopathic bacteria. It may be useful as a new adjunctive therapy for periodontitis.

  8. Effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus virulence factor profiles in patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yolanda; Samudio, Margarita; Fariña, Norma; Castillo, Verónica; Abente, Sonia; Nentwich, Martin M; González-Britez, Nilsa; Laspina, Florentina; Carron, Agustín; Cibils, Diógenes; de Kaspar, Herminia Miño

    2017-08-01

    In this prospective study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify genes encoding virulence factors (ica, atlE and mecA) in Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) isolates from the ocular microbiota of patients undergoing cataract surgery and to investigate possible changes in the CNS profile due to antibiotic prophylaxis. Between 09/2011 and 08/2013, patients undergoing cataract surgery were recruited at the Department of Ophthalmology, National University of Asuncion, Paraguay. In the eye to be operated on, patients received moxifloxacin 0.5 % eye drops four times at the day before surgery and a last drop 1 hour before surgery (T1). The other eye remained as control (T0). Conjunctival swabs were taken from both eyes 1 hour after the last drop. The presence of genes encoding biofilm formation (ica and atlE) and methicillin resistance (mecA) was detected by a multiplex PCR. Of the 162 patients (162 study eyes, 162 fellow eye as control group), 87 (53.7 %) eyes were positive for CNS at T0 yielding 96 CNS isolates; 70 eyes (43.2 %) were positive at T1 yielding 77 CNS isolates. For this study, 43 CNS isolates (44.8 %) from T0 and 45 (64.3 %) from T1 were used. Of the total isolates, 81.8 % (72/88) had at least one virulence factor gene (37/43 from T0 and 35/45 from T1) (p = 0.314). Simultaneous detection of ica and atlE genes was higher in T0 (58.0 %) than T1 (46.7 %), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.28). A high frequency of genes encoding virulence factors was observed in the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates. The use of moxifloxacin did not significantly modify the CNS virulence factor profiles.

  9. In vitro screening of probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotic glucooligosaccharides to select effective synbiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimoud, Julien; Durand, Henri; Courtin, Céline; Monsan, Pierre; Ouarné, Françoise; Theodorou, Vassilia; Roques, Christine

    2010-10-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics have been demonstrated to positively modulate the intestinal microflora and could promote host health. Although some studies have been performed on combinations of probiotics and prebiotics, constituting synbiotics, results on the synergistic effects tend to be discordant in the published works. The first aim of our study was to screen some lactic acid bacteria on the basis of probiotic characteristics (resistance to intestinal conditions, inhibition of pathogenic strains). Bifidobacterium was the most resistant genus whereas Lactobacillus farciminis was strongly inhibited. The inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was strain dependent but lactobacilli were the most effective, especially L. farciminis. The second aim of the work was to select glucooligosaccharides for their ability to support the growth of the probiotics tested. We demonstrated the selective fermentability of oligodextran and oligoalternan by probiotic bacteria, especially the bifidobacteria, for shorter degrees of polymerisation and absence of metabolism by pathogenic bacteria. Thus, the observed characteristics confer potential prebiotic properties on these glucooligosaccharides, to be further confirmed in vivo, and suggest some possible applications in synbiotic combinations with the selected probiotics. Furthermore, the distinctive patterns of the different genera suggest a combination of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria with complementary probiotic effects in addition to the prebiotic ones. These associations should be further evaluated for their synbiotic effects through in vitro and in vivo models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on growth rate and morphology of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhan-Garip, Ayse; Aksu, Burak; Akan, Zafer; Akakin, Dilek; Ozaydin, A Nilufer; San, Tangul

    2011-12-01

    To determine the effect of extremely low frequency (electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on the growth rate of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and to determine any morphological changes that might have been caused by ELF-EMF. Six bacterial strains, three Gram-negative and three Gram-positive were subjected to 50 Hz, 0.5 mT ELF-EMF for 6 h. To determine growth rate after ELF-EMF application, bacteria exposed to ELF-EMF for 3 h were collected, transferred to fresh medium and cultured without field application for another 4 h. Growth-rate was determined by optical density (OD) measurements made every hour. Morphological changes were determined with Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for two gram-negative and two gram-positive strains collected after 3 h of field application. A decrease in growth rate with respect to control samples was observed for all strains during ELF-EMF application. The decrease in growth-rate continued when exposed bacteria were cultured without field application. Significant ultrastructural changes were observed in all bacterial strains, which were seen to resemble the alterations caused by cationic peptides. This study shows that ELF-EMF induces a decrease in growth rate and morphological changes for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections.

  12. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

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    Gita Eslami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis discharge referred to health centers dependent Shahid Beheshti University in 91-92 were taken by a gynecologist with a dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth and were immediately sent to the lab location in cold chain for the next stages of investigation. From Thioglycollate and TSB medium was cultured on blood agar and EMB and Palkam and Differential diagnosis environments, and then incubated for 24 h at 37°C. Strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus were cultured in MRSA environment and were transfered to the lab. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, MIC methods and antibiogram, Lactobacillus rhamnosus inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria is checked. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software v.16.Results: The results of this study show the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial vaginosis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Entrococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E.Coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of the large number of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use means of preventing pregnancy and douching, respectively, 61%, 55%, 42% and 13% respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial vaginosis infection

  13. The effects of a new therapeutic triclosan/copolymer/sodium-fluoride dentifrice on oral bacteria, including odorigenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgang, David; Sreenivasan, Prem K; Zhang, Yun Po; Fine, Daniel H; Cummins, Diane

    2003-09-01

    This investigation examined the in vitro and ex vivo antimicrobial effects of a new dentifrice, Colgate Total Advanced Fresh, formulated with triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride, on oral bacteria, including those odorigenic bacteria implicated in bad breath. The effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh were compared to commercially available fluoride dentifrices that served as controls. Three experimental approaches were undertaken for these studies. In the first approach, the dentifrice formulations were tested in vitro against 13 species of oral bacteria implicated in bad breath. The second approach examined the antimicrobial activity derived from dentifrice that was adsorbed to and released from hydroxyapatite disks. In this approach, dentifrice-treated hydroxyapatite disks were immersed in a suspension of bacteria, and reduction in bacterial viability from the release of bioactive agents from hydroxyapatite was determined. The third approach examined the effect of treating bacteria immediately after their removal from the oral cavity of 11 adult human volunteers. This ex vivo study examined the viability of cultivable oral bacteria after dentifrice treatment for 2 minutes. Antimicrobial effects were determined by plating Colgate Total Advanced Fresh and control-dentifrice-treated samples on enriched media (for all cultivable oral bacteria) and indicator media (for hydrogen-sulfide-producing organisms), respectively. Results indicated that the antimicrobial effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh were significantly greater than either of the other dentifrices for all 13 oral odorigenic bacterial strains tested in vitro (P Colgate Total Advanced Fresh-treated hydroxyapatite disks were significantly more active in reducing bacterial growth than the other dentifrices tested (P oral bacteria with Colgate Total Advanced Fresh demonstrated a 90.9% reduction of all oral cultivable bacteria and a 91.5% reduction of oral bacteria producing hydrogen sulfide compared with

  14. Staphylococcus aureus effect of different factors on mammary gland infection with staphylococcus aureus bacteria

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    Jurčevič Alen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our investigation was to determine how certain factors (the environment, treatment, prevention, animal affect udder infection with Staphylococcus aureurs (S. aureus bacteria. A questionnaire investigated the effect of different factors on the frequency of infection with S. aureus bacteria. We established that prevention, treatment on the basis of results of bacteriological examinations and antibiograms, and the elimination of the negative influence of the environment, form a basis for reducing the frequency of udder infections. We verified the questionannire results with the variant analysis method and established that the effect of the environment significantly digresses from the other factors (prevention treatment and diagnosis, animal. Our results show that the breeder, with good prevention and good treatment of mastitis, often disregards the effects of the barn and the environment in which the cows are maintained. Poor barn conditions have a negative effect on cow resistance and at the same time enable the existence and multiplication of pathogenic species of bacteria. In addition to the maintenance conditions, one must not forget prevention and therapy of mammary gland inflammation, either. On the grounds of our previous investigations (Pengov et al., 2000, we recommend for the therapy of mammary gland inflammation the use of a combination of amoxicillin and clavulonic acid, and as prevention of mammary gland inflammation the use of an udder ointment.

  15. Excretions/secretions from bacteria-pretreated maggot are more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

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    Ke-chun Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sterile larvae--maggots of the green bottle blowfly Lucilia sericata are employed as a treatment tool for various types of chronic wounds. Previous studies reported that excretions/secretions (ES of the sterile larvae could prevent and remove the biofilms of various species of bacteria. In the present study we assessed the effect of ES from the larvae pretreated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the bacteria biofilms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of ES from the maggot pretreated with P. aeruginosa on the biofilms using microtitre plate assays and on bactericidal effect using the colony-forming unit (CFU assay. The results showed that only 30 µg of the ES from the pretreated maggots could prevent and degrade the biofilm of P. aeruginosa. However, the CFU count of P. aeruginosa was not decrease when compared to the ES from non pretreated maggots in this study condition. It is suggested that the ES from the pretreated maggot was more effective against biofilm of P. aeruginosa than sterile maggot ES. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the maggot ES, especially the bacteria-pretreated larva ES may provide a new insight into the treatment tool of the bacterial biofilms.

  16. Effect of garlic powder on the growth of commensal bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filocamo, Angela; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Bisignano, Carlo; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Narbad, Arjan

    2012-06-15

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is considered one of the best disease-preventive foods. We evaluated in vitro the effect of a commercial garlic powder (GP), at concentrations of 0.1% and 1% (w/v), upon the viability of representative gut bacteria. In pure culture studies, Lactobacillus casei DSMZ 20011 was essentially found to be resistant to GP whereas a rapid killing effect of between 1 and 3 log CFU/ml reduction in cell numbers was observed with Bacteroides ovatus, Bifidobacterium longum DSMZ 20090 and Clostridium nexile A2-232. After 6h incubation, bacterial numbers increased steadily and once the strains became resistant they retained their resistant phenotype upon sub-culturing. A colonic model was also used to evaluate the effect of GP on a mixed bacterial population representing the microbiota of the distal colon. Lactic acid bacteria were found to be more resistant to GP compared to the clostridial members of the gut microbiota. While for most bacteria the antimicrobial effect was transient, the lactobacilli showed a degree of resistance to garlic, indicating that its consumption may favour the growth of these beneficial bacterial species in the gut. Garlic intake has the potential to temporarily modulate the gut microbiota. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Manmohit Kalia

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a system of stimuli and responses in bacterial cells governed by their population density, through which they regulate genes that control virulence factors and biofilm formation. Despite considerable research on QS and the discovery of new antibiotics, QS-controlled biofilm formation by microorganisms in clinical settings has remained a problem because of nascent drug resistance, which requires screening of diverse compounds for anti-QS activities. Cinnamon is a dietary phytochemical that is traditionally used to remedy digestive problems and assorted contagions, which suggests that cinnamon might contain chemicals that can hinder the QS process. To test this hypothesis, the anti-QS activity of cinnamon oil against P. aeruginosa was tested, measured by the inhibition of biofilm formation and other QS-associated phenomena, including virulence factors such as pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, protease, alginate production, and swarming activity. To this end, multiple microscopy analyses, including light, scanning electron and confocal microscopy, revealed the ability of cinnamon oil to inhibit P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms and their accompanying extracellular polymeric substances. This work is the first to demonstrate that cinnamon oil can influence various QS-based phenomena in P. aeruginosa PAO1, including biofilm formation.

  18. [Special effects of a complex probiotic containing cellulolytic bacteria Cellulomonas on actively growing rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, N A; Laktionov, K S; Kozlova, A A; Ratnikova, I A; Gavrilova, N N

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that the association of probiotic bacteria of the genuses Bacillus and Cellulomonas form biolayers on the surface of beet marc particles. The positive effect of a fodder additive that contained the biolayer on the basis of a phytomatrix on the growth and development of young rabbits was shown. Feeding of animals with a mixed fodder that contained 0.1% preparation resulted in stimulation of digestion of all components of the food. Among other components of the mixed fodder, cellulose was digested most effectively. An increase in the biomass of symbiotic bacteria and enzymatic activity in the blindgut chymus was also observed. The positive nitrogen balance demonstrated an increase in the nitrogen content in animals and a decrease of its losses with excretion. The mechanism of response of the rabbit's organism to introduction of the complex probiotic preparation into the digestive tract is discussed.

  19. The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms.

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    Olaf Tyc

    Full Text Available In most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important strategy in complex habitats such as soils, with great implications for shaping the microbial community structure. Here, we used a sand microcosm approach to investigate how Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 responds to the presence of monocultures or mixtures of two phylogenetically different bacteria, a Gram-negative (Pedobacter sp. V48 and a Gram-positive (Bacillus sp. V102 under two nutrient conditions. Results revealed that under both nutrient poor and nutrient rich conditions confrontation with the Gram-positive Bacillus sp. V102 strain led to significant lower cell numbers of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, whereas confrontation with the Gram-negative Pedobacter sp. V48 strain did not affect the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. However, when Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was confronted with the mixture of both strains, no significant effect on the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was observed. Quantitative real-time PCR data showed up-regulation of genes involved in the production of a broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 when confronted with Pedobacter sp. V48, but not in the presence of Bacillus sp. V102. The results provide evidence that the performance of bacteria in soil depends strongly on the identity of neighbouring bacteria and that inter-specific interactions are an important factor in determining microbial community structure.

  20. Effect of carbon nanotubes on the transport and retention of bacteria in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-10-15

    This study investigated the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the transport and retention behaviors of bacteria (E. coli) in packed porous media at both low and high ionic strength in NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. At low ionic strengths (5 mM NaCl and 0.3 mM CaCl2), both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of bacteria with CNTs (both 5 and 10 mg L(-1)) were equivalent to those without CNTs, indicating the presence of CNTs did not affect the transport and retention of E. coli at low ionic strengths. The results were supported by those from cell characterization tests (i.e., viability, surface properties, sizes), which showed no significant difference between with and without CNTs. In contrast, breakthrough curves of bacteria with CNTs were lower than those without CNTs at high ionic strengths (25 mM NaCl and 1.2 mM CaCl2), suggesting that the presence of CNTs decreased cell transport at high ionic strengths. The enhanced bacterial deposition in the presence of CNTs was mainly observed at segments near the column inlet, leading to much steeper retained profiles relative to those without CNTs. Additional transport experiments conducted with sand columns predeposited with CNTs revealed that the codeposition of bacteria with CNTs, as well as the deposition of the cell-CNTs cluster formed in cell suspension due to cell bridging effect, largely contributed to the increased deposition of bacteria at high ionic strengths in porous media.

  1. Effect of nocardia rubra species as stimulant drugs on growth of bacteria

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    Алия Агасаф кызы Агаева

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study about stimulating properties of Nocardia rubra. It is found that the microorganism on Sabouraud agar medium allocates water-soluble red pigment. It easily extracted from the nutrient agar. It is completely harmless and has a strong stimulating effect on the growth of bacteria, particularly gram negative. As the dye it can be used in the food industry

  2. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

    OpenAIRE

    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.; Vergara-Jiménez M.J.; Baez-Flores M.E.; Cabrera-Chavez F.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i) food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii) food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii) food without oregano oil (the control). The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae). The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p

  3. Wastewater nutrient removal in a mixed microalgae-bacteria culture: effect of light and temperature on the microalgae-bacteria competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Camejo, J; Barat, R; Pachés, M; Murgui, M; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and temperature on nutrient removal and biomass productivity in a microalgae-bacteria culture and their effects on the microalgae-bacteria competition. Three experiments were carried out at constant temperature and various light intensities: 40, 85 and 125 µE m -2  s -1 . Other two experiments were carried out at variable temperatures: 23 ± 2°C and 28 ± 2°C at light intensity of 85 and 125 µE m -2  s -1 , respectively. The photobioreactor was fed by the effluent from an anaerobic membrane bioreactor. High nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies (about 99%) were achieved under the following operating conditions: 85-125 µE m -2  s -1 and 22 ± 1°C. In the microalgae-bacteria culture studied, increasing light intensity favoured microalgae growth and limited the nitrification process. However, a non-graduated temperature increase (up to 32°C) under the light intensities studied caused the proliferation of nitrifying bacteria and the nitrite and nitrate accumulation. Hence, light intensity and temperature are key parameters in the control of the microalgae-bacteria competition. Biomass productivity significantly increased with light intensity, reaching 50.5 ± 9.6, 80.3 ± 6.5 and 94.3 ± 7.9 mgVSS L -1  d -1 for a light intensity of 40, 85 and 125 µE m -2  s -1 , respectively.

  4. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product.

  5. Bactericidal Effect of Pterostilbene Alone and in Combination with Gentamicin against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Wee Xian Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of pterostilbene in combination with gentamicin against six strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of pterostilbene were determined using microdilution technique whereas the synergistic antibacterial activities of pterostilbene in combination with gentamicin were assessed using checkerboard assay and time-kill kinetic study. Results of the present study showed that the combination effects of pterostilbene with gentamicin were synergistic (FIC index < 0.5 against three susceptible bacteria strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli O157 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 15442. However, the time-kill study showed that the interaction was indifference which did not significantly differ from the gentamicin treatment. Furthermore, time-kill study showed that the growth of the tested bacteria was completely attenuated with 2 to 8 h treatment with 0.5 × MIC of pterostilbene and gentamicin. The identified combinations could be of effective therapeutic value against bacterial infections. These findings have potential implications in delaying the development of bacterial resistance as the antibacterial effect was achieved with the lower concentrations of antibacterial agents.

  6. Inhibition Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Food Born Pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes

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    Rouha Kasra-Kermanshahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Disease caused by consuming microbial contaminated food has increased significantly in recent years due to changes in the livelihoods and eating habits of the human populations. Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are three of the most important foodborne bacterial pathogens and can lead to foodborne diseases. Increased use of antibiotics, has led to development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of new types of effective and nontoxic antimicrobial compounds. Nowadays, the most extensive research and commercial practices are based on probiotic bacteria. Probiotics, specifically lactic acid bacteria are widely used in the food industry for fermentation but have gained attention from health professionals because of their potential beneficial effects. Now probiotic therapy is thought to be an effective way to improve the gut health and an alternative to antibiotic treatments. They contribute to food safety by their ability to inhibit the growth of several other bacteria. LAB can be used as protective cultures to compete with potential pathogens and other undesired organisms, thereby increasing the safety of the food product.

  7. A generation-time effect on the rate of molecular evolution in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Cory; Wu, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular evolutionary rate varies significantly among species and a strict global molecular clock has been rejected across the tree of life. Generation time is one primary life-history trait that influences the molecular evolutionary rate. Theory predicts that organisms with shorter generation times evolve faster because of the accumulation of more DNA replication errors per unit time. Although the generation-time effect has been demonstrated consistently in plants and animals, the evidence of its existence in bacteria is lacking. The bacterial phylum Firmicutes offers an excellent system for testing generation-time effect because some of its members can enter a dormant, nonreproductive endospore state in response to harsh environmental conditions. It follows that spore-forming bacteria would--with their longer generation times--evolve more slowly than their nonspore-forming relatives. It is therefore surprising that a previous study found no generation-time effect in Firmicutes. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach and leveraging on a large number of Firmicutes genomes, we found sporulation significantly reduces the genome-wide spontaneous DNA mutation rate and protein evolutionary rate. Contrary to the previous study, our results provide strong evidence that the evolutionary rates of bacteria, like those of plants and animals, are influenced by generation time. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompl, René; Jamitzky, Ferdinand; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Steffes, Bernd; Bunk, Wolfram; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich; Georgi, Matthias; Ramrath, Katrin; Stolz, Wilhelm; Stark, Robert W.; Urayama, Takuya; Fujii, Shuitsu; Eugen Morfill, Gregor

    2009-11-01

    Research on low-temperature atmospheric plasma sources (LTAPS) has grown strongly over the last few years, in part driven by possible medical 'in vivo' applications. LTAPS offer new technology for medicine and biomedical engineering. Important application examples include in situ production of reactive molecules and ions, delivery at the molecular level, contact-free and self-sterilizing devices. An important issue is the efficient bactericidal effect of LTAPS, which has already been studied widely in vitro. In spite of the many investigations, details of the plasma effect on bacteria are still largely unknown. To contribute to a better understanding of the sterilization process, we investigated the morphological changes of bacteria using atomic force microscopy before and after plasma treatment at high resolution. We examined both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at different plasma exposure times. Additionally, the effect of UV radiation as one agent in the plasma was investigated separately. Our results suggest that several sterilizing mechanisms exist and they proceed at different timescales.

  9. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on total bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahim Abubakr

    Full Text Available Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO, decanter cake (DC or palm kernel cake (PKC on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: control diet (CD, decanter cake diet (DCD, palm kernel cake diet (PKCD and CD plus 5% PO diet (CPOD were fed to rumen cannulated goats and rumen samples were collected at the start of the experimental diets (day 0 and on days 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30 post dietary treatments. Feeding DCD and PKCD resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05 DNA copy number of total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefeciens, and Ruminococcus albus. Rumen methanogenic archaea was significantly lower (P<0.05 in goats fed PKCD and CPOD and the trend showed a severe reduction on days 4 and 6 post experimental diets. In conclusion, results indicated that feeding DCD and PKC increased the populations of cellulolytic bacteria and decreased the density of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Analyzed in a Dictyostelium discoideum Host System

    OpenAIRE

    Cosson, Pierre; Zulianello, Laurence; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Faurisson, François; Gebbie, Leigh; Benghezal, Mohammed; Van Delden, Christian; Kocjancic Curty, Lasta; Köhler, Thilo

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that produces a variety of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors. P. aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat effectively because of the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this study, we analyzed whether the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as a simple model system to analyze the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains. The virulent wild-type strain PAO1 was shown to inhibit growth of D. discoide...

  11. Anti-Bacterial Effect of Propolis Extract in Oil Against Different Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sadat Ghasemi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Propolis is one of the most potent natural antibiotics. Propolis as an active natural substance is attractive due to its antimicrobial properties. Propolis has been used in folk medicine for centuries. It is known that propolis possesses anti- microbial, antioxidative, anti-ulcer and anti-tumor activities. Therefore, propolis has attracted much attention in recent years as a useful or potential substance used in medicine. Objectives The purpose of this study was to verify the activity of an oily liquid extract of propolis that called propolis extract in oil against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods In this experimental study antimicrobial activity of oily liquid extract of propolis called propolis extract in oil with different concentration of ethanol, methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide as diluents against different bacteria species. The duration of study set up was from Nov 2014 to Sep 2015. Chi-Square and Kappa methods, using Open Epi and Graph Pad Prism Software (Graph Pad, San Diego, California, USA. Graphs were plotted by Microsoft Excel software. Results In the agar diffusion tests, using wells containing propolis suspension with methanol / dimethyl sulfoxide / ethanol per wells, the some of bacteria were most sensitive to the effect of propolis preparations. No growth inhibition zone was shown in the agar diffusion test with paper disks impregnate with methanol/ dimethyl sulfoxide suspension. Conclusions The evaluation of the examination results showed that the effectiveness of the extract against bacteria may be explained by the fact that the effect of oily propolis was statistically significant by the introduction of methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide.

  12. The Effects of Allium sativum Extracts on Biofilm Formation and Activities of Six Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Garlic is considered a rich source of many compounds, which shows antimicrobial effects. The ability of microorganisms to adhere to both biotic and abiotic surfaces and to form biofilm is responsible for a number of diseases of chronic nature, demonstrating extremely high resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of sessile microorganisms, embedded in an extracellular matrix and irreversibly attached to various surfaces. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Allium sativum extract against the biofilms of six pathogenic bacteria and their free-living forms. The clinical isolates in this study had not been studied in any other studies, especially in regard to biofilm disruption and inhibition of biofilm cell metabolic activity. Antimicrobial activities of A. sativum L. extracts (methanol and ethanol extracts) against planktonic forms of bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were evaluated by a macrobroth dilution technique. The anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. The results showed that the A. sativum L. extract discs did not have any zone of inhibition for the tested bacteria. However, The MIC values of A. sativum L. extracts (0.078 - 2.5 mg/mL) confirmed the high ability of these extracts for inhibition of planktonic bacteria. A. sativum L. extracts were efficient to inhibit biofilm structures and the concentration of each extract had a direct relation with the inhibitory effect. Finally, it can be suggested that the extracts of this plant be applied as antimicrobial agents against these pathogens, particularly in biofilm forms.

  13. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pérez-Gallego

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis.

  14. Riboregulators: Fine-Tuning Virulence in Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fris, Megan E; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Within the past several years, RNA-mediated regulation (ribo-regulation) has become increasingly recognized for its importance in controlling critical bacterial processes. Regulatory RNA molecules, or riboregulators, are perpetually responsive to changes within the micro-environment of a bacterium. Notably, several characterized riboregulators control virulence in pathogenic bacteria, as is the case for each riboregulator characterized to date in Shigella. The timing of virulence gene expression and the ability of the pathogen to adapt to rapidly changing environmental conditions is critical to the establishment and progression of infection by Shigella species; ribo-regulators mediate each of these important processes. This mini review will present the current state of knowledge regarding RNA-mediated regulation in Shigella by detailing the characterization and function of each identified riboregulator in these pathogens.

  15. Effect of smokeless tobacco products on human oral bacteria growth and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Jin, Jinshan; Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of smokeless tobacco products (STPs) on oral bacteria, seven smokeless tobacco aqueous extracts (STAEs) from major brands of STPs and three tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs) were used in a growth and viability test against 38 oral bacterial species or subspecies. All seven STAEs showed concentration-dependent effects on the growth and viability of tested oral bacteria under anaerobic culture conditions, although there were strain-to-strain variations. In the presence of 1 mg/ml STAEs, the growth of 4 strains decreased over 0.32-2.14 log10 fold, while 14 strains demonstrated enhanced growth of 0.3-1.76 log10 fold, and the growth of 21 strains was not significantly affected. In the presence of 10 mg/ml STAEs, the growth of 17 strains was inhibited 0.3-2.11 log10 fold, 18 strains showed enhanced growth of 0.3-0.97 log10 fold, and 4 strains were not significantly affected. In the presence of 50 mg/ml STAEs, the growth of 32 strains was inhibited 0.3-2.96 log10 fold, 8 strains showed enhanced growth of 0.3-1.0 log10 fold, and 2 strains were not significantly affected. All seven STAEs could promote the growth of 4 bacterial strains, including Eubacterium nodatum, Peptostreptococcus micros, Streptococcus anginosus, and Streptococcus constellatus. Exposure to STAEs modulated the viability of some bacterial strains, with 21.1-66.5% decrease for 4 strains at 1 mg/ml, 20.3-85.7% decrease for 10 strains at 10 mg/ml, 20.0-93.3% decrease for 27 strains at 50 mg/ml, and no significant effect for 11 strains at up to 50 mg/ml. STAEs from snuffs inhibited more tested bacterial strains than those from snus indicating that the snuffs may be more toxic to the oral bacteria than snus. For TSNAs, cell growth and viability of 34 tested strains were not significantly affected at up to 100 μg/ml; while the growth of P. micros was enhanced 0.31-0.54 log10 fold; the growth of Veillonella parvula was repressed 0.33-0.36 log10 fold; and the cell

  16. Enterobacteria secrete an inhibitor of Pseudomonas virulence during clinical bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlemacher, Shannon I; Giblin, Daryl E; d'Avignon, D André; Stapleton, Ann E; Trautner, Barbara W; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2017-11-01

    Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae are among the most common pathogens of the human urinary tract. Among the genetic gains of function associated with urinary E. coli isolates is the Yersinia high pathogenicity island (HPI), which directs the biosynthesis of yersiniabactin (Ybt), a virulence-associated metallophore. Using a metabolomics approach, we found that E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae expressing the Yersinia HPI also secrete escherichelin, a second metallophore whose chemical structure matches a known synthetic inhibitor of the virulence-associated pyochelin siderophore system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected escherichelin during clinical E. coli urinary tract infection (UTI) and experimental human colonization with a commensal, potentially probiotic E. coli bacteriuria strain. Escherichelin production by colonizing enterobacteria may help human hosts resist opportunistic infections by Pseudomonas and other pyochelin-expressing bacteria. This siderophore-based mechanism of microbial antagonism may be one of many elements contributing to the protective effects of the human microbiome. Future UTI-preventive probiotic strains may benefit by retaining the escherichelin biosynthetic capacity of the Yersinia HPI while eliminating the Ybt biosynthetic capacity.

  17. Identification of Pathways Critical to Quorum Sensing and Virulence Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ognibene, Ted J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtz-Morris, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Daley, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-02-27

    Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication between bacteria that allows them to collectively regulate behavior such as virulence, sporulation, motility and biofilm formation. It is mediated by bacterially synthesized, diffusible, signaling molecules (autoinducers) that increase in concentration as a bacterial population expands until a critical threshold concentration is reached. However, in most bacterial species that produce autoinducer molecules, the physiologic concentration of these molecules is unknown. Moreover, many bacterial species, including Y. pestis, produce an array of quorum sensing molecules and the physiologic concentration of each individual type of autoinducer molecule is not known. There is a need to accurately and precisely quantitate these molecules, as it may be that different types of autoinducer molecules have different effects on virulence in the bacterium. We focused our efforts on the construction of a platform to identify and quantitate autoinducer molecules using FTICR, 14C isotope labeling and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Specifically, we focused on autoinducer-1 type molecules, acylhomoserine lactone (HSL), derived from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM).

  18. Effects of rotating magnetic field exposure on the functional parameters of different species of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijałkowski, Karol; Nawrotek, Paweł; Struk, Magdalena; Kordas, Marian; Rakoczy, Rafał

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the rotating magnetic field (RMF) on the growth, cell metabolic activity and biofilm formation by S. aureus, E. coli, A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. marcescens, S. mutans, C. sakazakii, K. oxytoca and S. xylosus. Bacteria were exposed to the RMF (RMF magnetic induction B = 25-34 mT, RMF frequency f = 5-50 Hz, time of exposure t = 60 min, temperature of incubation 37 °C). The persistence of the effect of exposure (B = 34 mT, f = 50 Hz, t = 60 min) on bacteria after further incubation (t = 300 min) was also studied. The work showed that exposure to RMF stimulated the investigated parameters of S. aureus, E. coli, S. marcescens, S. mutans, C. sakazakii, K. oxytoca and S. xylosus, however inhibited cell metabolic activity and biofilm formation by A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. The results obtained in this study proved, that the RMF, depending on its magnetic induction and frequency can modulate functional parameters of different species of bacteria.

  19. [Effect of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tibetan Plateau on silage fermentation quality of Elms nutans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Ke, Wencan; Jing, Peixin; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Ming; Yu, Yingwen; Guo, Xusheng

    2015-10-04

    In order to detect the effect of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tibetan Plateau on silage fermentation quality of Elms nutans. We used 3 isolated lactic acid bacteria with better growth at low temperatures of 10 and 15 degrees C at ensiling of Elymus nutans. Subsequently, effects of the selected lactic acid bacteria on fermentation profiles of Elymus nutans silages stored at 15 and 25 degrees C were evaluated by using the same species of commercial inoculants as the control. PP-6 isolated from Tibetan Plateau could ferment raffinose, lactose, sorbitol, melibiose and sucrose, and LS-5 could ferment cottonseed sugar, laetrile, rhamnose, lactose, sorbitol, xylose, arabinose, melibiose and sucrose, but the same species of commercial strains could not use these sugars. Inoculation of these three strains into Elymus nutans at 15 and 25 degrees C ensiled for 50 d, we found that LS-5 significantly reduced silage pH, propionic acid concentration and ratio of ammonia nitrogen/total nitrogen at 15 degrees C (P silage quality of Elymus nutans growing on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau at low temperature, but these strains have no obvious advantages at 25 degrees C in comparison with the commercial inoculants.

  20. Dual Effects of Lactobacilli as a Cholesterol Assimilator and an Inhibitor ofGastrointestinal Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Emami

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotics are live microbial supplements which can improve the healthy intestinal microbial balance. Lactobacilli are a group of lactic acid producing bacteria (LAB that are known as natural probiotics found in the dairy products. Objectives: In this study, we aimed to detect the most potent Lactobacillus isolates of the Fars province local dairy products in cholesterol removal and investigate their antibacterial properties against some gastrointestinal pathogens. Materials and Methods: Fifteen locally produced yogurt samples of the Fars province were collected and characterized with routine microbiology methods. Cholesterol removal ability of the Lactobacilli isolates were determined, and their growth inhibitory effect on some standard pathogenic strains pathogen was evaluated using the well-diffusion method. Results: In this study, five common strains of Lactobacilli including L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. fermentum, L. lactis, and L. bulgaricus were identified in the samples obtained from the locally produced yogurt in the Fars province. L. lactis and L. acidophilus were determined as the two most active strains with the maximum rate of cholesterol assimilation (5.6 and 4.5 mg/mL, respectively in the process of cholesterol removal. In the antibacterial activity assay, the two mentioned strains had significant inhibitory effect on all of the tested bacteria except for B. subtilis. Conclusions: Cholesterol removal ability had a direct relation with bacterial growth, so it is suggested to use the probiotic bacteria in the growth phase to achieve better results.

  1. [Effect of nickel ions on physiological and corrosion activity of bacteria of sulfur cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Borets'ka, M O

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the effect of nickel ions concentration in nutrient medium on sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 10-V (SRB) and their artificial corrosion-active associations which included thionic bacteria and their satellite Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. It is shown that the concentration of nickel in the nutrient medium being increased, the duration of lag-phase of SRB growth became 2-2.5 times less, and that of artificial associations--3-3.5 times less. The specific growth rate did not change in all the experiment variants. At the same time the hydrogenase and corrosion activity of the studied cultures increases almost twice with nickel content increase in the cultural medium to 0.5 mg/ml. Further increase of nickel concentration did not cause the change of the above parameters.

  2. Effects of surfactants on bacteria and the bacterial degradation of alkanes in crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruheim, Per

    1998-12-31

    This thesis investigates the effects of surfactants on the bacterial degradation of alkanes in crude oil. Several alkane oxidising Gram positive and Gram negative were tested for their abilities to oxidise alkanes in crude oil emulsified with surfactants. The surfactants used to make the oil in water emulsions were either of microbial or chemical origin. Oxidation rates of resting bacteria oxidising various crude oil in water emulsions were measured by Warburg respirometry. The emulsions were compared with non-emulsified oil to see which was the preferred substrate. The bacteria were pregrown to both the exponential and stationary phase of growth before harvesting and preparation for the Warburg experiments. 123 refs., 4 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. In-vitro antibacterial effects of extracts of Nigerian tooth-cleaning sticks on periodontopathic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sote, E O; Wilson, M

    1995-01-01

    Aqueous extracts from 8 plants used for tooth-cleaning in Nigeria were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of five periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens and Campylobacter rectus. Extracts of all the plants except that of Massularia acuminata exhibited varying growth inhibitory potentials on the microorganisms. Extract of Terminalia glaucescens showed the widest spectrum of activity, inhibiting the growth of all the tested bacteria except P. gingivalis. These findings corroborate other studies that the plants possess antiplaque properties and suggest that they may be useful tools in preventive dentistry in poor developing countries. However, the bioavailability of the active ingredients of the plants and their long term effects in vivo need to be investigated.

  4. Millimeter waves or extremely high frequency electromagnetic fields in the environment: what are their effects on bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soghomonyan, Diana; Trchounian, Karen; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-06-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) or electromagnetic fields of extremely high frequencies at low intensity is a new environmental factor, the level of which is increased as technology advance. It is of interest that bacteria and other cells might communicate with each other by electromagnetic field of sub-extremely high frequency range. These MMW affected Escherichia coli and many other bacteria, mainly depressing their growth and changing properties and activity. These effects were non-thermal and depended on different factors. The significant cellular targets for MMW effects could be water, cell plasma membrane, and genome. The model for the MMW interaction with bacteria is suggested; a role of the membrane-associated proton FOF1-ATPase, key enzyme of bioenergetic relevance, is proposed. The consequences of MMW interaction with bacteria are the changes in their sensitivity to different biologically active chemicals, including antibiotics. Novel data on MMW effects on bacteria and their sensitivity to different antibiotics are presented and discussed; the combined action of MMW and antibiotics resulted with more strong effects. These effects are of significance for understanding changed metabolic pathways and distinguish role of bacteria in environment; they might be leading to antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The effects might have applications in the development of technique, therapeutic practices, and food protection technology.

  5. Comparison of Antibacterial Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine on Two Cariogenic Bacteria: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poureslami HR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Dental plaque is the main source for dental caries and there is no proper vaccine that can affect dental plaques. Objectives: Daily use of an efficient anti-plaque product can be very beneficial in plaque control and, thus, prevention of caries. This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effects of four products of Chlorhexidine and Fluoride on two types of cariogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the antibacterial effect of Chlorhexidine and Fluoride (gel and solution against Streptococci Sanguis and Sobrinus was evaluated. Chlorhexidine gluconate 1% gel (Corosodyl, France, Chlorhexidine gluconate 2% solution (Consepsis, Ultradent, US, Sodium fluoride 0.2% solution (Oral-B, US and Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride 1.23% gel ( Denti-Care, Canada were used. The disc diffusion method was used for testing bacterial sensitivity. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and Chi-square test. Results: In comparison with the negative control, each of the four gels and solutions showed antibacterial effects but the effects were not statistically significant for fluoride solution (P=0.217. For S. Sobrinus, the mean diameter of inhibition zone around the discs coated with fluoride gel (F g, fluoride solution (F s, Chlorhexidine gel (CHX g and Chlorhexidine solution (CHX s were 19, 9, 21.5 and 27.5mm, respectively. For S. Sanguis, the mean diameter of inhibition zone around the discs coated with F g, F s, CHX g and CHX s were 17, 11, 17 and 25mm, respectively. CHX s had the most effect on both bacteria and F s had the least. CHX g and F g were less effective than CHX s, respectively. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that 2% CHX s and 1.23% F g can be effective on inhibition of the growth of some of cariogenic bacteria. Therefore, these agents can be used in the prevention of Early Childhood Caries.

  6. The Effects of Different Sources of Phosphorous and its Solubilizing Bacteria on Growth of the Hybrid Corn (KSC 704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of phosphorous of different sources and its solubilizing bacteria on the corn growth an experiment was conducted at Miyandoab Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Station in 2005 in Iran. The arrangement of experiment was factorial based on RCB design with three replications. Treatments consisted of four levels of phosphate solubilizing bacteria: control, thiobacillus bacteria, phosphate solubilizing bacteria and Thiobacillus bacteria and phosphate solubilizing bacteria and three levels of fertilizer: without fertilizer, rock phosphate and triple super phosphate. In this study 0.5 m2 of each plot was sampled every 15 days intervals and were studied the dry matter per unit area (TDM, leaf area index (LAI, crop growth rate (CGR and relative growth rate (RGR were analyzed. The results showed that the application of thiobacillus bacteria + phosphate solubilizing bacteria + triple super phosphate increased total dry matter (TDM and crop growth rate (CGR, while relative growth rate (RGR, decreased. LAI increased slowly during early growing stage but increased rapidly when growth proceeded. The highest LAI (4.3, TDM (3451 gr/m2 and CGR (5.41 gr/m2 were obtained from the application of thiobacillus + phosphate solubilizing bacteria triple super phosphate. Similar results were obtained by the application of thiobacillus + phosphate solubilizing bacteria + rock phosphate. It seems that application of thiobacillus + phosphate solubilizing bacteria is useful for availability of phosphorous to plant. Also, application of rock phosphate, due to low cost, availability of phosphorous to plant and its decreased effect on environment pollution can be used instead of other sources of phosphate fertilizers such as triple super phosphate.

  7. Effect of phenolic compounds on the growth of selected probiotic and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ordaz, R; Wall-Medrano, A; Goñi, M G; Ramos-Clamont-Montfort, G; Ayala-Zavala, J F; González-Aguilar, G A

    2018-01-01

    Fruit extracts from different tissues (pulp, seed and peel) have shown antimicrobial and prebiotic activities related to their phenolic profile, although structure-specific evaluations have not been reported yet. The effect of five phenolic compounds (catechin and gallic, vanillic, ferulic and protocatechuic acids) identified in different fruits, particularly in mango, was evaluated on the growth of two probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosusGG ATCC 53103 and Lactobacillus acidophilusNRRLB 4495) and two pathogenic (Escherichia coli 0157:H7 ATCC 43890 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028) bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of phenolic acids ranged from 15-20 mmol l-1 and 20-30 mmol l-1 against E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively. For catechin, the MIC and MBC were 35 mmol l-1 and >35 mmol l-1 against E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively. The presence of catechin and gallic, protocatechuic and vanillic acids in MRS broth without dextrose allowed the growth of lactobacilli. Catechin combined with protocatechuic or vanillic acid mildly allowed the growth of both probiotics. In conclusion, phenolic compounds can selectively inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria without affecting the viability of probiotics. This study provides relevant information about the effects of phenolic compounds commonly present in fruit and vegetables on the growth of probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. The compounds selectively allowed the growth of probiotic lactobacilli (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and inhibited pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium) at the same concentration (20 mmol l-1 ). These findings can contribute to the formulation of nutraceutical products, such as synbiotics, that can restore or maintain an optimal composition of human microbiota, potentially improving the overall health of the consumer. © 2017 The Society

  8. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, H.; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...

  9. Effect of overexpressing rsmA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa on virulence of select phytotoxin-producing strains of P. syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GacS/GacA two-component system functions mechanistically in conjunction with the global post-transcriptional regulator RsmA to allow pseudomonads and other bacteria to adapt to changing environmental stimuli. Analysis of this Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway in phytotoxin-producing pathovars...

  10. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    bacterial community structure at a specific space and time. A new generation high-throughput sequencing method was employed to compensate for the small sample size. A total of 27,006 nucleotide sequences with an average 437.8 bp in length were analyzed. The results revealed the presence of some commercially important surfactant-producing bacteria such as Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Corynebacterium and Pseudomonas. Recognizing that there is still a large number of marine bacterial species that have not been taxonomically classified nor recognized as surfactant-associated species, the effects on synthetic aperture radar imaging due to a high number of surfactant-associated marine bacteria is expected. This study has provided the basis for the biological importance for fine-scale synthetic aperture satellite imaging. Moreover, this new approach is expected to have applications in monitoring biological and chemical properties of the sea surface across the globe.

  11. Effect of peppermint essential oil on growth and survival of some foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Boniadian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of peppermint essential oils on Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica. In the first step, Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of peppermint essential were determined by the tube dilution method in tryptic soy broth (TSB. Then, the growth behavior of each of the aforementioned bacteria was assessed in presence of peppermint essential oil in concentration of less than MIC. The result of first step showed that Y. enterocolitica is more sensitive to peppermint essential oil than other tested bacteria (MIC = 0.1% & MBC = 0.22%, followed by L. monocytogenes (MIC = 0.12% & MBC = 0.15%, S. typhimurium (MIC = 0.22% & MBC = 0.25% and B. cereus (MIC = 0.3% & MBC = 5%, respectively. The results revealed that, the peppermint essential oils in low concentration inhibited the growth rate of bacteria thus may use as a natural preservative and flavoring in foods.

  12. [Effect of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) on chloraminated disinfection attenuation in drinking water distribution system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Yun-Long; Zhou, Bin-Hui; Zhi, Xing-Hua

    2009-06-15

    The growth of microbe and formation of biofilm in water distribution system were important factors affecting the security of water quality. The number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm of a chloraminated drinking water distribution system in Shanghai was detected by MPN-Griess method, and the relations among AOB, nitrification and chloraminated disinfection were analyzed. Meanwhile, the effects of AOB on chloraminated disinfection fastness and attenuation by simulation experiment were studied. The result indicated that the number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in pipe biofilm was between 1.0 x 10(2)-4.3 x 10(5) MPN/g dry biofilm. Correlation coefficients of AOB with ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were -0.563, 0.603 and -0.563. Correlation coefficients of AOB with total chlorine and mono-chloramine were -0.659 and -0.571. Fastness of AOB to chloramine was higher than heterotrophic bacteria and AOB can deplete more chloramine than HPC.

  13. The effect of bacteria, enzymes and inulin on fermentation and aerobic stability of corn silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymanfar, S; Kermanshahi, RK

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ensiling is a conservation method for forage crops. It is based on the fact that anaerobe lactic acid bacteria (LAB) convert watersoluble carbohydrates into organic acids. Therefore, pH decreases and the forage is preserved. The aim of this study was to isolate special kinds of lactic acid bacteria from silage and to study the effect of bacteria, inulin and enzymes as silage additives on the fermentation and aerobic stability of the silage. Materials and Methods The heterofermentative LAB were isolated from corn silages in Broujerd, Iran and biochemically characterized. Acid tolerance was studied by exposure to acidic PBS and growth in bile salt was measured by the spectrophotometric method. Results The results of molecular analysis using 16SrDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to Lactobacillus and Enterococcus genera. To enhance stability in acidic environment and against bile salts, microencapsulation with Alginate and Chitosan was used. The Lactobacillus plantarum strains were used as control. The inoculants (1 × 107 cfu/g) alone or in combination with inulin or in combination with enzymes were added to chopped forages and ensiled in 1.5-L anaerobic jars. Conclusion Combination of the isolates Lactobacillus and Enterococcus with inulin and enzymes can improve the aerobic stability of corn silage. PMID:23205249

  14. Neonatal and infantile immune responses to encapsulated bacteria and conjugate vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klouwenberg, Peter Klein; Bont, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Encapsulated bacteria are responsible for the majority of mortality among neonates and infants. The major components on the surface of these bacteria are polysaccharides which are important virulence factors. Immunity against these components protects against disease. However, most of the

  15. Archaea and bacteria mediate the effects of native species root loss on fungi during plant invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamet, Steven D; Lamb, Eric G; Piper, Candace L; Winsley, Tristrom; Siciliano, Steven D

    2017-05-01

    Although invasive plants can drive ecosystem change, little is known about the directional nature of belowground interactions between invasive plants, native roots, bacteria, archaea and fungi. We used detailed bioinformatics and a recently developed root assay on soils collected in fescue grassland along a gradient of smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) invasion to examine the links between smooth brome shoot litter and root, archaea, bacteria and fungal communities. We examined (1) aboveground versus belowground influences of smooth brome on soil microbial communities, (2) the importance of direct versus microbe-mediated impacts of plants on soil fungal communities, and (3) the web of roots, shoots, archaea, bacteria and fungi interactions across the A and B soil horizons in invaded and non-invaded sites. Archaea and bacteria influenced fungal composition, but not vice versa, as indicated by redundancy analyses. Co-inertia analyses suggested that bacterial-fungal variance was driven primarily by 12 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Brome increased bacterial diversity via smooth brome litter in the A horizon and roots in the B horizon, which then reduced fungal diversity. Archaea increased abundance of several bacterial OTUs, and the key bacterial OTUs mediated changes in the fungi's response to invasion. Overall, native root diversity loss and bacterial mediation were more important drivers of fungal composition than were the direct effects of increases in smooth brome. Critically, native plant species displacement and root loss appeared to be the most important driver of fungal composition during invasion. This causal web likely gives rise to the plant-fungi feedbacks, which are an essential factor determining plant diversity in invaded grassland ecosystems.

  16. Effects of Psychrotrophic Bacteria, Serratia liquefaciens and Acinetobacter genomospecies 10 on Yogurt Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Kook; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jong-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proteolytic (Serratia liquefaciens, match %: 99.39) or lipolytic (Acinetobacter genomospecies 10, match %: 99.90) psychrotrophic bacteria (bacterial counts, analysis of free fatty acids (FFA) and analysis of free amino acids) on the microbial and chemical properties (yogurt composition), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of yogurt during storage. Yogurts were prepared with raw milk preinoculated with each psychrotrophic bacteria. The total solid, fat, and protein content were not affected by preinoculation, but the pH of yogurt preinoculated with psychrotrophic bacteria was higher than in control. There was a dramatic increase in short chain free fatty acids among FFA in yogurt with Acinetobacter genomospecies 10. For 14 d of cold storage condition, SCFFA was 25.3 mg/kg to 34.4 mg/kg (1.36 times increased), MCFFA was 20.4 mg/kg to 25.7 mg/kg (1.26 times increased), and LCFFA was 240.2 mg/kg to 322.8 mg/kg (1.34 times increased). Serratia liquefaciens (match %: 99.39) in yogurt caused a greater accumulation of free amino acids (FAA), especially bitter peptides such as leucine, valine, arginine, and tyrosine, but SDS-PAGE showed that the inoculation of Serratia liquefaciens did not affect the degree of casein degradation during storage. Taken together, the excessive peptides and FFA in yogurt generated from psychrotrophic bacteria could develop off-flavors that degrade the quality of commercial yogurt products. PMID:26761293

  17. Study of antimicrobial effect of novel Quaternary Ammonium Compounds on bacteria and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sadrnia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quarterly Ammonium Compounds (QuAC are the more effective antimicrobial agents in medicine and industry. It needs to produce the new compounds with the wider spectrum and less toxicity, because of microbial resistance. Aim of this study was microbiological Evaluation of the new Quarterly Ammonium Compounds produced by Structural modifications on some bacteria, yeast and fungi. Material and Methods: 16 Quat salts were designed and made in Ethanol or Aceto Nitril. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was determined by standard method on Nutrient Broth and Minimal agar culture media for bacteria , Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA for fungi and Nutrient Agar and Saboro Dextrose Agar (SDA for yeasts . Results: Compounds 2,7,8,9,12,13 has the more antimicrobial effect ( minimum of MIC. Furthermore, it was shown that MIC was unrelated to culture compounds. In yeast culture it must to increases the concentration in enriched media. Compounds 9,12 and 13 has the more antibacterial effect as well as antifungal effect. Conclusion: In comparison of structure of produced compounds and results of the study, it was revealed that radical R3 has the most important role in antimicrobial properties of Quats and it could to be substitute any suitable group related to increasing anti microbial effects.

  18. Effect of whey fermented by Enterococcus faeciumin consortium with Veilonella parvulaon ruminal bacteria in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higor Fábio Carvalho Bezerra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of whey fermented by Enterococus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in vitro on ruminal microorganisms in different substrates, with or without monensin. The first experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, in a 6 × 3 factorial arrangement (six substrates × three whey levels with two replicates. In experiment two, a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement (with and without monensin, three foods and four levels of fermented whey was used, in a randomized design with four replicates, totaling 24 treatments. There was no interaction among the wheys and the substrates in the variable for pectin, starch, and carboxymethyl cellulose. There was a greater growth of amylolytic and pectinolytic microorganisms and a lower growth of proteolytic and cellulolytic microorganisms. A significant effect of optical density was found in the media without substrate and that containing trypticase and glucose due to the addition of fermented whey. There was interaction for the pH at 24 hours among whey, food and monensin. For ammonia at 24 hours there was effect for food, whey and monensin, and interaction among factors. For microbial protein at 24 hours, there was effect for food, whey, monensin and no interaction among sources of variation. The use of whey fermented by bacteria Enterococcus faeciumand Veilonella parvula improves microbial protein synthesis by ruminal bacteria in media containing different energy sources. The combination of fermented whey and monensin shows variable results in relation to microbial growth.

  19. Ammonium removal using algae-bacteria consortia: the effect of ammonium concentration, algae biomass, and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huijun; Yuan, Qiuyan

    2017-12-13

    In this study, the effects of ammonium nitrogen concentration, algae biomass concentration, and light conditions (wavelength and intensity) on the ammonium removal efficiency of algae-bacteria consortia from wastewater were investigated. The results indicated that ammonium concentration and light intensity had a significant impact on nitrification. It was found that the highest ammonia concentration (430 mg N/L) in the influent resulted in the highest ammonia removal rate of 108 ± 3.6 mg N/L/days, which was two times higher than the influent with low ammonia concentration (40 mg N/L). At the lowest light intensity of 1000 Lux, algae biomass concentration, light wavelength, and light cycle did not show a significant effect on the performance of algal-bacterial consortium. Furthermore, the ammonia removal rate was approximately 83 ± 1.0 mg N/L/days, which was up to 40% faster than at the light intensity of 2500 Lux. It was concluded that the algae-bacteria consortia can effectively remove nitrogen from wastewater and the removal performance can be stabilized and enhanced using the low light intensity of 1000 Lux that is also a cost-effective strategy.

  20. Effect of alcoholic extract of garlic (Allium sativum on some food born pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiami Rad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available According to consumers' desire to consume foods without preservatives or containing a natural preservative, the use of plant extracts as a food preservative instead of chemicals has increased. This study was conducted to determine the antibacterial effect of different concentration of alcoholic extract of garlic (Allium sativum on standard strains of Salmonella enteritidis, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia entrocolitica. For this purpose, the agar well diffusion method was used. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC were measured with microtiter plate method using the rezazurin reagent. The results showed that garlic alcoholic extract had an inhibitory effect on any four tested bacteria. The highest inhibitory effect was observed on B. subtilis;meanwhile,the slightest effect was found on S. enteritidis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.39 mg/ml was observed for B. subtilis, however the highest amount was estimated at 12.5 mg/ml for S. enteritidis. According to the results of recent research it was concluded that alcoholic extract of garlic had appropriate antibacterial impact against bacteria and therefore could be used as a natural preservative in various foods.

  1. Effect of diesel leakage in circulating cooling water system on preponderant bacteria diversity and bactericidal effect of biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huiyun; Liu, Fang; Lu, Jinjin; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chaocheng

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum products leakage results in adverse effect on the normal operation of a circulating cooling water system. However, relatively little research has been done to explore the effect of petroleum products leakage on circulating cooling water quality and biofilm preponderant bacteria diversity. Also, normal biocides application modes cannot fulfil the need for biofilm control. In this study, diesel oil was used as the experimental subject representing leaking petroleum products; the effect of diesel addition on biofilm preponderant bacteria diversity and the bactericidal effect of chlorine dioxide and tetradecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (1427) was investigated. Bacterial community structures were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and PCR cloning of 16S rDNA genes. Except for 100 mg/L diesel, increasing diesel concentration enhanced the biofilm detachment ratio compared with the control test. The microstructure of biofilm samples with 0, 300 and 900 mg/L diesel addition was observed. The species of preponderant bacteria in the biofilm sample with 300 mg/L diesel addition were more and the bacterial distribution was more uniform than those in the biofilm sample with 900 mg/L diesel addition. With ClO2 and 1427 addition, chemical oxygen demand increased, lipid phosphorus and bacterial count first decreased and then remained stable, and the bactericidal ratio first increased and then remained stable. Diesel addition variation has more obvious effect on ClO2 than 1427.

  2. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-06

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution.

  3. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  4. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging on the persistence and expression of virulence factors of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on shredded iceberg lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manan; Lakshman, Sudesna; Ferguson, Sean; Ingram, David T; Luo, Yaguang; Patel, Jitu

    2011-05-01

    Fresh-cut leafy greens contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 have caused foodborne outbreaks. Packaging conditions, coupled with abusive storage temperatures of contaminated lettuce, were evaluated for their effect on the potential virulence of E. coli O157:H7. Shredded lettuce was inoculated with 5.58 and 3.98 log CFU E. coli O157:H7 per g and stored at 4 and 15°C, respectively, for up to 10 days. Lettuce was packaged under treatment A (modified atmosphere packaging conditions used for commercial fresh-cut produce, in gas-permeable film with N(2)), treatment B (near-ambient air atmospheric conditions in a gas-permeable film with microperforations), and treatment C (high-CO(2) and low-O(2) conditions in a gas-impermeable film). E. coli O157:H7 populations from each treatment were determined by enumeration of numbers on MacConkey agar containing nalidixic acid. RNA was extracted from packaged lettuce for analysis of expression of virulence factor genes stx(2), eae, ehxA, iha, and rfbE. E. coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce at 4°C under all treatments decreased, but most considerably so under treatment B over 10 days. At 15°C, E. coli O157:H7 populations increased by at least 2.76 log CFU/g under all treatments. At 15°C, expression of eae and iha was significantly greater under treatment B than it was under treatments A and C on day 3. Similarly, treatment B promoted significantly higher expression of stx(2), eae, ehxA, and rfbE genes on day 10, compared with treatments A and C at 15°C. Results indicate that storage under near-ambient air atmospheric conditions can promote higher expression levels of O157 virulence factors on lettuce, and could affect the severity of E. coli O157:H7 infections associated with leafy greens.

  5. Polycationic photosensitizer conjugates: effects of chain length and Gram classification on the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R; O'Donnell, David A; Murthy, Naveen; Rajagopalan, Krishnan; Michaud, Norman; Sherwood, Margaret E; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2002-06-01

    We have shown previously that a polycationic conjugate between poly-L-lysine and the photosensitizer chlorin(e6) was effective in photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this report we explore the relationship between the size of the polylysine chain and its effectiveness for mediating the killing of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Conjugates were prepared by attaching precisely one chlorin(e6) molecule to the alpha-amino group of poly-(epsilon-benzyloxycarbonyl)lysines of average length eight and 37 lysine residues, followed by deprotection of the epsilon-amino groups, and were characterized by iso-electric focusing. The uptake of these conjugates and free chlorin(e6) by Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 27659) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (ATCC 29181) after washing was measured as a function of photosensitizer concentration (0-4 microM chlorin(e6) equivalent) and incubation time. After incubation the bacteria were exposed to low fluences (10-40 J/cm(2)) of 660 nm light delivered from a diode laser, and viability was assessed after serial dilutions by a colony-forming assay. S. aureus and E. coli took up comparable amounts of the two conjugates, but free chlorin(e6) was only taken up by S. aureus. After illumination S. aureus was killed in a fluence-dependent fashion when loaded with the 8-lysine conjugate and free chlorin(e6) but somewhat less so with the 37-lysine conjugate. In contrast, PDI of E. coli was only effective with the 37-lysine conjugate at concentrations up to 4 microM. PDI using the 8-lysine conjugate and free chlorin(e6) on E. coli was observed at a concentration of 100 microM. Transmission electron micrographs showed internal electron-lucent areas consistent with chromosomal damage. These results can be explained by the necessity of a large polycation to penetrate the impermeable outer membrane of Gram-negative E. coli, while Gram-positive S. aureus is more easily penetrated by

  6. Edible foam based on Pickering effect of probiotic bacteria and milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yücel, Cigdem; Geng, Xiaolu; Cárdenas, Marité

    2017-01-01

    We report the preparation and characterization of aqueous Pickering foams using bio-particles constituted by lactic acid bacteria surface modified by oppositely charged milk proteins. Cell surface modification was shown by zeta potential measurements. Foams stabilized by bacterial Pickering bio...... and fluorescence microscopy revealed organized cell structures around and in between the air bubbles providing for an internal network that effectively stabilizes the foam. Therefore, entirely food grade stable foams can be produced by using modified health promoting bacterial cells and surface active milk...

  7. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

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    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii food without oregano oil (the control. The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae. The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p <0.05 in tissues from animals whose food was supplemented with oregano oil. We concluded that dietary supplementation of shrimps with oregano oil provides antimicrobial activity into the body of the penaeids.

  8. Effects of a Mutation in the gyrA Gene on the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Sáez-López, Emma; Frimodt-Møller, N

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are among the drugs most extensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. Resistance to quinolones can be chromosome or plasmid mediated. The chromosomal mechanism of resistance is associated with mutations in the DNA gyrase- and topois......Fluoroquinolones are among the drugs most extensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. Resistance to quinolones can be chromosome or plasmid mediated. The chromosomal mechanism of resistance is associated with mutations in the DNA gyrase......- and topoisomerase IV-encoding genes and mutations in regulatory genes affecting different efflux systems, among others. We studied the role of the acquisition of a mutation in the gyrA gene in the virulence and protein expression of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The HC14366M strain carrying a mutation...... the gyrA wild-type gene. However, only a slight recovery was observed in the colonization of the bladder in the GyrA complement strain compared to the mutant strain in a murine model of ascending urinary tract infection. In conclusion, a mutation in the gyrA gene of uropathogenic E. coli reduced...

  9. Beyond Mortality: Sterility As a Neglected Component of Parasite Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Jessica L; Kada, Sarah; Lion, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Virulence is generally defined as the reduction in host fitness following infection by a parasite (see Box 1 for glossary) [1]. In general, parasite exploitation of host resources may reduce host survival (mortality virulence), decrease host fecundity (sterility virulence), or even have sub-lethal effects that disturb the way individuals interact within a community (morbidity) [2,3]. In fact, the virulence of many parasites involves a combination of these various effects (Box 2). In practice, however, virulence is most often defined as disease-induced mortality [1, 4-6]. This is especially true in the theoretical literature, where the evolution of sterility virulence, morbidity, and mixed strategies of host exploitation have received relatively little attention. While the focus on mortality effects has allowed for easy comparison between models and, thus, rapid advancement of the field, we ask whether these theoretical simplifications have led us to inadvertently minimize the evolutionary importance of host sterilization and secondary virulence effects. As explicit theoretical work on morbidity is currently lacking (but see [7]), our aim in this Opinion piece is to discuss what is understood about sterility virulence evolution, its adaptive potential, and the implications for parasites that utilize a combination of host survival and reproductive resources.

  10. The Complex Relationship between Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Schroeder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance, prompted by the overuse of antimicrobial agents, may arise from a variety of mechanisms, particularly horizontal gene transfer of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes, which is often facilitated by biofilm formation. The importance of phenotypic changes seen in a biofilm, which lead to genotypic alterations, cannot be overstated. Irrespective of if the biofilm is single microbe or polymicrobial, bacteria, protected within a biofilm from the external environment, communicate through signal transduction pathways (e.g., quorum sensing or two-component systems, leading to global changes in gene expression, enhancing virulence, and expediting the acquisition of antibiotic resistance. Thus, one must examine a genetic change in virulence and resistance not only in the context of the biofilm but also as inextricably linked pathologies. Observationally, it is clear that increased virulence and the advent of antibiotic resistance often arise almost simultaneously; however, their genetic connection has been relatively ignored. Although the complexities of genetic regulation in a multispecies community may obscure a causative relationship, uncovering key genetic interactions between virulence and resistance in biofilm bacteria is essential to identifying new druggable targets, ultimately providing a drug discovery and development pathway to improve treatment options for chronic and recurring infection.

  11. Communication between microorganisms as a basis for production of virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Eugenia; Bogiel, Tomasz; Zalas-Wiecek, Patrycja

    2009-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), or cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, is achieved through the production and subsequent response to the accumulation of extracellular signal molecules called autoinductors. The main role of QS is regulation of production of virulence factors in bacteria. Bacterial pathogenicity is often manifested by the expression of various cell-associated and secreted virulence factors, such as exoenzymes, toxins and biofilm. In bacteria, the expression of virulence factors is controlled coordinately by the global regulatory QS systems, which includes the AI-1/LuxIR-, AI-2/LuxS-, AI-3/QsC-, AIP/Agr-based systems. The regulation of production of virulence factors is extremely complex and many components influence it.

  12. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  13. Effect of Different Aloe Fractions on the Growth of Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodelli, Giulia; Pellizzoni, Marco; Ruzickova, Gabriela; Lucini, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Several foods on the market, such as yogurt and fermented milk, include mixtures of prebiotics and probiotic microorganisms effective in promoting the proliferation and equilibrium of intestinal bacteria, thus improving gut health. Particularly, researchers and the public have shown increasing interest in the combination of probiotics with natural substances that promote health or that can act as substrates to promote bacterial growth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of different extracts of Aloe barbadensis and Aloe arborescens in fermented milk, taking into account both the prebiotic effect of aloe polysaccharides and the antimicrobial activity of several secondary metabolites. The results demonstrate a beneficial effect of 5% aloe inner gel on Lactobacillus growth and confirm the antimicrobial activity of the phenolic compounds peculiar of green rind extracts. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. In vitro effect of Chinese herb extracts on caries-related bacteria and glucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, MingYu; Liu, Zheng

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of herb extracts on caries-related bacteria and glucan of dental plaque in vitro. Bacterial sensitivity tests were done using broth dilution, and the phenol sulphate method was used to assess glucan inhibition. The results showed that tannic acid could inhibit bacterial growth more effectively than other herb extracts. Eugenol showed a 46.87 +/- 12.74 and 36.67 +/- 6.30% inhibitory effect on insoluble and soluble glucan synthesis, respectively. Cnidium, barbaloin, caryophyllin, and piperine had > 40.0% inhibitory effect on soluble glucan synthesis. Both insoluble and soluble glucan synthesis of S. sobrinus were inhibited by eugenol and piperine. Eugenol and piperine were efficacious in inhibiting glucan synthesis making them desirable agents for oral care products.

  15. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...... afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate...... and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response....

  16. Effectivity of blunt end with side hole irrigation needle to eliminate root canal bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmiari Setyowati

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The blunt end with side hole irrigation needles have some advantages. They can be placed close to irrigation area, produce turbulent motion of irrigation material, and not push debris to apical. There is no data about the effectiveness of blunt end with side hole irrigation needle to eliminate root canal bacteria in vivo, therefore the research about effectivity of this needle compare to conventional irrigation needle was permormed. In this study 12 samples were used and divided into two groups. The conventional irrigation needle in the first group was used as control and the blunt end with side hole needle was used in the second group. The bacteriological sampling and colony counting was conducted. The paired t-test analysis before and after irrigation showed significant difference on the first and second group. The result indicated that blunt end with side hole needle more effective in eliminating root canal bacteria than conventional needle. Supporting to this study a software of fluent had been done in vitro. The result showed blunt end with side hole needle produced turbulent motion of irrigating liquid and the conventional needle produced laminar motion.

  17. Effects of oxidants and reductants on the efficiency of excitation transfer in green photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer in chlorosome antennas in the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium vibrioforme and Chlorobium limicola was found to be highly sensitive to the redox potential of the suspension. Energy transfer efficiencies were measured by comparing the absorption spectrum of the bacteriochlorophyll c or d pigments in the chlorosome to the excitation spectrum for fluorescence arising from the chlorosome baseplate and membrane-bound antenna complexes. The efficiency of energy transfer approaches 100% at low redox potentials induced by addition of sodium dithionite or other strong reductants, and is lowered to 10-20% under aerobic conditions or after addition of a variety of membrane-permeable oxidizing agents. The redox effect on energy transfer is observed in whole cells, isolated membranes and purified chlorosomes, indicating that the modulation of energy transfer efficiency arises within the antenna complexes and is not directly mediated by the redox state of the reaction center. It is proposed that chlorosomes contain a component that acts as a highly quenching center in its oxidized state, but is an inefficient quencher when reduced by endogenous or exogenous reductants. This effect may be a control mechanism that prevents cellular damage resulting from reaction of oxygen with reduced low-potential electron acceptors found in the green sulfur bacteria. The redox modulation effect is not observed in the green gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which contains chlorosomes but does not contain low-potential electron acceptors.

  18. The interplay between Entamoeba and enteropathogenic bacteria modulates epithelial cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Del Carmen Domínguez-Robles, M; Franco, Elizabeth; Meza, Isaura

    2008-07-23

    Mixed intestinal infections with Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and bacteria with exacerbated manifestations of disease are common in regions where amoebiasis is endemic. However, amoeba-bacteria interactions remain largely unexamined. Trophozoites of E. histolytica and E. dispar were co-cultured with enteropathogenic bacteria strains Escherichia coli (EPEC), Shigella dysenteriae and a commensal Escherichia coli. Amoebae that phagocytosed bacteria were tested for a cytopathic effect on epithelial cell monolayers. Cysteine proteinase activity, adhesion and cell surface concentration of Gal/GalNAc lectin were analyzed in amoebae showing increased virulence. Structural and functional changes and induction of IL-8 expression were determined in epithelial cells before and after exposure to bacteria. Chemotaxis of amoebae and neutrophils to human IL-8 and conditioned culture media from epithelial cells exposed to bacteria was quantified. E. histolytica digested phagocytosed bacteria, although S. dysenteriae retained 70% viability after ingestion. Phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria augmented the cytopathic effect of E. histolytica and increased expression of Gal/GalNAc lectin on the amoebic surface and increased cysteine proteinase activity. E. dispar remained avirulent. Adhesion of amoebae and damage to cells exposed to bacteria were increased. Additional increases were observed if amoebae had phagocytosed bacteria. Co-culture of epithelial cells with enteropathogenic bacteria disrupted monolayer permeability and induced expression of IL-8. Media from these co-cultures and human recombinant IL-8 were similarly chemotactic for neutrophils and E. histolytica. Epithelial monolayers exposed to enteropathogenic bacteria become more susceptible to E. histolytica damage. At the same time, phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria by amoebae further increased epithelial cell damage. The in vitro system presented here provides evidence that the Entamoeba

  19. The interplay between Entamoeba and enteropathogenic bacteria modulates epithelial cell damage.

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    José Manuel Galván-Moroyoqui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mixed intestinal infections with Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and bacteria with exacerbated manifestations of disease are common in regions where amoebiasis is endemic. However, amoeba-bacteria interactions remain largely unexamined. METHODOLOGY: Trophozoites of E. histolytica and E. dispar were co-cultured with enteropathogenic bacteria strains Escherichia coli (EPEC, Shigella dysenteriae and a commensal Escherichia coli. Amoebae that phagocytosed bacteria were tested for a cytopathic effect on epithelial cell monolayers. Cysteine proteinase activity, adhesion and cell surface concentration of Gal/GalNAc lectin were analyzed in amoebae showing increased virulence. Structural and functional changes and induction of IL-8 expression were determined in epithelial cells before and after exposure to bacteria. Chemotaxis of amoebae and neutrophils to human IL-8 and conditioned culture media from epithelial cells exposed to bacteria was quantified. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: E. histolytica digested phagocytosed bacteria, although S. dysenteriae retained 70% viability after ingestion. Phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria augmented the cytopathic effect of E. histolytica and increased expression of Gal/GalNAc lectin on the amoebic surface and increased cysteine proteinase activity. E. dispar remained avirulent. Adhesion of amoebae and damage to cells exposed to bacteria were increased. Additional increases were observed if amoebae had phagocytosed bacteria. Co-culture of epithelial cells with enteropathogenic bacteria disrupted monolayer permeability and induced expression of IL-8. Media from these co-cultures and human recombinant IL-8 were similarly chemotactic for neutrophils and E. histolytica. CONCLUSIONS: Epithelial monolayers exposed to enteropathogenic bacteria become more susceptible to E. histolytica damage. At the same time, phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria by amoebae further increased epithelial cell damage. SIGNIFICANCE

  20. Effect of cigarette smoking on subgingival bacteria in healthy subjects and patients with chronic periodontitis.

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    Karasneh, Jumana A; Al Habashneh, Rola A; Marzouka, Nour Aldain S; Thornhill, Martin H

    2017-03-21

    Cigarette smoking is known to increase the risk of periodontal destruction and developing chronic periodontitis (CP). It is also reported to affect the subgingival bacterial profile among CP patients. However, studies on the effect of smoking on the bacterial profile among healthy subjects are still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of smoking on the subgingival bacterial profile in both healthy adults and CP patients. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from CP patients (30 nonsmokers and 9 smokers) and healthy subjects (37 non-smokers and 18 smokers). Genomic DNA was extracted and 25 bacterial species were detected using PCR of 16S rRNA. Comparing smokers to non-smokers from each group was conducted using chi2 and binary logistic regression analysis. After correcting for confounding factors, the odds of having Slackia exigua, Selenomonas sputigena and Campylobacter rectus was higher among healthy smokers (ORadj = 10.1, 6.62 and 5.62 respectively). While for CP group, the highest odds were observed for Treponema amylovorum, Treponema medium, Slackia exigua and Treponema vincentii (ORadj = 20.7, 7.97, 6.37 and 5.37 respectively) and the increase in Treponema amylovorum was statistically significant (p = 0.05). Smoking affects the subgingival bacterial profile in healthy individuals and is responsible for the depletion of beneficial bacteria and the increase in periodontopathogenic bacteria. In the CP patient group, our study suggests that subgingival bacteria (particularly Treponema species) make a more substantial contribution in the etiology of CP among non-smokers. Further studies using a larger sample set and more sensitive and quantitative techniques (such as real -time PCR) are needed to enhance our understanding of the exact effect of smoking on subgingival biofilm.

  1. Does the Reciproc file remove root canal bacteria and endotoxins as effectively as multifile rotary systems?

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    Marinho, A C S; Martinho, F C; Gonçalves, L M; Rabang, H R C; Gomes, B P F A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Reciproc for the removal of cultivable bacteria and endotoxins from root canals in comparison with multifile rotary systems. The root canals of forty human single-rooted mandibular pre-molars were contaminated with an Escherichia coli suspension for 21 days and randomly assigned to four groups according to the instrumentation system: GI - Reciproc (VDW); GII - Mtwo (VDW); GIII - ProTaper Universal (Dentsply Maillefer); and GIV -FKG Race(™) (FKG Dentaire) (n = 10 per group). Bacterial and endotoxin samples were taken with a sterile/apyrogenic paper point before (s1) and after instrumentation (s2). Culture techniques determined the colony-forming units (CFU) and the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay was used for endotoxin quantification. Results were submitted to paired t-test and anova. At s1, bacteria and endotoxins were recovered in 100% of the root canals investigated (40/40). After instrumentation, all systems were associated with a highly significant reduction of the bacterial load and endotoxin levels, respectively: GI - Reciproc (99.34% and 91.69%); GII - Mtwo (99.86% and 83.11%); GIII - ProTaper (99.93% and 78.56%) and GIV - FKG Race(™) (99.99% and 82.52%) (P endotoxin removal (P > 0.01). The reciprocating single file, Reciproc, was as effective as the multifile rotary systems for the removal of bacteria and endotoxins from root canals. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effects of volatile organic compounds produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Waseem; Wang, Jichen; Wu, Yuncheng; Ling, Ning; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbes is an important characteristic for their selection as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. In this study, we identified the VOCs produced by the biocontrol strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens T-5 and evaluated their impact on the growth and virulence traits of tomato bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The results showed that the VOCs of strain T-5 significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum in agar medium and in soil. In addition, VOCs significantly inhibited the motility traits, root colonization, biofilm formation, and production of antioxidant enzymes and exopolysaccharides by R. solanacearum. However, no effect of VOCs on the production of hydrolytic enzymes by R. solanacearum was observed. The strain T-5 produced VOCs, including benzenes, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes, acids, and one furan and naphthalene compound; among those, 13 VOCs showed 1-10 % antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum in their produced amounts by T-5; however, the consortium of all VOCs produced on agar medium, in sterilized soil, and in natural soil showed 75, 62, and 85 % growth inhibition of R. solanacearum, respectively. The real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the results when the expression of different virulence- and metabolism-related genes in R. solanacearum cells was decreased after exposure to the VOCs of strain T-5. The results of this study clearly revealed the significance of VOCs in the control of plant pathogens. This information would help to better comprehend the microbial interactions mediated by VOCs in nature and to develop safer strategies to control plant disease.

  3. The Effects of Nutrient Imbalances and Temperature on the Biomass Stoichiometry of Freshwater Bacteria.

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    Phillips, Katherine N; Godwin, Casey M; Cotner, James B

    2017-01-01

    Two contemporary effects of humans on aquatic ecosystems are increasing temperatures and increasing nutrient concentrations from fertilizers. The response of organisms to these perturbations has important implications for ecosystem processes. We examined the effects of phosphorus (P) supply and temperature on organismal carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (C, N, and P) content, cell size and allocation into internal P pools in three strains of recently isolated bacteria ( Agrobacterium sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Arthrobacter sp.). We manipulated resource C:P in chemostats and also manipulated temperatures from 10 to 30°C. Dilution rates were maintained for all the strains at ~25% of their temperature-specific maximum growth rate to simulate low growth rates in natural systems. Under these conditions, there were large effects of resource stoichiometry and temperature on biomass stoichiometry, element quotas, and cell size. Each strain was smaller when C-limited and larger when P-limited. Temperature had weak effects on morphology, little effect on C quotas, no effect on N quotas and biomass C:N, but had strong effects on P quotas, biomass N:P and C:P, and RNA. RNA content per cell increased with increasing temperature at most C:P supply ratios, but was more strongly affected by resource stoichiometry than temperature. Because we used a uniform relative growth rate across temperatures, these findings mean that there are important nutrient and temperature affects on biomass composition and stoichiometry that are independent of growth rate. Changes in biomass stoichiometry with temperature were greatest at low P availability, suggesting tighter coupling between temperature and biomass stoichiometry in oligotrophic ecosystems than in eutrophic systems. Because the C:P stoichiometry of biomass affects how bacteria assimilate and remineralize C, increased P availability could disrupt a negative feedback between biomass stoichiometry and C availability.

  4. Calcium hydroxide has limited effectiveness in eliminating bacteria from human root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balto, Khaled A

    2007-01-01

    Searches of Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, six thesis databases (Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, Proquest Digital Dissertations, OAIster, Index to Theses, Australian Digital Thesis program and Dissertation.com) and one conference report database (BIOSIS Previews) were undertaken. There were no language restrictions. Studies were included in which participants had a noncontributory medical history, presented with mature teeth and radiographic evidence of periapical bone loss (as an indication of pre-operative canal infection), whose selected root canals had not previously received any endodontic treatment, and who had undergone nonsurgical root canal treatment during the study in which calcium hydroxide had also been used to seal in the canals. In addition, it was required that microbiological sampling had been undertaken during the course of treatment, before canal preparation, after canal preparation and after canal medication. Aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques were performed on all samples. The treatment outcomes were stated in terms of positive and negative canal cultures. All data were extracted in the same manner using a standardised data extraction sheet. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using the standard chi-squared test or Q-statistic. The principal measure of treatment effect (antibacterial efficacy) was risk difference, which is normally defined as the risk in the experimental group minus risk in the control group. For the purpose of this study, it is given as the difference in the proportion of bacteria-positive cultures pre- and post-medication. Out of the eight studies (257 cases) included, one study used a small control group (in which canals were left empty, and no intracanal medicament was used between appointments). The other seven studies simply compared the frequency of positive cultures before and after calcium hydroxide medication. Six studies demonstrated a

  5. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure Processing on the Number of Bacteria and Texture of Beef Liver

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    Hirokazu Ogihara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing beef liver for raw consumption was banned in Japan on July 1, 2012. To lift the ban, the establishment of effective countermeasures for safe raw consumption is necessary. In this study, we examined the effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing on raw beef liver. Beef liver samples subjected to 300 MPa of pressure or higher for 10 min at 25°C became firmer and showed a paler color and were considered unsuitable for raw consumption. More than 3.0 log reductions of bacteria were seen after treatments at 400 and 500 MPa, but the treatment with lower pressure did not show enough microcidal effects for safe consumption. Histological and ultrastructural analysis revealed that high hydrostatic pressure processing increased mitochondrial swelling and reduced rough endoplasmic reticula in hepatocytes, and such changes might be related to the observed changes of texture in the treated raw beef liver.

  6. Bacteria-material surface interactions: methodological development for the assessment of implant surface induced antibacterial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborowska, Magdalena; Welch, Ken; Brånemark, Rickard; Khalilpour, Poroshat; Engqvist, Håkan; Thomsen, Peter; Trobos, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The choice of material for implanted prostheses is of great importance concerning bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Consequently, methods to investigate bacterial behavior are needed in order to develop new infection resistant surfaces. In this study, different methodological setups were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of photocatalytic titanium oxide and silver surfaces. Biofilm formation and eradication under static and dynamic culture conditions were studied with the use of the following analytical techniques: viable colony-forming unit (CFU) counting, imprinting, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. The present study demonstrates that different methods are needed in order to evaluate the prophylactic and treatment effects on planktonic and biofilm bacteria and to assess the antimicrobial effect of different surface treatments/coatings. Choosing the right antibacterial testing model for the specific application is also of great importance. Both in situ approaches and indirect methods provide valuable complementary information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorkova, E; Zakova, T; Landa, P; Novakova, J; Vadlejch, J; Kokoska, L

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 15 grape phenolic compounds of various chemical classes (phenolic acids, stilbenes and flavonoids) using the broth microdilution method against yeasts and acetic acid bacteria frequently occurring in deteriorated wine. Pterostilbene (MICs=32-128 μg/mL), resveratrol (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) and luteolin (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) are among six active compounds that possessed the strongest inhibitory effects against all microorganisms tested. In the case of phenolic acids, myricetin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids exhibited selective antimicrobial activity (MICs=256-512 μg/mL), depending upon yeasts and bacteria tested. In comparison with potassium metabisulphite, all microorganisms tested were more susceptible to the phenolics. The results revealed the antibacterial and antiyeast effects against wine spoilage microorganisms of several highly potent phenolics naturally occurring in grapes. These findings also provide arguments for further investigation of stilbenes as prospective compounds reducing the need for the use of sulphites in winemaking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mussel biofiltration effects on attached bacteria and unicellular eukaryotes in fish-rearing seawater

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    Eleni Voudanta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mussel biofiltration is a widely used approach for the mitigation of aquaculture water. In this study, we investigated the effect of mussel biofiltration on the communities of particle-associated bacteria and unicellular eukaryotes in a sea bass aquaculture in southern North Sea. We assessed the planktonic community changes before and after biofiltration based on the diversity of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes by using next generation sequencing technologies. Although there was no overall reduction in the operational taxonomic units (OTU numbers between the control (no mussels and the test (with mussels tanks, a clear reduction in the relative abundance of the top three most dominant OTUs in every sampling time was observed, ranging between 2–28% and 16–82% for Bacteria and Eukarya, respectively. The bacterial community was dominated by OTUs related to phytoplankton blooms and/or high concentrations of detritus. Among the eukaryotes, several fungal and parasitic groups were found. Their relative abundance in most cases was also reduced from the control to the test tanks; a similar decreasing pattern was also observed for both major higher taxa and functional (trophic groups. Overall, this study showed the effectiveness of mussel biofiltration on the decrease of microbiota abundance and diversity in seawater fueling fish farms.

  9. Does the presence of bacteria effect basaltic glass dissolution rates? 1: Dead Pseudomonas reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Benezeth, Pascale

    2010-05-01

    Si, Ca, and Mg release rates from basaltic glass with increasing concentration of dead bacteria at pH 4 and 6, but no effect at pH 8 and 10. The Al dissolution rate is lowered by up to one order of magnitude at all four pH values by the presence of dead bacteria. Comparison of SEM photos of the basaltic glass before and after experiments show no visible change of the glass surface. These results suggest that the presence of dead Pseudomonas reactants in the basaltic formations of Iceland will likely affect negligible the dissolution of basaltic glass during CO2 sequestration. The main effect of bacterial presence seems to be 1) the increase of the concentration of DOC that can complex metals and thus facilitate cation release from the solid phase and/or 2) adsorption of released metals at the surface of the biomass thus decreasing the overall element export rate.

  10. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence.

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    Ayala Tovy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS. The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP, a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1 which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5, two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon.

  11. Effect of Bawang Dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia (L) Merr) crude extract towards bacteria inhibition zone and carp (Cyprinus carpio) hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftuch

    2017-05-01

    Negative impacts of antibiotics and chemical substance usage in aquaculture demand the researchers discover more efficient alternative yet environmentally friendly to overcome fish diseases. One alternative is by using Bawang Dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia (L.) Merr). This research aimed to reveal the effect of Bawang Dayak crude extract towards the inhibition zone of A. hydrophilia, V. harveyi, and P. fluorescens bacteria. Furthermore, it was also conducted to investigate the carp (C. carpio) hematology which was infected with A. hydrophila bacteria, and find the most appropriate dose of Bawang Dayak crude extract to inhibit the bacteria. This experimental research was performed by using Completely Randomized Design with 4 treatments and 3 replications. The best result of the zone of inhibition test in A. hydrophila bacteria was at the dose of 70 ppm while V. harveyi and P. Fluorescens bacteria were at the dose of 85 ppm. Then, fish hematology was found best at the dose of 80 ppm. Bawang Dayak crude extract was significant towards the inhibition zone of A. hydrophila, V. harveyi and P. Fluorescens bacteria, and carp hematology which was infected with A. hydrophila bacteria.

  12. Protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro

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    Đurašević Siniša F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of probiotic bacteria against cadmium (Cd-induced genotoxicity was studied in rat hepatocytes in vivo and in vitro. Male Wistar rats, Rattus norvegicus, were treated for five weeks with (i CdCl2 (70 ppm in the drinking water, (ii a mixture of lyophilized probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. acidophilus and Bifido-bacterium longum (5×108 cfu/g of food, or (iii CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria. In addition, single cells obtained from the untreated rat liver were exposed to CdCl2 (70 ppm, probiotic bacteria (1.28 mg/ml, or CdCl2 and probiotic bacteria, for 15 min at 22°C in the dark. The level of Cd-induced DNA damage in hepatocytes was determined by the comet assay. The obtained results show that probiotic bacteria significantly reduced Cd-induced genotoxicity, both in vivo and in vitro (20% and 48%, respectively. Moreover, the toxicity of Cd to lactobacilli in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats was significantly decreased in the probiotic-treated animals. The binding of Cd2+ to probiotic bacteria was proposed as the most probable protection mechanism. [Acknowledgments. This research was financially supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Government of Serbia, projects No 172058 and 173023

  13. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobrot...

  14. Effect of arginine on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuelian; Zhang, Keke; Deng, Meng; Exterkate, Robertus A M; Liu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Ten Cate, Jacob M

    2017-10-01

    Alkali production via arginine deiminase system (ADS) of oral bacteria plays a significant role in oral ecology, pH homeostasis and inhibition of dental caries. ADS activity in dental plaque varies greatly between individuals, which may profoundly affect their susceptibility to caries. To investigate the effect of arginine on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria. Polymicrobial dental biofilms derived from saliva were formed in a high-throughput active attachment biofilm model and l-arginine (Arg) was shown to reduce the colony forming units (CFU) counts of such biofilms grown for various periods or biofilms derived from saliva of subjects with different caries status. Arg hardly disturbed bacterial growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii in BHI medium, but only inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed S. mutans biofilms harboured fewer cells grown with Arg than that without Arg, even in the initial 2h and 8h phase. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) images of poly-microbial dental and S. mutans biofilms revealed the biofilms grown with Arg had lower exopolysaccharide (EPS)/bacteria ratios than those without Arg (P=0.004, 0.002, respectively). Arg could significantly reduce the production of water-insoluble EPS in S. mutans biofilms (PgtfC or gtfD (P=0.32, 0.06, 0.44 respectively). Arg could reduce the biomass of poly-microbial dental biofilms and S. mutans biofilms, which may be due to the impact of Arg on water-insoluble EPS. Considering the contribution to pH homeostasis in dental biofilms, Arg may serve as an important agent keeping oral biofilms healthy thus prevent dental caries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of external or internal fecal contamination on numbers of bacteria on prechilled broiler carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D P; Northcutt, J K; Cason, J A; Hinton, A; Buhr, R J; Ingram, K D

    2007-06-01

    During processing, fecal material may contact broiler carcasses externally or internally. A study was conducted to determine the effect of external vs. internal fecal contamination on numbers of bacteria on broiler carcasses. In each of 3 trials, 12 carcasses just prior to evisceration were obtained from a commercial processing plant, placed on a shackle line, and eviscerated with commercial equipment in a pilot scale processing plant. Also, approximately 20 intestinal tracts were collected from the processing plant; then cecal contents were collected and pooled. One gram of cecal content was placed on the exterior breast skin (external), inside the carcass cavity (internal), or not applied (control). All carcasses were held 10 min, then placed on the shackle line and passed through a commercial inside-outside bird washer set at 552 kPa, 5 s dwell time, using approximately 189 L per min of tap water at ambient temperature. After a 1-min drip, whole carcass rinses were conducted on each carcass, and coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter counts were determined and reported as log cfu/mL of rinse. External carcass contamination resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05) coliform, E. coli, and Campylobacter numbers than internal contamination (5.0 vs. 4.5, 4.9 vs. 4.2, and 3.6 vs. 2.6, respectively). Control carcass counts were significantly lower than external or internal carcass contamination counts for coliforms (3.7), E. coli (3.6), and Campylobacter (2.2). External contamination resulted in higher numbers of bacteria after carcass washing, but carcasses with internal contamination still have higher numbers of bacteria after washing than carcasses without applied contamination.

  16. Brucella abortus RB51 induces protection in mice orally infected with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Paolo; Rosanna, Adone; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Ciuchini, Franco

    2003-05-01

    Brucellae are gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria which are one of the most common causes of abortion in animals. In addition, they are the source of a severe zoonosis. In this trial, we evaluated the effect of oral inoculation of Brucella abortus RB51 in mice against a challenge infection with B. abortus 2308. First, we showed that a gastric acid neutralization prior to the oral inoculation contributed to a more homogeneous and consistent infection with both vaccine strain B. abortus RB51 and virulent strain B. abortus 2308. Successively, we assessed the clearance and the immune response following an oral infection with B. abortus RB51. Oral inoculation gave a mild infection which was cleared 42 days after infection, and it induced a delayed humoral and cell-mediated immune response. Finally, we immunized mice by oral inoculation with B. abortus RB51, and we challenged them with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 by an oral or intraperitoneal route 42 days after vaccination. Oral inoculation of B. abortus RB51 was able to give protection to mice infected with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 by the oral route but not to mice infected intraperitoneally. Our results indicate that oral inoculation of mice with B. abortus RB51 is able to give a protective immunity against an oral infection with virulent strains, and this protection seems to rely on an immune response at the mucosal level.

  17. The Antibacterial Effect of Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts of Stachys schtschegleevii (Poulk Leave on Bacteria Causing Urinary Infection

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    Atefe Bayat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The medical herb Poulk is used for the treatment of infectious diseases in urinary tract, vagina, respiratory tract, rheumatism, ear infections, and other inflammatory conditions. In this study, the antibacterial effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Poulk on bacterial infection of urine, was investigated. Methods: In this experimental study, techniques for determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of bacterial growth, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, and disk diffusion were used to investigate the antibacterial effects of Poulk on the mentioned bacteria. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Duncan’s tests. Significance level was considered p<0.05. Results: In this study, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria showed sensitivity to aqueous and methanolic extracts of Poulk in different concentrations. Proteus mirabilis bacteria with an inhibition zone diameter of (2.00±0.2 mm was the most resistant and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria with an inhibition zone diameter of (20.50±0.2mm was the most sensitive bacteria to the extract effect. The effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts on staphylococcus aureus was the same. Hydro-methanolic extracts showed MIC and MBC, but aqueous extracts had no bactericidal effect on the bacteria. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that aqueous and methanolic extracts of poulk have strong antibacterial effects                on Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus (bacteria causing urinary infections, but no effect on Proteus mirabilis.

  18. The effect on the virulence and infectivity of Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella gallinarum of acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids from organisms that had caused serious outbreaks of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H W; Tucker, J F

    1979-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance plasmids from organisms that had caused serious epidemics, including those responsible for epidemics of chloramphenicol-resistant typhoid fever and dysentery in Central America, were transferred to a strain of Salmonella typhimurium and of Salmonella gallinarum. The virulence and infectivity of these R(+) forms were then compared with the R(-) parent forms in orally inoculated chickens.None of the R(+) forms were more virulent than their R(-) parent forms. The mortality rates they produced were either the same as or less than that of their R(-) parent forms. The mortality rates were not increased by feeding the chickens on diets containing antibiotics against which the plasmids provided resistance.The removal of the plasmids from some R(+) forms of decreased virulence was not accompanied by any alteration in virulence, indicating that they were less virulent mutants of the parent strain that had conjugated preferentially. In other cases their virulence was increased, indicating that the very possession of the plasmid was involved in their decreased virulence. Of four forms of the S. gallinarum strain harbouring the plasmid that had been incriminated in the Central American dysentery outbreak, one was as virulent as the parent R(-) form and the other three were less virulent. Preferential conjugation by an avirulent mutant was responsible for the lack of virulence of one of them but the very possession of the plasmid appeared responsible for the decreased virulence of the other two. The decreased virulence of de-repressed F(+) and I(+) forms of the S. typhimurium strain was increased to that of repressed F(+) form and of the parent form by plasmid removal.Organisms of the R(+) forms of the S. typhimurium strain were not excreted in larger amounts or for longer periods of time by infected chickens than organisms of the R(-) parent form were. Neither did organisms of the R(+) forms of this strain or the S. gallinarum strain spread more rapidly or

  19. Establishment of rat model of central venous catheter (CVC): associated infection and evaluation of the virulence of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lian-Hua; Huang, Yun-Chao; Guo, Feng-Li; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Guang-Qiang; Duan, Lin-Can; Jin, Cong-Guo

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC)-associated infection model was established in rats to investigate and evaluate the effect of biofilms on the virulence of the pathogens. Twenty-four adult SD rats were randomly divided into biofilm positive (BF+) and biofilm negative (BF-) groups to be challenged with strains of S.epidermidis. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured and the infection rate and counts of bacteria cells were studied. Compared to rats of BF- group, the serum level of TNF and IL-6 significantly increased in rats of BF+ group (P infection rate and bacterial counts in tissues and blood of rats of BF + group were significantly higher than those of rats of BF- group (P associated infection model can be successfully reproduced in rats by injecting 5 × 10(6) CFU of S.epidermidis. Biofilm formation can significantly enhance the virulence of the bacteria, leading to uncontrolled infection. The serum level of inflammatory cytokines, infection rate and the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration are important markers for evaluating the virulence of biofilm.

  20. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Lomada, Santosh Kumar; Tomar, Archana; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-11-01

    Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named Xanthomonas iron binding regulator) of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon's involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in Xanthomonads in

  1. The subtilisin-like protease AprV2 is required for virulence and uses a novel disulphide-tethered exosite to bind substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Kennan

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens produce extracellular proteases that degrade the extracellular matrix of the host and therefore are involved in disease pathogenesis. Dichelobacter nodosus is the causative agent of ovine footrot, a highly contagious disease that is characterized by the separation of the hoof from the underlying tissue. D. nodosus secretes three subtilisin-like proteases whose analysis forms the basis of diagnostic tests that differentiate between virulent and benign strains and have been postulated to play a role in virulence. We have constructed protease mutants of D. nodosus; their analysis in a sheep virulence model revealed that one of these enzymes, AprV2, was required for virulence. These studies challenge the previous hypothesis that the elastase activity of AprV2 is important for disease progression, since aprV2 mutants were virulent when complemented with aprB2, which encodes a variant that has impaired elastase activity. We have determined the crystal structures of both AprV2 and AprB2 and characterized the biological activity of these enzymes. These data reveal that an unusual extended disulphide-tethered loop functions as an exosite, mediating effective enzyme-substrate interactions. The disulphide bond and Tyr92, which was located at the exposed end of the loop, were functionally important. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that other pathogenic bacteria may have proteases that utilize a similar mechanism. In conclusion, we have used an integrated multidisciplinary combination of bacterial genetics, whole animal virulence trials in the original host, biochemical studies, and comprehensive analysis of crystal structures to provide the first definitive evidence that the extracellular secreted proteases produced by D. nodosus are required for virulence and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which these proteases bind to their natural substrates. We postulate that this exosite mechanism may be used by proteases produced by

  2. Structure-Based Discovery of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cariogenic Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Hua, Zhang; Nguyen, Thao; Zou, Jing; Cai, Xia; Michalek, Suzanne M; Velu, Sadanandan E; Wu, Hui

    2017-07-20

    Streptococcus mutans employs a key virulence factor, three glucosyltransferase (GtfBCD) enzymes to establish cariogenic biofilms. Therefore, the inhibition of GtfBCD would provide anti-virulence therapeutics. Here a small molecule library of 500,000 small molecule compounds was screened in silico against the available crystal structure of the GtfC catalytic domain. Based on the predicted binding affinities and drug-like properties, small molecules were selected and evaluated for their ability to reduce S. mutans biofilms, as well as inhibit the activity of Gtfs. The most potent inhibitor was further characterized for Gtf binding using OctetRed instrument, which yielded low micromolar KD against GtfB and nanomolar KD against GtfC, demonstrating selectivity towards GtfC. Additionally, the lead compound did not affect the overall growth of S. mutans and commensal oral bacteria, and selectively inhibit the biofilm formation by S. mutans, indicative of its selectivity and non-bactericidal nature. The lead compound also effectively reduced cariogenicity in vivo in a rat model of dental caries. An analog that docked poorly in the GtfC catalytic domain failed to inhibit the activity of Gtfs and S. mutans biofilms, signifying the specificity of the lead compound. This report illustrates the validity and potential of structure-based design of anti-S. mutans virulence inhibitors.

  3. [Effect of compound Chinese traditional medicine on infected root canal bacteria biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Li-li; Xia, Wen-wei; Zhu, Cai-lian; Ye, Dong-xia

    2010-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of compound Chinese traditional medicine(CTM), which composed of gallic acid, magnolol and polysaccharide of Blettila striata, against the infected root canal bacterial biofilm. Actinomyces viscosus (Av), Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) were composed to form biofilm, then confocal laser scan microscope (CLSM) was used to observe and study the bacterial activity. SAS6.12 software package was used for statistical analysis. The biofilm thickness reduced after treatment by both CTM and ZnO (P>0.05),while there was a significant decrease of the percentage of vital bacterias after treatment by CTM (P<0.01). The compound Chinese traditional medicine is effective on biofilm control, so that it would be an effective disinfecting drug for root canal sealers. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.2008L008A).

  4. Anti-obesity effects of gut microbiota are associated with lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Cheng, Po-Ching; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rapidly becoming endemic in industrialized countries and continues to increase in developing countries worldwide. Obesity predisposes people to an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Recent studies have described an association between obesity and certain gut microbiota, suggesting that gut microbiota might play a critical role in the development of obesity. Although probiotics have many beneficial health effects in humans and animals, attention has only recently been drawn to manipulating the gut microbiota, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB), to influence the development of obesity. In this review, we first describe the causes of obesity, including the genetic and environmental factors. We then describe the relationship between the gut microbiota and obesity, and the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota influence energy metabolism and inflammation in obesity. Lastly, we focus on the potential role of LAB in mediating the effects of the gut microbiota in the development of obesity.

  5. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  6. Lead biosorption of probiotic bacteria: effects of the intestinal content from laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sicheng; Wang, Jie; Liang, Juan Boo; Jahromi, Mohammad Faseleh; Zhu, Cui; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Laudadio, Vito; Tufarelli, Vincenzo; Liao, Xindi

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the effects and the possible mechanisms of intestinal content (IC) from laying hens on in vitro lead (Pb(2+)) biosorption of four probiotic bacterial strains (Bifidobacterium longum BB79, Lactobacillus paracasei Kgl6, Lactobacillus pentosus ITA23, and Lactobacillus acidipiscis ITA44). The total Pb(2+) removal capacity of the four probiotic strains, with and without capsule polysaccharides (CPSs), increased in the presence of IC compared to the control (without IC). SEM imaging revealed certain unidentified particles from the IC adhered on the surface of bacterial cells sorted out using flow cytometry. Follow-up experiment showed an overall trend of increase in the Pb(2+) removal capacity of the sorted bacteria, but statistically significant for L. pentosus ITA23 and B. longum BB79 after incubation with IC, particularly with the suspended solid portion of the IC. In addition, the Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer data showed that functional groups such as C-H, O-H, C=O, and C-O-C which possibly associated with Pb(2+) binding were mainly presented in the suspended solid portion of IC. Putting the above together, we postulated that the enhanced Pb(2+) binding capacity the probiotic bacteria incubated in IC is due to the adherence of the yet to be identified particles which could much exist in suspended solid portion of IC containing negatively charged functional groups which bind with the positive Pb(2+) ions.

  7. [Effect of vitamine A on mice immune response induced by specific periodontal pathogenic bacteria-immunization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Jia; Liu, Hong-Li; DU, Li-Li; Toshihisa, Kawai

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamine-A deficiency on the induction of specific periodontal pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetetemcomitans(Aa) immunization. BALB/c mice were fed with vitamine A-depleted diet or control regular diet throughout the whole experiment period. After 2 weeks, immunized formalin-killed Aa to build immunized models, 6 weeks later, sacrificed to determine specific antibody-IgG, IgM and sub-class IgG antibody titers in serum, and concentration of IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α and RANKL in T cell supernatant were measured by ELISA and T cell proliferation was measured by cintilography. SPSS 11.5 software package was used for statistical analysis. The levels of whole IgG and IgM antibody which were immunized by Aa significantly elevated, non-immune group was unable to produce any antibody. Compared with Aa immunized+RD group, the level of whole IgG in Aa immunized+VAD group was significantly higher (Pvitamin-A diet can increase the immunized mice's susceptibility to periodontal pathogenic bacteria and trigger or aggravate immune inflammatory response. Adequate vitamin A is an important factor in maintaining body health. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (Grant No.20092139) and Science and Technology Program of Shenyang Municipality (Grant No.F10-149-9-32).

  8. Effect of electrical charges and fields on injury and viability of airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainelis, Gediminas; Górny, Rafał L; Reponen, Tiina; Trunov, Mikhaylo; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Baron, Paul; Yadav, Jagjit; Willeke, Klaus

    2002-07-20

    In this study, the effects of the electric charges and fields on the viability of airborne microorganisms were investigated. The electric charges of different magnitude and polarity were imparted on airborne microbial cells by a means of induction charging. The airborne microorganisms carrying different electric charge levels were then extracted by an electric mobility analyzer and collected using a microbial sampler. It was found that the viability of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria, used as a model for sensitive bacteria, carrying a net charge from 4100 negative to 30 positive elementary charges ranged between 40% and 60%; the viability of the cells carrying >2700 positive charges was below 1.5%. In contrast, the viability of the stress-resistant spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (used as simulant of anthrax-causing Bacillus anthracis spores when testing bioaerosol sensors in various studies), was not affected by the amount of electric charges on the spores. Because bacterial cells depend on their membrane potential for basic metabolic activities, drastic changes occurring in the membrane potential during aerosolization and the local electric fields induced by the imposed charges appeared to affect the sensitive cells' viability. These findings facilitate applications of electric charging for environmental control purposes involving sterilization of bacterial cells by imposing high electric charges on them. The findings from this study can also be used in the development of new bioaerosol sampling methods based on electrostatic principles. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria on Transplants Growth and Lettuce Yield in Organic Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczech Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of beneficial bacterial strain B125 (Enterobacter sp. and strain PZ9 (Bacillus sp. in lettuce transplants production significantly enhanced seed germination and plant biomass. The best effect was obtained when the mixture of B125 and PZ9 was used. Combined application of these bacteria significantly increased transplants biomass, which was about 45% higher than that in the control. However, after planting these transplants in organic field, generally, there were no differences in yield and nutrient content in plants treated and not treated with the bacteria, except for nitrogen and vitamin C. The lettuce grown from transplants treated with bacterial mixture B125 + PZ9 contained significantly higher nitrogen than plants from other treatments. Opposite to nitrogen, bacterial applications decreased the amount of vitamin C. The growth and organic lettuce composition was affected by planting time. The yield was higher in spring, but the concentration of nutrients in these plants was lower than that in plants harvested in autumn. Climatic and light conditions in the late season were the reasons for increased dry matter content, minerals, phenolic compounds, and vitamin C, as well as high concentration of nitrates.

  10. Effect of nitrogen source on growth and trichloroethylene degradation by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.H.; Alvarez-Cohen, L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1998-09-01

    The effect of nitrogen source on methane-oxidizing bacteria with respect to cellular growth and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation ability were examined. One mixed chemostat culture and two pure type II methane-oxidizing strains, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and strain CAC-2, which was isolated from the chemostat culture, were used in this study. All cultures were able to grow with each of three different nitrogen sources: ammonia, nitrate, and molecular nitrogen. Both M. trichosporium OB3b and strain CAC-2 showed slightly lower net cellular growth rates and cell yields but exhibited higher methane uptake rates, levels of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production, and naphthalene oxidation rates when grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The TCE-degrading ability of each culture was measured in terms of initial TCE oxidation rates and TCE transformation capacities, measured both with and without external energy sources. Higher initial TCE oxidation rates and TCE transformation capacities were observed in nitrogen-fixing mixed, M. trichosporium OB3b, and CAC-2 cultures than in nitrate- or ammonia-supplied cells. TCE transformation capacities were found to correlate with cellular PHB content in all three cultures. The results of this study suggest that the nitrogen-fixing capabilities of methane-oxidizing bacteria can be used to select for high-activity TCE degraders for the enhancement of bioremediation in fixed-nitrogen-limited environments.

  11. Effects of Methylcellulose on Cellulolytic Bacteria Attachment and Rice Straw Degradation in the Rumen Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Guyn Sung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of methylcellulose on the attachment of major cellulolytic bacteria on rice straw and its digestibility. Rice straw was incubated with ruminal mixture with or without 0.1% methylcellulose (MC. The attachment of F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and R. albus populations on rice straw was measured using real-time PCR with specific primer sets. Methylcellulose at the level of 0.1% decreased the attachment of all three major cellulolytic bacteria. In particular, MC treatment reduced (p<0.05 attachment of F. succinogenes on rice straw after 10 min of incubation while a significant reduction (p<0.05 in attachment was not observed until 4 h incubation in the case of R. flavefaciens and R. albus. This result indicated F. succinogenes responded to MC more sensitively and earlier than R. flavefaciens and R. albus. Dry matter digestibility of rice straw was subsequently inhibited by 0.1% MC, and there was a significant difference between control and MC treatment (p<0.05. Incubated cultures containing MC had higher pH and lower gas production than controls. Current data clearly indicated that the attachment of F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and R. albus on rice straw was inhibited by MC, which apparently reduced rice straw digestion.

  12. Inhibitory effects of a super pulsed carbon dioxide laser at low energy density on periodontopathic bacteria and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Taro; Shimada, Koichi; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Ito, Koichi

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have described the effect of irradiation by a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser at high energy density on oral bacteria, and various side-effects have also been observed. However, no published studies have examined the effect of irradiation by a CO2 laser at low energy density on oral bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of super pulsed CO2 laser irradiation on periodontopathic bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Bacterial suspensions of two species of periodontopathic bacteria received laser irradiation at energy densities of 0-12.5 J/cm2. The suspensions were then spread over agar plates and incubated anaerobically. The bactericidal effects were evaluated based on colony formation. Samples of LPS were laser-irradiated at energy densities of 0-12.5 J/cm2. The biological activity was measured, and LPS was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The irradiation at low energy densities of 7.5 and 12.5 J/cm2 killed more than 99.9 and 99.999% of Porphyromonas gingivalis and more than 99% of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was sterilized by the irradiation at 7.5 J/cm2. LPS biological activity was significantly decreased by laser irradiation at energy densities of more than 7.5 J/cm2 (p CO2 laser irradiation at low power is capable of bactericidal effect on periodontopathic bacteria and decreasing LPS activity.

  13. Thyme Oil Reduces Biofilm Formation and Impairs Virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae

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    Akanksha Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, a common bacterial plant pathogen regulates its virulence and biofilm formation attribute via a chemical method of communication. Disabling this mechanism offers a promising alternative to reduce the virulence and pathogencity of the microorganism. In this study, the effect of thyme (THY oil on Quorum Sensing mediated synthesis of various virulence factors and biofilm formation was analyzed. Treatment of Xoo with 500 ppm THY oil displayed a significant diminution in swimming, swarming, exopolysaccharide and xanthomonadin secretion. However, no effect was observed on bacterial growth kinetics and metabolic activity of the cells. Results were further authenticated by RT-qPCR as significant reduction in motA, motB, and flgE genes was observed upon THY oil treatment. Similarly, the expression of some extracellular enzyme genes such as endoglucanase, xylanase, cellobiosidase, and polygalacturonase was also found to be significantly reduced. However, biochemical plate assays revealed insignificant effect of 500 ppm THY oil on secretion of protease, cellulase, and lipase enzymes. The rpfF gene known to play a crucial role in the virulence of the phytopathogenic bacteria was also significantly reduced in the THY oil treated Xoo cells. HPTLC analysis further revealed significant reduction in DSF and BDSF signaling molecules when Xoo cells were treated with 500 ppm THY oil. Disease reduction was observed in in vitro agar plate assay as lesion length was reduced in THY oil treated Xoo cells when compared with the alone treatment. GC–MS result revealed thymol as the active and major component of THY oil which showed potential binding with rpfF gene. Application of 75 μM thymol resulted in downregulation of gumC, motA, estA, virulence acvB and pglA along with rpfF. The other genes such as cheD, flgA, cheY, and pilA, were not found to be significantly affected. Overall, the results clearly indicated THY oil and its

  14. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiño, Jonathan; Villena, Julio; Kanmani, Paulraj; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-08-15

    Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics) exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS), that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells) as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105)/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  15. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Laiño

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS, that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  16. Growth-inhibiting effects of seco-tanapartholides identified in Artemisia princeps var. orientalis whole plant on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S-H; Na, Y-E; Ahn, Y-J

    2003-01-01

    The present work aimed at isolating antibacterial constituents from the whole plant of Artemisia princeps var. orientalis active towards nine human intestinal bacteria. The growth-inhibiting activities of materials derived from the Artemisia whole plant towards test bacteria were examined using an impregnated paper disc method. The biologically active constituents of the Artemisia whole plant were characterized as the sesquiterpene lactones seco-tanapartholides A and B by spectroscopic analysis. In a test using 1 mg per disc, seco-tanapartholides A and B produced a clear inhibitory effect against Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis and Staphylococcus aureus. These compounds did not affect the growth of test lactic acid-producing bacteria (Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bif. breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lact. casei) and Escherichia coli, whereas weak growth inhibition towards Bif. bifidum was observed. At 0.5 mg per disc, seco-tanapartholides A and B exhibited moderate growth inhibition towards Cl. perfringens but weak growth inhibition towards Bact. fragilis and Staph. aureus. Inhibitory action of seco-tanapartholides A and B towards specific bacteria without any adverse effects on lactic acid-producing bacteria may be an indication of at least one of the pharmacological actions of A. princeps var. orientalis whole plant. These naturally occurring Artemisia whole plant-derived materials could be useful as a new preventive agent against various diseases caused by harmful intestinal bacteria such as clostridia.

  17. Anti-Quorum Sensing Potential of Potato Rhizospheric Bacteria

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    Adeleh Sobhanipour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria is becoming a serious problem. The rise of multiresistance strains has forced the pharmaceutical industry to come up with new generation of more effective and potent antibiotics, therefore creating development of antivirulence compounds. Due to extensive usage of cell-to-cell bacterial communication (QS systems to monitor the production of virulence factors, disruption of QS system results in creation of a promising strategy for the control of bacterial infection. Numerous natural quorum quenching (QQ agents have been identified. In addition, many microorganisms are capable of producing smaller molecular QS inhibitors and/or macromolecular QQ enzymes. In present survey, anti QS activity of 1280 rhizosphere bacteria was assessed using the Pectobacterium carotovorum as AHL-donor and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as biosensor system. The results showed that 61 strains had highly AHL-degrading activity. Both Lux I and Lux R activity were affected by some isolates, suggesting that the rhizobacteria target both QS signal and receptor. These soil microorganisms with their anti-QS activity have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents for reducing virulence and pathogenicity of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

  18. Effectiveness of aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts of Acanthospermum australe (Loefl. Kuntze against diarrhea-inducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mallmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leaves and roots of Acanthospermum australe (Asteraceae have been used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of various ailments including diarrhea, skin diseases, blennorrhagia, dyspepsia, parasitic worms and malaria. The aim of study was to characterize the chemical profiles of the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts of leaves and roots of A. australe, and to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against diarrhea-inducing bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Shigella dysenteriae and Yersinia enterocolitica, as well as their cytotoxic properties. Aqueous leaf extracts were obtained by infusion, while aqueous root extracts were obtained by decoction. The hydroalcoholic leaf and root extracts were prepared by maceration in 90% ethanol for 3 days. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using standard techniques and cytotoxicity was evaluated using Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO-K1. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, saponins and phenolic compounds in the extracts. Although root extracts were not effective against E. faecalis, leaf extracts at concentrations of 20 mg/mL exhibited bactericidal activities against this microorganism. The hydroalcoholic root extract was unique in presenting a bactericidal effect against S. dysenteriae. None of the extracts showed bacteriostatic or bactericidal activities against Y. enterocolitica. The results presented herein demonstrate that the Gram-positive E. faecalis and the Gram-negative S. dysenteriae were susceptible to A. australe extracts, although bacteriostatic/bactericidal activities were only observed at concentrations considered too high for clinical application. Our results support the ethnopharmacological use of A. australe in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, particularly diarrhea caused by infectious bacteria, although further studies are required to determine the anti-diarrhea effects and the toxicities of the extracts in vivo.

  19. Triclosan causes toxic effects to algae in marine biofilms, but does not inhibit the metabolic activity of marine biofilm bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, C Henrik; Janmar, Lisa; Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-07-15

    Effects of the antimicrobial agent triclosan to natural periphyton communities (biofilms, comprising primarily microalgae and bacteria) were assessed in two independent experiments during spring and summer. For that purpose a semi-static test system was used in which periphyton was exposed to a concentration range of 5-9054 nmol/L triclosan. Effects on algae were analyzed as content and composition of photosynthetic pigments. The corresponding EC50 values were 39.25 and 302.45 nmol/L for the spring and summer experiment, respectively. Effects on periphytic bacteria were assessed as effects on carbon utilization patterns, using Biolog Ecoplates. No inhibition of either total carbon utilization or functional diversity was observed, indicating a pronounced triclosan tolerance of the marine bacteria. In contrast, a small stimulation of the total carbon utilization was observed at triclosan concentrations exceeding 100 nmol/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined antioxidant effects of Neem extract, bacteria, red blood cells and Lysozyme: possible relation to periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Leali; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Heyman, Samuel N; Ginsburg, Isaac; Gleitman, Yossi; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2017-08-10

    The common usage of chewing sticks prepared from Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) in India suggests its potential efficacy in periodontal diseases. The objective of this study is to explore the antibacterial effects of Neem leaf extract on the periodontophatic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and its antioxidant capacities alone and in combination with bacteria and polycationic peptides that may be at the site of inflammation. Neem leaf extract was prepared by ethanol extraction. The growth kinetics of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum under anaerobic conditions in the presence of Neem leaf extract were measured. Broth microdilution test was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of Neem leaf extract against each bacterial strain. The effect of Neem leaf extract on the coaggregation of the bacteria was assessed by a visual semi-quantitative assay. The antioxidant capacities of Neem leaf extract alone and in combination with bacteria, with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides chlorhexidine and lisozyme, were determined using a chemiluminescence assay. Neem leaf extract showed prominent dose-dependent antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis, however, had no effect on the growth of F. nucleatum nor on the coaggregation of the two bacteria. Yet, it showed intense antioxidant activity, which was amplified following adherence to bacteria and with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides. Neem leaf extract, containing polyphenols that adhere to oral surfaces, have the potential to provide long-lasting antibacterial as well as synergic antioxidant activities when in complex with bacteria, red blood cells and lisozyme. Thus, it might be especially effective in periodontal diseases.

  1. Effect of lauric arginate, nisin Z, and a combination against several food-related bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayaiying, Rinrada; H-Kittikun, Aran; Cutter, Catherine N

    2014-10-01

    The effects of lauric arginate (LAE) and nisin Z, alone or in combination, on cell damage were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Brochothrix thermosphacta, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, efflux of potassium and phosphate ions, and growth inhibition. A combination of LAE with nisin Z caused severe and dramatic changes in the cytoplasmic membrane and cell lysis of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The combination treatment also caused significant potassium and phosphate ion leakage of E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes and B. thermosphacta, when compared with other treatments: 16.62±1.05, 50.35±0.81 and 45.47±1.15mg/L of potassium ion and 122.66±8.81, 97.96±3.31 and 26.47±13.97mg/L of phosphate ion after treatment for 6h, respectively. Bacteria were reduced by approximately 7log10CFU/mL within the first hour of treatment and then cells were unable to grow for the remainder of the experiment. Treatment with LAE alone resulted in changes in cellular morphology, coagulation of the cytoplasm, and low level leakage of potassium and phosphate ions in all bacteria tested. Treatment of L. monocytogenes and B. thermosphacta with nisin Z (320AU/mL of final concentration) resulted in the formation of membrane channels and leakage of potassium and phosphate ions at rather high levels; but the bacteriocin was not effective against E. coli O157:H7. LAE or nisin Z reduced growth of both L. monocytogenes and B. thermosphacta by approximately 7log10CFU/mL. Conversely, E. coli O157:H7 was not inhibited by treatments with nisin Z, but decreased by approximately 4.45log10CFU/mL after treatment with LAE. These findings provide additional information on the mode of action of these compounds on bacterial populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effective combination of LED-based visible light, photosensitizer and photocatalyst to combat Gram (-) bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponiene, Kristina; Luksiene, Zivile

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial efficiency of combined treatments of visible light (405nm), chlorophyllin (Chl) and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Results obtained indicate that incubation of the Gram (-) Escherichia coli with Chl (1.5×10(-5)M) for 60min as well as illumination alone (405nm; 380kJ/m(2)) has no impact on the viability of E. coli. Just photosensitization (60min incubation with 1.5×10(-5)M Chl and following illumination, 405nm; 380kJ/m(2)) slightly reduces their population (∼1.5 log). ZnO NPs (5×10(-4)M) in the dark have negligible effect on E. coli viability. However, photocatalytic treatment (10min incubation with ZnO NPs (5×10(-4)M) and following illumination with light (λ=405nm; 380kJ/m(2)) resulted in significant reduction of viable cell population (4.6 log). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that cell surface-adhered NPs as well as chlorophyllin after illumination trigger cell shrinkage and eventually death. Simultaneous (at the same time) incubation 30min. with Chl and ZnO NPs and following illumination (380kJ/m(2)) was less effective than every treatment separately. Interaction of bacteria with photosensitizer and photocatalyst in the sequence (photosensitizer→photocatalyst→light) reduced the viability of bacteria by 3 log. But applying interaction of bacteria with photosensitizer and photocatalyst in opposite order (photocatalyst→photosensitizer→light) looks more promising as this reduced the Gram (-) E. coli microbial population by 4.5 log using 5 times lower photocatalyst concentration in comparison with efficiency of photoactivated ZnO NPs (4.6 log). In this case ZnO NPs interact electrostatically with negatively-charged cell surface and afterwards bind negatively charged Chl, thus act as mediators between negatively-charged cell surface and negatively-charged photosensitizer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulative effect of lactic acid bacteria in the growth of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Planas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB from telluric origin on the growth of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana (I. galbana in small and medium volume flasks. Methods: In the first experiment, 7 LAB species [Carnobacterium piscicola, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei ssp. casei, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides spp. mesenteroides (L. mesenteroides spp. mesenteroides and Pediococcus acidilactici (P. acidilactici] were inoculated in 250 mL flasks containing microalgae I. galbana (106 cells/mL. After fitting the growth data to two mathematical models, two LAB strains (L. mesenteroides spp. mesenteroides and P. acidilactici were selected for the second experiment in which those strains were inoculated in medium size (5 L volume cultures of I. galbana (1.2 × 105 –1.5 × 105 cells/mL. The bacterial load in cultures from the first experiment was analyzed by plating on marine agar, MRS agar and thiosulfate citrate bile saltssucrose media. Results: All strains of LAB tested enhanced the growth rate and the final biomass yield of I. galbana cultures, even in the absence of nutrients in the media. The best overall results and the maximal final cell densities in small flasks were achieved with strains L. mesenteroides spp. mesenteroides and P. acidilactici, respectively. These two strains also stimulated the growth (40% and 16% with respect to controls of I. galbana in medium size volumes. For most strains, CFU values of LAB remained stable (105 –108 CFU/mL for at least 4 days. A high variability was observed in bacteria strains among treatments, with Pseudomonas and Moraxella being the most abundant bacteria. Conclusions: The results of present study showed that the growth of I. galbana in both small and medium size volumes was enhanced by LAB, both in the absence and the presence of nutrients in the culture. The highest final biomass was achieved by adding P

  4. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig...... by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracyclineresistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated...... with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaximeresistant strains...

  5. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT MEAT SHOP ON MEAT PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND BACTERIA POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H.C. Dewi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the effect of different meat shops on meat physicalcharacteristics and bacteria population. Sixteen PO carcasses were used in the experiment which wasarranged in a completely randomized design with 4 treatments of different meat shops (traditionalmarket, meat shop, supermarket and slaughter house. Parameters measured were meat pH, waterholding capacity, cooking loss and bacterial total count. The result showed that the average of pH was5.25- 6.03; water holding capacity was 17.07-38.87%; cooking loss was 33.15-48.20 and bacterial totalcount was 1.48x106-10.75x106 CFU/g. It was concluded that bacterial total count in slaughter house andspecial market (meat shop and supermarket were less than those in traditional market.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF INOCULANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON THE FERMENTATION AND AEROBIC STABILITY OF SUNFLOWER SILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisun Koc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of actic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation and aerobic stability of sunflower silages. Sunflower was harvested at the milk stage. Inoculant-1174 (Pioneer®,USA was used as homofermentative lactic acid bacterial inoculant. Inoculant was applied 6.00 log10 cfu/g silage levels. Silages with no additive served as controls. After treatment, the chopped sunflower was ensiled in the PVC type laboratory silos. Three silos for each group were sampled for chemical and microbiological analysis on days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, all silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test for 14 days. Neither inoculant improved the fermentation parameters of sunflower silages. At the end of the ensiling period, inoculant increased lactic acid bacteria (LAB and decreased yeast and mould numbers of silages. Inoculant treatment did not affect aerobic stability of silages.

  7. An Effective Application of Bacteria Quorum Sensing and Circular Elimination in MOPSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shan; Zhao, Long-Long; Jiang, Xiao-Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an approach that incorporates a turbulence mechanism and a circular elimination strategy is presented to strengthen the performance of multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO). For convergence enhancement, the turbulence mechanism derived from bacteria quorum sensing behavior is introduced to MOPSO to preserve the swarm diversity. Meanwhile, the circular elimination strategy is used to select particles for next iteration for better distribution of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The improved MOPSO algorithm has been tested on a set of benchmark functions and compared with representative multi-objective optimization algorithms. Simulation results illustrate that the algorithm outperforms the other algorithms on convergence while keep good spread performance, and could be used as an effective global optimization tool.

  8. [Construction of high-effective symbiotic bacteria: evolutionary models and genetic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Onishchuk, O P; Iurgel', S N; Kurchak, O N; Chizhevskaia, E P; Vorob'ev, N I; Zatovskaia, T V; Simarov, B V

    2014-11-01

    Using the example of N2-fixing legume-rhizobial symbiosis, we demonstrated that the origin and evolution of bacteria symbiotic for plants involve the following: 1) the formation of novel sym gene systems based on reorganizations of the bacterial genomes and on the gene transfer from the distant organisms; 2) the loss of genes encoding for functions that are required for autonomous performance but interfere with symbiotic functions (negative regulators of symbiosis). Therefore, the construction of effective rhizobia strains should involve improvement of sym genes activities (for instance, nif, fix, and dct genes, encoding for nitrogenase synthesis or for the energy supply of N2 fixation), as well as the inactivation of negative regulators of symbiosis identified in our lab (eff genes encoding for the transport of sugars, and the production of polysaccharides, and storage compounds, as well as for oxidative-reductive processes).

  9. Beneficial Effect of Bidens pilosa on Body Weight Gain, Food Conversion Ratio, Gut Bacteria and Coccidiosis in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cicero L T; Chung, Chih-Yao; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Kuo, Tien-Fen; Yang, Chu-Wen; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    In the interests of food safety and public health, plants and their compounds are now re-emerging as an alternative approach to treat gastrointestinal diseases in chickens. Here, we studied the impact of the edible medicinal plant, B. pilosa, on growth performance, gut bacteria and coccidiosis in chickens. First, we found that B. pilosa significantly elevated body weight gain and lowered feed conversion ratio in chickens. Next, we showed that B. pilosa reduced cecal damage as evidenced by increased hemorrhage, villus destruction and decreased villus-to-crypt ratio in chicken ceca. We also performed pyrosequencing of the PCR ampilcons based on the 16S rRNA genes of gut bacteria in chickens. Metagenomic analysis indicated that the chicken gut bacteria belonged to 6 phyla, 6 classes, 6 orders, 9 families, and 8 genera. More importantly, we found that B. pilosa affected the composition of bacteria. This change in bacteria composition was correlated with body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and gut pathology in chickens. Collectively, this work suggests that B. pilosa has beneficial effects on growth performance and protozoan infection in chickens probably via modulation of gut bacteria.

  10. Effect of soil depth and texture on fecal bacteria removal from septic effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, A D; Mueller, T G; Boone, B; Thompson, Y L

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of soils with different texture and depth to treat fecal bacteria eluted from a house-hold septic effluent. The assessments were accomplished by leaching undisturbed soil monoliths of 30, 45, and 60cm thickness and 25cm in diameter, representing the four different textural groups and hydraulic loadings recommended by the Kentucky Health Department, with domestic wastewater effluent collected regularly from a house-hold septic system. Eluent concentrations were monitored daily over a 15 day period for fecal coliform and fecal streptococci concentrations. The results of the study indicate an alarming frequency of failure to comply with United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for depth to groundwater, when using a 30 cm vertical separation distance between the bottom of the drain-field and a limiting soil interface. The treatment performance was especially poor in coarse-textured soils. Although biomat development over time is expected to improve treatment, the high influent levels of fecal bacteria pose great concerns for surface and groundwater contamination. Fine-textured soils generally provided better treatment efficiency and more consistent compliance with EPA standards. Treatment efficiency and compliance usually improved with increasing soil depth, with the 60cm thickness providing the most consistent performance and compliance with maximum discharge limit (MDL) requirements. The findings of this study document a general inadequacy of the 30cm vertical separation distance to provide effective treatment of septic effluents in Kentucky soils, particularly in coarse-textured soils. Considering that increasing the soil depth thickness may be impractical in many marginal soils, complementary or alternative treatment technologies should be adopted to improve treatment efficiency and prevent further deterioration of the quality of water resources.

  11. Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Growth of Staphylococcus aureus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Claudia T.; Frazier, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Cultures of lactic acid bacteria, mostly from foods, were tested for their effect on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Trypticase Soy Broth (BBL). Some of the effectors, e.g., Streptococcus faecalis, S. faecium, Lactobacillus lactis, L. brevis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, stimulated growth of S. aureus during early hours of growth, especially at higher temperatures of incubation, but most cultures were inhibitory, and some (S. faecium and L. mesenteroides) were even killing by the time of attainment of the maximal phase of growth of the Staphylococcus. Low-temperature meat lactobacilli and Leuconostoc dextranicum inhibited S. aureus at 10, 15, 20, and 25 C throughout its growth. Streptococcus faecalis var. liquefaciens inhibited at these temperatures and at 30 and 37 C, as well. When the ratio of effectors to staphylococci in the inoculum was 100:1, the three enterococci, the meat Lactobacillus, and L. dextranicum prevented the attainment of 5 × 106 staphylococci per milliliter at 15 C, and all but the meat Lactobacillus did so at 22 C. A ratio of 1:1 accomplished similar results at 15 C, except that S. aureus was only delayed for 12 hr by S. faecalis. A ratio of 1:100 usually was ineffective. In general, the more effector bacteria there were in the inoculum, the greater was the overall inhibition (or stimulation) of S. aureus. Inhibition was most effective at 10 or 15 C, less so at 20 or 25 C, and least at 30 or 37 C, whereas stimulation during early growth was greater at the higher temperatures. Results with different strains of the effectors and with two strains of S. aureus were similar, for the most part. PMID:4959983

  12. Study of effectiveness of bacteria isolated from rumen microbes with acetogen medium as methanogenesis inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlius Thalib

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruminal methanogenesis has disadvantageous effects on ruminant animals and environment of atmosphere. Inhibition of methane produced through reduction of carbondioxide has been conducted by bacteriological approach. The approach involved the isolation of bacteria from rumens of sheep (IBD and buffalo (IBK using medium for CO-utilizing acetogens. The isolate of bacterium was multiplied with the usual culture medium and then used as inoculum to degrade a substrate of King grass under constant temperature (390C for 48 hours. Fresh rumen fluid of sheep (CRDS was used as comparing inoculum. Measurementswere carbondioxide and methane gasses, pH, volatile fatty acid (VFA and NH3-N contents, bacterial count, and dry matter digestibility (in vitro DMD. The data measured were analyzed by using completely randomized design. The results showed that morphological cell of IBD was oval pleomorphic with Gram negative type, and cell of IBK was rod with Gram negative type. Percentage of CH4 produced by inoculum of IBD was lower than CRDS but was not significantly different (29.47 vs. 33.07%, while the percentage of methane produced by inoculum of IBK was very significantly lower than CRDS (24.29 vs. 33.07% (P<0.01. Acetate/propionate ratio as a result of substrate fermentation by inoculum of IBD (3.55 and IBK (3.79 were very significantly higher than that of CRDS (2.43 (P<0.01. It is concluded from this experiment that isolates used were effective to inhibit the methanogenesis and the species contained in the isolates were indicated to be homoacetogenic bacteria.

  13. Effect of Instrumentation Techniques and Preparation Taper on Apical Extrusion of Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksel, Hacer; Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Çakar, Aslı; Serper, Ahmet; Özkuyumcu, Cumhur; Azim, Adham A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different root canal instrumentation techniques and preparation tapers on the amount of apically extruded bacteria. The root canals of 98 extracted human mandibular incisors were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis suspension. After incubation at 37°C for 24 hours, the root canals were instrumented with K3 rotary files in a crown-down (CD) or full-length linear instrumentation technique (FL) by using 3 different root canal tapers (0.02, 0.04, and 0.06). During instrumentation, apically extruded bacteria were collected into vials containing saline solution. The microbiological samples were taken from the vials and incubated in brain-heart agar medium for 24 hours, and the numbers of colony-forming units (CFUs) were determined. The obtained results were analyzed with t test and one-way analysis of variance for the comparisons between the instrumentation techniques (CD and FL) and the preparation tapers (0.02, 0.04, and 0.06), respectively. Tukey honestly significant difference test was used for pairwise comparisons. The preparation taper had no effect on the number of CFUs when a FL instrumentation technique was used (P > .05). There was a statistically significant difference in the CFUs between FL and CD techniques when the preparation taper was 0.02 (P instrumentation techniques (P > .05). Using a 0.02 taper in a CD manner results in the least amount of bacterial extrusion. The instrumentation technique did not seem to affect the amount of bacterial extrusion when 0.04 and 0.06 taper instruments were used for cleaning and shaping the root canal space. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tea leaf explants: effects of counteracting bactericidity of leaf polyphenols without loss of bacterial virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, Indra; Saini, Uksha; Lacroix, Benoît; Bhattacharya, Amita; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2007-02-01

    Tea is one of the major crops in Asia and Africa, and its improvement by genetic modification is important for economy of many tea-producing regions. Although somatic embryos derived from cotyledon explants have been transformed with Agrobacterium, the leaves of several commercially important tea cultivars have remained recalcitrant to transformation, largely due to bactericidal effect of polyphenols that are exuded by tea leaves in vitro. Moreover, the commonly used polyphenol adsorbents and antioxidants cannot overcome this problem. Leaf explants, however, are more desirable than cotyledon-derived somatic embryos, especially when it is necessary to further improve a selected elite and also retain its superior traits. Thus, we developed a procedure for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tea leaf explants which is based on the presence of L-glutamine in the co-cultivation medium. We then showed that the transformation process is facilitated via a protective action of L-glutamine against bactericidal effects of leaf polyphenols without affecting the bacterial virulence (vir) gene expression.

  15. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhe Wu,1 Zhan Li,1 Xiaolu Li,2,3 Yaomei Tian,1 Yingzi Fan,1 Chaoheng Yu,1 Bailing Zhou,1 Yi Liu,4 Rong Xiang,5 Li Yang1 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy/Collaborative Innovation Center of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 2International Center for Translational Chinese Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Chinese Medicine Sciences, Chengdu, 3Department of Plastic and Burn Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, 4Department of Microbial Examination, Sichuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chengdu, 5Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001 and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli. The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L. When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus

  16. Combinations of maggot excretions/secretions and antibiotics are effective against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and the bacteria derived therefrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Dambrot, Cheryl; Dogterom-Ballering, Heleen C M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. Previously we reported that maggot excretions/secretions (ES) break down Staphylococcus aureus biofilms but do not kill the bacteria. As many antibiotics are not effective against biofilms we assessed...... the effect of combinations of ES and antibiotics on S. aureus biofilms and on the survival of the bacteria released from the biofilms. METHODS: Effects of ES, antibiotics (vancomycin, daptomycin or clindamycin) and combinations thereof on S. aureus ATCC 29 213 biofilms and bacterial viability were determined...... using microtitre plates and in vitro killing assays. RESULTS: Vancomycin and daptomycin dose-dependently enhanced biofilm formation, whereas clindamycin reduced S. aureus biofilm size. Adding ES to antibiotic incubations caused a complete biofilm breakdown. After a lag time the bacteria derived from...

  17. A review on beneficial effects of rhizosphere bacteria on soil nutrient availability and plant nutrient uptake.

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio Vega, Nelson Walter

    2011-01-01

    Este artículo se constituye en una revisión de los beneficios de bacterias rizosféricas sobre la nutrición vegetal. La interacción entre planta y bacterias solubilizadoras de fosfato es explicada en mayor detalle y usada como modelo para ilustrar el rol que algunas bacterias de la rizosfera juegan en la disponibilidad de nutrientes en el suelo. Las condiciones ambientales de la rizosfera también se discuten con detalle. Los beneficios de estas bacterias han sido obtenidos, y mejorados, en pre...

  18. Polyphosphate and associated enzymes as global regulators of stress response and virulence in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Torrelles, Jordi B; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2016-09-07

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni), a Gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium, is a predominant cause of bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Despite its importance as a major foodborne pathogen, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying C. jejuni stress survival and pathogenesis is limited. Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P) has been shown to play significant roles in bacterial resistance to stress and virulence in many pathogenic bacteria. C. jejuni contains the complete repertoire of enzymes required for poly P metabolism. Recent work in our laboratory and others have demonstrated that poly P controls a plethora of C. jejuni properties that impact its ability to survive in the environment as well as to colonize/infect mammalian hosts. This review article summarizes the current literature on the role of poly P in C. jejuni stress survival and virulence and discusses on how poly P-related enzymes can be exploited for therapeutic/prevention purposes. Additionally, the review article identifies potential areas for future investigation that would enhance our understanding of the role of poly P in C. jejuni and other bacteria, which ultimately would facilitate design of effective therapeutic/preventive strategies to reduce not only the burden of C. jejuni-caused foodborne infections but also of other bacterial infections in humans.

  19. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  20. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobroth dilution technique. Anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. According to disc diffusion test (MIC and MBC), the ability of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris ) extracts for inhibition of bacteria in planktonic form was confirmed. In dealing with biofilm structures, the inhibitory effect of the extracts was directly correlated to their concentration. Except for the inhibition of biofilm formation, efficacy of each extract was independent from type of solvent. According to the potential of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts to inhibit the test bacteria in planktonic and biofilm form, it can be suggested that Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts can be applied as antimicrobial agents against the pathogenic bacteria particularly in biofilm forms.

  1. Cell Density Effects of Frog Skin Bacteria on Their Capacity to Inhibit Growth of the Chytrid Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Bell, Sara; Alford, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts on frog skin can reduce the growth of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) through production of inhibitory metabolites. Bacteria can be effective at increasing the resistance of amphibians to chytridiomycosis when added to amphibian skin, and isolates can be screened for production of metabolites that inhibit Bd growth in vitro. However, some bacteria use density-dependent mechanism such as quorum sensing to regulate metabolite production. It is therefore important to consider cell density effects when evaluating bacteria as possible candidates for bioaugmentation. The aim of our study was to evaluate how the density of cutaneous bacteria affects their inhibition of Bd growth in vitro. We sampled cutaneous bacteria isolated from three frog species in the tropical rainforests of northern Queensland, Australia, and selected ten isolates that were inhibitory to Bd in standardised pilot trials. We grew each isolate in liquid culture at a range of initial dilutions, sub-sampled each dilution at a series of times during the first 48 h of growth and measured spectrophotometric absorbance values, cell counts and Bd-inhibitory activity of cell-free supernatants at each time point. The challenge assay results clearly demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of most isolates were density dependent, with relatively low variation among isolates in the minimum cell density needed to inhibit Bd growth. We suggest the use of minimum cell densities and fast-growing candidate isolates to maximise bioaugmentation efforts.

  2. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobroth dilution technique. Anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to disc diffusion test (MIC and MBC, the ability of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts for inhibition of bacteria in planktonic form was confirmed. In dealing with biofilm structures, the inhibitory effect of the extracts was directly correlated to their concentration. Except for the inhibition of biofilm formation, efficacy of each extract was independent from type of solvent. Conclusion: According to the potential of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts to inhibit the test bacteria in planktonic and biofilm form, it can be suggested that Thymus vulgaris(T. vulgaris extracts can be applied as antimicrobial agents against the pathogenic bacteria particularly in biofilm forms.

  3. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia 2007 with a Deletion of Virulence-Associated Gene 9GL (B119L), when Administered at Low Doses, Leads to Virus Attenuation in Swine and Induces an Effective Protection against Homologous Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G; Krug, Peter W; Gladue, Douglas P; Carlson, Jolene; Sanford, Brenton; Alfano, Marialexia; Kramer, Edward; Lu, Zhiqiang; Arzt, Jonathan; Reese, Bo; Carrillo, Consuelo; Risatti, Guillermo R; Borca, Manuel V

    2015-08-01

    in pigs but only against homologous virus challenges. Here we produced a recombinant ASFV lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL in an attempt to produce a vaccine against virulent ASFV-G, a highly virulent virus isolate detected in the Caucasus region in 2007 and now spreading though the Caucasus region and Eastern Europe. Deletion of 9GL, unlike with other ASFV isolates, did not attenuate completely ASFV-G. However, when delivered once at low dosages, recombinant ASFV-G-Δ9GL induces protection in swine against parental ASFV-G. The protection against ASFV-G is highly effective after 28 days postvaccination, whereas at 21 days postvaccination, animals survived the lethal challenge but showed signs of ASF. Here we report the design and development of an experimental vaccine that induces protection against virulent ASFV-G. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Virulence variations in Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli using the Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Crystal Ching; Octavia, Sophie; Mooney, Anne-Marie; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-01-01

    Shigella species and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) belong to the same species genetically, with remarkable phenotypic and genomic similarities. Shigella is the main cause of bacillary dysentery with around 160 million annual cases, while EIEC generally induces a milder disease compared to Shigella. This study aimed to determine virulence variations between Shigella and EIEC using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Caenorhabditis elegans killing- and bacterial colonization assays were performed to examine the potential difference in virulence between Shigella and EIEC strains. Statistically significant difference in the survival rates of nematodes was demonstrated, with Shigella causing death at 88.24 ± 1.20% and EIEC at 94.37 ± 0.70%. The intestinal load of bacteria in the nematodes was found to be 7.65 × 10(4) ± 8.83 × 10(3) and 2.92 × 10(4) ± 6.26 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1) per nematode for Shigella and EIEC, respectively. Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 which carries the Shiga toxin showed the lowest nematode survival rate at 82.6 ± 3.97% and highest bacterial colonization of 1.75 × 10(5) ± 8.17 × 10(4) CFU ml(-1), whereas a virulence plasmid-negative Shigella strain demonstrated 100 ± 0% nematode survival and lowest bacterial accumulation of 1.02 × 10(4) ± 7.23 × 10(2) CFU ml(-1). This study demonstrates C. elegans as an effective model for examining and comparing Shigella and EIEC virulence variation. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. [REGULATING EFFECT OF ASSOCIATIVE MICROBIOTA ON THE RHYTHMS OF BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FUNGI AND BACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, T Kh; Bukharin, O V; Nikolenko, M V; Paromova, Ya I; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Study the effect of exometabolites of associative microbiota on circadian dynamics of functional parameters, that reflect pathogenic and persistence properties of fungi and bacteria. Clinical isolates of Candida albicans, isolated-from intestine of healthy individuals and patients with candidosis, as well as clinical isolates and museum ATCC strains Staphylococcus. aureus 25923, Escherichia coli 35218 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853 were taken for study of proliferative, adhesive, catalase, protease, phospholipase, hemolytic, anti-lysozyme, biofilm-forming activity. The results were treated statistically. C. albicans isolates, isolated from healthy individuals were revealed to be indifferent to the effect of bacterial metabolites. Chrono-infrastructure of biological properties of fungi altered under the effect of microbiota metabolites. Hospital isolates of S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa displayed a relative stability of physiological properties against the effect of bacterial-fungal metabolites as opposed to museum strains. The alterations of chrono-infrastructure of biological rhythms of microorganisms by bacterial-fungal metabolites of associants reflect the intensity of the biological system, that is inevitable during the process of formation of inter-microbial interactions.

  6. Effects of food preservatives on growth and metabolism of plaque bacteria in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikanger, S. (Department of Operative Dentistry, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)); Bjertness, E. (Section for Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, national Institute of Public Health, Oslo (Norway)); Aamdal Scheie, A. (Department of Microbiology, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway))

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the consumption of food preservatives during the last decades, and to study the effect of the preservatives, sorbic and benzoic acid, on growth and glycolysis of oral bacteria in vitro, and on acid formation by dental plaque in vivo. Five consumption reports from the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway were used to estimate alterations in consumption of staple food containing the two preservatives. A modified broth dilution method was used to determine the MIC values of the preservatives against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguis. Extracellular [sup 14]C-glycolytic metabolites were studied by HPLC analyses. Plaque-pH measurements were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports were used to assess possible effects on acid production. The consumption reports indicated increased consumption of preservatives. The in vitro testing suggested that legal concentrations of preservatives may inhibit the growth of oral streptococci. However, the preservatives did not inhibit in vitro glycolysis at tested concentrations. In vivo testing with similar concentrations (0.4% w/v) showed a significant effect. A higher concentration (2% w/v potassium sorbate) had a tendency to inhibit acid-formation by dental plaque even more. (au).

  7. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis -induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  8. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in

  9. Temperature and Oxidative Stress as Triggers for Virulence Gene Expression in Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia Fraser

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zooanthroponosis aetiologically caused by pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus, Leptospira. Environmental signals such as increases in temperatures or oxidative stress can trigger response regulatory modes of virulence genes during infection. This study sought to determine the effect of temperature and oxidative stress on virulence associated genes in highly passaged Leptospira borgpeterseneii Jules and L. interrogans Portlandvere. Bacteria were grown in EMJH at 30°C, 37°C, or at 30°C before being transferred to 37°C. A total of 14 virulence-associated genes (fliY, invA, lenA, ligB, lipL32, lipL36, lipL41, lipL45, loa22, lsa21, mce, ompL1, sph2, and tlyC were assessed using endpoint PCR. Transcriptional analyses of lenA, lipL32, lipL41, loa22, sph2 were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR at the temperature conditions. To assess oxidative stress, bacteria were exposed to H2O2 for 30 and 60 min with or without the temperature stress. All genes except ligB (for Portlandvere and ligB and mce (for Jules were detectable in the strains. Quantitatively, temperature stress resulted in significant changes in gene expression within species or between species. Temperature changes were more influential in gene expression for Jules, particularly at 30°C and upshift conditions; at 37°C, expression levels were higher for Portlandvere. However, compared to Jules, where temperature was influential in two of five genes, temperature was an essential element in four of five genes in Portlandvere exposed to oxidative stress. At both low and high oxidative stress levels, the interplay between genetic predisposition (larger genome size and temperature was biased towards Portlandvere particularly at 30°C and upshift conditions. While it is clear that expression of many virulence genes in highly passaged strains of Leptospira are attenuated or lost, genetic predisposition, changes in growth temperature and/or oxidative intensity and

  10. Temperature and Oxidative Stress as Triggers for Virulence Gene Expression in Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Tricia; Brown, Paul D

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zooanthroponosis aetiologically caused by pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus, Leptospira. Environmental signals such as increases in temperatures or oxidative stress can trigger response regulatory modes of virulence genes during infection. This study sought to determine the effect of temperature and oxidative stress on virulence associated genes in highly passaged Leptospira borgpeterseneii Jules and L. interrogans Portlandvere. Bacteria were grown in EMJH at 30°C, 37°C, or at 30°C before being transferred to 37°C. A total of 14 virulence-associated genes (fliY, invA, lenA, ligB, lipL32, lipL36, lipL41, lipL45, loa22, lsa21, mce, ompL1, sph2, and tlyC) were assessed using endpoint PCR. Transcriptional analyses of lenA, lipL32, lipL41, loa22, sph2 were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR at the temperature conditions. To assess oxidative stress, bacteria were exposed to H2O2 for 30 and 60 min with or without the temperature stress. All genes except ligB (for Portlandvere) and ligB and mce (for Jules) were detectable in the strains. Quantitatively, temperature stress resulted in significant changes in gene expression within species or between species. Temperature changes were more influential in gene expression for Jules, particularly at 30°C and upshift conditions; at 37°C, expression levels were higher for Portlandvere. However, compared to Jules, where temperature was influential in two of five genes, temperature was an essential element in four of five genes in Portlandvere exposed to oxidative stress. At both low and high oxidative stress levels, the interplay between genetic predisposition (larger genome size) and temperature was biased towards Portlandvere particularly at 30°C and upshift conditions. While it is clear that expression of many virulence genes in highly passaged strains of Leptospira are attenuated or lost, genetic predisposition, changes in growth temperature and/or oxidative intensity and/or duration

  11. Efflux inhibitor suppresses Streptococcus mutans virulence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huihui; Liu, Jia; Ling, Junqi

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that efflux pumps play important roles in bacterial pathogenicity and efflux inhibitors (EIs) have been proved to be effective in suppressing bacterial virulence properties. However, little is known regarding the EI of Streptococcus mutans, a well-known caries-inducing bacterium. In this study, we identified the EI of S. mutans through ethidium bromide efflux assay and investigated how EI affected S. mutans virulence regarding the cariogenicity and stress response. Results indicated that reserpine, the identified EI, suppressed acid tolerance, mutacin production and transformation efficiency of S. mutans, and modified biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution. Suppressed glycosyltransferase activity was also noted after reserpine exposure. The data from quantitative real-time-PCR demonstrated that reserpine significantly altered the expression profile of quorum-sensing and virulence-associated genes. These findings suggest that reserpine represents a promising adjunct anticariogenic agent in that it suppresses virulence properties of S. mutans. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effect of methionine and lactic acid bacteria as aflatoxin binder on broiler performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiqomah, Lusty; Damayanti, Ema; Julendra, Hardi; Suryani, Ade Erma; Sakti, Awistaros Angger; Anggraeni, Ayu Septi

    2017-06-01

    The use of aflatoxin binder product based amino acids, lacic acid bacteria, and natural product gived the opportunity to be an alternative biological decontamination of aflatoxins. A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of aflatoxin binder administration (amino acid methionine and lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum G7)) as feed additive on broiler performance. In this study, 75 Lohmann unsexed day old chicks were distributed randomly into 5 units of cages, each filled with 15 broilers. Five cages were assigned into 5 treatments groups and fed with feed contained aflatoxin. The treatments as follow: P1 (aflatoxin feed without aflatoxin binder), P3 (aflatoxin feed + 0.8% of methionine + 1% of LAB), P4 (aflatoxin feed + 1.2% of methionine + 1% of LAB), P5 (aflatoxin feed + 1% of LAB), and K0 (commercial feed). The measurement of aflatoxin content in feed was performed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay method using AgraQuant® Total Aflatoxin Assay Romer Labs procedure. The experimental period was 35 days with feeding and drinking ad libitum. LAB was administered into drinking water, while methionine into feed. Vaccination program of Newcastle Disease (ND) was using active vaccine at 4 and 18 day old, while Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was given at 8 day old. Parameter of body weight was observed weekly, while feed consumption noted daily. The result showed that aflatoxin in feed for 35 days period did not significantly affect the body weight gain and feed conversion. The lowest percentage of organ damage at 21 day old was found in P5 treatment (55%), while at 35day old was found in P4 treatment (64%). It could be concluded that technological process of detoxifying aflatoxin could be applied in an attempt to reduce the effect on the toxicity of aflatoxin in poultry feed.

  13. Tyrosinase Inhibitory and Anti-oxidative Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Dairy Cow Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Keunho; Cho, Youn Su; Kim, Young Tae

    2017-05-06

    Overproduction and accumulation of melanin cause a number of skin diseases. The inhibitors of tyrosinase are important for the treatment of skin diseases associated with hyper-pigmentation after UV exposure and application in cosmetics for whitening and depigmentation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide are generated by chemical substances and metabolic intermediates and cause various diseases including cancer and heart diseases. We have isolated four different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains from dairy cow feces and investigated the tyrosinase inhibition and anti-oxidative effects of culture filtrates prepared from the isolated bacteria, which are designated as EA3, EB2, PC2, and PD3. To investigate optimal culture conditions isolated LAB strains, the measurements of tyrosinase inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were performed. The results of tyrosinase inhibitory activities revealed that Enterococcus sp. EA3 showed about 65% at culture conditions (14 h, 30 °C, pH 8, and 0% NaCl), Enterococcus sp. EB2 about 65% at culture conditions (12 h, 30 °C, pH 9, and 0% NaCl), Pediococcus sp. PC2 about 80% at culture conditions (20 h, 30 °C, pH 6, and 0% NaCl), and Pediococcus sp. PD3 about 80% at culture conditions (20 h, 30 °C, pH 8, and 0% NaCl), respectively. In addition, anti-oxidative activities against four different LAB strains showed approximately more than 30% at optimal conditions for the measurements of tyrosinase inhibitory activities. From the results, we have suggested that the isolated four LAB strains could be useful for a potential agent for developing anti-oxidants and tyrosinase inhibitors.

  14. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Hainanmycin on Protein Degradation and Populations of Ammonia-producing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro fermentation was conducted to determine the effects of hainanmycin on protein degradation and populations of ammonia-producing bacteria. The substrates (DM basis for in vitro fermentation consisted of alfalfa hay (31.7%, Chinese wild rye grass hay (28.3%, ground corn grain (24.5%, soybean meal (15.5% with a forage: concentrate of 60:40. Treatments were the control (no additive and hainanmycin supplemented at 0.1 (H0.1, 1 (H1, 10 (H10, and 100 mg/kg (H100 of the substrates. After 24 h of fermentation, the highest addition level of hainanmycin decreased total VFA concentration and increased the final pH. The high addition level of hainanmycin (H1, H10, and H100 reduced (p0.05. After 24 h of fermentation, H10 and H100 increased (p<0.05 concentrations of peptide nitrogen and AA nitrogen and proteinase activity, and decreased (p<0.05 NH3-N concentration and deaminase activity compared with control. Peptidase activitives were not affected by hainanmycin. Hainanmycin supplementation only inhibited the growth of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, which is one of the species of low deaminative activity. Hainanmycin supplementation also decreased (p<0.05 relative population sizes of hyper-ammonia-producing species, except for H0.1 on Clostridium aminophilum. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with hainanmycin could improve ruminal fermentation and modify protein degradation by changing population size of ammonia-producing bacteria in vitro; and the addition level of 10 mg/kg appeared to achieve the best results.

  15. Effect of proteolitic enzymes with probiotic of lactic acid bacteria on characteristics of cow milk dadih

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskiyah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Texture of dadih from cow milk tends to be soft, while dadih from buffalo milk have more compact and solid texture. Enzyme is one of food additives that may produce fermented products made from cow milk that has same charcteristic as dadih’s from buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk affect product characteristics. This study aimed to determine the effect of combination of enzyme and probiotic lactic acid bacteria on the characteristics of cow's milk dadih. The study was aime designed using completely randomized design (CRD with 9 treatments, A: renin 2 ppm + 3% Lactobacillus casei; B: renin 2 ppm + 3% B. longum; C: renin 2 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum; D: crude extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 3% L. casei; E: crude extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 3% Brevibacterium longum; F: crude enzyme extract of Mucor sp. 0.5 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum; G: papain 100 ppm + 3% L. casei; H: papain 100 ppm + 3% B. longum; and F: papain 100 ppm + 1.5% L. casei + 1.5% B. longum. Each treatment was repeated two times. Results showed that combination of renin 2 ppm with 3% of L. casei resulted in the best characteristics of cow milk dadih with viscosity 2278 cP; pH 5.63; titrable acidity 0.56%; moisture 75.03%; protein 6.80%; fat 3.35%; carbohydrate 13.21%; LAB total 6.90 x 1010 cfu/g; it also had a flavor, aroma, texture, and general acceptance that mostly preferred by panelists.

  16. Quantifying cost-effectiveness of controlling nosocomial spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: the case of MRSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan W M Wassenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The costs and benefits of controlling nosocomial spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are unknown. METHODS: We developed a mathematical algorithm to determine cost-effectiveness of infection control programs and explored the dynamical interactions between different epidemiological variables and cost-effectiveness. The algorithm includes occurrence of nosocomial infections, attributable mortality, costs and efficacy of infection control and how antibiotic-resistant bacteria affect total number of infections: do infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria replace infections caused by susceptible bacteria (replacement scenario or occur in addition to them (addition scenario. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bacteremia was used for illustration using observational data on S. aureus bacteremia (SAB in our hospital (n = 189 between 2001-2004, all being methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA]. RESULTS: In the replacement scenario, the costs per life year gained range from 45,912 euros to 6590 euros for attributable mortality rates ranging from 10% to 50%. Using 20,000 euros per life year gained as a threshold, completely preventing MRSA would be cost-effective in the replacement scenario if attributable mortality of MRSA is > or = 21%. In the addition scenario, infection control would be cost saving along the entire range of estimates for attributable mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Cost-effectiveness of controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria is highly sensitive to the interaction between infections caused by resistant and susceptible bacteria (addition or replacement and attributable mortality. In our setting, controlling MRSA would be cost saving for the addition scenario but would not be cost-effective in the replacement scenario if attributable mortality would be < 21%.

  17. EFFECT OF AEROSOLIZATION ON CULTURABILITY AND VIABILITY OF GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimations of the bacterial content of air can be more easily made now than a decade ago, with colony formation the method of choice for enumeration of airborne bacteria.However, plate counts are subject to error because bacteria exposed to the air may remain viable yet lose the...

  18. The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, Olaf; Wolf, Alexandra; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    n most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important

  19. Effect of Plant Derived Antimicrobials on Salmonella Enteritidis Adhesion to and Invasion of Primary Chicken Oviduct Epithelial Cells in vitro and Virulence Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Venkitanarayanan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Enteritidis (SE is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States and one of the most frequently reported Salmonella serotypes globally. Eggs are the most common food product associated with SE infections in humans. The pathogen colonizes the intestinal tract in layers, and migrates to reproductive organs systemically. Since adhesion to and invasion of chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC is critical for SE colonization in reproductive tract, reducing these virulence factors could potentially decrease egg yolk contamination. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations of three plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs, namely carvacrol, thymol and eugenol in reducing SE adhesion to and invasion of COEC, and survival in chicken macrophages. In addition, the effect of PDAs on SE genes critical for oviduct colonization and macrophage survival was determined using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. All PDAs significantly reduced SE adhesion to and invasion of COEC (p < 0.001. The PDAs, except thymol consistently decreased SE survival in macrophages (p < 0.001. RT-qPCR results revealed down-regulation in the expression of genes involved in SE colonization and macrophage survival (p < 0.001. The results indicate that PDAs could potentially be used to control SE colonization in chicken reproductive tract; however, in vivo studies validating these results are warranted.

  20. Human lipoproteins have divergent neutralizing effects on E. coli LPS, N. meningitidis LPS, and complete Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprong, Tom; Netea, Mihai G; van der Ley, Peter; Verver-Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth E H; Stalenhoef, Anton; van der Meer, Jos W M; van Deuren, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    The use of lipoproteins has been suggested as a treatment for Gram-negative sepsis because they inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated cytokine production. However, little is known about the neutralizing effects of lipoproteins on cytokine production by meningococcal LPS or whole Gram-negative bacteria. We assessed the neutralizing effect of LDLs, HDLs, and VLDLs on LPS- or whole bacteria-induced cytokines in human mononuclear cells. A strong inhibition of Escherichia coli LPS-induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-10 by LDL and HDL was seen, whereas VLDL had a less pronounced effect. In contrast, Neisseria meningitidis LPS, in similar concentrations, was neutralized much less effectively than E. coli LPS. Effective neutralization of meningococcal LPS required a longer interaction time, a lower concentration of LPS, or higher concentrations of lipoproteins. The difference in neutralization was independent of the saccharide tail, suggesting that the lipid A moiety accounted for the difference. Minimal neutralizing effects of the lipoproteins were observed on whole E. coli or N. meningitidis bacteria under all conditions tested. These results indicate that efficient neutralization of LPS depends on the type of LPS, but a sufficiently long interaction time, a low LPS concentration, or high lipoprotein concentration also inhibited cytokines by the less efficiently neutralized N. meningitidis LPS. Irrespective of these differences, whole bacteria showed no neutralization by lipoproteins.

  1. Anti-Biofilm Activity of Polyazolidinammonium Modified with Iodine Hydrate Ions against Microbial Biofilms of Uropathogenic Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, O V; Tikhomirova, E I; Zayarsky, D A; Bespalova, N V; Glinskaya, E V; Shurshalova, N F; Al Bayati, B M; Babailova, A I

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of microbial biofilm formation by standard strain and by clinical strains of uropathogenic coliform bacteria was investigated in vitro and the effect of sublethal concentrations of the polymer compound polyazolidinammonium modified with iodine hydrate ions on the initial stages of biofilm formation was assessed. Treatment of immunological plate wells with the polymeric compound prevented film formation, especially in case of clinical E. coli strain carrying FimH virulence gene.

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial effect of some Sinai medicinal plant extracts on bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamil S. G. Zeedan

    2014-11-01

    for the extracts ranged from 0.01 to 1.56 mg/ml. when comparing antibacterial activity of A. herb alba plant extracted with acetone solvent on the same bacteria with zone of inhibition values ± SD, ranging from 00±00 to 5.6±0.60 mm. Both extracts from J. montana and A. herb alba plant extracts with petroleum ether, methanol and chloroform solvent were less antibacterial activities than acetone solvent extract. Conclusion: The present study spot highlight on isolation and identification of mastitis pathogens that are fundamental aspects of milk quality, udder health control programs and public health and food safety issues associated with food borne pathogens. J. montana and A. herb alba plants have antibacterial effects more than antibiotics used in the treatment of mastitis. Finally, the medicinal plant extracts can be used to discover bioactive natural product in the form of antibacterial that may be serve the development of new pharmaceutical products. But still need further research necessary to identify active compounds and research to mechanism and drug interaction.

  3. Antimicrobial effects of Thai medicinal plants against acne-inducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej; Surassmo, Suvimol; Nukoolkarn, Veena S; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2005-10-03

    Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been recognized as pus-forming bacteria triggering an inflammation in acne. The present study was conducted to evaluate antimicrobial activities of Thai medicinal plants against these etiologic agents of acne vulgaris. Crude extracts were tested for antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. The results from the disc diffusion method showed that 13 medicinal plants could inhibit the growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Among those, Senna alata, Eupatorium odoratum, Garcinia mangostana, and Barleria lupulina had strong inhibitory effects. Based on a broth dilution method, the Garcinia mangostana extract had the greatest antimicrobial effect. The MIC values were the same (0.039 mg/ml) for both bacterial species and the MBC values were 0.039 and 0.156 mg/ml against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, respectively. In bioautography assay, the Garcinia mangostana extract produced strong inhibition zones against Propionibacterium acnes. Antimicrobial activity from fractions of column chromatography revealed one of the active compounds in Garcinia mangostana could be mangostin, a xanthone derivative. Taken together, our data indicated that Garcinia mangostana had a strong inhibitory effect on Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Therefore, this plant would be an interesting topic for further study and possibly for an alternative treatment for acne.

  4. Antimicrobial effect of emulsion-encapsulated isoeugenol against biofilms of food pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogsgård Nielsen, Christina; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina; Snabe, Torben; Schwarz, Karin; Serfert, Yvonne; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2017-02-02

    Food-related biofilms can cause food-borne illnesses and spoilage, both of which are problems on a global level. Essential oils are compounds derived from plant material that have a potential to be used in natural food preservation in the future since they are natural antimicrobials. Bacterial biofilms are particularly resilient towards biocides, and preservatives that effectively eradicate biofilms are therefore needed. In this study, we test the antibacterial properties of emulsion-encapsulated and unencapsulated isoeugenol against biofilms of Lis. monocytogenes, S. aureus, P. fluorescens and Leu. mesenteroides in tryptic soy broth and carrot juice. We show that emulsion encapsulation enhances the antimicrobial properties of isoeugenol against biofilms in media but not in carrot juice. Some of the isoeugenol emulsions were coated with chitosan, and treatment of biofilms with these emulsions disrupted the biofilm structure. Furthermore, we show that addition of the surfactant Tween 80, which is commonly used to disperse oils in food, hampers the antibacterial properties of isoeugenol. This finding highlights that common food additives, such as surfactants, may have an adverse effect on the antibacterial activity of preservatives. Isoeugenol is a promising candidate as a future food preservative because it works almost equally well against planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Emulsion encapsulation has potential benefits for the efficacy of isoeugenol, but the effect of encapsulation depends on the properties of food matrix in which isoeugenol is to be applied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of three heavy metals on the bacteria growth kinetics. A bivariate model for toxicological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rial, Diego; Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Murado, Miguel Anxo [Instituto de Investigacions Marinas (CSIC), Vigo (ES). Grupo de Reciclado y Valorizacion de Materiales Residuales (REVAL)

    2011-05-15

    The effects of three heavy metals (Co, Ni and Cd) on the growth kinetics of five bacterial strains with different characteristics (Pseudomonas sp., Phaeobacter sp. strain 27-4, Listonella anguillarum, Carnobacterium piscicola and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. lysis) were studied in a batch system. A bivariate model, function of time and dose, is proposed to describe simultaneously all the kinetic profiles obtained by incubating a microorganism at increasing concentrations of individual metals. This model combines the logistic equation for describing growth, with a modification of the cumulative Weibull's function for describing the dose-dependent variations of growth parameters. The comprehensive model thus obtained - which minimizes the effects of the experimental error - was statistically significant in all the studied cases, and it raises doubts about toxicological evaluations that are based on a single growth parameter, especially if it is not obtained from a kinetic equation. In lactic acid bacteria cultures (C. piscicola and L. mesenteroides), Cd induced remarkable differences in yield and time course of characteristic metabolites. A global parameter is defined (ED{sub 50,{tau}}: dose of toxic chemical that reduces the biomass of a culture by 50% compared to that produced by the control at the time corresponding to its semi maximum biomass) that allows comparing toxic effects on growth kinetics using a single value. (orig.)

  6. Proposal for a method to estimate nutrient shock effects in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nuno F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plating methods are still the golden standard in microbiology; however, some studies have shown that these techniques can underestimate the microbial concentrations and diversity. A nutrient shock is one of the mechanisms proposed to explain this phenomenon. In this study, a tentative method to assess nutrient shock effects was tested. Findings To estimate the extent of nutrient shock effects, two strains isolated from tap water (Sphingomonas capsulata and Methylobacterium sp. and two culture collection strains (E. coli CECT 434 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 were exposed both to low and high nutrient conditions for different times and then placed in low nutrient medium (R2A and rich nutrient medium (TSA. The average improvement (A.I. of recovery between R2A and TSA for the different times was calculated to more simply assess the difference obtained in culturability between each medium. As expected, A.I. was higher when cells were plated after the exposition to water than when they were recovered from high-nutrient medium showing the existence of a nutrient shock for the diverse bacteria used. S. capsulata was the species most affected by this phenomenon. Conclusions This work provides a method to consistently determine the extent of nutrient shock effects on different microorganisms and hence quantify the ability of each species to deal with sudden increases in substrate concentration.

  7. Investigation of Sterilization Effect by various Gas Plasmas and Electron Microscopic Observation of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yota; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Oshita, Takaya; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization method. It is considered that factor of plasma sterilization are mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the sterilization mechanism hasn't been investigated in detail because conventional plasma sources have a limitation in usable gas species and lack variety of ROS. So we developed multi-gas plasma jet which can generate various gas plasmas. In this study, investigation of sterilization effect by various gas plasmas and electron microscopic observation of bacteria were performed. Oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon and air were used as plasma gas. To investigate gas-species dependence of sterilization effect, S.aureus was treated. As a result, nitrogen plasma and carbon dioxide plasma were effective for sterilization. To investigate sterilization mechanism, the surface of S.aureus was observed by scanning electron microscope. As a result, dimples were observed on the surface after irradiation of nitrogen plasma, but no change observed in the case of carbon dioxide plasma. These results suggest that bactericidal mechanism of nitrogen and carbon dioxide plasma should be different. In the presentation, Measurement result of ROS will be reported.

  8. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from hot springs for plant growth promoting traits and effect on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinjal Samir; Naik, Jinal Hardik; Chaudhari, Sejal; Amaresan, Natarajan

    2017-04-01

    To elucidate the functional diversity of hot spring bacteria, 123 bacteria were isolated and screened for evaluating their multifunctional plant growth promoting (PGP) properties. The antagonistic activity against different phytopathogens showed the presence of a high amount of biocontrol bacteria in the hot springs. During screening for PGP properties, 61.0% isolates showed production of indole acetic acid and 23.6% showed inorganic phosphate solubilization qualitatively. For production of extracellular enzymes, it was found that 61.0% isolates produced lipase, 56.9% produced protease, and 43.9% produced cellulase. In extreme properties, half of the isolates showed tolerance to 5% NaCl (w/v) and 48.8% isolates survived heat shock at 70°C. The identification of 12 multipotential bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the bacteria belonged to Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus and Bacillus spp. Bacterization of tomato seeds showed that the hot spring bacteria promoted shoot height, fresh shoot weight, root length, and fresh root weight of tomato seedlings, with values ranging from 3.12% to 74.37%, 33.33% to 350.0%, 16.06% to 130.41%, and 36.36% to 318.18%, respectively, over the control. This research shows that multifunctional bacteria could be isolated from the hot springs. The outcome of this research may have a potential effect on crop production methodologies used in saline and arid environments. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  10. The effect of marination on lactic acid bacteria communities in raw broiler fillet strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, T. T.; Välitalo, H.; Säde, E.; Paloranta, A.; Koskinen, K.; Björkroth, J.

    2012-01-01

    Marination with marinade containing salt, sugar, and acetic acid is commonly used in Finland to enhance the value of raw broiler meat. In this study, we investigated the effect of marination, marinade components and storage time on composition of bacterial communities in modified atmosphere-packaged (MAP) broiler fillet strips. The communities were characterized using two culture-independent methods: 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. In unmarinated broiler fillet strips, Lactococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. predominated at the early storage phase but were partially replaced by Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. when the chilled storage time was extended. In the marinated fillet strips, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. predominated independent from the storage time. By mixing the different marinade components with broiler meat, we showed that marination changed the community composition and favored Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. by the combined effect of carbohydrates and acetic acid in marinade. Marination increased the maximum level of lactic acid bacteria in broiler meat and enhanced CO2 production and acidification of meat during the chilled storage. Accumulation of CO2 in package head-space due to the enhanced growth of Leuconostoc spp. in marinated meat may lead to bulging of packages, which is a spoilage defect frequently associated with marinated and MAP raw broiler preparations in Finland. PMID:23087685

  11. Effects of bacteria-produced human alpha, beta, and gamma interferons on in vitro immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, M R; Weck, P K; Rinderknecht, E; Harkins, R N; Frane, J W; Ross, M J

    1984-04-01

    The effects of bacteria-produced human interferons (HuIFN) alpha, beta, and gamma on in vitro immune functions of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied. Proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin was significantly inhibited by the addition of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta at 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml. In contrast, HuIFN-gamma showed suppressive activities only when added at 1000 U/ml. HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta caused significant inhibition of human mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR) as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Similar inhibition was caused by HuIFN-gamma when it was added only at very low concentrations (1 U/ml); 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml resulted in no or only a modest increase in MLR. All three interferons exhibited dose-related effects on PWM-induced immunoglobulin synthesis in cultures of PBMC. These data demonstrate that purified interferons produced by recombinant DNA technology can significantly alter in vitro immune functions and that HuIFN-gamma has properties which are different from those of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta.

  12. Combinatorial effects of amoxicillin and metronidazole on selected periodontal bacteria and whole plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik Kunz, Eva M; Lenkeit, Krystyna; Waltimo, Tuomas; Weiger, Roland; Walter, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze in vitro the combinatorial effects of the antibiotic combination of amoxicillin plus metronidazole on subgingival bacterial isolates. Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Eikenella corrodens from our strain collection and subgingival bacteria isolated from patients with periodontitis were tested for their susceptibility to amoxicillin and metronidazole using the Etest. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), which is commonly used to describe drug interactions, was calculated. Synergy, i.e. FICI values ≤ 0.5, between amoxicillin and metronidazole was shown for two A. actinomycetemcomitans (FICI: 0.3), two F. nucleatum (FICI: 0.3 and 0.5, respectively) and one E. corrodens (FICI: 0.4) isolates. Indifference, i.e. FIC indices of >0.5 but ≤4, occurred for other isolates and the 14 P. intermedia/nigrescens strains tested. Microorganisms resistant to either amoxicillin or metronidazole were detected in all samples by Etest. Combinatorial effects occur between amoxicillin and metronidazole on some strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and E. corrodens. Synergy was shown for a few strains only. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of stress hormones on the production of volatile sulfur compounds by periodontopathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Morini Calil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of stress hormones on the etiologic agents of halitosis. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of adrenaline (ADR, noradrenaline (NA and cortisol (CORT on bacteria that produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC, the major gases responsible for bad breath. Cultures of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn, Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe, Prevotella intermedia (Pi and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg were exposed to 50 µM ADR, NA and CORT or equivalent volumes of sterile water as controls for 12 and 24 h. Growth was evaluated based on absorbance at 660 nm. Portable gas chromatography was used to measure VSC concentrations. Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post-hoc test were used to compare the groups. For Fn, ADR, NA and CORT significantly reduced bacterial growth after 12 h and 24 h (p 0.05. In the Pi cultures, ADR, NA and CORT increased H2S (p < 0.05. Catecholamines and cortisol can interfere with growth and H2S production of sub-gingival species in vitro. This process appears to be complex and supports the association between stress and the production of VSC.

  14. The effect of marination on lactic acid bacteria communities in raw broiler fillet strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Tapio Nieminen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Marination with marinade containing salt, sugar and acetic acid is commonly used in Finland to enhance the value of raw broiler meat. In this study, the effect of marination and marinade components on composition and evolution of bacterial communities in modified atmosphere-packaged broiler fillet strips was investigated using culture-independent partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. In unmarinated broiler fillet strips, Lactococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp predominated at the early storage but were partially replaced by Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. when the chilled storage time was extended. In the marinated fillet strips, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. predominated independent from the storage time. By mixing the different marinade components with broiler meat, we showed that marination changed the community composition and favored Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. by the combined effect of carbohydrates and acetic acid in the marinade. Marination increased the maximum level of lactic acid bacteria in broiler meat and enhanced CO2 production and acidification of meat during chilled storage. Accumulation of CO2 in the package head-space due to the enhanced growth of Leuconostoc spp. in marinated meat may lead to bulging of packages, which is a spoilage defect frequently associated with marinated and modified atmosphere-packaged raw broiler preparations in Finland.

  15. Bioinhibitory effect of hydrogenotrophic bacteria on nitrate reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yi; Dong, Qi; Zhang, Keqiang

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogenotrophic bacteria (HTB) were introduced into a nitrate removal system, which used nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reductant, to investigate its bioinhibitory effect. Based on the results, it was noted that addition of HTB culture (10-50 mL) led to 58.9-91.4% decrease in the first observed rate constant (kobs1), which represented the nitrate removal rate by nZVI, and a reduction in the generated poisonous by-products from 94.9% to 38.5%. In other words, HTB had a significant inhibitory effect on nitrate reduction by nZVI. However, the pathway of this bioinhibition only prevented the occurrence of chemical reduction, but not competition for nitrate. Furthermore, FeOOH coating was observed on the surface of nZVI, instead of Fe3O4 or Fe2O3, which could prevent electron transmission from nZVI to nitrate. Considering that FeOOH was the product of iron corrosion, the result indicated that HTB could inhibit chemical reduction by enhancing the reaction between nZVI and water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria, native microorganisms, and rock dust on Jatropha curcas L. growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, E B; Marques, E L S; Dias, J C T

    2016-10-05

    Microorganisms with the ability to release nutrients to the soil from insoluble sources may be useful for plant cultivation. We evaluated the growth-promoting effect on Jatropha curcas L. of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and the native microbiota in soil with or without rock dust. J. curcas L. is important for biodiesel production. The experiments were performed in a greenhouse under a random-statistical design with 14 replicates. The soil received increasing dosages of rock dust. The presence of resident microorganisms and PSB inoculum was correlated with plant height, biomass production, and phosphorus content in plants for 120 days. Native soil microorganisms were detected and identified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis. Several bacterial populations belonged to the genus Bacillus. Populations associated with the phyla Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were detected among the fungi. The best results for the variable plant height were correlated with the presence of resident microbiota and rock dust until the end of the experiment. The largest biomass production and the highest content of phosphorus occurred in the presence of soil-resident microbiota only up to 120 days. No significant effects were observed for biomass production with the use of PSB combined with rock dust. J. curcas L. under the influence of only resident microbiota showed the best plant growth results. Future research will focus on the specificity of resident microbiota activity in plant growth promotion and the isolation of these microorganisms to produce a new inoculum to be tested in various plants.

  17. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A study on the selection of indigenous leaching-bacteria for effective bioleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. J.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Bioleaching technology, which is based on the ability of microorganisms to transform solid compounds into soluble and extractable valuable elements that can be recovered, has been rapidly developed in recent decades for its advantages, which include mild reaction condition, low energy consumption, simple process, low environmental impact and being suitable for low grade mine tailings and residues. The bacteria activities (survival, adaptation of toxically environments etc.) in the bioleaching technology play a key role in the solubilization of metals. The purpose of this study was to selection of optimal leaching-bacteria through changed pH and redox potential on bio-oxidation in batch experiments for successful bioleaching technology. Twenty three indigenous bacteria used throughout this study, leaching-bacteria were obtained from various geochemical conditions; bacteria inhabitation type (acid mine drainage, mine wastes leachate and sulfur hot springs) and base-metal type (sulfur, sulfide, iron and coal). Bio-oxidation experiment result was showed that 9 cycles (1 cycle - 28days) after the leaching-bacteria were inoculated to a leaching medium, pH was observed decreasing and redox potential increased. In the bacteria inhabitation type, bio-oxidation of sulfur hot springs bacteria was greater than other types (acid mine drainage and mine wastes leachate). In addition, bio-oxidation on base-metal type was appeared sulfur was greater than other types (sulfide, iron and coal). This study informs basic knowledge when bacteria apply to eco-/economic resources utilization studies including the biomining and the recycling of mine waste system.

  19. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo-Siguero, Maria; Madrid, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs), hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs) and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs)). Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600) were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs. PMID:28783048

  20. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto and Different Components in Culture on Rumen Fermentation and Rumen Functional Bacteria In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Li, Jinan; Bu, Dengpan; Nan, Xuemei; Du, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto, their fermented products and media on rumen fermentation and rumen functional bacteria in vitro. Rumen fluid from three multiparous lactating Holstein cows was combined and transferred into serum bottles after diluted. Fifteen serum bottles were divided into five treatments, which were designed as following: CTR (the fermentation of 0.5 g TMR and ruminal fluids from dairy cows), LBS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu live Bacillus subtilis natto), ABS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto), BSC (CTR plus 1 ml Bacillus subtilis natto fermentation products without bacteria), and BSM (CTR plus 1 ml liquid fermentation medium). When separated from the culture, live Bacillus subtilis natto individually increased the concentrations of ammonia-N (P Bacillus subtilis natto has the similar function with the live bacteria except for the ratio of acetate and propionate. Except B. fibrisolvens, live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto did not influence or decreased the 16S rRNA gene quantification of the detected bacteria. BSC and BSM altered the relative expression of certain functional bacteria in the rumen. These results indicated that it was Bacillus subtilis natto thalli that played the important role in promoting rumen fermentation when applied as a probiotic in dairy ration.

  1. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Palomo-Siguero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs. Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs.

  2. Isolation of the moderately halophilic bacteria and effects of pH and incubation on their growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zanjirband

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro organisms that grow in habitats characterized by high or low temperatures, acidic or alkaline pHs, high salt concentrations and high pressures have been termed extremophiles. The halophilic microorganisms are a group of extremophiles that are able to grow in the presence of NaCl. For isolation of moderately halophilic bacteria, specimens were collected from sea water (Persian Gulf and different parts of tannery factory. Samples were enriched in specific medium for halophils, and bacteria were purred with streak plate method and were identified. To investigate the effects of various temperatures and various pH on their growth, drop plate method and microtitre plate method were used. In this study, 8 bacteria from different parts of tannery factory and 8 bacteria from Persian Gulf were isolated. Phenotypic and biotipic studies were accomplished the collected bacteria. Results indicated that, the best temperature for tannery factory and Persian Gulf isolates were 28C and 37C respectively. Optimum pH for tannery factory and Persian Gulf isolates was 7.2.

  3. Thioridazine protects the mouse from a virulent infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Asish; Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati

    2010-01-01

    When administered to mice at doses of 100microg/mouse and 200microg/mouse, thioridazine (TDZ) significantly protected animals from the lethality produced by a virulent strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and reduced the number of bacteria retrieved from the spleen, liver and heart...... blood. The protection conferred by TDZ against a virulent Salmonella infection is hypothesised to be due to a reduction in the 55kDa virulence protein of the outer membrane of the organism, as this protein is almost totally absent when the organism is exposed to the phenothiazine. It is further...

  4. Effective cellulose degradation by a mixed-culture system composed of a cellulolytic Clostridium and aerobic non-cellulolytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Haruta, Shin; Cui, Zong Jun; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2004-12-27

    A stable cellulose-degrading microflora enriched from composting materials has been analyzed in our laboratory. Cellulose-degrading efficiency of an anaerobic cellulolytic isolate, Clostridium straminisolvens CSK1, was remarkably lower than that of the original microflora. We successfully constructed bacterial communities with effective cellulose degradation by mixing C. straminisolvens CSK1 with aerobic non-cellulolytic bacteria isolated from the original microflora. Comparison of the cellulose degradation processes of the pure culture of C. straminisolvens CSK1 and the mixed-culture indicated that non-cellulolytic bacteria essentially contribute to cellulose degradation by supplying anaerobic environment, consuming metabolites, which otherwise deteriorate the cellulolytic activity, and by neutralizing pH.

  5. Virulence evolution at the front line of spreading epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griette, Quentin; Raoul, Gaël; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatial spread of emerging pathogens is a major challenge for the public health management of infectious diseases. Theoretical epidemiology shows that the speed of an epidemic is governed by the life-history characteristics of the pathogen and its ability to disperse. Rapid evolution of these traits during the invasion may thus affect the speed of epidemics. Here we study the influence of virulence evolution on the spatial spread of an epidemic. At the edge of the invasion front, we show that more virulent and transmissible genotypes are expected to win the competition with other pathogens. Behind the front line, however, more prudent exploitation strategies outcompete virulent pathogens. Crucially, even when the presence of the virulent mutant is limited to the edge of the front, the invasion speed can be dramatically altered by pathogen evolution. We support our analysis with individual-based simulations and we discuss the additional effects of demographic stochasticity taking place at the front line on virulence evolution. We confirm that an increase of virulence can occur at the front, but only if the carrying capacity of the invading pathogen is large enough. These results are discussed in the light of recent empirical studies examining virulence evolution at the edge of spreading epidemics. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Effects of artemisinin and Artemisia annua extracts on xenic bacteria isolated from clonal cultures of Histomonas meleagridis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøfner, Ida; Hess, Claudia; Liebhart, Dieter

    nutrient supply due to their appearance in parasitic food vacuoles. However, the relationship of the parasite and the bacteria is not fully clear. Six previously established clonal cultures of H. meleagridis were used to evaluate the effect of five Artemisia annua derived materials (i.e. dry leaves...

  7. Effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal in wastewater-based algae cultivation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Fu, Zongqiang; Cheng, Yanling; Min, Min; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yunkai; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Centrate, a type of nutrient-rich municipal wastewater was used to determine the effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal efficiency in this study. The characteristics of algal and bacterial growth profiles, wastewater nutrient removal and effect of initial algal inoculums were systematically examined. The results showed that initial algal concentration had apparent effect on bacterial growth, and the presence of bacteria had a significant influence on algal growth pattern, suggesting symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria at the initial stage of algae cultivation. The maximum algal biomass of 2.01 g/L with 0.1g/L initial algal inoculums concentration can be obtained during algae cultivation in raw centrate medium. The synergistic effect of centrate-borne bacteria and microalgae on algae growth and nutrient removal performance at initial fast growth stage has great potential to be applied to pilot-scale wastewater-based algae wastewater system cultivated in continuous or semi-continuous mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxic effects exerted on methanogenic, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria by chemicals used in a milk analysis laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Fiuza, J.; Buys, B.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Omil, F.; Mendez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effects caused by the chemicals contained in wastewaters generated by laboratories involved in raw milk analyses were assessed using batch assays. These assays were carried out separately with methanogenic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria. Since sodium azide

  9. Comparing the harmful effects of nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Taylor-Robinson, David; Waldmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To better understand the relative effects of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function decline in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the impact of each infection in a Danish setting. METHODS: Longitudinal registry study of 432 patients with cystic...

  10. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E.; Williams, Thomas R.; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can

  11. Effects of photochemical smog from a flow reactor on bacteria. II. Determination of bactericidal components in photochemical smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nover, H.; Botzenhart, K.

    1983-04-01

    The mixture of substances in the photochemical smog could be detected by different reduction rates of exposed bacteria. Beside ozone other products of the ozone/olefine-reaction could reduce the survival of exposed bacteria. For Staph. epidermidis a toxic influence from the reaction products could be found only after UV-irradiation. The main components were aldehydes, hydrocarbons, radicals, peroxiradicals and radicaloxides. For peroxiacetylnitrate (PAN) no bactericidal effect could be found for bacteria adsorbed on membrane filters in concentrations of 300 ppb in the smog (UV-irradiation was put off for two hours) and even in concentrations of 1000 ppb prepared by gaschromatography. The influence on lipopolysaccharide (lps) defective mutants of Salmonella minnesota showed the protection of the lps-layer against e.g. relative humidity and ozone (500 ppb), but no specific protection against smog components.

  12. Beneficial effects on host energy metabolism of short-chain fatty acids and vitamins produced by commensal and probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Chain, Florian; Martín, Rebeca; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Courau, Stéphanie; Langella, Philippe

    2017-05-08

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effect in host energy metabolism of the production of B group vitamins and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) by commensal, food-grade and probiotic bacteria, which are also actors of the mammalian nutrition. The mechanisms of how these microbial end products, produced by these bacterial strains, act on energy metabolism will be discussed. We will show that these vitamins and SCFA producing bacteria could be used as tools to recover energy intakes by either optimizing ATP production from foods or by the fermentation of certain fibers in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Original data are also presented in this work where SCFA (acetate, butyrate and propionate) and B group vitamins (riboflavin, folate and thiamine) production was determined for selected probiotic bacteria.

  13. De Novo Synthesis of Phosphorylated Triblock Copolymers with Pathogen Virulence-Suppressing Properties That Prevent Infection-Related Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jun; Zaborin, Alexander; Poroyko, Valeriy; Goldfeld, David; Lynd, Nathaniel A. [McKetta; Chen, Wei [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2017-07-31

    Phosphate is a key and universal "cue" in response to which bacteria either enhance their virulence when local phosphate is scarce or downregulate it when phosphate is adundant. Phosphate becomes depleted in the mammalian gut following physiologic stress and serves as a major trigger for colonizing bacteria to express virulence. This process cannot be reversed with oral supplementation of inorganic phosphate because it is nearly completely absorbed in the proximal small intestine. In the present study, we describe the de novo synthesis of phosphorylated polyethylene glycol compounds with three defined ABA (hydrophilic/-phobic/-philic) structures, ABA-PEG10k-Pi10, ABA-PEG16k-Pi14, and ABA-PEG20k-Pi20, and linear polymer PEG20k-Pi20 absent of the hydrophobic block. The 10k, 16k, and 20k demonstrate the molecular weights of the poly(ethylene glycol) block, and Pi10, Pi14, and Pi20 represent the repeating units of phosphate. Polymers were tested for their efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in vitro and in vivo by assessing the expression of the phosphate sensing protein PstS, the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin, and Caenorhabditis elegans killing assays. Results indicate that all phosphorylated polymers suppressed phosphate sensing, virulence expression, and lethality in P. aeruginosa. Among all of the phosphorylated polymers, ABA-PEG20kPi20 displayed the greatest degree of protection against P. aeruginosa. To define the role of the hydrophobic core in ABA-PEG20k-Pi20 in the above response, we synthesized PEG20k-Pi20 in which the hydrophobic core is absent. Results indicate that the hypdrophobic core of ABA-PEG20k-Pi20 is a key structure in its protective effect against P. aeruginosa, in part due to its ability to coat the surface of bacteria. Taken together, the synthesis of novel polymers with defined structures and levels of phosphorylation may elucidate their antivirulence action against clinically important and lethal pathogens such as

  14. Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathea...... 3 expedition, a strain collection was established comprising bacteria that express antimicrobial activity against Vibrio anguillarum and/or Staphylococcus aureus. Within this collection we searched colony material, culture supernatants, and cell extracts for virulence modulating activity showing...... that 68 out of 83 marine bacteria (affiliated with the Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonas sp.) influenced expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin toxin and/or spa encoding Protein A. The isolate that upon initial screening showed the highest degree of interference (crude ethyl acetate extract...

  15. Effects of hydrography on the distribution of bacteria and virus in Cochin Estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A; Jasna, V.; Jina, S.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Lallu, K.R.; Madhu, N; Muraleedharan, K.R.; NaveenKumar, K.R.; Balachandran, K.K.

    The viral dynamics have rarely been investigated in estuarine environments of India. The present study brings out a first hand information on the distribution of virus and bacteria in an eutrophic estuary (Cochin, India). Thirteen stations were...

  16. Inhibitory effect for proliferation of oral bacteria in dogs by tooth brushing and application of toothpaste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    WATANABE, Kazuhiro; KIJIMA, Saku; NONAKA, Chie; MATSUKAWA, Yuki; YAMAZOE, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    ...) and application of toothpaste (P). Before scaling (Pre) and at 0 to 8 weeks after scaling (0–8 w), we collected oral bacteria from the dental surface every week and counted them using a bacterial counter...

  17. [Bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria effect of different kinds of root decoction pieces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Wang, Ya-Ke; Han, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Ya-Qi; Jiang, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Zhi-Jun; Deng, Hai-Ying

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the microbial contamination in Chinese herbal decoction pieces with different functional types by studying the total aerobic microbial count (TAMC), and total yeast and mould count (TYMC) in 40 samples of 8 types of root decoction pieces; further evaluate the contamination load of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and identify the Gram-negative bacteria by using biochemical identification system for Gram-negative bacteria. Our results showed that the TAMC value was more than 1 000 CFU•g⁻¹ in 85% (34/40) samples, and was more than 100 CFU•g⁻¹ in 30% (12/40) samples; the contamination of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was detected in 45% (18/40) of the samples. The bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria load of seven batches of samples was N>1 000 MPN•g⁻¹. Sixteen bacterium strains including Serratia plymouthensis, Cedecea neteri, Escherichia vulneris, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter amnigenus, E. cloacae, E. sakazakii, Proteus penneri and E. gergoviae were obtained and identified. E. cloacae was the predominant bacterium that was isolated from Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, while E. amnigenus, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was the typical bacterium of Ophiopogonis Radix and Codonopsis Radix, respectively. All these suggested that the contamination of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria was severe for the root decoction pieces in Wuhan city. Microbial species have certain selection specificity for medicinal ingredients, so the type and limit of control bacteria for detection should be formulated according to the pollution type and quantity of bile-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. EFFECT OF NATURALLY OCCURRING XANTHINES ON BACTERIA. I. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTION AND POTENTIATING EFFECT ON ANTIBIOTIC SPECTRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAJ, C V; DHALA, S

    1965-05-01

    The effect of xanthines on various microorganisms was studied. The antibacterial effect was not high; most of the test organisms could easily withstand a concentration of 2,500 mug/ml. Caffeine was more antibacterial than theophylline, and the latter more than theobromine. Caffeine citrate exhibited greater inhibitory effect than did pure caffeine. The effect was both bacteriostatic and bactericidal against susceptible organisms. The susceptibility of organisms to xanthines differed greatly even in related species. The morphology of Aerobacter aerogenes and A. cloacae was affected under the influence of caffeine; filamentation of cells followed sublethal doses. Potentiation was seen with antibiotics and caffeine; resistant strains were killed with a lower dose of drug in the presence of caffeine. This potentiating effect was pronounced with the tetracyclines; with streptomycin, the effect was the contrary.

  19. Evaluation of post-antibiotic effect in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Tavella

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the postantibiotic effect (PAE is a well recognized phenomenon, the mechanism by which it is induced has not fully elucidated yet. It has been suggested that PAE is the time required by bacteria to synthesize proteins or mRNA characterized by a short half-life that are consumed during antibiotic treatment.This phenomenon is widely studied on Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods, while information about Gram-positive rods and Gram-negative cocci are scanty.To gain new insights on the PAE, this study was addressed to evaluated the time required by Moraxella catarrhalis and Lactobacillus planctarum to resume their physiological growth rate after exposure to various antibiotics. Methods PAE was estimated in accordance with the method of Craig and Gudmundsson using the following drugs: penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefalotin, ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamycin and azithromycin. Log-phase bacteria were exposed to drug at a concentration corresponding to 4 times the MIC value for 1h.The drug was inactivated by 1:1000 dilution. Bacterial counts were determined at time zero, immediately after drug dilution, and at each hour after removal for 6 - 7h by a pour-plate technique. The PAE was defined as the difference in time required by test and control cultures to increase by 1 log in CFU number. Results All drugs tested induced a PAE on the strains studied. M. catarrhalis registered PAE values ranging between 0,5 (gentamycin and 2 (ceftazidime, imipenem and azithromycin.With respect to L. plantarum a PAE between 0,8 (cefalotin and 3 hours (ciprofloxacin were detected. Conclusion. These findings demonstrated that all the drugs tested were able to induce a PAE on the strains tested.This observation differs from that observed on Gram-negative rods characterised by negative PAE values induced by penicillins and cephalosporins.This results might reflect the different target of these compounds on these Gram-positive rods or the

  20. The Immunostimulatory Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamese, Murat; Aydin, Hakan; Sengul, Emin; Gelen, Volkan; Sevim, Cigdem; Ustek, Duran; Karakus, Emre

    2016-09-01

    Probiotics are "live", beneficial microbes that provide important health benefits in their hosts. There is significant interest in the modulation and regulation of the immune function by probiotics. To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of a probiotic mixture, including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species, by detecting serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels. The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. The first group was "Control group" and other 3 groups were probiotic application groups who received different doses of probiotics. The probiotic mixture included 12 probiotic bacteria, mostly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains. Probiotic mixture was administered to rats for 12 consecutive days. TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-1-β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels as well as serum IgG and IgA concentrations were detected in the sera after 12 days. Probiotics led to a decrease in the levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β; however, they led to increase in the serum levels of IL-10, IgG and IgA. There were significant differences between control group and probiotic application groups (p<0.05). These data suggest that the commensal microbiota are important for stimulating both proinflammatory and regulatory responses in order to rapidly clear infections and minimize inflammation-associated tissue damage.

  1. Effect of multiple metal resistant bacteria from contaminated lake sediments on metal accumulation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kefeng [Department of Biological Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Ramakrishna, Wusirika, E-mail: wusirika@mtu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Naturally occurring bacteria play an important role in bioremediation of heavy metal pollutants in soil and wastewater. This study identified high levels of resistance to zinc, cesium, lead, arsenate and mercury in eight copper resistant Pseudomonas strains previously isolated from Torch Lake sediment. These strains showed variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. Furthermore, these metal resistant strains were capable of bioaccumulation of multiple metals and solubilization of copper. Bacterial strains TLC 3-3.5-1 and TLC 6-6.5-1 showed high bioaccumulation ability of Zn (up to 15.9 mg/g dry cell) and Pb (80.7 mg/g dry cell), respectively. All the strains produced plant growth promoting indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), iron chelating siderophore and solubilized mineral phosphate and metals. The effect of bacterial inoculation on plant growth and copper uptake by maize (Zea mays) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) was investigated using one of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. TLC 6-6.5-4) with higher IAA production and phosphate and metal soubilization, which resulted in a significant increase in copper accumulation in maize and sunflower, and an increase in the total biomass of maize. The multiple metal-resistant bacterial isolates characterized in our study have potential applications for remediation of metal contaminated soils in combination with plants and metal contaminated water.

  2. Effects of bacteria on CdS thin films used in technological devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpdoğan, S.; Adıgüzel, A. O.; Sahan, B.; Tunçer, M.; Metin Gubur, H.

    2017-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition method at 70 {}^\\circ \\text{C} considering deposition times ranging from 2 h to 5 h. The optical band gaps of CdS thin films were found to be in the 2.42-2.37 eV range. CdS thin films had uniform spherical nano-size grains which had polycrystalline, hexagonal and cubic phases. The films had a characteristic electrical resistivity of the order of {{10}5} Ω \\text{cm} and n-type conductivity at room condition. CdS thin films were incubated in cultures of B.domonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which exist abundantly in the environment, and form biofilms. SEM images showed that S. aureus and K. pneumonia were detected significantly on the film surfaces with a few of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis cells attached. CdS thin film surface exhibits relatively good resistance to the colonization of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. Optical results showed that the band gap of CdS thin films which interacted with the bacteria is 2.42 \\text{eV} . The crystal structure and electrical properties of CdS thin films were not affected by bacterial adhesion. The antimicrobial effect of CdS nanoparticles was different for different bacterial strains.

  3. Predicting metal effects and interactions on light output in bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) using coordination chemistry data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Previous studies have shown correlations between Log of the negative solubility product for the metal hydroxide (Log -KsoMOH) and bioaccumulation of metals. The concentration of metal at which light output was reduced 50% (EC-50) in a marine bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) was determined for several metals using Microtox{reg_sign}. Median affect concentrations were corrected for the amount of free ion using MINTEQ and graphed against Log -KsoMOH. A negative relationship was found between 15 minute EC50`s for all metals tested and Log -KsoMOH. The interaction between metal pairs were then determined to see if the interaction between metals could be predicted from Log -KsoMOH. In general, metals with similar values of Log KsoMOH interacted more strongly than metals with very different values. The authors conclude that metal effects (EC-50) could be predicted based on the Log -KsoMOH and that for metals with similar mechanisms of toxicity, the interaction between metals was also predictable based on Log -KsoMOH.

  4. Effect of four dispersants on biodegradation and growth of bacteria on crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkins-Phillips, G J; Stewart, J E

    1974-10-01

    Four chemical dispersants, Corexit 8666, Gamlen Sea Clean, G. H. Woods Degreaser-Formula 11470, and Sugee 2 were examined singly and in individual combinations with Arabian Crude Oil (1:1 ratio) at 10 and 25 C for their effects on the growth of bacteria indigenous to local marine waters, the bacterial population composition, and biodegradation of crude oil; in addition, their emulsifying capacities, at approximately 24 C, were determined. None of the dispersants used alone were toxic even at relatively high concentrations (1.25%), although Gamlen Sea Clean and G. H. Woods Degreaser-Formula 11470 did cause an increase in the lag phase which was more pronounced at 10 than at 25 C; addition of the crude oil reduced the lag phase increase. All of the dispersants used alone supported good growth of microorganisms, but qualitative population shifts were caused by the dispersant-oil combinations. The degrees of degradation of the n-alkane fraction of the crude oil varied depending upon the dispersant used. Under these test conditions, only Sugee 2, which had the poorest emulsifying capacity, promoted n-alkane degradation compared with the values obtained by using the crude oil alone.

  5. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liao, Qiang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of nitrogen supplementation on aerobic degradation of LAS by consortia of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Temitope Eniola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Untreated detergent-bearing wastes discharged into the environment serve as sources of LAS. Detergent wastes usually do not contain nitrogen or contain very low amounts. Biostimulation by introducing limiting nutrient element can be useful in biotreatment of such waste. The effect of inorganic and organic nitrogen supplements on aerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS by LAS-utilizing bacteria (LUB was examined. Phosphate-buffered LAS mineral media were prepared and supplemented with different nitrogen sources: NPK fertilizer (inorganic and Urea fertilizer (organic. Individual and various consortia of pure cultures of Alcaligenes odorans, Citrobacter diversus, Micrococcus luteus and Pseudomonas putida previously isolated from detergent-effluent polluted stream were used. Biodegradation of LAS was monitored in terms of half-life (t½ of the surfactant. The rates of biodegradation by the consortia can be ranked as: four-membered (t½= 8- 12 days > three-membered (t½= 8 to 13 days > two-membered consortia (t½= 10 to 15 days > individuals (t½= 9 to 16 days. The inorganic nitrogen source enhanced utilization of the surfactant, while organic nitrogen supplementation generally slowed degradation of the surfactant. In undertaking bio-treatment of detergent-bearing effluent; inorganic nitrogen should be used as biostimulant.

  7. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangchao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liao, Qiang, E-mail: lqzx@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rchen@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhu, Xun, E-mail: zhuxun@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  8. The DSF Family of Cell-Cell Signals: An Expanding Class of Bacterial Virulence Regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Ryan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria use cell-cell signaling systems involving the synthesis and perception of diffusible signal molecules to control virulence as a response to cell density or confinement to niches. Bacteria produce signals of diverse structural classes. Signal molecules of the diffusible signal factor (DSF family are cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. The paradigm is cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, which controls virulence in this plant pathogen. Although DSF synthesis was thought to be restricted to the xanthomonads, it is now known that structurally related molecules are produced by the unrelated bacteria Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, signaling involving these DSF family members contributes to bacterial virulence, formation of biofilms and antibiotic tolerance in these important human pathogens. Here we review the recent advances in understanding DSF signaling and its regulatory role in different bacteria. These advances include the description of the pathway/mechanism of DSF biosynthesis, identification of novel DSF synthases and new members of the DSF family, the demonstration of a diversity of DSF sensors to include proteins with a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain and the description of some of the signal transduction mechanisms that impinge on virulence factor expression. In addition, we address the role of DSF family signals in interspecies signaling that modulates the behavior of other microorganisms. Finally, we consider a number of recently reported approaches for the control of bacterial virulence through the modulation of DSF signaling.

  9. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. and Manihot esculenta Extracts on Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Zenon Machado; da Trindade, Lenilson Santos; Santana, Genelane Cruz; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; da Costa Mendonça, Marcelo; da Costa, Luiz Pereira; López, Jorge A.; Macedo, Maria Lucila Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Background: The chemical composition of plants used in traditional medicine exhibits biologically active compounds, such as tannins, flavonoids, and alkaloids and becomes a promising approach to treat microbial infections, mainly with drug-resistant bacteria. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hydroethanolic leaf extracts of Tamarindus indica (tamarind) and Manihot esculenta (cassava) as antimicrobial potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolated and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods: Hydroethanolic leaf extracts were prepared and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection, Fourier transform infrared, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, and ultraviolet-visible methods. The antimicrobial activity against four strains of clinical relevance was evaluated by the microdilution method at minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: Phenolic compounds such as flavonoids were detected in the plant extracts. T. indica extract at 500 μg/mL showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa; however, M. esculenta showed only activity against P. aeruginosa in this concentration. Conclusions: Our results suggested that polyphenols and flavonoids present in T. indica leaf extracts are a potential source of antimicrobial compound. The T. indica extract showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa while M. esculenta had effect only on P. aeruginosa meropenem resistant. SUMMARY Antibacterial effect of T. indica and M. esculenta leaf extract was evaluated.T. indica extract displayed activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains.M. esculenta showed effect on P. aeruginosa meropenem resistant. Abbreviations Used: BHI: Agar brain heart infusion, CAPES: Coordination for the improvement of higher education personnel, DPPH: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, FAPITEC/SE: Foundation for support to research and technological innovation of the state of

  10. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. and Manihot esculenta Extracts on Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Zenon Machado; da Trindade, Lenilson Santos; Santana, Genelane Cruz; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; da Costa Mendonça, Marcelo; da Costa, Luiz Pereira; López, Jorge A; Macedo, Maria Lucila Hernández

    2017-01-01

    The chemical composition of plants used in traditional medicine exhibits biologically active compounds, such as tannins, flavonoids, and alkaloids and becomes a promising approach to treat microbial infections, mainly with drug-resistant bacteria. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hydroethanolic leaf extracts of Tamarindus indica (tamarind) and Manihot esculenta (cassava) as antimicrobial potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolated and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Hydroethanolic leaf extracts were prepared and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection, Fourier transform infrared, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, and ultraviolet-visible methods. The antimicrobial activity against four strains of clinical relevance was evaluated by the microdilution method at minimum inhibitory concentrations. Phenolic compounds such as flavonoids were detected in the plant extracts. T. indica extract at 500 μg/mL showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa; however, M. esculenta showed only activity against P. aeruginosa in this concentration. Our results suggested that polyphenols and flavonoids present in T. indica leaf extracts are a potential source of antimicrobial compound. The T. indica extract showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa while M. esculenta had effect only on P. aeruginosa meropenem resistant. Antibacterial effect of T. indica and M. esculenta leaf extract was evaluated.T. indica extract displayed activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains.M. esculenta showed effect on P. aeruginosa meropenem resistant. Abbreviations Used: BHI: Agar brain heart infusion, CAPES: Coordination for the improvement of higher education personnel, DPPH: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, FAPITEC/SE: Foundation for support to research and technological innovation of the state of sergipe, FTIR: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, HPLC: High

  11. Characteristics of isolated lactic acid bacteria and their effects on the silage quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siran; Yuan, Xianjun; Dong, Zhihao; Li, Junfeng; Guo, Gang; Bai, Yunfeng; Zhang, Junyu; Shao, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Objective Four lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from common vetch, tall fescue and perennial ryegrass on the Tibetan Plateau were characterized, and their effects on the fermentation quality of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) silage were studied. Methods The four isolated strains and one commercial inoculant (G, Lactobacillus plantarum MTD-1) were evaluated using the acid production ability test, morphological observation, Gram staining, physiological, biochemical and acid tolerance tests. The five LAB strains were added to Italian ryegrass for ensiling at three different temperatures (10°C, 15°C, and 25°C). Results All isolated strains (LCG3, LTG7, I5, and LI3) could grow at 5°C to 20°C, pH 3.0 to 8.0 and NaCl (3.0%, 6.5%). Strains LCG3, LTG7, I5, and LI3 were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, and Lactobacillus casei by sequencing 16S rDNA, respectively. All LAB inoculants significantly (psilages at various temperatures (10°C, 15°C, and 25°C). Compared to the commercial inoculant G, I5, and LI3 showed similar effects on improving the silage quality of Italian ryegrass at 10°C and 15°C, indicated by similar pH, LA content and AN/TN. Conclusion All inoculants could improve the silage fermentation quality at various temperatures (10°C, 15°C, and 25°C). At the temperature of 10°C and 15°C, strain I5 and LI3 had similar effects with the commercial inoculant G on improving the silage quality of Italian ryegrass. PMID:27764915

  12. Cryo-protective effect of an ice-binding protein derived from Antarctic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiagalli, Marco; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Tedesco, Pietro; Natalello, Antonino; Kaleda, Aleksei; Brocca, Stefania; de Pascale, Donatella; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Miceli, Cristina; Braslavsky, Ido; Lotti, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cold environments are populated by organisms able to contravene deleterious effects of low temperature by diverse adaptive strategies, including the production of ice binding proteins (IBPs) that inhibit the growth of ice crystals inside and outside cells. We describe the properties of such a protein (EfcIBP) identified in the metagenome of an Antarctic biological consortium composed of the ciliate Euplotes focardii and psychrophilic non-cultured bacteria. Recombinant EfcIBP can resist freezing without any conformational damage and is moderately heat stable, with a midpoint temperature of 66.4 °C. Tested for its effects on ice, EfcIBP shows an unusual combination of properties not reported in other bacterial IBPs. First, it is one of the best-performing IBPs described to date in the inhibition of ice recrystallization, with effective concentrations in the nanomolar range. Moreover, EfcIBP has thermal hysteresis activity (0.53 °C at 50 μm) and it can stop a crystal from growing when held at a constant temperature within the thermal hysteresis gap. EfcIBP protects purified proteins and bacterial cells from freezing damage when exposed to challenging temperatures. EfcIBP also possesses a potential N-terminal signal sequence for protein transport and a DUF3494 domain that is common to secreted IBPs. These features lead us to hypothesize that the protein is either anchored at the outer cell surface or concentrated around cells to provide survival advantage to the whole cell consortium. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Impacts of organic and conventional crop management on diversity and activity of free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria and total bacteria are subsidiary to temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H; Leifert, Carlo; Cummings, Stephen P; Cooper, Julia M

    2012-01-01

    A three year field study (2007-2009) of the diversity and numbers of the total and metabolically active free-living diazotophic bacteria and total bacterial communities in organic and conventionally managed agricultural soil was conducted using the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study, in northeast England. Fertility management appeared to have little impact on both diazotrophic and total bacterial communities. However, copy numbers of the nifH gene did appear to be negatively impacted by conventional crop protection measures across all years suggesting diazotrophs may be particularly sensitive to pesticides. Impacts of crop management were greatly overshadowed by the influence of temporal effects with diazotrophic communities changing on a year by year basis and from season to season. Quantitative analyses using qPCR of each community indicated that metabolically active diazotrophs were highest in year 1 but the population significantly declined in year 2 before recovering somewhat in the final year. The total bacterial population in contrast increased significantly each year. It appeared that the dominant drivers of qualitative and quantitative changes in both communities were annual and seasonal effects. Moreover, regression analyses showed activity of both communities was significantly affected by soil temperature and climatic conditions.

  14. Impacts of Organic and Conventional Crop Management on Diversity and Activity of Free-Living Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria and Total Bacteria Are Subsidiary to Temporal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H.; Leifert, Carlo; Cummings, Stephen P.; Cooper, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    A three year field study (2007–2009) of the diversity and numbers of the total and metabolically active free-living diazotophic bacteria and total bacterial communities in organic and conventionally managed agricultural soil was conducted using the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study, in northeast England. Fertility management appeared to have little impact on both diazotrophic and total bacterial communities. However, copy numbers of the nifH gene did appear to be negatively impacted by conventional crop protection measures across all years suggesting diazotrophs may be particularly sensitive to pesticides. Impacts of crop management were greatly overshadowed by the influence of temporal effects with diazotrophic communities changing on a year by year basis and from season to season. Quantitative analyses using qPCR of each community indicated that metabolically active diazotrophs were highest in year 1 but the population significantly declined in year 2 before recovering somewhat in the final year. The total bacterial population in contrast increased significantly each year. It appeared that the dominant drivers of qualitative and quantitative changes in both communities were annual and seasonal effects. Moreover, regression analyses showed activity of both communities was significantly affected by soil temperature and climatic conditions. PMID:23285218

  15. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-10-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acid and the interaction between these environmental factors. Growth models were developed by combining new and existing cardinal parameter values. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameters (μref at 25°C) were fitted to a total of 52 growth rates from cottage cheese to improve model performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese. The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07-1.10 with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid bacteria from added starter culture were on average predicted to grow 16% faster than observed (Bf of 1.16 and Af of 1.32) and growth of the diacetyl producing aroma culture was on average predicted 9% slower than observed (Bf of 0.91 and Af of 1.17). The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new models to successfully predict maximum population density of L. monocytogenes when growing together with lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. 11 of 13 simulations of L

  16. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth, photosynthesis and yield of corn

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    mohsen jahan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biological fertilizers have received special attention by scientists in sustainable and low input agriculture. In order to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth and photosynthesis characteristics of corn in conventional and ecological cropping systems, a field experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during year 2006. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (1- High input conventional system, 2- Medium input conventional system, 3- Low input conventional system and 4- Ecological system and four inoculations (1- Mycorrhiza fungus, Glomus intraradices, 2- Bacteria, Azotobacter paspali and Azospirillum brasilense, 3- Dual inoculation, Fungus plus bacteria, and 4- No-inoculation, control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. All agronomic practices and inputs application during planting and nursing for each of cropping systems were conducted according to regional traditions. Results showed that the effect of inoculation on photosynthesis rates of corn was significant, as the highest photosynthesis rate obtained in dual inoculation. Single inoculation (fungus or bacteria was ranked second. The effect of all inoculations on corn dry matter production was significant and dual inoculation produced the highest dry matter yield. The cropping systems have significant effect on corn yield and the difference between medium input conventional system and high input conventional system was significant, but the high input, low input and ecological cropping systems showed no differences. Inoculants affected the SPAD readings, and dual inoculation showed the highest SPAD readings. This study showed that utilization of low input conventional and ecological systems in combination with use of dual inoculation of

  17. Antibacterial Effects of Garlic Extracts and Ziziphora Essential Oil on Bacteria Associated with Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Farzane; Ghasemi, Shima; Babaloo, Amirreza; Javadzadeh, Yousef; Momeni, Rosa; Ghanizadeh, Milad; Moaddab, Seyyed Reza; Fathi, Farzad Yeganeh

    2017-04-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory process, characterized by loss of bone around implants and bleeding on probing. Colonization of bacteria in the pocket created around the implant is one of the most important aetiologic factors involved. Although antibiotics are routinely used and are effective agents against this bacterial infection, due to the side effects and drug resistance of these medications, researchers are more interested in using herbal derivatives. There are relatively limited number of studies in this respect. To evaluate and compare the antibacterial effects of the extracts of Allium sativum and Ziziphora clinopodioides essential oil on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. In this in vitro study conducted at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences between March 2016 and July 2016, aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic and ziziphora essential oil were prepared and then their effects on one standard strain of P. aeruginosa and two standard strains of S. aureus and 18 clinical strains, (nine strains of P. aeruginosa and nine strains of S. aureus) which had been isolated from wound and blood cultures, were evaluated using the reference broth macro dilution method and disk diffusion technique. Data were evaluated with descriptive statistical techniques and t-test for independent groups, using SPSS 17. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of garlic did not exhibit inhibitory effects on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) for ziziphora essential oil against S. aureus were 0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively. The mean diameter of growth inhibition zone for S. aureus in the ziziphora essential oil group (0.25μg/mL) and Vancomycin group (10 μg/mL) were 26.09±5.8 and 14.63±1.20 mm respectively (p<0.001). Growth inhibition zone for P. aeruginosa were observed in only one (35 mm) and three cases (12.5±3.4 mm) in the ziziphora essential oil group (0.5 μg/mL) and Nalidixic acid group (10

  18. The Effect of Biofertilizer on The Diversity of N2O Reducing Bacteria in Paddy Fields of Sukabumi, Indonesia

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    Alfan Cahyadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the methanotrophic bacteria and N2O reducing bacteria have been proven to be able to support the plant growth and increase the productivity of paddy. However effect of the methanotrophic and N2O reducing bacteria application as a biofertilizer to indigenous N2O reducing bacteria is still not well known yet. The aim of this study was to analyze the diversity of N2O reducing bacteria in lowland paddy soil based on a nosZ gene. Soil samples were taken from lowland paddy soils in Pelabuhan Ratu Sukabumi, West Java, Indonesia. There were two treatments for the paddy field soil, ie. biofertilizer-treated field 20% fertilizer (50 kg/ha with the addition of biofertilizer and 100% fertilizer. PCR amplification of nosZ gene was successfully conducted using nosZF and nosZR primer pair. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE process was conducted at 150 V for 5.5h. There were three differences nosZ bands were sequenced. The phylogenetic analysis showed that they were close to uncultured bacteria. Microbial diversity in the biofertilizer-treated field was higher than that of in the 100% fertilizer-treated field. The biofertilizer treatment has higher in microbial diversity than that of applied non-biofertilizer paddy fields. This research might have impact in the application of biofertilizers due to the emission of N2O as a green house gas from paddy fields farming activity. The biofertilizer has great potential application in sustainable environmental friendly agriculture systems.

  19. Molecular characterization of virulence factors in Aeromonas hydrophila obtained from fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira T.L. Oliveira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple factors can be involved in the virulence processes of Aeromonas hydrophila. The objective of the present paper was to verify the presence of aerolysin, hidrolipase, elastase and lipase virulence genes through the polymerase chain reaction (PCR in A. hydrophila isolates obtained from fish of the São Francisco River Valley, and to evaluate virulence according to the presence of these genes in Nile tilapia fingerlings. One hundred and fourteen isolates from the bacteria were used. DNA was heat extracted and PCR undertaken using specific primers described in the literature. For in vivo tests Nile tilapia fingerlings were used. From the PCR tests, negative isolates for all genes tested were selected, positive isolates for two genes (aerolysin and elastase and positive for the four genes tested. These were inoculated at a concentration of 10(8 UFC/ml into the tilapias, considered as treatments; another group of animals was used as control (with inoculation of saline solution. In all, 12 distinct standards regarding the presence of virulence factors in isolates from A. hydrophila, were observed. Of the 114 isolates analyzed, 100 (87.72% presented at least one of the virulence factors under study. The virulence factors were widely distributed among the A. hydrophila isolates. Aerolysin was the most frequent virulence factor present in the isolates analyzed. A. hydrophila led to the mortality of the Nile tilapia fingerlings, regardless of the absence or quantity of virulence genes tested.

  20. Empirical prediction and validation of antibacterial inhibitory effects of various plant essential oils on common pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir Evrendilek, Gulsun

    2015-06-02

    In this study, fractional compound composition, antioxidant capacity, and phenolic substance content of 14 plant essential oils-anise (Pimpinella anisum), bay leaves (Laurus nobilis), cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum verum), clove (Eugenia caryophyllata), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), hop (Humulus lupulus), Istanbul oregano (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum), Izmir oregano (Origanum onites), mint (Mentha piperita), myrtus (Myrtus communis), orange peel (Citrus sinensis), sage (Salvia officinalis), thyme (Thymbra spicata), and Turkish oregano (Origanum minutiflorum)--were related to inhibition of 10 bacteria through multiple linear or non-linear (M(N)LR) models-four Gram-positive bacteria of Listeria innocua, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis, and six Gram-negative bacteria of Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Klebsiella oxytoca. A total of 65 compounds with different antioxidant capacity, phenolic substance content and antibacterial properties were detected with 14 plant essential oils. The best-fit M(N)LR models indicated that relative to anise essential oil, the essential oils of oreganos, cinnamon, and thyme had consistently high inhibitory effects, while orange peel essential oil had consistently a low inhibitory effect. Regression analysis indicated that beta-bisabolene (Turkish and Istanbul oreganos), and terpinolene (thyme) were found to be the most inhibitory compounds regardless of the bacteria type tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria on Yield and Nutrient Uptake in Comparison with Chemical and Organic Fertilizers in Wheat

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    A. Fallah Nosrat Abad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The high cost of fertilizers in farming systems, soil pollution and degradation of soil are factors that caused to full use of available renewable nutrient sources of plant (organic and biological with optimal application of fertilizers in order to maintain fertility, structure, biological activity, exchange capacity and water-holding capacity of the water in soil. Therefore, in recent years, according to investigators biofertilizers and organic farming as an alternative to chemical fertilizers has been drawn. Through this study, we examined the effects of triple superphosphate, organic matters and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms on quantitative and qualitative yield of wheat and nutrient uptake. The experiment was carried out in the factorial based on randomized complete block design. The factors were: 1-phosphate solubilizing bacteria in three levels including control, Pseudomonas Putida and Bacillus Coagulans bacteria, 2- triple superphosphate in five levels of 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% and 3-organic matter in 2 levels of 0 and 15 ton/ha in the soil with high phosphorous accessibility (13 mg/kg soil but lower than sufficient limit for plant 15 mg/kg soil. The results showed that the highest amount of yield has been recorded in Pseudomonas Putida bacteria treatment with organic matter and 25% phosphate fertilizer. As a result, at the conditions of this experiment phosphate solubilizing bacteria and organic matter significantly had higher yield than control and their combination with phosphate fertilizer had significant effect on reducing phosphate fertilizer use.

  2. O-antigen and virulence profiling of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by a rapid and cost-effective DNA microarray colorimetric method

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    Beatriz eQuiñones

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. The present study developed the use of DNA microarrays with the ampliPHOX colorimetric method to rapidly detect and genotype STEC strains. A low-density 30-mer oligonucleotide DNA microarray was designed to target O-antigen gene clusters of eleven E. coli serogroups (O26, O45, O91, O103, O104, O111, O113, O121, O128, O145 and O157 that have been associated with the majority of STEC infections. In addition, the DNA microarray targeted eleven virulence genes, encoding adhesins, cytotoxins, proteases, and receptor proteins, which have been implicated in conferring increased ability to cause disease for STEC. Results from the validation experiments demonstrated that this microarray-based colorimetric method allowed for a rapid and accurate genotyping of STEC reference strains from environmental and clinical sources and from distinct geographical locations. Positive hybridization signals were detected only for probes targeting serotype and virulence genes known to be present in the STEC reference strains. Quantification analysis indicated that the mean pixel intensities of the signal for probes targeting O-antigen or virulence genes were at least three times higher when compared to the background. Furthermore, this microarray-based colorimetric method was then employed to genotype a group of E. coli isolates from watershed sediment and animal fecal samples that were collected from an important region for leafy-vegetable production in the central coast of California. The results indicated an accurate identification of O-type and virulence genes in the tested isolates and confirmed that the ampliPHOX colorimetric method with low density DNA microarrays enabled a fast assessment of the virulence potential of STEC using low-cost reagents and instrumentation.

  3. Effect of dry air or immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huezo, R; Northcutt, J K; Smith, D P; Fletcher, D L; Ingram, K D

    2007-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of chilling method (air or immersion) on concentration and prevalence of Escherichia coli, coliforms, Campylobacter, and Salmonella recovered from broiler chicken carcasses. For each of four replications, 60 broilers were inoculated orally and intracloacally with 1 ml of a suspension containing Campylobacter at approximately 10(8) cells per ml. After 1 day, broilers were inoculated with 1 ml of a suspension containing Salmonella at approximately 10(8) cells per ml. Broilers were processed, and carcasses were cooled with dry air (3.5 m/s at -1.1 degrees C for 150 min) or by immersion chilling in ice water (0.6 degrees C for 50 min). Concentrations of E. coli, coliforms, Campylobacter, and Salmonella recovered from prechill carcasses averaged 3.5, 3.7, 3.4, and 1.4 log CFU/ml of rinse, respectively. Overall, both chilling methods significantly reduced bacterial concentrations on the carcasses, and no difference in concentrations of bacteria was observed between the two chilling methods (P chilling methods reduced E. coli and coliforms by 0.9 to 1.0 log CFU/ml. Air and immersion chilling reduced Campylobacter by 1.4 and 1.0 log CFU/ml and reduced Salmonella by 1.0 and 0.6 log CFU/ml, respectively. Chilling method had no effect on the prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella recovered from carcasses. These results demonstrate that air- and immersion-chilled carcasses without chemical intervention are microbiologically comparable, and a 90% reduction in concentrations of E. coli, coliforms, and Campylobacter can be obtained by chilling.

  4. Commensal bacteria drive endogenous transformation and tumour stem cell marker expression through a bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmin; Yang, Yonghong; Huycke, Mark M

    2015-03-01

    Commensal bacteria and innate immunity play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). We propose that selected commensals polarise colon macrophages to produce endogenous mutagens that initiate chromosomal instability (CIN), lead to expression of progenitor and tumour stem cell markers, and drive CRC through a bystander effect. Primary murine colon epithelial cells were repetitively exposed to Enterococcus faecalis-infected macrophages, or purified trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)-an endogenous mutagen and spindle poison produced by macrophages. CIN, gene expression, growth as allografts in immunodeficient mice were examined for clones and expression of markers confirmed using interleukin (IL) 10 knockout mice colonised by E. faecalis. Primary colon epithelial cells exposed to polarised macrophages or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal developed CIN and were transformed after 10 weekly treatments. In immunodeficient mice, 8 of 25 transformed clones grew as poorly differentiated carcinomas with 3 tumours invading skin and/or muscle. All tumours stained for cytokeratins confirming their epithelial cell origin. Gene expression profiling of clones showed alterations in 3 to 7 cancer driver genes per clone. Clones also strongly expressed stem/progenitor cell markers Ly6A and Ly6E. Although not differentially expressed in clones, murine allografts positively stained for the tumour stem cell marker doublecortin-like kinase 1. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 and Ly6A/E were expressed by epithelial cells in colon biopsies for areas of inflamed and dysplastic tissue from E. faecalis-colonised IL-10 knockout mice. These results validate a novel mechanism for CRC that involves endogenous CIN and cellular transformation arising through a microbiome-driven bystander effect. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Antibacterial Inhibitory Effects ofPunica GranatumGel on Cariogenic Bacteria: Anin vitroStudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Grazielle; Juntavee, Apa; Ratanathongkam, Ariya; Nualkaew, Natsajee; Peerapattana, Jomjai; Chatchiwiwattana, Supaporn

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro antibacterial effects of the formulated Punica granatum (PG) gel against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus casei. The PG extract was dissolved in water at 500 mg/mL. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for identification and quantification of chemical marker punicalagin. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill assay (TKA) were investigated. Antibacterial activities of the formulated PG gel, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel and blank gel were tested by measuring the zones of inhibition through agar well diffusion method. The HPLC results showed presence of punicalagin at 2023.58 ± 25.29 pg/mL in the aqueous PG extract and at 0.234% (w/w) in the formulated PG gel. The MBC for S. mutans, S. Sanguinis, and L. casei were 250, 125, and 500 mg/mL respectively. The TKA of 500 mg/mL aqueous PG extract showed total inhibition of S. mutans, S. Sanguinis, and L. casei at 6, 1, and 24 hours contact time respectively. Agar well diffusion revealed that for S. mutans, CHX gel > PG gel > blank gel; for S. sanguinis, CHX gel = PG gel > blank gel; for L. casei, CHX gel > PG gel = blank gel. Comparison of the PG gel potency showed that S. sanguinis = S. mutans > L. casei. The PG gel equivalent to 0.234% punicalagin (w/w) inhibited S. mutans and S. sanguinis but not L. casei within 24 hours incubation period and has the potential to be used for caries prevention. Millo G, Juntavee A, Ratanathongkam A, Nualkaew N, Peerapattana J, Chatchiwiwattana S. Antibacterial Inhibitory Effects of Punica Granatum Gel on Cariogenic Bacteria: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):152-157.

  6. [Effect of antagonistic bacteria and soil disinfectant on soil bacterium community in banana Fusarium wilt disease area].

    Science.gov (United States