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Sample records for viral vectors selective

  1. In vitro selection of viral vectors with modified tropism: the adeno-associated virus display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perabo, Luca; Büning, Hildegard; Kofler, David M; Ried, Martin U; Girod, Anne; Wendtner, Clemens M; Enssle, Jörg; Hallek, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Improving the efficiency and specificity of gene vectors is critical for the success of gene therapy. In an effort to generate viral mutants with controlled tropism we produced a library of adeno-associated virus (AAV) clones with randomly modified capsids and used it for the selection of receptor-targeting mutants. After several rounds of selection on different cell lines that were resistant to infection by wild-type (wt) AAV, infectious mutants were harvested at high titers. These mutants transduced target cells with an up to 100-fold increased efficiency, in a receptor-specific manner and without interacting with the primary receptor for wt AAV. The results demonstrate for the first time that a combinatorial approach based on a eukaryotic virus library allows one to generate efficient, receptor-specific targeting vectors with desired tropism.

  2. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Diana L.; Collins, Casey P.; Hocum, Jonah D.; Leap, David J.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34+ cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  3. Viral vector-mediated selective and reversible blockade of the pathway for visual orienting in mice

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    Tadashi eIsa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, by using a combination of two viral vectors, we developed a technique for pathway-selective and reversible synaptic transmission blockade, and successfully induced a behavioral deficit of dexterous hand movements in macaque monkeys by affecting a population of spinal interneurons. To explore the capacity of this technique to work in other pathways and species, and to obtain fundamental methodological information, we tried to block the crossed tecto-reticular pathway, which is known to control orienting responses to visual targets, in mice. A neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer vector with the gene encoding enhanced tetanus neurotoxin (eTeNT tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of a tetracycline responsive element was injected into the left medial pontine reticular formation. 7–17 days later, an adeno-associated viral vector with a highly efficient Tet-ON sequence, rtTAV16, was injected into the right superior colliculus. 5–9 weeks later, the daily administration of doxycycline (Dox was initiated. Visual orienting responses toward the left side were impaired 1 - 4 days after Dox administration. Anti-GFP immunohistochemistry revealed that a number of neurons in the intermediate and deep layers of the right superior colliculus were positively stained, indicating eTeNT expression. After the termination of Dox administration, the anti-GFP staining returned to the baseline level within 28 days. A second round of Dox administration, starting from 28 days after the termination of the first Dox administration, resulted in the reappearance of the behavioral impairment. These findings showed that pathway-selective and reversible blockade of synaptic transmission causes behavioral effects also in rodents, and that the crossed tecto-reticular pathway surely controls visual orienting behaviors.

  4. Efficient gene delivery and selective transduction of astrocytes in the mammalian brain using viral vectors

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    Nicolas eMerienne

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are now considered as key players in brain information processing because of their newly discovered roles in synapse formation and plasticity, energy metabolism and blood flow regulation. However, our understanding of astrocyte function is still fragmented compared to other brain cell types. A better appreciation of the biology of astrocytes requires the development of tools to generate animal models in which astrocyte-specific proteins and pathways can be manipulated. In addition, it is becoming increasingly evident that astrocytes are also important players in many neurological disorders. Targeted modulation of protein expression in astrocytes would be critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Gene transfer is valuable to target a subpopulation of cells and explore their function in experimental models. In particular, viral-mediated gene transfer provides a rapid, highly flexible and cost-effective, in vivo paradigm to study the impact of genes of interest during CNS development or in adult animals. We will review the different strategies that led to the recent development of efficient viral vectors that can be successfully used to selectively transduce astrocytes in the mammalian brain.

  5. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  6. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  7. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  8. Selective optical control of synaptic transmission in the subcortical visual pathway by activation of viral vector-expressed halorhodopsin.

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    Katsuyuki Kaneda

    Full Text Available The superficial layer of the superior colliculus (sSC receives visual inputs via two different pathways: from the retina and the primary visual cortex. However, the functional significance of each input for the operation of the sSC circuit remains to be identified. As a first step toward understanding the functional role of each of these inputs, we developed an optogenetic method to specifically suppress the synaptic transmission in the retino-tectal pathway. We introduced enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light-sensitive, membrane-targeting chloride pump, into mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs by intravitreously injecting an adeno-associated virus serotype-2 vector carrying the CMV-eNpHR-EYFP construct. Several weeks after the injection, whole-cell recordings made from sSC neurons in slice preparations revealed that yellow laser illumination of the eNpHR-expressing retino-tectal axons, putatively synapsing onto the recorded cells, effectively inhibited EPSCs evoked by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve layer. We also showed that sSC spike activities elicited by visual stimulation were significantly reduced by laser illumination of the sSC in anesthetized mice. These results indicate that photo-activation of eNpHR expressed in RGC axons enables selective blockade of retino-tectal synaptic transmission. The method established here can most likely be applied to a variety of brain regions for studying the function of individual inputs to these regions.

  9. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

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    Cinnamon L. Hardee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic

  10. Viral Vectors for Plant Genome Engineering.

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    Zaidi, Syed Shan-E-Ali; Mansoor, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in genome engineering (GE) has made it possible to precisely alter DNA sequences in plant cells, providing specifically engineered plants with traits of interest. Gene targeting efficiency depends on the delivery-method of both sequence-specific nucleases and repair templates, to plant cells. Typically, this is achieved using Agrobacterium mediated transformation or particle bombardment, both of which transform only a subset of cells in treated tissues. The alternate in planta approaches, stably integrating nuclease-encoding cassettes and repair templates into the plant genome, are time consuming, expensive and require extra regulations. More efficient GE reagents delivery methods are clearly needed if GE is to become routine, especially in economically important crops that are difficult to transform. Recently, autonomously replicating virus-based vectors have been demonstrated as efficient means of delivering GE reagents in plants. Both DNA viruses (Bean yellow dwarf virus, Wheat dwarf virus and Cabbage leaf curl virus) and RNA virus (Tobacco rattle virus) have demonstrated efficient gene targeting frequencies in model plants (Nicotiana benthamiana) and crops (potato, tomato, rice, and wheat). Here we discuss the recent advances using viral vectors for plant genome engineering, the current limitations and future directions.

  11. Glycated AAV vectors: chemical redirection of viral tissue tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Eric D; Weinberg, Marc S; Asokan, Aravind

    2011-04-20

    A chemical approach for selective masking of arginine residues on viral capsids featuring an exogenous glycation reaction has been developed. Reaction of adeno-associated viral (AAV) capsids with the α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal, resulted in formation of arginine adducts. Specifically, surface-exposed guanidinium side chains were modified into charge neutral hydroimidazolones, thereby disrupting a continuous cluster of basic amino acid residues implicated in heparan sulfate binding. Consequent loss in heparin binding ability and decrease in infectivity were observed. Strikingly, glycated AAV retained the ability to infect neurons in the mouse brain and were redirected from liver to skeletal and cardiac muscle following systemic administration in mice. Further, glycated AAV displayed altered antigenicity demonstrating the potential for evading antibody neutralization. Generation of unnatural amino acid side chains through capsid glycation might serve as an orthogonal strategy to engineer AAV vectors displaying novel tissue tropisms for gene therapy applications.

  12. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

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    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  13. Hybrid viral vectors for vaccine and antibody production in plants.

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    Yusibov, Vidadi; Streatfield, Stephen J; Kushnir, Natasha; Roy, Gourgopal; Padmanaban, Annamalai

    2013-01-01

    Plants have a demonstrated potential for large-scale, rapid production of recombinant proteins for diverse product applications, including subunit vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. In this field, the accent has recently shifted from the engineering of "edible" vaccines based on stable expression of target protein in transgenic or transplastomic plants to the development of purified formulated vaccines that are delivered via injection. The injectable vaccines are commonly produced using transient expression of target gene delivered into genetically unmodified plant host via viral or bacterial vectors. Most viral vectors are based on plant RNA viruses, where nonessential sequences are replaced with the gene of interest. Utilization of viral hybrids that consist of genes and regulatory elements of different virus species, or transcomplementation systems (vector/transgene) had a substantial impact on the level of target protein expression. Development and introduction of agroviral hybrid vectors that combine genetic elements of bacterial binary plasmids and plant viral vectors, and agroinfiltration as a tool of the vector delivery have resulted in significant progress in large-scale production of recombinant vaccines and monoclonal antibodies in plants. This article presents an overview of plant hybrid viral vector expression systems developed so far.

  14. Viral Vectors for Use in the Development of Biodefense Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, John S; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Parker, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    ... agents of bioterrorism or biowarfare. The use of viruses, for example adenovirus, vaccinia virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, as vaccine-vectors has enabled researchers to develop effective means for countering the threat of bioterrorism and biowarfare. An overview of the different viral vectors and the threats they counter will be discussed.

  15. Transient dominant host-range selection using Chinese hamster ovary cells to generate marker-free recombinant viral vectors from vaccinia virus.

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    Liu, Liang; Cooper, Tamara; Eldi, Preethi; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Howley, Paul M; Hayball, John D

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs) are promising antigen-delivery systems for vaccine development that are also useful as research tools. Two common methods for selection during construction of rVACV clones are (i) co-insertion of drug resistance or reporter protein genes, which requires the use of additional selection drugs or detection methods, and (ii) dominant host-range selection. The latter uses VACV variants rendered replication-incompetent in host cell lines by the deletion of host-range genes. Replicative ability is restored by co-insertion of the host-range genes, providing for dominant selection of the recombinant viruses. Here, we describe a new method for the construction of rVACVs using the cowpox CP77 protein and unmodified VACV as the starting material. Our selection system will expand the range of tools available for positive selection of rVACV during vector construction, and it is substantially more high-fidelity than approaches based on selection for drug resistance.

  16. [Selective ablation of certain neural pathways by gene transfer using viral vectors: analysis of primate basal ganglia functions by using immunotoxin-mediated tract targeting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    Using a neuron-specific retrograde gene-transfer vector based on the lentivirus, we established immunotoxin (IT)-mediated tract targeting in the primate brain; this technique allows ablation of a neuronal population constituting a certain pathway. Here, we introduce a recent study on selective removal of the cortico-subthalamic "hyperdirect" pathway. Together with the direct and indirect pathways, the hyperdirect pathway plays a crucial role in motor information processing in the basal ganglia. This pathway links the motor-related areas of the frontal lobe directly to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) without relay at the striatum. After electrical stimulation of the motor-related areas, such as the supplementary motor area (SMA), triphasic responses consisting of an early excitation, an inhibition, and a late excitation are usually detected in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Several lines of evidence suggest that the early excitation may be derived from the hyperdirect pathway. We injected the lentiviral vector expressing human interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit into the monkey STN. IT was then injected into the SMA. We recorded GPi neuron responses to SMA stimulation. We found that the early excitation was reduced neither with the inhibition nor with the late excitation. The spontaneous firing rate and pattern of GPi neurons remained unchanged. This indicated that IT-mediated tract targeting successfully and selectively eliminated the hyperdirect pathway from the basal ganglia circuitry without affecting the spontaneous activity of STN neurons. This electrophysiological finding was confirmed using anatomical data obtained from retrograde and anterograde neural tracings. The present results show that the cortically driven early excitation in GPi neurons is mediated by the hyperdirect pathway. The IT-mediated tract targeting technique will provide us with novel strategies for elucidating various neural network functions.

  17. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

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    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions.

  18. Production and Titering of Recombinant Adeno-associated Viral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    McClure, Christina; Cole, Katy L. H.; Wulff, Peer; Klugmann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have become increasingly valuable for in vivo studies in animals, and are also currently being tested in human clinical trials. Wild-type AAV is a non-pathogenic member of the parvoviridae family and inherently replication-deficient. The broad transduction profile, low immune response as well as the strong and persistent transgene expression achieved with these vectors has made them a popular and versatile tool for in vitro and ...

  19. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

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    Rastislav Lukac

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03 in Grado, Italy.

  20. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, Krys; Cunningham, Janet

    2012-11-13

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant AAV virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) are provided for the treatment of CNS disorders, particularly those disorders which involve the neurotransmitter dopamine. The methods entail providing rAAV virions that comprise a transgene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and administering the virions to the brain of a mammal using a non-manual pump.

  1. Production and titering of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Christina; Cole, Katy L H; Wulff, Peer; Klugmann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew J

    2011-11-27

    In recent years recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have become increasingly valuable for in vivo studies in animals, and are also currently being tested in human clinical trials. Wild-type AAV is a non-pathogenic member of the parvoviridae family and inherently replication-deficient. The broad transduction profile, low immune response as well as the strong and persistent transgene expression achieved with these vectors has made them a popular and versatile tool for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. rAAVs can be easily and cheaply produced in the laboratory and, based on their favourable safety profile, are generally given a low safety classification. Here, we describe a method for the production and titering of chimeric rAAVs containing the capsid proteins of both AAV1 and AAV2. The use of these so-called chimeric vectors combines the benefits of both parental serotypes such as high titres stocks (AAV1) and purification by affinity chromatography (AAV2). These AAV serotypes are the best studied of all AAV serotypes, and individually have a broad infectivity pattern. The chimeric vectors described here should have the infectious properties of AAV1 and AAV2 and can thus be expected to infect a large range of tissues, including neurons, skeletal muscle, pancreas, kidney among others. The method described here uses heparin column purification, a method believed to give a higher viral titer and cleaner viral preparation than other purification methods, such as centrifugation through a caesium chloride gradient. Additionally, we describe how these vectors can be quickly and easily titered to give accurate reading of the number of infectious particles produced.

  2. Comparative study of the transfection efficiency of commonly used viral vectors in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Hao; Liao, Zhi-Xing; Rizak, Joshua D.; Zheng, Na; Zhang, Lin-Heng; Tang, Hen; He, Xiao-Bin; Wu, Yang; He, Xia-Ping; Yang, Mei-Feng; Li, Zheng-Hui; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Viral vector transfection systems are among the simplest of biological agents with the ability to transfer genes into the central nervous system. In brain research, a series of powerful and novel gene editing technologies are based on these systems. Although many viral vectors are used in rodents, their full application has been limited in non-human primates. To identify viral vectors that can stably and effectively express exogenous genes within non-human primates, eleven commonly used recombinant adeno-associated viral and lentiviral vectors, each carrying a gene to express green or red fluorescence, were injected into the parietal cortex of four rhesus monkeys. The expression of fluorescent cells was used to quantify transfection efficiency. Histological results revealed that recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors, especially the serotype 2/9 coupled with the cytomegalovirus, human synapsin Ⅰ, or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅱ promoters, and lentiviral vector coupled with the human ubiquitin C promoter, induced higher expression of fluorescent cells, representing high transfection efficiency. This is the first comparison of transfection efficiencies of different viral vectors carrying different promoters and serotypes in non-human primates (NHPs). These results can be used as an aid to select optimal vectors to transfer exogenous genes into the central nervous system of non-human primates. PMID:28409504

  3. Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy: Translational and Clinical Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Chalberg, Thomas W; Schaffer, David V

    2015-01-01

    In a range of human trials, viral vectors have emerged as safe and effective delivery vehicles for clinical gene therapy, particularly for monogenic recessive disorders, but there has also been early work on some idiopathic diseases. These successes have been enabled by research and development efforts focusing on vectors that combine low genotoxicity and immunogenicity with highly efficient delivery, including vehicles based on adeno-associated virus and lentivirus, which are increasingly enabling clinical success. However, numerous delivery challenges must be overcome to extend this success to many diseases; these challenges include developing techniques to evade preexisting immunity, to ensure more efficient transduction of therapeutically relevant cell types, to target delivery, and to ensure genomic maintenance. Fortunately, vector-engineering efforts are demonstrating promise in the development of next-generation gene therapy vectors that can overcome these barriers. This review highlights key historical trends in clinical gene therapy, the recent clinical successes of viral-based gene therapy, and current research that may enable future clinical application.

  4. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    OpenAIRE

    Vreugdenhil Erno; Garner Keith M; Luijendijk Mieneke CM; Brans Maike AD; Fitzsimons Carlos P; de Backer Marijke WA; Adan Roger AH

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected...

  5. Prevalence study and risk factor analysis of selected bacterial, protozoal and viral, including vector-borne, pathogens in cats from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attipa, Charalampos; Papasouliotis, Kostas; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Baneth, Gad; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Sarvani, Elpida; Knowles, Toby G; Mengi, Sena; Morris, David; Helps, Chris; Tasker, Séverine

    2017-03-13

    Feline infectious agent studies are lacking in Cyprus. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for various feline infectious agents, including feline vector-borne pathogens (FVBP), in cats from Cyprus. A cross-sectional, descriptive, multicentre study was performed on 174 feline samples [138 owned and 36 shelter-feral, including both healthy (43) and non-healthy (131), cats] from private veterinary clinics from all six districts of Cyprus. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were used to detect Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" (CMhm) and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" (CMt). The population was tested for four FVBP including Bartonella henselae and Leishmania spp. using qPCR, while conventional PCR assays were used to detect Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. and Hepatozoon spp. Serological assays were performed to detect Leishmania infantum antibodies, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigen and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies. Statistical analysis was performed to test associations and possible risk factors between variables and infectious agents. Ninety-six (55.2%) of the 174 cats were PCR-positive for at least one infectious agent. Forty-six cats (26.4%) were haemoplasma positive, including 13 (7.5%) for Mhf, 36 (20.7%) for CMhm and 12 (6.9%) for CMt. Sixty-six cats (37.9%) were positive for Hepatozoon spp., while 19 (10.9%) were positive for B. henselae, four (2.3%) for Leishmania spp. and one (0.6%) for Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. Sequencing revealed the presence of Hepatozoon felis, L. infantum and Anaplasma platys. Of the 164 cats that underwent retroviral serology, 10 (6.1%) were FeLV-positive and 31 (18.9%) were FIV-positive, while L. infantum serology was positive in 7 (4.4%) of the 160 cats tested. Multivariable logistic regression revealed significant associations for various infectious agents including L. infantum with each of Hepatozoon spp. and CMt

  6. Viral paratransgenesis in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Ren

    Full Text Available Paratransgenesis, the genetic manipulation of insect symbiotic microorganisms, is being considered as a potential method to control vector-borne diseases such as malaria. The feasibility of paratransgenic malaria control has been hampered by the lack of candidate symbiotic microorganisms for the major vector Anopheles gambiae. In other systems, densonucleosis viruses (DNVs are attractive agents for viral paratransgenesis because they infect important vector insects, can be genetically manipulated and are transmitted to subsequent generations. However, An. gambiae has been shown to be refractory to DNV dissemination. We discovered, cloned and characterized the first known DNV (AgDNV capable of infection and dissemination in An. gambiae. We developed a flexible AgDNV-based expression vector to express any gene of interest in An. gambiae using a two-plasmid helper-transducer system. To demonstrate proof-of-concept of the viral paratransgenesis strategy, we used this system to transduce expression of an exogenous gene (enhanced green fluorescent protein; EGFP in An. gambiae mosquitoes. Wild-type and EGFP-transducing AgDNV virions were highly infectious to An. gambiae larvae, disseminated to and expressed EGFP in epidemiologically relevant adult tissues such as midgut, fat body and ovaries and were transmitted to subsequent mosquito generations. These proof-of-principle data suggest that AgDNV could be used as part of a paratransgenic malaria control strategy by transduction of anti-Plasmodium peptides or insect-specific toxins in Anopheles mosquitoes. AgDNV will also be extremely valuable as an effective and easy-to-use laboratory tool for transient gene expression or RNAi in An. gambiae.

  7. Evolving lessons on nanomaterial-coated viral vectors for local and systemic gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasala, Dayananda; Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2016-07-01

    Viral vectors are promising gene carriers for cancer therapy. However, virus-mediated gene therapies have demonstrated insufficient therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials due to rapid dissemination to nontarget tissues and to the immunogenicity of viral vectors, resulting in poor retention at the disease locus and induction of adverse inflammatory responses in patients. Further, the limited tropism of viral vectors prevents efficient gene delivery to target tissues. In this regard, modification of the viral surface with nanomaterials is a promising strategy to augment vector accumulation at the target tissue, circumvent the host immune response, and avoid nonspecific interactions with the reticuloendothelial system or serum complement. In the present review, we discuss various chemical modification strategies to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of viral vectors delivered either locally or systemically. We conclude by highlighting the salient features of various nanomaterial-coated viral vectors and their prospects and directions for future research.

  8. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Autophagy pathway induced by a plant virus facilitates viral spread and transmission by its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Qian; Li, Manman; Mao, Qianzhuo; Chen, Hongyan; Wu, Wei; Jia, Dongsheng; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-11-01

    Many viral pathogens are persistently transmitted by insect vectors and cause agricultural or health problems. Generally, an insect vector can use autophagy as an intrinsic antiviral defense mechanism against viral infection. Whether viruses can evolve to exploit autophagy to promote their transmission by insect vectors is still unknown. Here, we show that the autophagic process is triggered by the persistent replication of a plant reovirus, rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV) in cultured leafhopper vector cells and in intact insects, as demonstrated by the appearance of obvious virus-containing double-membrane autophagosomes, conversion of ATG8-I to ATG8-II and increased level of autophagic flux. Such virus-containing autophagosomes seem able to mediate nonlytic viral release from cultured cells or facilitate viral spread in the leafhopper intestine. Applying the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing the expression of Atg5 significantly decrease viral spread in vitro and in vivo, whereas applying the autophagy inducer rapamycin or silencing the expression of Torc1 facilitate such viral spread. Furthermore, we find that activation of autophagy facilitates efficient viral transmission, whereas inhibiting autophagy blocks viral transmission by its insect vector. Together, these results indicate a plant virus can induce the formation of autophagosomes for carrying virions, thus facilitating viral spread and transmission by its insect vector. We believe that such a role for virus-induced autophagy is common for vector-borne persistent viruses during their transmission by insect vectors.

  10. Adeno-associated viral vectors for the treatment of hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Katherine A.; Anguela, Xavier M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer studies for the treatment of hemophilia began more than two decades ago. A large body of pre-clinical work evaluated a variety of vectors and target tissues, but by the start of the new millennium it became evident that adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene transfer to the liver held great promise as a therapeutic tool. The transition to the clinical arena uncovered a number of unforeseen challenges, mainly in the form of a human-specific immune response against the vector that poses a significant limitation in the application of this technology. While the full nature of this response has not been elucidated, long-term expression of therapeutic levels of factor IX is already a reality for a small number of patients. Extending this success to a greater number of hemophilia B patients remains a major goal of the field, as well as translating this strategy to clinical therapy for hemophilia A. This review summarizes the progress of AAV-mediated gene therapy for the hemophilias, along with its upcoming prospects and challenges. PMID:26614390

  11. Viral and vector zoonotic exploitation of a homo-sociome memetic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, C E; Burgess, G W

    2015-05-01

    As most newly characterized emerging infectious diseases are considered to be zoonotic, a modern pre-eminence ascribed within this classification lies clearly within the viral taxonomic realm. In particular, RNA viruses deserve special concern given their documented impact on conservation biology, veterinary medicine and public health, with an unprecedented ability to promote an evolutionary host-pathogen arms race from the ultimate infection and immunity perspective. However, besides the requisite molecular/gross anatomical and physiological bases for infectious diseases to transmit from one host to another, both viral pathogens and their reservoirs/vectors exploit a complex anthropological, cultural, historical, psychological and social suite that specifically defines the phylodynamics within Homo sapiens, unlike any other species. Some of these variables include the ecological benefits of living in groups, decisions on hunting and foraging behaviours and dietary preferences, myths and religious doctrines, health economics, travel destinations, population planning, political decisions on agricultural product bans and many others, in a homo-sociome memetic complex. Taken to an extreme, such complexities elucidate the underpinnings of explanations as to why certain viral zoonoses reside in neglected people, places and things, whereas others are chosen selectively and prioritized for active mitigation. Canine-transmitted rabies serves as one prime example of how a neglected viral zoonosis may transition to greater attention on the basis of renewed advocacy, social media, local champions and vested international community engagement. In contrast, certain bat-associated and arboviral diseases suffer from basic ignorance and perpetuated misunderstanding of fundamental reservoir and vector ecology tenets, translated into failed control policies that only exacerbate the underlying environmental conditions of concern. Beyond applied biomedical knowledge, epidemiological

  12. Viral Hybrid Vectors for Somatic Integration - Are They the Better Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ehrhardt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent history of clinical trials in viral gene therapy has taught us important lessons about vector design and safety issues. Much effort was spent on analyzing genotoxicity after somatic integration of therapeutic DNA into the host genome. Based on these findings major improvements in vector design including the development of viral hybrid vectors for somatic integration have been achieved. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of available hybrid vectors utilizing viruses for high transduction efficiencies in concert with various integration machineries for random and targeted integration patterns. It discusses advantages but also limitations of each vector system.

  13. Viral vector-based tools advance knowledge of basal ganglia anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Rachel J; Seeger-Armbruster, Sonja; Hughes, Stephanie M; Parr-Brownlie, Louise C

    2016-04-01

    Viral vectors were originally developed to deliver genes into host cells for therapeutic potential. However, viral vector use in neuroscience research has increased because they enhance interpretation of the anatomy and physiology of brain circuits compared with conventional tract tracing or electrical stimulation techniques. Viral vectors enable neuronal or glial subpopulations to be labeled or stimulated, which can be spatially restricted to a single target nucleus or pathway. Here we review the use of viral vectors to examine the structure and function of motor and limbic basal ganglia (BG) networks in normal and pathological states. We outline the use of viral vectors, particularly lentivirus and adeno-associated virus, in circuit tracing, optogenetic stimulation, and designer drug stimulation experiments. Key studies that have used viral vectors to trace and image pathways and connectivity at gross or ultrastructural levels are reviewed. We explain how optogenetic stimulation and designer drugs used to modulate a distinct pathway and neuronal subpopulation have enhanced our mechanistic understanding of BG function in health and pathophysiology in disease. Finally, we outline how viral vector technology may be applied to neurological and psychiatric conditions to offer new treatments with enhanced outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 × 108 or 1 × 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 × 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Results Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. Conclusions This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest. PMID:20626877

  15. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Backer, Marijke W A; Fitzsimons, Carlos P; Brans, Maike A D; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Garner, Keith M; Vreugdenhil, Erno; Adan, Roger A H

    2010-07-13

    This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 x 108 or 1 x 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 x 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest.

  16. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vreugdenhil Erno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP, with a lentiviral (LV vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed, to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 × 108 or 1 × 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 × 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Results Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. Conclusions This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest.

  17. Kunjin virus replicons: an RNA-based, non-cytopathic viral vector system for protein production, vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Suhrbier, A.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The application of viral vectors for gene expression and delivery is rapidly evolving, with several entering clinical trials. However, a number of issues, including safety, gene expression levels, cell selectivity and antivector immunity, are driving the search for new vector systems. A number of

  18. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated viral vector-amplified transient gene expression in Nicotiana glutinosa plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collens, Jason I; Mason, Hugh S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2007-01-01

    A viral vector based on the bean yellow dwarf virus was investigated for its potential to increase transient gene expression. An intron-containing GUS reporter gene and the cis-acting viral regulatory elements were incorporated in the viral vector and could be complemented by the viral replication-associated proteins provided on a secondary vector. All vectors were delivered to Nicotiana glutinosa plant cell suspension or hairy root cultures via auxotrophic Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Cell culture generated greater yield of reporter gene expression than did root culture, as a result of the limitation imposed on roots to express the protein only in surface tissue containing actively dividing cells. Reporter gene expression increased for cell culture when the reporter gene construct was co-delivered with the construct supplying both viral replication associated proteins (REP and REPA); gene expression decreased when the construct supplying only the viral REP protein was co-delivered. Reporter protein expression increased from 0.091% for the reporter construct alone to 0.22% total soluble protein (% TSP) when the viral Rep-supplying vector was co-delivered with the reporter gene construct. Reporter protein was generated 3 days after the initiation of bacterial co-culture, providing for rapid generation of heterologous protein in cell culture.

  20. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Nalla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV.

  1. Filamentous Structures Induced by a Phytoreovirus Mediate Viral Release from Salivary Glands in Its Insect Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qianzhuo; Liao, Zhenfeng; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Yuyan; Wu, Wei; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Qian; Jia, Dongsheng; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-06-15

    Numerous viral pathogens are persistently transmitted by insect vectors and cause agricultural or health problems. These viruses circulate in the vector body, enter the salivary gland, and then are released into the apical plasmalemma-lined cavities, where saliva is stored. The cavity plasmalemma of vector salivary glands thus represents the last membrane barrier for viral transmission. Here, we report a novel mechanism used by a persistent virus to overcome this essential barrier. We observed that the infection by rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a species of the genus Phytoreovirus in the family Reoviridae, induced the formation of virus-associated filaments constructed by viral nonstructural protein Pns11 within the salivary glands of its leafhopper vector, Recilia dorsalis Such filaments attached to actin-based apical plasmalemma and induced an exocytosis-like process for viral release into vector salivary gland cavities, through a direct interaction of Pns11 of RGDV and actin of R. dorsalis Failure of virus-induced filaments assembly by RNA interference with synthesized double-stranded RNA targeting the Pns11 gene inhibited the dissemination of RGDV into salivary cavities, preventing viral transmission by R. dorsalis For the first time, we show that a virus can exploit virus-induced inclusion as a vehicle to pass through the apical plasmalemma into vector salivary gland cavities, thus overcoming the last membrane barrier for viral transmission by insect vectors.IMPORTANCE Understanding how persistent viruses overcome multiple tissue and membrane barriers within the insect vectors until final transmission is the key for viral disease control. The apical plasmalemma of the cavities where saliva is stored in the salivary glands is the last barrier for viral transmission by insect vectors; however, the mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we show that a virus has evolved to exploit virus-induced filaments to perform an exocytosis-like process that enables viral

  2. Viral Vectors for Use in the Development of Biodefense Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-17

    development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1308 6. Anti-vector immune responses associated with virus-vectored vaccines...to influence the outcome of a local election. Another radical group in Japan, the Aum Shinrikyo, allegedly conducted research on BoNT, B. anthracis...aflotoxin and actively researched Clostridium perfringins, rotavirus , echovi- rus 71, and camelpox virus for use in biological warfare [2,3]. Their

  3. Viral vector-mediated transgenic cell therapy in regenerative medicine: safety of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-04-01

    There are safety concerns regarding viral vectors in regenerative medicine research because of adverse experiences in conventional gene therapy with systemic delivery of recombinant virus. Transgenic cell therapy emerges as an attractive strategy, in which the genes of interest are delivered in vitro into isolated cells first; instead of transgene vectors, these transgenic cells are then implanted back to the host. This ex vivo strategy enables the examination of cell viability and phenotype before subsequent transplantation and prevents to the most extent the potential delivery-related hazards caused by exposure of viral components to the host. The transgenic implants are often localized, thus traceable for safety monitoring except those cases involving systemic distribution of transgenic cells. The safety of ex vivo process used in viral vector-mediated transgenic cell therapy for regenerative medicine purpose. Safety concerns related to viral vector delivery can be dispelled in the majority of regenerative medicine applications by transgenic cell therapy. The ex vivo process executes in vitro transfection before subsequent transplantation of transgenic cells so that it avoids the exposure of viral components (particularly capsids or envelops) to the host, while this exposure is inevitable in conventional in vivo gene therapy. Besides, the practice of localized cell implantation and in vitro manipulation also reinforce the safety of transgenic cell therapy. Given the significantly reduced delivery-related hazard, viral vector-mediated transgenic cell therapy can be generally considered as a safe approach for most regenerative medicine applications.

  4. Development of replication-competent viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Christopher L; Picker, Louis J; King, C Richter

    2013-09-01

    To briefly describe some of the replication-competent vectors being investigated for development of candidate HIV vaccines focusing primarily on technologies that have advanced to testing in macaques or have entered clinical trials. Replication-competent viral vectors have advanced to the stage at which decisions can be made regarding the future development of HIV vaccines. The viruses being used as replication-competent vector platforms vary considerably, and their unique attributes make it possible to test multiple vaccine design concepts and also mimic various aspects of an HIV infection. Replication-competent viral vectors encoding simian immunodeficiency virus or HIV proteins can be used to safely immunize macaques, and in some cases, there is evidence of significant vaccine efficacy in challenge protection studies. Several live HIV vaccine vectors are in clinical trials to evaluate immunogenicity, safety, the effect of mucosal delivery, and potential effects of preexisting immunity. A variety of DNA and RNA viruses are being used to develop replication-competent viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery. Multiple viral vector platforms have proven to be well tolerated and immunogenic with evidence of efficacy in macaques. Some of the more advanced HIV vaccine prototypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, and Sendai virus are in clinical trials.

  5. Viral vectors: a look back and ahead on gene transfer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Laura; Lai, Michele; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Pistello, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    No matter what their origin, strain and family, viruses have evolved exquisite strategies to reach and penetrate specific target cells where they hijack the cellular machinery to express viral genes and produce progeny particles. The ability to deliver and express genetic information to cells is the basis for exploiting viruses as "Trojan horses" to genetically modify the natural cell target or, upon manipulation of the viral receptor to retarget the virus, to genetically engineer different cell types. This process, known as transduction, is accomplished using viral vectors derived from parental wild type viruses whose viral genes, essential for replication and virulence, have been replaced with the heterologous gene(s) required for cell manipulation. Rearrangement of the viral genome to impede replication or generation of infectious virions but maintaining the ability to deliver nucleic acids has been the object of intense research since the early 1980s. Technological advances and the ever-growing knowledge of molecular virology and virus-host cell relationships have constantly improved the safety profile of viral vectors that are now used in vitro and in vivo to study cellular gene function, correct genetic defects (gene therapy), express therapeutic proteins, vaccinate against infectious agents and tumors, produce experimental animal models, and for other purposes. This review illustrates the strategies used to generate some of the most used viral vectors, and their advantages, limitations and principal applications.

  6. Transduction of the central nervous system after intracerebroventricular injection of adeno-associated viral vectors in neonatal and juvenile mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Macaldaz, Margarita E; Hampson, David R

    2013-08-01

    Several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders affecting the central nervous system are potentially treatable via viral vector-mediated gene transfer. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been used in clinical trials because of their desirable properties including a high degree of safety, efficacy, and stability. Major factors affecting tropism, expression level, and cell type specificity of AAV-mediated transgenes include encapsidation of different AAV serotypes, promoter selection, and the timing of vector administration. In this study, we evaluated the ability of single-stranded AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids from serotype 9 (AAV2/9) to transduce the brain and target gene expression to specific cell types after intracerebroventricular injection into mice. Titer-matched AAV2/9 vectors encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter, driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, or the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter, were injected bilaterally into the lateral ventricles of C57/BL6 mice on postnatal day 5 (neonatal) or 21 (juvenile). Brain sections were analyzed 25 days after injection, using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. eGFP immunohistochemistry after neonatal and juvenile administration of viral vectors revealed transduction throughout the brain including the striatum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum, but with different patterns of cell-specific gene expression. eGFP expression was seen in astrocytes after treatment on postnatal day 5 with vectors carrying the CMV promoter, expanding the usefulness of AAVs for modeling and treating diseases involving glial cell pathology. In contrast, injection of AAV2/9-CMV-eGFP on postnatal day 21 resulted in preferential transduction of neurons. Administration of AAV2/9-eGFP with the synapsin-1 promoter on either postnatal day 5 or 21 resulted in widespread neuronal transduction. These results outline efficient methods and tools for gene delivery

  7. Novel adeno-associated viral vectors for retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, L H; Auricchio, A

    2012-02-01

    Vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently the most promising vehicles for therapeutic gene delivery to the retina. Recently, subretinal administration of AAV2 has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in patients with a rare form of inherited childhood blindness, suggesting that AAV-mediated retinal gene therapy may be successfully extended to other blinding conditions. This is further supported by the great versatility of AAV as a vector platform as there are a large number of AAV variants and many of these have unique transduction characteristics useful for targeting different cell types in the retina including glia, epithelium and many types of neurons. Naturally occurring, rationally designed or in vitro evolved AAV vectors are currently being utilized to transduce several different cell types in the retina and to treat a variety of animal models of retinal disease. The continuous and creative development of AAV vectors provides opportunities to overcome existing challenges in retinal gene therapy such as efficient transfer of genes exceeding AAV's cargo capacity, or the targeting of specific cells within the retina or transduction of photoreceptors following routinely used intravitreal injections. Such developments should ultimately advance the treatment of a wide range of blinding retinal conditions.

  8. Tripartite polyionic complex (PIC) micelles as non-viral vectors for mesenchymal stem cell siRNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisin, Sophie; Morille, Marie; Bony, Claire; Noël, Danièle; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Belamie, Emmanuel

    2017-08-22

    In the context of regenerative medicine, the use of RNA interference mechanisms has already proven its efficiency in targeting specific gene expression with the aim of enhancing, accelerating or, more generally, directing stem cell differentiation. However, achievement of good transfection levels requires the use of a gene vector. For in vivo applications, synthetic vectors are an interesting option to avoid possible issues associated with viral vectors (safety, production costs, etc.). Herein, we report on the design of tripartite polyionic complex micelles as original non-viral polymeric vectors suited for mesenchymal stem cell transfection with siRNA. Three micelle formulations were designed to exhibit pH-triggered disassembly in an acidic pH range comparable to that of endosomes. One formulation was selected as the most promising with the highest siRNA loading capacity while clearly maintaining pH-triggered disassembly properties. A thorough investigation of the internalization pathway of micelles into cells with tagged siRNA was made before showing an efficient inhibition of Runx2 expression in primary bone marrow-derived stem cells. This work evidenced PIC micelles as promising synthetic vectors that allow efficient MSC transfection and control over their behavior, from the perspective of their clinical use.

  9. Intravitreal injection of adeno-associated viral vectors result in the transduction of different types of retinal neurons in neonatal and adult rats: A comparison with lentiviral vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, A.R.; Kamphuis, W.; Eggers, R.; Symons, N.A.; Blits, B.; Niclou, S.; Boer, G. J.; Verhaagen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Replication-deficient viral vectors encoding the marker gene green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected into the vitreous of newborn, juvenile (P14), and adult rats. We tested two different types of modified virus: adeno-associated viral-2-GFP (AAV-GFP) and lentiviral-GFP vectors (LV-GFP). The

  10. Influence of HEK293 metabolism on the production of viral vectors and vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petiot, Emma; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Shen, Chun Fang; Kamen, Amine

    2015-11-04

    Mammalian cell cultures are increasingly used for the production of complex biopharmaceuticals including viral vectors and vaccines. HEK293 is the predominant cell line used for the transient expression of recombinant proteins and a well-established system for the production of viral vectors. Understanding metabolic requirements for high productivity in HEK293 cells remains an important area of investigation. Many authors have presented approaches for increased productivity through optimization of cellular metabolism from two distinct perspectives. One is a non-targeted approach, which is directed to improving feeding strategies by addition of exhausted or critical substrates and eventually removal of toxic metabolites. Alternatively, a targeted approach has attempted to identify specific targets for optimization through better understanding of the cellular metabolism under different operating conditions. This review will present both approaches and their successes with regards to improvement of viral production in HEK293 cells outlining the key relations between HEK293 cell metabolism and viral vector productivity. Also, we will summarize the current knowledge on HEK293 metabolism indicating remaining issues to address and problems to resolve to maximize the productivity of viral vectors in HEK293 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Narcissus mosaic viral vector system for protein expression and flavonoid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background With the explosive numbers of sequences generated by next generation sequencing, the demand for high throughput screening to understand gene function has grown. Plant viral vectors have been widely used as tools in down-regulating plant gene expression. However, plant viral vectors can also express proteins in a very efficient manner and, therefore, can also serve as a valuable tool for characterizing proteins and their functions in metabolic pathways in planta. Results In this study, we have developed a Gateway®-based high throughput viral vector cloning system from Narcissus Mosaic Virus (NMV). Using the reporter genes of GFP and GUS, and the plant genes PAP1 (an R2R3 MYB which activates the anthocyanin pathway) and selenium-binding protein 1 (SeBP), we show that NMV vectors and the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana can be used for efficient protein expression, protein subcellular localization and secondary metabolite production. Conclusions Our results suggest that not only can the plant viral vector system be employed for protein work but also can potentially be amenable to producing valuable secondary metabolites on a large scale, as the system does not require plant regeneration from seed or calli, which are stages where certain secondary metabolites can interfere with development. PMID:23849589

  12. The Impact of Peptide Insertions on Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Fate

    OpenAIRE

    Uhrig, Silke

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors possess a number of attractive properties including low immunogenicity, high stability, longevity of transgene expression and the potential to integrate site-specifically without known side-effects. The major limitation regarding the use of AAV vectors for gene therapy is the broad tissue tropism of AAV following in vivo gene tranfer application. Recently, genetic modification of the AAV capsid by insertion of receptor-specific ligands (AAV ta...

  13. Viral vector-based prime-boost immunization regimens : a possible involvement of T-cell competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mare, A.; Lambeck, A. J. A.; Regts, J.; van Dam, G. M.; Nijman, H. W.; Snippe, H.; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.

    Vaccination with recombinant viral vectors may be impeded by preexisting vector-specific immunity or by vector-specific immunity induced during the priming immunization. It is assumed that virus-neutralizing antibodies represent the principal effector mechanism of vector-specific immunity, while

  14. Ub-ISAP: a streamlined UNIX pipeline for mining unique viral vector integration sites from next generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Atul; Hallwirth, Claus V; Alexander, Ian E; McCowage, Geoffrey B; Kramer, Belinda

    2017-06-17

    The analysis of viral vector genomic integration sites is an important component in assessing the safety and efficiency of patient treatment using gene therapy. Alongside this clinical application, integration site identification is a key step in the genetic mapping of viral elements in mutagenesis screens that aim to elucidate gene function. We have developed a UNIX-based vector integration site analysis pipeline (Ub-ISAP) that utilises a UNIX-based workflow for automated integration site identification and annotation of both single and paired-end sequencing reads. Reads that contain viral sequences of interest are selected and aligned to the host genome, and unique integration sites are then classified as transcription start site-proximal, intragenic or intergenic. Ub-ISAP provides a reliable and efficient pipeline to generate large datasets for assessing the safety and efficiency of integrating vectors in clinical settings, with broader applications in cancer research. Ub-ISAP is available as an open source software package at https://sourceforge.net/projects/ub-isap/ .

  15. Gene therapy for haemophilia...yes, but...with non-viral vectors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, A; Olmedillas, S

    2009-05-01

    High-purity plasma-derived and recombinant factors are currently safe and efficient treatment for haemophilia. The mid-term future of haemophilia treatment will involve the use of modified recombinant factors to achieve advantages such as decreased immunogenicity in inhibitor formation and enhanced efficacy as a result of their longer half-life. In the long-term, gene therapy and cell therapy strategies will have to be considered. Achievements in cell therapy to date have been using embryonic stem cells and hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells. Current gene therapy strategies for haemophilia are based on gene transfer using adeno-associated viruses and non-viral vectors. Gene therapy for haemophilia is justified because it is a chronic disease and because a very regular factor infusion is required that may involve fatal risks and because it is very expensive. Haemophilia is a very good candidate for use of gene therapy protocols because it is a monogenic disease, and even low expression is able to achieve reversion from a severe to a moderate phenotype. The current trends in haemophilia using adeno-associated viral vectors are safe but also involve immunogenicity problems. The other alternatives are non-viral vectors. There have been in recent years relevant advances in non-viral transfection that raise hope for considering this possibility. Several research groups are opting for this experimental alternative. An expression over 5%, representing a moderate phenotype, for a few months with a high safety, regarding vector, transfected cells, and implantation procedure, would already be a great success. This may represent an intermediate protocol in which the expression levels and times obtained are lower and shorter respectively as compared to viral vectors, but which provide a potential greater patient safety. This may more readily win acceptance among both patients and haematologists because fatal events in the past due to HIV/HCV infection may constrain the

  16. Sequential selection of random vectors under a sum constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Stanke, Mario

    2004-01-01

    We observe a sequence X1,X2,...,Xn of independent and identically distributed coordinatewise nonnegative d-dimensional random vectors. When a vector is observed it can either be selected or rejected but once made this decision is final. In each coordinate the sum of the selected vectors must not exceed a given constant. The problem is to find a selection policy that maximizes the expected number of selected vectors. For a general absolutely continuous distribution of t...

  17. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, Krystof; Cunningham, Janet

    2016-11-15

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) using convection enhanced delivery (CED) are provided. The rAAV virions include a nucleic acid sequence encoding a therapeutic polypeptide. The methods can be used for treating CNS disorders such as for treating Parkinson's Disease.

  18. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. VSV-GP: a potent viral vaccine vector that boosts the immune response upon repeated applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tober, Reinhard; Banki, Zoltan; Egerer, Lisa; Muik, Alexander; Behmüller, Sandra; Kreppel, Florian; Greczmiel, Ute; Oxenius, Annette; von Laer, Dorothee; Kimpel, Janine

    2014-05-01

    Antivector immunity limits the response to homologous boosting for viral vector vaccines. Here, we describe a new, potent vaccine vector based on replication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with the glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (VSV-GP), which we previously showed to be safe in mice. In mice, VSV and VSV-GP encoding ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen (VSV-OVA and VSV-GP-OVA) induced equal levels of OVA-specific humoral and cellular immune responses upon a single immunization. However, boosting with the same vector was possible only for VSV-GP-OVA as neutralizing antibodies to VSV limited the immunogenicity of the VSV-OVA boost. OVA-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses induced by VSV-GP-OVA were at least as potent as those induced by an adenoviral state-of-the-art vaccine vector and completely protected mice in a Listeria monocytogenes challenge model. VSV-GP is so far the only replication-competent vaccine vector that does not lose efficacy upon repeated application. Although there has been great progress in treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in the past several years, effective vaccines against some of the most serious infections, e.g., AIDS, malaria, hepatitis C, or tuberculosis, are urgently needed. Here, several approaches based on viral vector vaccines are under development. However, for all viral vaccine vectors currently in clinical testing, repeated application is limited by neutralizing antibodies to the vector itself. Here, we have exploited the potential of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with the glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (VSV-GP) as a vaccine platform. VSV-GP is the first replication-competent viral vector vaccine that does not induce vector-specific humoral immunity, i.e., neutralizing antibodies, and therefore can boost immune responses against a foreign antigen by repeated applications. The vector allows introduction of various antigens and

  20. Adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene transfer in the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Duan, Mao; Bordet, Thierry; Mezzina, Mauro; Kahn, Axel; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2002-07-19

    Peripheral sensorineural hearing loss is a very common inner ear disorder affecting nearly 10% of the population. At present there is no cure for this disorder but gene therapy has been suggested as a potentially effective method for clinical treatment in the future. Thus we investigated the effectiveness of adenoviral (Ad) and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to transduce the cochlea of guinea pigs. After direct injection into the basal turn of the cochlea, we found that both Ad and AAV vectors coding for the reporter genes lacZ or GFP readily transduced spiral ganglion cells. In addition, some transgene expression was detected in the stria vascularis after AAV-GFP injection. Gene expression persisted at least 8 weeks after viral vector injection. Present findings will help to develop future gene therapy protocols in the inner ear by using Ad and AAV coding for neurotrophins such as NT-3, BDNF, GDNF and VEGF.

  1. Updates in inducible transgene expression using viral vectors: from transient to stable expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Cara L; Dugdale, Benjamin; Dale, James L

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of economically producing useful biologics in plants has greatly increased with the advent of viral vectors. The ability of viral vectors to amplify transgene expression has seen them develop into robust transient platforms for the high-level, rapid production of recombinant proteins. To adapt these systems to stably transformed plants, new ways of deconstructing the virus machinery and linking its expression and replication to chemically controlled promoters have been developed. The more advanced of these stable, inducible hyper-expression vectors provide both activated and amplified heterologous transgene expression. Such systems could be deployed in broad acre crops and provide a pathway to fully exploit the advantages of plants as a platform for the manufacture of a wide spectrum of products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective gene silencing by viral delivery of short hairpin RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sliva Katja

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA interference (RNAi technology has not only become a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also allows rapid drug target discovery and in vitro validation of these targets in cell culture. Furthermore, RNAi represents a promising novel therapeutic option for treating human diseases, in particular cancer. Selective gene silencing by RNAi can be achieved essentially by two nucleic acid based methods: i cytoplasmic delivery of short double-stranded (ds interfering RNA oligonucleotides (siRNA, where the gene silencing effect is only transient in nature, and possibly not suitable for all applications; or ii nuclear delivery of gene expression cassettes that express short hairpin RNA (shRNA, which are processed like endogenous interfering RNA and lead to stable gene down-regulation. Both processes involve the use of nucleic acid based drugs, which are highly charged and do not cross cell membranes by free diffusion. Therefore, in vivo delivery of RNAi therapeutics must use technology that enables the RNAi therapeutic to traverse biological membrane barriers in vivo. Viruses and the vectors derived from them carry out precisely this task and have become a major delivery system for shRNA. Here, we summarize and compare different currently used viral delivery systems, give examples of in vivo applications, and indicate trends for new developments, such as replicating viruses for shRNA delivery to cancer cells.

  3. Perinatal systemic gene delivery using adeno-associated viral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajvinder eKarda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative monogenic diseases can also affect a broad range of tissues and organs throughout the body. An effective treatment would require a systemic approach. The intravenous administration of novel therapies is ideal but is hampered by the inability of such drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier and precludes efficacy in the central nervous system. A number of these early lethal intractable diseases also present devastating irreversible pathology at birth or soon after. Therefore, any therapy would ideally be administered during the perinatal period to prevent, stop or ameliorate disease progression. The concept of perinatal gene therapy has moved a step further towards being a feasible approach to treating such disorders. This has primarily been driven by the recent discoveries that particular serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV gene delivery vectors have the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier following intravenous administration. Furthermore, this has been safely demonstrated in perinatal mice and non-human primates. This review focuses on the progress made in using AAV to achieve systemic transduction and what this means for developing perinatal gene therapy for early lethal neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transduction in mesencephalic slice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihira, Tomoko; Yasuda, Toru; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2011-09-30

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is a non-pathogenic vehicle that is suitable for the delivery of foreign genes into non-dividing neuronal cells. This vector has been utilized for in vivo neurological research and in clinical trials of gene therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. Viral vector-mediated gene delivery has the limitation that progressive changes in cellular phenotype cannot be monitored in living animals. To visualize living neurons transduced with foreign genes in vitro, we used cultured mesencephalic tissue harboring living dopaminergic (DA) neurons and examined cellular tropism of serotype-1 and serotype-2 AAV vectors in a culture system. The viability of DA neurons was evaluated using transgenic mice carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, which enables the visualization of living DA cells in the substantia nigra. Apoptosis of a subset of neuronal cells was noted within one day of culture. After 7 days, the serotype-1 AAV vector had successfully delivered the foreign gene into neurons and astrocytes, and serotype-2 AAV vector was able to transduce TH-positive DA neurons efficiently. Our method should be useful for in vitro investigations of pathological changes in DA neurons following transduction with foreign genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Corticospinal tract transduction: a comparison of seven adeno-associated viral vector serotypes and a non-integrating lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, T H; Verhaagen, J; Yáñez-Muñoz, R J; Moon, L D F

    2012-01-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is extensively used as a model system for assessing potential therapies to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). However, efficient transduction of the CST is challenging and remains to be optimised. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors and integration-deficient lentiviral vectors are promising therapeutic delivery systems for gene therapy to the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study the cellular tropism and transduction efficiency of seven AAV vector serotypes (AAV1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8) and an integration-deficient lentiviral vector were assessed for their ability to transduce corticospinal neurons (CSNs) following intracortical injection. AAV1 was identified as the optimal serotype for transducing cortical and CSNs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression detectable in fibres projecting through the dorsal CST (dCST) of the cervical spinal cord. In contrast, AAV3 and AAV4 demonstrated a low efficacy for transducing CNS cells and AAV8 presented a potential tropism for oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, it was shown that neither AAV nor lentiviral vectors generate a significant microglial response. The identification of AAV1 as the optimal serotype for transducing CSNs should facilitate the design of future gene therapy strategies targeting the CST for the treatment of SCI.

  6. Viral vector-based reversible neuronal inactivation and behavioral manipulation in the macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristina J; Callaway, Edward M; Krauzlis, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for the dissection of neural circuits. In principle, they can manipulate neurons at a level of specificity not otherwise achievable. While many studies have used viral vector-based approaches in the rodent brain, only a few have employed this technique in the non-human primate, despite the importance of this animal model for neuroscience research. Here, we report evidence that a viral vector-based approach can be used to manipulate a monkey's behavior in a task. For this purpose, we used the allatostatin receptor/allatostatin (AlstR/AL) system, which has previously been shown to allow inactivation of neurons in vivo. The AlstR was expressed in neurons in monkey V1 by injection of an adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1) vector. Two monkeys were trained in a detection task, in which they had to make a saccade to a faint peripheral target. Injection of AL caused a retinotopic deficit in the detection task in one monkey. Specifically, the monkey showed marked impairment for detection targets placed at the visual field location represented at the virus injection site, but not for targets shown elsewhere. We confirmed that these deficits indeed were due to the interaction of AlstR and AL by injecting saline, or AL at a V1 location without AlstR expression. Post-mortem histology confirmed AlstR expression in this monkey. We failed to replicate the behavioral results in a second monkey, as AL injection did not impair the second monkey's performance in the detection task. However, post-mortem histology revealed a very low level of AlstR expression in this monkey. Our results demonstrate that viral vector-based approaches can produce effects strong enough to influence a monkey's performance in a behavioral task, supporting the further development of this approach for studying how neuronal circuits control complex behaviors in non-human primates.

  7. Viral vector-based reversible neuronal inactivation and behavioral manipulation in the macaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Juliane Nielsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for the dissection of neural circuits. In principle, they can manipulate neurons at a level of specificity not otherwise achievable. While many studies have used viral vector-based approaches in the rodent brain, only a few have employed this technique in the non-human primate, despite the importance of this animal model for neuroscience research. Here, we report for the first time that a viral vector-based approach can be used to manipulate a monkey’s behavior in a task. For this purpose, we used the allatostatin receptor/allatostatin (AlstR/AL system, which has previously been shown to allow inactivation of neurons in vivo. The AlstR was expressed in neurons in monkey V1 by injection of an AAV1 vector. Two monkeys were trained in a detection task, in which they had to make a saccade to a faint peripheral target. Injection of AL caused a retinotopic deficit in the detection task in one monkey. Specifically, the monkey showed marked impairment for detection targets placed at the visual field location represented at the virus injection site, but not for targets shown elsewhere. We confirmed that these deficits indeed were due to the interaction of AlstR and AL by injecting saline, or AL at a V1 location without AlstR expression. Post-mortem histology confirmed AlstR expression in this monkey. We failed to replicate the behavioral results in a second monkey, as AL injection did not impair the second monkey’s performance in the detection task. However, post-mortem histology revealed a very low level of AlstR expression in this monkey. Our results demonstrate that viral vector-based approaches can produce effects strong enough to influence a monkey’s performance in a behavioral task, supporting the further development of this approach for studying how neuronal circuits control complex behaviors in non-human primates.

  8. Role of T cell competition in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity during viral vector-based immunization regimens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, A.J.A.; Nijman, H.W.; Hoogeboom, B.N.; Regts, J.; Mare, A. de; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.

    2010-01-01

    T cell competition between antigen- and vector-specific T cells may determine the outcome of viral vector-based immunization regimens, as we previously proposed. Here, we unravelled the interplay between antigen- and vector-specific immunity, using recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV). Priming of

  9. Annotation of selection strengths in viral genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCauley, Stephen; de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    and pol are indeed annotated as such, we also discover several sites of less stringent negative selection within the env gene. The the best of our knowledge we are the first to subsequently provide a full selection annotation of the Hepatitis B genome by explicitly modelling the evolution within...... obtain an annotation of the coding regions, as well as a posterior probability for each site of the strength of selection acting on it. From this we may deduce the average posterior selection acting on the different genes. Whilst we are encouraged to see in HIV2, that the known to be conserved genes gag...

  10. Infectious bursal disease virus as a replication-incompetent viral vector expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) has been established as a replication-competent viral vector capable of carrying an epitope at multiple loci in the genome. To enhance the safety and increase the insertion capacity of IBDV as a vector, a replication-incompetent IBDV vector was developed in the present study. The feasibility of replacing one of the viral gene loci, including pvp2, vp3, vp1, or the polyprotein vp243, with the sequence of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was explored. A method combining TCID50 and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) determined the most feasible locus for gene replacement to be pvp2. The genomic segment containing gfp at the pvp2 locus was able to be encapsidated into IBDV particles. Furthermore, the expression of GFP in GFP-IBDV infected cells was confirmed by Western blotting and GFP-IBDV particles showed similar morphology and size to that of wildtype IBDV by electron microscopy. By providing the deleted protein in trans in a packaging cell line (pVP2-DF1), replication-incompetent GFP-IBDV particles were successfully plaque-quantified. The gfp sequence from the plaque-forming GFP-IBDV in pVP2-DF1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. To our knowledge, GFP-IBDV developed in the present study is the first replication-incompetent IBDV vector which expresses a foreign protein in infected cells without the capability to produce viral progeny. Additionally, such replication-incompetent IBDV vectors could serve as bivalent vaccine vectors for conferring protection against infections with IBDV and other economically important, or zoonotic, avian pathogens.

  11. Development of novel AAV serotype 6 based vectors with selective tropism for human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayroo, R; Nolasco, D; Yin, Z; Colon-Cortes, Y; Pandya, M; Ling, C; Aslanidi, G

    2016-01-01

    Viral vectors-based gene therapy is an attractive alternative to common anti-cancer treatments. In the present studies, AAV serotype 6 vectors were identified to be particularly effective in the transduction of human prostate (PC3), breast (T47D) and liver (Huh7) cancer cells. Next, we developed chimeric AAV vectors with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide incorporated into the viral capsid to enable specific targeting of integrin-overexpressing malignant cells. These AAV6-RGD vectors improved transduction efficiency approximately 3-fold compared with wild-type AAV6 vectors by enhancing the viral entry into the cells. We also observed that transduction efficiency significantly improved, up to approximately 5-fold, by the mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine and threonine residues involved in the intracellular trafficking of AAV vectors. Therefore, in our study, the AAV6-Y705-731F+T492V vector was identified as the most efficient. The combination of RGD peptide, tyrosine and threonine mutations on the same AAV6 capsid further increased the transduction efficiency, approximately 8-fold in vitro. In addition, we mutated lysine (K531E) to impair the affinity of AAV6 vectors to heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Finally, we showed a significant increase in both specificity and efficiency of AAV6-RGD-Y705-731F+T492V+K531E vectors in a xenograft animal model in vivo. In summary, the approach described here can lead to the development of AAV vectors with selective tropism to human cancer cells.

  12. Genetic manipulation of specific neural circuits by use of a viral vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2017-01-05

    To understand the mechanisms underlying higher brain functions, we need to analyze the roles of specific neuronal pathways or cell types forming the complex neural networks. In the neuroscience field, the transgenic approach has provided a useful gene engineering tool for experimental studies of neural functions. The conventional transgenic technique requires the appropriate promoter regions that drive a neuronal type-specific gene expression, but the promoter sequences specifically functioning in each neuronal type are limited. Previously, we developed novel types of lentiviral vectors showing high efficiency of retrograde gene transfer in the central nervous system, termed highly efficient retrograde gene transfer (HiRet) vector and neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer (NeuRet) vector. The HiRet and NeuRet vectors enable genetical manipulation of specific neural pathways in diverse model animals in combination with conditional cell targeting, synaptic transmission silencing, and gene expression systems. These newly developed vectors provide powerful experimental strategies to investigate, more precisely, the machineries exerting various neural functions. In this review, we give an outline of the HiRet and NeuRet vectors and describe recent representative applications of these viral vectors for studies on neural circuits.

  13. Generation of recombinant adenovirus vectors with modified fibers for altering viral tropism.

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnykh, V N; Mikheeva, G V; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D.T.

    1996-01-01

    To expand the utility of recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy applications, methods to alter native viral tropism to achieve cell-specific transduction would be beneficial. To this end, we are pursuing genetic methods to alter the cell recognition domain of the adenovirus fiber. To incorporate these modified fibers into mature virions, we have developed a method based on homologous DNA recombination between two plasmids. A fiber-deleted, propagation-defective rescue plasmid has bee...

  14. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    OpenAIRE

    Uta Griesenbach; Makoto Inoue; Mamoru Hasegawa; et al

    2010-01-01

    Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and...

  15. Carbohydrate-Based Ice Recrystallization Inhibitors Increase Infectivity and Thermostability of Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M.; Balcerzak, Anna K.; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Mironov, Gleb G.; Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Briard, Jennie G.; Ben, Robert N.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2014-07-01

    The inability of vaccines to retain sufficient thermostability has been an obstacle to global vaccination programs. To address this major limitation, we utilized carbohydrate-based ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) to eliminate the cold chain and stabilize the potency of Vaccinia virus (VV), Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV) and Herpes virus-1 (HSV-1). The impact of these IRIs was tested on the potency of the viral vectors using a plaque forming unit assay following room temperature storage, cryopreservation with successive freeze-thaw cycles and lyophilization. Viral potency after storage with all three conditions demonstrated that N-octyl-gluconamide (NOGlc) recovered the infectivity of shelf stored VV, 5.6 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 40 days, and HSV-1, 2.7 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 9 days. Carbon-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogue ornithine-glycine-glycine-galactose (OGG-Gal) increases the recovery of VV and VSV more than 1 Log10 PFU mL-1 after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. In VSV, cryostorage with OGG-Gal maintains high infectivity and reduces temperature-induced aggregation of viral particles by 2 times that of the control. In total, OGG-Gal and NOGlc preserve virus potency during cryostorage. Remarkably, NOGlc has potential to eliminate the cold chain and permit room temperature storage of viral vectors.

  16. Defective interfering viruses and their impact on vaccines and viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frensing, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Defective interfering particles (DIPs) have been found for many important viral pathogens and it is believed that most viruses generate DIPs. This article reviews the current knowledge of the generation and amplification of DIPs, which possess deletions in the viral genome but retain the ability to replicate in the presence of a complete helper virus. In addition, mechanisms are discussed by which DIPs interfere with the replication of their helper virus leading to the production of mainly progeny DIPs by coinfected cells. Even though DIPs cannot replicate on their own, they are biologically active and it is well known that they have a huge impact on virus replication, evolution, and pathogenesis. Moreover, defective genomes are potent inducers of the innate immune response. Yet, little attention has been paid to DIPs in recent years and their impact on biotechnological products such as vaccines and viral vectors remains elusive in most cases. With a focus on influenza virus, this review demonstrates that DIPs are important for basic research on viruses and for the production of viral vaccines and vectors. Reducing the generation and/or amplification of DIPs ensures reproducible results as well as high yields and consistent product quality in virus production. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  18. Efficient production of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector, serotype DJ/8, carrying the GFP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Haruo; Mizushima, Tomoko; Chijiwa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish an efficient method for the preparation of an adeno-associated viral (AAV), serotype DJ/8, carrying the GFP gene (AAV-DJ/8-GFP). We compared the yields of AAV-DJ/8 vector, which were produced by three different combination methods, consisting of two plasmid DNA transfection methods (lipofectamine and calcium phosphate co-precipitation; CaPi) and two virus DNA purification methods (iodixanol and cesium chloride; CsCl). The results showed that the highest yield of AAV-DJ/8-GFP vector was accomplished with the combination method of lipofectamine transfection and iodixanol purification. The viral protein expression levels and the transduction efficacy in HEK293 and CHO cells were not different among four different combination methods for AAV-DJ/8-GFP vectors. We confirmed that the AAV-DJ/8-GFP vector could transduce to human and murine hepatocyte-derived cell lines. These results show that AAV-DJ/8-GFP, purified by the combination of lipofectamine and iodixanol, produces an efficient yield without altering the characteristics of protein expression and AAV gene transduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Disruption of vector transmission by a plant-expressed viral glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Astúa, Mauricio; Rotenberg, Dorith; Leach-Kieffaber, Alexandria; Schneweis, Brandi A; Park, Sunghun; Park, Jungeun K; German, Thomas L; Whitfield, Anna E

    2014-03-01

    Vector-borne viruses are a threat to human, animal, and plant health worldwide, requiring the development of novel strategies for their control. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the 10 most economically significant plant viruses and, together with other tospoviruses, is a threat to global food security. TSWV is transmitted by thrips, including the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. Previously, we demonstrated that the TSWV glycoprotein GN binds to thrips vector midguts. We report here the development of transgenic plants that interfere with TSWV acquisition and transmission by the insect vector. Tomato plants expressing GN-S protein supported virus accumulation and symptom expression comparable with nontransgenic plants. However, virus titers in larval insects exposed to the infected transgenic plants were three-log lower than insects exposed to infected nontransgenic control plants. The negative effect of the GN-S transgenics on insect virus titers persisted to adulthood, as shown by four-log lower virus titers in adults and an average reduction of 87% in transmission efficiencies. These results demonstrate that an initial reduction in virus infection of the insect can result in a significant decrease in virus titer and transmission over the lifespan of the vector, supportive of a dose-dependent relationship in the virus-vector interaction. These findings demonstrate that plant expression of a viral protein can be an effective way to block virus transmission by insect vectors.

  20. Replicating viral vectors as HIV vaccines: Summary report from IAVI Sponsored Satellite Symposium, International AIDS Society Conference, July 22, 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koff, W. C.; Parks, C. L.; Berkhout, B.; Ackland, J.; Noble, S.; Gust, I. D.

    2008-01-01

    At the International AIDS Society Conference oil Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention held in Sydney, Australia, in July 2007, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) convened a satellite symposium entitled 'Accelerating the Development of Replicating Viral Vectors for AIDS Vaccines.' Its

  1. A Viral Satellite DNA Vector (TYLCCNV) for Functional Analysis of miRNAs and siRNAs in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zheng; Cao, Dongyan; Gao, Chao; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhai, Baiqiang; Li, Shan; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2017-04-01

    With experimental and bioinformatical methods, numerous small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), have been found in plants, and they play vital roles in various biological regulation processes. However, most of these small RNAs remain to be functionally characterized. Until now, only several viral vectors were developed to overexpress miRNAs with limited application in plants. In this study, we report a new small RNA overexpression system via viral satellite DNA associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) vector, which could highly overexpress not only artificial and endogenous miRNAs but also endogenous siRNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana First, we constructed basic TYLCCNV-amiRPDS(319L) vector with widely used AtMIR319a backbone, but the expected photobleaching phenotype was very weak. Second, through comparing the effect of backbones (AtMIR319a, AtMIR390a, and SlMIR159) on specificity and significance of generating small RNAs, the AtMIR390a backbone was optimally selected to construct the small RNA overexpression system. Third, through sRNA-Seq and Degradome-Seq, the small RNAs from AtMIR390a backbone in TYLCCNV-amiRPDS(390) vector were confirmed to highly overexpress amiRPDS and specifically silence targeted PDS gene. Using this system, rapid functional analysis of endogenous miRNAs and siRNAs was carried out, including miR156 and athTAS3a 5'D8(+). Meanwhile, through designing corresponding artificial miRNAs, this system could also significantly silence targeted endogenous genes and show specific phenotypes, including PDS, Su, and PCNA These results demonstrated that this small RNA overexpression system could contribute to investigating not only the function of endogenous small RNAs, but also the functional genes in plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Peripheral non-viral MIDGE vector-driven delivery of β-endorphin in inflammatory pain

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    Busch Melanie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocytes infiltrating inflamed tissue produce and release opioid peptides such as β-endorphin, which activate opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory nerves resulting in analgesia. Gene therapy is an attractive strategy to enhance continuous production of endogenous opioids. However, classical viral and plasmid vectors for gene delivery are hampered by immunogenicity, recombination, oncogene activation, anti-bacterial antibody production or changes in physiological gene expression. Non-viral, non-plasmid minimalistic, immunologically defined gene expression (MIDGE vectors may overcome these problems as they carry only elements needed for gene transfer. Here, we investigated the effects of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-coupled MIDGE encoding the β-endorphin precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rats. Results POMC-MIDGE-NLS injected into inflamed paws appeared to be taken up by leukocytes resulting in higher concentrations of β-endorphin in these cells. POMC-MIDGE-NLS treatment reversed enhanced mechanical sensitivity compared with control MIDGE-NLS. However, both effects were moderate, not always statistically significant or directly correlated with each other. Also, the anti-hyperalgesic actions could not be increased by enhancing β-endorphin secretion or by modifying POMC-MIDGE-NLS to code for multiple copies of β-endorphin. Conclusion Although MIDGE vectors circumvent side-effects associated with classical viral and plasmid vectors, the current POMC-MIDGE-NLS did not result in reliable analgesic effectiveness in our pain model. This was possibly associated with insufficient and variable efficacy in transfection and/or β-endorphin production. Our data point at the importance of the reproducibility of gene therapy strategies for the control of chronic pain.

  3. pEPito: a significantly improved non-viral episomal expression vector for mammalian cells

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    Ogris Manfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The episomal replication of the prototype vector pEPI-1 depends on a transcription unit starting from the constitutively expressed Cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMV-IEP and directed into a 2000 bp long matrix attachment region sequence (MARS derived from the human β-interferon gene. The original pEPI-1 vector contains two mammalian transcription units and a total of 305 CpG islands, which are located predominantly within the vector elements necessary for bacterial propagation and known to be counterproductive for persistent long-term transgene expression. Results Here, we report the development of a novel vector pEPito, which is derived from the pEPI-1 plasmid replicon but has considerably improved efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. The pEPito vector is significantly reduced in size, contains only one transcription unit and 60% less CpG motives in comparison to pEPI-1. It exhibits major advantages compared to the original pEPI-1 plasmid, including higher transgene expression levels and increased colony-forming efficiencies in vitro, as well as more persistent transgene expression profiles in vivo. The performance of pEPito-based vectors was further improved by replacing the CMV-IEP with the human CMV enhancer/human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter (hCMV/EF1P element that is known to be less affected by epigenetic silencing events. Conclusions The novel vector pEPito can be considered suitable as an improved vector for biotechnological applications in vitro and for non-viral gene delivery in vivo.

  4. CRISPR/Cas9 delivery with one single adenoviral vector devoid of all viral genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Schiwon, Maren; Leitner, Theo; Dávid, Stephan; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2017-12-07

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system revolutionized the field of gene editing but viral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has not been fully explored. Here we adapted clinically relevant high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral genes for the delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery using a single viral vector. We present a platform enabling fast transfer of the Cas9 gene and gRNA expression units into the HCAdV genome including the option to choose between constitutive or inducible Cas9 expression and gRNA multiplexing. Efficacy and versatility of this pipeline was exemplified by producing different CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV targeting the human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 oncogene E6, the dystrophin gene causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the HIV co-receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5). All CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV proved to be efficient to deliver the respective CRISPR/Cas9 expression units and to introduce the desired DNA double strand breaks at their intended target sites in immortalized and primary cells.

  5. Enhanced CAR T-cell engineering using non-viral Sleeping Beauty transposition from minicircle vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjezi, R; Miskey, C; Gogishvili, T; Schleef, M; Schmeer, M; Einsele, H; Ivics, Z; Hudecek, M

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy with T cell modified with gamma-retroviral or lentiviral (LV) vectors to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown remarkable efficacy in clinical trials. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity of viral vectors is a safety concern, and their cost and regulatory demands a roadblock for rapid and broad clinical translation. Here, we demonstrate that CAR T cells can be engineered through non-viral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposition of CAR genes from minimalistic DNA vectors called minicircles (MCs). We analyzed genomic distribution of SB and LV integrations and show that a significantly higher proportion of MC-derived CAR transposons compared with LV integrants had occurred outside of highly expressed and cancer-related genes into genomic safe harbor loci that are not expected to cause mutagenesis or genotoxicity. CD19-CAR T cells engineered with our enhanced SB approach conferred potent reactivity in vitro and eradicated lymphoma in a xenograft model in vivo. Intriguingly, electroporation of SB MCs is substantially more effective and less toxic compared with conventional plasmids, and enables cost-effective rapid preparation of therapeutic CAR T-cell doses. This approach sets a new standard in advanced cellular and gene therapy and will accelerate and increase the availability of CAR T-cell therapy to treat hematologic malignancies.

  6. A Simplified Voltage Vector Selection Strategy for Direct Torque Control

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    Ma Jian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct torque control (DTC for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM under the control of switching table suffers from high torque ripple and variable switching frequency. For PMSM DTC system, voltage vector selection strategy as the hysteresis control principle determines the systems performance. The angle (a between stator flux vector and the applying voltage vector determines effect of the voltage vector on the amplitude of stator flux and torque angle. The effect of the voltage vector on toque is dependent on a, torque angle and parameters of PMSM. A voltage vector selection strategy based on the technology of space vector modulation (SVM is proposed to control stator flux, torque angle and torque. Experimental results for a 15-kW interior PMSM show it can decrease stator current and torque ripples and fix the switching frequency.

  7. A compact dual promoter adeno-associated viral vector for efficient delivery of two genes to dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagoe, N D; Eggers, R; Verhaagen, J; Mason, M R J

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors based on serotype 5 are an efficient means to target dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to study gene function in the primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In this study, we have developed a compact AAV dual promoter vector composed of the

  8. Lenti-viral vector- mediated genetic modification of the neural scar: predominant transduction of astrocytes but not meningeal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, W.T.J.; Eggers, R.; Verhaagen, J.; Boer, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Viral vector-mediated overexpression of neurotrophins in cells constituting the neural scar may represent a powerful approach to rendering scar tissue of a central nervous system (CNS) lesion permissive for neuronal regrowth. In this study a lentiviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein

  9. Adeno-associated viral vector transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Murphy, Mary; O'Brien, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have received considerable attention in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. One aspect of MSC research focuses on genetically modifying the cells with the aim of enhancing their regenerative potential. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise as a vector...... in human MSCs and to assess whether AAV transduction affects MSC multipotentiality. The results indicated that human MSCs could indeed be transiently transduced in vitro by the AAV2 vector with efficiencies of up to 65%. The percentage of GFP-positive cells peaked at 4 days post-transduction and declined...... rapidly towards 0% after day 8. The level of transgene expression in the GFP-positive population increased 4-fold over a 10,000 fold viral dose increase. This dose-response contrasted with the 200-fold increase observed in similarly transduced 293-cells, indicating a relatively restricted transgene...

  10. Protein trans-splicing as a means for viral vector-mediated in vivo gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Sun, Wunchang; Wang, Bing; Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2008-09-01

    Inteins catalyze protein splicing in a fashion similar to how self-splicing introns catalyze RNA splicing. Splitinteins catalyze precise ligation of two separate polypeptides through trans-splicing in a highly specific manner. Here we report a method of using protein trans-splicing to circumvent the packaging size limit of gene therapy vectors. To demonstrate this method, we chose a large dystrophin gene and an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which has a small packaging size. A highly functional 6.3-kb Becker-form dystrophin cDNA was broken into two pieces and modified by adding appropriate split-intein coding sequences, resulting in splitgenes sufficiently small for packaging in AAV vectors. The two split-genes, after codelivery into target cells, produced two polypeptides that spontaneously trans-spliced to form the expected Becker-form dystrophin protein in cell culture in vitro. Delivering the split-genes by AAV1 vectors into the muscle of a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy rendered therapeutic gene expression and benefits.

  11. Viral Vector-Based Dissection of Marmoset GFAP Promoter in Mouse and Marmoset Brains.

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    Yoichiro Shinohara

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors are small in diameter, diffuse easily in the brain, and represent a highly efficient means by which to transfer a transgene to the brain of a large animal. A major demerit of AAV vectors is their limited accommodation capacity for transgenes. Thus, a compact promoter is useful when delivering large transgenes via AAV vectors. In the present study, we aimed to identify the shortest astrocyte-specific GFAP promoter region that could be used for AAV-vector-mediated transgene expression in the marmoset brain. The 2.0-kb promoter region upstream of the GFAP gene was cloned from the marmoset genome, and short promoters (1.6 kb, 1.4 kb, 0.6 kb, 0.3 kb and 0.2 kb were obtained by progressively deleting the original 2.0-kb promoter from the 5' end. The short promoters were screened in the mouse cerebellum in terms of their strength and astrocyte specificity. We found that the 0.3-kb promoter maintained 40% of the strength of the original 2.0-kb promoter, and approximately 90% of its astrocyte specificity. These properties were superior to those of the 1.4-kb, 0.6-kb (20% promoter strength and 0.2-kb (70% astrocyte specificity promoters. Then, we verified whether the 0.3-kb GFAP promoter retained astrocyte specificity in the marmoset cerebral cortex. Injection of viral vectors carrying the 0.3-kb marmoset GFAP promoter specifically transduced astrocytes in both the cerebral cortex and cerebellar cortex of the marmoset. These results suggest that the compact 0.3-kb promoter region serves as an astrocyte-specific promoter in the marmoset brain, which permits us to express a large gene by AAV vectors that have a limited accommodation capacity.

  12. Cholesterol improves the transfection efficiency of polyallylamine as a non-viral gene delivery vector

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    Reza Kazemi Oskuee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cationic polymers such as polyallylamine (PAA having primary amino groups are poor transfection agents and possess a high cytotoxicity index when used without any chemical modification. In this study, PAA was modified with cholesterol in order to improve transfection efficiency and to reduce cytotoxicity. PAA polymers with molecular weights of 15 and 65 kDa were selected and grafted with cholesterol at percentages of 5, 10, 15, 30, and 50. After purification, the efficacy of the synthetic vectors was evaluated in terms of DNA condensation using the ethidium bromide test, buffering capacity, particle size, zeta potential, transfection efficiency, and cytotoxicity assay in Neuro2A cell lines. According to the ethidium bromide test, these vectors can condense DNA at moderate and high carrier to plasmid (C/P ratios. The buffering capacity of the prepared vector in both molecular weights was less than unmodified PAA. Particle size measurements demonstrated that modified PAAs were able to form nanoparticles ranging in size from 125 to 530 nm. The vectors based on PAA 15 kDa demonstrated a better transfection efficiency than the vectors made of PAA 65 kDa. Cytotoxicity studies showed that toxicity of all vectors was less than PAA. Some cholesterol modified polymers composed of PAA (15 kDa were suitable vectors for gene delivery with low cytotoxicity.

  13. Sindbis viral vector induced apoptosis requires translational inhibition and signaling through Mcl-1 and Bak

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    Meruelo Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viral vectors are able to efficiently target and kill tumor cells in vivo, as shown using pancreatic and ovarian cancer models. Infection results in apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Sindbis vector uptake is mediated by the LAMR, which is upregulated on a number of different tumor types, thus conferring specificity of the vector to a wide range of cancers. In this study we elucidate the mechanism of apoptosis in two tumor cell lines, MOSEC, derived from the ovarian epithelium and Pan02, derived from a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of apoptosis would facilitate the design of more effective vectors for cancer therapy. Results The initial phase of Sindbis vector induced apoptosis in MOSEC and Pan02 models reconfirms that viral infection is sensed by PKR due to double-stranded RNA intermediates associated with genomic replication. PKR activation results in translation inhibition through eIF2α phosphorylation and initiation of the stress response. Our studies indicate that the roles of two proteins, Mcl-1 and JNK, intimately link Sindbis induced translational arrest and cellular stress. Translational arrest inhibits the synthesis of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, Mcl-1. JNK activation triggers the release of Bad from 14-3-3, which ultimately results in apoptosis. These signals from translational arrest and cellular stress are propagated to the mitochondria where Bad and Bik bind to Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 respectively. Formation of these heterodimers displaces Bak, which results in caspase 9 cleavage and signaling through the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Conclusion The host cell response to Sindbis is triggered through PKR activation. Our studies demonstrate that PKR activation and subsequent translational arrest is linked to both cellular stress and apoptosis. We have also found the linkage point between translational arrest and apoptosis to be Mcl-1, a protein whose constant

  14. [Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a vaccine vector for immunization against viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Orzechowska, Beata

    2013-01-11

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a member of the Rhabdoviridae family, is a promising candidate for potential use in construction of antiviral vaccines. In the natural environment VSV is a pathogen of wild ungulates and livestock. Some of the features that make VSV an excellent platform for the development of a range of viral therapeutics includes its immunogenicity and ability to grow to high titers in cell lines approved for vaccine use. Infection in humans is rare and usually asymptomatic, with mild flu-like symptoms. Moreover, due to affinity of VSV envelope glycoprotein to the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor, VSV is effective at targeting a variety of tissues in vivo. A series of research results confirm the possibility of developing VSV-based vaccines against human papilloma viruses (HPV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and filoviruses (MARV, ZEBOV and SEBOV), as well as the potential use of a successfully developed vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). VSV is neurotropic and infection can cause a viral encephalitis in experimental animals. Therefore, intensive studies are being undertaken to achieve satisfactory expression of the viral antigens while maintaining the safety of the constructed vectors.

  15. Exploiting the Intron-splicing Mechanism of Insect Cells to Produce Viral Vectors Harboring Toxic Genes for Suicide Gene Therapy

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    Haifeng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two mammalian introns, the human growth hormone intron and the Simian virus 40 large T antigen intron, were inserted into the coding sequences of diphtheria toxin fragment A (DT-A and barnase (Bar, respectively, to disrupt their open-reading frames (ORFs. Expression of these two toxic proteins were totally abolished, which enabled the production of normal levels of recombinant baculoviral and adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors in insect cells. When these viral vectors were introduced into mammalian cells, the introns were spliced out and the toxic proteins were expressed, which resulted in apoptosis in mammalian cells. This is the first report to show that viral vectors harboring toxin genes can be produced at normal levels by exploiting the intron-splicing mechanism of insect cells. Furthermore, viral vectors carrying the DT-A gene under control of tumor-specific promoters were able to exert tumor-specific cell killing. This novel method to produce viral vectors harboring toxic genes under control of tumor-specific promoter offers a powerful tool for further research, as well as for the development of toxin-based suicide gene therapy drugs.

  16. Efficient generation of rat induced pluripotent stem cells using a non-viral inducible vector.

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    Claudia Merkl

    Full Text Available Current methods of generating rat induced pluripotent stem cells are based on viral transduction of pluripotency inducing genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc and Klf4 into somatic cells. These activate endogenous pluripotency genes and reprogram the identity of the cell to an undifferentiated state. Epigenetic silencing of exogenous genes has to occur to allow normal iPS cell differentiation. To gain more control over the expression of exogenous reprogramming factors, we used a novel doxycycline-inducible plasmid vector encoding Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. To ensure efficient and controlled generation of iPS cells by plasmid transfection we equipped the reprogramming vector with a bacteriophage φC31 attB site and used a φC31 integrase expression vector to enhance vector integration. A series of doxycycline-independent rat iPS cell lines were established. These were characterized by immunocytochemical detection of Oct4, SSEA1 and SSEA4, alkaline phosphatase staining, methylation analysis of the endogenous Oct4 promoter and RT-PCR analysis of endogenous rat pluripotency genes. We also determined the number of vector integrations and the extent to which reprogramming factor gene expression was controlled. Protocols were developed to generate embryoid bodies and rat iPS cells demonstrated as pluripotent by generating derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro, and teratoma formation in vivo. All data suggest that our rat iPS cells, generated by plasmid based reprogramming, are similar to rat ES cells. Methods of DNA transfection, protein transduction and feeder-free monolayer culture of rat iPS cells were established to enable future applications.

  17. Cooler temperatures destabilize RNA interference and increase susceptibility of disease vector mosquitoes to viral infection.

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    Zach N Adelman

    Full Text Available The impact of global climate change on the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases is the subject of extensive debate. The transmission of mosquito-borne viral diseases is particularly complex, with climatic variables directly affecting many parameters associated with the prevalence of disease vectors. While evidence shows that warmer temperatures often decrease the extrinsic incubation period of an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus, exposure to cooler temperatures often predisposes disease vector mosquitoes to higher infection rates. RNA interference (RNAi pathways are essential to antiviral immunity in the mosquito; however, few experiments have explored the effects of temperature on the RNAi machinery.We utilized transgenic "sensor" strains of Aedes aegypti to examine the role of temperature on RNA silencing. These "sensor" strains express EGFP only when RNAi is inhibited; for example, after knockdown of the effector proteins Dicer-2 (DCR-2 or Argonaute-2 (AGO-2. We observed an increase in EGFP expression in transgenic sensor mosquitoes reared at 18°C as compared with 28°C. Changes in expression were dependent on the presence of an inverted repeat with homology to a portion of the EGFP sequence, as transgenic strains lacking this sequence, the double stranded RNA (dsRNA trigger for RNAi, showed no change in EGFP expression when reared at 18°C. Sequencing small RNAs in sensor mosquitoes reared at low temperature revealed normal processing of dsRNA substrates, suggesting the observed deficiency in RNAi occurs downstream of DCR-2. Rearing at cooler temperatures also predisposed mosquitoes to higher levels of infection with both chikungunya and yellow fever viruses.This data suggest that microclimates, such as those present in mosquito breeding sites, as well as more general climactic variables may influence the dynamics of mosquito-borne viral diseases by affecting the antiviral immunity of disease vectors.

  18. Safety of the novel influenza viral vector Brucella abortus vaccine in pregnant heifers

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    Kaissar Tabynov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present study provides the first information about the safety of a new influenza viral vector vaccine expressing the Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 or Omp16 containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in pregnant heifers. Immunization of pregnant heifers was conducted via the conjunctival (n=10 or subcutaneous (n=10 route using cross prime and booster vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. The vector vaccine was evaluated in comparison with positive control groups vaccinated with B. abortus S19 (n=10 or B. abortus RB51 (n=10 and a negative (PBS+Montanide Gel01; n=10 control group. Clinical studies, thermometry, assessment of local reactogenicity and observation of abortion showed that the vector vaccine via the conjunctival or subcutaneous route was completely safe for pregnant heifers compared to the commercial vaccines B. abortus S19 or B. abortus RB51. The only single adverse event was the formation of infiltration at the site of subcutaneous injection; this reaction was not observed for the conjunctival route.

  19. Chikungunya viral fitness measures within the vector and subsequent transmission potential.

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    Rebecca C Christofferson

    Full Text Available Given the recent emergence of chikungunya in the Americas, the accuracy of forecasting and prediction of chikungunya transmission potential in the U.S. requires urgent assessment. The La Reunion-associated sub-lineage of chikungunya (with a valine substitution in the envelope protein was shown to increase viral fitness in the secondary vector, Ae. albopictus. Subsequently, a majority of experimental and modeling efforts focused on this combination of a sub-lineage of the East-Central-South African genotype (ECSA-V-Ae. albopictus, despite the Asian genotype being the etiologic agent of recent chikungunya outbreaks world-wide. We explore a collection of data to investigate relative transmission efficiencies of the three major genotypes/sub-lineages of chikungunya and found difference in the extrinsic incubation periods to be largely overstated. However, there is strong evidence supporting the role of Ae. albopictus in the expansion of chikungunya that our R0 calculations cannot attribute to fitness increases in one vector over another. This suggests other ecological factors associated with the Ae. albopictus-ECSA-V cycle may drive transmission intensity differences. With the apparent bias in literature, however, we are less prepared to evaluate transmission where Ae. aegypti plays a significant role. Holistic investigations of CHIKV transmission cycle(s will allow for more complete assessment of transmission risk in areas affected by either or both competent vectors.

  20. Targeting of Deep Brain Structures with Microinjections for Delivery of Drugs, Viral Vectors, or Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Microinjections into the brain parenchyma are important procedures to deliver drugs, viral vectors or cell transplants. The brain lesion that an injecting needle produces during its trajectory is a major concern especially in the mouse brain for not only the brain is small but also sometimes multiple injections are needed. We show here a method to produce glass capillary needles with a 50-μm lumen which significantly reduces the brain damage and allows a precise targeting into the rodent brain. This method allows a delivery of small volumes (from 20 to 100 nl), reduces bleeding risks, and minimizes passive diffusion of drugs into the brain parenchyma. By using different size of capillary glass tubes, or changing the needle lumen, several types of substances and cells can be injected. Microinjections with a glass capillary tube represent a significant improvement in injection techniques and deep brain targeting with minimal collateral damage in small rodents. PMID:21178958

  1. Generation and validation of novel adeno-associated viral vectors for the analysis of Ca2+ homeostasis in motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norante, Rosa Pia; Massimino, Maria Lina; Lorenzon, Paolo; De Mario, Agnese; Peggion, Caterina; Vicario, Mattia; Albiero, Mattia; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2017-07-26

    A finely tuned Ca2+ homeostasis in restricted cell domains is of fundamental importance for neurons, where transient Ca2+ oscillations direct the proper coordination of electro-chemical signals and overall neuronal metabolism. Once such a precise regulation is unbalanced, however, neuronal functions and viability are severely compromised. Accordingly, disturbed Ca2+ metabolism has often been claimed as a major contributor to different neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that is characterised by selective motor neuron (MN) damage. This notion highlights the need for probes for the specific and precise analysis of local Ca2+ dynamics in MNs. Here, we generated and functionally validated adeno-associated viral vectors for the expression of gene-encoded fluorescent Ca2+ indicators targeted to different cell domains, under the transcriptional control of a MN-specific promoter. We demonstrated that the probes are specifically expressed, and allow reliable local Ca2+ measurements, in MNs from murine primary spinal cord cultures, and can also be expressed in spinal cord MNs in vivo, upon systemic administration to newborn mice. Preliminary analyses using these novel vectors have shown larger cytosolic Ca2+ responses following stimulation of AMPA receptors in the cytosol of primary cultured MNs from a murine genetic model of ALS compared to the healthy counterpart.

  2. Visualizing viral dissemination in the mouse nervous system, using a green fluorescent protein-expressing Borna disease virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Andreas; Guelzow, Timo; Staeheli, Peter; Schneider, Urs; Heimrich, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) frequently persists in the brain of infected animals. To analyze viral dissemination in the mouse nervous system, we generated a mouse-adapted virus that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP). This viral vector supported GFP expression for up to 150 days and possessed an extraordinary staining capacity, visualizing complete dendritic arbors as well as individual axonal fibers of infected neurons. GFP-positive cells were first detected in cortical areas from where the virus disseminated through the entire central nervous system (CNS). Late in infection, GFP expression was found in the sciatic nerve, demonstrating viral spread from the central to the peripheral nervous system.

  3. Chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery vectors targeting osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huading Lu

    Full Text Available The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS with a low molecular weight (Mw PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa. Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w. The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes.

  4. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors.

  5. [Aspirin-PEI-beta-CyD as a novel non-viral vector for gene transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Ren; Chen, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2009-01-01

    To develop a novel non-viral gene delivery vector based on PEI-beta-CyD as backbone modified with aspirin, and to identify its physicochemical characters. 1, 1-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) was used to bind aspirin onto PEI-beta-CyD to form PEI-beta-CyD-ASP. (1)H-NMR, FT-IR, UV and XRD were used to confirm the polymer structure. The ability of condensation was demonstrated by gel retardation assay. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability in B16, Hela and A293 cell lines. Transfection efficiency of the polymer was tested in B16 cells. The structure of PEI-beta-CyD-ASP was confirmed by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR, UV and XRD, which efficiently condensed plasmid DNA at the N/P ratio of 4. The copolymer showed low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in B16 cells. The synthesized aspirin-PEI-beta-CyD might be a potential gene delivery vector.

  6. Internalization of novel non-viral vector TAT-streptavidin into human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulomaa Markku S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell-penetrating peptide derived from the Human immunodeficiency virus-1 transactivator protein Tat possesses the capacity to promote the effective uptake of various cargo molecules across the plasma membrane in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this study was to characterize the uptake and delivery mechanisms of a novel streptavidin fusion construct, TAT47–57-streptavidin (TAT-SA, 60 kD. SA represents a potentially useful TAT-fusion partner due to its ability to perform as a versatile intracellular delivery vector for a wide array of biotinylated molecules or cargoes. Results By confocal and immunoelectron microscopy the majority of internalized TAT-SA was shown to accumulate in perinuclear vesicles in both cancer and non-cancer cell lines. The uptake studies in living cells with various fluorescent endocytic markers and inhibiting agents suggested that TAT-SA is internalized into cells efficiently, using both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lipid-raft-mediated macropinocytosis. When endosomal release of TAT-SA was enhanced through the incorporation of a biotinylated, pH-responsive polymer poly(propylacrylic acid (PPAA, nuclear localization of TAT-SA and TAT-SA bound to biotin was markedly improved. Additionally, no significant cytotoxicity was detected in the TAT-SA constructs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that TAT-SA-PPAA is a potential non-viral vector to be utilized in protein therapeutics to deliver biotinylated molecules both into cytoplasm and nucleus of human cells.

  7. Tweaking Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cell Immunomodulatory Properties with Viral Vectors Delivering Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Paola; Focosi, Daniele; Freer, Giulia; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-09-15

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) can be found in various body sites. Their main role is to differentiate into cartilage, bone, muscle, and fat cells to allow tissue maintenance and repair. During inflammation, MSCs exhibit important immunomodulatory properties that are not constitutive, but require activation, upon which they may exert immunosuppressive functions. MSCs are defined as "sensors of inflammation" since they modulate their ability of interfering with the immune system both in vitro and in vivo upon interaction with different factors. MSCs may influence immune responses through different mechanisms, such as direct cell-to-cell contact, release of soluble factors, and through the induction of anergy and apoptosis. Human MSCs are defined as plastic-adherent cells expressing specific surface molecules. Lack of MHC class II antigens makes them appealing as allogeneic tools for the therapy of both autoimmune diseases and cancer. MSC therapeutic potential could be highly enhanced by the expression of exogenous cytokines provided by transduction with viral vectors. In this review, we attempt to summarize the results of a great number of in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at improving the ability of MSCs as immunomodulators in the therapy of autoimmune, degenerative diseases and cancer. We will also compare results obtained with different vectors to deliver heterologous genes to these cells.

  8. A selective-update affine projection algorithm with selective input vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, NamWoong; Shin, JaeWook; Park, PooGyeon

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes an affine projection algorithm (APA) with selective input vectors, which based on the concept of selective-update in order to reduce estimation errors and computations. The algorithm consists of two procedures: input- vector-selection and state-decision. The input-vector-selection procedure determines the number of input vectors by checking with mean square error (MSE) whether the input vectors have enough information for update. The state-decision procedure determines the current state of the adaptive filter by using the state-decision criterion. As the adaptive filter is in transient state, the algorithm updates the filter coefficients with the selected input vectors. On the other hand, as soon as the adaptive filter reaches the steady state, the update procedure is not performed. Through these two procedures, the proposed algorithm achieves small steady-state estimation errors, low computational complexity and low update complexity for colored input signals.

  9. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  10. Noninvasive Imaging Reveals Stable Transgene Expression in Mouse Airways After Delivery of a Nonintegrating Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidovic, D; Gijsbers, R; Quiles Jimenez, A; Dooley, J; Van Den Haute, C; Van der Perren, A; Liston, A; Baekelandt, V; Debyser, Z; Carlon, MS

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise to cure a wide range of genetic and acquired diseases. Recent successes in recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV)-based gene therapy in the clinic for hereditary disorders such as Leber's congenital amaurosis and hemophilia B encouraged us to reexplore an rAAV

  11. Adeno-associated viral vector-induced overexpression of neuropeptide Y Y2 receptors in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Ängehagen, Mikael; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure...... suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is predominantly mediated by Y2 receptors, which, together with neuropeptide Y, are upregulated after seizures as a compensatory mechanism. To explore whether such upregulation could prevent seizures, we overexpressed Y2 receptors in the hippocampus using...... recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. In two temporal lobe epilepsy models, electrical kindling and kainate-induced seizures, vector-based transduction of Y2 receptor complementary DNA in the hippocampus of adult rats exerted seizure-suppressant effects. Simultaneous overexpression of Y2...

  12. Clustered Integrin Ligands as a Novel Approach for the Targeting of Non-Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Quinn Kwan Tai

    Gene transfer or gene delivery is described as the process in which foreign DNA is introduced into cells. Over the years, gene delivery has gained the attention of many researchers and has been developed as powerful tools for use in biotechnology and medicine. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, such advances in technology allowed for the identification of diseases ranging from hereditary disorders to acquired ones (cancer) which were thought to be incurable. Gene therapy provides the means necessary to treat or eliminate genetic diseases from its origin, unlike traditional medicine which only treat symptoms. With ongoing clinical trials for gene therapy increasing, the greatest difficulty still lies in developing safe systems which can target cells of interest to provide efficient delivery. Nature, over millions of years of evolution, has provided an example of one of the most efficient delivery systems: viruses. Although the use of viruses for gene delivery has been well studied, the safety issues involving immunogenicity, insertional mutagenesis, high cost, and poor reproducibility has provided problems for their clinical application. From understanding viruses, we gain insight to designing new systems for non-viral gene delivery. One of these techniques utilized by adenoviruses is the clustering of ligands on its surface through the use of a protein called a penton base. Through the use of nanotechnology we can mimic this basic concept in non-viral gene delivery systems. This dissertation research is focused on developing and applying a novel system for displaying the integrin binding ligand (RGD) in a constrained manner to form a clustered integrin ligand binding platform to be used to enhance the targeting and efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors. Peptide mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles provides a suitable surface for ligand clustering. A relationship between the peptide ratios in the reaction solution used to form these

  13. Hybrid adeno-associated viral vectors utilizing transposase-mediated somatic integration for stable transgene expression in human cells.

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    Wenli Zhang

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors have been shown to be one of the most promising vectors for therapeutic gene delivery because they can induce efficient and long-term transduction in non-dividing cells with negligible side-effects. However, as AAV vectors mostly remain episomal, vector genomes and transgene expression are lost in dividing cells. Therefore, to stably transduce cells, we developed a novel AAV/transposase hybrid-vector. To facilitate SB-mediated transposition from the rAAV genome, we established a system in which one AAV vector contains the transposon with the gene of interest and the second vector delivers the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB transposase SB100X. Human cells were infected with the AAV-transposon vector and the transposase was provided in trans either by transient and stable plasmid transfection or by AAV vector transduction. We found that groups which received the hyperactive transposase SB100X showed significantly increased colony forming numbers indicating enhanced integration efficiencies. Furthermore, we found that transgene copy numbers in transduced cells were dose-dependent and that predominantly SB transposase-mediated transposition contributed to stabilization of the transgene. Based on a plasmid rescue strategy and a linear-amplification mediated PCR (LAM-PCR protocol we analysed the SB100X-mediated integration profile after transposition from the AAV vector. A total of 1840 integration events were identified which revealed a close to random integration profile. In summary, we show for the first time that AAV vectors can serve as template for SB transposase mediated somatic integration. We developed the first prototype of this hybrid-vector system which with further improvements may be explored for treatment of diseases which originate from rapidly dividing cells.

  14. Stability of Retroviral Vectors Against Ultracentrifugation Is Determined by the Viral Internal Core and Envelope Proteins Used for Pseudotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Il

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral and lentiviral vectors are mostly pseudotyped and often purified and concentrated via ultracentrifugation. In this study, we quantified and compared the stabilities of retroviral [murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based] and lentiviral [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-based] vectors pseudotyped with relatively mechanically stable envelope proteins, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins (VSVGs), and the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins against ultracentrifugation. Lentiviral genomic and functional particles were more stable than the corresponding retroviral particles against ultracentrifugation when pseudotyped with VSVGs. However, both retroviral and lentiviral particles were unstable when pseudotyped with the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins. Therefore, the stabilities of pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors against ultracentrifugation process are a function of not only the type of envelope proteins, but also the type of viral internal core (MLV or HIV-1 core). In addition, the fraction of functional viral particles among genomic viral particles greatly varied at times during packaging, depending on the type of envelope proteins used for pseudotyping and the viral internal core.

  15. Vector competence of New Zealand mosquitoes for selected arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Laura D; Chin, Pam; Cane, Rachel P; Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Mackereth, Graham

    2011-07-01

    New Zealand (NZ) historically has been free of arboviral activity with the exception of Whataroa virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus), which is established in bird populations and is transmitted by local mosquitoes. This naive situation is threatened by global warming, invasive mosquitoes, and tourism. To determine the threat of selected medically important arboviruses to NZ, vector competence assays were conducted using field collected endemic and introduced mosquito species. Four alphaviruses (Togaviridae): Barmah Forest virus, Chikungunya virus, Ross River virus, and Sindbis virus, and five flaviviruses (Flaviviridae): Dengue virus 2, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and Yellow fever virus were evaluated. Results indicate some NZ mosquito species are highly competent vectors of selected arboviruses, particularly alphaviruses, and may pose a threat were one of these arboviruses introduced at a time when the vector was prevalent and the climatic conditions favorable for virus transmission.

  16. Gene therapy of inherited retinopathies: a long and successful road from viral vectors to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Pasqualina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IRs) are common and untreatable blinding conditions inherited mostly as monogenic due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PRs) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Over the last two decades, the retina has emerged as one of the most favorable target tissues for gene therapy given its small size and its enclosed and immune-privileged environment. Different types of viral vectors have been developed, especially those based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV), which efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to PRs or RPE upon subretinal injections. Dozens of successful proofs of concept of the efficacy of gene therapy for recessive and dominant IRs have been generated in small and large models that have paved the way to the first clinical trials using AAV in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis, a severe form of childhood blindness. The results from these initial trials suggest that retinal gene therapy with AAV is safe in humans, that vision can be improved in patients that have suffered from severe impairment of visual function, in some cases for decades, and that readministration of AAV to the subretinal space is feasible, effective, and safe. However, none of the trials could match the levels of efficacy of gene therapy observed in a dog model of the disease, suggesting that there is room for improvement. In conclusion, these results bode well for further testing of AAV-mediated retinal gene therapy in patients with other monogenic and complex forms of blindness.

  17. The emerging role of viral vectors as vehicles for DMD gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Ignazio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-05-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The DMD gene, spanning over 2.4 megabases along the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21.2), is the largest genetic locus known in the human genome. The size of DMD, combined with the complexity of the DMD phenotype and the extent of the affected tissues, begs for the development of novel, ideally complementary, therapeutic approaches. Genome editing based on the delivery of sequence-specific programmable nucleases into dystrophin-defective cells has recently enriched the portfolio of potential therapies under investigation. Experiments involving different programmable nuclease platforms and target cell types have established that the application of genome-editing principles to the targeted manipulation of defective DMD loci can result in the rescue of dystrophin protein synthesis in gene-edited cells. Looking towards translation into the clinic, these proof-of-principle experiments have been swiftly followed by the conversion of well-established viral vector systems into delivery agents for DMD editing. These gene-editing tools consist of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered homing endoculeases (HEs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) based on clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 systems. Here, we succinctly review these fast-paced developments and technologies, highlighting their relative merits and potential bottlenecks, when used as part of in vivo and ex vivo gene-editing strategies.

  18. Advances in Viral Vector-Based TRAIL Gene Therapy for Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norian, Lyse A. [Department of Urology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); James, Britnie R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Griffith, Thomas S., E-mail: thomas-griffith@uiowa.edu [Department of Urology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Numerous biologic approaches are being investigated as anti-cancer therapies in an attempt to induce tumor regression while circumventing the toxic side effects associated with standard chemo- or radiotherapies. Among these, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown particular promise in pre-clinical and early clinical trials, due to its preferential ability to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells and its minimal toxicity. One limitation of TRAIL use is the fact that many tumor types display an inherent resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To circumvent this problem, researchers have explored a number of strategies to optimize TRAIL delivery and to improve its efficacy via co-administration with other anti-cancer agents. In this review, we will focus on TRAIL-based gene therapy approaches for the treatment of malignancies. We will discuss the main viral vectors that are being used for TRAIL gene therapy and the strategies that are currently being attempted to improve the efficacy of TRAIL as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

  19. Polyethylenimine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangbo; Tang, Zhaomin; Shi, Chunli; Shi, Shuai; Qian, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2012-11-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery. The nanoparticles could provide the magnetic-targeting, and the cationic polymer PEI could condense DNA and avoid in vitro barriers. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic light scattering measurements, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and atomic force microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to asses DNA binding and perform a DNase I protection assay. The Alamar blue assay was used to evaluate negative effects on the metabolic activity of cells incubated with PEI modified magnetic nanoparticles and their complexes with DNA both in the presence or absence of an external magnetic field. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were also performed to investigate the transfection efficiency of the DNA-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in A549 and B16-F10 tumor cells with (+M) or without (-M) the magnetic field. The in vitro transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles was improved obviously in a permanent magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles show considerable potential as nanocarriers for gene delivery.

  20. Direct Neural Conversion from Human Fibroblasts Using Self-Regulating and Nonintegrating Viral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shong Lau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings show that human fibroblasts can be directly programmed into functional neurons without passing via a proliferative stem cell intermediate. These findings open up the possibility of generating subtype-specific neurons of human origin for therapeutic use from fetal cell, from patients themselves, or from matched donors. In this study, we present an improved system for direct neural conversion of human fibroblasts. The neural reprogramming genes are regulated by the neuron-specific microRNA, miR-124, such that each cell turns off expression of the reprogramming genes once the cell has reached a stable neuronal fate. The regulated system can be combined with integrase-deficient vectors, providing a nonintegrative and self-regulated conversion system that rids problems associated with the integration of viral transgenes into the host genome. These modifications make the system suitable for clinical use and therefore represent a major step forward in the development of induced neurons for cell therapy.

  1. Advances in Viral Vector-Based TRAIL Gene Therapy for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyse A. Norian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous biologic approaches are being investigated as anti-cancer therapies in an attempt to induce tumor regression while circumventing the toxic side effects associated with standard chemo- or radiotherapies. Among these, tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has shown particular promise in pre-clinical and early clinical trials, due to its preferential ability to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells and its minimal toxicity. One limitation of TRAIL use is the fact that many tumor types display an inherent resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To circumvent this problem, researchers have explored a number of strategies to optimize TRAIL delivery and to improve its efficacy via co-administration with other anti-cancer agents. In this review, we will focus on TRAIL-based gene therapy approaches for the treatment of malignancies. We will discuss the main viral vectors that are being used for TRAIL gene therapy and the strategies that are currently being attempted to improve the efficacy of TRAIL as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

  2. Zn(II)-dipicolylamine-based metallo-lipids as novel non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a series of Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) based cationic lipids bearing different hydrophobic tails (long chains, α-tocopherol, cholesterol or diosgenin) were synthesized. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these lipids was studied in detail by investigating the effects of several structural aspects including the type of hydrophobic tails, the chain length and saturation degree. In addition, several assays were used to study their interactions with plasmid DNA, and results reveal that these lipids could condense DNA into nanosized particles with appropriate size and zeta-potentials. MTT-based cell viability assays showed that lipoplexes 5 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed the hydrophobic tails clearly affected the TE, and hexadecanol-containing lipid 5b gives the best TE, which was 2.2 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum. The results not only demonstrate that these lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, but also afford us clues for further optimization of lipidic gene delivery materials.

  3. Single scan vector prediction in selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Bruins, R.; Terpstra, L.; Huls, R.A.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In selective laser melting (SLM) products are built by melting layers of metal powder successively. Optimal process parameters are usually obtained by scanning single vectors and subsequently determining which settings lead to a good compromise between product density and build speed. This paper

  4. Monitoring and visualizing microRNA dynamics during live cell differentiation using microRNA-responsive non-viral reporter vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Miki, Kenji; Komatsu, Kaoru R; Umeda, Masayuki; Mochizuki, Megumi; Inagaki, Azusa; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Saito, Hirohide

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) activity differs with cell type, suggesting it can be used as a cell marker. In this study, we developed novel miRNA-responsive non-viral reporter vectors to continuously monitor and visualize miRNA dynamics during differentiation and to efficiently purify target living cells. Each vector codes miRNA-responsive and reference reporter genes in a single mRNA. These two genes are independent modules but transcribed by a single promoter, which enables us to distinguish miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional repression from transcriptional repression. We generated stable, miRNA-responsive vector-containing human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) using the piggyBac transposon or episomal vectors. We could continuously monitor the differentiation status of living hiPSCs by detecting the activity of hiPSC-specific miRNA (miR-302a*). In addition, we could selectively sort hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes using cardiomyocyte-specific miRNA (miR-208a or miR-1)-reporter vectors. Our miRNA reporter system provides a simple way to quantitatively and continuously monitor and visualize changes in the cellular state and should facilitate a broad range of studies that depend on cellular changes including drug discovery and cell-fate conversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved vaccine protection against retrovirus infection after co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding viral antigens and type I interferon subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groitl Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I interferons (IFNs exhibit direct antiviral effects, but also distinct immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we analyzed type I IFN subtypes for their effect on prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccination of mice against Friend retrovirus (FV or HIV. Results Mice were vaccinated with adenoviral vectors encoding FV Env and Gag proteins alone or in combination with vectors encoding IFNα1, IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα5, IFNα6, IFNα9 or IFNβ. Only the co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα6 and IFNα9 resulted in strongly improved immune protection of vaccinated mice from subsequent FV challenge infection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. The level of protection correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses and enhanced antibody titers. Similar results were obtained when mice were vaccinated against HIV with adenoviral vectors encoding HIV Env and Gag-Pol in combination with various type I IFN encoding vectors. Here mainly CD4+ T cell responses were enhanced by IFNα subtypes. Conclusions Our results indicate that certain IFNα subtypes have the potential to improve the protective effect of adenovirus-based vaccines against retroviruses. This correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Thus, co-expression of select type I IFNs may be a valuable tool for the development of anti-retroviral vaccines.

  6. Viral Vector-Based Innovative Approaches to Directly Abolishing Tumorigenic Pluripotent Stem Cells for Safer Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Mitsui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are a promising source of regenerative material for clinical applications. However, hPSC transplant therapies pose the risk of teratoma formation and malignant transformation of undifferentiated remnants. These problems underscore the importance of developing technologies that completely prevent tumorigenesis to ensure safe clinical application. Research to date has contributed to establishing safe hPSC lines, improving the efficiency of differentiation induction, and indirectly ensuring the safety of products. Despite such efforts, guaranteeing the clinical safety of regenerative medicine products remains a key challenge. Given the intrinsic genome instability of hPSCs, selective growth advantage of cancer cells, and lessons learned through failures in previous attempts at hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy, conventional strategies are unlikely to completely overcome issues related to hPSC tumorigenesis. Researchers have recently embarked on studies aimed at locating and directly treating hPSC-derived tumorigenic cells. In particular, novel approaches to directly killing tumorigenic cells by transduction of suicide genes and oncolytic viruses are expected to improve the safety of hPSC-based therapy. This article discusses the current status and future perspectives of methods aimed at directly eradicating undifferentiated tumorigenic hPSCs, with a focus on viral vector transduction.

  7. Presencia de rotavirus durante un proceso de compostaje. Abonos como vectores de contaminación viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus presence in a waste composting process. Organic fertilizers as vehicles for viral contamination. Objective. To show thepresence of rotavirus in different stages of a composting process: matrices used as raw material, mixture to be composted and the finalproduct. Materials and methods. Immunochromatography, ELISA and RT-PCR were used for viral detection. Results. Rotavirus wasfound in the first composting step, no virus was found in the second step, and some inhibitory substances were found in the third step thatposed difficulties in interpreting the PCR results and therefore providing a concluding result on rotavirus presence in the final product.Conclusions. Organic fertilizers can be vectors of human pathogenic viruses; therefore quality control tests must be implemented to avoidfurther viral dissemination. There are inhibitory substances present in organic fertilizers capable of interfering with the detection tests.

  8. The yellow fever 17D vaccine virus: molecular basis of viral attenuation and its use as an expression vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galler R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The yellow fever (YF virus is the prototype flavivirus. The use of molecular techniques has unraveled the basic mechanisms of viral genome structure and expression. Recent trends in flavivirus research include the use of infectious clone technology with which it is possible to recover virus from cloned cDNA. Using this technique, mutations can be introduced at any point of the viral genome and their resulting effect on virus phenotype can be assessed. This approach has opened new possibilities to study several biological viral features with special emphasis on the issue of virulence/attenuation of the YF virus. The feasibility of using YF virus 17D vaccine strain, for which infectious cDNA is available, as a vector for the expression of heterologous antigens is reviewed

  9. Therapeutic liabilities of in vivo viral vector tropism: adeno-associated virus vectors, NMDAR1 antisense, and focal seizure sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Rebecca; Criswell, Hugh; Snowdy, Stephen; Ming, Zhen; Breese, George; Samulski, R; McCown, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor provides a potential target for gene therapy of focal seizure disorders. To test this approach, we cloned a 729-bp NMDA receptor (NMDAR1) cDNA fragment in the antisense orientation into adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, where expression was driven by either a tetracycline-off regulatable promoter (AAV-tTAK-NR1A) or a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (AAV-CMV-NR1A). After infection of primary cultured cortical neurons with recombinant AAV-tTAK-NR1A, patch clamp studies found a significant decrease in maximal NMDA-evoked currents, indicative of a decrease in the number of NMDA receptors. Similarly, infusion of AAV-tTAK-NR1A (1 microl) into the rat temporal cortex significantly decreased NMDAR1-like immunoreactivity in layer V pyramidal cells. When AAV-tTAK-NR1A vectors were infused into the seizure-sensitive site of the rat inferior collicular cortex, the seizure sensitivity increased significantly over a period of 4 weeks. However, collicular infusion of AAV-CMV-NR1A vectors caused the opposite effect, a significant decrease in seizure sensitivity. Subsequent collicular coinfusion of vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the tetracyclineoff promoter (AAV-tTAK-GFP) and vector encoding beta-galactosidase driven by the CMV promoter (AAV-CMV-LacZ) transduced distinct neuronal populations with only partial overlap. Thus, differing transduction ratios of inhibitory interneurons to primary output neurons likely account for the divergent seizure influences. Although AAV vector-derived NMDAR1 antisense can influence NMDA receptor function both in vitro and in vivo, promoter-related tropic differences dramatically alter the physiological outcome of this receptor-based gene therapy.

  10. Incorporating double copies of a chromatin insulator into lentiviral vectors results in less viral integrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Jakobsson, Johan; Rosenqvist, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lentiviral vectors hold great promise as gene transfer vectors in gene therapeutic settings. However, problems related to the risk of insertional mutagenesis, transgene silencing and positional effects have stalled the use of such vectors in the clinic. Chromatin insulators are bounda...

  11. Experimental and Natural Infections of Goats with Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus: Evidence for Ticks as Viral Vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Jiao

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, the causative agent for the fatal life-threatening infectious disease, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS, was first identified in the central and eastern regions of China. Although the viral RNA was detected in free-living and parasitic ticks, the vector for SFTSV remains unsettled.Firstly, an experimental infection study in goats was conducted in a bio-safety level-2 (BSL-2 facility to investigate virus transmission between animals. The results showed that infected animals did not shed virus to the outside through respiratory or digestive tract route, and the control animals did not get infected. Then, a natural infection study was carried out in the SFTSV endemic region. A cohort of naïve goats was used as sentinel animals in the study site. A variety of daily samples including goat sera, ticks and mosquitoes were collected for viral RNA and antibody (from serum only detection, and virus isolation. We detected viral RNA from free-living and parasitic ticks rather than mosquitoes, and from goats after ticks' infestation. We also observed sero-conversion in all members of the animal cohort subsequently. The S segment sequences of the two recovered viral isolates from one infected goat and its parasitic ticks showed a 100% homology at the nucleic acid level.In our natural infection study, close contact between goats does not appear to transmit SFTSV, however, the naïve animals were infected after ticks' infestation and two viral isolates derived from an infected goat and its parasitic ticks shared 100% of sequence identity. These data demonstrate that the etiologic agent for goat cohort's natural infection comes from environmental factors. Of these, ticks, especially the predominant species Haemaphysalis longicornis, probably act as vector for this pathogen. The findings in this study may help local health authorities formulate and focus preventive measures to contain

  12. Mucosal vaccination with heterologous viral vectored vaccine targeting subdominant SIV accessory antigens strongly inhibits early viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Huanbin; Andersson, Anne-Marie Carola; Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2017-01-01

    Conventional HIV T cell vaccine strategies have not been successful in containing acute peak viremia, nor in providing long-term control. We immunized rhesus macaques intramuscularly and rectally using a heterologous adenovirus vectored SIV vaccine regimen encoding normally weakly immunogenic tat...... immune hyperactivation as measured by naïve T cell depletion, Ki-67 and PD-1 expression on T cells. These results indicate that vaccination towards SIV accessory antigens vaccine can provide a level of acute control of SIV replication with a suggestion of beneficial immunological consequences in infected...... animals of unknown long-term significance. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that a vaccine encoding subdominant antigens not normally associated with virus control can exert a significant impact on acute peak viremia....

  13. Priming Cross-Protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Specific Immunity Using Live-Vectored Mosaic Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehnaz Lokhandwala

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV plays a key role in bovine respiratory disease complex, which can lead to pneumonia, diarrhea and death of calves. Current vaccines are not very effective due, in part, to immunosuppressive traits and failure to induce broad protection. There are diverse BVDV strains and thus, current vaccines contain representative genotype 1 and 2 viruses (BVDV-1 & 2 to broaden coverage. BVDV modified live virus (MLV vaccines are superior to killed virus vaccines, but they are susceptible to neutralization and complement-mediated destruction triggered by passively acquired antibodies, thus limiting their efficacy. We generated three novel mosaic polypeptide chimeras, designated NproE2123; NS231; and NS232, which incorporate protective determinants that are highly conserved among BVDV-1a, 1b, and BVDV-2 genotypes. In addition, strain-specific protective antigens from disparate BVDV strains were included to broaden coverage. We confirmed that adenovirus constructs expressing these antigens were strongly recognized by monoclonal antibodies, polyclonal sera, and IFN-γ-secreting T cells generated against diverse BVDV strains. In a proof-of-concept efficacy study, the multi-antigen proto-type vaccine induced higher, but not significantly different, IFN-γ spot forming cells and T-cell proliferation compared to a commercial MLV vaccine. In regards to the humoral response, the prototype vaccine induced higher BVDV-1 specific neutralizing antibody titers, whereas the MLV vaccine induced higher BVDV-2 specific neutralizing antibody titers. Following BVDV type 2a (1373 challenge, calves immunized with the proto-type or the MLV vaccine had lower clinical scores compared to naïve controls. These results support the hypothesis that a broadly protective subunit vaccine can be generated using mosaic polypeptides that incorporate rationally selected and validated protective determinants from diverse BVDV strains. Furthermore, regarding

  14. Replication-competent infectious hepatitis B virus vectors carrying substantially sized transgenes by redesigned viral polymerase translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihua Wang

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are engineered virus variants able to deliver nonviral genetic information into cells, usually by the same routes as the parental viruses. For several virus families, replication-competent vectors carrying reporter genes have become invaluable tools for easy and quantitative monitoring of replication and infection, and thus also for identifying antivirals and virus susceptible cells. For hepatitis B virus (HBV, a small enveloped DNA virus causing B-type hepatitis, such vectors are not available because insertions into its tiny 3.2 kb genome almost inevitably affect essential replication elements. HBV replicates by reverse transcription of the pregenomic (pg RNA which is also required as bicistronic mRNA for the capsid (core protein and the reverse transcriptase (Pol; their open reading frames (ORFs overlap by some 150 basepairs. Translation of the downstream Pol ORF does not involve a conventional internal ribosome entry site (IRES. We reasoned that duplicating the overlap region and providing artificial IRES control for translation of both Pol and an in-between inserted transgene might yield a functional tricistronic pgRNA, without interfering with envelope protein expression. As IRESs we used a 22 nucleotide element termed Rbm3 IRES to minimize genome size increase. Model plasmids confirmed its activity even in tricistronic arrangements. Analogous plasmids for complete HBV genomes carrying 399 bp and 720 bp transgenes for blasticidin resistance (BsdR and humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP produced core and envelope proteins like wild-type HBV; while the hrGFP vector replicated poorly, the BsdR vector generated around 40% as much replicative DNA as wild-type HBV. Both vectors, however, formed enveloped virions which were infectious for HBV-susceptible HepaRG cells. Because numerous reporter and effector genes with sizes of around 500 bp or less are available, the new HBV vectors should become highly useful tools to

  15. Replication-competent infectious hepatitis B virus vectors carrying substantially sized transgenes by redesigned viral polymerase translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihua; Wu, Li; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Shizhu; Li, Baosheng; Li, Haijun; Kang, Fubiao; Wang, Junping; Xia, Huan; Ping, Caiyan; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors are engineered virus variants able to deliver nonviral genetic information into cells, usually by the same routes as the parental viruses. For several virus families, replication-competent vectors carrying reporter genes have become invaluable tools for easy and quantitative monitoring of replication and infection, and thus also for identifying antivirals and virus susceptible cells. For hepatitis B virus (HBV), a small enveloped DNA virus causing B-type hepatitis, such vectors are not available because insertions into its tiny 3.2 kb genome almost inevitably affect essential replication elements. HBV replicates by reverse transcription of the pregenomic (pg) RNA which is also required as bicistronic mRNA for the capsid (core) protein and the reverse transcriptase (Pol); their open reading frames (ORFs) overlap by some 150 basepairs. Translation of the downstream Pol ORF does not involve a conventional internal ribosome entry site (IRES). We reasoned that duplicating the overlap region and providing artificial IRES control for translation of both Pol and an in-between inserted transgene might yield a functional tricistronic pgRNA, without interfering with envelope protein expression. As IRESs we used a 22 nucleotide element termed Rbm3 IRES to minimize genome size increase. Model plasmids confirmed its activity even in tricistronic arrangements. Analogous plasmids for complete HBV genomes carrying 399 bp and 720 bp transgenes for blasticidin resistance (BsdR) and humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) produced core and envelope proteins like wild-type HBV; while the hrGFP vector replicated poorly, the BsdR vector generated around 40% as much replicative DNA as wild-type HBV. Both vectors, however, formed enveloped virions which were infectious for HBV-susceptible HepaRG cells. Because numerous reporter and effector genes with sizes of around 500 bp or less are available, the new HBV vectors should become highly useful tools to better

  16. Matrix Multiplication Algorithm Selection with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    libraries that could intelligently choose the optimal algorithm for a particular set of inputs. Users would be oblivious to the underlying algorithmic...SAT.” J. Artif . Intell. Res.(JAIR), vol. 32, pp. 565–606, 2008. [9] M. G. Lagoudakis and M. L. Littman, “Algorithm selection using reinforcement...Artificial Intelligence , vol. 21, no. 05, pp. 961–976, 2007. [15] C.-C. Chang and C.-J. Lin, “LIBSVM: A library for support vector machines,” ACM

  17. Novel Bivalent Viral-Vectored Vaccines Induce Potent Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Conferring Protection against Stringent Influenza A Virus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Claire M; Chinnakannan, Senthil; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ulaszewska, Marta; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lambe, Teresa

    2017-07-19

    Seasonal influenza viruses are a common cause of acute respiratory illness worldwide and generate a significant socioeconomic burden. Influenza viruses mutate rapidly, necessitating annual vaccine reformulation because traditional vaccines do not typically induce broad-spectrum immunity. In addition to seasonal infections, emerging pandemic influenza viruses present a continued threat to global public health. Pandemic influenza viruses have consistently higher attack rates and are typically associated with greater mortality compared with seasonal strains. Ongoing strategies to improve vaccine efficacy typically focus on providing broad-spectrum immunity; although B and T cells can mediate heterosubtypic responses, typical vaccine development will augment either humoral or cellular immunity. However, multipronged approaches that target several Ags may limit the generation of viral escape mutants. There are few vaccine platforms that can deliver multiple Ags and generate robust cellular and humoral immunity. In this article, we describe a novel vaccination strategy, tested preclinically in mice, for the delivery of novel bivalent viral-vectored vaccines. We show this strategy elicits potent T cell responses toward highly conserved internal Ags while simultaneously inducing high levels of Abs toward hemagglutinin. Importantly, these humoral responses generate long-lived plasma cells and generate Abs capable of neutralizing variant hemagglutinin-expressing pseudotyped lentiviruses. Significantly, these novel viral-vectored vaccines induce strong immune responses capable of conferring protection in a stringent influenza A virus challenge. Thus, this vaccination regimen induces lasting efficacy toward influenza. Importantly, the simultaneous delivery of dual Ags may alleviate the selective pressure that is thought to potentiate antigenic diversity in avian influenza viruses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Application of viral vectors to the study of neural connectivities and neural circuits in the marmoset brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watakabe, Akiya; Sadakane, Osamu; Hata, Katsusuke; Ohtsuka, Masanari; Takaji, Masafumi; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    It is important to study the neural connectivities and functions in primates. For this purpose, it is critical to be able to transfer genes to certain neurons in the primate brain so that we can image the neuronal signals and analyze the function of the transferred gene. Toward this end, our team has been developing gene transfer systems using viral vectors. In this review, we summarize our current achievements as follows. 1) We compared the features of gene transfer using five different AAV serotypes in combination with three different promoters, namely, CMV, mouse CaMKII (CaMKII), and human synapsin 1 (hSyn1), in the marmoset cortex with those in the mouse and macaque cortices. 2) We used target-specific double-infection techniques in combination with TET-ON and TET-OFF using lentiviral retrograde vectors for enhanced visualization of neural connections. 3) We used an AAV-mediated gene transfer method to study the transcriptional control for amplifying fluorescent signals using the TET/TRE system in the primate neocortex. We also established systems for shRNA mediated gene targeting in a neocortical region where a gene is significantly expressed and for expressing the gene using the CMV promoter for an unexpressed neocortical area in the primate cortex using AAV vectors to understand the regulation of downstream genes. Our findings have demonstrated the feasibility of using viral vector mediated gene transfer systems for the study of primate cortical circuits using the marmoset as an animal model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 354-372, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Neurobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gene delivery to carcinoma cells via novel non-viral vectors: nanoparticle tracking analysis and suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Senait; Singh, Aruna; Koons, Stephen; Bernt, William; Konopka, Krystyna; Duzgunes, Nejat

    2014-08-18

    Suicide gene therapy of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may be a viable approach to the treatment of this cancer. However, human OSCC cells are relatively resistant to efficient transfection by non-viral vectors. To identify an optimal vector for gene delivery, we compared the transfection activities and efficiencies of Glycofect, Metafectene, Metafectene Pro, Metafectene Easy and FuGENE HD, using the OSCC cell line, HSC-3, and the cervical carcinoma cell line, HeLa. The size distribution and ζ-potential of the complexes of these vectors with plasmid DNA were assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis and electrophoretic mobility measurements, respectively. Metafectene Easy and FuGENE HD mediated the highest transfection activity (measured as luciferase expression) and efficiency (measured as the percentage of cells transfected with ß-galactosidase). These vectors were used to deliver a plasmid encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, followed by ganciclovir treatment. By day 9, HeLa cell viability was 22±3% of controls with FuGENE HD and 26±3% with Metafectene Easy. The viability of HSC-3 cells was 42±25% with FuGENE HD, and 58±28% with Metafectene Easy. The reduction in viability was statistically significant in both cases (p⩽0.005; average of 3 independent experiments), although there was considerable variability between experiments with the HSC-3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral-tolerization Prevents Immune Responses and Improves Transgene Persistence Following Gene Transfer Mediated by Adeno-associated Viral Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardet, Romain; Chevalier, Benjamin; Dupaty, Léa; Naïmi, Yassine; Riou, Gaëtan; Drouot, Laurent; Jean, Laetitia; Salvetti, Anna; Boyer, Olivier; Adriouch, Sahil

    2016-02-01

    Gene therapy represents a feasible strategy to treat inherited monogenic diseases and intramuscular (i.m.) injection of recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is now recognized as a convenient and safe method of gene transfer. However, this approach is hampered by immune responses directed against the vector and against the transgenic protein. We used here to reproduce this situation a mouse model where robust immune responses are induced following injection of an AAV vector coding for an immunogenic transgenic protein. We show that prophylactic oral administration of the immunogenic protein before AAV-mediated gene transfer completely prevented antibody formation and cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Consistently, prophylactic oral-tolerization considerably improved long-term transgene persistence and expression. Mechanistically, inhibition of the cytotoxic immune response involved abortive proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, upregulation of the PD-1 immunoregulatory molecule, downregulation of the Bcl-2 antiapoptotic factor, and their deletion in the context of AAV-mediated gene transfer. Hence, gene therapy may represent an ideal situation where oral-tolerization can be adopted before or at the same time as vector injection to efficiently prevent deleterious immune responses directed against the transgenic protein.

  1. Protocol for efficient generation and characterization of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Andreas; Leuchs, Barbara; Katus, Hugo A; Rommelaere, Jean; Müller, Oliver J

    2017-09-21

    AAV vectors are a powerful tool for gene transfer approaches. We have established a simple and fast plasmid-based production system for achieving high AAV titers within 6 working days. The same procedure can be used for all serotypes and thus allows direct comparability of different serotypes. In this protocol we describe a step-by-step procedure which results in well-characterized vectors suitable for both in vitro approaches and preclinical studies.

  2. Differential myocardial gene delivery by recombinant serotype-specific adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lingling; Kido, Masakuni; Lee, Darwin V; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Samulski, R Jude; Jamieson, Stuart W; Weitzman, Matthew D; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A

    2004-09-01

    Recombinant cross-packaging of adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome of one serotype into other AAV serotypes has the potential to optimize tissue-specific gene transduction and expression in the heart. To evaluate the role of AAV1 to 5 virion shells on AAV2 transgene transduction, we constructed hybrid vectors in which each serotype capsid coding domain was cloned into a common vector backbone containing AAV2 replication genes. Constructs were tested for expression in: (1) adult murine heart in vivo using direct injection of virus, (2) neonatal and adult murine ventricular cardiomyocytes in vitro, and (3) adult human ventricular cardiomyocytes in vitro, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the measurable transgene. Serotype 1 virus demonstrated the highest transduction efficiency in adult murine cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, while serotype 2 virus had the greater transduction efficiency in neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. Prolonged in vivo myocardial GFP expression was observed for up to 12 months using serotype 1 and 2 vectors only. In human cardiomyocytes, serotype 1 vector was superior in transduction efficiency, followed by types 2, 5, 4, and 3. These data establish a hierarchy for efficient serotype-specific vector transduction in myocardial tissue. AAV1 serotype packaging results in more efficient transduction of genes in the murine and human adult heart, compared to other AAV serotypes. Our results suggest that adult human cardiac gene therapy may be enhanced by the use of serotype 1-specific AAV vectors.

  3. New Space Vector Selection Scheme for VSI Supplied Dual Three-Phase Induction Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICEVIC, D.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel space vector selection scheme applicable for the control of dual three-phase induction motor drives supplied from a six-phase voltage source inverter (VSI. The vector selection method is based on the vector space decomposition technique (VSD. Unique vector selection pattern simplifies problems related to complicated implementation of standard VSD in commercially available digital signals processors (DSP. The proposed vector selection scheme is verified through a theoretical analysis, computer simulations and practical experimental results conducted on a dual three-phase test rig prototype with control algorithm implemented in Texas Instrument?s TMS320F2808 DSP.

  4. Optimization of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene delivery to the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Backer, Marijke W A; Brans, Maike A D; Luijendijk, Mieneke C; Garner, Keith M; Adan, Roger A H

    2010-06-01

    To efficiently deliver genes and short hairpin RNAs to the hypothalamus we aimed to optimize the transduction efficiency of adeno-associated virus (AAV) in the rat hypothalamus. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with AAV1, AAV8, and mosaic AAV1/2 and AAV2/8 coats with that of an AAV2 coated vector after injection into the lateral hypothalamus of rats. In addition, we determined the transduction areas and the percentage of neurons infected after injection of various titers and volumes of two AAV1-pseudotyped vectors in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVN). Successful gene delivery to the hypothalamus was achieved with AAV1-pseudotyped AAV vectors. The optimal approach to transduce an area, with the size of the PVN, was to inject 1 x 10(9) genomic copies of an AAV1-pseudotyped vector in a volume of 1 microl. At a radius of 0.05 mm from the injection site almost all neurons were transduced. In addition, overexpression of AgRP with the optimal approach resulted in an increase in food intake and body weight when compared with AAV-GFP.

  5. Effective photodynamic therapy in drug-resistant prostate cancer cells utilizing a non-viral antitumor vector (a secondary publication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masaya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Tachikawa, Shoji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There is an urgent need to develop an efficient strategy for the treatment of drug-resistant prostate cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which low incident levels of laser energy are used to activate a photosensitizer taken up by tumor cells, is expected as a novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer because of the minimal invasive nature of PDT. The present study was designed to assess the efficacy of a novel vector approach combined with a conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Our group focused on a non-viral vector (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) lipid, termed the porphyrus envelope (PE). It has been previously confirmed that HVJ-E has drug-delivering properties and can induce cancer-specific cell death. The PE (HVJ-E contained in PpIX lipid) was developed as a novel photosensitizer. In this study, the antitumor and PDT efficacy of the PE against hormone-antagonistic human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) were evaluated. Results and Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that, under specific circumstances, PDT using the PE was very effective against PC-3 cells. A novel therapy for drug-resistant prostate cancer based on this vector approach is eagerly anticipated. PMID:27141155

  6. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  7. Insect vectors of pathogens in selected undisposed refuse dumps in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The occurrence and abundance of these vectors suggests that vector-borne disease transmission is prevalent in Kaduna metropolis. The health implications of the presence of these insects and their role in disease transmission are ...

  8. Non-essential viral proteins of orbiviruses are essential for vector-borne spread by midges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the Reoviridae family are non-enveloped multi-layered viruses with a double stranded RNA genome consisting of 9-12 genome segments. The Orbivirus genus contains vector borne virus species with 10 genome segments such as bluetongue virus (BTV) with about 30 serotypes, and African horse sic...

  9. Mycophenolate Mofetil Impairs Transduction of Single-Stranded Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montenegro-Miranda, Paula; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Kunne, Cindy; de Waart, Dirk R.; Bosma, Piter J.

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) liver-directed gene therapy seems a feasible treatment for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, an inherited liver disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Transient immunosuppression coupled with vector administration seems needed to overcome host

  10. Characterization of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Mediated Human Factor VIII Gene Therapy in Hemophilia A Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Jenny A; Wang, Qiang; Reicherter, Amanda L; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Tipper, Christopher H; Clark, K Reed; Wadsworth, Samuel; Wang, Lili; Wilson, James M

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are promising vehicles for hemophilia gene therapy, with favorable clinical trial data seen in the treatment of hemophilia B. In an effort to optimize the expression of human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) for the treatment of hemophilia A, an extensive study was performed with numerous combinations of liver-specific promoter and enhancer elements with a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene. After generating 42 variants of three reduced-size promoters and three small enhancers, transgene cassettes were packaged within a single AAV capsid, AAVrh10, to eliminate performance differences due to the capsid type. Each hFVIII vector was administered to FVIII knockout (KO) mice at a dose of 10(10) genome copies (GC) per mouse. Criteria for distinguishing the performance of the different enhancer/promoter combinations were established prior to the initiation of the studies. These criteria included prominently the level of hFVIII activity (0.12-2.12 IU/mL) and the pattern of development of anti-hFVIII antibodies. In order to evaluate the impact of capsid on hFVIII expression and antibody formation, one of the enhancer and promoter combinations that exhibited high hFVIII immunogenicity was evaluated using AAV8, AAV9, AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1 capsids. The capsids subdivided into two groups: those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in ≤20% of mice (AAV8 and AAV9), and those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in >20% of mice (AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1). The results of this study, which entailed extensive vector optimization and in vivo testing, demonstrate the significant impact that transcriptional control elements and capsid can have on vector performance.

  11. Adaptive Compressive Tracking via Online Vector Boosting Feature Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Kaihua; Wu, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the large scale target appearance variations due to its data-independent random projection matrix that results in less discriminative features. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose an adaptive CT approach, which selects the most discriminative features to design an effective appearance model. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects. First, the most discriminative features are selected via an online vector boosting method. Second, the object representation is updated in an effective online manner, which preserves the stable features while filtering out the noisy ones. Furthermore, a simple and effective trajectory rectification approach is adopted that can make the estimated location more accurate. Finally, a multiple scale adaptation mechanism is explored to estimate object size, which helps to relieve interference from background information. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark and the VOT2014 challenges demonstrate the superior performance of our method.

  12. Pseudotyped Adeno-associated Viral Vector Tropism and Transduction Efficiencies in Murine Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Keswani, Sundeep G.; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency pro...

  13. Development of Recombinant Vaccine Using Herpesvirus of Turkey (Hvt as Vector for Several Viral Diseases in Poultry Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risza Hartawan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus of turkey (HVT has been utilised as live vaccine against Marek’s disease in poultry industry world-wide for many years. However, the potency of HVT is not limited on the Marek’s disease only. Along with rapid development of recombinant technique, the potency of HVT can be broaden for other diseases. As naturally apathogenic virus, HVT is a suitable candidate as vector vaccine to express important antigens of viral pathogens. Several researches have been dedicated to design HVT recombinant vaccine by inserting gene of important virus, such as Marek’s disease virus (MDV, immuno bursal disease virus (IBDV, Newcastle disease virus (NDV and Avian Influenza virus (AIV. Therefore, the future recombinant of HVT has been expected to be better in performance along with the improvement of recombinant technique.

  14. The potential of adeno-associated viral vectors for gene delivery to muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhong, Li; Nahid, M Abu; Gao, Guangping

    2014-03-01

    Muscle-directed gene therapy is rapidly gaining attention primarily because muscle is an easily accessible target tissue and is also associated with various severe genetic disorders. Localized and systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors of several serotypes results in very efficient transduction of skeletal and cardiac muscles, which has been achieved in both small and large animals, as well as in humans. Muscle is the target tissue in gene therapy for many muscular dystrophy diseases, and may also be exploited as a biofactory to produce secretory factors for systemic disorders. Current limitations of using rAAVs for muscle gene transfer include vector size restriction, potential safety concerns such as off-target toxicity and the immunological barrier composing of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell response against AAV capsid in humans. In this article, we will discuss basic AAV vector biology and its application in muscle-directed gene delivery, as well as potential strategies to overcome the aforementioned limitations of rAAV for further clinical application. Delivering therapeutic genes to large muscle mass in humans is arguably the most urgent unmet demand in treating diseases affecting muscle tissues throughout the whole body. Muscle-directed, rAAV-mediated gene transfer for expressing antibodies is a promising strategy to combat deadly infectious diseases. Developing strategies to circumvent the immune response following rAAV administration in humans will facilitate clinical application.

  15. Epidemiological investigation of selected pigeon viral infections in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, T A; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A

    2012-12-01

    Due to a lack of data in regard to the spread of viral infections in Polish pigeon populations, studies were undertaken to assess the frequency of adeno-, circo- and herpesvirus infections in flocks of pigeons across the entire country. In total, 107 flocks were examined, of which 61 per cent consisted of racing and 39 per cent of fancy pigeons. The flocks were divided into groups according to breed (racing and fancy pigeons) as well as physical condition (healthy and sick). In the studied pigeon flocks, the pigeon circovirus (PiCV) genetic material was the most frequently detected (44.5-100 per cent depending on the group), pigeon herpesvirus genetic material was second in frequency (0-30 per cent depending on the group), while genetic material of pigeon adenovirus was found only in two flocks of young birds with clinical symptoms of Young Pigeon Disease Syndrome (YPDS). The presence of fowl adenovirus (FAdV) genetic material was not detected in any of the studied flocks. Results obtained demonstrate a wide spread of circovirus in pigeon flocks in Poland, and substantiate earlier theories proposed by other authors, that immunosuppression evoked by PiCV infection is one of the main causative agents of YPDS.

  16. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  17. Is passive transmission of non-viral vectors through artificial insemination of sperm-DNA mixtures sufficient for chicken transgenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparian, Shahram; Abdulahnejad, Ahad; Rashidi, Farzad; Toghyani, Majid; Gheisari, Abbasali; Eghbalsaied, Shahin

    2016-06-17

    DNA uptake in the post-acrosomal region of the spermatozoa takes place exclusively in immotile spermatozoa that are naturally unable to fertilize eggs. The present study aimed to assess whether passive transmission of non-viral vectors to the surrounding areas of chicken embryos could be an alternate mechanism in chicken sperm-mediated gene transfer. First, the presence of nucleases in rooster seminal plasma was evaluated. Semen ejaculates from five roosters were centrifuged and the supernatant was incubated with pBL2 for 1 h. A robust nuclease cocktail was detected in the rooster semen. To overcome these nucleases, plasmid-TransIT combinations were incubated with semen for 1 h. Incubation of exogenous DNA in the lipoplex structure could considerably bypass the semen nuclease effect. Then, intravaginal insemination of 1 × 10(9) sperm mixed with lipoplexes (40 µg pBL2:40 µl TransIT) was carried out in 15 virgin hens. Neither the epithelial tissue from the inseminated female reproductive tracts nor the produced embryos following artificial insemination showed the transgene. To remove any bias in the transgene transmission possibility, the plasmid-TransIT admixture was directly injected in close vicinity of the embryos in newly laid eggs. Nonetheless, none of the produced fetuses or chicks carried the transgene. In conclusion, the results of the present study revealed a nuclease admixture in rooster seminal plasma, and passive/active transmission of the non-viral vector into close vicinity of the chicken embryo was inefficient for producing transgenic chicks.

  18. A novel adeno-associated viral variant for efficient and selective intravitreal transduction of rat Müller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R Klimczak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathologies of numerous retinal degenerative diseases can be attributed to a multitude of genetic factors, and individualized treatment options for afflicted patients are limited and cost-inefficient. In light of the shared neurodegenerative phenotype among these disorders, a safe and broad-based neuroprotective approach would be desirable to overcome these obstacles. As a result, gene delivery of secretable-neuroprotective factors to Müller cells, a type of retinal glia that contacts all classes of retinal neurons, represents an ideal approach to mediate protection of the entire retina through a simple and innocuous intraocular, or intravitreal, injection of an efficient vehicle such as an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV. Although several naturally occurring AAV variants have been isolated with a variety of tropisms, or cellular specificities, these vectors inefficiently infect Müller cells via intravitreal injection.We have previously applied directed evolution to create several novel AAV variants capable of efficient infection of both rat and human astrocytes through iterative selection of a panel of highly diverse AAV libraries. Here, in vivo and in vitro characterization of these isolated variants identifies a previously unreported AAV variant ShH10, closely related to AAV serotype 6 (AAV6, capable of efficient, selective Müller cell infection through intravitreal injection. Importantly, this new variant shows significantly improved transduction relative to AAV2 (>60% and AAV6.Our findings demonstrate that AAV is a highly versatile vector capable of powerful shifts in tropism from minor sequence changes. This isolated variant represents a new therapeutic vector to treat retinal degenerative diseases through secretion of neuroprotective factors from Müller cells as well as provides new opportunities to study their biological functions in the retina.

  19. A novel adeno-associated viral variant for efficient and selective intravitreal transduction of rat Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Ryan R; Koerber, James T; Dalkara, Deniz; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V

    2009-10-14

    The pathologies of numerous retinal degenerative diseases can be attributed to a multitude of genetic factors, and individualized treatment options for afflicted patients are limited and cost-inefficient. In light of the shared neurodegenerative phenotype among these disorders, a safe and broad-based neuroprotective approach would be desirable to overcome these obstacles. As a result, gene delivery of secretable-neuroprotective factors to Müller cells, a type of retinal glia that contacts all classes of retinal neurons, represents an ideal approach to mediate protection of the entire retina through a simple and innocuous intraocular, or intravitreal, injection of an efficient vehicle such as an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Although several naturally occurring AAV variants have been isolated with a variety of tropisms, or cellular specificities, these vectors inefficiently infect Müller cells via intravitreal injection. We have previously applied directed evolution to create several novel AAV variants capable of efficient infection of both rat and human astrocytes through iterative selection of a panel of highly diverse AAV libraries. Here, in vivo and in vitro characterization of these isolated variants identifies a previously unreported AAV variant ShH10, closely related to AAV serotype 6 (AAV6), capable of efficient, selective Müller cell infection through intravitreal injection. Importantly, this new variant shows significantly improved transduction relative to AAV2 (>60%) and AAV6. Our findings demonstrate that AAV is a highly versatile vector capable of powerful shifts in tropism from minor sequence changes. This isolated variant represents a new therapeutic vector to treat retinal degenerative diseases through secretion of neuroprotective factors from Müller cells as well as provides new opportunities to study their biological functions in the retina.

  20. Viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  1. Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

    2006-11-01

    Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing

  2. WNV infection - an emergent vector borne viral infection in Serbia: Current situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Tamaš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a neurovirulent mosquito-borne Flavivirus with zoonotic potential. Virus is maintained in nature in an enzootic transmission cycle between avian hosts and mosquito vectors, but occasionally infects other vertebrates. The infection in horses and humans can be asymptomatic or it can have different clinical manifestations ranging from light febrile diseases to fatal meningoencephalitis. Recently, the number, frequency and severity of outbreaks with neurological consequences for birds, humans and horses have increased dramatically throughout central and south Europe, including Serbia, posing a serious veterinary and public health problem. The emergency of WNV infections in Serbia is described through the current epidemiology situation based on recent data on the incidence of WNV infection among virus natural hosts and vectors; sentinel (horses and other animal species, and in human population. The results of the WNV serology studies conducted on horse blood samples collected in different occasions during the last six years, and the results of the serology studies conducted among other animal species like pigs, wild boars, roe deer and dogs in Serbia are presented and discussed. Also, the results of the first studies on WNV presence in mosquito vectors and in wild birds as virus natural hosts in Serbia are presented and analyzed. In addition, the data on the WNV serology studies conducted in human population in Serbia in the last few years, and the existing data of WNV outbreaks in 2012 and 2013 are included. Regarding the existing knowledge on WNV epidemiology situation, the crucial role of veterinary service in early detection of WNV presence and ongoing national program of WNV surveillance in sentinel animals, mosquitoes and wild birds are discussed.

  3. Highly Efficient Delivery of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to the Primate Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Clark, Mark E; Sandefer, Kristen J; Girkin, Chris A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the preferred vector for targeting gene expression to the retina. Subretinally injected AAV can efficiently transduce retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors in primate retina. Inner and middle primate retina can be transduced by intravitreally delivered AAV, but with low efficiency. This is due to dilution of vector, potential neutralization of capsid because it is not confined to the immune-privileged retinal compartment, and the presence of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a barrier separating the vitreous from the neural retina. We here describe a novel "subILM" injection method that addresses all three issues. Specifically, vector is placed in a surgically induced, hydrodissected space between the ILM and neural retina. In an initial experiment, we injected viscoelastic (Healon(®)), a substance we confirmed was biocompatible with AAV, to create a subILM bleb and subsequently injected AAV2-GFP into the bleb after irrigation with basic salt solution. For later experiments, we used a Healon-AAV mixture to place single, subILM injections. In all cases, subILM delivery of AAV was well tolerated-no inflammation or gross structural changes were observed by ophthalmological examination or optical coherence tomography. In-life fluorescence imaging revealed profound transgene expression within the area of the subILM injection bleb that persisted for the study duration. Uniform and extensive transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was achieved in the areas beneath the subILM bleb. Transduction of Müller glia, ON bipolar cells, and photoreceptors was also observed. Robust central labeling from green fluorescent protein-expressing RGCs confirmed their continued survival, and was observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus, and the pretectum. Our results confirm that the ILM is a major barrier to transduction by AAV in primate retina and that, when it is circumvented, the efficiency and

  4. A viral vector expressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Xiqing; Kong, Weina; Liu, Lingyun; Yu, Wenguo; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sun, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human HIF-1α gene (rAAV-HIF-1α), and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1α represses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein. Our results confirmed that rAAV-HIF-1α significantly reduces apoptosis induced by amyl...

  5. Adeno Associated Viral Vector Delivered RNAi for Gene Therapy of SOD1 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Lorelei; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are a leading cause of ALS, responsible for up to 20% of familial cases. Although the exact mechanism by which mutant SOD1 causes disease remains unknown, multiple studies have shown that reduction of the mutant species leads to delayed disease onset and extension of lifespan of animal models. This makes SOD1 an ideal target for gene therapy coupling adeno associated virus vector (AAV) gene delivery with RNAi molecules. In this review we summarize the studies done thus far attempting to decrease SOD1 gene expression, using AAV vectors as delivery tools, and RNAi as therapeutic molecules. Current hurdles to be overcome, such as the need for widespread gene delivery through the entire central nervous system (CNS), are discussed. Continued efforts to improve current AAV delivery methods and capsids will accelerate the application of these therapeutics to the clinic.

  6. Adeno-associated viral vector serotype 5 poorly transduces liver in rat models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Montenegro-Miranda

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies in mice and non-human primates showed that AAV serotype 5 provides efficient liver transduction and as such seems a promising vector for liver directed gene therapy. An advantage of AAV5 compared to serotype 8 already shown to provide efficient correction in a phase 1 trial in patients suffering from hemophilia B, is its lower seroprevalence in the general population. Our goal is liver directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, inherited severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by UGT1A1 deficiency. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, we compared the efficacy of AAV 5 and 8 to that of AAV1 previously shown to be effective. Ferrying a construct driving hepatocyte specific expression of UGT1A1, both AAV8 and AAV1 provided an efficient correction of hyperbilirubinemia. In contrast to these two and to other animal models AAV5 failed to provide any correction. To clarify whether this unexpected finding was due to the rat model used or due to a problem with AAV5, the efficacy of this serotype was compared in a mouse and two additional rat strains. Administration of an AAV5 vector expressing luciferase under the control of a liver specific promoter confirmed that this serotype poorly performed in rat liver, rendering it not suitable for proof of concept studies in this species.

  7. Activation of cytotoxic and regulatory functions of NK cells by Sindbis viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Tomer; Venticinque, Lisa; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Meruelo, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) represent a relatively novel anti-cancer modality. Like other new cancer treatments, effective OV therapy will likely require combination with conventional treatments. In order to design combinatorial treatments that work well together, a greater scrutiny of the mechanisms behind the individual treatments is needed. Sindbis virus (SV) based vectors have previously been shown to target and kill tumors in xenograft, syngeneic, and spontaneous mouse models. However, the effect of SV treatment on the immune system has not yet been studied. Here we used a variety of methods, including FACS analysis, cytotoxicity assays, cell depletion, imaging of tumor growth, cytokine blockade, and survival experiments, to study how SV therapy affects Natural Killer (NK) cell function in SCID mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma tumors. Surprisingly, we found that SV anti-cancer efficacy is largely NK cell-dependent. Furthermore, the enhanced therapeutic effect previously observed from Sin/IL12 vectors, which carry the gene for interleukin 12, is also NK cell dependent, but works through a separate IFNγ-dependent mechanism, which also induces the activation of peritoneal macrophages. These results demonstrate the multimodular nature of SV therapy, and open up new possibilities for potential synergistic or additive combinatorial therapies with other treatments.

  8. Insect vectors of pathogens in selected undisposed refuse dumps in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and abundance of these vectors suggests that vector-borne disease transmission is prevalent in Kaduna metropolis. The health implications of the presence of these insects and their role in disease transmission are highlighted. Proper disposal of refuse dumps is recommended to avoid public health ...

  9. Single-step cloning-screening method: a new tool for developing and studying high-titer viral vector producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A F; Formas-Oliveira, A S; Guerreiro, M R; Tomás, H A; Alves, P M; Coroadinha, A S

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a novel method merging the cloning of viral vector producer cells with vector titer screening, allowing for screening 200-500 clones in 2 weeks. It makes use of a GFP separated into two fragments, S10 and S11 (Split GFP), fluorescing only upon transcomplementation. Producer cells carrying a S11 viral transgene are cloned in 96-well plates and co-cultured with target cells stably expressing S10. During the period of clone expansion, S11 viruses infect S10 target cells reconstituting the GFP signal. Transcomplemented fluorescence data provide direct estimation of the clone's productivity and can be analyzed in terms of density distribution, offering valuable information on the average productivity of the cell population and allowing the identification of high-producing clones. The method was validated by establishing a retrovirus producer from a nude cell line, in cell lines demonstrating that the latter sustains increased titers. Finally, it was used to study genetic manipulation of glutathione metabolism in retrovirus production showing that changing cell metabolism steers higher vector expression with titer increases of more than one order of magnitude.This method is a valuable tool not only for cell line development but also for genetic manipulation of viral vector and/or producer cells contributing to advancing the field of viral gene therapy.

  10. Biology of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar eMurlidharan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a promising approach for treating a spectrum of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders by delivering corrective genes to the central nervous system (CNS. In particular, Adeno-Associated Viruses (AAV have emerged as promising tools for clinical gene transfer in a broad range of genetic disorders with neurological manifestations. In the current review, we have attempted to bridge our understanding of the biology of different AAV strains with their transduction profiles, cellular tropisms and transport mechanisms within the CNS. Continued efforts to dissect AAV-host interactions within the brain are likely to aid in the development of improved vectors for CNS-directed gene transfer applications in the clinic.

  11. Altering the selection capabilities of common cloning vectors via restriction enzyme mediated gene disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The cloning of gene sequences forms the basis for many molecular biological studies. One important step in the cloning process is the isolation of bacterial transformants carrying vector DNA. This involves a vector-encoded selectable marker gene, which in most cases, confers resistance to an antibiotic. However, there are a number of circumstances in which a different selectable marker is required or may be preferable. Such situations can include restrictions to host strain choice, two phase cloning experiments and mutagenesis experiments, issues that result in additional unnecessary cloning steps, in which the DNA needs to be subcloned into a vector with a suitable selectable marker. Results We have used restriction enzyme mediated gene disruption to modify the selectable marker gene of a given vector by cloning a different selectable marker gene into the original marker present in that vector. Cloning a new selectable marker into a pre-existing marker was found to change the selection phenotype conferred by that vector, which we were able to demonstrate using multiple commonly used vectors and multiple resistance markers. This methodology was also successfully applied not only to cloning vectors, but also to expression vectors while keeping the expression characteristics of the vector unaltered. Conclusions Changing the selectable marker of a given vector has a number of advantages and applications. This rapid and efficient method could be used for co-expression of recombinant proteins, optimisation of two phase cloning procedures, as well as multiple genetic manipulations within the same host strain without the need to remove a pre-existing selectable marker in a previously genetically modified strain. PMID:23497512

  12. A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector

    KAUST Repository

    He, Zhijian

    2015-04-02

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Developing safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems remains a major challenge. We present a new cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer for gene therapy that was synthesized by sequential polymerization of non-ionic 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and a new 2-oxazoline monomer, 2-(N-methyl, N-Boc-amino)-methyl-2-oxazoline, followed by deprotection of the pendant secondary amine groups. Upon mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA), CPOx forms small (diameter ≈80 nm) and narrowly dispersed polyplexes (PDI <0.2), which are stable upon dilution in saline and against thermal challenge. These polyplexes exhibited low plasma protein binding and very low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to the polyplexes of pDNA and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLL). CPOx/pDNA polyplexes at N/P = 5 bound considerably less plasma protein compared to polyplexes of PEG-b-PLL at the same N/P ratio. This is a unique aspect of the developed polyplexes emphasizing their potential for systemic delivery in vivo. The transfection efficiency of the polyplexes in B16 murine melanoma cells was low after 4 h, but increased significantly for 10 h exposure time, indicative of slow internalization of polyplexes. Addition of Pluronic P85 boosted the transfection using CPOx/pDNA polyplexes considerably. The low protein binding of CPOx/pDNA polyplexes is particularly interesting for the future development of targeted gene delivery.

  13. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  14. Cellular toxicity following application of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated RNA interference in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Erich M; Eggers, Ruben; Niclou, Simone P; Verhaagen, Joost

    2010-02-18

    After a spinal cord lesion, axon regeneration is inhibited by the presence of a diversity of inhibitory molecules in the lesion environment. At and around the lesion site myelin-associated inhibitors, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and several axon guidance molecules, including all members of the secreted (class 3) Semaphorins, are expressed. Interfering with multiple inhibitory signals could potentially enhance the previously reported beneficial effects of blocking single molecules. RNA interference (RNAi) is a tool that can be used to simultaneously silence expression of multiple genes. In this study we aimed to employ adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to target all Semaphorin class 3 signaling by knocking down its receptors, Neuropilin 1 (Npn-1) and Neuropilin 2 (Npn-2). We have successfully generated shRNAs that knock down Npn-1 and Npn-2 in a neuronal cell line. We detected substantial knockdown of Npn-2 mRNA when AAV5 viral vector particles expressing Npn-2 specific shRNAs were injected in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of the rat. Unexpectedly however, AAV1-mediated expression of Npn-2 shRNAs and a control shRNA in the red nucleus resulted in an adverse tissue response and neuronal degeneration. The observed toxicity was dose dependent and was not seen with control GFP expressing AAV vectors, implicating the shRNAs as the causative toxic agents. RNAi is a powerful tool to knock down Semaphorin receptor expression in neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo. However, when shRNAs are expressed at high levels in CNS neurons, they trigger an adverse tissue response leading to neuronal degradation.

  15. Cellular toxicity following application of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated RNA interference in the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaagen Joost

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a spinal cord lesion, axon regeneration is inhibited by the presence of a diversity of inhibitory molecules in the lesion environment. At and around the lesion site myelin-associated inhibitors, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs and several axon guidance molecules, including all members of the secreted (class 3 Semaphorins, are expressed. Interfering with multiple inhibitory signals could potentially enhance the previously reported beneficial effects of blocking single molecules. RNA interference (RNAi is a tool that can be used to simultaneously silence expression of multiple genes. In this study we aimed to employ adeno-associated virus (AAV mediated expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs to target all Semaphorin class 3 signaling by knocking down its receptors, Neuropilin 1 (Npn-1 and Neuropilin 2 (Npn-2. Results We have successfully generated shRNAs that knock down Npn-1 and Npn-2 in a neuronal cell line. We detected substantial knockdown of Npn-2 mRNA when AAV5 viral vector particles expressing Npn-2 specific shRNAs were injected in dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the rat. Unexpectedly however, AAV1-mediated expression of Npn-2 shRNAs and a control shRNA in the red nucleus resulted in an adverse tissue response and neuronal degeneration. The observed toxicity was dose dependent and was not seen with control GFP expressing AAV vectors, implicating the shRNAs as the causative toxic agents. Conclusions RNAi is a powerful tool to knock down Semaphorin receptor expression in neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo. However, when shRNAs are expressed at high levels in CNS neurons, they trigger an adverse tissue response leading to neuronal degradation.

  16. Synthesis of Mannosylated Polyethylenimine and Its Potential Application as Cell-Targeting Non-Viral Vector for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mannose polyethylenimine with a molecular weight of 25 k (Man-PEI25k was synthesized via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge using mannopyranosylphenyl isothiocyanate as a coupling reagent, and characterized by 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Spherical nanoparticles were formed with diameters of 80–250 nm when the copolymer was mixed with DNA at various charge ratios of copolymer/DNA (N/P. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the DNA had been condensed and retained by the PEI derivates at low N/P ratios. The Man-PEI25k/DNA complexes were less cytotoxic than the PEI complexes with a molecular weight of 25 k (PEI25k at the same N/P ratio. Laser scan confocal microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed that the Man-PEI25k/DNA complexes gave higher cell uptake efficiency in (Dendritic cells DC2.4 cells than HeLa cells. The transfection efficiency of Man-PEI25k was higher than that of PEI25k towards DC2.4 cells. These results indicated that Man-PEI25k could be used as a potential DC-targeting non-viral vector for gene therapy.

  17. Delivery of viral vectors to hepatic stellate cells in fibrotic livers using HVJ envelopes fused with targeted liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Joanna E; Kamps, Jan A A M; Poelstra, Klaas; Scherphof, Gerrit L; Meijer, Dirk K F; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are a major target for antifibrotic therapies in the liver and in particular gene delivery to these cells would be relevant. Previously, we demonstrated that mannose 6-phosphate human serum albumin (M6P-HSA) coupled liposomes accumulate in HSC in fibrotic livers. Here we prepared a M6P-HSA modified viral vector that allows the targeted delivery of plasmid DNA to HSC. Therefore, UV inactivated hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ) containing plasmid DNA was fused with M6P-HSA liposomes to yield HVJ liposomes targeted to HSC. These new particles had a diameter of approximately 200 nm, as determined by electron microscopy. In a carbon tetrachloride mouse model of liver fibrosis, M6P-HSA-HVJ-liposomes associated with HSC. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that fusion of M6P-HSA liposomes with HVJ envelopes results in HVJ particles that accumulate in HSC, allowing for new possibilities to interfere with fibrosis in the liver.

  18. Viral vector-mediated downregulation of RhoA increases survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christoph Koch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rho/ROCK pathway is a promising therapeutic target in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of various pathway members has been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and survival. However, because pharmacological inhibitors are inherently limited in their specificity, shRNA-mediated approaches can add more information on the function of each single kinase involved. Thus, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV to specifically downregulate RhoA via shRNA. We found that specific knockdown of RhoA promoted neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGC grown on the inhibitory substrate CSPG as well as neurite regeneration of primary midbrain neurons after scratch lesion. In the rat optic nerve crush model in vivo, downregulation of RhoA significantly enhanced axonal regeneration compared to control. Moreover, survival of RGCs transduced with AAV expressing RhoA-shRNA was substantially increased at two weeks after optic nerve axotomy.Compared to previous data using pharmacological inhibitors to target RhoA, its upstream regulator Nogo or its main downstream target ROCK2, the specific effects of RhoA downregulation shown here were more pronounced in regard to promoting RGC survival while the stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth were rather moderate. Taken together, we show here that specific knockdown of RhoA substantially increases neuronal survival after optic nerve axotomy and modestly increases neurite outgrowth in vitro and axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush.

  19. Viral vector-mediated downregulation of RhoA increases survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jan Christoph; Tönges, Lars; Michel, Uwe; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The Rho/ROCK pathway is a promising therapeutic target in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of various pathway members has been shown to promote neuronal regeneration and survival. However, because pharmacological inhibitors are inherently limited in their specificity, shRNA-mediated approaches can add more information on the function of each single kinase involved. Thus, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) to specifically downregulate Ras homologous member A (RhoA) via shRNA. We found that specific knockdown of RhoA promoted neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) grown on the inhibitory substrate chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) as well as neurite regeneration of primary midbrain neurons (PMN) after scratch lesion. In the rat optic nerve crush (ONC) model in vivo, downregulation of RhoA significantly enhanced axonal regeneration compared to control. Moreover, survival of RGC transduced with AAV expressing RhoA-shRNA was substantially increased at 2 weeks after optic nerve axotomy. Compared to previous data using pharmacological inhibitors to target RhoA, its upstream regulator Nogo or its main downstream target ROCK, the specific effects of RhoA downregulation shown here were most pronounced in regard to promoting RGC survival but neurite outgrowth and axonal regeneration were also increased significantly. Taken together, we show here that specific knockdown of RhoA substantially increases neuronal survival after optic nerve axotomy and modestly increases neurite outgrowth in vitro and axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush.

  20. Transduction of striatum and cortex tissues by adeno-associated viral vectors produced by herpes simplex virus- and baculovirus-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Steve; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Slgirim; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can be engineered to carry genetic material encoding therapeutic gene products that have demonstrated significant clinical promise. These viral vectors are typically produced in mammalian cells by the transient transfection of two or three plasmids encoding the AAV rep and cap genes, the adenovirus helper gene, and a gene of interest. Although this method can produce high-quality AAV vectors when used with multiple purification protocols, one critical limitation is the difficulty in scaling-up manufacturing, which poses a significant hurdle to the broad clinical utilization of AAV vectors. To address this challenge, recombinant herpes simplex virus type I (rHSV-1)- and recombinant baculovirus (rBac)-based methods have been established recently. These methods are more amenable to large-scale production of AAV vectors than methods using the transient transfection of mammalian cells. To investigate potential applications of AAV vectors produced by rHSV-1- or rBac-based platforms, the in vivo transduction of rHSV-1- or rBac-produced AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) vectors within the rat brain were examined by comparing them with vectors generated by the conventional transfection method. Injection of rHSV-1- or rBac-produced AAV vectors into rat striatum and cortex tissues revealed no differences in cellular tropism (i.e., predominantly neuronal targeting) or anteroposterior spread compared with AAV2 vectors produced by transient transfection. This report represents a step towards validating AAV vectors produced by the rHSV-1- and the rBac-based systems as promising tools, especially for delivering therapeutic molecules to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Parameter Selection Method for Support Vector Regression Based on Adaptive Fusion of the Mixed Kernel Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Support vector regression algorithm is widely used in fault diagnosis of rolling bearing. A new model parameter selection method for support vector regression based on adaptive fusion of the mixed kernel function is proposed in this paper. We choose the mixed kernel function as the kernel function of support vector regression. The mixed kernel function of the fusion coefficients, kernel function parameters, and regression parameters are combined together as the parameters of the state vector. Thus, the model selection problem is transformed into a nonlinear system state estimation problem. We use a 5th-degree cubature Kalman filter to estimate the parameters. In this way, we realize the adaptive selection of mixed kernel function weighted coefficients and the kernel parameters, the regression parameters. Compared with a single kernel function, unscented Kalman filter (UKF support vector regression algorithms, and genetic algorithms, the decision regression function obtained by the proposed method has better generalization ability and higher prediction accuracy.

  2. An efficient viral vector for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees and its induced resistance to Plum pox virus via silencing of a host factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2017-03-01

    RNA silencing is a powerful technology for molecular characterization of gene functions in plants. A commonly used approach to the induction of RNA silencing is through genetic transformation. A potent alternative is to use a modified viral vector for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to degrade RNA molecules sharing similar nucleotide sequence. Unfortunately, genomic studies in many allogamous woody perennials such as peach are severely hindered because they have a long juvenile period and are recalcitrant to genetic transformation. Here, we report the development of a viral vector derived from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a widespread fruit tree virus that is endemic in all Prunus fruit production countries and regions in the world. We show that the modified PNRSV vector, harbouring the sense-orientated target gene sequence of 100-200 bp in length in genomic RNA3, could efficiently trigger the silencing of a transgene or an endogenous gene in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. We further demonstrate that the PNRSV-based vector could be manipulated to silence endogenous genes in peach such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E isoform (eIF(iso)4E), a host factor of many potyviruses including Plum pox virus (PPV). Moreover, the eIF(iso)4E-knocked down peach plants were resistant to PPV. This work opens a potential avenue for the control of virus diseases in perennial trees via viral vector-mediated silencing of host factors, and the PNRSV vector may serve as a powerful molecular tool for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Retroviral DNA integration: viral and cellular determinants of target-site selection.

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    Mary K Lewinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses differ in their preferences for sites for viral DNA integration in the chromosomes of infected cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV integrates preferentially within active transcription units, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV integrates preferentially near transcription start sites and CpG islands. We investigated the viral determinants of integration-site selection using HIV chimeras with MLV genes substituted for their HIV counterparts. We found that transferring the MLV integrase (IN coding region into HIV (to make HIVmIN caused the hybrid to integrate with a specificity close to that of MLV. Addition of MLV gag (to make HIVmGagmIN further increased the similarity of target-site selection to that of MLV. A chimeric virus with MLV Gag only (HIVmGag displayed targeting preferences different from that of both HIV and MLV, further implicating Gag proteins in targeting as well as IN. We also report a genome-wide analysis indicating that MLV, but not HIV, favors integration near DNase I-hypersensitive sites (i.e., +/- 1 kb, and that HIVmIN and HIVmGagmIN also favored integration near these features. These findings reveal that IN is the principal viral determinant of integration specificity; they also reveal a new role for Gag-derived proteins, and strengthen models for integration targeting based on tethering of viral IN proteins to host proteins.

  4. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison C Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i the size of the factor VIII (fVIII transgene, (ii humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A.

  5. Global diffuse distribution in the brain and efficient gene delivery to the dorsal root ganglia by intrathecal injection of adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Naotaka; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Motoko; Miyake, Noriko; Kurai, Toshiyuki; Teramoto, Akira; Shimada, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    The success of gene therapy for inherited neurodegenerative diseases such as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) depends on the development of efficient gene delivery throughout the brain guarded by the blood-brain barrier and achieves distribution of the deficient enzyme throughout the brain. Direct injection of viral vector into the brain parenchyma is too invasive and may not be sufficient to treat the entire brain. As an alternative approach, we examined the feasibility of intrathecal (IT) injection of adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (AAV1). AAV1 vector expressing arylsulfatase A (ASA) and green fluorescence protein (GFP) was intrathecally injected into ASA knockout MLD model mice. Expression of GFP was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemical methods, whereas the concentration of ASA was determined by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Broad distribution of GFP expression was seen throughout the brain after IT injection of AAV1 vector. In addition, a large number of nerve fibers in the dorsal spinal cord and many neural cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia were efficiently transduced. Widespread distribution of ASA activity and a significant reduction of sulfatide content were confirmed in treated MLD model mice. IT injection of AAV1 vector is a useful and non-invasive method for widespread gene delivery to the brain and dorsal root ganglia. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A feature selection approach towards progressive vector transmission over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ru; Song, Jia; Feng, Min

    2017-09-01

    WebGIS has been applied for visualizing and sharing geospatial information popularly over the Internet. In order to improve the efficiency of the client applications, the web-based progressive vector transmission approach is proposed. Important features should be selected and transferred firstly, and the methods for measuring the importance of features should be further considered in the progressive transmission. However, studies on progressive transmission for large-volume vector data have mostly focused on map generalization in the field of cartography, but rarely discussed on the selection of geographic features quantitatively. This paper applies information theory for measuring the feature importance of vector maps. A measurement model for the amount of information of vector features is defined based upon the amount of information for dealing with feature selection issues. The measurement model involves geometry factor, spatial distribution factor and thematic attribute factor. Moreover, a real-time transport protocol (RTP)-based progressive transmission method is then presented to improve the transmission of vector data. To clearly demonstrate the essential methodology and key techniques, a prototype for web-based progressive vector transmission is presented, and an experiment of progressive selection and transmission for vector features is conducted. The experimental results indicate that our approach clearly improves the performance and end-user experience of delivering and manipulating large vector data over the Internet.

  7. Tropism and toxicity of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1,2,5,6,7,8,9 in rat neurons and glia in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Douglas B.; Powers, Kathleen; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors are frequently used for gene delivery to the central nervous system and are capable of transducing neurons and glia in vitro. In this study, seven serotypes of a rAAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were characterized for tropism and toxicity in primary cortical cells derived from embryonic rat brain. At 2 days after transduction, serotypes 1 and 5 through 8 expressed GFP predominately in glia, but by 6 days post-transduction...

  8. Assessment of virally vectored autoimmunity as a biocontrol strategy for cane toads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie A Pallister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cane toad, Bufo (Chaunus marinus, is one of the most notorious vertebrate pests introduced into Australia over the last 200 years and, so far, efforts to identify a naturally occurring B. marinus-specific pathogen for use as a biological control agent have been unsuccessful. We explored an alternative approach that entailed genetically modifying a pathogen with broad host specificity so that it no longer caused disease, but carried a gene to disrupt the cane toad life cycle in a species specific manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The adult beta globin gene was selected as the model gene for proof of concept of autoimmunity as a biocontrol method for cane toads. A previous report showed injection of bullfrog tadpoles with adult beta globin resulted in an alteration in the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs as well as reduced survival. In B. marinus we established for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin exists. The effect of injecting B. marinus tadpoles with purified recombinant adult globin protein was then assessed using behavioural (swim speed in tadpoles and jump length in metamorphs, developmental (time to metamorphosis, weight and length at various developmental stages, protein profile of adult globin and genetic (adult globin mRNA levels measures. However, we were unable to detect any differences between treated and control animals. Further, globin delivery using Bohle iridovirus, an Australian ranavirus isolate belonging to the Iridovirus family, did not reduce the survival of metamorphs or alter the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While we were able to show for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin does occur in B. marinus, we were not able to induce autoimmunity and disrupt metamorphosis. The short development time of B. marinus tadpoles may preclude this approach.

  9. Assessment of virally vectored autoimmunity as a biocontrol strategy for cane toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Jackie A; Halliday, Damien C T; Robinson, Anthony J; Venables, Daryl; Voysey, Rhonda D; Boyle, Donna G; Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Hardy, Christopher M; Siddon, Nicole A; Hyatt, Alex D

    2011-01-25

    The cane toad, Bufo (Chaunus) marinus, is one of the most notorious vertebrate pests introduced into Australia over the last 200 years and, so far, efforts to identify a naturally occurring B. marinus-specific pathogen for use as a biological control agent have been unsuccessful. We explored an alternative approach that entailed genetically modifying a pathogen with broad host specificity so that it no longer caused disease, but carried a gene to disrupt the cane toad life cycle in a species specific manner. The adult beta globin gene was selected as the model gene for proof of concept of autoimmunity as a biocontrol method for cane toads. A previous report showed injection of bullfrog tadpoles with adult beta globin resulted in an alteration in the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs as well as reduced survival. In B. marinus we established for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin exists. The effect of injecting B. marinus tadpoles with purified recombinant adult globin protein was then assessed using behavioural (swim speed in tadpoles and jump length in metamorphs), developmental (time to metamorphosis, weight and length at various developmental stages, protein profile of adult globin) and genetic (adult globin mRNA levels) measures. However, we were unable to detect any differences between treated and control animals. Further, globin delivery using Bohle iridovirus, an Australian ranavirus isolate belonging to the Iridovirus family, did not reduce the survival of metamorphs or alter the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs. While we were able to show for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin does occur in B. marinus, we were not able to induce autoimmunity and disrupt metamorphosis. The short development time of B. marinus tadpoles may preclude this approach.

  10. P01.22GENERATION OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELL-DERIVED NEURAL STEM CELLS WITHOUT USING VIRAL VECTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, T.; Kawaji, H.; Kamio, Y.; Amano, S.; Sameshima, T.; Sakai, N.; Tokuyama, T.; Namba, H.

    2014-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered stem cells are is one of the most feasible and promising approaches for glioma therapy. Various stem cells, such as neural and mesenchymal stem cells, have been tested for their tumor tropic activity. We have tested stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (HSV-TK, suicide gene) encoding a viral thymidine kinase which phosphorylates prodrug ganciclovir (GCV) for experimental glioma in rodents, because the HSV-TK/GCV system generates a potent bystander effect. Recently we found that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs) also had tumor tropic activity under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. One of the major limitations of use of HSV-TK gene-trasnduced iPSs in clinical field is the use of virus vectors that randomly integrate into the host genome and are associated with the risk of malignant transformation due to insertional mutagenesis. In the present study, we present a non-viral transfection method for obtaining HSV-TK expressing iPS-derived neural stem cells to circumvent the concerns associated with use of viral vectors. Mouse iPS cells were generated from somatic cells by the plasmid vectors expressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc and Nanog-GFP-IRES-Puror. We differentiated the mouse iPS cells into neural stem cells and then transfected with the plasmid containing HSV-TK gene using electroporation method. In this way, we obtained HSV-TK gene-trasnduced iPSs-derived neural stem cells without using viral vectors for further pre-clinical expariments of glioma therapy.

  11. Immune responses to rAAV6: The influence of canine parvovirus vaccination and neonatal administration of viral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L H Arnett

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV. rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, one month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice.

  12. The Use of HIS6 Gene as a Selectable Marker for Yeast Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMADEARTIKA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS6 gene has been shown to be functional as a selectable marker for selecting and maintaining a yeast vector in yeast S. cerevisiae host cells. The yeast HIS6 gene encodes an enzyme involved in the yeast histidine biosynthesis. The yeast HIS6 gene was cloned into a yeast expression vector. The resultant recombinant plasmid was introduced into yeast host cells defective in endogenous HIS6 gene. The functionality of the HIS6 gene as a selectable marker was tested by growing transformed cells on selective minimum medium lacking histidine supplementation.

  13. Identifying selection in the within-host evolution of influenza using viral sequence data.

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    Christopher J R Illingworth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The within-host evolution of influenza is a vital component of its epidemiology. A question of particular interest is the role that selection plays in shaping the viral population over the course of a single infection. We here describe a method to measure selection acting upon the influenza virus within an individual host, based upon time-resolved genome sequence data from an infection. Analysing sequence data from a transmission study conducted in pigs, describing part of the haemagglutinin gene (HA1 of an influenza virus, we find signatures of non-neutrality in six of a total of sixteen infections. We find evidence for both positive and negative selection acting upon specific alleles, while in three cases, the data suggest the presence of time-dependent selection. In one infection we observe what is potentially a specific immune response against the virus; a non-synonymous mutation in an epitope region of the virus is found to be under initially positive, then strongly negative selection. Crucially, given the lack of homologous recombination in influenza, our method accounts for linkage disequilibrium between nucleotides at different positions in the haemagglutinin gene, allowing for the analysis of populations in which multiple mutations are present at any given time. Our approach offers a new insight into the dynamics of influenza infection, providing a detailed characterisation of the forces that underlie viral evolution.

  14. Adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene transfer in the red nucleus of the adult rat brain: comparative analysis of the transduction properties of seven AAV serotypes and lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blits, Bas; Derks, Sanne; Twisk, Jaap; Ehlert, Erich; Prins, Jolanda; Verhaagen, Joost

    2010-01-15

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAVs) are very promising gene transfer tools for the nervous system. We have compared the efficiency of gene expression of seven AAV serotypes in young adult rats following a single injection in a major nucleus of the mid brain, the red nucleus, which is the origin of the rubrospinal tract. AAV serotypes 1-6 and 8 and a lentiviral vector (LV) were used, all encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. AAV vectors were titer matched at 5x10(11) genomic copies (GC)/ml and 1mul was injected into the red nucleus. The proportion of transduced neurons in the red nucleus was determined at 1 and 4 weeks post-injection. AAV1 would be the vector of choice if the aim would be to overexpress a transgene at high level for a longer period of time. AAV5 and AAV8 would be the preferred serotype if onset of expression is should be somewhat delayed. The use of lentiviral vectors should be considered when transduction of both glial cells and neurons is required. Serotypes 3 and 4 did not transduce red nucleus neurons. AAV1, AAV6 and LV would be the vectors of choice if the aim of the experiment would be to rapidly express a transgene. The current data are important for the design of experiments that aim to study the effects of transgene products on the regenerative capacity of injured red nucleus neurons.

  15. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  16. About the use of vector optimization for company's contractors selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Medvedev, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    For effective functioning of an enterprise it is necessary to make a right choice of partners: suppliers of raw material, buyers of finished products, and others with which the company interacts in the course of their business. However, the presence on the market of big amount of enterprises makes the choice of the most appropriate among them very difficult and requires the ability to objectively assess of the possible partners, based on multilateral analysis of their activities. This analysis can be carried out based on the solution of multiobjective problem of mathematical programming by using the methods of vector optimization. The present work addresses the theoretical foundations of such approach and also describes an algorithm realizing proposed method on practical example.

  17. [Expression patterns of non-viral transfection with GFP in the organ of Corti in vitro and in vivo. Gene therapy of the inner ear with non-viral vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, M; Pfannenstiel, S; Klingmann, C; Baumann, I; Plinkert, P K; Staecker, H

    2008-05-01

    Diseases of the inner ear such as presbycusis, tinnitus, sudden hearing loss, and vertigo affect many patients, but so far there are no specific therapy options. Gene therapy might become a potential modality of treatment. Viral vectors are standard in animal models to date. Future considerations, however, call for a further evaluation of non-viral transfection methods. The non-viral transfection agents Metafectene, Superfect, Effectene, and Mirus TransIT were incubated with a plasmid coding for GFP. In vivo, the plasmid-agent mix was injected via the membrane of the round window, and 48 h later the inner ear was perfused, harvested, decalcified, and histologically evaluated for GFP expression. Cationic lipids (Metafectene) and dendrimers (Superfect) were able to transfect cells in the area of the organ of Corti and lead to GFP expression. The polyamine (Mirus TransIT) did show expression of GFP in the area of Rosenthal's canal and in the area of the inner hair cell. The combination of a non-liposomal lipid with a DNA condensing component (Effectene) did not show transfection of the organ of Corti. In the area of the spiral ganglia cells, GFP expression was seen with all the transfection agents. Non-viral transfection agents are able to introduce a reporter gene in cells of the inner ear in vitro and in vivo. There are, however, differences in the efficiency of the transfection. They might be an alternative in gene therapy of the inner ear. Further investigations to elucidate their potential are needed.

  18. An RNA Domain Imparts Specificity and Selectivity to a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Jardine, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During assembly, double-stranded DNA viruses, including bacteriophages and herpesviruses, utilize a powerful molecular motor to package their genomic DNA into a preformed viral capsid. An integral component of the packaging motor in the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage ϕ29 is a viral genome-encoded pentameric ring of RNA (prohead RNA [pRNA]). pRNA is a 174-base transcript comprised of two domains, domains I and II. Early studies initially isolated a 120-base form (domain I only) that retains high biological activity in vitro; hence, no function could be assigned to domain II. Here we define a role for this domain in the packaging process. DNA packaging using restriction digests of ϕ29 DNA showed that motors with the 174-base pRNA supported the correct polarity of DNA packaging, selectively packaging the DNA left end. In contrast, motors containing the 120-base pRNA had compromised specificity, packaging both left- and right-end fragments. The presence of domain II also provides selectivity in competition assays with genomes from related phages. Furthermore, motors with the 174-base pRNA were restrictive, in that they packaged only one DNA fragment into the head, whereas motors with the 120-base pRNA packaged several fragments into the head, indicating multiple initiation events. These results show that domain II imparts specificity and stringency to the motor during the packaging initiation events that precede DNA translocation. Heteromeric rings of pRNA demonstrated that one or two copies of domain II were sufficient to impart this selectivity/stringency. Although ϕ29 differs from other double-stranded DNA phages in having an RNA motor component, the function provided by pRNA is carried on the motor protein components in other phages. IMPORTANCE During virus assembly, genome packaging involves the delivery of newly synthesized viral nucleic acid into a protein shell. In the double-stranded DNA phages and herpesviruses, this is accomplished by a powerful

  19. A viral vectored prime-boost immunization regime targeting the malaria Pfs25 antigen induces transmission-blocking activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Goodman

    Full Text Available The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63, human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a heterologous prime-boost regime. Immunization of mice with AdHu5 Pfs25 at week 0 and MVA Pfs25 at week 10 (Ad-MVA Pfs25 resulted in high anti-Pfs25 IgG titers, consisting of predominantly isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a. A single priming immunization with ChAd63 Pfs25 was as effective as AdHu5 Pfs25 with respect to ELISA titers at 8 weeks post-immunization. Sera from Ad-MVA Pfs25 immunized mice inhibited the transmission of P. falciparum to the mosquito both ex vivo and in vivo. In a standard membrane-feeding assay using NF54 strain P. falciparum, oocyst intensity in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes was significantly reduced in an IgG concentration-dependent manner when compared to control feeds (96% reduction of intensity, 78% reduction in prevalence at a 1 in 5 dilution of sera. In addition, an in vivo transmission-blocking effect was also demonstrated by direct feeding of immunized mice infected with Pfs25DR3, a chimeric P. berghei line expressing Pfs25 in place of endogenous Pbs25. In this assay the density of Pfs25DR3 oocysts was significantly reduced when mosquitoes were fed on vaccinated as compared to control mice (67% reduction of intensity, 28% reduction in prevalence and specific IgG titer correlated with efficacy. These data confirm the utility of the adenovirus-MVA vaccine platform for the induction of antibodies with transmission-blocking activity, and support the continued development of this alternative approach to transmission-blocking malaria subunit

  20. The Use of HIS6 Gene as a Selectable Marker for Yeast Vector

    OpenAIRE

    IMADEARTIKA,

    2009-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS6 gene has been shown to be functional as a selectable marker for selecting and maintaining a yeast vector in yeast S. cerevisiae host cells. The yeast HIS6 gene encodes an enzyme involved in the yeast histidine biosynthesis. The yeast HIS6 gene was cloned into a yeast expression vector. The resultant recombinant plasmid was introduced into yeast host cells defective in endogenous HIS6 gene. The functionality of the HIS6 gene as a selectable marker was te...

  1. Comparative analyses of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 9 in marmoset, mouse and macaque cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watakabe, Akiya; Ohtsuka, Masanari; Kinoshita, Masaharu; Takaji, Masafumi; Isa, Kaoru; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Isa, Tadashi; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    Here we investigated the transduction characteristics of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) serotypes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 9 in the marmoset cerebral cortex. Using three constructs that each has hrGFP under ubiquitous (CMV), or neuron-specific (CaMKII and Synapsin I (SynI)) promoters, we investigated (1) the extent of viral spread, (2) cell type tropism, and (3) neuronal transduction efficiency of each serotype. AAV2 was clearly distinct from other serotypes in small spreading and neuronal tropism. We did not observe significant differences in viral spread among other serotypes. Regarding the cell tropism, AAV1, 5, 8 and 9 exhibited mostly glial expression for CMV construct. However, when the CaMKII construct was tested, cortical neurons were efficiently transduced (>∼70% in layer 3) by all serotypes, suggesting that glial expression obscured neuronal expression for CMV construct. For both SynI and CaMKII constructs, we observed generally high-level expression in large pyramidal cells especially in layer 5, as well as in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. The expression from the CaMKII construct was more uniformly observed in excitatory cells compared with SynI construct. Injection of the same viral preparations in mouse and macaque cortex resulted in essentially the same result with some species-specific differences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Viral phylodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Volz

    Full Text Available Viral phylodynamics is defined as the study of how epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes act and potentially interact to shape viralphylogenies. Since the coining of the term in 2004, research on viral phylodynamics has focused on transmission dynamics in an effort to shed light on how these dynamics impact viral genetic variation. Transmission dynamics can be considered at the level of cells within an infected host, individual hosts within a population, or entire populations of hosts. Many viruses, especially RNA viruses, rapidly accumulate genetic variation because of short generation times and high mutation rates. Patterns of viral genetic variation are therefore heavily influenced by how quickly transmission occurs and by which entities transmit to one another. Patterns of viral genetic variation will also be affected by selection acting on viral phenotypes. Although viruses can differ with respect to many phenotypes, phylodynamic studies have to date tended to focus on a limited number of viral phenotypes. These include virulence phenotypes, phenotypes associated with viral transmissibility, cell or tissue tropism phenotypes, and antigenic phenotypes that can facilitate escape from host immunity. Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread[2], spatio-temporal dynamics including metapopulation dynamics[3], zoonotic transmission, tissue tropism[4], and antigenic drift[5]. The quantitative investigation of these processes through the consideration of viral phylogenies is the central aim of viral phylodynamics.

  3. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    -based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral......-68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential...... vectors encoding both M2 and M3. Additionally we show that M3 immunization prevented the usual development of virus-induced splenomegaly at 2-3 weeks post-infection. This is the first time that immunization with a non-replicating vaccine has lead to a significantly reduced viral load at time points beyond...

  4. A potent replicative delta-24 adenoviral vector driven by the promoter of human papillomavirus 16 that is highly selective for associated neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Cervantes-García, Daniel; Martínez-Dávila, Irma A; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Alemany-Bonastre, Ramón; Silva-Platas, Christian I; Lugo-Trampe, Angel; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Galván-Salazar, Héctor R; Coronel-Tene, Christian G; Sánchez-Santillán, Carlos F; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2007-10-01

    Several human epithelial neoplasms are associated with high-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) such as cervical, anorectal, and other carcinomas. For some tumor types the current therapeutic tools are only palliative. Conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds) are promising antineoplastic agents, which also can trigger confined antitumor effects. We constructed a series of CRAds driven by the upstream regulatory promoter region (URR) of an Asian-American variant of HPV-16, which contained different mutations at the E1A region (dl1015 and/or Delta24) and wild-type. All vectors were tested in vitro for viral replication and cytotoxicity. Viral DNA replication and E1A expression were also assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, we confirmed the antitumoral efficacy of this vector in injected and non-injected xenotransplanted cervical tumors in a murine model for tumor regression and survival studies. A vector denominated Ad-URR/E1ADelta24 displayed a potent cytopathic effect associated with high selectivity for HPV+ cell lines. We found that the oncolytic effect of this CRAd was comparable to Ad-wt or Ad-Delta24, but this efficacy was significantly attenuated in HPV- cell lines, an effect that was contributed by the URR promoter. Ad-URR/E1ADelta24 was very effective to control tumor growth, in both, injected and non-injected tumors generated with two different HPV+ cell lines. CRAd Ad-URR/E1ADelta24 is a highly selective vector for HPV+ cell lines and tumors that preserves the oncolytic efficacy of Ad-wt and Ad-Delta24. Our preclinical data suggest that this vector may be useful and safe for the treatment of tumors induced by HPV, like cervical cancers. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Novel sulI binary vectors enable an inexpensive foliar selection method in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jamison

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is conferred by the sulI gene found on many Enterobacteriaceae R plasmids and Tn21 type transposons. The sulI gene encodes a sulfonamide insensitive dihydropteroate synthase enzyme required for folate biosynthesis. Transformation of tobacco, potato or Arabidopsis using sulI as a selectable marker generates sulfadiazine-resistant plants. Typically sulI-based selection of transgenic plants is performed on tissue culture media under sterile conditions. Findings A set of novel binary vectors containing a sulI selectable marker expression cassette were constructed and used to generate transgenic Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the sulI selectable marker can be utilized for direct selection of plants grown in soil with a simple foliar spray application procedure. A highly effective and inexpensive high throughput screening strategy to identify transgenic Arabidopsis without use of tissue culture was developed. Conclusion Novel sulI-containing Agrobacterium binary vectors designed to over-express a gene of interest or to characterize a test promoter in transgenic plants have been constructed. These new vector tools combined with the various beneficial attributes of sulfonamide selection and the simple foliar screening strategy provide an advantageous alternative for plant biotechnology researchers. The set of binary vectors is freely available upon request.

  6. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor hippocampal overexpression via viral vectors is associated with modest anxiolytic-like and proconvulsant effects in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V; Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2012-01-01

    -like effect in rodents. The present study explored an alternative and more specific approach: overexpression of Y1 receptors. Using a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) encoding the Y1 gene (rAAV-Y1), we, for the first time, induced overexpression of functional transgene Y1 receptors...... in the hippocampus of adult mice and tested the animals in anxiety- and depression-like behavior. Hippocampal Y1 receptors have been suggested to mediate seizure-promoting effect, so the effects of rAAV-induced Y1 receptor overexpression were also tested in kainate-induced seizures. Y1 receptor transgene...... overexpression was found to be associated with modest anxiolytic-like effect in the open field and elevated plus maze tests, but no effect was seen on depression-like behavior using the tail suspension and forced swim tests. However, the rAAV-Y1 vector modestly aggravated kainate-induced seizures. These data...

  7. Adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1 and 5 targeted to the neonatal rat and pig striatum induce widespread transgene expression in the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Stott, Simon R W; Mattsson, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    as striatal input and output areas, including large parts of the cortex. In both species, rAAV5 resulted in a more widespread transgene expression compared to rAAV1. In neonatal rats, rAAV5 also transduced several other areas such as the olfactory bulbs, hippocampus, and septum. Phenotypic analysis of the GFP......Viral vector-mediated gene transfer has emerged as a powerful means to target transgene expression in the central nervous system. Here we characterized the efficacy of serotypes 1 and 5 recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) after stereotaxic...... to study effects of genetic manipulation in this non-primate large animal species. Finally, we generated an atlas of the Göttingen minipig brain for guiding future studies in this large animal species....

  8. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor reverses atrophy of rubrospinal neurons following both acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Blits, Bas; Dijkhuizen, Paul A; te Beek, Erik T; Bakker, Arne; van Heerikhuize, Joop J; Pool, Chris W; Hermens, Wim T J; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, Joost

    2004-03-01

    Rubrospinal neurons (RSNs) undergo marked atrophy after cervical axotomy. This progressive atrophy may impair the regenerative capacity of RSNs in response to repair strategies that are targeted to promote rubrospinal tract regeneration. Here, we investigated whether we could achieve long-term rescue of RSNs from lesion-induced atrophy by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We show for the first time that AAV vectors can be used for the persistent transduction of highly atrophic neurons in the red nucleus (RN) for up to 18 months after injury. Furthermore, BDNF gene transfer into the RN following spinal axotomy resulted in counteraction of atrophy in both the acute and chronic stage after injury. These novel findings demonstrate that a gene therapeutic approach can be used to reverse atrophy of lesioned CNS neurons for an extended period of time.

  9. Viral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño-Corvo, P; Martín-Duque, P

    2006-12-01

    Cancer is a multigenic disorder involving mutations of both tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A large body of preclinical data, however, has suggested that cancer growth can be arrested or reversed by treatment with gene transfer vectors that carry a single growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic gene or a gene that can recruit immune responses against the tumor. Many of these gene transfer vectors are modified viruses. The ability for the delivery of therapeutic genes, made them desirable for engineering virus vector systems. The viral vectors recently in laboratory and clinical use are based on RNA and DNA viruses processing very different genomic structures and host ranges. Particular viruses have been selected as gene delivery vehicles because of their capacities to carry foreign genes and their ability to efficiently deliver these genes associated with efficient gene expression. These are the major reasons why viral vectors derived from retroviruses, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, herpesvirus and poxvirus are employed in more than 70% of clinical gene therapy trials worldwide. Because these vector systems have unique advantages and limitations, each has applications for which it is best suited. Retroviral vectors can permanently integrate into the genome of the infected cell, but require mitotic cell division for transduction. Adenoviral vectors can efficiently deliver genes to a wide variety of dividing and nondividing cell types, but immune elimination of infected cells often limits gene expression in vivo. Herpes simplex virus can deliver large amounts of exogenous DNA; however, cytotoxicity and maintenance of transgene expression remain as obstacles. AAV also infects many non-dividing and dividing cell types, but has a limited DNA capacity. This review discusses current and emerging virusbased genetic engineering strategies for the delivery of therapeutic molecules or several approaches for cancer treatment.

  10. Accurate Identification and Quantification of DNA Species by Next-Generation Sequencing in Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Produced in Insect Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Lecomte, Emilie; Guy-Duché, Aurélien; Saleun, Sylvie; Roulet, Alain; Lopez-Roques, Céline; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Léger, Adrien; Blouin, Véronique; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Moullier, Philippe; Ayuso, Eduard

    2017-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have proven excellent tools for the treatment of many genetic diseases and other complex diseases. However, the illegitimate encapsidation of DNA contaminants within viral particles constitutes a major safety concern for rAAV-based therapies. Moreover, the development of rAAV vectors for early-phase clinical trials has revealed the limited accuracy of the analytical tools used to characterize these new and complex drugs. Although most published data concerning residual DNA in rAAV preparations have been generated by quantitative PCR, we have developed a novel single-strand virus sequencing (SSV-Seq) method for quantification of DNA contaminants in AAV vectors produced in mammalian cells by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Here, we describe the adaptation of SSV-Seq for the accurate identification and quantification of DNA species in rAAV stocks produced in insect cells. We found that baculoviral DNA was the most abundant contaminant, representing less than 2.1% of NGS reads regardless of serotype (2, 8, or rh10). Sf9 producer cell DNA was detected at low frequency (≤0.03%) in rAAV lots. Advanced computational analyses revealed that (1) baculoviral sequences close to the inverted terminal repeats preferentially underwent illegitimate encapsidation, and (2) single-nucleotide variants were absent from the rAAV genome. The high-throughput sequencing protocol described here enables effective DNA quality control of rAAV vectors produced in insect cells, and is adapted to conform with regulatory agency safety requirements.

  11. Amelioration of chronic neuropathic pain after partial nerve injury by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated over-expression of BDNF in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, M J; Blits, B; Ruitenberg, M J; Verhaagen, J; Oudega, M

    2002-10-01

    Changing the levels of neurotrophins in the spinal cord micro-environment after nervous system injury has been proposed to recover normal function, such that behavioral response to peripheral stimuli does not lead to chronic pain. We have investigated the effects of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV)-mediated over-expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the spinal cord on chronic neuropathic pain after unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. The rAAV-BDNF vector was injected into the dorsal horn at the thirteenth thoracic spinal cord vertebra (L(1) level) 1 week after CCI. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by CCI in the hindpaws were permanently reversed, beginning 1 week after vector injection, compared with a similar injection of a control rAAV-GFP vector (green fluorescent protein) or saline. In situ hybridization for BDNF demonstrated that both dorsal and ventral lumbar spinal neurons contained an intense signal for BDNF mRNA, at 1 to 8 weeks after vector injection. There was no similar BDNF mRNA over-expression associated with either injections of saline or rAAV-GFP. These data suggest that chronic neuropathic pain is sensitive to early spinal BDNF levels after partial nerve injury and that rAAV-mediated gene transfer could potentially be used to reverse chronic pain after nervous system injuries in humans.

  12. Phase 2 clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing α1-antitrypsin: interim results.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flotte, Terence R

    2011-10-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors offer promise for the gene therapy of α(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In our prior trial, an rAAV vector expressing human AAT (rAAV1-CB-hAAT) provided sustained, vector-derived AAT expression for >1 year. In the current phase 2 clinical trial, this same vector, produced by a herpes simplex virus complementation method, was administered to nine AAT-deficient individuals by intramuscular injection at doses of 6.0×10(11), 1.9×10(12), and 6.0×10(12) vector genomes\\/kg (n=3 subjects\\/dose). Vector-derived expression of normal (M-type) AAT in serum was dose dependent, peaked on day 30, and persisted for at least 90 days. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild injection site reactions and no serious adverse events. Serum creatine kinase was transiently elevated on day 30 in five of six subjects in the two higher dose groups and normalized by day 45. As expected, all subjects developed anti-AAV antibodies and interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV peptides, and no subjects developed antibodies to AAT. One subject in the mid-dose group developed T cell responses to a single AAT peptide unassociated with any clinical effects. Muscle biopsies obtained on day 90 showed strong immunostaining for AAT and moderate to marked inflammatory cell infiltrates composed primarily of CD3-reactive T lymphocytes that were primarily of the CD8(+) subtype. These results support the feasibility and safety of AAV gene therapy for AAT deficiency, and indicate that serum levels of vector-derived normal human AAT >20 μg\\/ml can be achieved. However, further improvements in the design or delivery of rAAV-AAT vectors will be required to achieve therapeutic target serum AAT concentrations.

  13. AAV ancestral reconstruction library enables selection of broadly infectious viral variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Ortiz, J; Ojala, D S; Westesson, O; Weinstein, J R; Wong, S Y; Steinsapir, A; Kumar, S; Holmes, I; Schaffer, D V

    2015-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. However, enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties and to gain insights into AAV's evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes and, in general, ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not use sialic acids, galactose or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19- to 31-fold higher gene expression in the muscle compared with AAV1, a clinically used serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy.

  14. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CD8+ CTL lines were derived from two patients and maintained in long-term cultures. Target cell infections with E1-deleted and E1-plus E2-deleted adenoviruses, as well as transcription-blocking experiments with actinomycin D, revealed that host T-cell recognition did not require viral gene transcription. Target cells treated with brefeldin A were not lysed, indicating that viral input protein-derived peptides are associated with HLA class I molecules. Using recombinant capsid component-loaded targets, we observed that the three major proteins could be recognized. These results raise the question of the use of multideleted adenoviruses for gene therapy in the quest to diminish antivector CTL responses. PMID:10906225

  15. Genetics and Genomics of Cotton Leaf Curl Disease, Its Viral Causal Agents and Whitefly Vector: A Way Forward to Sustain Cotton Fiber Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehboob-ur- Rahman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD after its first epidemic in 1912 in Nigeria, has spread to different cotton growing countries including United States, Pakistan, India, and China. The disease is of viral origin—transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, which is difficult to control because of the prevalence of multiple virulent viral strains or related species. The problem is further complicated as the CLCuD causing virus complex has a higher recombination rate. The availability of alternate host crops like tomato, okra, etc., and practicing mixed type farming system have further exaggerated the situation by adding synergy to the evolution of new viral strains and vectors. Efforts to control this disease using host plant resistance remained successful using two gene based-resistance that was broken by the evolution of new resistance breaking strain called Burewala virus. Development of transgenic cotton using both pathogen and non-pathogenic derived approaches are in progress. In future, screening for new forms of host resistance, use of DNA markers for the rapid incorporation of resistance into adapted cultivars overlaid with transgenics and using genome editing by CRISPR/Cas system would be instrumental in adding multiple layers of defense to control the disease—thus cotton fiber production will be sustained.

  16. Characterization of a rat model of Huntington's disease based on targeted expression of mutant huntingtin in the forebrain using adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabery, Sanaz; Sajjad, Muhammad U; Hult, Sofia; Soylu, Rana; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2012-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (htt) gene. Neuropathology is most severe in the striatum and cerebral cortex. As mutant htt is ubiquitously expressed, it has not been possible to establish clear structure-to-function relationships for the clinical aspects. In the present study, we have injected recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 5 (rAAV5) expressing an 853-amino-acid fragment of htt with either 79 (mutant) or 18 (wild-type) glutamines (Q) in the dorsal striatum of neonatal rats to achieve expression of htt in the forebrain. Rats were followed for 6 months and compared with control rats. Neuropathological assessment showed long-term expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene (used as a marker protein) and accumulation of htt inclusions in the cerebral cortex with the rAAV5-htt-79Q vectors. We estimated that around 10% of NeuN-positive cells in the cerebral cortex and 2% of DARPP-32 neurons in the striatum were targeted with the GFP-expressing vector. Formation of intracellular htt inclusions was not associated with neuronal loss, gliosis or microglia activation and did not lead to altered motor activity or changes in body weight. However, the same mutant htt vector caused orexin loss in the hypothalamus - another area known to be affected in HD. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that widespread forebrain expression of mutant htt can be achieved using rAAV5-vectors and suggest that this technique can be further explored to study region-specific effects of mutant htt or other disease-causing genes in the brain. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Stem cell selection in vivo using foamy vectors cures canine pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D Trobridge

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1 and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA. For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency.We used a foamy virus (FV vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure.Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies.

  18. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue Virus Group Specific Antigen by Viral Vectors: Analysis of the Induced Immune Responses and Evaluation of Protective Potential in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  19. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue virus group specific antigen by viral vectors: analysis of the induced immune responses and evaluation of protective potential in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Bouet-Cararo

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0 or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7, to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity.

  20. Nisin-selectable food-grade secretion vector for Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiqing; Takala, Timo M; Qiao, Mingqiang; Xu, Haijin; Saris, Per E J

    2011-04-01

    A nisin-resistant Lactococcus lactis strain TML01 was isolated from crude milk. A gene with 99% homology to the nisin-resistance gene, nsr, was identified. The food-grade secretion plasmid, pLEB690 (3746 bp), was constructed based on this novel nsr gene enabling primary selection with up to 5 μg nisin/ml. The functionality of pLEB690 as a secretion vector was shown by expressing and secreting the pediocin AcH gene papA in L. lactis. pLEB690 is therefore, a functional food-grade secretion vector potentially useful for the food industry.

  1. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus—Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J. P.; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis. PMID:27754363

  2. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus-Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J P; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-10-13

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis.

  3. Determination of Anti-Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Neutralizing Antibodies in Patients With Heart Failure in the Cardiovascular Foundation of Colombia (ANVIAS): Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Melvin Y; Prada, Carlos E; Lopez, Marcos; Castillo, Victor; Echeverria, Luis Eduardo; Serrano, Norma

    2016-06-09

    Recent progress in the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) has led to the development of new therapeutic options such as gene therapy and the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Despite the promising results in early clinical trials of gene therapy for HF, various obstacles have been faced, such as the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against the capsid vectors. NAb activity limits vector transduction levels and therefore diminishes the final therapeutic response. Recent studies evaluating the prevalence of NAbs in various populations found considerable geographic variability for each AAV serotype. However, the levels of NAbs in Latin American populations are unknown, becoming a limiting factor to conducting AAV vector therapeutic trials in this population. The goal of this study is to determine for the first time, the prevalence of anti-AAV NAbs for the serotypes 1, 2, and 9 in HF patients from the city of Bucaramanga, Colombia, using the in vitro transduction inhibition assay. We will conduct a cross-sectional study with patients who periodically attend the HF clinic of the Cardiovascular Foundation of Colombia and healthy volunteers matched for age and sex. For all participants, we will evaluate the NAb levels against serotypes AAV1, AAV2, and AAV9. We will determine NAb levels using the in vitro transduction inhibition assay. In addition, participants will answer a survey to evaluate their epidemiological and socioeconomic variables. Participation in the study will be voluntary and all participants will sign an informed consent document before any intervention. The project is in the first phase: elaboration of case report forms and the informed consent form, and design of the recruitment strategy. Patient recruitment is expected to begin in the spring of 2016. We expect to have preliminary results, including the titer of the viral vectors, multiplicity of infections that we will use for each serotype, and the general validation of the assay

  4. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated neurotrophin gene transfer in the injured adult rat spinal cord improves hind-limb function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blits, B; Oudega, M; Boer, G J; Bartlett Bunge, M; Verhaagen, J

    2003-01-01

    To foster axonal growth from a Schwann cell bridge into the caudal spinal cord, spinal cells caudal to the implant were transduced with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (AAV-NT-3). Control rats received AAV vectors encoding for green fluorescent protein or saline. AAV-BDNF- and AAV-NT-3-transduced 293 human kidney cells produced and secreted BDNF or NT-3, respectively, in vitro. The secreted neurotrophins were biologically active; they both promoted outgrowth of sensory neurites in vitro. In vivo, transgene expression was observed predominantly in neurons for at least 16 weeks after injection. Compared with controls, a modest though significant improvement in hind-limb function was found in rats that received AAV-BDNF and AAV-NT-3. Retrograde tracing demonstrated that twice as many neurons with processes extending toward the Schwann cell graft were present in the second lumbar cord segment of AAV-BDNF- and AAV-NT-3-injected animals compared with controls. We found no evidence, however, for growth of regenerated axons from the Schwann cell implant into the caudal cord. Our results suggest that AAV vector-mediated overexpression of BDNF and NT-3 in the cord caudal to a Schwann cell bridge modified the local lumbar axonal circuitry, which was beneficial for locomotor function.

  5. Retinal Gene Therapy for Choroideremia: In Vitro Testing for Gene Augmentation Using an Adeno-Associated Viral (AAV) Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício, Maria I; MacLaren, Robert E

    2018-01-01

    As gene therapy of choroideremia is becoming a clinical reality, there is a need for reliable and sensitive assays to determine the expression of exogenously delivered Rab Escort Protein-1 (REP1), in particular to test new gene therapy vectors and as a quality control screen for clinical vector stocks. Here we describe an in vitro protocol to test transgene expression following AAV2/2-REP1 transduction of a human cell line. Gene augmentation can be confirmed by western blot and quantification of the fold-increase of human REP1 levels over untransduced controls.

  6. Selection of inhibitor-resistant viral potassium channels identifies a selectivity filter site that affects barium and amantadine block.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck C Chatelain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the interactions between ion channels and blockers remains an important goal that has implications for delineating the basic mechanisms of ion channel function and for the discovery and development of ion channel directed drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used genetic selection methods to probe the interaction of two ion channel blockers, barium and amantadine, with the miniature viral potassium channel Kcv. Selection for Kcv mutants that were resistant to either blocker identified a mutant bearing multiple changes that was resistant to both. Implementation of a PCR shuffling and backcrossing procedure uncovered that the blocker resistance could be attributed to a single change, T63S, at a position that is likely to form the binding site for the inner ion in the selectivity filter (site 4. A combination of electrophysiological and biochemical assays revealed a distinct difference in the ability of the mutant channel to interact with the blockers. Studies of the analogous mutation in the mammalian inward rectifier Kir2.1 show that the T-->S mutation affects barium block as well as the stability of the conductive state. Comparison of the effects of similar barium resistant mutations in Kcv and Kir2.1 shows that neighboring amino acids in the Kcv selectivity filter affect blocker binding. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data support the idea that permeant ions have an integral role in stabilizing potassium channel structure, suggest that both barium and amantadine act at a similar site, and demonstrate how genetic selections can be used to map blocker binding sites and reveal mechanistic features.

  7. Selection of Inhibitor-Resistant Viral Potassium Channels Identifies a Selectivity Filter Site that Affects Barium and Amantadine Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Arrigoni, Cristina; Domigan, Courtney; Ferrara, Giuseppina; Pantoja, Carlos; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna; Minor, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the interactions between ion channels and blockers remains an important goal that has implications for delineating the basic mechanisms of ion channel function and for the discovery and development of ion channel directed drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings We used genetic selection methods to probe the interaction of two ion channel blockers, barium and amantadine, with the miniature viral potassium channel Kcv. Selection for Kcv mutants that were resistant to either blocker identified a mutant bearing multiple changes that was resistant to both. Implementation of a PCR shuffling and backcrossing procedure uncovered that the blocker resistance could be attributed to a single change, T63S, at a position that is likely to form the binding site for the inner ion in the selectivity filter (site 4). A combination of electrophysiological and biochemical assays revealed a distinct difference in the ability of the mutant channel to interact with the blockers. Studies of the analogous mutation in the mammalian inward rectifier Kir2.1 show that the T→S mutation affects barium block as well as the stability of the conductive state. Comparison of the effects of similar barium resistant mutations in Kcv and Kir2.1 shows that neighboring amino acids in the Kcv selectivity filter affect blocker binding. Conclusions/Significance The data support the idea that permeant ions have an integral role in stabilizing potassium channel structure, suggest that both barium and amantadine act at a similar site, and demonstrate how genetic selections can be used to map blocker binding sites and reveal mechanistic features. PMID:19834614

  8. Differential immunogenicity of various heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens using DNA and viral vectors in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuola, Jenni M; Keating, Sheila; Webster, Daniel P; Berthoud, Tamara; Dunachie, Susanna; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2005-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boost vaccination has been shown to be an efficient way of inducing T cell responses in animals and in humans. We have used three vaccine vectors, naked DNA, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), and attenuated fowlpox strain, FP9, for prime-boost vaccination approaches against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in humans. In this study, we characterize, using two types of ELISPOT assays and FACS analysis, cell-mediated immune responses induced by different prime-boost combinations where all vectors encode a multiepitope string fused to the pre-erythrocytic Ag thrombospondin-related adhesion protein. We show that these different vectors need to be used in a specific order for an optimal ex vivo IFN-gamma response. From the different combinations, DNA priming followed by MVA boosting and FP9 priming followed by MVA boosting were most immunogenic and in both cases the IFN-gamma response was of broad specificity and cross-reactive against two P. falciparum strains (3D7 and T9/96). Immunization with all three vectors showed no improvement over optimal two vector regimes. Strong ex vivo IFN-gamma responses peaked 1 wk after the booster dose, but cultured ELISPOT assays revealed longer-lasting T cell memory responses for at least 6 mo. In the DNA-primed vaccinees the IFN-gamma response was mainly due to CD4(+) T cells, whereas in the FP9-primed vaccinees it was mainly due to CD4-dependent CD8(+) T cells. This difference may be of importance for the protective efficacy of these vaccination approaches against various diseases.

  9. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  10. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. Results In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs, based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD. Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure, an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. Conclusions We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on

  11. An Improved Endmember Selection Method Based on Vector Length for MODIS Reflectance Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanliu Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Endmember selection is the basis for sub-pixel land cover classifications using multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA that adopts variant endmember matrices for each pixel to mitigate errors caused by endmember variability in SMA. A spectral library covering a large number of endmembers can account for endmember variability, but it also lowers the computational efficiency. Therefore, an efficient endmember selection scheme to optimize the library is crucial to implement MESMA. In this study, we present an endmember selection method based on vector length. The spectra of a land cover class were divided into subsets using vector length intervals of the spectra, and the representative endmembers were derived from these subsets. Compared with the available endmember average RMSE (EAR method, our approach improved the computational efficiency in endmember selection. The method accuracy was further evaluated using spectral libraries derived from the ground reference polygon and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS imagery respectively. Results using the different spectral libraries indicated that MESMA combined with the new approach performed slightly better than EAR method, with Kappa coefficient improved from 0.75 to 0.78. A MODIS image was used to test the mapping fraction, and the representative spectra based on vector length successfully modeled more than 90% spectra of the MODIS pixels by 2-endmember models.

  12. Development of Gateway Binary Vector Series with Four Different Selection Markers for the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Minoru; Inoue, Keisuke; Ishida, Sakiko; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods for the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha using the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene as a marker for selection with hygromycin. In this study, we developed three additional markers for M. polymorpha transformation: the gentamicin 3'-acetyltransferase gene for selection with gentamicin; a mutated acetolactate synthase gene for selection with chlorsulfuron; and the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene for selection with G418. Based on these four marker genes, we have constructed a series of Gateway binary vectors designed for transgenic experiments on M. polymorpha. The 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus and endogenous promoters for constitutive and heat-inducible expression were used to create these vectors. The reporters and tags used were Citrine, 3×Citrine, Citrine-NLS, TagRFP, tdTomato, tdTomato-NLS, GR, SRDX, SRDX-GR, GUS, ELuc(PEST), and 3×FLAG. These vectors, designated as the pMpGWB series, will facilitate molecular genetic analyses of the emerging model plant M. polymorpha. PMID:26406247

  13. Large-Scale Production of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Serotype-9 Carrying the Human Survival Motor Neuron Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Chermahini, Gholamhossein Amini; Li, Shaoyong; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors are a suitable vector for gene therapy studies because of desired characteristics such as low immunogenicity, transfection of non-dividing and dividing cells, and long-term expression of the transgene. In this study, the large-scale production of single stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the human survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (AAV9-SMN) suitable for in vivo gene therapy studies of SMA was described. SMN cDNA has been cloned into pAAV-CB6-PI and pAAVsc-CB6-PI with and without its specific UTRs, respectively. Both plasmids bear CMV enhancer/beta-actin (CB) promoter, CMV IE enhancer, and polyadenylation signal sequences. 2.5 μg of constructed pAAV-CB6-PI-SMN and pAAVsc-CB6-PI-SMN cause to, respectively, 4.853- and 2.321-fold increases in SMN protein levels in transfected cells compared to untransfected cells. Ss and scAAV9-SMN vectors were also produced from these plasmids by transient transfection of HEK293 cells using CaCl2 solution. The silver staining and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated good quality of both isolated vectors, ssAAV9-SMN and scAAV9-SMN, with the titers of 2.00E+13 and 1.00E+13 GC/ml. The results of this study show that, the plasmid containing UTR elements causes to twice more SMN gene expression in transfected cells. The quality control results show that both produced ss and scAAV9-SMN are suitable for in vivo studies.

  14. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Ohashi, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-15

    Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX). An adenovirus (Ad) vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX) (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX) maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  15. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Iizuka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX. An adenovirus (Ad vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  16. Dynamic properties of the Sulfolobus CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr systems when challenged with vector-borne viral and plasmid genes and protospacers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðbergsdóttir, Sóley Ruth; Deng, Ling; Chen, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    The adaptive immune CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr systems of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus were challenged by a variety of viral and plasmid genes, and protospacers preceded by different dinucleotide motifs. The genes and protospacers were constructed to carry sequences matching...... individual spacers of CRISPR loci, and a range of mismatches were introduced. Constructs were cloned into vectors carrying pyrE/pyrF genes and transformed into uracil auxotrophic hosts derived from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 or Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Most constructs, including those carrying different...... protospacer mismatches, yielded few viable transformants. These were shown to carry either partial deletions of CRISPR loci, covering a broad spectrum of sizes and including the matching spacer, or deletions of whole CRISPR/Cas modules. The deletions occurred independently of whether genes or protospacers...

  17. Viral vectors based on bidirectional cell-specific mammalian promoters and transcriptional amplification strategy for use in vitro and in vivo

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    Kasparov Sergey

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using cell-type-specific promoters to restrict gene expression to particular cells is an attractive approach for gene therapy, but often hampered by insufficient transcriptional activity of these promoters. Previous studies have shown that transcriptional amplification strategy (TAS can be used to enhance the activity of such promoters without loss of cell type specificity. Originally TAS involved the use of two copies of a cell-specific promoter leading to generation of large expression cassettes, which can be hard to use given the space limitations of the conventional viral gene expression vectors. Results We have now developed a new bidirectional lentiviral vector system, based on TAS that can enhance the transcriptional activity of human synapsin-1 (SYN promoter and the compact glial fibrillary acidic protein (GfaABC1D promoter. In the opposite orientation, a minimal core promoter (65 bp derived from the human cytomegalovirus (CMV was joined upstream of the SYN promoter or GfaABC1D promoter. This led to the formation of synthetic bidirectional promoters which were flanked with two gene expression cassettes. The 5' cassette transcribed the artificial transcriptional activator. The downstream cassette drove the synthesis of the gene of interest. Studies in both cell cultures and in vivo showed that the new bidirectional promoters greatly increased the expression level of the reporter gene. In vivo studies also showed that transgene expression was enhanced without loss of cell specificity of both SYN and GfaABC1D promoters. Conclusion This work establishes a novel approach for creating compact TAS-amplified cell-specific promoters, a feature important for their use in viral backbones. This improved approach should prove useful for the development of powerful gene expression systems based on weak cell-specific promoters.

  18. Synthesis, and Characterization, and Evaluation of Cellular Effects of the FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL Nanoparticles as a Potential Non-Viral Vector for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghiamkazemi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we synthesized the potential non viral vector for gene delivery with proper transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Polyethylenimine (PEI is a well-known cationic polymer which has high positive surface charge for condensing plasmid DNA. However; it is highly cytotoxic in many cell lines because of the high surface charge, non-biodegradability and non-biocompatibility. To enhance PEI biodegradability, the graft copolymer “PEG-g-PEI” was synthesized. To target cancer liver cells, two targeting ligands folic acid and galactose (lactobionic acid which are over expressed on human hepatocyte carcinoma were attached to graft copolymer and “FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL” copolymer was synthesized. Composition of this grafted copolymer was characterized using 1H-NMR and FTIR spectra. The molecular weight and zeta potential of this copolymer was compared to PEI. The particle size and zeta potential of FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL/DNA complexes at various N/P ratio were measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS. Cytotoxicity of the copolymer was also studied in cultured HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cell line. The FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL/DNA complexes at various N/P ratios exhibited no cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line compared to PEI 25K as a control. The novel copolymer showed enhanced biodegradability in physiological conditions in compared with PEI and targeted cultured HepG2 cells. More importantly, significant transfection efficiency was exhibited in cancer liver cells. Together, our results showed that “FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL” nanoparticals could be considered as a useful non-viral vector for targeted gene delivery.

  19. Topology of evolving, mutagenized viral populations: quasispecies expansion, compression, and operation of negative selection

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    Sierra Saleta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular events and evolutionary forces underlying lethal mutagenesis of virus (or virus extinction through an excess of mutations are not well understood. Here we apply for the first time phylogenetic methods and Partition Analysis of Quasispecies (PAQ to monitor genetic distances and intra-population structures of mutant spectra of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV quasispecies subjected to mutagenesis by base and nucleoside analogues. Results Phylogenetic and PAQ analyses have revealed a highly dynamic variation of intrapopulation diversity of FMDV quasispecies. The population diversity first suffers striking expansions in the presence of mutagens and then compressions either when the presence of the mutagenic analogue was discontinued or when a mutation that decreased sensitivity to a mutagen was selected. The pattern of mutations found in the populations was in agreement with the behavior of the corresponding nucleotide analogues with FMDV in vitro. Mutations accumulated at preferred genomic sites, and dn/ds ratios indicate the operation of negative (or purifying selection in populations subjected to mutagenesis. No evidence of unusually elevated genetic distances has been obtained for FMDV populations approaching extinction. Conclusion Phylogenetic and PAQ analysis provide adequate procedures to describe the evolution of viral sequences subjected to lethal mutagenesis. These methods define the changes of intra-population structure more precisely than mutation frequencies and Shannon entropies. PAQ is very sensitive to variations of intrapopulation genetic distances. Strong negative (or purifying selection operates in FMDV populations subjected to enhanced mutagenesis. The quantifications provide evidence that extinction does not imply unusual increases of intrapopulation complexity, in support of the lethal defection model of virus extinction.

  20. An Electrostatically Self-Assembled Ternary Nanocomplex as a Non-Viral Vector for the Delivery of Plasmid DNA into Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hee Cho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed electrostatically self-assembled ternary nanocomplexes as a safe and effective non-viral vector for the delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA into human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs. Although polyethylenimine (PEI polymers initially showed excellent performance as gene delivery carriers, their broad use has been limited by cytotoxicity resulting from their strong positive charge. To reduce the cytotoxicity, we utilized anionic hyaluronic acid (HA as a corona layer material for pDNA/PEI binary nanocomplexes. HA was also introduced to increase the targeting efficiency of pDNA/PEI nanocomplexes because HA has can bind CD44 that is highly expressed on the surface of hASCs. We confirmed that the addition of HA changed the surface charge of pDNA/PEI nanocomplexes from positive to negative. The pDNA/PEI/HA ternary nanocomplexes showed high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity compared with commercially available products. When hASCs were pretreated with HA to passivate CD44, the transfection efficiency of pDNA/PEI/HA nanocomplexes was significantly reduced. These results suggest that HA that can act as a targeting ligand to CD44 contributed to the improved transfection of pDNA into hASCs. Our novel pDNA/PEI/HA nanocomplexes may be used as an effective non-viral pDNA delivery system for hASCs.

  1. Serologic surveillance for selected viral agents in captive and free-ranging populations of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Kai; Hamblin, Christopher; Jung, Sandra; Ostrowski, Stéphane; Mwanzia, Jacob; Streich, Wolf Jürgen; Anderson, John; Armstrong, Robert M; Anajariyah, Saud

    2005-01-01

    A total of 294 sera collected between 1999 and 2001 from eight captive and one free-ranging herds of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) distributed in Saudi Arabia (SA) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were assayed for antibodies against 13 selected viral agents. Arabian oryx have been exposed to bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), rinderpest virus (RPV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3), cervid herpesvirus-1, foot-and-mouth disease virus, equine herpesvirus 9, and bovine viral diarrhea virus. The high seroprevalence to BTV and EHDV in the UAE and SA indicates that Arabian oryx are likely to be susceptible to infection by these viruses and therefore could act as a source of virus to vectors during the infective stage of infection. Moreover, antibodies were detected against RPV and BRSV in sera from SA and against BAV-3 in sera from the UAE. No antibodies were found against bovine herpesvirus-1, caprine herpesvirus-1, enzootic bovine leucosis virus, and peste des petits ruminants virus. On the basis of these results, caution should be applied when considering translocation of Arabian oryx, and only those proven to be free of infectious agents that might present a risk to other species should be moved.

  2. Comparative analysis of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1, 2, 5, 7, and 8 in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Haute, Chris Van Den; Thiry, Irina; Deroose, Christophe M; Mortelmans, Luc; Wilson, James M; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) vectors have been shown to deliver genes effectively to neurons in the brain, retina, and spinal cord. The characterization of new AAV serotypes revealed different patterns of transduction in a diverse array of tissues (Gao, G., Vandenberghe, L.H., and Wilson, J.M. [2005]. Curr. Gene Ther. 5, 285-297). Here, we extensively compare the neural tropism of human-derived rAAVs (types 2/1, 2, and 2/5) with nonhuman primate-derived rAAVs (types 2/7 and 2/8) in adult mouse brain. Mice were injected with rAAV type 2/1, 2, 2/5, 2/7, or 2/8 via the caudate-putamen and substantia nigra. Intrahippocampal injections were also performed for rAAV2/7 and rAAV2/8. In all regions injected, the vectors transduced neurons almost exclusively. Retrograde transduction of all rAAV pseudotypes was also observed in particular CNS areas. At high titers, all rAAV pseudotypes transduced comparable brain volumes in all targeted regions except for rAAV2, which transduced much smaller brain volumes. A dose-range comparison of intrastriatally injected rAAV types 2/5, 2/7, and 2/8 highlighted that the transduction efficiency, as determined by transduced volume and biophotonic imaging of green fluorescent protein expression intensity, was significantly higher for rAAV2/5 and rAAV2/7 compared with rAAV2/8 at low titers, whereas all three serotypes performed equally well at higher doses. These results demonstrate the use and efficiency of both human- and nonhuman primate-derived rAAV vectors for disease modeling and their potential for gene therapy.

  3. Development of a plant viral-vector-based gene expression assay for the screening of yeast cytochrome p450 monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kathleen; Nguyen, Long V; Khan, Faizah; Pogue, Gregory P; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; Panda, Sanjay; Pinot, Franck; Oriedo, Vincent B; Rasochova, Lada; Subramanian, Mani; Miller, Barbara; White, Earl L

    2003-02-01

    Development of a gene discovery tool for heterologously expressed cytochrome P450 monooxygenases has been inherently difficult. The activity assays are labor-intensive and not amenable to parallel screening. Additionally, biochemical confirmation requires coexpression of a homologous P450 reductase or complementary heterologous activity. Plant virus gene expression systems have been utilized for a diverse group of organisms. In this study we describe a method using an RNA vector expression system to phenotypically screen for cytochrome P450-dependent fatty acid omega-hydroxylase activity. Yarrowia lipolytica CYP52 gene family members involved in n-alkane assimilation were amplified from genomic DNA, cloned into a plant virus gene expression vector, and used as a model system for determining heterologous expression. Plants infected with virus vectors expressing the yeast CYP52 genes (YlALK1-YlALK7) showed a distinct necrotic lesion phenotype on inoculated plant leaves. No phenotype was detected on negative control constructs. YlALK3-, YlALK5-, and YlALK7-inoculated plants all catalyzed the terminal hydroxylation of lauric acid as confirmed using thin-layer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. The plant-based cytochrome P450 phenotypic screen was tested on an n-alkane-induced Yarrowia lipolytica plant virus expression library. A subset of 1,025 random library clones, including YlALK1-YlALK7 constructs, were tested on plants. All YlALK gene constructs scored positive in the randomized screen. Following nucleotide sequencing of the clones that scored positive using a phenotypic screen, approximately 5% were deemed appropriate for further biochemical analysis. This report illustrates the utility of a plant-based system for expression of heterologous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and for the assignment of gene function.

  4. Antibody neutralization poses a barrier to intravitreal adeno-associated viral vector gene delivery to non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, M A; Yin, L; Strazzeri, J M; Flannery, J G; Merigan, W H; Schaffer, D V

    2015-02-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have exhibited promise in both preclinical disease models and human clinical trials for numerous disease targets, including the retinal degenerative disorders Leber's congenital amaurosis and choroideremia. One general challenge for AAV is that preexisting immunity, as well as subsequent development of immunity following vector administration, can severely inhibit systemic AAV vector gene delivery. However, the role of neutralizing antibodies (NABs) in AAV transduction of tissues considered to be immune privileged, such as the eye, is unclear in large animals. Intravitreal AAV administration allows for broad retinal delivery, but is more susceptible to interactions with the immune system than subretinal administration. To assess the effects of systemic anti-AAV antibody levels on intravitreal gene delivery, we quantified the anti-AAV antibodies present in sera from non-human primates before and after intravitreal injections with various AAV capsids. Analysis showed that intravitreal administration resulted in an increase in anti-AAV antibodies regardless of the capsid serotype, transgene or dosage of virus injected. For monkeys injected with wild-type AAV2 and/or an AAV2 mutant, the variable that most significantly affected the production of anti-AAV2 antibodies was the amount of virus delivered. In addition, post-injection antibody titers were highest against the serotype administered, but the antibodies were also cross-reactive against other AAV serotypes. Furthermore, NAB levels in serum correlated with those in vitreal fluid, demonstrating both that this route of administration exposes AAV capsid epitopes to the adaptive immune system and that serum measurements are predictive of vitreous fluid NAB titers. Moreover, the presence of preexisting NAB titers in the serum of monkeys correlated strongly (R=0.76) with weak, decaying or no transgene expression following intravitreal administration of AAV

  5. Tropism and toxicity of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 in rat neurons and glia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Douglas B; Powers, Kathleen; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2008-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors are frequently used for gene delivery to the central nervous system and are capable of transducing neurons and glia in vitro. In this study, seven serotypes of a rAAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were characterized for tropism and toxicity in primary cortical cells derived from embryonic rat brain. At 2 days after transduction, serotypes 1 and 5 through 8 expressed GFP predominately in glia, but by 6 days post-transduction expression was neuronal except for AAV5. AAV2 and 9 produced minimal GFP expression. Using cell viability assays, toxicity was observed at higher multiplicities of infection (MOI) for all serotypes except AAV2 and 9. The toxicity of AAV1 and 5-8 affected mostly glia as indicated by a loss of glial-marker immunoreactivity. A frameshift mutation in the GFP gene reduced overall toxicity for serotypes 1, 5 and 6, but not 7 and 8 suggesting that the toxicity was not solely due to the overexpression of GFP. Collectively, a differential tropism and toxicity was observed among the AAV serotypes on primary cortical cultures with an overall preferential glial transduction and toxicity.

  6. Application of Arrhenius kinetic theory to viral eclipse: selection of bacteriophage phi X174 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incardona, N L

    1981-08-01

    Analysis of the bacteriophage phi X174 eclipse period in terms of Arrhenius kinetic theory suggests the following hypothesis: mutants should exist with two concomitant physiological characteristics as their phenotype. These are an eclipse rate lower than that of the wild type at permissive temperatures for plaque formation and an eclipse rate too low at lower temperatures to permit plaque development. Thus, enrichment of a mutagenized virus population for mutants that fail to eclipse during a short period at permissive temperatures should yield eclipse mutants with the cold-sensitive (cs; nonpermissive temperature, 25 degrees C), and not the temperature-sensitive (ts; nonpermissive temperature, 42 degrees C), plaque phenotype. In several trials, the frequency of the cs phenotype in the population increased from less than 0.2% to between 2 and 4% after the enrichment step, whereas the frequency of the ts phenotype remained unchanged (less than 0.2%). Moreover, 80% of these cs mutants have eclipse rates that are 3- to 40-fold lower than that of the wild type at both 37 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The successful application of the Arrhenius theory to phi X eclipse may provide insights into the molecular mechanism whereby the phi X174 genome is delivered into the host cell. Since the eclipse kinetics of other nonenveloped viruses are similar to those of phi X174, kinetic theory may be broadly applicable in the selection and characterization of viral eclipse mutants.

  7. Diagnosis of Chronic Kidney Disease Based on Support Vector Machine by Feature Selection Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Huseyin; Danaei Mehr, Homay; Cetin, Aydin

    2017-04-01

    As Chronic Kidney Disease progresses slowly, early detection and effective treatment are the only cure to reduce the mortality rate. Machine learning techniques are gaining significance in medical diagnosis because of their classification ability with high accuracy rates. The accuracy of classification algorithms depend on the use of correct feature selection algorithms to reduce the dimension of datasets. In this study, Support Vector Machine classification algorithm was used to diagnose Chronic Kidney Disease. To diagnose the Chronic Kidney Disease, two essential types of feature selection methods namely, wrapper and filter approaches were chosen to reduce the dimension of Chronic Kidney Disease dataset. In wrapper approach, classifier subset evaluator with greedy stepwise search engine and wrapper subset evaluator with the Best First search engine were used. In filter approach, correlation feature selection subset evaluator with greedy stepwise search engine and filtered subset evaluator with the Best First search engine were used. The results showed that the Support Vector Machine classifier by using filtered subset evaluator with the Best First search engine feature selection method has higher accuracy rate (98.5%) in the diagnosis of Chronic Kidney Disease compared to other selected methods.

  8. Transient expression of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) gene in cucurbit plants using viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaran, Vahid Jalali; Shafeinia, Alireza; Javaran, Mokhtar Jalali; Gojani, Esmaeil Ghasemi; Mirzaee, Malihe

    2017-04-01

    To use a transient expression system to express a truncated human tissue plasminogen activator (K2S) gene in cucurbit plants. The recombinant tissue plasminogen activator protein (K2S form) was expressed in active form in cucurbit plants. Its molecular weight was 43 kDa. The plant-derived rt-PA was determined using goat anti-rabbit antibody by western blotting. Among the infected lines, the highest expression of rt-PA was 62 ng/100 mg per leaf tissue as measured by ELISA. The enzymatic activity of the plant-derived rt-PA was 0.8 IU/ml. The K25 form of rt-PA was expressed for the first time using the viral expression system. Plant-derived rt-PA showed similar potency to commercially-available PA.

  9. Non-viral generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells by a six-factor-in-one-vector approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Debowski

    Full Text Available Groundbreaking studies showed that differentiated somatic cells of mouse and human origin could be reverted to a stable pluripotent state by the ectopic expression of only four proteins. The resulting pluripotent cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, could be an alternative to embryonic stem cells, which are under continuous ethical debate. Hence, iPS cell-derived functional cells such as neurons may become the key for an effective treatment of currently incurable degenerative diseases. However, besides the requirement of efficacy testing of the therapy also its long-term safety needs to be carefully evaluated in settings mirroring the clinical situation in an optimal way. In this context, we chose the long-lived common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus as a non-human primate species to generate iPS cells. The marmoset monkey is frequently used in biomedical research and is gaining more and more preclinical relevance due to the increasing number of disease models. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first-time generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells from postnatal skin fibroblasts by non-viral means. We used the transposon-based, fully reversible piggyback system. We cloned the marmoset monkey reprogramming factors and established robust and reproducible reprogramming protocols with a six-factor-in-one-construct approach. We generated six individual iPS cell lines and characterized them in comparison with marmoset monkey embryonic stem cells. The generated iPS cells are morphologically indistinguishable from marmoset ES cells. The iPS cells are fully reprogrammed as demonstrated by differentiation assays, pluripotency marker expression and transcriptome analysis. They are stable for numerous passages (more than 80 and exhibit euploidy. In summary, we have established efficient non-viral reprogramming protocols for the derivation of stable marmoset monkey iPS cells, which can be used to develop and test cell replacement

  10. Non-viral generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells by a six-factor-in-one-vector approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowski, Katharina; Warthemann, Rita; Lentes, Jana; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Dressel, Ralf; Langenstroth, Daniel; Gromoll, Jörg; Sasaki, Erika; Behr, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Groundbreaking studies showed that differentiated somatic cells of mouse and human origin could be reverted to a stable pluripotent state by the ectopic expression of only four proteins. The resulting pluripotent cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, could be an alternative to embryonic stem cells, which are under continuous ethical debate. Hence, iPS cell-derived functional cells such as neurons may become the key for an effective treatment of currently incurable degenerative diseases. However, besides the requirement of efficacy testing of the therapy also its long-term safety needs to be carefully evaluated in settings mirroring the clinical situation in an optimal way. In this context, we chose the long-lived common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) as a non-human primate species to generate iPS cells. The marmoset monkey is frequently used in biomedical research and is gaining more and more preclinical relevance due to the increasing number of disease models. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first-time generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells from postnatal skin fibroblasts by non-viral means. We used the transposon-based, fully reversible piggyback system. We cloned the marmoset monkey reprogramming factors and established robust and reproducible reprogramming protocols with a six-factor-in-one-construct approach. We generated six individual iPS cell lines and characterized them in comparison with marmoset monkey embryonic stem cells. The generated iPS cells are morphologically indistinguishable from marmoset ES cells. The iPS cells are fully reprogrammed as demonstrated by differentiation assays, pluripotency marker expression and transcriptome analysis. They are stable for numerous passages (more than 80) and exhibit euploidy. In summary, we have established efficient non-viral reprogramming protocols for the derivation of stable marmoset monkey iPS cells, which can be used to develop and test cell replacement therapies in

  11. Enhancement of heterologous gene expression in Flammulina velutipes using polycistronic vectors containing a viral 2A cleavage sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Lin

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation for edible mushrooms has been previously established. However, the enhancement of heterologous protein production and the expression of multi-target genes remains a challenge. In this study, heterologous protein expression in the enoki mushroom Flammulina velutipes was notably enhanced using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage to co-express multiple copies of single gene. The polycistronic expression vectors were constructed by connecting multi copies of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp gene using 2A peptides derived from porcine teschovirus-1. The P2A peptides properly self-cleaved as shown by the formation of the transformants with antibiotic resistant capacity and exciting green fluorescence levels after introducing the vectors into F. velutipes mycelia. The results of western blot analysis, epifluorescent microscopy and EGFP production showed that heterologous protein expression in F. velutipes using the polycistronic strategy increased proportionally as the gene copy number increased from one to three copies. In contrast, much lower EGFP levels were detected in the F. velutipes transformants harboring four copies of the egfp gene due to mRNA instability. The polycistronic strategy using 2A peptide-mediated cleavage developed in this study can not only be used to express single gene in multiple copies, but also to express multiple genes in a single reading frame. It is a promising strategy for the application of mushroom molecular pharming.

  12. International network for capacity building for the control of emerging viral vector-borne zoonotic diseases: ARBO-ZOONET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, J; Bouloy, M; Ergonul, O; Fooks, Ar; Paweska, J; Chevalier, V; Drosten, C; Moormann, R; Tordo, N; Vatansever, Z; Calistri, P; Estrada-Pena, A; Mirazimi, A; Unger, H; Yin, H; Seitzer, U

    2009-03-26

    Arboviruses are arthropod-borne viruses, which include West Nile fever virus (WNFV), a mosquito-borne virus, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus, and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus. These arthropod-borne viruses can cause disease in different domestic and wild animals and in humans, posing a threat to public health because of their epidemic and zoonotic potential. In recent decades, the geographical distribution of these diseases has expanded. Outbreaks of WNF have already occurred in Europe, especially in the Mediterranean basin. Moreover, CCHF is endemic in many European countries and serious outbreaks have occurred, particularly in the Balkans, Turkey and Southern Federal Districts of Russia. In 2000, RVF was reported for the first time outside the African continent, with cases being confirmed in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. This spread was probably caused by ruminant trade and highlights that there is a threat of expansion of the virus into other parts of Asia and Europe. In the light of global warming and globalisation of trade and travel, public interest in emerging zoonotic diseases has increased. This is especially evident regarding the geographical spread of vector-borne diseases. A multi-disciplinary approach is now imperative, and groups need to collaborate in an integrated manner that includes vector control, vaccination programmes, improved therapy strategies, diagnostic tools and surveillance, public awareness, capacity building and improvement of infrastructure in endemic regions.

  13. Viral Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Selective Host MicroRNA Expression by Targeting ZEB Transcriptional Repressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Youn; Leader, Andrew; Stoller, Michelle L.; Coen, Donald M.; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) brings numerous changes in cellular gene expression. Levels of most host mRNAs are reduced, limiting synthesis of host proteins, especially those involved in antiviral defenses. The impact of HSV-1 on host microRNAs (miRNAs), an extensive network of short non-coding RNAs that regulate mRNA stability/translation, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that transcription of the miR-183 cluster (miR-183, miR-96, and miR-182) is selectively induced by HSV-1 during productive infection of primary fibroblasts and neurons. ICP0, a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase expressed as an immediate-early protein, is both necessary and sufficient for this induction. Nuclear exclusion of ICP0 or removal of the RING (really interesting new gene) finger domain that is required for E3 ligase activity prevents induction. ICP0 promotes the degradation of numerous host proteins and for the most part, the downstream consequences are unknown. Induction of the miR-183 cluster can be mimicked by depletion of host transcriptional repressors zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1)/δ-crystallin enhancer binding factor 1 (δEF1) and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2)/Smad-interacting protein 1 (SIP1), which we establish as new substrates for ICP0-mediated degradation. Thus, HSV-1 selectively stimulates expression of the miR-183 cluster by ICP0-mediated degradation of ZEB transcriptional repressors. PMID:28783105

  14. AAV ANCESTRAL RECONSTRUCTION LIBRARY ENABLES SELECTION OF BROADLY INFECTIOUS VIRAL VARIANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago-Ortiz, J; Ojala, DS; Westesson, O; Weinstein, JR; Wong, SY; Steinsapir, A; Kumar, S.; Holmes, I; Schaffer, DV

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. However, enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties and to gain insights into AAV’s evolutionary history, we computationa...

  15. Multiwavelength mode-locked cylindrical vector beam fiber laser based on mode selective coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Cai, Yu; Wang, Jie; Wan, Hongdan; Zhang, Zuxing; Zhang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a multiwavelength mode-locked fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam generation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The mode-locking mechanism is based on a nonlinear polarization rotation effect in fiber, and the multiwavelength operation is contributed to by an in-line birefringence fiber filter with periodic multiple passbands, formed by incorporating a section of polarization maintaining fiber into the laser cavity with a fiber polarizer. Furthermore, by using a home-made mode selective coupler, which acts as both a mode converter from fundamental mode to higher-order mode and an output coupler, multiwavelength mode-locked cylindrical vector beams have been obtained. This may have potential applications in mode-division multiplexing optical fiber communication and material processing.

  16. Effect of viral dose on neutralizing antibody response and transgene expression after AAV1 vector re-administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, H; Brooks, A; Orme, A; Wang, P; Liu, P; Xie, J; Kretschmer, P; Qian, H S; Hermiston, T W; Harkins, R N

    2008-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (nAB) at the time of administration hamper the effectiveness of adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a clinical DNA delivery system. The present study was designed to investigate if AAV re-administration in muscle tissue is dependent on the nAB titer. Recombinant (r)AAV serotype 1, as a promising candidate for targeting skeletal muscle, was used for gene delivery. C57Bl/6 mice were infected intramuscularly with doses between 1 x 10(9) and 5 x 10(10) virus particles (vp) of AAV1-expressing luciferase (AAV1-luc) or human interferon-beta (AAV1-hIFNbeta). Increasing transgene expression was observed over the first 2 months and anti-AAV1 nAB titers peaked between weeks 4 and 8. Six months after the first administration, 5 x 10(10) vp of AAV1-IFNbeta were re-administered. Following re-administration, nAB titers increased but did not significantly affect transgene expression from the AAV vector that had been administered first. In contrast, hIFNbeta expression originating from the second vector administration was significantly diminished and reflected the nAB titer present at the day of re-administration. The present study extends earlier observations that preexisting nAB affects AAV1 re-administration. The level of nAB is proportional to the virus dose used for the first injection and transgene expression following re-administration is dependent on preexisting nAB titer.

  17. Development of a dual-expression vector facilitated with selection-free PCR recombination cloning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liting; Zhou, Yancheng; Huang, Lin; Dong, Shiqi; Ma, Yue

    2017-12-01

    The conventional procedure for the construction of recombinant expression vector of a target gene includes PCR cloning and restriction enzyme mediated subcloning, which is time-consuming and sometimes troublesome because of the inefficiency of ligation. A variety of ligase-independent PCR cloning strategies have been developed, but they either involve complicated PCR procedures or need other DNA modifying enzymes. In this study, we report the design, and construction of an omnipotent expression vector pOmni, with which a target gene can be easily cloned through innovative selection-free PCR recombination cloning strategy with only one pair of primer and two times of PCR in one work day, without using any restriction enzymes, ligase and other DNA modifying enzymes. Furthermore, the target gene cloned in pOmni is ready to be high-efficiently expressed in either Escherichia coli cells or eukaryotic cells because of the elaborate design of compatible T7 promoter and CMV promoter expression elements in the vector. The cloning capability and reliability of selection-free PCR recombination cloning with pOmni were validated through cloning of 6 DNA fragments with length from 315 to 4557 bp, and the dual-expression function of the vector was verified through the cloning and expression of EGFP in E. coli BL21 and HeLa cells. pOmni developed in our study provides a powerful tool for gene cloning and expression, and is of special value for researches in which both prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression of a target gene are necessary.

  18. Viral Delivery of dsRNA for Control of Insect Agricultural Pests and Vectors of Human Disease: Prospects and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolliopoulou, Anna; Taning, Clauvis N. T.; Smagghe, Guy; Swevers, Luc

    2017-01-01

    RNAi is applied as a new and safe method for pest control in agriculture but efficiency and specificity of delivery of dsRNA trigger remains a critical issue. Various agents have been proposed to augment dsRNA delivery, such as engineered micro-organisms and synthetic nanoparticles, but the use of viruses has received relatively little attention. Here we present a critical view of the potential of the use of recombinant viruses for efficient and specific delivery of dsRNA. First of all, it requires the availability of plasmid-based reverse genetics systems for virus production, of which an overview is presented. For RNA viruses, their application seems to be straightforward since dsRNA is produced as an intermediate molecule during viral replication, but DNA viruses also have potential through the production of RNA hairpins after transcription. However, application of recombinant virus for dsRNA delivery may not be straightforward in many cases, since viruses can encode RNAi suppressors, and virus-induced silencing effects can be determined by the properties of the encoded RNAi suppressor. An alternative is virus-like particles that retain the efficiency and specificity determinants of natural virions but have encapsidated non-replicating RNA. Finally, the use of viruses raises important safety issues which need to be addressed before application can proceed. PMID:28659820

  19. RNase L Mediates the Antiviral Effect of Interferon through a Selective Reduction in Viral RNA during Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ling; Blackford, John A.; Hassel, Bret A.

    1998-01-01

    The 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system is an RNA degradation pathway which plays an important role in the antipicornavirus effects of interferon (IFN). RNase L, the terminal component of the 2-5A system, is thought to mediate this antiviral activity through the degradation of viral RNA; however, the capacity of RNase L to selectively target viral RNA has not been carefully examined in intact cells. Therefore, the mechanism of RNase L-mediated antiviral activity was investigated following encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection of cell lines in which expression of transfected RNase L was induced or endogenous RNase L activity was inhibited. RNase L induction markedly enhanced the anti-EMCV activity of IFN via a reduction in EMCV RNA. Inhibition of endogenous RNase L activity inhibited this reduction in viral RNA. RNase L had no effect on IFN-mediated protection from vesicular stomatitis virus. RNase L induction reduced the rate of EMCV RNA synthesis, suggesting that RNase L may target viral RNAs involved in replication early in the virus life cycle. The RNase L-mediated reduction in viral RNA occurred in the absence of detectable effects on specific cellular mRNAs and without any global alteration in the cellular RNA profile. Extensive rRNA cleavage, indicative of high levels of 2-5A, was not observed in RNase L-induced, EMCV-infected cells; however, transfection of 2-5A into cells resulted in widespread degradation of cellular RNAs. These findings provide the first demonstration of the selective capacity of RNase L in intact cells and link this selective activity to cellular levels of 2-5A. PMID:9525594

  20. Generation of transgenic mesenchymal stem cells expressing green fluorescent protein as reporter gene using no viral vector in caprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Yasotha, T; Singh, R K; Singh, Renu; Kumar, Kuldeep; Ranjan, R; Meshram, Chetan D; Das, B C; Bag, Sadhan

    2013-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent cells that can be derived from many different organs and tissues. While there are many ways to label and track cells each with strengths and weakness, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a reporter gene commonly employed. In the present study, caprine MSC were collected from bone marrow and cells were characterised with MSC specific markers. Passage 10 (P10) MSC cells were transfected using plasmid vector containing GFP as reporter gene with different concentrations of DNA and lipofectamine. Six different concentrations of DNA and lipofectamine as 1 microg DNA: 2 microL lipofectamine, 1 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.2 microg DNA: 2.2 microL lipofectamine, 1.2 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.5 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.5 microg DNA: 3 microL lipofectamine were used. After 24 h and 48 h of transfection, caprine MSC were observed under florescent microscope. Highest transfection rate indicating green flourecscent MSC were found when the cells were transfected with 1.2 microg DNA: 2.2 microL lipofectamine and 1.5 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine than other combinations. These cells have been propagated beyond 4th passage maintaining GFP expression. The results indicated that stable GFP positive MSC cells can be generated using the above protocol. These cells are being used for transplantation studies.

  1. [Rapid selection of recombinant orf virus expression vectors using green fluorescent protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachun; Guo, Xianfeng; Zhang, Min; Wu, Feifan; Peng, Yongzheng

    2016-01-01

    To construct a universal, highly attenuated orf virus expression vector for exogenous genes using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the reporter gene. The flanking regions of the ORFV132 of orf virus DNA were amplified by PCR to construct the shuttle plasmid pSPV-132LF-EGFP-132RF. The shuttle plasmid was transfected into OFTu cells and GFP was incorporated into orf virus IA82Delta 121 by homologous recombination. The recombinant IA82Delta121-V was selected by green fluorescent signal. The deletion gene was identified by PCR and sequencing. The effects of ORFV132 knockout were evaluated by virus titration and by observing the proliferation of the infected vascular endothelial cells in vitro. The recombinant orf virus IA82Delta121-V was obtained successfully and quickly, and the deletion of ORFV132 did not affect the replication of the virus in vitro but reduced its virulence. Green fluorescent protein is a selectable marker for rapid, convenient and stable selection of the recombinant viruses. Highly attenuated recombinant orf virus IA82Delta121-V can serve as a new expression vector for exogenous genes.

  2. Synthesis of bifunctional molecules containing [12]aneN3 and coumarin moieties as effective DNA condensation agents and new non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Pan; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Zhi-Fo; Cao, Ao-Cheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Zhai, Yong-Gong

    2015-04-21

    A series of bifunctional molecules with different combinations of macrocyclic polyamine [12]aneN3 and coumarin moieties, 4a/b and 5a/b, were synthesized by a two-step copper(I)-mediated alkyne–azide click reactions between 1,3,5-tris(azidomethyl)benzene and Boc-protected N-propynyl-[12]aneN3/7-propynyloxycoumarins. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiments indicated that bifunctional molecules 4b and 5b effectively induced complete plasmid DNA condensation at concentrations up to 40 μM. It was found that the structural variation had a major impact on the condensation behavior of these compounds. The electrostatic interaction involving the [12]aneN3 moiety can be compensated by the binding contribution of the coumarin units during the DNA condensation process. These two types of interaction showed different effects on the reversibility of DNA condensation. Results from studies using dynamic laser scattering, atomic force microscopy, and EB replacement assay further supported the above conclusion. Cytotoxicity assays on bifunctional compounds 4a/b and 5a/b indicated their low cytotoxicity. Results from cellular uptake and cell transfection experiments proved that bifunctional compounds 4b and 5b successfully served as non-viral gene vectors. Furthermore, methyl substituents attached to the coumarin unit (4b and 5b) greatly enhanced their DNA condensation capability and gene transfection. These bifunctional molecules, with the advantages of lower cytotoxicity, good water solubility, and potential structural modification, will have great potential for the development of new non-viral gene delivery agents.

  3. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Jespersen, Thomas; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2003-01-01

    The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV...... mutational library of Arg 85 and Asp 86 in the first variable region of Akv envelope protein. Homologous amino acids to Asp 86 in Moloney and Friend murine leukemia viruses are thought to be directly involved in receptor binding. Subsequent selection of mutants capable of infecting murine NIH 3T3 cells...... indicated that the wild type aspartic acid or another hydrophilic residue at position 86 is an important determinant for envelope function....

  4. A fast gene selection method for multi-cancer classification using multiple support vector data description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jin; Zhang, Li; Wang, Bangjun; Li, Fanzhang; Yang, Jiwen

    2015-02-01

    For cancer classification problems based on gene expression, the data usually has only a few dozen sizes but has thousands to tens of thousands of genes which could contain a large number of irrelevant genes. A robust feature selection algorithm is required to remove irrelevant genes and choose the informative ones. Support vector data description (SVDD) has been applied to gene selection for many years. However, SVDD cannot address the problems with multiple classes since it only considers the target class. In addition, it is time-consuming when applying SVDD to gene selection. This paper proposes a novel fast feature selection method based on multiple SVDD and applies it to multi-class microarray data. A recursive feature elimination (RFE) scheme is introduced to iteratively remove irrelevant features, so the proposed method is called multiple SVDD-RFE (MSVDD-RFE). To make full use of all classes for a given task, MSVDD-RFE independently selects a relevant gene subset for each class. The final selected gene subset is the union of these relevant gene subsets. The effectiveness and accuracy of MSVDD-RFE are validated by experiments on five publicly available microarray datasets. Our proposed method is faster and more effective than other methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selection of Vector Boson Fusion Events in the $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ Decay Channel Using an Inclusive Event Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Braren, Früd; Schleper, Peter

    Present-day measurements of the signal strength of the Higgs-boson production mode vector boson fusion tend to suffer from large theoretical uncertainties on the gluon fusion contamination in the vector boson fusion selection. The measurements are still limited by the statistical uncertainties, but as more data will be recorded, the statistical uncertainties will be reduced. Therefore it is of importance to think of alternative vector boson fusion selections with a better control over the theoretical uncertainty. Vector boson fusion selections use a central jet veto. Such a veto can be implemented via the inclusive event shape 2-jettiness as an alternative to the presently used central-jet veto. In this thesis, the properties of this event shape in $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ events and its use in a vector boson fusion selection are examined. The theoretical uncertainties accompanying this event-shape based selection are studied. Finally, the vector boson fusion signal strength is determined using 8 TeV ATLAS ...

  6. A genetic algorithm-support vector machine method with parameter optimization for selecting the tag SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Ilhan; Tezel, Gülay

    2013-04-01

    SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) include millions of changes in human genome, and therefore, are promising tools for disease-gene association studies. However, this kind of studies is constrained by the high expense of genotyping millions of SNPs. For this reason, it is required to obtain a suitable subset of SNPs to accurately represent the rest of SNPs. For this purpose, many methods have been developed to select a convenient subset of tag SNPs, but all of them only provide low prediction accuracy. In the present study, a brand new method is developed and introduced as GA-SVM with parameter optimization. This method benefits from support vector machine (SVM) and genetic algorithm (GA) to predict SNPs and to select tag SNPs, respectively. Furthermore, it also uses particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to optimize C and γ parameters of support vector machine. It is experimentally tested on a wide range of datasets, and the obtained results demonstrate that this method can provide better prediction accuracy in identifying tag SNPs compared to other methods at present. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recombinant AAV viral vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids from serotypes 1, 2, and 5 display differential efficiency and cell tropism after delivery to different regions of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Corinna; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Velardo, Margaret J; Peden, Carmen S; Williams, Philip; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Reier, Paul J; Mandel, Ronald J; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) has been shown to deliver genes to neurons effectively in the brain, retina, and spinal cord. The characterization of new AAV serotypes has revealed that they have different patterns of transduction in diverse tissues. We have investigated the tropism and transduction frequency in the central nervous system (CNS) of three different rAAV vector serotypes. The vectors contained AAV2 terminal repeats flanking a green fluorescent protein expression cassette under the control of the synthetic CBA promoter, in AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsids, producing the pseudotypes rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5. Rats were injected with rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, or rAAV2/5 into selected regions of the CNS, including the hippocampus (HPC), substantia nigra (SN), striatum, globus pallidus, and spinal cord. In all regions injected, the three vectors transduced neurons almost exclusively. All three vectors transduced the SN pars compacta with high efficiency, but rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 also transduced the pars reticulata. Moreover, rAAV2/1 showed widespread distribution throughout the entire midbrain. In the HPC, rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 targeted the pyramidal cell layers in the CA1-CA3 regions, whereas AAV2/2 primarily transduced the hilar region of the dentate gyrus. In general, rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 exhibited higher transduction frequencies than rAAV2/2 in all regions injected, although the differences were marginal in some regions. Retrograde transport of rAAV1 and rAAV5 was also observed in particular CNS areas. These results suggest that vectors based on distinct AAV serotypes can be chosen for specific applications in the nervous system. Copyright The American Society of Gene Therapy

  8. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

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    Lark L. Coffey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed.

  9. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  10. [Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus replication in chicken embryos by miRNAs delivered by recombinant avian adeno-associated viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pengpeng; Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli

    2011-02-01

    We studied the inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication in chicken embryos by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV)-delivered VP1- and VP2-specific microRNAs (miRNAs). We co-transfected AAV-293 cells with the VP1- or VP2 gene-specific miRNA expression vector pAITR-RFPmiVP1 or AITR-RFPmiVP2E, AAAV packaging vector pcDNA-ARC and adenovirus helper vector pHelper, resulting in recombinant virus rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E. We also generated the recombinant viruses rAAAV-RFP (without miRNA expression cassette) and rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con (expressing control miRNA) using the same method as the control purpose. Electron microscopy showed that the recombinant viruses had a typical morphology of AAV. We confirmed the presence of miRNA expression cassette in the recombinant viral genomes by using PCR. Our poly (A)-tailed RT-PCR showed correct expression of the miRNAs in the rAAAV-transduced DF-1 cells. We inoculated the recombinant viruses individually into 8-day-old SPF chicken embryos and then challenged them using Lukert strain IBDV on day 2 after inoculation. Our IBDV titration assay showed that the 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of rAAAV-RFP- or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con-inoculated group was 8.0 log10, whereas the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP1-inoculated group decreased to 1.0 and 0.8 log10 on day 3 and 6 after challenge, respectively. Similarly, the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E-inoculated group decreased to 1.5 and 2.0 log10, respectively. These data suggest that rAAAV can transduce efficiently chicken embryos and the expressed VP1- and VP2-specific miRNAs can inhibit the replication of IBDV efficiently.

  11. Triazine dendrimers as non-viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo RNAi: The effects of peripheral groups and core structure on biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Olivia M.; Mintzer, Meredith A.; Librizzi, Damiano; Samsonova, Olga; Dicke, Tanja; Sproat, Brian; Garn, Holger; Barth, Peter J.; Simanek, Eric E.; Kissel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A family of triazine dendrimers, differing in their core flexibility, generation number, and surface functionality, was prepared and evaluated for its ability to accomplish RNAi. The dendriplexes were analyzed with respect to their physicochemical and biological properties, including condensation of siRNA, complex size, surface charge, cellular uptake and subcellular distribution, their potential for reporter gene knockdown in HeLa/Luc cells, and ultimately their stability, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and intracellular uptake in mice after intravenous (iv.) administration. The structure of the backbone was found to significantly influence siRNA transfection efficiency, with rigid, second generation dendrimers displaying higher gene knockdown than the flexible analogues while maintaining less off-target effects than Lipofectamine. Additionally, among the rigid, second generation dendrimers, those with either arginine-like exteriors or peripheries containing hydrophobic functionalities mediated the most effective gene knockdown, thus showing that dendrimer surface groups also affect transfection efficiency. Moreover, these two most effective dendriplexes were stable in circulation upon intravenous administration and showed passive targeting to the lung. Both dendriplex formulations were taken up into the alveolar epithelium, making them promising candidates for RNAi in the lung. The ability to correlate the effects of triazine dendrimer core scaffolds, generation number, and surface functionality with siRNA transfection efficiency yields valuable information for further modifying this non-viral delivery system and stresses the importance of only loosely correlating effective gene delivery vectors with siRNA transfection agents. PMID:20524664

  12. Quantitative analysis of axon bouton distribution of subthalamic nucleus neurons in the rat by single neuron visualization with a viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Yoshinori; Fujiyama, Fumino; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-06-15

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) of the basal ganglia plays a key role in motor control, and STN efferents are known to mainly target the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), entopeduncular nucleus (Ep), and substantia nigra (SN) with some axon collaterals to the other regions. However, it remains to be clarified how each STN neuron projects axon fibers and collaterals to those target nuclei of the STN. Here we visualized the whole axonal arborization of single STN neurons in the rat brain by using a viral vector expressing membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein, and examined the distribution of axon boutons in those target nuclei. The vast majority (8-9) of 10 reconstructed STN neurons projected to the GPe, SN, caudate-putamen (CPu), and Ep, which received, on average ± SD, 457 ± 425, 400 ± 347, 126 ± 143, and 106 ± 100 axon boutons per STN neuron, respectively. Furthermore, the density of axon boutons in the GPe was highest among these nuclei. Although these target nuclei were divided into calbindin-rich and -poor portions, STN projection showed no exclusive preference for those portions. Since STN neurons mainly projected not only to the GPe, SN, and Ep but also to the CPu, the subthalamostriatal projection might serve as a positive feedback path for the striato-GPe-subthalamic disinhibitory pathway, or work as another route of cortical inputs to the striatum through the corticosubthalamostriatal disynaptic excitatory pathway. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Bidirectional changes in water-maze learning following recombinant adenovirus-associated viral vector (rAAV)-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Büeler, Hansruedi; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression have been implicated in the pathogenesis of emotional and cognitive dysfunction. Here, we induced BDNF overexpression in the rat hippocampus using recombinant adenovirus-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, and studied its long-term (2 months postinduction) effects on anxiety-related behaviour, exploration in the open field, and spatial learning in the water maze. Although the treatment successfully led to substantial elevation of hippocampal BDNF levels, its effect on spatial learning was bidirectional: a subset of rAAV-induced BDNF-overexpressing rats performed well above control level, whereas the rest were clearly impaired. This behavioural distinction corresponded to two markedly different levels of BDNF overexpression. The increase in dorsal hippocampal BDNF content achieved in the 'water-maze-impaired' subgroup was twice that attained in the 'water-maze-improved' rats. Although neither subgroup of rAAV-induced BDNF-overexpressing rats differed from controls in the open field, the 'water-maze-impaired' subgroup also showed a significant anxiolytic effect. Our results suggest that hippocampal BDNF elevation significantly affects cognitive and emotional behaviours, but the direction and magnitude of the effects critically depend on the precise levels of overexpression. This factor must be taken into account in future studies examining the functional consequences of hippocampal BDNF overexpression.

  14. Biodegradable Nanoparticles of mPEG-PLGA-PLL Triblock Copolymers as Novel Non-Viral Vectors for Improving siRNA Delivery and Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Sheng Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of mRNA by RNA interference is one of the most powerful and specific mechanisms for gene silencing. However, insufficient cellular uptake and poor stability have limited its usefulness. Here, we report efficient delivery of siRNA via the use of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs made from monomethoxypoly(ethylene glycol-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid-poly-l-lysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL triblock copolymers. Various physicochemical properties of mPEG-PLGA-PLL NPs, including morphology, size, surface charge, siRNA encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release profile of siRNA from NPs, were characterized by scanning electron microscope, particle size and zeta potential analyzer, and high performance liquid chromatography. The levels of siRNA uptake and targeted gene inhibition were detected in human lung cancer SPC-A1-GFP cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein. Examination of the cultured SPC-A1-GFP cells with fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry showed NPs loading Cy3-labeled siRNA had much higher intracellular siRNA delivery efficiencies than siRNA alone and Lipofectamine-siRNA complexes. The gene silencing efficiency of mPEG-PLGA-PLL NPs was higher than that of commercially available transfecting agent Lipofectamine while showing no cytotoxicity. Thus, the current study demonstrates that biodegradable NPs of mPEG-PLGA-PLL triblock copolymers can be potentially applied as novel non-viral vectors for improving siRNA delivery and gene silencing.

  15. Biodegradable Nanoparticles of mPEG-PLGA-PLL Triblock Copolymers as Novel Non-Viral Vectors for Improving siRNA Delivery and Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Sun, Ying; Shi, Qiu-Sheng; Liu, Pei-Feng; Zhu, Ming-Jie; Wang, Chun-Hui; Du, Lian-Fang; Duan, You-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of mRNA by RNA interference is one of the most powerful and specific mechanisms for gene silencing. However, insufficient cellular uptake and poor stability have limited its usefulness. Here, we report efficient delivery of siRNA via the use of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) made from monomethoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly-l-lysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) triblock copolymers. Various physicochemical properties of mPEG-PLGA-PLL NPs, including morphology, size, surface charge, siRNA encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release profile of siRNA from NPs, were characterized by scanning electron microscope, particle size and zeta potential analyzer, and high performance liquid chromatography. The levels of siRNA uptake and targeted gene inhibition were detected in human lung cancer SPC-A1-GFP cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein. Examination of the cultured SPC-A1-GFP cells with fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry showed NPs loading Cy3-labeled siRNA had much higher intracellular siRNA delivery efficiencies than siRNA alone and Lipofectamine-siRNA complexes. The gene silencing efficiency of mPEG-PLGA-PLL NPs was higher than that of commercially available transfecting agent Lipofectamine while showing no cytotoxicity. Thus, the current study demonstrates that biodegradable NPs of mPEG-PLGA-PLL triblock copolymers can be potentially applied as novel non-viral vectors for improving siRNA delivery and gene silencing. PMID:22312268

  16. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  17. Feature selection by merging sequential bidirectional search into relevance vector machine in condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kui; Dong, Yu; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    For more accurate fault detection and diagnosis, there is an increasing trend to use a large number of sensors and to collect data at high frequency. This inevitably produces large-scale data and causes difficulties in fault classification. Actually, the classification methods are simply intractable when applied to high-dimensional condition monitoring data. In order to solve the problem, engineers have to resort to complicated feature extraction methods to reduce the dimensionality of data. However, the features transformed by the methods cannot be understood by the engineers due to a loss of the original engineering meaning. In this paper, other forms of dimensionality reduction technique(feature selection methods) are employed to identify machinery condition, based only on frequency spectrum data. Feature selection methods are usually divided into three main types: filter, wrapper and embedded methods. Most studies are mainly focused on the first two types, whilst the development and application of the embedded feature selection methods are very limited. This paper attempts to explore a novel embedded method. The method is formed by merging a sequential bidirectional search algorithm into scale parameters tuning within a kernel function in the relevance vector machine. To demonstrate the potential for applying the method to machinery fault diagnosis, the method is implemented to rolling bearing experimental data. The results obtained by using the method are consistent with the theoretical interpretation, proving that this algorithm has important engineering significance in revealing the correlation between the faults and relevant frequency features. The proposed method is a theoretical extension of relevance vector machine, and provides an effective solution to detect the fault-related frequency components with high efficiency.

  18. Oviposition site selection by the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and its implications for dengue control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacklyn Wong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Because no dengue vaccine or antiviral therapy is commercially available, controlling the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is currently the only means to prevent dengue outbreaks. Traditional models of Ae. aegypti assume that population dynamics are regulated by density-dependent larval competition for food and little affected by oviposition behavior. Due to direct impacts on offspring survival and development, however, mosquito choice in oviposition site can have important consequences for population regulation that should be taken into account when designing vector control programs.We examined oviposition patterns by Ae. aegypti among 591 naturally occurring containers and a set of experimental containers in Iquitos, Peru. Using larval starvation bioassays as an indirect measure of container food content, we assessed whether females select containers with the most food for their offspring. Our data indicate that choice of egg-laying site is influenced by conspecific larvae and pupae, container fill method, container size, lid, and sun exposure. Although larval food positively influenced oviposition, our results did not support the hypothesis that females act primarily to maximize food for larvae. Females were most strongly attracted to sites containing immature conspecifics, even when potential competitors for their progeny were present in abundance.Due to strong conspecific attraction, egg-laying behavior may contribute more to regulating Ae. aegypti populations than previously thought. If highly infested containers are targeted for removal or larvicide application, females that would have preferentially oviposited in those sites may instead distribute their eggs among other suitable, previously unoccupied containers. Strategies that kill mosquitoes late in their development (i.e., insect growth regulators that kill pupae rather than larvae will enhance vector control by creating "egg sinks," treated sites that exploit conspecific

  19. Survival Prediction and Feature Selection in Patients with Breast Cancer Using Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Goli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Support Vector Regression (SVR model has been broadly used for response prediction. However, few researchers have used SVR for survival analysis. In this study, a new SVR model is proposed and SVR with different kernels and the traditional Cox model are trained. The models are compared based on different performance measures. We also select the best subset of features using three feature selection methods: combination of SVR and statistical tests, univariate feature selection based on concordance index, and recursive feature elimination. The evaluations are performed using available medical datasets and also a Breast Cancer (BC dataset consisting of 573 patients who visited the Oncology Clinic of Hamadan province in Iran. Results show that, for the BC dataset, survival time can be predicted more accurately by linear SVR than nonlinear SVR. Based on the three feature selection methods, metastasis status, progesterone receptor status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status are the best features associated to survival. Also, according to the obtained results, performance of linear and nonlinear kernels is comparable. The proposed SVR model performs similar to or slightly better than other models. Also, SVR performs similar to or better than Cox when all features are included in model.

  20. SNPs selection using support vector regression and genetic algorithms in GWAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fabrízzio Condé; Borges, Carlos Cristiano Hasenclever; Almeida, Fernanda Nascimento; e Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; da Silva Verneque, Rui; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius G B; Arbex, Wagner

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology to simultaneously select the most relevant SNPs markers for the characterization of any measurable phenotype described by a continuous variable using Support Vector Regression with Pearson Universal kernel as fitness function of a binary genetic algorithm. The proposed methodology is multi-attribute towards considering several markers simultaneously to explain the phenotype and is based jointly on statistical tools, machine learning and computational intelligence. The suggested method has shown potential in the simulated database 1, with additive effects only, and real database. In this simulated database, with a total of 1,000 markers, and 7 with major effect on the phenotype and the other 993 SNPs representing the noise, the method identified 21 markers. Of this total, 5 are relevant SNPs between the 7 but 16 are false positives. In real database, initially with 50,752 SNPs, we have reduced to 3,073 markers, increasing the accuracy of the model. In the simulated database 2, with additive effects and interactions (epistasis), the proposed method matched to the methodology most commonly used in GWAS. The method suggested in this paper demonstrates the effectiveness in explaining the real phenotype (PTA for milk), because with the application of the wrapper based on genetic algorithm and Support Vector Regression with Pearson Universal, many redundant markers were eliminated, increasing the prediction and accuracy of the model on the real database without quality control filters. The PUK demonstrated that it can replicate the performance of linear and RBF kernels.

  1. Replicative Homeostasis: A fundamental mechanism mediating selective viral replication and escape mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallie Richard

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C (HCV, hepatitis B (HBV, the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, and other viruses that replicate via RNA intermediaries, cause an enormous burden of disease and premature death worldwide. These viruses circulate within infected hosts as vast populations of closely related, but genetically diverse, molecules known as "quasispecies". The mechanism(s by which this extreme genetic and antigenic diversity is stably maintained are unclear, but are fundamental to understanding viral persistence and pathobiology. The persistence of HCV, an RNA virus, is especially problematic and HCV stability, maintained despite rapid genomic mutation, is highly paradoxical. This paper presents the hypothesis, and evidence, that viruses capable of persistent infection autoregulate replication and the likely mechanism mediating autoregulation – Replicative Homeostasis – is described. Replicative homeostasis causes formation of stable, but highly reactive, equilibria that drive quasispecies expansion and generates escape mutation. Replicative homeostasis explains both viral kinetics and the enigma of RNA quasispecies stability and provides a rational, mechanistic basis for all observed viral behaviours and host responses. More importantly, this paradigm has specific therapeutic implication and defines, precisely, new approaches to antiviral therapy. Replicative homeostasis may also modulate cellular gene expression.

  2. High efficiency mode-locked, cylindrical vector beam fiber laser based on a mode selective coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongdan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Zuxing; Cai, Yu; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Lin

    2017-05-15

    We propose and demonstrate an all-fiber passively mode-locked laser with a figure-8 cavity, which generates pulsed cylindrical vector beam output based on a mode selective coupler (MSC). The MSC made of a two mode fiber and a standard single mode fiber is used as both the intracavity transverse mode converter and mode splitter with a low insertion loss of about 0.65 dB. The slope efficiency of the fiber laser is > 3%. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity which are measured to be > 94%. The laser operates at 1556.3 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 3.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have duration of 17 ns and a repetition rate of 0.66 MHz.

  3. A Greedy Algorithm of Data-Dependent User Selection for Fast Fading Gaussian Vector Broadcast Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Keigo

    2012-01-01

    User selection (US) with Zero-forcing beamforming (ZF-BF) is considered in fast fading Gaussian vector broadcast channels (VBCs) with perfect channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter. A novel criterion for US is proposed, which depends on both CSI and the data symbols, while the conventional criteria only depend on CSI. Since the optimization of US based on the proposed criterion is infeasible, a greedy algorithm of data-dependent US is proposed to perform the optimization approximately. An overhead issue arises in fast fading channels: On every update of US, the transmitter may inform each user whether he/she has been selected, using a certain fraction of resources. This overhead results in a significant rate loss for fast fading channels. In order to circumvent this overhead issue, iterative detection and decoding schemes are derived on the basis of belief propagation (BP). The proposed iterative schemes require no information about whether each user has been selected. The proposed US scheme is co...

  4. Characterization of cognitive deficits in rats overexpressing human alpha-synuclein in the ventral tegmental area and medial septum using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hélène; Jewett, Michael; Landeck, Natalie; Nilsson, Nathalie; Schagerlöf, Ulrika; Leanza, Giampiero; Kirik, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Intraneuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein (a-syn) constitute one of the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) and are accompanied by severe neurodegeneration of A9 dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra. Although to a lesser extent, A10 dopaminergic neurons are also affected. Neurodegeneration of other neuronal populations, such as the cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic cell groups, has also been documented in PD patients. Studies in human post-mortem PD brains and in rodent models suggest that deficits in cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may be associated with the cognitive impairment seen in this disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of targeted overexpression of a-syn in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways. Rats were injected with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding for either human wild-type a-syn or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the ventral tegmental area and the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, two regions rich in dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed widespread insoluble a-syn positive inclusions in all major projections areas of the targeted nuclei, including the hippocampus, neocortex, nucleus accumbens and anteromedial striatum. In addition, the rats overexpressing human a-syn displayed an abnormal locomotor response to apomorphine injection and exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze task, in the absence of obvious spontaneous locomotor impairment. As losses in dopaminergic and cholinergic immunoreactivity in both the GFP and a-syn expressing animals were mild-to-moderate and did not differ from each other, the behavioral impairments seen in the a-syn overexpressing animals appear to be determined by the long term persisting neuropathology in the surviving neurons rather than by neurodegeneration.

  5. Characterization of cognitive deficits in rats overexpressing human alpha-synuclein in the ventral tegmental area and medial septum using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Hall

    Full Text Available Intraneuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein (a-syn constitute one of the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD and are accompanied by severe neurodegeneration of A9 dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra. Although to a lesser extent, A10 dopaminergic neurons are also affected. Neurodegeneration of other neuronal populations, such as the cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic cell groups, has also been documented in PD patients. Studies in human post-mortem PD brains and in rodent models suggest that deficits in cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may be associated with the cognitive impairment seen in this disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of targeted overexpression of a-syn in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways. Rats were injected with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding for either human wild-type a-syn or green fluorescent protein (GFP in the ventral tegmental area and the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, two regions rich in dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed widespread insoluble a-syn positive inclusions in all major projections areas of the targeted nuclei, including the hippocampus, neocortex, nucleus accumbens and anteromedial striatum. In addition, the rats overexpressing human a-syn displayed an abnormal locomotor response to apomorphine injection and exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze task, in the absence of obvious spontaneous locomotor impairment. As losses in dopaminergic and cholinergic immunoreactivity in both the GFP and a-syn expressing animals were mild-to-moderate and did not differ from each other, the behavioral impairments seen in the a-syn overexpressing animals appear to be determined by the long term persisting neuropathology in the surviving neurons rather than by neurodegeneration.

  6. Integration of antimicrobial peptides with gold nanoparticles as unique non-viral vectors for gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells with antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Hua; Huang, Yan-Fen; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Niu, Jie; Chen, Ying; Chu, Yang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have emerged as attractive non-viral gene vectors. However their application in regenerative medicine is still limited partially due to a lack of an intrinsic capacity to transfect difficult-to-transfect cells such as primary cells or stem cells. In current study, we report the synthesis of antimicrobial peptide conjugated cationic AuNPs (AuNPs@PEP) as highly efficient carriers for gene delivery to stem cells with antibacterial ability. The AuNPs@PEP integrate the advantages of cationic AuNPs and antibacterial peptides: the presence of cationic AuNPs can effectively condense DNA and the antimicrobial peptides are essential for the cellular & nucleus entry enhancement to achieve high transfection efficiency and antibacterial ability. As a result, antimicrobial peptides conjugated AuNPs significantly promoted the gene transfection efficiency in rat mesenchymal stem cells than pristine AuNPs, with a similar extent to those expressed by TAT (a well-known cell-penetrating peptide) modified AuNPs. More interestingly, the combinational system has better antibacterial ability than free antimicrobial peptides in vitro and in vivo, possibly due to the high density of peptides on the surface of AuNPs. Finally we present the concept-proving results that AuPs@PEP can be used as a carrier for in vivo gene activation in tissue regeneration, suggesting its potential as a multifunctional system with both gene delivery and antibacterial abilities in clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adeno-associated viral vector 2.9 thymosin ß4 application attenuates rejection after heart transplantation: results of a preclinical study in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postrach, Johannes; Schmidt, Maximilian; Thormann, Michael; Thein, Eckart; Burdorf, Lars; Reichart, Bruno; Sotlar, Karl; Walz, Christoph; Faber, Claudius; Bauer, Andreas; Schmoeckel, Michael; Kupatt, Christian; Hinkel, Rabea

    2014-10-27

    Graft survival is the most important factor for morbidity and mortality in cardiac transplantation. Improved immunosuppression significantly reduced early graft rejection. However, acute rejection may predispose to chronic rejection. Targeting both phases of the recipient's immune-reactivity by means of long-acting recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAVs) encoding anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective factors appears to be a promising therapeutic approach. We investigate thymosin ß4 (Tß4) possessing anti-inflammatory and prosurvival abilities, as a means for pretransplant gene therapy. Heterotopic, abdominal transplantation of cardiac allografts into landrace or into Munich mini pigs (n=5 per group) was performed. Transplants were transduced with AAV2.9 before transplantation by means of in situ perfusion of the donor organ. Vascuar endothelial growth factor and AAV2.9.Tß4 or AAV2.9.LacZ were added to the autologous blood used for perfusing the grafts for a period of 45 min. Immunosuppression was applied for 10 days after the operation. Transgene expression, capillary density, graft function, survival, and rejection were assessed. The AAV2.9 transduction induced robust overexpression of the transgene. In addition, Tß4 ameliorated inflammation, necrosis, vascular reaction (acute rejection) and in parallel improved capillary density. In addition, graft survival was significantly prolonged (10±3 days AAV2.9.LacZ vs. 31±4 days AAV2.9.Tß4). In the mini pig model, regional myocardial function of the grafts was improved by Tß4 transduction compared to LacZ (9.1%±0.9% subendocardial segment shortening in AAV2.9.LacZ vs. 15.8%±2.3% in AAV2.9.Tß4). In situ AAV2.9-mediated gene transfer of thymosin β4 attenuated graft rejection in a heterotopic heart transplantation model. Perioperative cardioprotection by means of gene therapy might improve graft survival in cardiac allotransplantation.

  8. Genomic Footprints of Selective Sweeps from Metabolic Resistance to Pyrethroids in African Malaria Vectors Are Driven by Scale up of Insecticide-Based Vector Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kayla G; Weedall, Gareth D; Ndula, Miranda; Irving, Helen; Mzihalowa, Themba; Hemingway, Janet; Wondji, Charles S

    2017-02-01

    Insecticide resistance in mosquito populations threatens recent successes in malaria prevention. Elucidating patterns of genetic structure in malaria vectors to predict the speed and direction of the spread of resistance is essential to get ahead of the 'resistance curve' and to avert a public health catastrophe. Here, applying a combination of microsatellite analysis, whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing of a resistance locus, we elucidated the continent-wide population structure of a major African malaria vector, Anopheles funestus. We identified a major selective sweep in a genomic region controlling cytochrome P450-based metabolic resistance conferring high resistance to pyrethroids. This selective sweep occurred since 2002, likely as a direct consequence of scaled up vector control as revealed by whole genome and fine-scale sequencing of pre- and post-intervention populations. Fine-scaled analysis of the pyrethroid resistance locus revealed that a resistance-associated allele of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP6P9a has swept through southern Africa to near fixation, in contrast to high polymorphism levels before interventions, conferring high levels of pyrethroid resistance linked to control failure. Population structure analysis revealed a barrier to gene flow between southern Africa and other areas, which may prevent or slow the spread of the southern mechanism of pyrethroid resistance to other regions. By identifying a genetic signature of pyrethroid-based interventions, we have demonstrated the intense selective pressure that control interventions exert on mosquito populations. If this level of selection and spread of resistance continues unabated, our ability to control malaria with current interventions will be compromised.

  9. The sudden vector projection model for reactivity: mode specificity and bond selectivity made simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua; Jiang, Bin

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Mode specificity is defined by the differences in reactivity due to excitations in various reactant modes, while bond selectivity refers to selective bond breaking in a reaction. These phenomena not only shed light on reaction dynamics but also open the door for laser control of reactions. The existence of mode specificity and bond selectivity in a reaction indicates that not all forms of energy are equivalent in promoting the reactivity, thus defying a statistical treatment. They also allow the enhancement of reactivity and control product branching ratio. As a result, they are of central importance in chemistry. This Account discusses recent advances in our understanding of these nonstatistical phenomena. In particular, the newly proposed sudden vector projection (SVP) model and its applications are reviewed. The SVP model is based on the premise that the collision in many direct reactions is much faster than intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in the reactants. In such a sudden limit, the coupling of a reactant mode with the reaction coordinate at the transition state, which dictates its ability to promote the reaction, is approximately quantified by the projection of the former onto the latter. The SVP model can be considered as a generalization of the venerable Polanyi's rules, which are based on the location of the barrier. The SVP model is instead based on properties of the saddle point and as a result capable of treating the translational, rotational, and multiple vibrational modes in reactions involving polyatomic reactants. In case of surface reactions, the involvement of surface atoms can also be examined. Taking advantage of microscopic reversibility, the SVP model has also been used to predict product energy disposal in reactions. This simple yet powerful rule of thumb has been successfully demonstrated in many reactions including uni- and bimolecular reactions in the gas phase and gas-surface reactions. The success of the SVP

  10. Filtered selection coupled with support vector machines generate a functionally relevant prediction model for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabere MN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Musa Nur Gabere,1 Mohamed Aly Hussein,1 Mohammad Azhar Aziz2 1Department of Bioinformatics, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center/King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Colorectal Cancer Research Program, Department of Medical Genomics, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Purpose: There has been considerable interest in using whole-genome expression profiles for the classification of colorectal cancer (CRC. The selection of important features is a crucial step before training a classifier.Methods: In this study, we built a model that uses support vector machine (SVM to classify cancer and normal samples using Affymetrix exon microarray data obtained from 90 samples of 48 patients diagnosed with CRC. From the 22,011 genes, we selected the 20, 30, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 genes most relevant to CRC using the minimum-redundancy–maximum-relevance (mRMR technique. With these gene sets, an SVM model was designed using four different kernel types (linear, polynomial, radial basis function [RBF], and sigmoid.Results: The best model, which used 30 genes and RBF kernel, outperformed other combinations; it had an accuracy of 84% for both ten fold and leave-one-out cross validations in discriminating the cancer samples from the normal samples. With this 30 genes set from mRMR, six classifiers were trained using random forest (RF, Bayes net (BN, multilayer perceptron (MLP, naïve Bayes (NB, reduced error pruning tree (REPT, and SVM. Two hybrids, mRMR + SVM and mRMR + BN, were the best models when tested on other datasets, and they achieved a prediction accuracy of 95.27% and 91.99%, respectively, compared to other mRMR hybrid models (mRMR + RF, mRMR + NB, mRMR + REPT, and mRMR + MLP. Ingenuity pathway analysis was used to analyze the functions of the 30 genes selected for this model and their potential association with CRC: CDH3, CEACAM7, CLDN1, IL8, IL6R, MMP1

  11. SELECTIVE PROPHYLAXIS OF RHINO-SINUSITIS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTION

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    Tamara Aleksandrovna Mashkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment of 52 children with acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI aged from 4 to 10 years were studied based onobservation diaries, filled by parents, and data of the otorhinolaryngologists examinations on the 7th and 10th days from the onset of the disease. The children were divided into 2 groups: 1 group consisted of 30 children, which were treated with Sinupret monotherapy; 2 group consisted of 22 children, which were treated with endonasal irrigation, decongestants and antiseptics. The parallel analysis of the treatment results of children with ARVI showed, that Sinupret is well-tolerated by patients, contributes to milder course of the disease. Due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-viral actions this drug prevents development of such complications of respiratory tract infections as acute purulent rhino-sinusitis and acute otitis media. Sinupret also precipitates the processes of convalescence on 45% at the average and shorten the prolongation of disease on 5 days at the average, so it can be recommended to be included into the standard protocol of treatment children with ARVI.

  12. Classifier transfer with data selection strategies for online support vector machine classification with class imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Mario Michael; Wilshusen, Nils; Seeland, Anett; Kim, Su Kyoung

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Classifier transfers usually come with dataset shifts. To overcome dataset shifts in practical applications, we consider the limitations in computational resources in this paper for the adaptation of batch learning algorithms, like the support vector machine (SVM). Approach. We focus on data selection strategies which limit the size of the stored training data by different inclusion, exclusion, and further dataset manipulation criteria like handling class imbalance with two new approaches. We provide a comparison of the strategies with linear SVMs on several synthetic datasets with different data shifts as well as on different transfer settings with electroencephalographic (EEG) data. Main results. For the synthetic data, adding only misclassified samples performed astoundingly well. Here, balancing criteria were very important when the other criteria were not well chosen. For the transfer setups, the results show that the best strategy depends on the intensity of the drift during the transfer. Adding all and removing the oldest samples results in the best performance, whereas for smaller drifts, it can be sufficient to only add samples near the decision boundary of the SVM which reduces processing resources. Significance. For brain-computer interfaces based on EEG data, models trained on data from a calibration session, a previous recording session, or even from a recording session with another subject are used. We show, that by using the right combination of data selection criteria, it is possible to adapt the SVM classifier to overcome the performance drop from the transfer.

  13. Large-System Analysis of Joint User Selection and Vector Precoding for Multiuser MIMO Downlink

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Keigo; Kawabata, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Joint user selection (US) and vector precoding (US-VP) is proposed for multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) downlink. The main difference between joint US-VP and conventional US is that US depends on data symbols for joint US-VP, whereas conventional US is independent of data symbols. The replica method is used to analyze the performance of joint US-VP in the large-system limit, where the numbers of transmit antennas, users, and selected users tend to infinity while their ratios are kept constant. The analysis under the assumptions of replica symmetry (RS) and 1-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) implies that optimal data-independent US provides nothing but the same performance as random US in the large-system limit, whereas data-independent US is capacity-achieving as only the number of users tends to infinity. It is shown that joint US-VP can provide a substantial reduction of the energy penalty in the large-system limit. Consequently, joint US-VP outperforms separate US-VP in terms of the ...

  14. BLProt: Prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar

    2011-08-17

    Background: Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence.Results: In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated.Conclusion: BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. 2011 Kandaswamy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Plasmid Vectors for Xylella fastidiosa Utilizing a Toxin-Antitoxin System for Stability in the Absence of Antibiotic Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-08-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacterial genetics but there are only a limited number of plasmid vectors available that replicate in X. fastidiosa, and even fewer that are retained without antibiotic selection. Two plasmids are described here that show stable replication in X. fastidiosa and are effective for gene complementation both in vitro and in planta. Plasmid maintenance is facilitated by incorporation of the PemI/PemK plasmid addiction system, consisting of PemK, an endoribonuclease toxin, and its cognate antitoxin, PemI. Vector pXf20pemIK utilizes a native X. fastidiosa replication origin as well as a high-copy-number pUC origin for propagation in Escherichia coli cloning strains. Broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK is a medium- to low-copy-number plasmid based on the pBBR1 backbone. Both plasmids are maintained for extended periods of time in the absence of antibiotic selection, as well as up to 14 weeks in grapevine, without affecting bacterial fitness. These plasmids present an alternative to traditional complementation and expression vectors which rely on antibiotic selection for plasmid retention.

  16. Novel random peptide libraries displayed on AAV serotype 9 for selection of endothelial cell-directed gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, K; Michelfelder, S; Korff, T; Hecker, M; Trepel, M; Katus, H A; Kleinschmidt, J A; Müller, O J

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated the potential of random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV)2 to select for AAV2 vectors with improved efficiency for cell type-directed gene transfer. AAV9, however, may have advantages over AAV2 because of a lower prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in humans and more efficient gene transfer in vivo. Here we provide evidence that random peptide libraries can be displayed on AAV9 and can be utilized to select for AAV9 capsids redirected to the cell type of interest. We generated an AAV9 peptide display library, which ensures that the displayed peptides correspond to the packaged genomes and performed four consecutive selection rounds on human coronary artery endothelial cells in vitro. This screening yielded AAV9 library capsids with distinct peptide motifs enabling up to 40-fold improved transduction efficiencies compared with wild-type (wt) AAV9 vectors. Incorporating sequences selected from AAV9 libraries into AAV2 capsids could not increase transduction as efficiently as in the AAV9 context. To analyze the potential on endothelial cells in the intact natural vascular context, human umbilical veins were incubated with the selected AAV in situ and endothelial cells were isolated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed a 200-fold improved transduction efficiency compared with wt AAV9 vectors. Furthermore, AAV9 vectors with targeting sequences selected from AAV9 libraries revealed an increased transduction efficiency in the presence of human intravenous immunoglobulins, suggesting a reduced immunogenicity. We conclude that our novel AAV9 peptide library is functional and can be used to select for vectors for future preclinical and clinical gene transfer applications.

  17. Selective pressure causes an RNA virus to trade reproductive fitness for increased structural and thermal stability of a viral enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Dessau

    Full Text Available The modulation of fitness by single mutational substitutions during environmental change is the most fundamental consequence of natural selection. The antagonistic tradeoffs of pleiotropic mutations that can be selected under changing environments therefore lie at the foundation of evolutionary biology. However, the molecular basis of fitness tradeoffs is rarely determined in terms of how these pleiotropic mutations affect protein structure. Here we use an interdisciplinary approach to study how antagonistic pleiotropy and protein function dictate a fitness tradeoff. We challenged populations of an RNA virus, bacteriophage Φ6, to evolve in a novel temperature environment where heat shock imposed extreme virus mortality. A single amino acid substitution in the viral lysin protein P5 (V207F favored improved stability, and hence survival of challenged viruses, despite a concomitant tradeoff that decreased viral reproduction. This mutation increased the thermostability of P5. Crystal structures of wild-type, mutant, and ligand-bound P5 reveal the molecular basis of this thermostabilization--the Phe207 side chain fills a hydrophobic cavity that is unoccupied in the wild-type--and identify P5 as a lytic transglycosylase. The mutation did not reduce the enzymatic activity of P5, suggesting that the reproduction tradeoff stems from other factors such as inefficient capsid assembly or disassembly. Our study demonstrates how combining experimental evolution, biochemistry, and structural biology can identify the mechanisms that drive the antagonistic pleiotropic phenotypes of an individual point mutation in the classic evolutionary tug-of-war between survival and reproduction.

  18. Present and Future Projections of Habitat Suitability of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, a Vector of Viral Pathogens, from Global Climate Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proestos, Y.; Christophides, G.; Erguler, K.; Tanarhte, M.; Waldock, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause Chikungunya, Dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model (GCM) at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the 21st century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that about 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million square kilometres will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making.

  19. Reduced susceptibility to selected synthetic pyrethroids in urban malaria vector Anopheles stephensi: a case study in Mangalore city, South India

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    Dash Aditya P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic pyrethroids are potent insecticides most commonly used in the vector control programme. These are applied for indoor residual sprays, space sprays and in impregnated bed nets. Resistance reduces the efficacy of insecticides. Thus, the susceptibility status of the target vector(s is monitored routinely to select the effective ones. A study was undertaken in a malaria endemic coastal city Mangalore, Karnataka, South India, against the known malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. Methods The susceptibility status was assessed at diagnostic doses of DDT (4%, malathion (5%, deltamethrin (0.05%, cyfluthrin (0.15%, alphacypermethrin (0.10%, lambdacyhalothrin (0.05% and permethrin (0.75% using the standard WHO tube test method during October/November 2006. Results Anopheles stephensi was resistant to malathion by 54.9%, but tolerant to deltamethrin by 86.1%, cyfluthrin 95.5% and alphacypermethrin 90.6%, whereas it was susceptible to DDT by 98.1%, lambdacyhalothrin 98.6% and permethrin 100.0%, respectively. The KDT50 and KDT95 values for these insecticides also showed the similar responses. Conclusion Susceptibility of An. stephensi to DDT is an important finding as this has never been used in Mangalore city, whereas its rural counterpart Anopheles culicifacies is widely resistant to this insecticide. The study explores the selection and rotation of the appropriate insecticide molecule even within the same group for effective vector management.

  20. Improved influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine induces robust B and T-cell responses and protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailybayeva, Aigerim; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Sansyzbay, Abylai; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Tabynov, Kaissar

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a potent candidate vaccine against bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus using the influenza viral vector expressing Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins (Flu-BA). Our success in the Flu-BA vaccine trial in cattle and results of a pilot study in non-pregnant small ruminants prompted us in the current study to test its efficacy against B. melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats. In this study, we improved the Flu-BA vaccine formulation and immunization method to achieve maximum efficacy and safety. The Flu-BA vaccine formulation had two additional proteins Omp19 and SOD, and administered thrice with 20% Montanide Gel01 adjuvant, simultaneously by both subcutaneous and conjunctival routes at 21 days intervals in pregnant sheep and goats. At 42 days post-vaccination (DPV) we detected antigen-specific IgG antibodies predominantly of IgG2a isotype but also IgG1, and also detected a strong lymphocyte recall response with IFN-γ production. Importantly, our candidate vaccine prevented abortion in 66.7% and 77.8% of pregnant sheep and goats, respectively. Furthermore, complete protection (absence of live B. melitensis 16M) was observed in 55.6% and 66.7% of challenged sheep and goats, and 72.7% and 90.0% of their fetuses (lambs/yeanlings), respectively. The severity of B. melitensis 16M infection in vaccinated sheep and goats and their fetuses (index of infection and rates of Brucella colonization in tissues) was significantly lower than in control groups. None of the protection parameters after vaccination with Flu-BA vaccine were statistically inferior to protection seen with the commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine (protection against abortion and vaccination efficacy, alpha = 0.18-0.34, infection index, P = 0.37-0.77, Brucella colonization, P = 0.16 to P > 0.99). In conclusion, our improved Flu-BA vaccine formulation and delivery method were found safe and effective in protecting pregnant sheep and goats against adverse

  1. Voltammetric electronic tongue and support vector machines for identification of selected features in Mexican coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Rocio Berenice; Moreno-Barón, Laura; Muñoz, Roberto; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-09-24

    This paper describes a new method based on a voltammetric electronic tongue (ET) for the recognition of distinctive features in coffee samples. An ET was directly applied to different samples from the main Mexican coffee regions without any pretreatment before the analysis. The resulting electrochemical information was modeled with two different mathematical tools, namely Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). Growing conditions (i.e., organic or non-organic practices and altitude of crops) were considered for a first classification. LDA results showed an average discrimination rate of 88% ± 6.53% while SVM successfully accomplished an overall accuracy of 96.4% ± 3.50% for the same task. A second classification based on geographical origin of samples was carried out. Results showed an overall accuracy of 87.5% ± 7.79% for LDA and a superior performance of 97.5% ± 3.22% for SVM. Given the complexity of coffee samples, the high accuracy percentages achieved by ET coupled with SVM in both classification problems suggested a potential applicability of ET in the assessment of selected coffee features with a simpler and faster methodology along with a null sample pretreatment. In addition, the proposed method can be applied to authentication assessment while improving cost, time and accuracy of the general procedure.

  2. Development of Patient-specific AAV Vectors After Neutralizing Antibody Selection for Enhanced Muscle Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Wu, Shuqing; Albright, Blake; Hirsch, Matthew; Li, Wuping; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McPhee, Scott; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-02-01

    A major hindrance in gene therapy trials with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that inhibit AAV transduction. In this study, we used directed evolution techniques in vitro and in mouse muscle to select novel NAb escape AAV chimeric capsid mutants in the presence of individual patient serum. AAV mutants isolated in vitro escaped broad patient-specific NAb activity but had poor transduction ability in vivo. AAV mutants isolated in vivo had enhanced NAb evasion from cognate serum and had high muscle transduction ability. More importantly, structural modeling identified a 100 amino acid motif from AAV6 in variable region (VR) III that confers this enhanced muscle tropism. In addition, a predominantly AAV8 capsid beta barrel template with a specific preference for AAV1/AAV9 in VR VII located at threefold symmetry axis facilitates NAb escape. Our data strongly support that chimeric AAV capsids composed of modular and nonoverlapping domains from various serotypes are capable of evading patient-specific NAbs and have enhanced muscle transduction.

  3. Evidence for positive selection on the E2 gene of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fangqiang; Zhang, Chuyu

    2007-12-01

    Despite the growing interest in the molecular epidemiology of pestivirus, there have been few attempts to determine which regions of the pestivirus genome are subject to positive selection, although this may be a key indicator of the nature of the interaction between host and virus. By using likelihood-based methods for phylogenetic inference, the positive selection pressure of BVDV-1 E2 gene were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed, to identify specific codons undergoing diversifying positive selection. The overall omega was 0.20, indicating that most sites were subject to strong purifying selection and five positively selected sites (886, 888, 905, 944, and 946) were identified. It is surprising to find that all the potential positively selected sites fall within the C-terminal of E2, and out of the N-terminal of E2 which is thought to be surface-exposed and therefore prime targets for host antibody response. In conclusion, these results suggest that selection favoring avoidance of antibody recognition has not been a major factor in the history of BVDV-1. Further analysis is necessary to see if amino acid substitutions in the BVDV-1 positively selected sites can lead to change of host tropism or\\and escape from epitope-specific CD8 T-cell response.

  4. Meta-Analysis of DNA Tumor-Viral Integration Site Selection Indicates a Role for Repeats, Gene Expression and Epigenetics

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    Janet M. Doolittle-Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoviruses cause tremendous global cancer burden. For several DNA tumor viruses, human genome integration is consistently associated with cancer development. However, genomic features associated with tumor viral integration are poorly understood. We sought to define genomic determinants for 1897 loci prone to hosting human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV or Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. These were compared to HIV, whose enzyme-mediated integration is well understood. A comprehensive catalog of integration sites was constructed from the literature and experimentally-determined HPV integration sites. Features were scored in eight categories (genes, expression, open chromatin, histone modifications, methylation, protein binding, chromatin segmentation and repeats and compared to random loci. Random forest models determined loci classification and feature selection. HPV and HBV integrants were not fragile site associated. MCPyV preferred integration near sensory perception genes. Unique signatures of integration-associated predictive genomic features were detected. Importantly, repeats, actively-transcribed regions and histone modifications were common tumor viral integration signatures.

  5. Enhanced selective gene delivery to neural stem cells in vivo by an adeno-associated viral variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Vazin, Tandis; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are defined by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into mature neuronal and glial cell types. NSCs are the subject of intense investigation, owing to their crucial roles in neural development and adult brain function and because they present potential targets for gene and cell replacement therapies following injury or disease. Approaches to specifically genetically perturb or modulate NSC function would be valuable for either motivation. Unfortunately, most gene delivery vectors are incapable of efficient or specific gene delivery to NSCs in vivo. Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) present a number of advantages and have proven increasingly successful in clinical trials. However, natural AAV variants are inefficient in transducing NSCs. We previously engineered a novel AAV variant (AAV r3.45) capable of efficient transduction of adult NSCs in vitro. Here, to build upon the initial promise of this variant, we investigated its in vitro and in vivo infectivity. AAV r3.45 was more selective for NSCs than mature neurons in a human embryonic stem cell-derived culture containing a mixture of cell types, including NSCs and neurons. It was capable of more efficient and selective transduction of rat and mouse NSCs in vivo than natural AAV serotypes following intracranial vector administration. Delivery of constitutively active β-catenin yielded insights into mechanisms by which this key regulator modulates NSC function, indicating that this engineered AAV variant can be harnessed for preferential modulation of adult NSCs in the hippocampus. The capacity to rapidly genetically modify these cells might greatly accelerate in vivo investigations of adult neurogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Serosurvey for selected viral diseases and demography of African wild dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, S; Creel, N M; Munson, L; Sanderlin, D; Appel, M J

    1997-10-01

    African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are endangered, with only 3,000-5,000 remaining in the wild. It is believed that wild dogs are unusually vulnerable to viral diseases, particularly rabies and canine distemper (CDV). However, canine distemper has been confirmed by laboratory diagnosis in only one free-living wild dog. The 43,000 km2 Selous Game Reserve (SGR; Tanzania) holds approximately 900 adult wild dogs. In a study area of 2,600 km2, the population maintained high density (> or = 1 dog/20.5 km2) from 1991 to 1996. The population was stable, varying 18% below and 9% above the mean density over the 6-yr period. Serum samples (n = 22) collected over 3 yr showed that most individuals were exposed to CDV (59%:95% confidence interval = 43-76% seropositive) and canine parvovirus (68%:95% CI = 54-81% seropositive), although none were seropositive for rabies (0%:95% CI = 0-17%). CDV titers were positively related to age, with no seropositive dogs younger than 1.9 yr. At least five of 13 dogs positive for CDV seroconverted during the study. Dogs with high CDV titers did not survive better in the years after sampling (mean survival +/- SE for those that died = 638 +/- 92 days,). Variation in mean litter size was inversely related to CPV exposure in the SGR and elsewhere. Annual mortality rates were low in comparison to other populations for all age classes (pups: 31 +/- 8%, n = 127, yearlings: 22 +/- 10%, n = 93, adults: 20 +/- 6%, n = 235). Annual mortality rates fluctuated little between 1992 and 1996. These data show that wild dog populations, like those of other canids, can remain stable and demographically healthy despite exposure to CDV and CPV.

  7. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a vehicle for therapeutic gene delivery: improvements in vector design and viral production enhance potential to prolong graft survival in pancreatic islet cell transplantation for the reversal of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapturczak, M H; Flotte, T; Atkinson, M A

    2001-05-01

    Most viral gene delivery syslems utilized to date have demonstrated significant limitations in practicality and safety due to the level and duration of recombinant transgene expression as well as their induction of host immunogenicity to vector proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors appear to offer a vehicle for safe, long-term therapeutic gene transfer; factors afforded through the propensity of rAAV to establish long-term latency without deleterious effects on the host cell and the relative non-immunogenicity of the virus or viral expressed transgenes. The principal historical limitation of this vector system, efficiency of rAAV-mediated transduction, has recently observed a dramatic increase as the titer, purity, and production capacity of rAAV preparations have improved. In terms of systems that could benefit from such improvements, rAAV gene therapy to enhance solid organ transplantation would appear an obvious choice with islet transplantation forming a promising candidate due to the ability to perform viral transductions ex vivo. Currently, islet transplantation can be used to treat type 1 diabetes yet persisting alloimmune and autoimmune responses represent major obstacles to the clinical success for this procedure. The delivery of transgenes capable of interfering with antigenic recognition and/or cell death [e.g., Fas ligand (FasL), Bcl-2, Bcl-XL] as well as imparting tolerance/immunoregulation [e.g., interleukin(IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta], or cytoprotection [e.g., heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)] may prevent recurrent type 1 diabetes in islet transplantation and offer a promising form of immunotherapy. Research investigations utilizing such systems may also provide information vital to understanding the immunoregulatory mechanisms critical to the development of both alloimmune and autoimmune islet cell rejection mechanisms and recurrent type 1 diabetes.

  8. Comparative genomics shows that viral integrations are abundant and express piRNAs in the arboviral vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palatini, U.; Miesen, P.; Carballar-Lejarazu, R.; Ometto, L.; Rizzo, E.; Tu, Z.; Rij, R.P. van; Bonizzoni, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) transmitted by mosquito vectors cause many important emerging or resurging infectious diseases in humans including dengue, chikungunya and Zika. Understanding the co-evolutionary processes among viruses and vectors is essential for the development of

  9. Support Vector Machines Parameter Selection Based on Combined Taguchi Method and Staelin Method for E-mail Spam Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chih Hsu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Support vector machines (SVM are a powerful tool for building good spam filtering models. However, the performance of the model depends on parameter selection. Parameter selection of SVM will affect classification performance seriously during training process. In this study, we use combined Taguchi method and Staelin method to optimize the SVM-based E-mail Spam Filtering model and promote spam filtering accuracy. We compare it with other parameters optimization methods, such as grid search. Six real-world mail data sets are selected to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the method. The results show that our proposed methods can find the effective model with high classification accuracy

  10. Expresión en cultivo celular de la proteína VP6 de rotavirus mediante el uso de vectores virales basados en HSV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A. Palacios; Claus, Juan; Mattion, Nora

    2016-01-01

    HSV-1 vectors were developed for the expression of several rotavirus genes. Genes from other pathogens were also expressed, thus generating a set of tools to be tested as new vaccine candidates against In this section, we show two different HSV-1 vectors that express the VP6 protein from different rotavirus strains. Figure 1 shows a defective recombinant virus expressing simultaneously EGFP and VP6 from murine rotavirus strain EC, In Figure 2, an amplicon vector overexpressing VP6 from a Wa s...

  11. Molecular evolution of a viral non-coding sequence under the selective pressure of amiRNA-mediated silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Shun Lin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant microRNAs (miRNA guide cleavage of target mRNAs by DICER-like proteins, thereby reducing mRNA abundance. Native precursor miRNAs can be redesigned to target RNAs of interest, and one application of such artificial microRNA (amiRNA technology is to generate plants resistant to pathogenic viruses. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing amiRNAs designed to target the genome of two unrelated viruses were resistant, in a highly specific manner, to the appropriate virus. Here, we pursued two different goals. First, we confirmed that the 21-nt target site of viral RNAs is both necessary and sufficient for resistance. Second, we studied the evolutionary stability of amiRNA-mediated resistance against a genetically plastic RNA virus, TuMV. To dissociate selective pressures acting upon protein function from those acting at the RNA level, we constructed a chimeric TuMV harboring a 21-nt, amiRNA target site in a non-essential region. In the first set of experiments designed to assess the likelihood of resistance breakdown, we explored the effect of single nucleotide mutation within the target 21-nt on the ability of mutant viruses to successfully infect amiRNA-expressing plants. We found non-equivalency of the target nucleotides, which can be divided into three categories depending on their impact in virus pathogenicity. In the second set of experiments, we investigated the evolution of the virus mutants in amiRNA-expressing plants. The most common outcome was the deletion of the target. However, when the 21-nt target was retained, viruses accumulated additional substitutions on it, further reducing the binding/cleavage ability of the amiRNA. The pattern of substitutions within the viral target was largely dominated by G to A and C to U transitions.

  12. Evaluation of blood and bone marrow in selected canine vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, Anna S; Otranto, Domenico; Furlanello, Tommaso; Tasca, Silvia; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Stanneck, Dorothee; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Capelli, Gioia; de Caprariis, Donato

    2014-12-02

    Bone marrow (BM) is a major hematopoietic organ that can harbour a variety of vector-borne pathogens; however, knowledge of BM pathological changes in dogs infected with vector-borne pathogens is limited. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the pathological changes in canine BM associated with natural infections by four vector-borne pathogens, as well as to determine the relationships between such changes and abnormalities of the peripheral blood. Cytological disorders and pathological changes of the BM of 83 dogs naturally-infected with one or more of four vector-borne pathogens (i.e., Anaplasma platys, Leishmania infantum, Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis) were evaluated and compared with the corresponding hematological findings. Dysgranulopoiesis and dysmegakaryocytopoiesis were the most frequently observed BM abnormalities in infected dogs. Erythroid suppression, and lymphocytic, monocytic and macrophage hyperplasia were also observed. Interestingly, associations between suppression and hyperplasia of specific cell lines in the marrow and corresponding changes in numbers of circulating peripheral blood cells were not observed. Infections with one or more of the vector-borne pathogens examined in this study should be considered as differential diagnoses for secondary dysmyelopoiesis.

  13. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway of a vector insect is activated by virus capsid protein and promotes viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Wan; Li, Jing; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2017-01-01

    No evidence has shown whether insect-borne viruses manipulate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway of vector insects. Using a system comprising the plant virus Rice stripe virus (RSV) and its vector insect, the small brown planthopper, we have studied the response of the vector insect’s JNK pathway to plant virus infection. We found that RSV increased the level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and decreased the level of G protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) in the insect vector. The virus capsid protein competitively bound GPS2 to release it from inhibiting the JNK activation machinery. We confirmed that JNK activation promoted RSV replication in the vector, whereas JNK inhibition caused a significant reduction in virus production and thus delayed the disease incidence of plants. These findings suggest that inhibition of insect vector JNK may be a useful strategy for controling the transmission of plant viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26591.001 PMID:28716183

  14. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  15. Biodegradable Tri-Block Copolymer Poly(lactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol-poly(L-lysine(PLA-PEG-PLL as a Non-Viral Vector to Enhance Gene Transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Low cytotoxicity and high gene transfection efficiency are critical issues in designing current non-viral gene delivery vectors. The purpose of the present work was to synthesize the novel biodegradable poly (lactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol-poly(L-lysine (PLA-PEG-PLL copolymer, and explore its applicability and feasibility as a non-viral vector for gene transport. PLA-PEG-PLL was obtained by the ring-opening polymerization of Lys(Z-NCA onto amine-terminated NH2-PEG-PLA, then acidolysis to remove benzyloxycarbonyl. The tri-block copolymer PLA-PEG-PLL combined the characters of cationic polymer PLL, PLA and PEG: the self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs possessed a PEG loop structure to increase the stability, hydrophobic PLA segments as the core, and the primary ε-amine groups of lysine in PLL to electrostatically interact with negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA to deposit with the PLA core. The physicochemical properties (morphology, particle size and surface charge and the biological properties (protection from nuclease degradation, plasma stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vitro transfection ability in HeLa and HepG2 cells of the gene-loaded PLA-PEG-PLL nanoparticles (PLA-PEG-PLL NPs were evaluated, respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay confirmed that the PLA-PEG-PLL NPs could condense DNA thoroughly and protect DNA from nuclease degradation. Initial experiments showed that PLA-PEG-PLL NPs/DNA complexes exhibited almost no toxicity and higher gene expression (up to 21.64% in HepG2 cells and 31.63% in HeLa cells than PEI/DNA complexes (14.01% and 24.22%. These results revealed that the biodegradable tri-block copolymer PLA-PEG-PLL might be a very attractive candidate as a non-viral vector and might alleviate the drawbacks of the conventional cationic vectors/DNA complexes for gene delivery in vivo.

  16. Semliki Forest virus is an efficient and selective vector for gene delivery in infarcted rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loot, AE; Henning, RH; Deelman, LE; Tio, RA; Schoen, P; Wilschut, JC; van Gijst, WH; Roks, AJM

    Gene therapy is emerging as a realistic addition to the therapeutic arsenal in heart failure, but the search for suitable vectors for cardiac transfection is still ongoing. In this study, we explore the applicability of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) in heart failure. SFV was intracoronarily

  17. Selective gene delivery toward gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma cells via EpCAM-targeted adenoviral vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heideman, DAM; Snijders, PJF; Craanen, ME; Bloemena, E; Meijer, CJLM; Meuwissen, SGM; van Beusechem, VW; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Haisma, HJ; Gerritsen, WR

    Application of recombinant adenoviral vectors for cancer gene therapy is currently limited due to lack of specificity for tumor cells. For gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma, we present here that the relative abundant expression of the primary adenovirus receptor, coxsackie/adenovirus receptor

  18. Precocious flowering of juvenile citrus induced by a viral vector based on Citrus leaf blotch virus: a new tool for genetics and breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Karelia; Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María C; Aleza, Pablo; Pina, José A; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Guerri, José

    2016-10-01

    The long juvenile period of citrus trees (often more than 6 years) has hindered genetic improvement by traditional breeding methods and genetic studies. In this work, we have developed a biotechnology tool to promote transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase in juvenile citrus plants by expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana or citrus FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) genes using a Citrus leaf blotch virus-based vector (clbvINpr-AtFT and clbvINpr-CiFT, respectively). Citrus plants of different genotypes graft inoculated with either of these vectors started flowering within 4-6 months, with no alteration of the plant architecture, leaf, flower or fruit morphology in comparison with noninoculated adult plants. The vector did not integrate in or recombine with the plant genome nor was it pollen or vector transmissible, albeit seed transmission at low rate was detected. The clbvINpr-AtFT is very stable, and flowering was observed over a period of at least 5 years. Precocious flowering of juvenile citrus plants after vector infection provides a helpful and safe tool to dramatically speed up genetic studies and breeding programmes. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Behavioural determinants of gene flow in malaria vector populations: Anopheles gambiae males select large females as mates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan G

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium-refractory mosquitoes are being rapidly developed for malaria control but will only succeed if they can successfully compete for mates when released into the wild. Pre-copulatory behavioural traits maintain genetic population structure in wild mosquito populations and mating barriers have foiled previous attempts to control malaria vectors through sterile male release. Methods Varying numbers of virgin male and female Anopheles gambiae Giles, from two strains of different innate sizes, were allowed to mate under standardized conditions in laboratory cages, following which, the insemination status, oviposition success and egg batch size of each female was assessed. The influence of male and female numbers, strain combination and female size were determined using logistic regression, correlation analysis and a simple mechanistic model of male competition for females. Results Male An. gambiae select females on the basis of size because of much greater fecundity among large females. Even under conditions where large numbers of males must compete for a smaller number of females, the largest females are more likely to become inseminated, to successfully oviposit and to produce large egg batches. Conclusions Sexual selection, on the basis of size, could either promote or limit the spread of malaria-refractory genes into wild populations and needs to be considered in the continued development and eventual release of transgenic vectors. Fundamental studies of behavioural ecology in malaria vectors such as An. gambiae can have important implications for malaria control and should be prioritised for more extensive investigation in the future.

  20. Trophic activity of Rabies G protein-pseudotyped equine infectious anemia viral vector mediated IGF-I motor neuron gene transfer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Qingshan; Garrity-Moses, Mary; Federici, Thais; Tanase, Diana; Liu, James K; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Azzouz, Mimoun; Walmsley, Lucy E; Carlton, Erin; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2005-12-01

    The present study examines gene delivery to cultured motor neurons (MNs) with the Rabies G protein (RabG)-pseudotyped lentiviral equine infectious anemia virus (RabG.EIAV) vector. RabG.EIAV-mediated beta-galactosidase (RabG.EIAV-LacZ) gene expression in cultured MNs plateaus 120 h after infection. The rate and percent of gene expression observed are titer-dependent (P vector (RabG.EIAV-IGF-I) and was shown to induce IGF-I expression in HEK 293 cells. MNs infected with RabG.EIAV-IGF-I demonstrate enhanced survival compared to MNs infected with RabG.EIAV-LacZ virus (P control virus (P motor neuron tropism of RabG.EIAV previously demonstrated in vivo, together with the trophic effects of RabG.EIAV-IGF-I MN gene expression may lend this vector to therapeutic application in motor neuron disease.

  1. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  2. Efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotypes 1, 2, and 5 for the transduction of pancreatic and colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschendorf, Christian; Emons, Barbara; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Graeven, Ullrich; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2010-06-01

    The development of efficient and specific vector systems remains a central issue in gene therapy. Several different adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes have so far been characterized so far which show different tissue tropisms. The vectors used here contained AAV2 transgene cassette containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsids, producing the recombinant pseudotypes rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5. The transduction efficiency of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors was tested in vitro in pancreatic and colon cancer cells lines (HT-29, BXPC3, and Hs766T). For all three serotypes, the percentage of GFP-positive cells was below 10% at multiplicities of infection (MOI) 100 rAAV vectors when used alone for infection. However, transduction efficiency for rAAV vectors increased dramatically when the cells were co-infected with wild-type adenovirus (wtAd). The percentage of GFP-positive cells ranged from 19.8-65.3% for AAV2/1 and 16.9-70.2% for AAV2/5, respectively. It was highest for rAAV2/2, at 40.9-88.4%. Variation between the cell lines was observed, with BXPC3 scoring the highest transduction rates and HT-29 the lowest. This study indicates that vectors based on distinct AAV serotypes 1, 2, and 5 all transduce pancreatic and colon cell lines poorly when used alone. Co-infection with wtAd increase transduction rates dramatically indicating that slow second-strand synthesis is a reason for the poor transduction efficiency. Due to the poor transduction rates, none of the rAAV serotypes tested here seem to be feasible for the treatment of malignant tumors.

  3. HVJ-E/importin-β hybrid vector for overcoming cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes as double barrier for non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Takeshi; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Uno, Atsushi; Azuma, Hideki; Nagasaki, Takeshi

    2012-10-01

    In order to enhance the nuclear import of the transgene, we prepared plasmid DNA/importin-β conjugates consisting of biotinylated poly(ethylenimine)s and recombinant streptavidin-fused importin-β. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope vector containing the PEI polyplex/importin-β conjugate showed high transfection efficiency not only in vitro but also in vivo. We showed that novel HVJ-E/importin-β-conjugated PEI polyplex hybrid vector could overcome plasma and nuclear membrane barriers to achieve effective transfection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Immune Response to Recombinant Adenovirus in Humans: Capsid Components from Viral Input Are Targets for Vector-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Gahery-Segard, Hanne; Mehtali, Majid; Le Boulaire, Christophe; Ribault, Sébastien; Boulanger, Pierre; Tursz, Thomas; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Farace, Françoise

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single injection of 109 PFU of recombinant adenovirus into patients induces strong vector-specific immune responses (H. Gahéry-Ségard, V. Molinier-Frenkel, C. Le Boulaire, P. Saulnier, P. Opolon, R. Lengagne, E. Gautier, A. Le Cesne, L. Zitvogel, A. Venet, C. Schatz, M. Courtney, T. Le Chevalier, T. Tursz, J.-G. Guillet, and F. Farace, J. Clin. Investig. 100:2218–2226, 1997). In the present study we analyzed the mechanism of vector recognition by cytotoxic T ...

  5. Genetic engineering of the glucocorticoid receptor by fusion with the herpes viral protein VP22 causes selective loss of transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, J; Stevens, A; Ray, D W

    2002-03-01

    The development of methods for engineering proteins with novel properties opens the way to manipulating intracellular processes in a therapeutically useful way. Glucocorticoids, acting via glucocorticoid receptors (GR), are potent anti-inflammatory agents, acting to oppose nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) function. The herpes viral protein, VP22, has been reported to confer intercellular trafficking activity on 'cargo' proteins, potentially facilitating gene therapy with intracellular proteins. VP22GR, resulting from the addition of VP22 to the N terminal of GR, was equipotent with the wild-type GR in opposing NF kappa B p65-driven expression of an NF kappa B reporter gene. Surprisingly, VP22GR was incapable of inducing transactivation of positive glucocorticoid reporter genes (MMTV-luc and TAT3-luc). Furthermore, the VP22GR had powerful dominant negative activity on both endogenous and exogenous GR transactivation. VP22GR was cytoplasmic in quiescent cells, and after hormone addition underwent nuclear translocation to share the same distribution as the GR. The ability of the VP22GR to selectively confer and enhance glucocorticoid-dependent transrepression of NF kappa B may be of use therapeutically in e.g. transplant rejection, inflammatory arthritis or asthma.

  6. Intraventricular vector flow mapping—a Doppler-based regularized problem with automatic model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Kondo Claude; Gay, Etienne; Chnafa, Christophe; Mendez, Simon; Nicoud, Franck; Abascal, Juan F. P. J.; Lantelme, Pierre; Tournoux, François; Garcia, Damien

    2017-09-01

    We propose a regularized least-squares method for reconstructing 2D velocity vector fields within the left ventricular cavity from single-view color Doppler echocardiographic images. Vector flow mapping is formulated as a quadratic optimization problem based on an {{\\ell }2} -norm minimization of a cost function composed of a Doppler data-fidelity term and a regularizer. The latter contains three physically interpretable expressions related to 2D mass conservation, Dirichlet boundary conditions, and smoothness. A finite difference discretization of the continuous problem was adopted in a polar coordinate system, leading to a sparse symmetric positive-definite system. The three regularization parameters were determined automatically by analyzing the L-hypersurface, a generalization of the L-curve. The performance of the proposed method was numerically evaluated using (1) a synthetic flow composed of a mixture of divergence-free and curl-free flow fields and (2) simulated flow data from a patient-specific CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model of a human left heart. The numerical evaluations showed that the vector flow fields reconstructed from the Doppler components were in good agreement with the original velocities, with a relative error less than 20%. It was also demonstrated that a perturbation of the domain contour has little effect on the rebuilt velocity fields. The capability of our intraventricular vector flow mapping (iVFM) algorithm was finally illustrated on in vivo echocardiographic color Doppler data acquired in patients. The vortex that forms during the rapid filling was clearly deciphered. This improved iVFM algorithm is expected to have a significant clinical impact in the assessment of diastolic function.

  7. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm Based Feature Selection and Parameter Optimization for Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensive applications of support vector machines (SVMs require efficient method of constructing a SVM classifier with high classification ability. The performance of SVM crucially depends on whether optimal feature subset and parameter of SVM can be efficiently obtained. In this paper, a coarse-grained parallel genetic algorithm (CGPGA is used to simultaneously optimize the feature subset and parameters for SVM. The distributed topology and migration policy of CGPGA can help find optimal feature subset and parameters for SVM in significantly shorter time, so as to increase the quality of solution found. In addition, a new fitness function, which combines the classification accuracy obtained from bootstrap method, the number of chosen features, and the number of support vectors, is proposed to lead the search of CGPGA to the direction of optimal generalization error. Experiment results on 12 benchmark datasets show that our proposed approach outperforms genetic algorithm (GA based method and grid search method in terms of classification accuracy, number of chosen features, number of support vectors, and running time.

  8. Patterns of selection in anti-malarial immune genes in malaria vectors: evidence for adaptive evolution in LRIM1 in Anopheles arabiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel A Slotman

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Co-evolution between Plasmodium species and its vectors may result in adaptive changes in genes that are crucial components of the vector's defense against the pathogen. By analyzing which genes show evidence of positive selection in malaria vectors, but not in closely related non-vectors, we can identify genes that are crucial for the mosquito's resistance against Plasmodium.We investigated genetic variation of three anti-malarial genes; CEC1, GNBP-B1 and LRIM1, in both vector and non-vector species of the Anopheles gambiae complex. Whereas little protein differentiation was observed between species in CEC1 and GNBP-B1, McDonald-Kreitman and maximum likelihood tests of positive selection show that LRIM1 underwent adaptive evolution in a primary malaria vector; An. arabiensis. In particular, two adjacent codons show clear signs of adaptation by having accumulated three out of four replacement substitutions. Furthermore, our data indicate that this LRIM1 allele has introgressed from An. arabiensis into the other main malaria vector An. gambiae.Although no evidence exists to link the adaptation of LRIM1 to P. falciparum infection, an adaptive response of a known anti-malarial gene in a primary malaria vector is intriguing, and may suggest that this gene could play a role in Plasmodium resistance in An. arabiensis. If so, our data also predicts that LRIM1 alleles in An. gambiae vary in their level of resistance against P. falciparum.

  9. Seedling protection and field practices for management of insect vectors and viral diseases of hot pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karungi, J.; Obua, T.; Kyamanywa, S.

    2013-01-01

    used to evaluate field practices in a split plot randomized controlled block design: (i) weekly foliar applications with dimethoate; (ii) close plant spacing of 60 cm × 50 cm); (iii) 1.5-m high net perimeter screen; (iv) transparent plastic mulch; (v) untreated control. Whiteflies were the vectors most...

  10. Using self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine (SVM) for classification of selectivity of ACAT inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Maolin; Yan, Aixia; Dai, Bin

    2013-02-01

    Using a self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine, two classification models were built to predict whether a compound is a selective inhibitor toward the two Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) isozymes, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. A dataset of 97 ACAT inhibitors was collected. For each molecule, the global descriptors, 2D and 3D property autocorrelation descriptors and autocorrelation of surface properties were calculated from the program ADRIANA.Code. The prediction accuracies of the models (based on the training/ test set splitting by SOM method) for the test sets are 88.9 % for SOM1, 92.6 % for SVM1 model. In addition, the extended connectivity fingerprints (ECFP_4) for all the molecules were calculated and the structure-activity relationship of selective ACAT inhibitors was summarized, which may help find important structural features of inhibitors relating to the selectivity of ACAT isozymes.

  11. Accumulation of Pol Mutations Selected by HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 Protective Haplotype-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Causes Low Plasma Viral Load Due to Low Viral Fitness of Mutant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Kuse, Nozomi; Sakai, Keiko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2017-02-15

    HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02, which is the most abundant haplotype in Japan, has a protective effect on disease progression in HIV-1-infected Japanese individuals, whereas HLA-B*57 and -B*27 protective alleles are very rare in Japan. A previous study on HLA-associated polymorphisms demonstrated that the number of HLA-B*52:01-associated mutations at four Pol positions was inversely correlated with plasma viral load (pVL) in HLA-B*52:01-negative individuals, suggesting that the transmission of HIV-1 with these mutations could modulate the pVL in the population. However, it remains unknown whether these mutations were selected by HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs and also reduced viral fitness. In this study, we identified two HLA-B*52:01-restricted and one HLA-C*12:02-restricted novel cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in Pol. Analysis using CTLs specific for these three epitopes demonstrated that these CTLs failed to recognize mutant epitopes or more weakly recognized cells infected with mutant viruses than wild-type virus, supporting the idea that these mutations were selected by the HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted T cells. We further showed that these mutations reduced viral fitness, although the effect of each mutation was weak. The present study demonstrated that the accumulation of these Pol mutations selected by HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted CTLs impaired viral replication capacity and thus reduced the pVL. The fitness cost imposed by the mutations partially accounted for the effect of the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype on clinical outcome, together with the effect of HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs on viral replication, which had been previously demonstrated. Numerous population-based studies identified HLA-associated HIV-1 mutations to predict HIV-1 escape mutations from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, the majority of these HLA-associated mutations have not been identified as CTL escape mutations. Our previous population-based study showed that five

  12. A novel Gateway®-compatible binary vector allows direct selection of recombinant clones in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traore Sy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloning genes into plasmid vectors is one of the key steps for studying gene function. Recently, Invitrogen™ developed a convenient Gateway® cloning system based on the site-specific DNA recombination properties of bacteriophage lambda and the cytotoxic protein ccdB, which is lethal to most E. coli strains. The ccdB protein, however, is not toxic to Agrobacterium tumefaciens, an important player often used for studying gene function in planta. This limits the direct application of the Gateway® cloning system in plant transformation-mediated research. Results In this study, we constructed a novel Gateway®-compatible destination vector, pEG101-SacB/R, by replacing the ccdB gene with a SacB-SacR gene cassette as the negative selectable marker. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the new pEG101-SacB/R destination vector can be used for Gateway® cloning in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. pEG101-SacB/R will be a valuable tool for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta.

  13. A novel Gateway®-compatible binary vector allows direct selection of recombinant clones in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Sy Mamadou; Zhao, Bingyu

    2011-12-07

    Cloning genes into plasmid vectors is one of the key steps for studying gene function. Recently, Invitrogen™ developed a convenient Gateway® cloning system based on the site-specific DNA recombination properties of bacteriophage lambda and the cytotoxic protein ccdB, which is lethal to most E. coli strains. The ccdB protein, however, is not toxic to Agrobacterium tumefaciens, an important player often used for studying gene function in planta. This limits the direct application of the Gateway® cloning system in plant transformation-mediated research. In this study, we constructed a novel Gateway®-compatible destination vector, pEG101-SacB/R, by replacing the ccdB gene with a SacB-SacR gene cassette as the negative selectable marker. Our results demonstrate that the new pEG101-SacB/R destination vector can be used for Gateway® cloning in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. pEG101-SacB/R will be a valuable tool for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta.

  14. BDDC Algorithms with deluxe scaling and adaptive selection of primal constraints for Raviart-Thomas vector fields

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Duk-Soon

    2017-06-13

    A BDDC domain decomposition preconditioner is defined by a coarse component, expressed in terms of primal constraints, a weighted average across the interface between the subdomains, and local components given in terms of solvers of local subdomain problems. BDDC methods for vector field problems discretized with Raviart-Thomas finite elements are introduced. The methods are based on a deluxe type of weighted average and an adaptive selection of primal constraints developed to deal with coefficients with high contrast even inside individual subdomains. For problems with very many subdomains, a third level of the preconditioner is introduced.

  15. A transposable P vector that confers selectable G418 resistance to Drosophila larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Steller, H; Pirrotta, V.

    1985-01-01

    Drosophila larvae are rapidly killed by food containing the antibiotic G418. The bacterial gene for neomycin resistance introduced in the genome by P-mediated transformation renders larvae resistant to G418 and able to grow to fertile adults. The neo gene transcribed from the herpes thymidine kinase promoter gives low levels of resistance but high levels can be obtained using the hsp70 heat-shock promoter. We have constructed a vector for P-mediated transformation which uses this finding to a...

  16. Efficient selection of recombinant adenoviruses by vectors that express beta-galactosidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaack, J.; Langer, S; Guo, X.

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 vectors which contain the Excherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene driven by the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter as a screenable marker have been made and successfully used in the construction of recombinant adenoviruses. The beta-galactosidase gene has been introduced into viruses in which the E3 region is maintained or deleted and in which the cis-acting packaging sequence has been reiterated at the right end of the chromosome. A unique BstBI site has been int...

  17. Vero cells as a model to study the effects of adenoviral gene delivery vectors on the RNAi system in context of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matskevich, Alexey A; Jung, Jiun-Shan; Schümann, Michael; Cascallo, Manel; Moelling, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Technology based on RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising source for new antiviral therapies. Although the application of RNAi has been studied extensively, significant problems with using RNAi remain. Very few studies have specifically assessed model systems for testing the effects of viruses or gene delivery vectors on the RNAi system. Since viruses have developed efficient strategies to circumvent the interferon (IFN) response, an IFN-deficient model system should be considered. Here we show that in Vero cells, which lack IFN-alpha and IFN-beta genes, knockdown of Dicer, a key RNAi component, led to accelerated death of cells infected with other evolutionary distinct viruses: influenza A virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and poliovirus. We also demonstrate that transduction of Vero cells with adenoviral vector with subsequent infection with influenza A virus also resulted in increased mortality of infected cells. These effects were much weaker in IFN-producing A549 and Hela cell lines. Thus, the Vero cell line could serve as an interesting model for studying the effects of gene delivery vectors on the RNAi system in the context of virus-related disorders. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Behavioral recovery in a primate model of Parkinson's disease by triple transduction of striatal cells with adeno-associated viral vectors expressing dopamine-synthesizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Fujimoto, Ken-Ichi; Ikeguchi, Kunihiko; Shizuma, Nami; Kawasaki, Katsuyoshi; Ono, Fumiko; Shen, Yang; Wang, Lijun; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kume, Akihiro; Matsumura, Masaru; Nagatsu, Ikuko; Urano, Fumi; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Terao, Keiji; Nakano, Imaharu; Ozawa, Keiya

    2002-02-10

    One potential strategy for gene therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the local production of dopamine (DA) in the striatum induced by restoring DA-synthesizing enzymes. In addition to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (AADC), GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH) is necessary for efficient DA production. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, we previously demonstrated that expression of these three enzymes in the striatum resulted in long-term behavioral recovery in rat models of PD. We here extend the preclinical exploration to primate models of PD. Mixtures of three separate AAV vectors expressing TH, AADC, and GCH, respectively, were stereotaxically injected into the unilateral putamen of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated monkeys. Coexpression of the enzymes in the unilateral putamen resulted in remarkable improvement in manual dexterity on the contralateral to the AAV-TH/-AADC/-GCH-injected side. Behavioral recovery persisted during the observation period (four monkeys: 48 days, 65 days, 50 days, and >10 months, each). TH-immunoreactive (TH-IR), AADC-IR, and GCH-IR cells were present in a large region of the putamen. Microdialysis demonstrated that concentrations of DA in the AAV-TH/-AADC/-GCH-injected putamen were increased compared with the control side. Our results show that AAV vectors efficiently introduce DA-synthesizing enzyme genes into the striatum of primates with restoration of motor functions. This triple transduction method may offer a potential therapeutic strategy for PD.

  19. Cancer Feature Selection and Classification Using a Binary Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maolong Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the feature gene selection for cancer classification, which employs an optimization algorithm to select a subset of the genes. We propose a binary quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (BQPSO for cancer feature gene selection, coupling support vector machine (SVM for cancer classification. First, the proposed BQPSO algorithm is described, which is a discretized version of original QPSO for binary 0-1 optimization problems. Then, we present the principle and procedure for cancer feature gene selection and cancer classification based on BQPSO and SVM with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV. Finally, the BQPSO coupling SVM (BQPSO/SVM, binary PSO coupling SVM (BPSO/SVM, and genetic algorithm coupling SVM (GA/SVM are tested for feature gene selection and cancer classification on five microarray data sets, namely, Leukemia, Prostate, Colon, Lung, and Lymphoma. The experimental results show that BQPSO/SVM has significant advantages in accuracy, robustness, and the number of feature genes selected compared with the other two algorithms.

  20. Icing Forecasting of High Voltage Transmission Line Using Weighted Least Square Support Vector Machine with Fireworks Algorithm for Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiannan Ma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecasting of icing thickness has great significance for ensuring the security and stability of the power grid. In order to improve the forecasting accuracy, this paper proposes an icing forecasting system based on the fireworks algorithm and weighted least square support vector machine (W-LSSVM. The method of the fireworks algorithm is employed to select the proper input features with the purpose of eliminating redundant influence. In addition, the aim of the W-LSSVM model is to train and test the historical data-set with the selected features. The capability of this proposed icing forecasting model and framework is tested through simulation experiments using real-world icing data from the monitoring center of the key laboratory of anti-ice disaster, Hunan, South China. The results show that the proposed W-LSSVM-FA method has a higher prediction accuracy and it may be a promising alternative for icing thickness forecasting.

  1. Prevalence of select vector-borne disease agents in owned dogs of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lorelei L; Ballweber, Lora R; Allen, Kelly; Little, Susan E; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-09-11

    Ticks, sera and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) blood were collected from dogs evaluated at the Amakom Veterinary Clinic in Kumasi, Ghana. Sera were evaluated for Dirofilaria immitis antigen and antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia canis. Conventional polymerase chain reaction assays designed to amplify the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of Ehrlichia spp. or Anaplasma spp. or Neorickettsia spp. or Wolbachia spp., Babesia spp., Rickettsia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Bartonella spp. and the haemoplasmas were performed on DNA extracted from EDTA blood and all positive amplicons were sequenced. This small survey shows that the following vector-borne pathogens are present in urban Ghanian dogs: Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis,Dirofilaria immitis and Anaplasma platys. Bartonella henselae was isolated from ticks but not from the dogs.

  2. PARAMETER SELECTION IN LEAST SQUARES-SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES REGRESSION ORIENTED, USING GENERALIZED CROSS-VALIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉS M. ÁLVAREZ MEZA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En este trabajo, se propone una metodología para la selección automática de los parámetros libres de la técnica de regresión basada en mínimos cuadrados máquinas de vectores de soporte (LS-SVM, a partir de un análisis de validación cruzada generalizada multidimensional sobre el conjunto de ecuaciones lineales de LS-SVM. La técnica desarrollada no requiere de un conocimiento a priori por parte del usuario acerca de la influencia de los parámetros libres en los resultados. Se realizan experimentos sobre dos bases de datos artificiales y dos bases de datos reales. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos, se concluye que el algoritmo desarrollado calcula regresiones apropiadas con errores relativos competentes.

  3. Rapid, long-term labeling of cells in the developing and adult rodent visual cortex using double-stranded adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Rebecca L; Zhang, Yu; Kelly, Emily A; Lamantia, Cassandra E; Harvey, Brandon K; Majewska, Ania K

    2009-09-01

    Chronic in vivo imaging studies of the brain require a labeling method that is fast, long-lasting, efficient, nontoxic, and cell-type specific. Over the last decade, adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been used to stably express fluorescent proteins in neurons in vivo. However, AAV's main limitation for many studies (such as those of neuronal development) is the necessity of second-strand DNA synthesis, which delays peak transgene expression. The development of double-stranded AAV (dsAAV) vectors has overcome this limitation, allowing rapid transgene expression. Here, we have injected different serotypes (1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9) of a dsAAV vector carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into the developing and adult mouse visual cortex and characterized its expression. We observed labeling of both neurons and astrocytes with serotype-specific tropism. dsAAV-GFP labeling showed high levels of neuronal GFP expression as early as 2 days postinjection and as long as a month, surpassing conventional AAV's onset of expression and matching its longevity. Neurons labeled with dsAAV-GFP appeared structurally and electrophysiologically identical to nonlabeled neurons, suggesting that dsAAV-GFP is neither cytotoxic nor alters normal neuronal function. We also demonstrated that dsAAV-labeled cells can be imaged with subcellular resolution in vivo over multiple days. We conclude that dsAAV is an excellent vector for rapid labeling and long-term in vivo imaging studies of astrocytes and neurons on the single cell level within the developing and adult visual cortex.

  4. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  5. Selective translational repression of HIV-1 RNA by Sam68DeltaC occurs by altering PABP1 binding to unspliced viral RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soros Vanessa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 structural proteins are translated from incompletely spliced 9 kb and 4 kb mRNAs, which are transported to the cytoplasm by Crm1. It has been assumed that once in the cytoplasm, translation of incompletely spliced HIV-1 mRNAs occurs in the same manner as host mRNAs. Previous analyses have demonstrated that Sam68 and a mutant thereof, Sam68ΔC, have dramatic effects on HIV gene expression, strongly enhancing and inhibiting viral structural protein synthesis, respectively. While investigating the inhibition of incompletely spliced HIV-1 mRNAs by Sam68ΔC, we determined that the effect was independent of the perinuclear bundling of the viral RNA. Inhibition was dependent upon the nuclear export pathway used, as translation of viral RNA exported via the Tap/CTE export pathway was not blocked by Sam68ΔC. We demonstrate that inhibition of HIV expression by Sam68ΔC is correlated with a loss of PABP1 binding with no attendant change in polyadenosine tail length of the affected RNAs. The capacity of Sam68ΔC to selectively inhibit translation of HIV-1 RNAs exported by Crm1 suggests that it is able to recognize unique characteristics of these viral RNPs, a property that could lead to new therapeutic approaches to controlling HIV-1 replication.

  6. In Utero Transfer of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Produces Long-Term Factor IX Levels in a Cynomolgus Macaque Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Citra N Z; Gil-Farina, Irene; Rosales, Cecilia; Johana, Nuryanti; Tan, Yvonne Yi Wan; McIntosh, Jenny; Kaeppel, Christine; Waddington, Simon N; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Schmidt, Manfred; Nathwani, Amit C; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2017-08-02

    The safe correction of an inherited bleeding disorder in utero prior to the onset of organ damage is highly desirable. Here, we report long-term transgene expression over more than 6 years without toxicity following a single intrauterine gene transfer (IUGT) at 0.9G using recombinant adeno-associated vector (AAV)-human factor IX (hFIX) in the non-human primate model we have previously described. Four of six treated animals monitored for around 74 months expressed hFIX at therapeutic levels (3.9%-120.0%). Long-term expression was 6-fold higher in males and with AAV8 compared to AAV5, mediated almost completely at this stage by random genome-wide hepatic proviral integrations, with no evidence of hotspots. Post-natal AAV challenge without immunosuppression was evaluated in two animals exhibiting chronic low transgene expression. The brief neutralizing immune reaction elicited had no adverse effect and, although expression was not improved at the dose administered, no clinical toxicity was observed. This long-term surveillance thus confirms the safety of late-gestation AAV-hFIX transfer and demonstrates that postnatal re-administration can be performed without immunosuppression, although it requires dose optimization for the desired expression. Nevertheless, eventual vector genotoxicity and the possibility of germline transmission will require lifelong monitoring and further evaluation of the reproductive function of treated animals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of Human Intestinal Absorption by GA Feature Selection and Support Vector Machine Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Zongyuan Cai; Zhi Wang; Aixia Yan

    2008-01-01

    QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) models for the prediction of human intestinal absorption (HIA) were built with molecular descriptors calculated by ADRIANA.Code, Cerius2 and a combination of them. A dataset of 552 compounds covering a wide range of current drugs with experimental HIA values was investigated. A Genetic Algorithm feature selection method was applied to select proper descriptors. A Kohonen's self-organizing Neural Network (KohNN) map was used to split the who...

  8. Expression profile of genes during resistance reversal in a temephos selected strain of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Strode

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes aegypti is one of the most important disease vectors because it transmits two major arboviruses, dengue and yellow fever, which cause significant global morbidity and mortality. Chemical insecticides form the cornerstone of vector control. The organophosphate temephos a larvicide recommended by WHO for controlling Ae. aegypti, however, resistance to this compound has been reported in many countries, including Brazil. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of this study was to identify genes implicated in metabolic resistance in an Ae. aegypti temephos resistant strain, named RecR, through microarray analysis. We utilized a custom 'Ae. aegypti detox chip' and validated microarray data through RT-PCR comparing susceptible and resistant individuals. In addition, we analyzed gene expression in 4(th instar larvae from a reversed susceptible strain (RecRev, exposed and unexposed to temephos. The results obtained revealed a set of 13 and 6 genes significantly over expressed in resistant adult mosquitoes and larvae, respectively. One of these genes, the cytochrome P450 CYP6N12, was up-regulated in both stages. RT-PCR confirmed the microarray results and, additionally, showed no difference in gene expression between temephos exposed and unexposed RecRev mosquitoes. This suggested that the differences in the transcript profiles among the strains are heritable due to a selection process and are not caused by immediate insecticide exposure. Reversal of temephos resistance was demonstrated and, importantly, there was a positive correlation between a decrease in the resistance ratio and an accompanying decrease in the expression levels of previously over expressed genes. Some of the genes identified here have also been implicated in metabolic resistance in other mosquito species and insecticide resistant populations of Ae. aegypti. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of gene expression signatures associated to

  9. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machkovech, Heather M; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8(+) T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8(+) T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8(+) T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  10. Novel Human Cytomegalovirus Viral Chemokines, vCXCL-1s, Display Functional Selectivity for Neutrophil Signaling and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J; Pitt, Elisabeth A; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J; Sparer, Tim E

    2015-01-01

    Human CMV (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable

  11. Evaluation of different heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies against Babesia bovis using viral vectored and protein-adjuvant vaccines based on a chimeric multi-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Paoletta, Martina Soledad; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2016-07-19

    Protection against the intraerythrocytic bovine parasite Babesia bovis requires both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, tailored combinations of immunogens targeted at both arms of the immune system are strategies of choice to pursue sterilizing immunity. In this study, different heterologous prime-boost vaccination schemes were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by a recombinant adenovirus, a modified vaccinia Ankara vector or a subunit vaccine all expressing a chimeric multi-antigen. This multi-antigen includes the immunodominant B and T cell epitopes of three B. bovis proteins: Merozoite Surface Antigen - 2c (MSA-2c), Rhoptry Associated Protein - 1 (RAP-1) and Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSP20). Both priming with the adenovirus or recombinant multi-antigen and boosting with the modified vaccinia Ankara vector achieved a high degree of activation of TNFα and IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells 60days after the first immunization. High titers of specific IgG antibodies were also detected at the same time point and lasted up to day 120 of the first immunization. Only the adenovirus - MVA combination triggered a marked isotype skew for the IgG2a antibody subclass meanwhile for the other immune traits analyzed here, both vaccination schemes showed similar performances. The immunological characterization in the murine model of these rationally designed immunogens led us to propose that adenoviruses as well as the bacterially expressed multi-antigen are highly reliable primer candidates to be considered in future experiments in cattle to test protection against bovine babesiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Additional selection for insecticide resistance in urban malaria vectors: DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Toé, Hyacinthe K; Sanou, Antoine; Namountougou, Moussa; Hughes, Angela; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Dabiré, Roch; Simard, Frederic; Ranson, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    In the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso, Anopheles arabiensis has superseded Anopheles gambiae s.s. as the major malaria vector and the larvae are found in highly polluted habitats normally considered unsuitable for Anopheles mosquitoes. Here we show that An. gambiae s.l. adults emerging from a highly polluted site in the city centre (Dioulassoba) have a high prevalence of DDT resistance (percentage mortality after exposure to diagnostic dose=65.8% in the dry season and 70.4% in the rainy season, respectively). An investigation into the mechanisms responsible found an unexpectedly high frequency of the 1014S kdr mutation (allele frequency=0.4), which is found at very low frequencies in An. arabiensis in the surrounding rural areas, and an increase in transcript levels of several detoxification genes, notably from the glutathione transferase and cytochrome P450 gene families. A number of ABC transporter genes were also expressed at elevated levels in the DDT resistant An. arabiensis. Unplanned urbanisation provides numerous breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The finding that Anopheles mosquitoes adapted to these urban breeding sites have a high prevalence of insecticide resistance has important implications for our understanding of the selective forces responsible for the rapid spread of insecticide resistant populations of malaria vectors in Africa.

  13. Additional selection for insecticide resistance in urban malaria vectors: DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Jones

    Full Text Available In the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso, Anopheles arabiensis has superseded Anopheles gambiae s.s. as the major malaria vector and the larvae are found in highly polluted habitats normally considered unsuitable for Anopheles mosquitoes. Here we show that An. gambiae s.l. adults emerging from a highly polluted site in the city centre (Dioulassoba have a high prevalence of DDT resistance (percentage mortality after exposure to diagnostic dose=65.8% in the dry season and 70.4% in the rainy season, respectively. An investigation into the mechanisms responsible found an unexpectedly high frequency of the 1014S kdr mutation (allele frequency=0.4, which is found at very low frequencies in An. arabiensis in the surrounding rural areas, and an increase in transcript levels of several detoxification genes, notably from the glutathione transferase and cytochrome P450 gene families. A number of ABC transporter genes were also expressed at elevated levels in the DDT resistant An. arabiensis. Unplanned urbanisation provides numerous breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The finding that Anopheles mosquitoes adapted to these urban breeding sites have a high prevalence of insecticide resistance has important implications for our understanding of the selective forces responsible for the rapid spread of insecticide resistant populations of malaria vectors in Africa.

  14. Possible consequences of the overlap between the CaMV 35S promoter regions in plant transformation vectors used and the viral gene VI in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podevin, Nancy; du Jardin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Multiple variants of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) are used to drive the expression of transgenes in genetically modified plants, for both research purposes and commercial applications. The genetic organization of the densely packed genome of this virus results in sequence overlap between P35S and viral gene VI, encoding the multifunctional P6 protein. The present paper investigates whether introduction of P35S variants by genetic transformation is likely to result in the expression of functional domains of the P6 protein and in potential impacts in transgenic plants. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to assess the safety for human and animal health of putative translation products of gene VI overlapping P35S. No relevant similarity was identified between the putative peptides and known allergens and toxins, using different databases. From a literature study it became clear that long variants of the P35S do contain an open reading frame, when expressed, might result in unintended phenotypic changes. A flowchart is proposed to evaluate possible unintended effects in plant transformants, based on the DNA sequence actually introduced and on the plant phenotype, taking into account the known effects of ectopically expressed P6 domains in model plants.

  15. Feature Selection Method Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm and Support Vector Machines for Medical Datasets Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Serter Uzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a hybrid approach that uses the artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm for feature selection and support vector machines for classification. The purpose of this paper is to test the effect of elimination of the unimportant and obsolete features of the datasets on the success of the classification, using the SVM classifier. The developed approach conventionally used in liver diseases and diabetes diagnostics, which are commonly observed and reduce the quality of life, is developed. For the diagnosis of these diseases, hepatitis, liver disorders and diabetes datasets from the UCI database were used, and the proposed system reached a classification accuracies of 94.92%, 74.81%, and 79.29%, respectively. For these datasets, the classification accuracies were obtained by the help of the 10-fold cross-validation method. The results show that the performance of the method is highly successful compared to other results attained and seems very promising for pattern recognition applications.

  16. Host selection and parasite infection in Aedes taeniorhynchus, endemic disease vector in the Galápagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fournié, Guillaume; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Parker, Patricia G; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2012-12-01

    Host selection in blood-sucking arthropods has important evolutionary and ecological implications for the transmission dynamics, distribution and host-specificity of the parasites they transmit. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedemann) is distributed throughout tropical to temperate coastal zones in the Americas, and continental populations are primarily mammalphilic. It is the only indigenous mosquito in the Galápagos Islands, having colonised the archipelago around 200,000 years ago, potentially adapting its host selection, and in the process, altering the dynamics of vector mediated pathogen interactions in the archipelago. Here, we use blood-meal analysis and PCR-based parasite screening approach to determine the blood-feeding patterns of A. taeniorhynchus in the Galápagos Islands and identify potential parasite transmission with which this mosquito could be involved. Our results show that A. taeniorhynchus feeds equally on mammals and reptiles, and only one avian sample was observed in 190 successful PCR amplifications from blood meals. However, we detected endemic filarial worms and Haemoproteus parasites known to infect various Galápagos bird species in mosquito thoraces, suggesting that feeding on birds must occur at low frequency, and that A. taeniorhynchus may play a role in maintaining some avian vector-borne pathogens, although more work is needed to explore this possibility. We also isolated three different DNA sequences corresponding to hemogregarine parasites of the genus Hepatozoon from mosquito and iguana blood samples, suggesting that more than one species of Hepatozoon parasites are present in Galápagos. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatozoon 18sRNA sequences indicates that A. taeniorhynchus may have facilitated a recent breakdown in host-species association of formerly isolated Hepatozoon spp. infecting the reptile populations in the Galápagos Islands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Topical herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccination with human papillomavirus vectors expressing gB/gD ectodomains induces genital-tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells and reduces genital disease and viral shedding after HSV-2 challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuburu, Nicolas; Wang, Kening; Goodman, Kyle N; Pang, Yuk Ying; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Schiller, John T

    2015-01-01

    No herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccine has been licensed for use in humans. HSV-2 glycoproteins B (gB) and D (gD) are targets of neutralizing antibodies and T cells, but clinical trials involving intramuscular (i.m.) injection of HSV-2 gB and gD in adjuvants have not been effective. Here we evaluated intravaginal (ivag) genetic immunization of C57BL/6 mice with a replication-defective human papillomavirus pseudovirus (HPV PsV) expressing HSV-2 gB (HPV-gB) or gD (HPV-gD) constructs to target different subcellular compartments. HPV PsV expressing a secreted ectodomain of gB (gBsec) or gD (gDsec), but not PsV expressing a cytoplasmic or membrane-bound form, induced circulating and intravaginal-tissue-resident memory CD8(+) T cells that were able to secrete gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as moderate levels of serum HSV neutralizing antibodies. Combined immunization with HPV-gBsec and HPV-gDsec (HPV-gBsec/gDsec) vaccines conferred longer survival after vaginal challenge with HSV-2 than immunization with HPV-gBsec or HPV-gDsec alone. HPV-gBsec/gDsec ivag vaccination was associated with a reduced severity of genital lesions and lower levels of viral shedding in the genital tract after HSV-2 challenge. In contrast, intramuscular vaccination with a soluble truncated gD protein (gD2t) in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) elicited high neutralizing antibody titers and improved survival but did not reduce genital lesions and viral shedding. Vaccination combining ivag HPV-gBsec/gDsec and i.m. gD2t-alum-MPL improved survival and reduced genital lesions and viral shedding. Finally, high levels of circulating HSV-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, but not serum antibodies, correlated with reduced viral shedding. Taken together, our data underscore the potential of HPV PsV as a platform for a topical mucosal vaccine to control local manifestations of primary HSV-2 infection. Genital herpes is a highly prevalent chronic disease caused by

  18. Sensorimotor Cortex Injection of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Mediates Knockout of PTEN in Neurons of the Brain and Spinal Cord of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Qin, Yu; Zhang, Wen; Bian, Zhiqun; Wang, Ruiqi

    2015-12-01

    Cre/loxP-mediated inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is proposed to be a promising therapeutic agent for promoting CNS and PNS regeneration. And adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has been developed as an attractive gene delivery system with proven safety. In the present study, we investigated Cre/loxP-mediated knockout of PTEN in the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord in PTEN floxed mice by immunohistological analysis of PI3K/AKT/mTOR expression in neurons of the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord after sensorimotor cortex injection of AAV-Cre. Two weeks after injection of AAV-Cre, the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord were dissected and examined the expression of downstream molecules pAKT and pS6 of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. The results showed that remote delivery of AAV-Cre through sensorimotor cortex injection mediated PTEN knockout in neurons of the sensorimotor cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord. We propose sensorimotor cortex injection of AAV may provide a potential strategy of gene therapy for the CNS diseases.

  19. Anti-α-synuclein immunotherapy reduces α-synuclein propagation in the axon and degeneration in a combined viral vector and transgenic model of synucleinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Valera, Elvira; Rockenstein, Edward; Overk, Cassia; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale; Games, Dora; Rissman, Robert A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2017-01-13

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's Disease (PD), PD dementia (PDD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterized by progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn) in neurons. Recent studies have proposed that neuron-to-neuron propagation of α-syn plays a role in the pathogenesis of these disorders. We have previously shown that antibodies against the C-terminus of α-syn reduce the intra-neuronal accumulation of α-syn and related deficits in transgenic models of synucleinopathy, probably by abrogating the axonal transport and accumulation of α-syn in in vivo models. Here, we assessed the effect of passive immunization against α-syn in a new mouse model of axonal transport and accumulation of α-syn. For these purpose, non-transgenic, α-syn knock-out and mThy1-α-syn tg (line 61) mice received unilateral intra-cerebral injections with a lentiviral (LV)-α-syn vector construct followed by systemic administration of the monoclonal antibody 1H7 (recognizes amino acids 91-99) or control IgG for 3 months. Cerebral α-syn accumulation and axonopathy was assessed by immunohistochemistry and effects on behavior were assessed by Morris water maze. Unilateral LV-α-syn injection resulted in axonal propagation of α-syn in the contra-lateral site with subsequent behavioral deficits and axonal degeneration. Passive immunization with 1H7 antibody reduced the axonal accumulation of α-syn in the contra-lateral side and ameliorated the behavioral deficits. Together this study supports the notion that immunotherapy might improve the deficits in models of synucleinopathy by reducing the axonal propagation and accumulation of α-syn. This represents a potential new mode of action through which α-syn immunization might work.

  20. Rescue and sprouting of motoneurons following ventral root avulsion and reimplantation combined with intraspinal adeno-associated viral vector-mediated expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blits, Bas; Carlstedt, Thomas P; Ruitenberg, Marc Jan; de Winter, Fred; Hermens, Wim T J M C; Dijkhuizen, Paul A; Claasens, Jill W C; Eggers, Ruben; van der Sluis, Ronald; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, Joost

    2004-10-01

    Following avulsion of a spinal ventral root, motoneurons that project through the avulsed root are axotomized. Avulsion between, for example, L2 and L6 leads to denervation of hind limb muscles. Reimplantation of an avulsed root directed to the motoneuron pool resulted in re-ingrowth of some motor axons. However, most motoneurons display retrograde atrophy and subsequently die. Two neurotrophic factors, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), promote the survival of motoneurons after injury. The long-term delivery of these neurotrophic factors to the motoneurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord is problematic. One strategy to improve the outcome of the neurosurgical reinsertion of the ventral root following avulsion would involve gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding these neurotrophic factors near the denervated motoneuron pool. Here, we show that AAV-mediated overexpression of GDNF and BDNF in the spinal cord persisted for at least 16 weeks. At both 1 and 4 months post-lesion AAV-BDNF- and -GDNF-treated animals showed an increased survival of motoneurons, the effect being more prominent at 1 month. AAV vector-mediated overexpression of neurotrophins also promoted the formation of a network of motoneuron fibers in the ventral horn at the avulsed side, but motoneurons failed to extent axons into the reinserted L4 root towards the sciatic nerve nor to improve functional recovery of the hind limbs. This suggests that high levels of neurotrophic factors in the ventral horn promote sprouting, but prevent directional growth of axons of a higher number of surviving motoneurons into the implanted root.

  1. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL. This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  2. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfil, Amanda R.; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Howard, Cory M.; Mates, Jessica M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Green, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i) in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment. PMID:26729154

  3. A versatile viral system for expression and depletion of proteins in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Campeau

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to express or deplete proteins in living cells is crucial for the study of biological processes. Viral vectors are often useful to deliver DNA constructs to cells that are difficult to transfect by other methods. Lentiviruses have the additional advantage of being able to integrate into the genomes of non-dividing mammalian cells. However, existing viral expression systems generally require different vector backbones for expression of cDNA, small hairpin RNA (shRNA or microRNA (miRNA and provide limited drug selection markers. Furthermore, viral backbones are often recombinogenic in bacteria, complicating the generation and maintenance of desired clones. Here, we describe a collection of 59 vectors that comprise an integrated system for constitutive or inducible expression of cDNAs, shRNAs or miRNAs, and use a wide variety of drug selection markers. These vectors are based on the Gateway technology (Invitrogen whereby the cDNA, shRNA or miRNA of interest is cloned into an Entry vector and then recombined into a Destination vector that carries the chosen viral backbone and drug selection marker. This recombination reaction generates the desired product with >95% efficiency and greatly reduces the frequency of unwanted recombination in bacteria. We generated Destination vectors for the production of both retroviruses and lentiviruses. Further, we characterized each vector for its viral titer production as well as its efficiency in expressing or depleting proteins of interest. We also generated multiple types of vectors for the production of fusion proteins and confirmed expression of each. We demonstrated the utility of these vectors in a variety of functional studies. First, we show that the FKBP12 Destabilization Domain system can be used to either express or deplete the protein of interest in mitotically-arrested cells. Also, we generate primary fibroblasts that can be induced to senesce in the presence or absence of DNA damage

  4. A BioBrick™-Compatible Vector for Allelic Replacement Using the XylE Gene as Selection Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Michela; Pasotti, Lorenzo; Zucca, Susanna; Politi, Nicolò; Massaiu, Ilaria; Calvio, Cinzia; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Circular plasmid-mediated homologous recombination is commonly used for marker-less allelic replacement, exploiting the endogenous recombination machinery of the host. Common limitations of existing methods include high false positive rates due to mutations in counter-selection genes, and limited applicability to specific strains or growth media. Finally, solutions compatible with physical standards, such as the BioBrick™, are not currently available, although they proved to be successful in the design of other replicative or integrative plasmids. We illustrate pBBknock, a novel BioBrick™-compatible vector for allelic replacement in Escherichia coli. It includes a temperature-sensitive replication origin and enables marker-less genome engineering via two homologous recombination events. Chloramphenicol resistance allows positive selection of clones after the first event, whereas a colorimetric assay based on the xylE gene provides a simple way to screen clones in which the second recombination event occurs. Here we successfully use pBBknock to delete the lactate dehydrogenase gene in E. coli W, a popular host used in metabolic engineering. Compared with other plasmid-based solutions, pBBknock has a broader application range, not being limited to specific strains or media. We expect that pBBknock will represent a versatile solution both for practitioners, also among the iGEM competition teams, and for research laboratories that use BioBrick™-based assembly procedures.

  5. Hybridization between multi-objective genetic algorithm and support vector machine for feature selection in walker-assisted gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria; Costa, Lino; Frizera, Anselmo; Ceres, Ramón; Santos, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Walker devices are often prescribed incorrectly to patients, leading to the increase of dissatisfaction and occurrence of several problems, such as, discomfort and pain. Thus, it is necessary to objectively evaluate the effects that assisted gait can have on the gait patterns of walker users, comparatively to a non-assisted gait. A gait analysis, focusing on spatiotemporal and kinematics parameters, will be issued for this purpose. However, gait analysis yields redundant information that often is difficult to interpret. This study addresses the problem of selecting the most relevant gait features required to differentiate between assisted and non-assisted gait. For that purpose, it is presented an efficient approach that combines evolutionary techniques, based on genetic algorithms, and support vector machine algorithms, to discriminate differences between assisted and non-assisted gait with a walker with forearm supports. For comparison purposes, other classification algorithms are verified. Results with healthy subjects show that the main differences are characterized by balance and joints excursion in the sagittal plane. These results, confirmed by clinical evidence, allow concluding that this technique is an efficient feature selection approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pemasaran ViralViral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Situmorang, James Rianto

    2010-01-01

    Viral marketing is an extremely powerful and effective form of internet marketing. Itis a new form of word-of-mouth through internet. In viral marketing, someone passeson a marketing message to someone else and so on. Viral marketing proposes thatmessages can be rapidly disseminated from consumer to consumer leading to largescale market acceptance. The analogy of a virus is used to described the exponentialdiffusion of information in an electronic environment and should not be confusedwith th...

  7. Immunogenicity of viral vector, prime-boost SIV vaccine regimens in infant rhesus macaques: attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) recombinant SIV vaccines compared to live-attenuated SIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Koen K A; Abel, Kristina; Earl, Patricia; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Easlick, Juliet; Moore, Joseph; Buonocore-Buzzelli, Linda; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Wilson, Robert L; Simon, Ian; Moss, Bernard; Rose, Nina; Rose, John; Marthas, Marta L

    2010-02-10

    In a previously developed infant macaque model mimicking HIV infection by breast-feeding, we demonstrated that intramuscular immunization with recombinant poxvirus vaccines expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) structural proteins provided partial protection against infection following oral inoculation with virulent SIV. In an attempt to further increase systemic but also local antiviral immune responses at the site of viral entry, we tested the immunogenicity of different orally administered, replicating vaccines. One group of newborn macaques received an oral prime immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing SIVmac239 gag, pol and env (VSV-SIVgpe), followed 2 weeks later by an intramuscular boost immunization with MVA-SIV. Another group received two immunizations with live-attenuated SIVmac1A11, administered each time both orally and intravenously. Control animals received mock immunizations or non-SIV VSV and MVA control vectors. Analysis of SIV-specific immune responses in blood and lymphoid tissues at 4 weeks of age demonstrated that both vaccine regimens induced systemic antibody responses and both systemic and local cell-mediated immune responses. The safety and immunogenicity of the VSV-SIVgpe+MVA-SIV immunization regimen described in this report provide the scientific incentive to explore the efficacy of this vaccine regimen against virulent SIV exposure in the infant macaque model. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Viral Vector Induction of CREB Expression in the Periaqueductal Gray Induces a Predator Stress-Like Pattern of Changes in pCREB Expression, Neuroplasticity, and Anxiety in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Adamec

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Predator stress is lastingly anxiogenic. Phosphorylation of CREB to pCREB (phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein is increased after predator stress in fear circuitry, including in the right lateral column of the PAG (periaqueductal gray. Predator stress also potentiates right but not left CeA-PAG (central amygdala-PAG transmission up to 12 days after stress. The present study explored the functional significance of pCREB changes by increasing CREB expression in non-predator stressed rats through viral vectoring, and assessing the behavioral, electrophysiological and pCREB expression changes in comparison with handled and predator stressed controls. Increasing CREB expression in right PAG was anxiogenic in the elevated plus maze, had no effect on risk assessment, and increased acoustic startle response while delaying startle habituation. Potentiation of the right but not left CeA-PAG pathway was also observed. pCREB expression was slightly elevated in the right lateral column of the PAG, while the dorsal and ventral columns were not affected. The findings of this study suggest that by increasing CREB and pCREB in the right lateral PAG, it is possible to produce rats that exhibit behavioral, brain, and molecular changes that closely resemble those seen in predator stressed rats.

  9. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Adhesion Receptors Mediate Efficient Non-viral Gene Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge S.; Kalicharan, Dharamdajal; Robillard, George T.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2007-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, including production limitations, potential unanticipated side effects, and an immunological response upon repeated systemic administration, virus-based vectors are as yet not ideal gene delivery vehicles, justifying further research into alternatives. Unlike viral vectors,

  11. Prediction of Bond Vector Autocorrelation Functions from Larmor Frequency-Selective Order Parameter Analysis of NMR Relaxation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janet S; Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M

    2017-07-11

    Protein molecular dynamics interpretation of the standard R1, R2, and heteronuclear NOE relaxation measurements has typically been limited to a single S2 order parameter which is often insufficient to characterize the rich content of these NMR experiments. In the absence of exchange linebroadening, an optimized reduced spectral density analysis of these measurements can yield spectral density values at three distinct frequencies. Surprisingly, these three discrete spectral density values have proven to be sufficient for a Larmor frequency-selective order parameter analysis of the 223 methine and methylene H-C bonds of the B3 domain of Protein G (GB3) to accurately back-calculate the entire curve of the corresponding bond vector autocorrelation functions upon which the NMR relaxation behavior depends. The 13C relaxation values calculated from 2 μs of CHARMM36 simulation trajectories yielded the corresponding autocorrelation functions to an average rmsd of 0.44% with only three bond vectors having rmsd errors slightly greater than 1.0%. Similar quality predictions were obtained using the CHARMM22/CMAP, AMBER ff99SB, and AMBER ff99SB-ILDN force fields. Analogous predictions for the backbone 15N relaxation values were 3-fold more accurate. Excluding seven residues for which either experimental data is lacking or previous MD studies have indicated markedly divergent dynamics predictions, the CHARMM36-derived and experimentally derived 15N relaxation values for the remaining 48 amides of GB3 agree to an average of 0.016, 0.010, and 0.020 for the fast limit (Sf2) and Larmor frequency-selective (SH2 and SN2) order parameters, respectively. In contrast, for a substantial fraction of side chain positions, the statistical uncertainties obtained in the relaxation value predictions from each force field were appreciably less than the much larger differences predicted among these force fields, indicating a significant opportunity for experimental NMR relaxation measurements to

  12. Molecular basis for viral selective replication in cancer cells: activation of CDK2 by adenovirus-induced cyclin E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in cancer cells and have been used in cancer therapies. We have previously shown that Ad E1B55K protein is involved in induction of cyclin E for Ad replication, but this E1B55K function is not required in cancer cells in which deregulation of cyclin E is frequently observed. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cyclin E and CDK2 in Ad-infected cells. Ad infection significantly increased the large form of cyclin E (cyclin EL, promoted cyclin E/CDK2 complex formation and increased CDK2 phosphorylation at the T160 site. Activated CDK2 caused pRb phosphorylation at the S612 site. Repression of CDK2 activity with the chemical inhibitor roscovitine or with specific small interfering RNAs significantly decreased pRb phosphorylation, with concomitant repression of viral replication. Our results suggest that Ad-induced cyclin E activates CDK2 that targets the transcriptional repressor pRb to generate a cellular environment for viral productive replication. This study reveals a new molecular basis for oncolytic replication of E1b-deleted Ads and will aid in the development of new strategies for Ad oncolytic virotherapies.

  13. Use of bicistronic retroviral vectors encoding the LacZ gene together with a gene of interest: a method to select producer cells and follow transduced target cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, F. J.; Bakker, A. Q.; Verkuijlen, M.; van Oort, E.; Spits, H.

    1996-01-01

    The coordinate expression of a marker gene and a therapeutic gene in one retroviral vector has considerable advantages. High-titer producer lines can potentially be selected on the basis of marker gene expression, and the expression of transduced genes in target cells can readily be followed.

  14. Vector competence and innate immune responses to dengue virus infection in selected laboratory and field-collected Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, I M; Caicedo, P A; Orobio, Y; Lowenberger, C; Ocampo, C B

    2017-09-01

    Control of dengue virus (DenV) transmission, primarily based on strategies to reduce populations of the principle vector Stegomya aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae), is difficult to sustain over time. Other potential strategies aim to manipulate characteristics such as vector competence (VC), the innate capacity of the vector to transmit the virus. Previous studies have identified genetic factors, including differential expression of apoptosis-related genes, associated with the refractory and susceptible phenotypes in selected strains of S. aegypti from Cali, Colombia. The present study was designed to evaluate the variability of VC in selected strains against different DenV serotypes and to determine whether field-collected mosquitoes respond similarly to selected laboratory strains in terms of enhanced or reduced expression of apoptosis-related genes. Vector competence differed between strains, but did not differ in response to different DenV serotypes. Differences in VC were observed among mosquitoes collected from different localities in Cali. The overexpression of the pro-apoptosis genes, caspase 16 and Aedronc, was conserved in field-collected refractory mosquitoes and the selected laboratory refractory strain. The results suggest that the apoptosis response is conserved among all refractory mosquitoes to inhibit the development of all DenV serotypes. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Serological study of selected vector-borne diseases in shelter dogs in central Spain using point-of-care assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, C Guillermo; Lorentzen, Leif; Beall, Melissa J; Shields, James; Bertolone, Nicolette; Couto, Jason I; Couto, Kristen M; Nash, Sarah; Slack, Jessica; Kvitko, Heather; Westendorf, Nicole; Marin, Liliana; Iazbik, M Christina; Vicario, Francisco Clemente; Sanz, Pilar; Ruano, Ricardo

    2010-11-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of selected vector-borne diseases in 131 dogs in an animal shelter in central Spain using point-of-care assays (SNAP 4DX and SNAP Leishmania; IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, ME). The SNAP 4DX detects Dirofilaria immitis (Di) antigen and antibodies against Ehrlichia canis (Ec), Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), and Anaplasma phagocytophylum (Aph); the SNAP Leishmania kit detects antibodies against Leishmania infantum (Li). Dogs were classified as healthy or sick based on physical examination, complete blood counts, and serum chemistry profiles. The prevalence of positive test results was as follows: Ec, 5.3% (n = 7); Aph, 19.0% (n = 25); Bb, 0%; Di, 0%; and Li, 5.3% (n = 7). Four dogs (3%) were coexposed to Ec and Aph, and three dogs (2.3%) were coexposed to Aph and Li. There was no statistically significant correlation between positive serology and clinical status (sick vs. healthy) or hematologic/biochemical abnormalities. The prevalence of Aph was the highest and is in agreement with a recent report in a dog shelter in northwestern Spain. These point-of-care assays may be more valuable as epidemiologic than as clinical tools.

  16. Increased transgene expression level of rabies virus vector for transsynaptic tracing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohara

    Full Text Available Viral vectors that can infect neurons transsynaptically and can strongly express foreign genes are useful for investigating the organization of neural circuits. We previously developed a propagation-competent rabies virus (RV vector based on a highly attenuated HEP-Flury strain (rHEP5.0-CVSG, which selectively infects neurons and propagates between synaptically connected neurons in a retrograde direction. Its relatively low level of transgene expression, however, makes immunostaining necessary to visualize the morphological features of infected neurons. To increase the transgene expression level of this RV vector, in this study we focused on two viral proteins: the large protein (L and matrix protein (M. We first attempted to enhance the expression of L, which is a viral RNA polymerase, by deleting the extra transcription unit and shortening the intergenic region between the G and L genes. This viral vector (rHEP5.0-GctL showed increased transgene expression level with efficient transsynaptic transport. We next constructed an RV vector with a rearranged gene order (rHEP5.0-GML with the aim to suppress the expression of M, which plays a regulatory role in virus RNA synthesis. Although this vector showed high transgene expression level, the efficiency of transsynaptic transport was low. To further evaluate the usability of rHEP5.0-GctL as a transsynaptic tracer, we inserted a fluorescent timer as a transgene, which changes the color of its fluorescence from blue to red over time. This viral vector enabled us the differentiation of primary infected neurons from secondary infected neurons in terms of the fluorescence wavelength. We expect this propagation-competent RV vector to be useful for elucidating the complex organization of the central nervous system.

  17. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Luke I; Rouzine, Igor M; Rozhnova, Ganna; Bishop, Lisa; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV's mutational escape (i.e., be 'resistance-proof'). However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles-termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs)-would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV ('unilaterally') evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness) in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance.

  18. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke I Rast

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV's mutational escape (i.e., be 'resistance-proof'. However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles-termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs-would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV ('unilaterally' evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance.

  19. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » Viral Hepatitis » Veterans and ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging Veterans ...

  20. Enhanced transduction of colonic cell lines in vitro and the inflamed colon in mice by viral vectors, derived from adeno-associated virus serotype 2, using virus-microbead conjugates bearing lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano Takeshi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-mediated delivery of therapeutic transgenes to the inflamed colon holds a great potential to serve as an effective therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease, since local, long-term expression of the encoded therapeutic proteins in the colorectal system is potentially achievable. Viral vectors, derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV, should be very useful for such therapeutic strategies, particularly because they can establish long-term expression of transgenes. However, few studies have been carried out to investigate the ability of AAV-based vectors to transduce the inflamed colon. Results AAV, derived from adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2, showed a limited ability to transduce colonic cell lines in vitro when used in free form. No appreciable enhancement of the transduction efficiency was seen when AAV2 particles were attached stably to the surfaces of microbeads and delivered to target cells in the form of AAV2-microbead conjugates. However, the transduction efficiency of these colonic cell lines was enhanced substantially when a lectin, concanavalin A (Con A, was co-attached to the microbead surfaces, to which AAV2 particles had been conjugated. This considerable infectivity enhancement of AAV2-microbead conjugates by the co-attachment of Con A may be derived from the fact that Con A binds to α-D-mannosyl moieties that are commonly and abundantly present in cell-surface carbohydrate chains, allowing the conjugates to associate stably with target cells. Intracolonical administration of free AAV2 or AAV2-microbead conjugates without Con A into a mouse colitis model by enema showed very poor transduction of the colonic tissue. In contrast, the delivery of AAV2 in the form of AAV2-microbead conjugates bearing Con A resulted in efficient transduction of the inflamed colon. Conclusion AAV2-microbead conjugates bearing Con A can serve as efficient gene transfer agents both for poorly permissive colonic

  1. Biodegradable charged polyester-based vectors (BCPVs) as an efficient non-viral transfection nanoagent for gene knockdown of the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengbin; Panwar, Nishtha; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Butian; Liu, Maixian; Toh, Huiting; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-04-01

    First-line therapy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has always involved the use of BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase inhibitors which is associated with an abnormal chromosome called Philadelphia chromosome. Although the overall survival rate has been improved by the current therapeutic regime, the presence of resistance has resulted in limited efficacy. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutic regime is proposed with the aim to knockdown the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA transfection rates have usually been limited due to the declining contact probability among polyplexes and the non-adherent nature of leukemic cells. Our work aims at addressing this limitation by using a biodegradable charged polyester-based vector (BCPV) as a nanocarrier for the delivery of BCR-ABL-specific siRNA to the suspension culture of a K562 CML cell line. BCR-ABL siRNAs were encapsulated in the BCPVs by electrostatic force. Cell internalization was facilitated by the BCPV and assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The regulation of the BCR-ABL level in K562 cells as a result of RNAi was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed that BCPV was able to form stable nanoplexes with siRNA molecules, even in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and successfully assisted in vitro siRNA transfection in the non-adherent K562 cells. As a consequence of downregulation of BCR-ABL, BCPV-siRNA nanoplexes inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. All results were compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine2000™, which served as a positive control. More importantly, this class of non-viral vector exhibits biodegradable features and negligible cytotoxicity, thus providing a versatile platform to deliver siRNA to non-adherent leukemia cells with high transfection efficiency by effectively overcoming extra- and intra-cellular barriers. Due to the excellent in vitro

  2. From selective full-length genes isolation by TAR cloning in yeast to their expression from HAC vectors in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Lee, Nicholas C O; Kononenko, Artem V; Samoshkin, Alexander; Larionov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning allows selective isolation of full-length genes and genomic loci as large circular Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) in yeast. The method has a broad application for structural and functional genomics, long-range haplotyping, characterization of chromosomal rearrangements, and evolutionary studies. In this paper, we describe a basic protocol for gene isolation by TAR as well as a method to convert TAR isolates into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) using a retrofitting vector. The retrofitting vector contains a 3' HPRT-loxP cassette to allow subsequent gene loading into a unique loxP site of the HAC-based (Human Artificial Chromosome) gene delivery vector. The benefit of combining the TAR gene cloning technology with the HAC gene delivery system for gene expression studies is discussed.

  3. The prevalence of bovine viral diarrhoea antibodies in selected South African dairy herds, and control of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Ferreira

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD serologically positive animals in 18 dairy herds with clinical and pathological lesions suggestive of BVD infection, the post-vaccinal seroconversion rates in negative animals vaccinated twice with an inactivated BVD vaccine, and the control measures taken, are described. The pathological and histopathological findings in 6 necropsies performed on animals that died in 5 separate herds closely resembled published descriptions. Positive immunohistochemistry results in 3 cases confirmed the diagnosis in those animals. In 1 herd the prevalence of prevaccinal BVDantibodies was only 36.8 %, while the prevalence varied from 79.85 to 100 % in the remainder. Control measures taken included immunoprophylaxis with an inactivated vaccine, culling animals that were serologically negative after vaccination that were regarded as probably persistently infected (PI and the implementation of additional biosecurity measures. The prevalence of serologically negative PI animals in 10 herds varied from 0.38 to 4.04 %, with 8 herds less than 1 %and 2 herds at 2.79 %and 4.04 %, respectively. Methods based on vaccinating the herd, followed by serological testing and culling cattle that did not develop an antibody titre, are not reliable. The identification of PI animals should be confirmed by isolation of the virus or identification of the antigen.

  4. Efficient brain lesion segmentation using multi-modality tissue-based feature selection and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Cohen, Laurent D; Raniga, Parnesh; Fripp, Jurgen

    2013-09-01

    Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning techniques that have been used for segmentation and classification of medical images, including segmentation of white matter hyper-intensities (WMH). Current approaches using SVM for WMH segmentation extract features from the brain and classify these followed by complex post-processing steps to remove false positives. The method presented in this paper combines advanced pre-processing, tissue-based feature selection and SVM classification to obtain efficient and accurate WMH segmentation. Features from 125 patients, generated from up to four MR modalities [T1-w, T2-w, proton-density and fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR)], differing neighbourhood sizes and the use of multi-scale features were compared. We found that although using all four modalities gave the best overall classification (average Dice scores of 0.54  ±  0.12, 0.72  ±  0.06 and 0.82  ±  0.06 respectively for small, moderate and severe lesion loads); this was not significantly different (p = 0.50) from using just T1-w and FLAIR sequences (Dice scores of 0.52  ±  0.13, 0.71  ±  0.08 and 0.81  ±  0.07). Furthermore, there was a negligible difference between using 5 × 5 × 5 and 3 × 3 × 3 features (p = 0.93). Finally, we show that careful consideration of features and pre-processing techniques not only saves storage space and computation time but also leads to more efficient classification, which outperforms the one based on all features with post-processing. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. In vitro selection of external guide sequences for directing RNase P-mediated inhibition of viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianhong; Kim, Joseph; Kilani, Ahmed F; Kim, Kihoon; Dunn, Walter; Jo, Solomon; Nepomuceno, Edward; Liu, Fenyong

    2002-08-16

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are small RNA molecules that bind to a target mRNA, form a complex resembling the structure of a tRNA, and render the mRNA susceptible to hydrolysis by RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme. An in vitro selection procedure was used to select EGSs that direct human RNase P to cleave the mRNA encoding thymidine kinase (TK) of herpes simplex virus 1. One of the selected EGSs, TK17, was at least 35 times more active in directing RNase P in cleaving TK mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA sequence. TK17, when in complex with the TK mRNA sequence, resembles a portion of tRNA structure and exhibits an enhanced binding affinity to the target mRNA. Moreover, a reduction of 95 and 50% in the TK expression was found in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells that expressed the selected EGS and the EGS derived from the natural tRNA sequence, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that EGS molecules isolated by the selection procedure are effective in tissue culture. These results also demonstrate the potential for using the selection procedure as a general approach for the generation of highly effective EGSs for gene-targeting application.

  6. Novel Viral Vector Systems for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, interest in the field of gene therapy seems to have fluctuated between hot and cold. Encouraging pre-clinical and clinical data has demonstrated the potential of genetic therapies and yet setbacks in clinical trials have cast doubts in some minds over the clinical future of gene therapy [1-3]. In the last two years, a number of studies have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in clinical trials aimed towards specific monogenetic disorders [4-6], and this has brought renewed optimism to the field. [...

  7. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  8. Viral Vectors for Plant Genome Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Mansoor, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in genome engineering (GE) has made it possible to precisely alter DNA sequences in plant cells, providing specifically engineered plants with traits of interest. Gene targeting efficiency depends on the delivery-method of both sequence-specific nucleases and repair templates, to plant cells. Typically, this is achieved using Agrobacterium mediated transformation or particle bombardment, both of which transform only a subset of cells in treated tissues. The alternate in planta...

  9. Surveillance of viral haemorrhagic fevers in Ghana: entomological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 2804 households were surveyed to estimate larval indices and man-vector contacts of potential vectors of viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Yellow fever and ... variations and the dry season was identified as the high-risk period for transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and possible disease outbreaks.

  10. Creation of a cardiotropic adeno-associated virus: the story of viral directed evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adeno-associated virus (AAV is an important vector system for human gene therapy. Although use of AAV serotypes can result in efficient myocardial gene transfer, improvements in the transduction efficiency and specificity are still required. As a method for artificial modification and selection of gene function, directed evolution has been used for diverse applications in genetic engineering of enzymes and proteins. Since 2000, pioneering work has been performed on directed evolution of viral vectors. We further attempted to evolve the AAV using DNA shuffling and in vivo biopanning in a mouse model. An AAVM41 mutant was characterized, which was found to have improved transduction efficiency and specificity in myocardium, an attribute unknown for any natural AAV serotypes. This review focuses on the development of AAV vector for cardiac gene transfer, the history of directed evolution of viral vectors, and our creation of a cardiotropic AAV, which might have implications for the future design and application of viral vectors.

  11. [Generation of vector backbone-free and selectable marker-free transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) via ovary-drip method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ai-Fu; Su, Qiao; An, Li-Jia

    2009-01-01

    The presence of vector backbone sequences and selectable marker genes in transgenic plants has been the key concern for biosafety. A direct solution is to totally avoid the use of vector backbone sequences and selectable marker genes from the beginning of transgenic plant generation. In this study, the ovary-drip method was established and optimized. The key features of this method focused on the complete removal of the whole styles, and the subsequent application of a DNA solution directly to the ovaries. A vector backbone-free and selectable marker-free linear GFP cassette (Ubi-GFP -nos) was transformed into maize via the ovary-drip method. PCR analysis showed that suitable maize variety was 9818 and optimal transformation time was 18-20 h after pollination, which produced the highest PCR positive frequency (3.01%). Southern blotting analysis showed that the transgenic plants had simple integration patterns (1-2 bands). GFP transcription was de-tected by RT-PCR analysis. Green fluorescence was observed in roots and immature embryos of transgenic plants by a fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Augmented transgene expression in transformed cells using a parvoviral hybrid vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, L; Eskerski, H; Dinsart, C; Cornelis, J; Rommelaere, J; Haberkorn, U; Kleinschmidt, J A

    2008-04-01

    Autonomous parvoviruses possess an intrinsic oncotropism based on viral genetic elements controlling gene expression and genome replication. We constructed a hybrid vector consisting of the H1 parvovirus-derived expression cassette comprising the p4 promoter, the ns1 gene and the p38 promoter flanked by the adeno-associated viruses 2 (AAV2) inverted terminal repeats and packaged into AAV2 capsids. Gene transduction using this vector could be stimulated by coinfection with adenovirus, by irradiation or treatment with genotoxic agents, similar to standard AAV2 vectors. However, the latter were in most cases less efficient in gene transduction than the hybrid vector. With the new vector, tumor cell-selective increase in transgene expression was observed in pairs of transformed and non-transformed cells, leading to selective killing of the transformed cells after expression of a prodrug-converting enzyme. Preferential gene expression in tumor versus normal liver tissue was also observed in vivo in a syngeneic rat model. Comparative transduction of a panel of different tumor cell lines with the H1 and the H1/AAV hybrid vector showed a preference of each vector for distinct cell types, probably reflecting the dependence of the viral tropism on capsid determinants.

  13. 'SOSORT consensus paper on brace action: TLSO biomechanics of correction (investigating the rationale for force vector selection)'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, M; Negrini, S; Weiss, H R; Grivas, T B; Maruyama, T; Kotwicki, T

    2006-07-20

    The effectiveness of orthotic treatment continues to be controversial in international medical literature due to differences in the reported results and conclusions of various studies. Heterogeneity of the samples has been suggested as a reason for conflicting results. Besides the obvious theoretical differences between the brace concepts, the variability in the technical factors can also explain the contradictory results between same brace types. This paper will investigate the degree of variability among responses of scoliosis specialists from the Brace Study Ground of the International Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment SOSORT. Ultimately, this information could be a foundation for establishing a consensus and framework for future prospective controlled studies. A preliminary questionnaire on the topic of 'brace action' relative to the theory of three-dimensional scoliosis correction and brace treatment was developed and circulated to specialists interested in the conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A particular case was presented (main thoracic curve with minor lumbar). Several key points emerged and were used to develop a second questionnaire which was discussed and full filed after the SOSORT consensus meeting (Milano, Italy, January 2005). Twenty-one questionnaires were completed. The Chêneau brace was the most frequently recommended. The importance of the three point system mechanism was stressed. Options about proper pad placement on the thoracic convexity were divided 50% for the pad reaching or involving the apical vertebra and 50% for the pad acting caudal to the apical vertebra. There was agreement about the direction of the vector force, 85% selecting a 'dorso lateral to ventro medial' direction but about the shape of the pad to produce such a force. Principles related to three-dimensional correction achieved high consensus (80%-85%), but suggested methods of correction were quite diverse. This study

  14. 'SOSORT consensus paper on brace action: TLSO biomechanics of correction (investigating the rationale for force vector selection'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama T

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of orthotic treatment continues to be controversial in international medical literature due to differences in the reported results and conclusions of various studies. Heterogeneity of the samples has been suggested as a reason for conflicting results. Besides the obvious theoretical differences between the brace concepts, the variability in the technical factors can also explain the contradictory results between same brace types. This paper will investigate the degree of variability among responses of scoliosis specialists from the Brace Study Ground of the International Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment SOSORT. Ultimately, this information could be a foundation for establishing a consensus and framework for future prospective controlled studies. Methods A preliminary questionnaire on the topic of 'brace action' relative to the theory of three-dimensional scoliosis correction and brace treatment was developed and circulated to specialists interested in the conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A particular case was presented (main thoracic curve with minor lumbar. Several key points emerged and were used to develop a second questionnaire which was discussed and full filed after the SOSORT consensus meeting (Milano, Italy, January 2005. Results Twenty-one questionnaires were completed. The Chêneau brace was the most frequently recommended. The importance of the three point system mechanism was stressed. Options about proper pad placement on the thoracic convexity were divided 50% for the pad reaching or involving the apical vertebra and 50% for the pad acting caudal to the apical vertebra. There was agreement about the direction of the vector force, 85% selecting a 'dorso lateral to ventro medial' direction but about the shape of the pad to produce such a force. Principles related to three-dimensional correction achieved high consensus (80%–85%, but suggested

  15. Valuable Virality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, E.; Berger, Jonah

    2017-01-01

    Given recent interest in social media, many brands now create content that they hope consumers will view and share with peers. While some campaigns indeed go “viral,” their value to the brand is limited if they do not boost brand evaluation or increase purchase. Consequently, a key question is how

  16. Viral Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help relieve the symptoms of viral gastroenteritis in adults: drinking plenty of liquids such as fruit juices, sports ... as the child is hungry giving infants breast milk or full strength ... solutions Older adults and adults with weak immune systems should also ...

  17. Viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, M V; Sherman, K E; Jordan, J A

    2010-07-01

    Despite continuous improvement in safety and purity of blood products for individuals with haemophilia, transmissible agents continue to affect individuals with haemophilia. This chapter addresses three viral pathogens with significant clinical impact: HIV, hepatitis C and parvovirus B19. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis and the major co-morbid complication of haemophilia treatment. Clinically, asymptomatic intermittent alanine aminotransferase elevation is typical, with biopsy evidence of advanced fibrosis currently in 25%. Current treatment is effective in up to 70%, and many new agents are in development. For those progressing to end-stage liver disease, liver transplantation outcomes are similar to those in non-haemophilia subjects, although pretransplant mortality is higher. HIV infection, the second leading co-morbid condition in haemophilia, is managed as a chronic infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HAART also slows hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression in those with HIV/HCV co-infection. Viral inactivation and recombinant technologies have effectively prevented transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens in haemophilia. Human parvovirus B19 infection, typically associated with anaemia or, rarely severe aplastic crisis, is a non-lipid enveloped virus, for which standard inactivation techniques are ineffective. Thus, nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen the blood supply for B19 DNA is currently under consideration by the Food and Drug Administration. To the extent, viral inactivation, recombinant, and NAT technologies are available worldwide, and the lifespan for those with haemophilia is approaching that of the normal population. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an update on three clinically significant transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens.

  18. An appropriate selection of a 3D alginate culture model for hepatic Huh-7 cell line encapsulation intended for viral studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nhu Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine; Défarge, Christian; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    adequate encapsulation condition can be selected for each target application in liver tissue engineering, specifically in viral studies.

  19. Plasmid vectors for Xylella fastidiosa utilizing a toxin-antitoxin system for plasmid stability in the absence of antibiotic selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacte...

  20. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  1. Distinguishing HIV-1 drug resistance, accessory, and viral fitness mutations using conditional selection pressure analysis of treated versus untreated patient samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV can evolve drug resistance rapidly in response to new drug treatments, often through a combination of multiple mutations 123. It would be useful to develop automated analyses of HIV sequence polymorphism that are able to predict drug resistance mutations, and to distinguish different types of functional roles among such mutations, for example, those that directly cause drug resistance, versus those that play an accessory role. Detecting functional interactions between mutations is essential for this classification. We have adapted a well-known measure of evolutionary selection pressure (Ka/Ks and developed a conditional Ka/Ks approach to detect important interactions. Results We have applied this analysis to four independent HIV protease sequencing datasets: 50,000 clinical samples sequenced by Specialty Laboratories, Inc.; 1800 samples from patients treated with protease inhibitors; 2600 samples from untreated patients; 400 samples from untreated African patients. We have identified 428 mutation interactions in Specialty dataset with statistical significance and we were able to distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations for many well-studied examples. Amino acid interactions identified by conditional Ka/Ks matched 80 of 92 pair wise interactions found by a completely independent study of HIV protease (p-value for this match is significant: 10-70. Furthermore, Ka/Ks selection pressure results were highly reproducible among these independent datasets, both qualitatively and quantitatively, suggesting that they are detecting real drug-resistance and viral fitness mutations in the wild HIV-1 population. Conclusion Conditional Ka/Ks analysis can detect mutation interactions and distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations in HIV-1. Ka/Ks analysis of treated vs. untreated patient data can distinguish drug-resistance vs. viral fitness mutations. Verification of these results would require longitudinal studies. The result

  2. Recruitment strategies and patient selection in clinical trials for Parkinson's disease: Going viral and keeping science and ethics at the highest standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picillo, Marina; Kou, Nancy; Barone, Paolo; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Enrollment of an adequate number of suitable candidates is a critical component of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Parkinson's disease (PD) is a highly heterogeneous disease and recruiting a large and homogeneous sample of patients is often challenging. Further, PD patients are often elderly, cognitively impaired and disabled, thus requiring the assistance from their caregivers for participation in RCTs. Only a limited number of studies have explored the effectiveness of recruitment strategies and PD patient selection in clinical trials. We aim to review the four crucial recruitment components of RCTs (i.e. infrastructure, nature of the research, recruiter characteristics and participant characteristics) with particular implications in PD, and to explore strategies to improve recruitment and patient selection in RCTs in PD. Movement disorders centers have a key role in managing recruitment and patient selection in RCTs in PD. Key recommendations within the infrastructure component are to improve trust and communication between patient and participant, and to consider the diversity, perceived disadvantages, and health care accessibility of the participants. Further, study designs that involve participant's opinions and considers placebo and lessebo effects are highly recommended for the nature of the research component of RCTs. Finally, a team-based approach with recruiters and participants that establishes relationships between researchers and the community and addresses ethical considerations are encouraged as part of the recruiters and participants components. Finally, we envisage a greater usage of internet-based strategies for clinical trials recruitment in PD with the goal of 'going viral' with the recruitment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  4. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  5. Serosurvey for selected viral infections in free-ranging jaguars (Panthera onca) and domestic carnivores in Brazilian Cerrado, Pantanal, and Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; de Ramos Filho, José Domingues; Scheffer, Karin Corrêa; Coelho, Claudio José; Cruz, Paula Sônia; Ikuta, Cassia Yumi; Jácomo, Anah Tereza de Almeida; Porfírio, Grasiela Edith de Oliveira; Silveira, Leandro; Sollmann, Rahel; Tôrres, Natália Mundim; Ferreira Neto, José Soares

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the exposure of jaguar (Panthera onca) populations and domestic carnivores to selected viral infections in the Cerrado, Amazon, and Pantanal biomes of Brazil. Between February 2000 and January 2010, we collected serum samples from 31 jaguars, 174 dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), and 35 domestic cats (Felis catus). Serologic analyses for antibodies to rabies virus, canine distemper virus (CDV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen were conducted. The jaguars from Cerrado and Pantantal were exposed to rabies virus, while the jaguars from the Pantanal and the dogs from all three areas were exposed to CDV. Two cats from the Amazonian site were antigen-positive for FeLV, but no jaguars had FeLV antigen or FIV antibody. Canine distemper and rabies viruses should be carefully monitored and considered potential threats to these jaguar populations. Currently FIV and FeLV do not appear to represent a health threat for jaguar populations in this area. Domestic dogs and cats in these areas should be vaccinated, and the movement of domestic animals around protected areas should be restricted.

  6. Selective inhibition of the reverse transcription of duck hepatitis B virus by binding of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate to the viral polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A Y; Robins, M J; Wilson, J S; Tyrrell, D L

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is mediated by the viral polymerase that possesses three functional domains: primer, DNA polymerase/reverse transcriptase, and RNase H. Using the Pekin duck as an animal model, we demonstrate a novel mechanism of inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by 2,6-diaminopurine 2',3'-dideoxyriboside (ddDAPR), a prodrug of 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine (ddG). A selective and irreversible inhibition of DHBV DNA replication is found in ducklings treated with high doses of ddDAPR (20 to 50 mg/kg), but not with similar doses of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC). The inhibition mediated by ddDAPR occurs at a very early stage of the reverse transcription. Despite the inhibition of DHBV DNA replication by ddDAPR, the DNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activities of the polymerase are found to remain active when tested on exogenous templates in activity gels. We have demonstrated direct binding of [alpha-32P]ddGTP to the DHBV polymerase expressed in an in vitro transcription and translation system. These results suggest that the binding of ddGTP to the polymerase blocks the initial DNA replication.

  7. Impact of clonal competition for peptide-MHC complexes on the CD8[superscript +] T-cell repertoire selection in a persistent viral infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynn, Katherine K.; Fulton, Zara; Cooper, Leanne; Silins, Sharon L.; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Miles, John J.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2008-04-29

    CD8{sup +} T-cell responses to persistent viral infections are characterized by the accumulation of an oligoclonal T-cell repertoire and a reduction in the naive T-cell pool. However, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains elusive. Here we show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific CD8{sup +} T cells recognizing distinct epitopes from the pp65 protein and restricted through an identical HLA class I allele (HLA B*3508) exhibited either a highly conserved public T-cell repertoire or a private, diverse T-cell response, which was uniquely altered in each donor following in vitro antigen exposure. Selection of a public T-cell receptor (TCR) was coincident with an atypical major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide structure, in that the epitope adopted a helical conformation that bulged from the peptide-binding groove, while a diverse TCR profile was observed in response to the epitope that formed a flatter, more 'featureless' landscape. Clonotypes with biased TCR usage demonstrated more efficient recognition of virus-infected cells, a greater CD8 dependency, and were more terminally differentiated in their phenotype when compared with the T cells expressing diverse TCR. These findings provide new insights into our understanding on how the biology of antigen presentation in addition to the structural features of the pMHC-I might shape the T-cell repertoire and its phenotype.

  8. Selection and validation of candidate reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR studies in the shrimp Penaeus vannamei under viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Castillo, Adán; Mendoza-Cano, Fernando; Enríquez-Espinosa, Tania; Grijalva-Chon, José Manuel; Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    The decapod Penstyldensovirus 1 (PstDV-1) represents one of the most serious threats for penaeid shrimp farming. Studies aimed at defining relevant molecular effects of this virus over its host are imperative in the attempt to increase our understanding of its pathogenesis. Unfortunately, few studies have focused on the definition of the expression profile of reference genes in shrimp challenged with a pathogen. As a result, there are no studies on the selection of reference genes for the normalization of target gene expression changes yielding reliable data of the effects following PstDV-1 infection in shrimp. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate and validate the appropriateness of four candidate reference genes (ef1-α, gapdh, rpl8 and β-tubulin) for their use as reference genes to normalize qPCR data in gene expression studies of PstDV-1-shrimp interactions. By analyzing the expression profile of those genes, gapdh was validated as a suitable reference gene to normalize expression data gathered from a PstDV1-challenge, while ef1-α, β-tubulin, and rpl8 were identified as unstably expressed during the infectious process. The suitability of gapdh as a common reference gene in studies of host gene response to viral infections is underlined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Viral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  10. The Short-Term Power Load Forecasting Based on Sperm Whale Algorithm and Wavelet Least Square Support Vector Machine with DWT-IR for Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-peng Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Short-term power load forecasting is an important basis for the operation of integrated energy system, and the accuracy of load forecasting directly affects the economy of system operation. To improve the forecasting accuracy, this paper proposes a load forecasting system based on wavelet least square support vector machine and sperm whale algorithm. Firstly, the methods of discrete wavelet transform and inconsistency rate model (DWT-IR are used to select the optimal features, which aims to reduce the redundancy of input vectors. Secondly, the kernel function of least square support vector machine LSSVM is replaced by wavelet kernel function for improving the nonlinear mapping ability of LSSVM. Lastly, the parameters of W-LSSVM are optimized by sperm whale algorithm, and the short-term load forecasting method of W-LSSVM-SWA is established. Additionally, the example verification results show that the proposed model outperforms other alternative methods and has a strong effectiveness and feasibility in short-term power load forecasting.

  11. Selecting Relevant Descriptors for Classification by Bayesian Estimates: A Comparison with Decision Trees and Support Vector Machines Approaches for Disparate Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon-Mangels, Miriam; Hutter, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    Classification algorithms suffer from the curse of dimensionality, which leads to overfitting, particularly if the problem is over-determined. Therefore it is of particular interest to identify the most relevant descriptors to reduce the complexity. We applied Bayesian estimates to model the probability distribution of descriptors values used for binary classification using n-fold cross-validation. As a measure for the discriminative power of the classifiers, the symmetric form of the Kullback-Leibler divergence of their probability distributions was computed. We found that the most relevant descriptors possess a Gaussian-like distribution of their values, show the largest divergences, and therefore appear most often in the cross-validation scenario. The results were compared to those of the LASSO feature selection method applied to multiple decision trees and support vector machine approaches for data sets of substrates and nonsubstrates of three Cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, which comprise strongly unbalanced compound distributions. In contrast to decision trees and support vector machines, the performance of Bayesian estimates is less affected by unbalanced data sets. This strategy reveals those descriptors that allow a simple linear separation of the classes, whereas the superior accuracy of decision trees and support vector machines can be attributed to nonlinear separation, which are in turn more prone to overfitting. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Impact of a large deletion in the neuraminidase protein identified in a laninamivir-selected influenza A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2) variant on viral fitness in vitro and in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Julie; Abed, Yacine; Beaulieu, Edith; Bouhy, Xavier; Joly, Marie-Hélène; Dubé, Karen; Carbonneau, Julie; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Mallett, Corey; Boivin, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Viral fitness of a laninamivir-selected influenza A/Brisbane/10/2007-like (H3N2) isolate (LRVp9) containing a 237-amino acid neuraminidase deletion and a P194L hemagglutinin mutation was evaluated in vitro and in ferrets. LRVp9 and the wild-type (WT) virus showed comparable replication kinetics in MDCK-ST6GalI cells. Cultured virus was recovered between days 2 and 5 post-infection in nasal washes (NW) from the 4 WT-infected ferrets whereas no virus was recovered from the LRVp9-infected animals. There was a ≥1 log reduction in viral RNA copies/μl of NW for LRVp9 compared to WT at most time points. The large neuraminidase deletion compromises viral infectivity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  14. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  15. Viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Plint, Amy C; Zorc, Joseph J

    2017-01-14

    Viral bronchiolitis is a common clinical syndrome affecting infants and young children. Concern about its associated morbidity and cost has led to a large body of research that has been summarised in systematic reviews and integrated into clinical practice guidelines in several countries. The evidence and guideline recommendations consistently support a clinical diagnosis with the limited role for diagnostic testing for children presenting with the typical clinical syndrome of viral upper respiratory infection progressing to the lower respiratory tract. Management is largely supportive, focusing on maintaining oxygenation and hydration of the patient. Evidence suggests no benefit from bronchodilator or corticosteroid use in infants with a first episode of bronchiolitis. Evidence for other treatments such as hypertonic saline is evolving but not clearly defined yet. For infants with severe disease, the insufficient available data suggest a role for high-flow nasal cannula and continuous positive airway pressure use in a monitored setting to prevent respiratory failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Viral superantigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    , expression of endogenous SAgs leads to thymic deletion of responding T cells (bearing Vβ6-9+ TCR) due to self-tolerance induction during the fetal life, and protects the host against future exogenous MMTV infections. The SAg of rabies virus is the N protein found in nucleocapsid structure and stimulates Vβ8+TCR-bearing T cells. The SAg-induced polyclonal activation of T cells leads to turn-off the specific immune response, to enhance the immunopathogenesis and facilitates viral transmission from the initial site of infection (the muscle tissue) to the nerve endings. In case of EBV-associated SAg that activates Vβ13+TCR-bearing T cells, it was detected that the SAg activity was not encoded by EBV itself, but instead was due to the transactivation of HERV-K18 by EBV latent membrane proteins, whose env gene encodes the SAg (Sutkowski, et al. 2001). It has been denoted that EBV-induced SAg expression plays a role in the long-term persistence and latency of virus in memory B cells, in the development of autoimmune diseases and in the oncogenesis mechanisms. The proteins which are identified as SAgs of HIV are Nef and gp120. It is believed that, the massive activation of CD4+ T cells (selectively with Vβ-12+, Vβ-5.3+ and Vβ-18+ TCRs) in early stages of infection and clonal deletion, anergy and apoptosis of bystander T cells in the late stages may be due to SAg property of Nef protein, as well as the other mechanisms. However there are some studies indicating that Nef does not act as a SAg (Lapatschek, et al. 2001). HIV gp120 glycoprotein is a B-cell SAg that binds to VH3-expressing B cell receptors and causes polyclonal B cell activation. In addition, binding of gp120 to IgE on the surface of basophiles and mast cells causes activation of those cells, secretion of high level proinflammatory mediators leading to allergic reactions and tissue damage. In a recent study, the depletion (anergy or deletion) of T cell populations bearing Vβ12+, Vβ13+ and Vβ17+ TCR have been

  17. DNA shuffling of adeno-associated virus yields functionally diverse viral progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, James T; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Schaffer, David V

    2008-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are extremely effective gene-delivery vehicles for a broad range of applications. However, the therapeutic efficacy of these and other vectors is currently limited by barriers to safe, efficient gene delivery, including pre-existing antiviral immunity, and infection of off-target cells. Recently, we have implemented directed evolution of AAV, involving the generation of randomly mutagenized viral libraries based on serotype 2 and high-throughput selection, to engineer enhanced viral vectors. Here, we significantly extend this capability by performing high-efficiency in vitro recombination to create a large (10(7)), diverse library of random chimeras of numerous parent AAV serotypes (AAV1, 2, 4-6, 8, and 9). In order to analyze the extent to which such highly chimeric viruses can be viable, we selected the library for efficient viral packaging and infection, and successfully recovered numerous novel chimeras. These new viruses exhibited a broad range of cell tropism both in vitro and in vivo and enhanced resistance to human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), highlighting numerous functional differences between these chimeras and their parent serotypes. Thus, directed evolution can potentially yield unlimited numbers of new AAV variants with novel gene-delivery properties, and subsequent analysis of these variants can further extend basic knowledge of AAV biology.

  18. Genetic specificity and potential for local adaptation between dengue viruses and mosquito vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Jason H

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several observations support the hypothesis that vector-driven selection plays an important role in shaping dengue virus (DENV genetic diversity. Clustering of DENV genetic diversity at a particular location may reflect underlying genetic structure of vector populations, which combined with specific vector genotype × virus genotype (G × G interactions may promote adaptation of viral lineages to local mosquito vector genotypes. Although spatial structure of vector polymorphism at neutral genetic loci is well-documented, existence of G × G interactions between mosquito and virus genotypes has not been formally demonstrated in natural populations. Here we measure G × G interactions in a system representative of a natural situation in Thailand by challenging three isofemale families from field-derived Aedes aegypti with three contemporaneous low-passage isolates of DENV-1. Results Among indices of vector competence examined, the proportion of mosquitoes with a midgut infection, viral RNA concentration in the body, and quantity of virus disseminated to the head/legs (but not the proportion of infected mosquitoes with a disseminated infection strongly depended on the specific combinations of isofemale families and viral isolates, demonstrating significant G × G interactions. Conclusion Evidence for genetic specificity of interactions in our simple experimental design indicates that vector competence of Ae. aegypti for DENV is likely governed to a large extent by G × G interactions in genetically diverse, natural populations. This result challenges the general relevance of conclusions from laboratory systems that consist of a single combination of mosquito and DENV genotypes. Combined with earlier evidence for fine-scale genetic structure of natural Ae. aegypti populations, our finding indicates that the necessary conditions for local DENV adaptation to mosquito vectors are met.

  19. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; Jong, Ad P J M de; Els, Cécile A C M van

    2006-01-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools

  20. Cylindrical vector beam generation in fiber with mode selectivity and wavelength tunability over broadband by acoustic flexural wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wending; Huang, Ligang; Wei, Keyan; Li, Peng; Jiang, Biqiang; Mao, Dong; Gao, Feng; Mei, Ting; Zhang, Guoquan; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-05-16

    Theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration are presented for the generation of cylindrical vector beams (CVBs) via mode conversion in fiber from HE11 mode to TM01 and TE01 modes, which have radial and azimuthal polarizations, respectively. Intermodal coupling is caused by an acoustic flexural wave applied on the fiber, whereas polarization control is necessary for the mode conversion, i.e. HE11x→TM01 and HE11y→TE01 for acoustic vibration along the x-axis. The frequency of the RF driving signal for actuating the acoustic wave is determined by the phase matching condition that the period of acoustic wave equals the beatlength of two coupled modes. With phase matching condition tunability, this approach can be used to generate different types of CVBs at the same wavelength over a broadband. Experimental demonstration was done in the visible and communication bands.

  1. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  2. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms involving metabolic changes and insensitive target sites selected in anopheline vectors of malaria in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunaratne SHP Parakrama

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance and the underlying resistance mechanisms were studied in the major vector of malaria, Anopheles culicifacies, and the secondary vector, Anopheles subpictus in five districts (Anuradhapura, Kurunegala, Moneragala, Puttalam and Trincomalee of Sri Lanka. Eight other anophelines, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles jamesii, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles tessellatus, Anopheles vagus and Anopheles varuna from Anuradhapura district were also tested. Methods Adult females were exposed to the WHO discriminating dosages of DDT, malathion, fenitrothion, propoxur, λ-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and etofenprox. The presence of metabolic resistance by esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST and monooxygenase-based mechanisms, and the sensitivity of the acetylcholinesterase target site were assessed using synergists, and biochemical, and metabolic techniques. Results All the anopheline species had high DDT resistance. All An. culicifacies and An. subpictus populations were resistant to malathion, except An. culicifacies from Kurunegala, where there was no malathion carboxylesterase activity. Kurunegala and Puttalam populations of An. culicifacies were susceptible to fenitrothion. All the An. culicifacies populations were susceptible to carbamates. Both species were susceptible to the discriminating dosages of cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, but had different levels of resistance to other pyrethroids. Of the 8 other anophelines, only An. nigerrimus and An. peditaeniatus were resistant to all the insecticides tested, probably due to their high exposure to the insecticides used in agriculture. An. vagus showed some resistance to permethrin. Esterases, GSTs and monooxygenases were elevated in both An. culicifacies and An. subpictus. AChE was most sensitive to insecticides in Kurunegala and Trincomalee An. culicifacies

  3. Serological survey of selected canine viral pathogens and zoonoses in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) from Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, B B; Kasten, R W; Chappuis, G; Soulier, M; Kikuchi, Y

    1998-12-01

    Between 1988 and 1991, 644 serum samples were collected from 480 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and 40 black bears (Ursus americanus) from Alaska, United States of America, and were tested for selected canine viral infections and zoonoses. Antibody prevalence in grizzly bears was 0% for parvovirus, 8.3% (40/480) for distemper, 14% (68/480) for infectious hepatitis, 16.5% (79/480) for brucellosis, 19% (93/480) for tularaemia and 47% (225/478) for trichinellosis. In black bears, prevalence ranged from 0% for distemper and parvovirus to 27.5% for trichinellosis and 32% for tularaemia. Antibody prevalence for brucellosis (2.5%) and tularaemia (32%) were identical for grizzly bears and black bears from the geographical area of interior Alaska. Links between differences in prevalence and the origin of the grizzly bears were observed. Antibodies to canine distemper virus and infectious hepatitis virus were mainly detected in grizzly bears from Kodiak Island and the Alaskan Peninsula. Brucellosis antibodies were prevalent in grizzly bears from western and northern Alaska, whereas tularaemia antibodies were detected in grizzly bears from interior Alaska and the Arctic. There was a strong gradient for antibodies to Trichinella spp. from southern to northern Alaska. For most diseases, antibody prevalence increased with age. However, for several infections, no antibodies were detected in grizzly bears aged from 0 to 2 years, in contrast to the presence of those infections in black bears. Grizzly bears served as excellent sentinels for surveillance of zoonotic infections in wildlife in Alaska.

  4. Select neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected women: associations with HIV viral load, hepatitis C virus, and depression, but not leukocyte telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle J Giesbrecht

    Full Text Available Through implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART remarkable gains have been achieved in the management of HIV infection; nonetheless, the neurocognitive consequences of infection remain a pivotal concern in the cART era. Research has often employed norm-referenced neuropsychological scores, derived from healthy populations (excluding many seronegative individuals at high risk for HIV infection, to characterize impairments in predominately male HIV-infected populations.Using matched-group methodology, we assessed 81 HIV-seropositive (HIV+ women with established neuropsychological measures validated for detection of HIV-related impairments, as well as additional detailed tests of executive function and decision-making from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB.On validated tests, the HIV+ women exhibited impairments that were limited to significantly slower information processing speed when compared with 45 HIV-seronegative (HIV- women with very similar demographic backgrounds and illness comorbidities. Additionally, select executive impairments in shifting attention (i.e., reversal learning and in decision-making quality were revealed in HIV+ participants. Modifiers of neurocognition in HIV-infected women included detectable HIV plasma viral load, active hepatitis C virus co-infection, and self-reported depression symptoms. In contrast, leukocyte telomere length (LTL, a marker of cellular aging, did not significantly differ between HIV+ and HIV- women, nor was LTL associated with overall neurocognition in the HIV+ group.The findings suggest that well-managed HIV infection may entail a more circumscribed neurocognitive deficit pattern than that reported in many norm-referenced studies, and that common comorbidities make a secondary contribution to HIV-related neurocognitive impairments.

  5. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  6. Expanding specificity of class 1 restricted CD8+ T cells for viral epitopes following multiple inoculations of swine with a human adenivorus vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune response to the highly acute foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is routinely reported as a measure of serum antibody. However, a critical effector function of immune responses combating viral infection of mammals is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, mediated by virus specific ...

  7. Vector-Virus Interactions and Transmission Dynamics of West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciota, Alexander T.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV; Flavivirus; Flaviviridae) is the cause of the most widespread arthropod-borne viral disease in the world and the largest outbreak of neuroinvasive disease ever observed. Mosquito-borne outbreaks are influenced by intrinsic (e.g., vector and viral genetics, vector and host competence, vector life-history traits) and extrinsic (e.g., temperature, rainfall, human land use) factors that affect virus activity and mosquito biology in complex ways. The concept of vectorial capacity integrates these factors to address interactions of the virus with the arthropod host, leading to a clearer understanding of their complex interrelationships, how they affect transmission of vector-borne disease, and how they impact human health. Vertebrate factors including host competence, population dynamics, and immune status also affect transmission dynamics. The complexity of these interactions are further exacerbated by the fact that not only can divergent hosts differentially alter the virus, but the virus also can affect both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts in ways that significantly alter patterns of virus transmission. This chapter concentrates on selected components of the virus-vector-vertebrate interrelationship, focusing specifically on how interactions between vector, virus, and environment shape the patterns and intensity of WNV transmission. PMID:24351794

  8. Chapter five--The development of transcription-regulated adenoviral vectors with high cancer-selective imaging capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Sato, Makoto; Wu, Lily

    2012-01-01

    A clear benefit of molecular imaging is to enable noninvasive, repetitive monitoring of intrinsic signals within tumor cells as a means to identify the lesions as malignant or to assess the ability of treatment to perturb key pathways within the tumor cells. Due to the promising utility of molecular imaging in oncology, preclinical research to refine molecular imaging techniques in small animals is a blossoming field. We will first discuss the several imaging modalities such as fluorescent imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography that are now commonly used in small animal settings. The indirect imaging approach, which can be adapted to a wide range of imaging reporter genes, is a useful platform to develop molecular imaging. In particular, reporter gene-based imaging is well suited for transcriptional-targeted imaging that can be delivered by recombinant adenoviral vectors. In this review, we will summarize transcription-regulated strategies used in adenoviral-mediated molecular imaging to visualize metastasis and monitor oncolytic therapy in preclinical models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological activity of selected Lamiaceae and Zingiberaceae plant essential oils against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Murugesan, Arunachalam Ganesan

    2012-03-01

    The larvicidal activity of hydrodistillate extracts from Mentha piperita L. Ocimum basilicum L. Curcuma longa L. and Zingiber officinale L. were investigated against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae).The results indicated that the mortality rates at 80, 100, 200 and 400 ppm of M. piperita, Z. officinale, C. longa and O. basilicum concentrations were highest amongst all concentrations of the crude extracts tested against all the larval instars and pupae of A. aegypti. Result of log probit analysis (at 95% confidence level) revealed that lethal concentration LC₅₀ and LC₉₀ values were 47.54 and 86.54 ppm for M. piperita, 40.5 and 85.53 ppm for Z. officinale, 115.6 and 193.3 ppm for C. longa and 148.5 and 325.7 ppm for O. basilicum, respectively. All of the tested oils proved to have strong larvicidal activity (doses from 5 to 350 ppm) against A. aegypti fourth instars, with the most potent oil being M. piperita extract, followed by Z. officinale, C. longa and O. basilicum. In general, early instars were more susceptible than the late instars and pupae. The results achieved suggest that, in addition to their medicinal activities, Lamiaceae and Zingiberaceae plant extracts may also serve as a natural larvicidal agent.

  10. HLA-B57/B*5801 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 elite controllers select for rare gag variants associated with reduced viral replication capacity and strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte [corrected] recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiyuki; Brockman, Mark A; Schneidewind, Arne; Lobritz, Michael; Pereyra, Florencia; Rathod, Almas; Block, Brian L; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa C; Li, Bin; Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Frahm, Nicole; Brander, Christian; Toth, Ildiko; Arts, Eric J; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) elite controllers (EC) maintain viremia below the limit of commercial assay detection (B57 and the closely related allele B*5801 are particularly associated with enhanced control and recognize the same Gag(240-249) TW10 epitope. The typical escape mutation (T242N) within this epitope diminishes viral replication capacity in chronically infected persons; however, little is known about TW10 epitope sequences in residual replicating viruses in B57/B*5801 EC and the extent to which mutations within this epitope may influence steady-state viremia. Here we analyzed TW10 in a total of 50 B57/B*5801-positive subjects (23 EC and 27 viremic subjects). Autologous plasma viral sequences from both EC and viremic subjects frequently harbored the typical cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL)-selected mutation T242N (15/23 sequences [65.2%] versus 23/27 sequences [85.1%], respectively; P = 0.18). However, other unique mutants were identified in HIV controllers, both within and flanking TW10, that were associated with an even greater reduction in viral replication capacity in vitro. In addition, strong CTL responses to many of these unique TW10 variants were detected by gamma interferon-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. These data suggest a dual mechanism for durable control of HIV replication, consisting of viral fitness loss resulting from CTL escape mutations together with strong CD8 T-cell immune responses to the arising variant epitopes.

  11. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  12. Novel feature selection method based on Stochastic Methods Coupled to Support Vector Machines using H- NMR data (data of olive and hazelnut oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Eduardo Gualdron

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the principal inconveniences that analysis and information processing presents is that of the representation of dataset. Normally, one encounters a high number of samples, each one with thousands of variables, and in many cases with irrelevant information and noise. Therefore, in order to represent findings in a clearer way, it is necessary to reduce the amount of variables. In this paper, a novel variable selection technique for multivariable data analysis, inspired on stochastic methods and designed to work with support vector machines (SVM, is described. The approach is demonstrated in a food application involving the detection of adulteration of olive oil (more expensive with hazelnut oil (cheaper. Fingerprinting by H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the different samples. Results show that it is possible to reduce the number of variables without affecting classification results.

  13. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  14. Effect of chemical functionalities in poly(amido amine)s for non-viral gene transfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, C.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Hennink, W.E.; Feijen, J.; Sam, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene delivery vectors is an essential prerequisite for successful gene therapy. As viral vectors suffer from inherent disadvantages, cationic polymers as non-viral vectors have great potential in gene delivery, but their practical application so far is seriously

  15. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Surveillance of viral haemorrhagic fevers in Ghana: entomological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 2804 households were surveyed to estimate larval indices and man-vector contacts of potential vectors of viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Yellow fever and Dengue. Over 56% households in each study site were positive for Aedes larvae. Relatively higher Breteaux index (BI) and Container index (CI) ...

  17. Manipulating gene expression in projection-specific neuronal populations using combinatorial viral approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Bryan B; Soden, Marta E; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian brain contains tremendous structural and genetic complexity that is vital for its function. The elucidation of gene expression profiles in the brain, coupled with the development of large-scale connectivity maps and emerging viral vector-based approaches for target-selective gene manipulation, now allow for detailed dissection of gene-circuit interfaces. This protocol details how to perform combinatorial viral injections to manipulate gene expression in subsets of neurons interconnecting two brain regions. This method utilizes stereotaxic injection of a retrograde transducing CAV2-Cre virus into one brain region, combined with injection of a locally transducing Cre-dependent AAV virus into another brain region. This technique is widely applicable to the genetic dissection of neural circuitry, as it enables selective expression of candidate genes, dominant-negatives, fluorescent reporters, or genetic tools within heterogeneous populations of neurons based upon their projection targets.

  18. Transcriptional activity of novel ALDH1L1 promoters in the rat brain following AAV vector-mediated gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janitha M Mudannayake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member L1 (ALDH1L1 is a recently characterized pan-astrocytic marker that is more homogenously expressed throughout the brain than the classic astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. We generated putative promoter sequence variants of the rat ALDH1L1 gene for use in adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, with an aim to achieve selective regulation of transgene expression in astrocytes in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, ALDH1L1 promoter variants mediated transcriptional activity exclusively in neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as assessed by luciferase reporter expression at 3 weeks postvector infusion. This selectivity for neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta also persisted in the context of adeno-associated viral serotype 5, 8 or 9 vector-mediated gene delivery. An in vivo promoter comparison showed the highest performing ALDH1L1 promoter variant mediated higher transgene expression than the neuronal-specific synapsin 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase promoters. The ALDH1L1 promoter was also transcriptionally active in dentate granule neurons following intrahippocampal adeno-associated viral vector infusion, whereas transgene expression was detected in both striatal neurons and astrocytes following vector infusion into the striatum. Our results demonstrate the potential suitability of the ALDH1L1 promoter as a new tool in the development of gene therapy and disease modelling applications.

  19. Pre-Clinical Development of BCG.HIVACAT, an Antibiotic-Free Selection Strain, for HIV-TB Pediatric Vaccine Vectored by Lysine Auxotroph of BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saubi, Narcís; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Gea-Mallorqui, Ester; Rosario, Maximillian; Gatell, Josep Maria; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT) system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer) strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVACAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs). We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVACAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVACAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVACAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVACAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth. PMID:22927933

  20. Pre-clinical development of BCG.HIVA(CAT, an antibiotic-free selection strain, for HIV-TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcís Saubi

    Full Text Available In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVA(CAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA(CAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVA(CAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA(CAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA(CAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVA(CAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVA(CAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth.

  1. A new expression vector facilitating production and functional analysis of scFv antibody fragments selected from Tomlinson I+J phagemid libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossysek, Karolina; Uchański, Tomasz; Kulesza, Małgorzata; Bzowska, Monika; Klaus, Tomasz; Woś, Klaudia; Madej, Mariusz; Bereta, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Tomlinson I+J are synthetic phagemid human scFv libraries widely employed to obtain specific antibody fragments via a phage display method. The pIT2/HB2151 expression system proposed by the designers of the libraries has certain drawbacks which result in the lack of expression or low expression levels of numerous soluble scFvs. At the stage of scFv screening, this may lead to losing some excellent antibodies, which can be avoided but requires laborious and expensive work. Here we present a new, pET-30-based vector, which is compatible with Tomlinson libraries, retains all virtues of pIT2 used as a plasmid and eliminates all its flaws. We demonstrate that pET-scFv-T is frequently superior to pIT2 in terms of efficient scFv expression. Moreover, an amber suppressor bacterial strain, RosettaBlue(DE3)pLysS, transformed with the new vector, pET-scFv-T, coding for a number of scFvs, produces substantial amounts of functional, easy to purify recombinant antibody fragments, regardless of whether their coding sequences contain amber codons. Thus, pET-scFv-T/RosettaBlue(DE3)pLysS expression system seems to be a perfect tool for screening for the finest soluble scFvs selected from Tomlinson I+J, as well as from many other phagemid libraries. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Kernel parameter variation-based selective ensemble support vector data description for oil spill detection on the ocean via hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Faruk Sukru

    2017-07-01

    Oil spills on the ocean surface cause serious environmental, political, and economic problems. Therefore, these catastrophic threats to marine ecosystems require detection and monitoring. Hyperspectral sensors are powerful optical sensors used for oil spill detection with the help of detailed spectral information of materials. However, huge amounts of data in hyperspectral imaging (HSI) require fast and accurate computation methods for detection problems. Support vector data description (SVDD) is one of the most suitable methods for detection, especially for large data sets. Nevertheless, the selection of kernel parameters is one of the main problems in SVDD. This paper presents a method, inspired by ensemble learning, for improving performance of SVDD without tuning its kernel parameters. Additionally, a classifier selection technique is proposed to get more gain. The proposed approach also aims to solve the small sample size problem, which is very important for processing high-dimensional data in HSI. The algorithm is applied to two HSI data sets for detection problems. In the first HSI data set, various targets are detected; in the second HSI data set, oil spill detection in situ is realized. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and performance improvement of the proposed algorithm for oil spill detection problems.

  3. Efficient genetic transformation of Lotus corniculatus L. using a direct shoot regeneration protocol, stepwise hygromycin B selection, and a super-binary Agrobacterium tumefaciens vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Radomirka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotyledons from 6-day-old Lotus corniculatus cv. Bokor seedlings, transversally cut into two halves, were capa­ble of regenerating buds without intervening callus formation. The explants were co-cultivated with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404/pTOK233 superbinary vector carrying the uidA-intron gene and the genes hpt and nptII. They were cultured for 14 days on a regeneration medium, then subjected to a stepwise hygromycin B selection procedure consisting of gradually increasing antibiotic concentrations (5-15 mg L-1 over 21 weeks. Transformed shoots were obtained within 5 months after co-cultivation. Out of 124 initially co-cultivated explants, 52 (42% plants survived hygromycin B selection. The presence of transgenes in regenerated plants was verified by β-glucuronidase histochemical assays and PCR analysis for the presence of uidA gene sequences. Hygromycin B-resistant and PCR-positive T0 plants were cultured in the greenhouse to produce flowers and seeds. The obtained data demonstrate that the reported transformation protocol could be useful for introducing agriculturally important genes into the new L. corniculatus cultivar Bokor.

  4. Large-System Analysis of Joint User Selection and Vector Precoding with Zero-Forcing Transmit Beamforming for MIMO Broadcast Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Keigo; Kawabata, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) broadcast channels (BCs) (MIMO-BCs) with perfect channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter are considered. As joint user selection (US) and vector precoding (VP) (US-VP) with zero-forcing transmit beamforming (ZF-BF), US and continuous VP (CVP) (US-CVP) and data-dependent US (DD-US) are investigated. The replica method, developed in statistical physics, is used to analyze the energy penalties for the two US-VP schemes in the large-system limit, where the number of users, the number of selected users, and the number of transmit antennas tend to infinity with their ratios kept constant. Four observations are obtained in the large-system limit: First, the assumptions of replica symmetry (RS) and 1-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) for DD-US can provide acceptable approximations for low and moderate system loads, respectively. Secondly, DD-US outperforms CVP with random US in terms of the energy penalty for low-to-moderate system loads. Thirdly, the asymptotic en...

  5. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  6. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  7. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  8. Expanding specificity of class I restricted CD8+ T cells for viral epitopes following multiple inoculations of swine with a human adenovirus vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse E.; Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary

    2016-01-01

    class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer staining. We also showed that a modified replication defective human adenovirus 5 vector expressing the FMDV structural proteins (Ad5-FMDV-T vaccine) targets the induction of a CD8(+) CTL response with a minimal humoral response. In this report, we...... show that the specificity of the CD8(+) T cell response to Ad5-FMDV-T varies between cohorts of genetically identical animals. Further, we demonstrate epitope specificity of CD8(+) T cells expands following multiple immunizations with this vaccine....

  9. APOBEC3G induces a hypermutation gradient: purifying selection at multiple steps during HIV-1 replication results in levels of G-to-A mutations that are high in DNA, intermediate in cellular viral RNA, and low in virion RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak Vinay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring Vif variants that are unable to inhibit the host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G have been isolated from infected individuals. A3G can potentially induce G-to-A hypermutation in these viruses, and hypermutation could contribute to genetic variation in HIV-1 populations through recombination between hypermutant and wild-type genomes. Thus, hypermutation could contribute to the generation of immune escape and drug resistant variants, but the genetic contribution of hypermutation to the viral evolutionary potential is poorly understood. In addition, the mechanisms by which these viruses persist in the host despite the presence of A3G remain unknown. Results To address these questions, we generated a replication-competent HIV-1 Vif mutant in which the A3G-binding residues of Vif, Y40RHHY44, were substituted with five alanines. As expected, the mutant was severely defective in an A3G-expressing T cell line and exhibited a significant delay in replication kinetics. Analysis of viral DNA showed the expected high level of G-to-A hypermutation; however, we found substantially reduced levels of G-to-A hypermutation in intracellular viral RNA (cRNA, and the levels of G-to-A mutations in virion RNA (vRNA were even further reduced. The frequencies of hypermutation in DNA, cRNA, and vRNA were 0.73%, 0.12%, and 0.05% of the nucleotides sequenced, indicating a gradient of hypermutation. Additionally, genomes containing start codon mutations and early termination codons within gag were isolated from the vRNA. Conclusion These results suggest that sublethal levels of hypermutation coupled with purifying selection at multiple steps during the early phase of viral replication lead to the packaging of largely unmutated genomes, providing a mechanism by which mutant Vif variants can persist in infected individuals. The persistence of genomes containing mutated gag genes despite this selection pressure indicates that dual

  10. Viral Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Packaging HIV- or FIV-based lentivector expression constructs and transduction of VSV-G pseudotyped viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Amy; Lesnik, Jacob; Mukherjee, Chandreyee; Antes, Travis; Sengupta, Ranjita

    2012-04-08

    As with standard plasmid vectors, it is possible to transfect lentivectors in plasmid form into cells with low-to-medium efficiency to obtain transient expression of effectors. Packaging lentiviral expression constructs into pseudoviral particles, however, enables up to 100% transduction, even with difficult-to-transfect cells, such as primary, stem, and differentiated cells. Moreover, the lentiviral delivery does not produce the specific cellular responses typically associated with chemical transfections, such as cell death resulting from toxicity of the transfection reagent. When transduced into target cells, the lentiviral construct integrates into genomic DNA and provides stable expression of the small hairpin RNA (shRNA), cDNA, microRNA or reporter gene. Target cells stably expressing the effector molecule can be isolated using a selectable marker contained in the expression vector construct such as puromycin or GFP. After pseudoviral particles infect target cells, they cannot replicate within target cells because the viral structural genes are absent and the long terminal repeats (LTRs) are designed to be self-inactivating upon transduction. There are three main components necessary for efficient lentiviral packaging. 1. The lentiviral expression vector that contains some of the genetic elements required for packaging, stable integration of the viral expression construct into genomic DNA, and expression of the effector or reporter. 2. The lentiviral packaging plasmids that provide the proteins essential for transcription and packaging of an RNA copy of the expression construct into recombinant pseudoviral particles. This protocol uses the pPACK plasmids (SBI) that encode for gag, pol, and rev from the HIV or FIV genome and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus g protein (VSV-G) for the viral coat protein. 3. 293TN producer cells (derived from HEK293 cells) that express the SV40 large T antigen, which is required for high-titer lentiviral production and a neomycin

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  15. Selective breeding provides an approach to increase resistance of rainbow trout ( Onchorhynchus mykiss ) to the diseases, enteric redmouth disease, rainbow trout fry syndrome, and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henryon, M.; Berg, P.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we reasoned that if we challenged rainbow trout with the causative agents of enteric redmouth disease (ERM), rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS), and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), we would: 1) detect additive genetic variation for resistance to ERM, RTFS, and VHS; and 2) find......, RTFS, and VHS will be successful, providing a complementary approach to control these diseases. The weak genetic correlations suggest that it should be relatively easy to improve resistance to each of the diseases simultaneously.......In this study, we reasoned that if we challenged rainbow trout with the causative agents of enteric redmouth disease (ERM), rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS), and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), we would: 1) detect additive genetic variation for resistance to ERM, RTFS, and VHS; and 2) find...... that resistance of the trout to ERM and RTFS are favourably correlated genetically, while resistance to VHS is unfavourably correlated with resistance to ERM and RTFS. We tested these premises by challenging 63 full-sib families of rainbow trout (50 sires, 38 dams) with Yersinia ruckeri, Flavobacterium...

  16. Safety profile of the viral vectors of attenuated fowlpox strain FP9 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara recombinant for either of 2 preerythrocytic malaria antigens, ME-TRAP or the circumsporozoite protein, in children and adults in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejon, Philip; Peshu, Norbert; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lowe, Brett S; Molyneux, Catherine S; Forsdyke, John; Lang, Trudie; Hill, Adrian V S; Marsh, Kevin

    2006-04-15

    We are developing a heterologous prime-boost vaccine strategy against malaria. This approach uses sequential immunization with different vectors to deliver a common preerythrocytic malaria antigen. Preliminary evidence of efficacy and safety has been previously documented in studies from an area where malaria is nonendemic. Additional safety data from an area where malaria is endemic are now required before larger-scale studies are undertaken to determine the efficacy of this vaccine strategy in the field. Other modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) recombinants and prime-boost immunizations are being developed as vaccines against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, tuberculosis, and cancer, and MVA is a candidate attenuated smallpox vaccine. Candidate vaccines against malaria were intradermally administered to 73 adults (7 of whom were HIV positive) and 22 children in Kenya. These vaccines used the attenuated fowlpox strain FP9 and the MVA recombinant for either of 2 preerythrocytic malaria antigens, multiple preerythrocytic-stage epitopes joined with the preerythrocytic-stage antigen TRAP (ME-TRAP) and the circumsporozoite protein (CS). Adverse events were recorded. Reactogenicity was mild. MVA caused less frequent and less severe cutaneous reaction if given after FP9 priming. Half doses reduced the frequency and the severity of systemic reactogenicity, and particular vaccine lots were associated with different reactogenicities. Unexpectedly, prior immunity to the ME-TRAP antigen appeared to be protective against local reactions after immunization. Where the final intention is to use MVA after FP9 priming, previous testing of MVA alone overestimates reactogenicity. These recombinant vectors appear to be safe and suitable for use in larger-scale studies of children in Africa and of HIV-positive individuals.

  17. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors and Their Use for Neuroscience Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Mónica S; Satterfield, Rachel; Young, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience research has been revolutionized by the use of recombinant viral vector technology from the basic, preclinical and clinical levels. Currently, multiple recombinant viral vector types are employed with each having its strengths and weaknesses depending on the proposed application. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HdAd) are emerging as ideal viral vectors that solve a major need in the neuroscience field: (1) expression of transgenes that are too large to be packaged by other viral vectors and (2) rapid onset of transgene expression in the absence of cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the methods for large-scale production of HdAd viral vectors for in vivo use with neurospecific transgene expression.

  18. Viral lysis of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lønborg, C.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2013-01-01

    The viral mediated transformation of phytoplankton organic carbon to dissolved forms (“viral shunt”) has been suggested as a major source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine systems. Despite the potential implications of viral activity on the global carbon fluxes, studies investigating

  19. Improved NYVAC-based vaccine vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen V Kibler

    Full Text Available While as yet there is no vaccine against HIV/AIDS, the results of the phase III Thai trial (RV144 have been encouraging and suggest that further improvements of the prime/boost vaccine combination of a poxvirus and protein are needed. With this aim, in this investigation we have generated derivatives of the candidate vaccinia virus vaccine vector NYVAC with potentially improved functions. This has been achieved by the re-incorporation into the virus genome of two host range genes, K1L and C7L, in conjunction with the removal of the immunomodulatory viral molecule B19, an antagonist of type I interferon action. These novel virus vectors, referred to as NYVAC-C-KC and NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R, have acquired relevant biological characteristics, giving higher levels of antigen expression in infected cells, replication-competency in human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts, activation of selective host cell signal transduction pathways, and limited virus spread in tissues. Importantly, these replication-competent viruses have been demonstrated to maintain a highly attenuated phenotype.

  20. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  1. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, J.R.; Midtlyng, Paul J.; Brown, F.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  2. Adeno-associated viral gene delivery in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Marongiu, Roberta; Musatov, Sergei A; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    The advent of viral gene therapy technology has contributed greatly to the study of a variety of medical conditions, and there is increasing promise for clinical translation of gene therapy into human treatments. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors provide one of the more promising approaches to gene delivery, and have been used extensively over the last 20 years. Derived from nonpathogenic parvoviruses, these vectors allow for stable and robust expression of desired transgenes in vitro and in vivo. AAV vectors efficiently and stably transduce neurons, with some strains targeting neurons exclusively in the brain. Thus, AAV vectors are particularly useful for neurodegenerative diseases, which have led to numerous preclinical studies and several human trials of gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and pediatric neurogenetic disorders. Here, we describe an efficient and reliable method for the production and purification of AAV serotype 2 vectors for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  3. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Ad P J M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2006-05-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools isolated from uninfected and virus-infected cells. Here we report on a powerful strategy aiming at the rapid, unambiguous identification of naturally processed MHC class I-associated peptides, which are induced by viral infection. The methodology, stable isotope tagging of epitopes (SITE), is based on metabolic labeling of endogenously synthesized proteins during infection. This is accomplished by culturing virus-infected cells with stable isotope-labeled amino acids that are expected to be anchor residues (i.e. residues of the peptide that have amino acid side chains that bind into pockets lining the peptide-binding groove of the MHC class I molecule) for the human leukocyte antigen allele of interest. Subsequently these cells are mixed with an equal number of non-infected cells, which are cultured in normal medium. Finally peptides are acid-eluted from immunoprecipitated MHC molecules and subjected to two-dimensional nanoscale LC-MS analysis. Virus-induced peptides are identified through computer-assisted detection of characteristic, binomially distributed ratios of labeled and unlabeled molecules. Using this approach we identified novel measles virus and respiratory syncytial virus epitopes as well as infection-induced self-peptides in several cell types, showing that SITE is a unique and versatile method for unequivocal identification of disease-related MHC class I epitopes.

  4. [Protective effect of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated expression of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat neurons against beta-amyloid-induced Alzheimer's disease in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-hui; Ma, Dong-liang; Jin, Hui; Ma, Yan-bing; Hu, Hai-tao

    2006-10-01

    To achieve expression of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) and explore the mechanism of its neuroprotective effects in rat neurons against beta-amyloid-induced Alzheimer's disease. Using molecular cloning technique, rAAV vector containing hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed to transfect SD rat hippocampal neurons exposed to beta-amyloid treatment. The changes in cell apoptosis were observed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, and the expression of hBDNF and Bcl-2 protein were determined by immunocytochemical staining. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to observe the changes of [Ca(2+)](i). The cultured rat hippocampal neurons were effectively transfected with AAV-hBDNF and expression of BDNF protein was obviously increased. hBNDF expression showed significant protective effects against beta-amyloid-induced neuronal damage, and the expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased significantly and the balance of [Ca(2+)](i) was maintained in BDNF-treated cells with beta-amyloid exposure. hBDNF expression can effectively protect cultured rat hippocampal cells from beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis through inhibiting the intracellular calcium overload and increasing the expression of Bcl-2 protein.

  5. Viral Marketing Past Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Nessipbekova, Zarina

    2010-01-01

    The work studies the viral marketing. These are past viral campaigns, viral campaigns today, and evaluates their actuality. The work tries to predict the development of viral marketing on the basis of the research done by the author.

  6. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Knockin Application in Cell Therapy: A Non-viral Procedure for Bystander Treatment of Glioma in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Meca-Cortés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-viral procedures, together with CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing technology, allows the insertion of single-copy therapeutic genes at pre-determined genomic sites, overcoming safety limitations resulting from random gene insertions of viral vectors with potential for genome damage. In this study, we demonstrate that combination of non-viral gene delivery and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockin via homology-directed repair can replace the use of viral vectors for the generation of genetically modified therapeutic cells. We custom-modified human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs, using electroporation as a transfection method and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockin for the introduction and stable expression of a 3 kb DNA fragment including the eGFP (selectable marker and a variant of the herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase genes (therapeutic gene, under the control of the human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter in exon 5 of the endogenous thymidine kinase 2 gene. Using a U87 glioma model in SCID mice, we show that the therapeutic capacity of the new CRISPR/Cas9-engineered hAMSCs is equivalent to that of therapeutic hAMSCs generated by introduction of the same therapeutic gene by transduction with a lentiviral vector previously published by our group. This strategy should be of general use to other applications requiring genetic modification of therapeutic cells.

  8. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  9. In vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation of antiviral medicinal plants using a vector-based assay technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimone, C O; Grunwald, T; Wildner, O; Nchinda, G; Tippler, B; Proksch, P; Uberla, K

    2005-01-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly being projected as suitable alternative sources of antiviral agents. The development of a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic screening technique could contribute to rapid identification of potential bioactive plants and also to the standardization and/or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profiling of the bioactive components. Recombinant viral vectors (lentiviral, retroviral and adenoviral) transferring the firefly luciferase gene were constructed and the inhibition of viral vector infectivity by various concentrations of plant extracts was evaluated in HeLa or Hep2 cells by measuring the changes in luciferase activity. Cytotoxicity of the extracts was evaluated in parallel on HeLa or Hep2 cells stably expressing luciferase. Amongst the 15 extracts screened, only the methanol (ME) and the ethyl acetate (ET) fractions of the lichen, Ramalina farinacea specifically reduced lentiviral and adenoviral infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Further, chromatographic fractionation of ET into four fractions (ET1-ET4) revealed only ET4 to be selectively antiviral with an IC50 in the 20 microg ml(-1) range. Preliminary mechanistic studies based on the addition of the extracts at different time points in the viral infection cycle (kinetic studies) revealed that the inhibitory activity was highest if extract and vectors were preincubated prior to infection, suggesting that early steps in the lentiviral or adenoviral replication cycle could be the major target of ET4. Inhibition of wild-type HIV-1 was also observed at a 10-fold lower concentration of the extract. The vector-based assay is a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation technique for antiviral medicinal plants. The technique has successfully demonstrated the presence of antiviral principles in R. farinacea. Potential anti-HIV medicinal plants could rapidly be evaluated with the reported vector-based technique. The lichen, R. farinacea could represent a lead source of antiviral

  10. Enhancers Are Major Targets for Murine Leukemia Virus Vector Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ravin, Suk See; Su, Ling; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Macpherson, Janet L.; Poidinger, Michael; Symonds, Geoff; Pond, Susan M.; Ferris, Andrea L.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviral vectors have been used in successful gene therapies. However, in some patients, insertional mutagenesis led to leukemia or myelodysplasia. Both the strong promoter/enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors and the vector-specific integration site preferences played an important role in these adverse clinical events. MLV integration is known to prefer regions in or near transcription start sites (TSS). Recently, BET family proteins were shown to be the major cellular proteins responsible for targeting MLV integration. Although MLV integration sites are significantly enriched at TSS, only a small fraction of the MLV integration sites (integration map of more than one million integration sites from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a clinically relevant MLV-based vector. The integration sites form ∼60,000 tight clusters. These clusters comprise ∼1.9% of the genome. The vast majority (87%) of the integration sites are located within histone H3K4me1 islands, a hallmark of enhancers. The majority of these clusters also have H3K27ac histone modifications, which mark active enhancers. The enhancers of some oncogenes, including LMO2, are highly preferred targets for integration without in vivo selection. IMPORTANCE We show that active enhancer regions are the major targets for MLV integration; this means that MLV preferentially integrates in regions that are favorable for viral gene expression in a variety of cell types. The results provide insights for MLV integration target site selection and also explain the high risk of insertional mutagenesis that is associated with gene therapy trials using MLV vectors. PMID:24501411

  11. Retroviral Vectors: Post Entry Events and Genomic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof von Kalle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The curative potential of retroviral vectors for somatic gene therapy has been demonstrated impressively in several clinical trials leading to sustained long-term correction of the underlying genetic defect. Preclinical studies and clinical monitoring of gene modified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in patients have shown that biologically relevant vector induced side effects, ranging from in vitro immortalization to clonal dominance and oncogenesis in vivo, accompany therapeutic efficiency of integrating retroviral gene transfer systems. Most importantly, it has been demonstrated that the genotoxic potential is not identical among all retroviral vector systems designed for clinical application. Large scale viral integration site determination has uncovered significant differences in the target site selection of retrovirus subfamilies influencing the propensity for inducing genetic alterations in the host genome. In this review we will summarize recent insights gained on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis based on intrinsic target site selection of different retrovirus families. We will also discuss examples of side effects occurring in ongoing human gene therapy trials and future prospectives in the field.

  12. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  13. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    for generation of a reference beam, a detector system comprising a first detector arrangement arranged in such a way that the signal beam and the reference beam are incident upon the first detector arrangement with the reference beam propagating at an angle relative to a signal beam, and wherein the first......The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...... assembly for emission of a measurement beam for illumination of an object in a measurement volume with coherent light whereby a signal beam emanating from the object in the measurement volume is formed in response to illumination of the object by the measurement beam, a reference beam generator...

  14. Virus-based transient expression vectors for woody crops: a new frontier for vector design and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William O; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2013-01-01

    Virus-based expression vectors are commonplace tools for the production of proteins or the induction of RNA silencing in herbaceous plants. This review considers a completely different set of uses for viral vectors in perennial fruit and nut crops, which can be productive for periods of up to 100 years. Viral vectors could be used in the field to modify existing plants. Furthermore, with continually emerging pathogens and pests, viral vectors could express genes to protec