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Sample records for videotaped teaching patients

  1. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

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    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  2. Videotape review: a valuable tool for self-assessment of teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleffner, J H; Hendricson, W D; Littlefield, J H; Hudepohl, N

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes the components of an instructor improvement program known as VISIT (Videotaping Instruction for Self-Assessment of Instructional Technique). Through the use of videotape recordings of classroom, laboratory or clinical teaching and observation by trained observers, faculty can pinpoint instructional strengths and problem areas, plan refinements and evaluate the impact of these refinements. Ten years of experience with VISIT indicates that post-lecture consultation sessions between the instructor and observer are vital to the success of this activity.

  3. Impact of customized videotape education on quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Thomas L; Dempsey, Edward C; Collins, Timothy; Pluss, William; Lipkus, Isaac; Cutter, Gary R; Chalmers, Robin; Mitchell, Amy; Weil, Kenneth C

    2006-01-01

    To compare the impact of a library of pulmonary rehabilitation videotapes versus an older videotape and usual care on quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living in persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Two hundred fourteen patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis were recruited and randomized to receive customized videotapes, standard videotapes, or usual care. Outcome measures included the Fatigue Impact Scale, Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire, and the SF-36(R) Health Survey. Differences in coping skills and emotional functioning on the Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire were found among the 174 subjects who completed the study. The customized videotape group improved by 8.6 and 4.8 points, respectively, whereas the score of the other groups decreased by less than 1 point for the coping skills, and the scores of the standard video and the control groups decreased by 3.0 and 2.1 points, respectively, for emotional functioning (P Impact Scale also improved for the customized videotape group, whereas the scores of the others remained unchanged. Videotape users demonstrated better conversion to and retention of exercise habits, with over 80% of customized videotape subjects who reported exercise habits at baseline continuing the habits as compared with 40% in the usual care group. Sedentary subjects at baseline were more likely to begin and maintain exercise if randomized to videotapes. These findings demonstrate increased quality of life, lower fatigue, and better compliance with a prescribed exercise regimen among subjects using the customized videotapes. There was a significant improvement in emotional functioning and coping skills among customized videotape subjects.

  4. Teaching diagnostic reasoning: using a classroom-as-clinic methodology with videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neistadt, M E; Smith, R E

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a "classroom-as-clinic" format, using videotaped occupational therapy evaluations, on students' diagnostic reasoning skills. In the classroom-as-clinic format, students write a problem list on the basis of preliminary client information before viewing the videotape. A post-hoc experimental design was used to compare the accuracy of treatment plan problem lists for two groups of senior occupational therapy students--one group viewed two videotapes of client-therapist interactions without a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 82), and one group viewed the same videotapes within the context of a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 45). Both groups viewed the same two videotapes. Videotape 1 was of a client with a brain stem infarct, and Videotape 2 was of a client with traumatic brain injury. Subjects experiencing a classroom-as-clinic format identified significantly more occupational therapy problems for Videotape 1 than those who did not have preevaluation information. There was no significant difference between the two subject groups in the accuracy of their problem lists for Videotape 2. Only subjects in the non-classroom-as-clinic group showed a significant improvement from Videotape 1 to Videotape 2 in occupational therapy problem identification. This study suggests that to be truly effective when used videotapes, the classroom-as-clinic methodology needs to be combined with explicit coaching in problem sensing and problem definition.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

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    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Garima; Sehgal, Stuti

    2012-01-30

    Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A) the video group, and B) the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  7. The effect of videotaping students' interviews with patients for interview skill education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Ji Eun; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Park, Ki Heum; Sung, Nak-Jin

    2013-03-01

    The importance of communication between patients and physicians has been proven in many previous studies. The authors analyzed the effect of interview skill education through videotapes which recorded students' interviews with real patients in the outpatient department of family medicine. This study was conducted with all students who chose the elective course of family medicine and one randomly selected student every week from an 'infectious internal medicine' class at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital during the period from December 2008 to March 2011. All students performed a preliminary examination of a new patient at the outpatient department of family medicine. All consultations were videotaped. Feedback to the student was given on the same day by viewing the videotape together. After feedback, all students performed another preliminary examination of one new patient at the department of family medicine the same week. Three family medicine residents scored all videotapes using 10-item interview skill checklists. Many parts of the checklists were modified using the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scales. Thirty-three students participated. Of 10 items, nine showed increased scores after feedback. There was a significant change in four items after feedback: 'type of question' (before 2.36 ± 0.60, after 2.73 ± 0.72), 'timeline' (before 2.82 ± 0.68, after 3.18 ± 0.73), 'positive verbal reinforcement' (before 2.24 ± 0.56, after 2.61 ± 0.90), and the total score (before 21.70 ± 2.62, after 23.39 ± 3.13) (P skills using videotapes of students' preliminary consultations with real patients in outpatient settings, was effective in improving the interview areas of 'type of question,' 'timeline,' 'positive verbal reinforcement,' and the total interview scores.

  8. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical…

  9. A Videotape Series for Teaching Physicians to Evaluate Sexually Abused Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jerry G.; Garrett, Judy; Worthington, Toss

    2004-01-01

    A free videotape subscription series was utilized to increase the knowledge of general physicians in clinical practice about the medical evaluation of sexually abused children. Of the 65 physicians who requested the first tape, 39 (60%) completed it. Fourteen of the 39 physicians who completed the first tape (36%) completed the 5-tape series.…

  10. Scars. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This 40-minute videotape tackles the issue of childhood bullying and unwanted teasing and torment. This videotape features real school children handling dramatic roles, and "doing the right thing" (aka "positive modeling.") The film is divided into two distinct parts: first act themes include bullying, girl bullies, children without one or both…

  11. Patients, doctors, and videotape: a prescription for creating optimal healing environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Sung, Sue Hee; Hsu, John T

    2005-01-01

    Despite repeated calls for greater patient autonomy, shared decision making, and exploration of patient preferences, relatively little is known about how patients actually experience care as a face-to-face interactional process. A selected review of the literature in this area suggests that important asymmetries exist. Key among them is the tendency to report experiences from the point of view of only one member of the doctor-patient dyad. Thus, patients might report on their experiences of the system gone awry or professionals might attempt to understand the root cause(s) of an error by describing the conditions under which it occurred. Either way, information about the experience of care tends to be reported as a "my side" telling. Optimal healing environments are defined as health care contexts that are based upon mutual respect and build positive, resilient relationships among participants, using the qualities and resources of those relationships to enhance health. Understanding optimal healing environments also requires a knowledge of how doctors and patients share time and space together in the consultation (an etic or outsider perspective) and also a knowledge of the participants' experience of their time together (an emic or insider perspective). After reviewing its methodological roots, the IMPACT approach (Interactive Methodology for Preserving and Analyzing Clinical Transactions) using videotaped encounters along with independent commentaries by participants is described and applied in two different types of analyses: one in which the doctor-patient dyad is the unit of measure; the second in which physicians are stratified by having historically high or low satisfaction scores. In the latter approach, doctors' and patients' comments are compared across strata. At the dyadic level, and despite large gaps in income and social status, doctors and patients exhibit a strong tendency to cluster in terms of where they comment, so much so that in a pilot study

  12. Tale of the Tape: International Teaching Assistant Noticing during Videotaped Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gwendolyn M.; Case, Rod E.

    2015-01-01

    International teaching assistants face challenges in learning the norms for teaching in American universities. In order to address this learning curve this article describes a qualitative study of twenty international teaching assistants that examined how these participants viewed observations as part of their professional development. The study…

  13. Evaluating the Utility of Commercial Videotapes for Teaching Hand Washing to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Nancy E.; Schwartz, Ilene S.; Davis, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of using a commercially available video model to teach three preschoolers with autism to wash their hands. While one child learned 80% of the hand washing steps, 2 of the 3 children did not learn from the commercial model. All were subsequently exposed to a customized video model, which resulted in at least some…

  14. Training Parents with Videotapes: Recognizing Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brandon W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Among the many methods of teaching skills to parents of disruptive children, videotape modeling of specific parent-child interaction sequences has been particularly effective. Given the likelihood of timeout resistance in defiant children, the authors tested the effectiveness of videotape parent training with a sample of clinic referred,…

  15. The Carrot Highway [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Ron

    "The Carrot Highway" is a 40-minute award-winning videotape that takes viewers on a whirlwind tour around the world to tell the story of the carrot. This videotape reveals the carrot in all its glory by cleverly integrating live-action, music, animation, videotape footage, and games. Viewers travel with a troupe of animated carrot characters to…

  16. Promoting Student Teachers' Content Related Knowledge in Teaching Systems Thinking: Measuring Effects of an Intervention through Evaluating a Videotaped Lesson

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    Rosenkränzer, Frank; Kramer, Tim; Hörsch, Christian; Schuler, Stephan; Rieß, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of complex, dynamic and animate systems has a special standing in education for sustainable development and biology. Thus one important role of science teacher education is to promote student teachers' Content Related Knowledge (CRK) for teaching systems thinking, consisting of extensive Content Knowledge (CK) and well formed…

  17. Reliability of videotaped observational gait analysis in patients with orthopedic impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Uden, C. van; Moorsel, S. van; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, visual gait observation is often used to determine gait disorders and to evaluate treatment. Several reliability studies on observational gait analysis have been described in the literature and generally showed moderate reliability. However, patients with orthopedic

  18. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bakker Dinny H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners' (GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for providing mental health care. We investigated if GPs who feel burnt out or dissatisfied with the time available for their patients, are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose their distress, and have shorter consultations, in order to gain time and energy. This may result in less psychological evaluations of patients' complaints. Methods We used 1890 videotaped consultations from a nationally representative sample of 126 Dutch GPs to analyse GPs' communication and the duration of their consultations. Burnout was subdivided into emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced accomplishment. Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate which subgroups of GPs differed significantly. Results GPs with feelings of exhaustion or dissatisfaction with the available time have longer consultations compared to GPs without these feelings. Exhausted GPs, and GPs with feelings of depersonalisation, talk more about psychological or social topics in their consultations. GPs with feelings of reduced accomplishment are an exception: they communicate less affectively, are less patient-centred and have less eye contact with their patients compared to GPs without reduced accomplishment. We found no relationship between GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the available time and their psychological evaluations of patients' problems. Conclusion GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the time available for their patients do not obstruct their diagnosis and awareness of patients' psychological problems. On the contrary, GPs with high levels of exhaustion or depersonalisation, and GPs who are dissatisfied with the

  19. How we teach the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, C; Lingiardi, V; Orlandini, A

    1991-01-01

    Since the reform of the Italian medical degree in 1988, fourth-year students now study the dynamics of the doctor-patient relationship as part of the compulsory 'methodology of the clinical, therapeutic, prevention and rehabilitation approach' course. This work illustrates a pilot scheme carried out at the Milan University Medical School and begun shortly before the reform of the Italian medical degree. In dealing with the teaching of the doctor-patient relationship, the authors look into a relational-psychological perspective which is supported by notions and instruments intrinsic to medical pedagogy. The work is handled along three main lines: (a) presentation of a relational teaching model and definition of teaching objectives; (b) presentation of the methods and techniques used (role-playing, videotape recordings, video simulation and group work); and (c) discussion on the evaluation criteria.

  20. Space Science in Action: Astronomy [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape recording teaches students about constellations, star movement, and how scientists have studied celestial bodies throughout history from Ptolemy to Copernicus to the work of the Hubble Space Telescope. An interview with Kathy Thornton, one of the astronauts who repaired the Hubble while in orbit, is featured. A hands-on activity…

  1. Effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education: a systematic review and practice guideline recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Audrey Jusko; Cosby, Roxanne; Boyko, Susan; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Turnbull, Gale

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE). A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games, computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration, and role playing. Methods of delivery focused on how to deliver the teaching strategies. Teaching strategies that increased knowledge, decreased anxiety, and increased satisfaction included computer technology, audio and videotapes, written materials, and demonstrations. Various teaching strategies used in combination were similarly successful. Moreover, structured-, culturally appropriate- and patient-specific teachings were found to be better than ad hoc teaching or generalized teaching. Findings provide guidance for establishing provincial standards for the delivery of PE. Recommendations concerning the efficacy of the teaching strategies and delivery methods are provided.

  2. Shifts in doctor-patient communication between 1986 and 2002: a study of videotaped General Practice consultations with hypertension patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.; Tromp, F.; Dulmen, S. van; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Verheul, W.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Departing from the hypotheses that over the past decades patients have become more active participants and physicians have become more task-oriented, this study tries to identify shifts in GP and patient communication patterns between 1986 and 2002. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional

  3. Shifts in doctor-patient communication between 1986 and 2002:a study of videotaped general practice consultations with hypertension patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Tromp, F.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Verheul, W.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Departing from the hypotheses that over the past decades patients have become more active participants and physicians have become more task-oriented, this study tries to identify shifts in GP and patient communication patterns between 1986 and 2002. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional

  4. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  5. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, E.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bakker, D.H. de; Meer, K. van der; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: General practitioners' (GPs') feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for

  6. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, Else M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; de Bakker, Dinny H.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: General practitioners' (GPs') feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for

  7. Videotaped evaluation of eyedrop instillation in glaucoma patients with visual impairment or moderate to severe visual field loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Amy L; Katz, Joanne; Covert, David; Protzko, Colleen; Robin, Alan L

    2010-12-01

    Objectively evaluate the ability of visually disabled glaucoma patients to successfully administer a single drop onto their eye. Prospective, observational study. Experienced glaucoma patients with Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity (VA) of ≤ 6/18 (≤ 20/60) ≥ 1 eye, or moderate or severe visual field damage in ≥ 1 eye. Subjects were "low vision" (20/60 ≤ VA 6 months. Subjects used a mean of 1.9 ± 1.1 bottles of intraocular pressure-lowering medications to treat their glaucoma. Seventy-six percent (155/204) of subjects had severe visual field damage, with a mean deviation of -14.5 ± 8.0. Twenty-six percent (54/204) had acuity of ≤ 20/200 in ≥ 1 eye, and subjects had a mean logarithm of minimal angle of resolution acuity of 0.8 ± 0.9. Seventy-one percent of subjects were able to get a drop onto the eye; only 39% instilled 1 drop onto the eye without touching the ocular surface, instilling a mean 1.4 ± 1.0 drops, using 1.2 ± 0.6 attempts. Of the 142 subjects who denied touching the bottle to the ocular surface, 24% did touch the bottle to the eye. Multiple factors were tested for ability to predict successful application of an eyedrop; however, only age (visually impaired glaucoma patients, we evaluated the difficulty this population has instilling eyedrops, most important, the use of multiple drops per instillation, potential contamination of a chronically used bottle, and poor patient understanding of the situation. Ability to self-administer eyedrops and cost considerations of wasted drops must be thought out before institution of glaucoma therapy. Efforts to determine better methods of eyedrop administration need to be undertaken. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Virtual Patients and Medical Teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Narváez, Yamile Reveiz

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical advancements have evolved to the point where teaching software may be implemented to represent real-life scenarios. Virtual Patients or VPs are software programs that simulate clinical scenarios allowing students to generate a diagnosis and make treatment decisions. In this article, advantages and disadvantages regarding the use of this state-of-the-art technology are discussed. VP is a useful technique for psychiatry students. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Videotaped recording as a method of participant observation in psychiatric nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latvala, E; Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes videotaped recording as a data collection method when conducting participant observation in a psychiatric nursing study. The videotaped episodes were part of the daily life of psychiatric nursing in a hospital environment. The advantages and limitations of using videotaped recording in nursing research will be discussed. This paper is based on two studies. The data consisted of 21 videotaped episodes of nursing report sessions or interdisciplinary team meetings in the psychiatric clinic of a university hospital. The participants consisted of patients, their significant others, nurses, doctors, social workers and physiotherapists. All videotaped material was transcribed verbatim. An essential advantage of videotaping is that most potentially useful interaction and behaviour can be captured. The advantage in terms of the credibility of videotaping was that the investigator was able to review the same videotaped situations again and again. Videotaped material is rich and provides several possibilities for analysing the data. In these studies data and source triangulation enabled the researchers to reduce personal influence on the results. The investigator must also be aware of the limitations concerning this method. The most essential limitations are mechanical problems and the influence of videotaping on behaviour. Careful ethical considerations are important concerning personal privacy, informed consent and respect for the self-determination of psychiatric patients.

  10. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  11. Evaluation of Videotaped and Live Theatre Auditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William C.

    Theatre auditions by 24 semifinalists in the 1980 Scholars in the Arts program were evaluated under two conditions. Four judges ranked the live auditions, while five evaluated videotapes of the same performance of the high school seniors. The auditions were videotaped in black and white. A single camera was used, fixed at an intermediate distance…

  12. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  13. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: Nurses′ experiences of teaching patients

    OpenAIRE

    Amnah Shubayra

    2015-01-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses′ experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study r...

  14. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  15. Video-Taped Instruction Creates Listening and Visual Memory Integration for Higher Reading and Math Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erland, Jan

    This pre-post quasi-experimental study was conducted in a public school 5th grade class to determine the effects of video-taped instruction in teaching analysis and pattern finding skills. Methodology included guidelines from Cognitive Behavior Modification, Suggestopedia, and Guilford's Structure of Intellect Model within the Kaufman and Kaufman…

  16. Patients' attitude towards bedside teaching in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Arwa; El Mhamdi, Sana; Bouanene, Ines; Sriha, Asma; Soltani, Mohamed

    2015-12-25

    To assess patient' reaction towards bedside teaching at the University Hospital of Monastir (Tunisia) and to identify the factors that may influence it. A cross-sectional study was conducted during December 2012 at the University Hospital of Monastir. Each department, except the psychiatric department and the intensive care units, was visited in one day. All inpatients present on the day of the study were interviewed by four trained female nurses using a structured questionnaire. Of the 401 patients approached, 356 (88.8%) agreed to participate. In general, the results demonstrate that patients were positive toward medical students' participation. The highest acceptance rates were found in situations where there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g. when reading their medical file, attending ward rounds and observing doctor examining them). As the degree of students' involvement increased, the refusal rate increased. Gender, age, educational level, marital status and the extent of students' involvement in patient's care were identified as the main factors affecting patients' attitude. Taking advantage of this attitude, valorizing patient role as educator and using further learning methods in situations where patient's consent for student involvement was not obtained should be considered to guarantee optimal care and safety to patients and good medical education to future physicians.

  17. Development of a Video Tape Teaching Module To Facilitate the Patient's Understanding of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Gertrude W.

    A practicum project was conducted to develop a method to enhance the knowledge base of targeted adult cancer patients entering into a treatment plan that included chemotherapy. The educational component necessary for informed consent by the patient had not been consistent; therefore, a videotape was developed containing general information common…

  18. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  19. Space Science in Action: Stars [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape recording shows students the many ways scientists look at the stars and how they can use what they see to answer questions such as What are stars made of?, How far away are they?, and How old are the stars? Students learn about the life span of stars and the various stages they pass through from protostar to main sequence star to…

  20. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  1. Videotaping the Lifespan of a Soap Bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Goran

    1995-01-01

    Describes how the use of a videotape to record the history of a soap bubble allows a study of many interesting events in considerable detail including interference fringes, convection and turbulence patterns on the surface, formation of black film, and the ultimate explosion of the bubble. (JRH)

  2. Adding Feminist Therapy to Videotape Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Jennifer L.; Yoder, Janice D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides directions for presenting a 32-minute series of four videotape segments that highlights the fundamental features of four approaches to psychotherapy, extending its reach to include a feminist perspective. Describes the approaches and included segments. Reports that students' comments demonstrate that the video sequence provided a helpful…

  3. Assessment of Waco, Texas FLIR videotape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Donald S.

    2001-09-01

    The FLIR video recorded by the FBI on 19 April 1993, records the final assault on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, and the fire in which some 80 members of the sect died. Attention has focused on a number of flashes recorded on the videotape. The author has examined the 1993 videotape and the recorded videotapes of the re-enactment conducted at Fort Hood, Texas on 19 March 2000. The following conclusions have been reached: 1) The flashes seen on the tape cannot be weapons muzzle flash. Their duration is far too long and their spatial extent is far too great. They are almost certainly the result of solar energy or heat energy form nearby vehicles reflected toward the FLIR by debris or puddles. 2) The FLIR video technology has a very low probability of detecting small arms muzzle flash. 3) As a consequence of 2) above, the absence of muzzle flash detection on the FLIR tape does not prove that no weapons were actually fired during the final assault. Indeed, there is ample evidence (not presented here) that the Davidians fired at the federal agents, but none of their muzzle flashes are detectable on the videotape.

  4. Copyright Handbook for Videotapes and Microcomputer Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, David; And Others

    Developed to help library media personnel, administrators, and educators understand and work with the copyright law as it applies to videotape and microcomputer software, this handbook provides: (1) an overview of copyright, including rights granted to copyright holders and libraries and court interpretation of the copyright law; (2) suggestions…

  5. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: Nurses′ experiences of teaching patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnah Shubayra

    2015-01-01

    In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  6. Predictors of Preservice Elementary Teacher Effectiveness in the Micro-Teaching of Mathematics Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Oakley D.; Littleton, Charles E.; Steiner, Robert L.; Woods, Emily S.

    1998-01-01

    Preservice elementary teachers were videotaped teaching three self-designed micro-teaching lessons to their peers, and the videotapes were rated by elementary mathematics-methods instructors. Mathematics methods course quiz average, mathematics anxiety score, and spatial ability were investigated as potential predictors of videotape ratings.…

  7. Nurses' perceptions of preoperative teaching for ambulatory surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Kar-yee; So, Winnie Kwok-wei

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine nurses' perceptions of the importance of providing preoperative information to ambulatory surgical patients, and factors that might influence their provision of such teaching. Ambulatory surgery is now widespread and creates a challenge for nurses to provide preoperative teaching in the limited contact time they have with patients. Although nurses act as key educators in patient teaching, little is known about their perceptions of the importance of preoperative teaching, or about current practice in the provision of such teaching for ambulatory surgical patients. A self-administered questionnaire including demographics and the Preoperative Teaching Questionnaire was completed by 91 of the 169 eligible nurses (response rate 53.8%) working in day-surgery units, operating theatres or outpatient clinics providing ambulatory surgery services in two public hospitals in Hong Kong in 2005. A discrepancy between nurses' perceptions and practice in relation to the provision of preoperative information was found. Limited teaching aids, tight operation schedules and language barriers affected the delivery of preoperative information to ambulatory surgical patients. The results highlight the importance of reviewing current preoperative teaching methods and improving the effectiveness of such teaching to enhance the quality of care for ambulatory surgical patients.

  8. Crosstown: A Fox Family Channel Afternoon Special for Cable in the Classroom. [Videotape with] Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    "Crosstown," the television program featured in this videotape and teaching guide, depicts a teenager who is forced, due to her father's lack of child support payments, to leave her comfortable home four years after her parents' divorce and to move across town to an apartment in an inner city neighborhood. The teenager decides not to be…

  9. Stroke Risk Factors among Patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Purpose: Epidemiological studies have identified modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for stroke. The aim of this study was to describe the risk factors in stroke patients admitted in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Methods: This is a prospective study carried out in the Jos University Teaching Hospital in ...

  10. Comparing Streaming Video and Videotapes: Can Streaming Video Convey Affective Meaning as Well as Videotape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Jay L.

    This study investigated whether or not low-bandwidth streaming video could be useful for affective purposes. A group of 30 students in a cinema course at a public, liberal arts university viewed a 10-minute dramatic video scene by either videotape or low-bandwidth streaming video. They also took a survey to determine their affective responses and…

  11. Waco investigation: analysis of FLIR videotapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Lena M.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents some of the image processing techniques that were applied to seek an answer to the question whether agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) directed gunfired against the Branch Davidian complex in the tragic event that took place in Waco, Texas, U.S., 1993. The task for this investigation was to provide a scientific opinion that clarified the cause of the questioned events, or flashes, that can be seen on one of the surveillance videotapes. These flashes were by several experts, concluded to be evidence of gunfire. However, there were many reasons to question the correctness of that conclusion, such as the fact that some of the flashes appeared on a regular basis. The main hypothesis for this work was that the flashes instead were caused by specular solar reflections. The technical approach for this work was to analyze and compare the flashes appearance. By reconstructing the spatial and temporal position of the sensor, the complex and the sun, the geometrical properties was compared to the theoretical appearance of specular solar reflections. The result showed that the flashes seen on the FLIR videotape, were caused by solar or heat reflections from single or multiple objects. Consequently, they could not form evidence of gunfire. Further, the result highlights the importance of considering the characteristics of the imaging system within investigations that utilizes images as information source. This is due to the need of separating real data from other phenomena (such as solar reflections), distortions and artifacts in a correct manner.

  12. Use of peer teaching to enhance student and patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priharjo, Robert; Hoy, Georgina

    This article describes an evaluation of a peer-teaching project undertaken by second-year nursing students at a higher education institution in England. The initiative has enhanced the students' understanding of peer education. The importance of the nurse's role in patient education is emphasised. It is hoped that the experience of peer teaching will prepare nursing students for their future roles as nurse educators for patients, students and other staff.

  13. Patients' satisfaction with eye care services in a Nigerian teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... Background: Understanding the patients' perception of services received is essential as the parameters important to the patient may be quite different from that to the eye health provider. Aim: This study aims to evaluate patients' satisfaction with the care received from the pioneer teaching hospital in.

  14. All about Bugs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Bugs fascinate children, and each kind of bug plays a special role in the circle of life. Some bugs pollinate plants, while others help to decompose plant and animal waste. In this videotape, students learn about the similar characteristics that all bugs share and compare them to their close cousins, the arachnids. This videotape correlates to the…

  15. Critical Time: Earthquake Response Planning and Schools. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    A videotape that describes what earthquakes are, and examines the disaster planning schools can develop during the first few minutes following an earthquake to assure students and staff survive. The kinds of destruction likely to happen during a damaging earthquake are highlighted. The videotape stresses the need for children and staff to know…

  16. All about Birds. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Winged, feathered friends helped to inspire the airplane and have always interested human bird watchers. In this videotape, children learn about the main characteristics of birds and look at their similar needs. Students find out about the process of egg laying and hatching in some of the most common birds. This videotape correlates to the…

  17. All about Mammals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this videotape, students learn more about the characteristics of common warm-blooded mammals and what makes them different from other animals. Children also find out how humans are more advanced in structure than other mammals, but how they still share the same basic traits. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education…

  18. Patient participation in general practice based undergraduate teaching: a focus group study of patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sophie E; Allfrey, Caroline; Jones, Melvyn M; Chana, Jasprit; Abbott, Ciara; Faircloth, Sofia; Higgins, Nicola; Abdullah, Laila

    2017-04-01

    Patients make a crucial contribution to undergraduate medical education. Although a national resource is available for patients participating in research, none is as yet available for education. This study aimed to explore what information patients would like about participation in general practice based undergraduate medical education, and how they would like to obtain this information. Two focus groups were conducted in London-based practices involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Patients both with and without teaching experience were recruited using leaflets, posters, and patient participation groups. An open-ended topic guide explored three areas: perceived barriers that participants anticipated or had experienced; patient roles in medical education; and what help would support participation. Focus groups were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Patients suggested ways of professionalising the teaching process. These were: making information available to patients about confidentiality, iterative consent, and normalising teaching in the practice. Patients highlighted the importance of relationships, making information available about their GPs' involvement in teaching, and initiating student-patient interactions. Participants emphasised educational principles to maximise exchange of information, including active participation of students, patient identification of student learner needs, and exchange of feedback. This study will inform development of patient information resources to support their participation in teaching and access to information both before and during general practice based teaching encounters. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  19. Teaching nurses how to teach: strategies to enhance the quality of patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidyk, Lisa; Ventura, Kate; Green, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of a training course for nurses that focused on teach-back as a key strategy for patient education. It describes evaluative methods used to collect feedback and determine effectiveness of education based on nurses' perception and self-assessment of their patient educational skills and improvements made for future courses. Professional Development Specialists can use the concepts in this article to create similar programs to improve the quality of patient education.

  20. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  1. Racial Disparity in Duration of Patient Visits to the Emergency Department: Teaching Versus Non-teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zynal Karaca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sources of racial disparity in duration of patients’ visits to emergency departments (EDs have not been documented well enough for policymakers to distinguish patient-related factors from hospital- or area-related factors. This study explores the racial disparity in duration of routine visits to EDs at teaching and non-teaching hospitals.Methods: We performed retrospective data analyses and multivariate regression analyses to investigate the racial disparity in duration of routine ED visits at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD were used in the analyses. The data include 4.3 million routine ED visits encountered in Arizona, Massachusetts, and Utah during 2008. We computed duration for each visit by taking the difference between admission and discharge times.Results: The mean duration for a routine ED visit was 238 minutes at teaching hospitals and 175 minutes at non-teaching hospitals. There were significant variations in duration of routine ED visits across race groups at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The risk-adjusted results show that the mean duration of routine ED visits for Black/African American and Asian patients when compared to visits for white patients was shorter by 10.0 and 3.4%, respectively, at teaching hospitals; and longer by 3.6 and 13.8%, respectively, at non-teaching hospitals. Hispanic patients, on average, experienced 8.7% longer ED stays when compared to white patients at non-teaching hospitals.Conclusion: There is significant racial disparity in the duration of routine ED visits, especially in non-teaching hospitals where non-White patients experience longer ED stays compared to white patients. The variation in duration of routine ED visits at teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals was smaller across race groups. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:529–541.

  2. Teaching in crisis. Patient and family education in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, M O

    2001-03-01

    Although the critical care setting is not always a positive teaching environment, it is possible to achieve the goal of optimal patient and family education. The critical care nurse must understand the unique learning needs of patients and families who are experiencing a life crisis a recognize that there are substantial obstacles to overcome to educate in this setting. In addition, it takes experience and resources to develop the teaching skills of the bedside nurse, so that those teachable moments are easily recognized and suitably used to give patients and family members valuable information in small doses. The advanced practice nurse is an essential nursing resource who can spearhead the development of teaching skills for all members of the health care team. In addition, the advanced practice nurse is a clinical expert who can assess the educational needs of patients and their families and provide more detailed and individualized health information from a different perspective. Achieving good patient and family education outcomes is possible when patient care continuity is a priority and the advanced practice nurse is an active part of the nursing team. Exploring the use of new technologies and resources to meet patient and family education needs is absolutely necessary. As hospitals continue to evolve and react to the financial demands placed on them, nursing leadership and critical care nurses will need to articulate clearly all of the essential components of patient care, including patient and family education. In keeping with the rich nursing tradition of patient and family education, critical care nurses and advanced practice nurses have the opportunity to demonstrate their unique teaching skills and continue to promote health education as a priority of patient care.

  3. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    of old and new findings. Results showed a negotiation both between and within the students of the importance of patients' experiential knowledge versus scientific biomedical knowledge. On one hand students appreciated the experiential learning environment offered in the PI-led sessions representing......The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study...... with a qualitative approach based on focus group interviews. Analysis was based on a prior developed model of the characteristics of learning from patient instructors. The authors used this model as sensitizing concepts for the analysis of data while at the same time being open to new insights by constant comparison...

  4. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  5. Phenomenological analysis of patient experiences of medical student teaching encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Emma; King, Nigel; Wenger, Etienne; Dornan, Tim

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know how patients are affected by becoming opportunistically involved in medical student education. In previous studies, researchers rather than patients set the research agenda and expert patients or people well known to teachers were more often involved than ordinary people. This study aimed to explore how ordinary patients experience undergraduate medical teaching when they become involved in it opportunistically and to derive practical insights from the lived experiences of these patients. The research was conducted in line with a conceptual orientation towards communities of practice theory and used phenomenology as a way of exploring patients' lived experiences in depth. Minimally structured interviews were carried out with 10 patients following ordinary out-patient or general practice appointments in which students were being taught. Template analysis was used to generate provisional themes and a process of phenomenological reduction was used to distil individual respondents' lived experiences to their essence. The presence of students in ambulatory consultations was normal. Nine respondents described transactional relationships in which they remained outside the community of practice of which the doctor and student were members. Only an intimate problem would engage them deeply enough for a student's presence to 'bother' them. One patient's personal and professional background led her to regard doctors' handling of consultation dynamics as factors contributing to whether teaching consultations were negative or positive experiences. When doctors' sensitive and inclusive behaviour drew her into a triadic relationship with the student and doctor, she experienced mutual benefits with students. When it did not, she felt objectified and alienated. Provided they receive the clinical care for which they are attending a consultation and are treated respectfully, patients may sometimes willingly become 'objects' from which students learn. They may

  6. Teaching Humane Care for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an elective, upper-level course on caring for terminally ill patients, designed for baccalaureate nursing students. Discusses the hospice concept and its background, course design, communication with dying patients and their families, and outcomes of the course as measured by a pretest and two posttests. (CH)

  7. Using Simulated Patients to Teach Clinical Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. Gregory; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Clinical Nutrition in an Interdisciplinary Setting" is a course designed to introduce basic nutrition knowledge and concepts of nutritional assessment, counseling, and intervention in the clinical care of patients. Provides a brief course overview and descriptions of its development, use, and preliminary evaluation of the patient simulation…

  8. Teaching safe sex practices to psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladyk, K

    1990-03-01

    An occupational therapist presented her 45-minute program called AIDS Education and Safe Sex 5 times to female mental patients in the locked ward of Cedarcrest Regional Hospital in Newington, Connecticut, to inform them about safe-sex practices and AIDS. She first administered a pretest then spoke briefly about AIDS and safe-sex practices. The lecture emphasized various important points such as no cure for AIDS exist, casual contact (e.g., kiss on the cheek, handshake) cannot transmit HIV, and effectiveness of using latex condoms. The occupational therapist spent much of her time addressing myths about AIDS and what safe-sex practices are. The patients discussed sexual abuse and dishonest partners. She administered a posttest which was the same as the pretest. Some sessions attracted more people than did other sessions. Test scores increased for every patient and for every session. They ranged from a 5% (68-73%) increase for the 3rd session to a 24% (67-91%) increase for the last session. She was not able to determine, however, whether the increased knowledge would translate into positive behavioral changes. Patients' psychiatric symptoms may have interfered with learning resulting in less than ideal improvements in knowledge. These symptoms were hypomanic behavior, restlessness, and distractibility. Perhaps other sessions with experiential techniques (e.g., putting condoms on dummies) would increase their understanding. This program helps fill the information gap not provided by the mass media which avoid mentioning safe-sex practices.

  9. Patient outcomes with teaching versus nonteaching healthcare: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis N Papanikolaou

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive debate exists in the healthcare community over whether outcomes of medical care at teaching hospitals and other healthcare units are better or worse than those at the respective nonteaching ones. Thus, our goal was to systematically evaluate the evidence pertaining to this question. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed all studies that compared teaching versus nonteaching healthcare structures for mortality or any other patient outcome, regardless of health condition. Studies were retrieved from PubMed, contact with experts, and literature cross-referencing. Data were extracted on setting, patients, data sources, author affiliations, definition of compared groups, types of diagnoses considered, adjusting covariates, and estimates of effect for mortality and for each other outcome. Overall, 132 eligible studies were identified, including 93 on mortality and 61 on other eligible outcomes (22 addressed both. Synthesis of the available adjusted estimates on mortality yielded a summary relative risk of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-1.00 for teaching versus nonteaching healthcare structures and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.99-1.10 for minor teaching versus nonteaching ones. There was considerable heterogeneity between studies (I(2 = 72% for the main analysis. Results were similar in studies using clinical and those using administrative databases. No differences were seen in the 14 studies fully adjusting for volume/experience, severity, and comorbidity (relative risk 1.01. Smaller studies did not differ in their results from larger studies. Differences were seen for some diagnoses (e.g., significantly better survival for breast cancer and cerebrovascular accidents in teaching hospitals and significantly better survival from cholecystectomy in nonteaching hospitals, but these were small in magnitude. Other outcomes were diverse, but typically teaching healthcare structures did not do better than nonteaching ones. CONCLUSIONS: The

  10. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  11. The Use of Simulation to Teach Suicide Risk Assessment to Health Profession Trainees-Rationale, Methodology, and a Proof of Concept Demonstration with a Virtual Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adriana; Chaudhary, Neelam; Murphy, James; Lok, Benjamin; Waller, Jennifer; Buckley, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing use of educational technologies in medical and surgical specialties. Described herein is the development and application of an interactive virtual patient (VP) to teach suicide risk assessment to health profession trainees. We studied the effect of the following: (1) an interaction with a bipolar VP who attempts suicide or (2) completion of a video-teaching module on interviewing a bipolar patient, on medical students' proficiency in assessing suicide risk in standardized patients. We hypothesized that students who interact with a bipolar VP will be at least as likely to assess suicide risk, as their peers who completed a video module. In a randomized, controlled study, we compared the frequency with which second-year students at the Medical College of Georgia asked suicide risk and bipolar symptoms questions by VP/video group. We recruited 67 students. The VP group inquired more frequently than the video group in 4 of 5 suicide risk areas and 11 of 14 other bipolar symptomatology areas. There were minimal to small effect sizes in favor of the VP technology. The students preferred the video over the VP as an educational tool (p = 0.007). Our study provides proof of concept that both VP and video module approaches are feasible for teaching students to assess suicide risk, and we present evidence about the role of active learning to improve communication skills. Depending on the learning context, interviewing a VP or observation of a videotaped interview can enhance the students' suicide risk assessment proficiency in an interview with a standardized patient. An interactive VP is a plausible modality to deliver basic concepts of suicide risk assessment to medical students, can facilitate individual preferences by providing easy access and portability, and has potential generalizability to other aspects of psychiatric training.

  12. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a videotape programme on interobserver reliability in outcome assessment for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, N; Anjema, C; Alikhan, N; Chhina, T; Dhanoa, D; Edelist, D; Esufali, Z; Ismail, F; Hill, J; Campbell, J

    1999-01-01

    A study was designed to assess the effects of a standardized instructional videotape on training senior medical students to acceptable levels of reliability in performing several commonly used observer dependent outcome measures in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). During a single day, six third-year medical students independently examined six patients with OA in predetermined order using a Latin Square design, before and after viewing a standardized videotape demonstrating 13 examination techniques. Reliability coefficients were calculated based on variance components of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) table. Preslandardization reliability coefficients were goniometry were uniformly low. Following the intervention, all but four reliability coefficients were >/= 0.93. For many measures, high levels of interobserver agreement were noted prior to viewing the instructional videotape. This may represent the success of undergraduate clinical skills training programmes, or it may be the result of having reviewed an illustrated instructional text just prior to the initial patient examinations. The notable exception was knee goniometry. Despite apparent familiarity with the technique, prestandardization reliability coefficients were very low. However, following the intervention, all coefficients improved dramatically, two-thirds achieving very high levels. These data suggest that skills development in senior medical students is not uniform and that, while reliability is high for many, the assessment of knee range of movement can be improved by viewing an instructional videotape.

  13. Teaching diagnostic approach to a patient through cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder

    2011-11-01

    Films are produced with the aim of entertaining people, but recently there has been increasing use of films to educate medical trainees about various disorders, symptoms of these disorders, patient-therapist interactions, and various other medical and psychiatric issues. Discussions in academic circles have moved from criticism of negative portrayals of mental illness in earlier films to their use in teaching sessions. Films can be used either in full length or clip format to conduct training modules. Use of the film Stigmata to train residents about diagnostic dilemmas and taking a diagnostic approach to patients is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  15. Space Science for Children: All about Stars [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape features information, for children in grades K-4, about stars including their composition, brightness, and location. How stars are formed, why they seem to move across our sky, and how humans have used their patterns to form the constellations are discussed. A hands-on activity related to the reflecting telescope is also…

  16. Me & Isaac Newton. [Videotape and] KIDSNET Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This videotape records the stories of 7 scientists, 3 women and 4 men who range in age from 33 to 81. Beginning with their earliest scientific questions and including their most personal ponderings, the scientists reveal their histories and professional obligations to affect the world. Director Michael Apted allows the personal adventures of the…

  17. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  18. All about Dinosaurs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs were the rulers of the land 65 million years ago. In this videotape, children learn more about the different kinds of dinosaurs by viewing vivid illustrations and fossil discoveries. Students compare the dinosaurs to their modern kin--snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Students also listen to different theories to try to answer the big…

  19. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  20. All about Animal Behavior & Communication. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Why do animals do what they do? What is the difference between instinct and learned behavior? How do animals communicate? These questions are answered as children examine animal behaviors that help them find food, protect themselves, and care for their young. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education Standards for Life…

  1. All about Food Chains. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Whether animals are herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, each one is part of an eternal food chain that carries on from one generation to the next. In this videotape, students learn more about terms like "predator,""pre-consumer" and "producer," as well as the cycles of food chains and food webs and how they support…

  2. Educating patients: understanding barriers, learning styles, and teaching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, Linda

    2011-10-01

    Health care delivery and education has become a challenge for providers. Nurses and other professionals are challenged daily to assure that the patient has the necessary information to make informed decisions. Patients and their families are given a multitude of information about their health and commonly must make important decisions from these facts. Obstacles that prevent easy delivery of health care information include literacy, culture, language, and physiological barriers. It is up to the nurse to assess and evaluate the patient's learning needs and readiness to learn because everyone learns differently. This article will examine how each of these barriers impact care delivery along with teaching and learning strategies will be examined. Copyright © 2011 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    OpenAIRE

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, outlined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Video...

  4. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    OpenAIRE

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, out-lined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Vide...

  5. Teaching clinical opioid pharmacology with the Human Patient Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zaki; DiLorenzo, Amy; Sloan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pain should be aggressively treated to decrease the development of chronic postsurgical pain. There has been an increase in the use of Human Patient Simulator (HPS) for teaching advanced courses in pharmacology to medical students, residents, and nurses. The aim of this educational investigation was to pilot the HPS for the training of medical students and surgical recovery room staff nurses in the pharmacology of opioids for the management of postoperative pain. The computerized HPS mannequin is fully monitored with appropriate displays and includes a voice speaker mounted in the head. Medical students and Postanesthesia care unit nurses, led by faculty in the Department of Anesthesiology in small groups of 4-6, participated in a 2- to 3-hour HPS course on the use of opioids for the management of acute postoperative pain. Trainees were asked to treat the acute and severe postoperative pain of a simulated patient. Opioid effects and side effects (such as respiratory depression) were presented on the mannequin in real time to the participants. Side effects of naloxone to reverse opioid depression were presented as a crisis in real time to the participants. Participants completed a 10-item course evaluation using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree). Twenty-two nurses and nine medical students completed the HPS opioid pharmacology scenario. Almost all participants rated the HPS course very highly and rated every item as either agree or strongly agree. Most participants agreed that the simulator session improved their understanding of opioid pharmacology including opioid side effects and management of opioid complications. Course participants felt most strongly (median, interquartile range) that the simulator session improved their understanding of naloxone pharmacology (5, 0), simulators serve as a useful teaching tool (5, 0), and that they would be pleased to participate in any additional HPS teaching sessions (5, 0). The

  6. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical…

  7. Service and Education: The Association Between Workload, Patient Complexity, and Teaching on Internal Medicine Inpatient Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Temple A; Crabtree, Meghan A; Palmer, Raymond F; Pugh, Jacqueline A; Lanham, Holly J; Leykum, Luci K

    2018-02-01

    Attending rounds remain the primary venue for formal teaching and learning at academic medical centers. Little is known about the effect of increasing clinical demands on teaching during attending rounds. To explore the relationships among teaching time, teaching topics, clinical workload, and patient complexity variables. Observational study of medicine teaching teams from September 2008 through August 2014. Teams at two large teaching hospitals associated with a single medical school were observed for periods of 2 to 4 weeks. Twelve medicine teaching teams consisting of one attending, one second- or third-year resident, two to three interns, and two to three medical students. The study examined relationships between patient complexity (comorbidities, complications) and clinical workload variables (census, turnover) with educational measures. Teams were clustered based on clinical workload and patient complexity. Educational measures of interest were time spent teaching and number of teaching topics. Data were analyzed both at the daily observation level and across a given patient's admission. We observed 12 teams, 1994 discussions (approximately 373 h of rounds) of 563 patients over 244 observation days. Teams clustered into three groups: low patient complexity/high clinical workload, average patient complexity/low clinical workload, and high patient complexity/high clinical workload. Modest associations for team, patient complexity, and clinical workload variables were noted with total time spent teaching (9.1% of the variance in time spent teaching during a patient's admission; F[8,549] = 6.90, p complexity characteristics among teams were only modestly associated with total teaching time and teaching topics.

  8. Impact on patients of expanded, general practice based, student teaching: observational and qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, John; Quince, Thelma; Hibble, Arthur; Fanshawe, Thomas; Emery, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To compare patients' enablement and satisfaction after teaching and non-teaching consultations. To explore patients' views about the possible impact that increased community based teaching of student doctors in their practice may have on the delivery of service and their attitudes towards direct involvement with students. Design Observational study using validated survey instruments (patient enablement index—PEI, and consultation satisfaction questionnaire—CSQ) administered after t...

  9. Medical Students' Learning from Patient-Led Teaching: Experiential versus Biomedical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study with a qualitative approach based on focus group…

  10. Preoperative patient teaching: the practice and perceptions among surgical ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Kong; Lee, Iris F-K

    2013-09-01

    To explore the consistency between the perceptions and actual practice of preoperative patient teaching and also the factors affecting the provision of teaching from the perspective of nurses working in surgical wards. Preoperative teaching is beneficial to surgical patients in alleviating their anxiety and promoting their postoperative recovery. Despite the leading role in patient teaching by nurses, sparse studies have been addressed the consistency between nurses' perceptions and their actual practice of preoperative teaching in surgical wards. A cross-sectional survey. Data were collected by using self-reported preoperative teaching questionnaires together with nurse demographic data sheets. Sampling setting was an acute public hospital and all nurses working in surgical wards (n = 100) were approached in the study. A total of 86 nurses returned the questionnaires. 'Details of anaesthesia' was the most prominent preoperative teaching component rated by nurses although their major teaching was pertained to 'preoperative preparation'. In addition, oral explanation was reported as the most prevalent way of information delivery and internet was the least preferred method. Discrepancies between nurses' perceptions and actual practice were found in this study. Moreover, nurses' time availability, language barriers and tight operation schedules were perceived as top factors affecting the provision of preoperative teaching. Furthermore, nurses' satisfaction with such patient teaching was significantly associated with their professional training and their daily workload in the clinical setting. Preoperative patient teaching was not fully achieved by nurses in this study, and the results highlighted the conflicting issues related to the implementation process that could be resolved by means of proper planning and management in clinical practice. Healthcare organisations and nurse managers should periodically review the existing clinical resources so that sufficient

  11. A qualitative study of the meaning of physical examination teaching for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Goldman, Ellen F; Craven, Katherine E; Faselis, Charles J

    2010-08-01

    Physical examination teaching using actual patients is an important part of medical training. The patient experience undergoing this type of teaching is not well-understood. To understand the meaning of physical examination teaching for patients. Phenomenological qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Patients who underwent a physical examination-based teaching session at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A purposive sampling strategy was used to include a diversity of patient teaching experiences. Multiple interviewers triangulated data collection. Interviews continued until new themes were no longer heard (total of 12 interviews). Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coding was performed by two investigators and peer-checked. Themes were identified and meanings extracted from themes. Seven themes emerged from the data: positive impression of students; participation considered part of the program; expect students to do their job: hands-on learning; interaction with students is positive; some aspects of encounter unexpected; range of benefits to participation; improve convenience and interaction. Physical examination teaching had four possible meanings for patients: Tolerance, Helping, Social, and Learning. We found it possible for a patient to move from one meaning to another, based on the teaching session experience. Physical examination teaching can benefit patients. Patients have the potential to gain more value from the experience based on the group interaction.

  12. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  13. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  14. Profile of hip arthroplasty patients in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Regina Goveia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to characterize the epidemiological profile of patients undergoing hip replacement, primary or revisional. METHODS: we conducted a retrospective, descriptive study, including hip arthroplasties performed from January 2009 to June 2012 in a Belo Horizonte teaching hospital, Minas Gerais State - MG, Brazil. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: orthopedic procedures represented 45% of the operations at the hospital in the period, 1.4% hip arthroplasties. There were 125 hip replacements, 85 total, 27 partial and 13 reviews. Among the patients, 40% were male and 60% were female. Age ranged between 20 and 102 years, mean and median of 73 and 76 years, respectively. The most frequent diagnosis (82% was femoral neck fracture by low-energy trauma caused by falling form standing position. In 13 revision operations, 12 required removal of the prosthesis. The infectious complication led to revision in 54% of the time, followed by dislocation (15%, peri-prosthetic fracture (15% and aseptic loosening (15%. The infection etiologic agent was identified in 43% of occasions. The average length of the prosthesis to a revision operation was eight months. CONCLUSION: patients undergoing hip arthroplasty are elderly, with femoral neck fracture caused by falling form standing position, affecting more women. The incidence of hip prosthesis loosening was 10%. The main cause of the infection was loosening. The incidence of revisional hip arthroplasty was 10% and the incidence of hospital mortality in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty was 7.2%.

  15. 36 CFR 1280.50 - What will I be allowed to film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes? 1280.50 Section 1280.50 Parks, Forests, and Public... film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes? (a) NARA will permit you to film, photograph, or..., photograph, or videotape if you intend to use the film, photographs, or videotape for commercial, partisan...

  16. Look and Do Ancient Greece. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Greek Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource, containing a teacher's manual, reproducible student workbook, and a color teaching poster, is designed to accompany a 21-minute videotape program, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "Greek Architecture," looks at elements of architectural construction as applied to Greek structures, and…

  17. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students....... Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. CONCLUSION: The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact...

  18. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  19. The efficacy of videotape feedback for enhancing the effects of exposure-based treatment for social anxiety disorder: A controlled investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Powers, M.B.; Buxkamper, R.; Telch, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Correcting patients' faulty beliefs concerning social evaluative threats is the hallmark of cognitive-behavioral treatment of social anxiety disorder. The current study examined the efficacy of two videotape feedback procedures as adjuncts to exposure-based treatment. Participants suffering from

  20. Medical students¿ assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundWe introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching...

  1. Terminally ill patients and Jehovah's Witnesses: teaching acceptance of patients' refusals of vital treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, B S; Harding, T W

    2002-05-01

    To find out whether and how the teaching of medical ethics can influence attitudes on accepting treatment refusals. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 4 groups of students at the University of Geneva who had participated (P) or not (nP) in teaching modules on medical law and ethics. One vignette described a terminally ill patient refusing mechanical ventilation, another a Jehovah's Witness refusing a life-saving blood transfusion. 127 medical and 168 law students. 5-point Likert scale of responses to the vignettes reaching from certain acceptance to certain non-acceptance of the treatment refusal. More than 80% of law students (nP) said that a good physician should accept the terminally ill patient's refusal. 84% (P) compared to 68% (nP) of medical students (P=0.03) would accept this refusal. The acceptance of the Jehovah's Witness refusal of a life-saving transfusion was less among all students. Students from the groups (P) reported significantly more often (P accept (76% of medical students) or that a good physician should accept (63% of law students) the treatment refusal of the Jehovah's Witness than medical students (48%) and law students (27%) from the two other groups (nP). (P) students showed significantly more acceptance of treatment refusals in the hypothetical case scenarios than (nP) students from the same faculty. Religion, cultural origin and school education of the parents had less influence on attitudes than participation in ethical teaching and type of student (medicine vs. law).

  2. Teaching and testing basic surgical skills without using patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, clinical skills centers are important structural components of authentic universities in the world. These centers can be use for tuition of cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills. In this study we have designed a surgical course, consist of 19 theoretical knowledge (cognitive skills and 10 procedural skills. Purpose: teaching and testing the designed course. Methods: This study has been conducted on 678 medical students at clerkship stage. Pre and post-self assessment technique has been used to assess learning progress. A multivariate statistical comparison were adapted for Judgments of learning achievement, Hotelling’s T-square has been used to ascertain the differences between pre and post tests score. For measuring the reliability of the test items. Cronbach's Alpha has been used to measure the reliability of test item. Results: The reliability of the test was 0.84 for cognitive skills and 0.92 for procedural skills. The two tailed test for comparing each pairs of score of 19 cognitive items showed a significant statistical difference between 13 items (P=0.000. For procedural skills the differences between the mean score of 9 items were significant (P=0.000. These results indicate learning achievements by students. Conclusion: This study suggests that, the ability of trainees in both cognitive and psychomotor skills can be improved by tuition of basic surgical skills in skill Lab. (without use of patients. Key words: BASIC SURGICAL SKILLS, CSC, (CLINICAL SKILLS CENTER PRE AND POST SELF-ASSESSMENT

  3. Using Patient-Simulators to Teach Telephone Communication Skills to Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Susan; Curtis, Peter

    1983-01-01

    A cost-effective audiotaped patient-simulation program to teach residents at a university family practice center is described. Similar programs have been implemented in other areas such as pediatrics, psychiatry, nursing, and a family medicine clerkship. (MSE)

  4. Collaborative learning in nursing simulation: near-peer teaching using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Amy M; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    Simulation in nursing education uses specific patient scenarios to provide students with hands-on learning experiences. A near-peer teaching experience, using upper-level nursing students as standardized patients, was created as an educational intervention. The premises of social cognitive theory, which include cognitive, behavioral, and environmental factors, were incorporated into this teaching activity. The upper-level students played the role of a patient, while they also practiced leadership, teaching, and mentoring of first-semester nursing students. In the scenario, the first-semester students provided care to the patient, while focusing on safety, identifying the problem, and practicing clinical decision making. Faculty were present to provide guidance and promote communication in debriefing. Near-peer teaching provided a learning opportunity for all students, facilitated teamwork, and encouraged knowledge and skills attainment. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Early Book Stages, 0-5 Years [and] Creciendo con Libros (Growing [up] with Books). [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Roxanna

    Using a lighthearted and simple approach, this 23-minute videotape in English and Spanish versions presents interactions between parents and children while reading books. The children in the videotape range in age from 0 to 5 years. The video is introduced by scenes of children enjoying books while narration discussing the impact of reading to…

  6. Camera Perspective Bias in Videotaped Confessions: Evidence that Visual Attention Is a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lezlee J.; Lassiter, G. Daniel; Patterson, Stephen M.; Ransom, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Several experiments have demonstrated a "camera perspective bias" in evaluations of videotaped confessions: videotapes with the camera focused on the suspect lead to judgments of greater voluntariness than alternative presentation formats. The present research investigated potential mediators of this bias. Using eye tracking to measure visual…

  7. Videotape Helps Standardize and Increase Objectivity of Medical Exams Across the Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-minute videotape demonstrates how to stage six stations simulating medical emergency problems to be solved by emergency medical technicians (EMT's) taking the National Registry's 150-question written final examination. The videotape also details the logistics of arranging the entire one-hour examination, used in over 30 States. (AJ)

  8. Patients "Embodied" and "As-a-Body" within Bedside Teaching Encounters: A Video Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Christopher; Challinor, Alexander; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2017-01-01

    Bedside teaching encounters (BTEs) involve doctor-patient-student interactions, providing opportunities for students to learn with, from and about patients. How the differing concerns of patient care and student education are balanced in situ remains largely unknown and undefined. This video ethnographic study explores "patient…

  9. Patients embodied and as-a-body within bedside teaching encounters: a video ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Christopher; Challinor, Alexander; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2017-03-01

    Bedside teaching encounters (BTEs) involve doctor-patient-student interactions, providing opportunities for students to learn with, from and about patients. How the differing concerns of patient care and student education are balanced in situ remains largely unknown and undefined. This video ethnographic study explores patient involvement during a largely student-centric activity: 'feedback sequences' where students learn clinical and practical skills. Drawing on a data subset from a multi-site study, we used Conversation Analysis to investigate verbal and non-verbal interactional practices to examine patients' inclusion and exclusion from teaching activities across 25 BTEs in General Practice and General Surgery and Medicine with 50 participants. Through analysis, we identified two representations of the patient: the patient embodied (where patients are actively involved) and the patient as-a-body (when they are used primarily as a prop for learning). Overall, patients were excluded more during physical examination than talk-based activities. Exclusion occurred through physical positioning of doctor-patient-student, and through doctors and students talking about, rather than to, patients using medical jargon and online commentaries. Patients' exclusion was visibly noticeable through eye gaze: patients' middle-distance gaze coincided with medical terminology or complex wording. Inclusory activities maintained the patient embodied during teaching activities through doctors' skilful embedding of teaching within their care: including vocalising clinical reasoning processes through students, providing patients with a 'warrant to listen', allocating turns-at-talk for them and eye-contact. This study uniquely demonstrates the visible nature patient exclusion, providing firm evidence of how this affects patient empowerment and engagement within educational activities for tomorrow's doctors.

  10. 36 CFR 1280.48 - How do I apply to film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes? 1280.48 Section 1280.48 Parks, Forests, and... film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes? (a) If you wish to film, photograph... wish to film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes at a Presidential library or at a regional...

  11. Applying athletic principles to medical rounds to improve teaching and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick; Lewis, Michelle; Treloar, Dina; Cherabuddi, Kartikeya; Radhakrishnan, Nila; Leverence, Robert; Han, Xiaoxia; Cottler, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Teaching hospital multidisciplinary work rounds are often inefficient, delaying the completion of patient care tasks and detracting from teaching. Participants often act as working groups rather than interdependent teams. Athletic principles were used to train multidisciplinary rounding teams to adopt the systems used by manufacturing to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care, as well as teamwork and didactic teaching. Experimental groups of general medical rounding teams-faculty member, house staff, medical students, bedside nurses, pharmacists, and a case manager-were introduced to individual job descriptions (playbooks), key customer-supplier relation ships, and efficient communication protocols, accompanied by weekly feed back (game films). A two-phase pilot 11-month prospective trial (February to July 2009 and September 2011 to January 2012) compared the experimental and control rounding teams on the basis of length of stay, 30-day readmission rates, and physician, student, and patient satisfaction. These interventions resulted in a 30% reduction in 30-day readmissions and, in the 2011-2012 phase, an 18% shorter length of stay. Anonymous surveys documented greater satisfaction of faculty, residents, and medical students, and student ratings of teaching were markedly improved. Patient satisfaction did not change. The new rounding system has the potential to reduce waste and improve the quality of patient care while improving caregiver satisfaction and medical student teaching. Adaptive leadership skills will be required to overcome resistance to change. The use of athletic analogies can improve teamwork and facilitate the adoption of a systems approach to the delivery of patient care.

  12. The teaching of self-care to ostomy patients and their families: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman de Felício Bortucan Lenza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the national and international literature on the teaching of selfcare to bowel ostomates and their relatives. Methods: It is an integrative review, in LILACS and MEDLINE electronic databases, in the period from 1996 to 2006, with the keywords ‘teaching’, ‘ostomates’ and ‘nursing’. Results: The sample was composed of eight articles, which reported the importance of teaching strategies applied with patients and their families regarding self-care and management of the stoma and collectors, however, no study has brought specific and systematized teaching strategies. Conclusion: The analyzed literature has demonstrated the importance of teaching strategies addressing the issue of self-care for the ostomates, but expressed the lack of researches and publications on the implementation of contextualized actions and with appropriate language for these patients and their families.

  13. The teaching of self-care to ostomy patients and their families: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman de Felício Bortucan Lenza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the national and international literature on the teaching of selfcare to bowel ostomates and their relatives. Methods: It is an integrative review, in LILACS and MEDLINE electronic databases, in the period from 1996 to 2006, with the keywords ‘teaching’, ‘ostomates’ and ‘nursing’. Results: The sample was composed of eight articles, which reported the importance of teaching strategies applied with patients and their families regarding self-care and management of the stoma and collectors, however, no study has brought specific and systematized teaching strategies. Conclusion: The analyzed literature has demonstrated the importance of teaching strategies addressing the issue of self-care for the ostomates, but expressed the lack of researches and publications on the implementation of contextualized actions and with appropriate language for these patients and their families.

  14. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Vitamin Supplementation among Patients visiting Out-Patient Physicians in a Teaching Hospital in Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal Azam; Zahra Aziz Samani; Waris Qidwai; Saima Lalani

    2012-01-01

     Objective: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding the use of vitamin supplements among patients visiting Out-Patient clinics of a teaching hospital.Methods: Four hundred patients were interviewed during the period of July to September 2008, at the Out-patient clinics, Aga Khan University hospital, Karachi. A pre-tested and structured questionnaire was used to collect information. It consisted of questions regarding demographics, awareness of vitamin supplements and its ...

  15. Comparing Self-Injection Teaching Strategies for Patients With Breast Cancer and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; Romanoff, Sonya; Thom, Bridgette; Burrows Walters, Chasity

    2016-10-01

    A prospective, quasiexperimental pilot study with a sequential design was performed to compare two methods of teaching self-injection. The study examined 50 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment and their caregivers to determine if simulation during the teaching experience affects patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, and self-confidence, as well as nurse satisfaction. Structured questionnaires were administered before the teaching, immediately after the teaching, and after the injection was performed at home. Nurses who performed the teaching also completed a questionnaire after the teaching. Use of simulation did not affect patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, or self-confidence. The largest impact on learner worry was the actual teaching experience, regardless of the methodology used. Nurses reported greater levels of satisfaction when simulation was part of the teaching. Patient/caregiver satisfaction with the teaching experience decreased after performing the injection at home. Additional research is needed to identify the best methodology for teaching patients and caregivers self-injection. Data from this study revealed that the addition of simulation during teaching does not always translate to better education. In addition, based on patient/caregiver reports, no substitution exists for actual injection administration.

  16. [Medical education and patient education: new teaching strategies and new communication dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, P; Nicolò, A

    2004-09-01

    This study was designed to shed light on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. An open-ended questionnaire was sent to 50 patients and 50 diabetics patients and 100 health care professionals working in the field of diabetes and nutrition who had been trained in patient education techniques. They were asked to describe the skills that were the easiest to teach patients and those that patients mastered the best, as well as the skills they found hardest to teach patients, those that patients mastered the least and those that gave rise to errors persisting after the patients education was completed. On the whole, the results showed that the educators found it easy to teach techniques: patients mastered procedures well and made few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving (involving multiple variables). Based on these findings, the authors discuss the notions of learning complexity and the time needed for successful patient education.

  17. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-02-01

    The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction.

  18. Computer-based desktop system for surgical videotape editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Hamelin, E; Sarmiento, J M; de la Puente, J M; Vicente, M

    1997-05-01

    The educational role of surgical video presentations should be optimized by linking surgical images to graphic evaluation of indications, techniques, and results. We describe a PC-based video production system for personal editing of surgical tapes, according to the objectives of each presentation. The hardware requirement is a personal computer (100 MHz processor, 1-Gb hard disk, 16 Mb RAM) with a PC-to-TV/video transfer card plugged into a slot. Computer-generated numerical data, texts, and graphics are transformed into analog signals displayed on TV/video. A Genlock interface (a special interface card) synchronizes digital and analog signals, to overlay surgical images to electronic illustrations. The presentation is stored as digital information or recorded on a tape. The proliferation of multimedia tools is leading us to adapt presentations to the objectives of lectures and to integrate conceptual analyses with dynamic image-based information. We describe a system that handles both digital and analog signals, production being recorded on a tape. Movies may be managed in a digital environment, with either an "on-line" or "off-line" approach. System requirements are high, but handling a single device optimizes editing without incurring such complexity that management becomes impractical to surgeons. Our experience suggests that computerized editing allows linking surgical scientific and didactic messages on a single communication medium, either a videotape or a CD-ROM.

  19. Faculty and medical students' perceptions of teaching and learning about the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnew, Thomas R; Wilson, Hamish J

    2010-05-01

    To explore student and faculty perceptions of how students are learning doctor-patient relationship skills in their clinical medical education. Exploratory qualitative study involving data from interviews and focus groups with students and interviews with teaching faculty. Respondents reported that pre-clinical relationship skills curricula were not well-coordinated with clinical curricula. Within the clinical curriculum, respondents perceived a disparity between general practice and hospital-based attachments. Teaching of relationship skills on the wards was highly variable, rarely explicit, and primarily dependent on role-modelling. In contrast, general practice runs included explicit teaching with feedback that reinforced skills taught in the pre-clinical curriculum. Respondents recommended increased focus on and assessment of students' interpersonal skills within clinical settings. Pre-clinical and clinical relationship skills curricula were not coordinated. The tension between service commitments and student teaching in hospital-based attachments contributed to an insufficient focus on communication and relationship skills acquisition and did not reinforce teaching in pre-clinical and ambulatory clinical settings. The teaching of doctor-patient relationship skills can be augmented by coordinating pre-clinical and clinical curricula and by requiring observation and structured feedback related to explicit criteria of student skills acquisition across all clinical learning experiences. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Demographic survey of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Miller Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Considering the increasing use of alternative therapies for children, it is appropriate to determine the demographic profile of pediatric patients entering a chiropractic clinic. Methods Collection of demographic data including age, gender, condition at presentation, previous clinicians consulted and medical referral rates of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic between 2006 and 2010. Results Over-all, 20.5% of patients were aged between two days...

  1. Teaching mental health skills to general practitioners and medical officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David; Gask, Linda

    2002-01-01

    David Goldberg opened by describing the research that had led up to the present WPA teaching package. Early research had demonstrated that many psychological illnesses were not detected in primary care settings (Goldberg & Huxley 1980; ibid 1992), and these findings have been replicated in 14 centres round the world, with broadly similar results (Ustun & Sartorius 1995). We have found that in the UK the problem is not defects in factual knowledge, but not having clinical skills to assist in the management of mental disorders in general medical settings. The clinical skills needed in primary care are seldom taught in medical schools, and cannot be learned by listening to a lecture: it is necessary to practice them after they have been demonstrated. To do this it is convenient to break complex clinical skills down into their components: these are called "micro-skills", and we will deal later with the way in which these are taught. The most powerful method for improving mental health skills in this setting is to provide doctors with feedback--either video or audio--of their interview with real patients. The emphasis of such teaching must be on the interview techniques used by the doctor, rather than the clinical problems displayed by the particular patient being interviewed (Gask et al 1991). The problem with this is that video-feedback teaching of the necessary type is not always available, so we have developed videotapes that we can send out to distant locations, and which focus the attention of both local tutor and postgraduates on what should be learned. Because it is essential that most of the teaching is done by the live teacher rather than the videotape, there are always several "discussion points" so that postgraduates can ask questions, or describe their own way of dealing with particular situations. The videotapes are supplied together with teaching notes for the tutor, power points slides which can be adapted to suit local conditions, "role plays" to allow

  2. Early Intervention Provider Use of Child Caregiver-Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Philippa H.; Coletti, Catherine Ehret

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the extent to which multidiscipline early intervention providers identified and demonstrated caregiver-teaching strategies. A total of 78 providers submitted 205 videotaped segments to illustrate 1 of 5 caregiver-teaching strategies (i.e., demonstration; caregiver practice with feedback; guided practice;…

  3. Impact of patient-based teaching in improving prescription writing skills of II MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenrajan, Padmavathi; Murugan, P Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Although prescription writing is a part of the medical students' curriculum, their prescribing skills are still poor either as a part of their examinations or as they go out as qualified health professionals which may be due to inadequate training. Educational intervention like patient-based teaching in pharmacology offers lifelike preparation and provides more relevance, easier recall, and help in improving prescribing skills. This study aims to determine the role of patient-based teaching in improving the prescribing skill of II year medical students compared to conventional case-based teaching. This prospective, comparative study was carried out after giving orientation to prescription writing as per the WHO prescribing guidelines (N = 50). The 25 students in control group were given case-based teaching and 25 students in test group were given patient-based teaching of prescription writing for the same five common clinical conditions. The prescription writing skill (knows how level) was assessed by evaluating the prescriptions written in the prescribed format and scored by a 14-point scoring system. The mean scores obtained by the control (9.6) and test (12.04) groups were compared by unpaired Student's t-test (P writing enables students to develop prescribing skills in a complete and professional way.

  4. Teaching Cancer Patients the Value of Correct Positioning During Radiotherapy Using Visual Aids and Practical Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Helle; Nielsen, Berit Kjærside; Boejen, Annette; Vestergaard, Anne

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate if teaching patients about positioning before radiotherapy treatment would (a) reduce the residual rotational set-up errors, (b) reduce the number of repositionings and (c) improve patients' sense of control by increasing self-efficacy and reducing distress. Patients were randomized to either standard care (control group) or standard care and a teaching session combining visual aids and practical exercises (intervention group). Daily images from the treatment sessions were evaluated off-line. Both groups filled in a questionnaire before and at the end of the treatment course on various aspects of cooperation with the staff regarding positioning. Comparisons of residual rotational set-up errors showed an improvement in the intervention group compared to the control group. No significant differences were found in number of repositionings, self-efficacy or distress. Results show that it is possible to teach patients about positioning and thereby improve precision in positioning. Teaching patients about positioning did not seem to affect self-efficacy or distress scores at baseline and at the end of the treatment course.

  5. Learning outcomes of "The Oncology Patient" study among nursing students: A comparison of teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Judith; Reguant, Mercedes; Canet, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Teaching strategies are essential in order to facilitate meaningful learning and the development of high-level thinking skills in students. To compare three teaching methodologies (problem-based learning, case-based teaching and traditional methods) in terms of the learning outcomes achieved by nursing students. This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the Nursing Degree programme in a group of 74 students who explored the subject of The Oncology Patient through the aforementioned strategies. A performance test was applied based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. A significant correlation was found between the intragroup theoretical and theoretical-practical dimensions. Likewise, intergroup differences were related to each teaching methodology. Hence, significant differences were estimated between the traditional methodology (x-=9.13), case-based teaching (x-=12.96) and problem-based learning (x-=14.84). Problem-based learning was shown to be the most successful learning method, followed by case-based teaching and the traditional methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient and preceptor attitudes towards teaching medical students in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlhöfer, Otto; Tönies, Hans; Spiegel, Wolfgang; Wilhelm-Mitteräcker, Andree; Maier, Manfred

    2013-06-07

    Curricula in most western medical universities include teaching in the primary care setting as core elements. This affects GP-teachers, their patients and their interaction. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to assess the influence of the presence of medical students in the teaching practice on the attitudes of both GPs and patients. Seventy-four GP-preceptors were invited to answer an online survey. Patients attending consultations with a medical student present completed questionnaires either before the consultation (WR group) or immediately after consultation (AC group). Fifty- nine preceptors completed the online survey. Physicians showed positive attitudes towards their activities as preceptors: 95% expressed a positive attitude predominantly towards being a role model and to represent the discipline and for 64% remuneration was not important. In 28 practices 508 questionnaires were completed by patients in the WR-group and 346 by the AC-group. Only 12% (WR) and 7.2% (AC) of patients expressed a preference for being seen by the doctor alone. While 16% of doctors rated that confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship is compromised, only 4.1% (WR) and 1.7% (AC) of patients felt so. The motivation to be a preceptor is primarily driven by personal and professional values and not by economic incentives. Further, patients have even more positive attitudes than the preceptors towards the presence of students during their consultation. Reservations to teaching students in GP-practices are, therefore, unwarranted.

  7. Applying Attribution Theory to Teaching of Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how to teach interviewing to journalism students. Advocates a course informed by attribution theory, based on a creative, dialogical definition of the interview. Suggests using tape recorders or videotapes to help students objectively evaluate their own and others' performances. (SR)

  8. Burns injuries among in-patients at Moi Teaching and Referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Africa contributes 12.2% to the total global deaths due to burn injuries. There are no data on burns in the Western region of Kenya Objectives: To determine the causes and outcome of burns injuries among in-patients at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH), Eldoret, Kenya. Study design: Retrospective ...

  9. Patients' assessment of efficiency of services at a teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight–five percent and 76.8% of patients were satisfied with the X–ray and catering departments respectively. However, patients' rating of the level of sanitation was poor (46%). Conclusion: Areas of need identified include, waiting time prior to consultation, sanitation of the hospital and pharmacy department. Although ...

  10. HIV/AIDS among surgical patients in Butare University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of the study was to determine the frequency HIV among these patients and associated surgical conditions. Methods: This 3-months prospective ... to avoid getting infected with HIV. We found no statistically significant difference in the surgical pathologies between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.

  11. Autopsy audit of burn patients; the Lagos State University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background There are many studies detailing the improvement in the care and survival of burns patients. Very little have however been documented about the postmortem findings in patients that died after sustaining burns. This study was carried out to assess the severity of injury to skin and internal organs as revealed by ...

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING CHOICE OF ORAL HYGIENE PRODUCTS BY DENTAL PATIENTS IN A NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Opeodu, O. I.; Gbadebo, S.O.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several factors, such as cost, branding, packaging and family influence, had been implicated as influencing the choice of toothpastes and toothbrushes by individuals. Media advertisement is also considered a very strong factor influencing consumer's choice. Aim: To assess the extent to which some factors influenced the choice of toothpastes and toothbrushes among dental patients in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Materials and methods: Two-hundred and two patients were interviewed o...

  13. Evaluation of Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization in Patients Hospitalized in a Referral Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Rasool Soltani; Hossein Vatanpour; Fatemeh Shafiee; Niloofar Sadeghian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opioid drugs are the most effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Rates of opioid use are influenced by a variety of factors. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of use of parenteral opioid drugs in hospitalized patients in a referral teaching hospital. Methods: In a retrospective study, required data were extracted from medical records of adult patients who had received any parenteral opioid analgesic in the 6-month period from March 2013 to S...

  14. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals.

  15. Patient perceptions of their role in undergraduate medical education within a primary care teaching practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Beverley; Pearson, David

    2012-07-01

    The importance of patient involvement as a positive contribution to both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education is now widely acknowledged. Patient contact has become an integral component of teaching, learning and assessment strategies. Research has considered the pedagogic advantage; however, a view from the patient on structure, process and outcome of their contribution has gone largely unexplored. The role of real patients in medical education is changing from passive to a more active involvement. Various commentators have called for more research into patients' perceptions of their role and involvement across a spectrum of educational activities and settings. This study offers an in-depth exploration of the patient perspective from primary care; a setting increasingly important for undergraduate medical education. The aim of this study is to explore patients' perceptions of their role in undergraduate medical education within a UK primary care setting. A case study approach with an emphasis on data from in-depth interviews of 18 volunteer patients conducted within a purposively selected single teaching practice. The study captures patient perceptions of their experience, process and an evaluation of their involvement in medical student education. Findings highlight four key themes of involvement that reflect the existing literature but provide additional insights. The themes are; reflections on level of involvement and organisational support; benefits to students; perceived benefits to patients themselves; and wider benefits to medical education and educators. Patient perceptions of their involvement in clinical teaching support their key intended role within the educational process. Patients identified perceptions of benefit for students, educators and themselves. The implications of these findings are explored within the context of educational practice.

  16. Postoperative Instructions Preoperatively-Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Teaching Model on Patient Satisfaction Regarding Instructions for Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepian, Jennifer; McGah, Cheryl; O'Brien, Claire

    2017-06-01

    Patients in the ambulatory setting often receive home care instructions, primarily in the postoperative phase. Patient's retention and understanding of these instructions is one determinant of postoperative outcomes. This article highlights how we designed and implemented a teaching strategy to better prepare patients for discharge from an ambulatory surgical setting. Our methods included developing a day of surgery plan for teaching patients their discharge instructions upon arrival, creating on-line teaching videos, and revising post discharge pain medication instructions. We used our patient satisfaction surveys to differentiate patients who were taught home care instructions in the preoperative phase day of surgery compared to those who received instructions in the postoperative phase. Our results indicate that doing home care instructions before surgery is the optimal time for patient teaching. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A systematic review of educational resources for teaching patient handover skills to residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F Masterson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: As physicians reduce their work hours, transfer of patient care becomes more common; this is a time of heightened risk to patients. Training in patient handover skills may reduce this risk. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature regarding education models available to teach handovers skills to healthcare professionals. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to identify published educational resources on patient handover skills. Two investigators independently reviewed publications for inclusion/exclusion. A third reviewer resolved any disagreement. Included papers contained an educational resource for teaching handover skills to any health profession in any patient population. Papers were rated on a previously described 4 point scale for quality. Results: 1746 papers were identified, of which twelve met the inclusion criteria These studies presented information on educational curricula, simulation technologies and didactic sessions. The most common educational method was simulation or role-playing, which is better received by learners than didactic sessions. Teaching handover practices makes residents feel more confident in their handover, and residents receiving adequate handover are more comfortable with their duties. Conclusions: Although  data are limited, effective training models for handover skills have been described in the literature. Residents and other healthcare practitioners should receive training in handover to improve practitioner comfort and patient care.

  18. Use of standardized patients to teach medical students about living organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Katrina A; Moolla, Ariff; Rehfield, Patricia L

    2012-03-01

    Educators routinely use standardized patients to teach medical students a variety of clinical concepts. Standardized patients have also been used to teach students about medical ethics and deceased organ donation. Not reported before, however, is the use of standardized patients to educate medical students about the ethical issues in living organ donation. It seems important to fill this gap because in the United States, roughly 45% of organ donors are living donors, and these patients will visit physicians throughout their lifespan, not just with the occurrence of donation. This article reports an experience teaching concepts in living donation and transplant ethics to second-year osteopathic medicine students using a standardized patient and supplementary instructional materials (eg, film, panel discussion, reading list). Specifically, a transplant ethics module was created that included an actor portraying a living donor candidate who had a number of case variables pertaining to medical and psychosocial matters. Instructional themes included informed consent, altruism, patient selection criteria, organ vending, and post-donation support systems.

  19. Using Technology to Enhance Discharge Teaching and Improve Coping for Patients After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Melissa A; Howard, Katrina A

    2017-06-01

    A diagnosis of stroke is a life-changing event. Effective discharge teaching after a stroke is crucial for recovery, but the overload of information can be overwhelming for patients and caregivers. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in discharge readiness and postdischarge coping in patients admitted for stroke after the use of individualized postdischarge information/education provided via a technology package (including patient online portal access, e-mail/secure messaging) compared with current standard discharge teaching methods (verbal/written instructions). This study used a descriptive comparative design to evaluate the difference between the nonintervention group A and the intervention group B. Patients in group B received additional discharge information via secured e-mail messaging at postdischarge days 2, 6, and 10. Two validated tools, Readiness for Hospital Discharge Form and Post-Discharge Coping Difficulty Scale, were used. One hundred patients were recruited for the study, but the final number of complete data sets collected was 86-42 in group A and 44 in group B. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in discharge readiness. There was a significant difference in coping scores between the 2 groups, with the technology group exhibiting higher coping. New technology affords new options to improve discharge readiness and contribute to positive patient coping after stroke. The researchers hope that this study will contribute to the growing body of evidence showing success using aspects of technology to enhance discharge teaching and follow-up after discharge.

  20. Awareness and Knowledge of Glaucoma Among Adult Patients at the Eye Clinic of a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkum, G; Lartey, S; Frimpong, C; Micah, F; Nkum, B

    2015-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is an irreversible blinding disease that often presents late because it is symptomless in the early stages. Prognosis depends on early diagnosis and treatment and patient understanding of their condition. Many patients present late because of poor awareness and knowledge. This study was conducted to assess patient's awareness and knowledge of glaucoma in a referral Teaching Hospital. Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among glaucoma patients aged 40 years and above attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH). Patients were selected by simple random sampling. They were recruited after informed consent had been given. A questionnaire on demographics, socio-economics and awareness of glaucoma was administered. There were a total of 117 participants, 61 males and 56 females. The median and modal age group was 50 and 59 years. Amongst the participants, 74% were aware of glaucoma. There were no significant statistical difference in the various age groups, sex, ethnic group or religion and their awareness of glaucoma (P > 0.05).There were statistically significant differences between those who had higher education and their awareness of glaucoma (P < 0.001). Yet only 27% of these had accurate knowledge of glaucoma. Glaucoma awareness in patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital is high. Higher education was associated with higher awareness yet this was not translated into accurate knowledge as there were significant misconceptions. There is the need to review the contents of health education with the aim of reducing dangerous misconception of glaucoma and targeting the lower socioeconomic population.

  1. A model to teach concomitant patient communication during psychomotor skill development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Delwyn; Sweet, Linda; Muller, Amanda; Hyett, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Many health professionals use psychomotor or task-based skills in clinical practice that require concomitant communication with a conscious patient. Verbally engaging with the patient requires highly developed verbal communication skills, enabling the delivery of patient-centred care. Historically, priority has been given to learning the psychomotor skills essential to clinical practice. However, there has been a shift towards also ensuring competent communication with the patient during skill performance. While there is literature outlining the steps to teach and learn verbal communication skills, little is known about the most appropriate instructional approach to teach how to verbally engage with the patient when also learning to perform a task. A literature review was performed and it identified that there was no model or proven approach which could be used to integrate the learning of both psychomotor and communication skills. This paper reviews the steps to teach a communication skill and provides a suggested model to guide the acquisition and development of the concomitant -communication skills required with a patient at the time a psychomotor skill is performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. (ANC) patients at the Lagos state university teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... correlation exist between malaria parasitaemia and age of patient (r = - 0.02), parity (r = - 0.02) and gestation ... has important consequences for pregnancy, especially ... To this end, early detection in pregnancy will enable the.

  3. Teaching strategies for self-care of the intestinal stoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching self-care must ensure the intestinal stoma patient more independence concerning the family and health professionals. The planning involves the assessment of the clinical and socio-demographic data, and the conditions for the self-care. This study aimed at identifying strategies to teach self-care for intestinal stoma patients in the scientific production. We used an integrative review on MEDLINE, PUBMED, LILACS, CINAHL and COCHRANE bases from 2005 to 2011, 7 papers were selected. In the perioperative teaching, multimedia, telephone follow-up, personal meetings, interactive material through the Internet were used, besides the continuing education of the health professionals. These different strategies profess the needs of each individual that promote self-care learning about the surgery and its consequences, skills development and the necessary adaptation of the condition of a stoma patient. The nurse needs to have technical and scientific knowledge on surgical technique, demarcation, treatment, complications, and skills for the teaching of self-care.

  4. Patient Storytelling in the Classroom: A Memorable Way to Teach Spiritual Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L

    2016-01-01

    Storytelling is an evidence-based teaching and learning strategy that engages students and promotes critical thinking. Although most nursing textbooks incorporate spiritual nursing care, the texts lack examples of how to tie evidence-based spiritual interventions to specific medical-suigical content. Stories told from the patient's perspective can communicate insights that nurses and students can use when planning spiritual carefor patients. Stories shared by patients with undergraduate nursing students were effective in promoting learning and offered concrete examples of supportive spiritual resources for patients.

  5. A Syllabus for Teaching Peritoneal Dialysis to Patients and Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana E; Bernardini, Judith; Bowes, Elaine; Hiramatsu, Miki; Price, Valerie; Su, Chunyan; Walker, Rachael; Brunier, Gillian

    Being aware of controversies and lack of evidence in peritoneal dialysis (PD) training, the Nursing Liaison Committee of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) has undertaken a review of PD training programs around the world in order to develop a syllabus for PD training. This syllabus has been developed to help PD nurses train patients and caregivers based on a consensus of training program reviews, utilizing current theories and principles of adult education. It is designed as a 5-day program of about 3 hours per day, but both duration and content may be adjusted based on the learner. After completion of our proposed PD training syllabus, the PD nurse will have provided education to a patient and/or caregiver such that the patient/caregiver has the required knowledge, skills and abilities to perform PD at home safely and effectively. The course may also be modified to move some topics to additional training times in the early weeks after the initial sessions. Extra time may be needed to introduce other concepts, such as the renal diet or healthy lifestyle, or to arrange meetings with other healthcare professionals. The syllabus includes a checklist for PD patient assessment and another for PD training. Further research will be needed to evaluate the effect of training using this syllabus, based on patient and nurse satisfaction as well as on infection rates and longevity of PD as a treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  6. Balancing patient care and student education: learning to deliver bad news in an optometry teaching clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M; Schryer, Catherine F; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of seven senior optometry students and six optometrist instructors at a Canadian optometry teaching clinic. The participants described their experiences in learning to deliver bad news. Using a grounded theory approach, our analysis was informed by situated learning and activity theory. Optometry students received formal classroom training regarding how to deliver bad news, including exposure to the medically-based six-step SPIKES protocol (Baile et al. The Oncologist, 5, 302-311, 2000). Yet, application of this protocol to the teaching clinic was limited by the lack of exposure most instructors had received to this strategy. Determinants of the students' complex learning process during their clinical apprenticeship, included: (i) knowing one's place, (ii) knowing one's audience, (iii) knowing through feedback, and (iv) knowing who speaks. The experiences of these participants pointed toward the need for: (1) more instructional "scaffolding" (Bruner and Sherwood Play: Its role in development and evolution, p. 280, 1976) in the clinical setting when the learning task is complex, and (2) explicit discussions about the impacts that unfold when the activities of patient care and student education overlap. We reflect on the possible consequences to student education and patient care in the absence of these changes.

  7. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges…

  8. Depressed patients seen at the University of Benin Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinicians need to pay attention to occupational functioning, as it may be a pointer to the severity of depression. Impaired occupational functioning, feelings of worthlessness and suicidal ideation should be inquired after during evaluation of depressed patients as uncovering them may forestall attempted or actual suicide.

  9. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, outlined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Videotaping was performed with actual keyboard sounds for realism. The recording was divided into four areas: office mock-up, keyboard close-ups, scan-conversion and screen close-ups. Once the footage was recorded, it was logged and rough-edited. Care was taken to balance the pace of the program with visual stimulation and amount of narration. The final edit was performed as a culmination of all scripts, video materials and rough edit, with graphics and steady change of visual information offsetting the static nature of the screen display. Carefully planned video programs can be a useful and economical adjunct in the training process for online services.

  10. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...

  11. Using a virtual patient activity to teach nurse prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Heather M; Marks-Maran, Diane

    2011-05-01

    The Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences at Kingston University/St George's University of London (KU/SGUL) provides a module to train registered nurses to qualify as independent nurse prescribers. During the programme the participants engage in an online learning activity using a virtual patient (VP). The aim of this VP activity is to enable students to consolidate their learning and to practice the range of skills that the students have been developing related to prescribing. The activity was designed by the module leader and was run as a pilot on two groups of students (n = 34). An evaluative study was undertaken on the value of this blended learning activity to the student and their prescribing practice. This paper presents the development, implementation and evaluation of the VP activity. Findings showed that the VP activity was perceived as being particular useful for helping them to learn the skills of patient history/assessment, decision-making and prescription writing. The VP was also perceived as being helpful in developing their confidence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a medication review service for patients with enteral tubes in a community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tracey; Eisenhart, Alison; Costello, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The results of a study to develop a hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes to improve patient safety are presented. Inappropriate enteral administration of medications can result in occluded tubes, altered clinical response, and an increase in adverse effects. At Saint Barnabas Medical Center, a 600-bed community teaching hospital located in Livingston, New Jersey, a medication review service for patients with an enteral tube was developed. A phased approach was used. In phase 1, a retrospective chart review revealed that 43% of our patients with enteral tubes received at least one medication that should not be crushed. In phase 2, we identified formulary medications that should not be crushed based on guidance from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. We added a "do not crush" warning to the identified medications in our electronic medication administration record and automated medication dispensing system. In phase 3, we created an automatic substitution list of medications. Phase 4 involved the development of the program in our health information technology platform. An electronic task list alerted pharmacists about patients with enteral tubes who required medication review and potential medication substitutions, as well as patients with newly removed enteral tubes who can be placed back on their original medications. In phase 5, we provided education to prescribers, nurses, and pharmacists. A hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes at our community teaching medical center was developed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using a competency-based approach to patient education: achieving congruence among learning, teaching and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Whei Ming; Herron, Bobbi; Osisek, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Millions of Americans are living with, and managing, their chronic health problems. Patient education plays an essential role in promoting safe self-management practice. To ensure that patients attain the required abilities, patient education needs to be competency-based. When developing and applying a competency-based patient education lesson/program, each nurse must answer questions concerning essential competencies, optimal teaching methods, best method to evaluate patient achievement, and documentation of evidence. This article describes how the authors used these questions as a guide to achieve congruence among intended learning, instruction, and evaluation to design and implement a patient education program, Managing Heart Failure, at a local hospital. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Bringing the homosexual patient out: teaching the doctor's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, K A; Hale, F A

    1985-11-01

    Little attention is given in the medical school curriculum to providing care for the 5-10% of the population that is homosexual. An elective course was developed to promote more positive attitudes among doctors-in-training towards homosexual patients. The format was primarily small group discussion between students and articulate homosexual people around societal biases towards homosexuals and issues of health care delivery. Students from this seminar and a control group from another elective completed an attitude questionnaire before and after the course. The study group became more accepting towards homosexual lifestyles significantly in 12 of 15 measures while no difference was found in the control group. Students' reaction to this learning experience was highly positive: they appreciated the opportunity to learn about same-sex life-styles in a personal and nonthreatening way, thus enabling them to accept and better care for homosexual people.

  15. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  16. [Teaching-learning strategies in nursing--analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva; Koizumi, Maria Sumie

    2009-09-01

    Using the Glasgow Coma Scale (ECGI) as a subject, this paper aims to analyze and verify the apprehension of knowledge towards the teaching-learning and self-learning offered to nursing workers, and to check the degree of knowledge acquired during the process and possible results stemming from the nursing student/nursing worker association. This descriptive, quantitative-based study counted on the participation of 62 currently enrolled students in the first semester of the 4th year of nursing. The following teaching-learning strategies were used: expositive classes with the use of slides and videotape, and a basic text. Among participants, 41.9% were nursing workers; 61.3% informed to have taken care of patients with high alteration of the consciousness level, predominantly located in their working group. Statistically, there has been a successful improvement in the percentage of correct actions after the expositive class and videotape. Self-learning results showed no alteration either. Intergroup correlations displayed no disparity in the degree of acquired knowledge.

  17. Do-not-resuscitate orders for terminal patients with cancer in teaching hospitals of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeun; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Nam, Eun Mi; Lee, Hye Ran; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Soon Nam

    2007-10-01

    To examine the current practices relating to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders for terminal patients with cancer at teaching hospitals in Korea. The records of 387 deaths from January 1 to December 31, 2005 at four cancer centers were identified and reviewed to assess the DNR delineation. Basic demographics, circumstances surrounding the establishment of the DNR directive, the percentage of orders for identified populations, and the time interval between DNR consent and death were evaluated. An order of DNR consent was obtained from 296 patients (76%) of a total of 387 patients. All DNR consents were made between the physician and family, without involving the patient. Written preprinted DNR consent forms were used in 169 (57%) cases and 127 patients (43%) had verbal DNR permission. DNR consent was interpreted in two ways: one forbade resuscitation in two hospitals and the other implied limited care in two other hospitals. A unilateral physician decision to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was decided for 62 (16%) patients. Terminal CPR was performed on 29 (7%) patients. DNR discussion was made within 7 days of the day of death on 228 (77%) patient among the 296 DNR consenting patients. From our teaching-hospital-based analysis of terminal cancer patients in Korea, consent for a DNR order was common. However, DNR order forms were not standardized and lacked room to document patient involvement in the decision. Usually the DNR decision was made within last days of the patient's life. Our results reflect the need for the improvement of end-of-life care decisions in Korea.

  18. The state of quality improvement and patient safety teaching in health professional education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Stolarek, Iwona; Wells, Susan; Bohm, Gillian

    2017-10-27

    To investigate how quality and patient safety domains are being taught in the pre-registration curricula of health profession education programmes in New Zealand. All tertiary institutions providing training for medicine, nursing, midwifery, dentistry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dietetics and 11 other allied health professions in New Zealand were contacted and a person with relevant curriculum knowledge was invited to participate. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide to explore nine quality and safety domains; improvement science, patient safety, quality and safety culture, evidence-based practice, patient-centred care, teamwork and communication, leadership for change, systems thinking and use of information technology (IT). Transcribed data were extracted and categorised by discipline and domain. Two researchers independently identified and categorised themes within each domain, using a general inductive approach. Forty-nine institutions were contacted and 43 (88%) people were interviewed. The inclusion and extent of quality and safety teaching was variable. Evidence-based practice, patient-centred care and teamwork and communication were the strongest domains and well embedded in programmes, while leadership, systems thinking and the role of IT were less explicitly included. Except for two institutions, improvement science was absent from pre-registration curricula. Patient safety teaching was focused mainly around incident reporting, and to a lesser extent learning from adverse events. Although a 'no blame' culture was articulated as important, the theme of individual accountability was still apparent. While participants agreed that all domains were important, the main barriers to incorporating improvement science and patient safety concepts into existing programmes included an 'already stretched curriculum' and having faculty with limited expertise in these areas. Although the building blocks for improving the quality and safety of

  19. [Implementation of the teaching-learning strategy for the chronic patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Maria Célia; de Santana, Mary Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    This study aims at implementing the teaching-learning strategy for families of patients in chronic conditions. It considers the importance of evaluating the needs and abilities of family members in order to prepare them to manage that situation appropriately, as well as to be able to provide adequate home care. A diagnostic evaluation of a family member/caretaker was conducted during the hospitalization of a patient with congestive cardiac insufficiency. During the diagnosis "knowledge deficit" was identified. Thus, a teaching plan was elaborated for such caretaker with the purpose of preparing him/her for home care. During implementation, formative evaluations were conducted with the purpose of learning about the efficacy of the strategies employed and the summative in the patient's home. The importance of nurses' resorting to the teaching-learning strategy in order to guide the family member/caretaker in the process of caring for people with chronic conditions was certified. The aim is promoting life, in spite of the disease, since the quality of such care will prevent aggravating recurrence and consequent re-hospitalizations.

  20. Teaching Student Pharmacists to Apply Drug Literature to Patient Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Robert D; Henriksen, Jennifer A; Hanson, Kierstan; Robison, Holly D

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To implement a series of activities designed to build drug literature evaluation skills and assess their impact on student pharmacists' ability to apply study results to patient cases. Design. Coursework was integrated across two didactic and pharmacy practice laboratory (PPL) courses. Team and individual journal clubs were used in traditional and case-based approaches during PPL courses to reinforce skills introduced in didactic courses. Student performance and perceptions were assessed during orientation for the third professional (P3) year and after the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) at the end of the P3 year in identical drug literature evaluation assessments and pre- and post-intervention surveys of students. Assessment. Mean scores on team and individual journal club sessions were 91.8%±7.3% and 88.0%±8.2%. Of 64 students who completed both P3 assessments, 29 (45.3%) earned a passing score on the drug literature evaluation assessment at orientation compared to 57 (89.1%) after the OSCE. Conclusion. Student performance and confidence improved on objective assessments following a series of both team and individual, and traditional and case-based journal clubs.

  1. Teaching French Transformational Grammar by Means of Computer-Generated Video-Tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred; Thomas, Jean Jacques

    This paper describes a pilot program in an integrated media presentation of foreign languages and the production and usage of seven computer-generated video tapes which demonstrate various aspects of French syntax. This instructional set could form the basis for CAI lessons in which the student is presented images identical to those on the video…

  2. Patient safety: the experience of an Italian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marchetti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction The risk management project of The University Hospital “A. Gemelli” aims to define the necessary procedures to manage clinical risk, by identifying the structures involved within this process, so that all of the personnel can contribute to a measurable improvement in the safety of both patients and staff.

    Methods The Risk Management Program is comprised of 5 long-term phases: Phase 1 - Strategy Definition and Communication: a clear and shared Risk Management Strategy is indispensable to guarantee a coordinated action plan, in order to focus all of the interventions towards the achievement of common and measurable results. Phase 2 - Risk Management System Governance: all of the organisational structures have been activated in order to effectively manage the Risk Management System. The system has been introduced to interact within all areas of the hospital and to transfer information. Phase 3 - Promotion within the Organisation: this phase fosters the aims of the project within the whole organisation, by stressing the concept of “learning from errors”. This is crucial if organisational and healthcare workers are to understand the true aims of risk prevention and protection and offer to contribute to the process. Phase 4 - Risk Assessment: a data survey system was created and institutionalized. This phase begins with an analysis of the information flow, in order to estimate the probabilities that certain risks occur, and ends with defining the interventions to undertake. Risk assessment makes it possible to forecast the consequences of certain risks and thus prioritise those for prevention. Phase 5 - Risk Management: this consists of planning and implementing all of the actions necessary to prevent risks, protect and finance (in terms of prevention A. Gemelli University Hospital.

    Results The results achieved are remarkable especially when one

  3. Life after Tracheostomy: Patient and Family Perspectives on Teaching, Transitions, and Multidisciplinary Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Michael E; Ward, Erin; Roberson, David W; Shah, Rahul K; Stachler, Robert J; Brenner, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    To report patient/family experiences and outcomes after tracheostomy International survey of patients and families with tracheostomy. Collaboration of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the Global Tracheostomy Collaborative. A 50-item survey was developed with multistakeholder collaboration. The survey was disseminated via international social networks used by patients with a tracheostomy and their families. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed. Of 220 respondents, 90% cared for a pediatric patient with a tracheostomy. Only 48% of respondents felt "very prepared" at time of discharge, and 11% did not receive emergency preparedness training prior to discharge. Home nursing needs were inadequately met in 17% of families, with resulting difficulties shortly after discharge; 14% sought emergent care within 1 week of discharge. Nearly half of respondents indicated a desire to have met with a patient with a tracheostomy prior to surgery but were not offered that opportunity. Fragmented care or limited teamwork was reported by 32% of respondents, whereas tracheotomy care was described as "integrated" or "maximally integrated" for 67%. While many families report satisfaction with tracheostomy care, opportunities remain for improving care. This study highlights the importance of teaching, teamwork, and smoothing transition from the hospital. Potential quality improvement areas include standardizing tracheostomy teaching for routine and emergency needs and optimizing postdischarge support and coordination. Prior to surgery, connecting families to people with a tracheostomy may also be beneficial. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  4. Expert patient illness narratives as a teaching methodology: A mixed method study of student nurses satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo-Cid, Maria; Moriña, David; Gómez-Ibáñez, Rebeca; Leyva-Moral, Juan M

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate nursing students' satisfaction with Expert Patient Illness Narratives as a teaching and learning methodology based on patient involvement. Mixed methods were used in this study: online survey with quantitative and qualitative items designed by researchers. Sixty-four nursing students of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, attending a Medical Anthropology elective course. Women more frequently considered that the new learning methodology was useful in developing the competency "to reason to reason the presence of the triad Health-Illness-Care in all the groups, societies and historical moments" (p-value=0.02) and in that it was consolidated as a learning outcome (p-value=0.022). On the other hand, men considered that this methodology facilitated the development of critical thinking (p=0.01) and the ability to identify normalized or deviant care situations (p=0.007). Students recognized the value of Expert Patient Illness Narratives in their nursing training as a way to acquire new nursing skills and broaden previously acquired knowledge. This educational innovation improved nursing skills and provided a different and richer perspective of humanization of care. The results of the present study demonstrate that nursing students found Expert Patient Illness Narratives satisfactory as a learning and teaching methodology, and reported improvement in different areas of their training and also the integration of new knowledge, meaning, theory applicability, as well las critical and reflective thinking. Involvement of patients as storytellers also provides a new humanizing perspective of care. Nonetheless, further studies of Expert Patient Illness Narratives are needed in order to improve its benefits as a teaching and learning methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of hidden curriculum in teaching pharmacy students about patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Fay; Steven, Alison; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2011-09-10

    To examine how hidden and informal curricula shaped pharmacy students' learning about patient safety. A preliminary study exploring planned patient safety content in pharmacy curricula at 3 UK schools of pharmacy was conducted. In-depth case studies were then carried out at 2 schools of pharmacy to examine patient safety education as delivered. Informal learning from teaching practitioners was assigned high levels of credibility by the students, indicating the importance of role models in practice. Students felt that the hidden lessons received in the form of voluntary work experience compensated for limited practice exposure and elements of patient safety not adequately addressed in the formal curriculum, such as learning about safe systems, errors, and professionalism. Patient safety is a multifaceted concept and the findings from this study highlight the importance of pharmacy students learning in a variety of settings to gain an appreciation of these different facets.

  6. 36 CFR 1280.44 - May I film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for commercial purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for commercial purposes? 1280.44 Section 1280.44 Parks, Forests, and Public... Rules for Filming, Photographing, or Videotaping on NARA Property? § 1280.44 May I film, photograph, or...

  7. Merging the Power of the Computer and VCR: Interactive Videotape with the Mandell Instant-Active Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Mandell Instant-Active Device, a microcomputer-based system that enables teachers to add questions and/or statement prompts to an existing videotape without affecting the videotape itself. Applications, procedures, student feedback, and hardware requirements are discussed. Ordering information is included. (MES)

  8. A Critical Review of the Effectiveness of "Teach-Back" Technique in Teaching COPD Patients Self-Management Using Respiratory Inhalers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantic, Dennis Emralino

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine and discuss the evidence base behind the effectiveness of the "teach-back" technique as an educational intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient self-management using respiratory inhalers. Design: A systematic literature review Method: A search was conducted through Medline, CINAHL…

  9. Predictors of preoperative anxiety among surgical patients in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, South Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigussie, Seifu; Belachew, Tefera; Wolancho, Wadu

    2014-09-05

    Hospitalization and surgery are critical negative life events that lead to the experience of considerable anxiety in patients. Patients may perceive the day of surgery as the biggest and the most threatening day in their lives. There is paucity of information on predictors of anxiety in the current study area. The main objective of this study is to assess predictors of preoperative anxiety among patients scheduled for surgery in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted using quantitative data collection technique in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital from February 13 to April 13, 2012 on 239 patients scheduled for surgery. The data were collected by five trained diploma nurses using structured interviewer administered questionnaires that were prepared based on state trait anxiety inventory measurement scale. The quantitative data were entered into SPSS for windows version 16. 0 and descriptive, simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. A total of 239 patients were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 93.0%. Their mean age was 42.7 ± 1.8 years (range 16 to 85 years). Nearly over half 53.6% were females, while 48.1% illiterate, 72.4% Oromo and 56.5% were Muslim followers. Significant preoperative anxiety was seen in 70.3% patients. The most common factors that lead to anxiety were fear of death 38.1% and fear of unknown origin 24.3% and the most common strategy mentioned by patient in reducing anxiety were talking to other patient 79.8% and religious belief. In the present study, two third 70.3% of preoperative patients had anxiety. Factors which were positively correlated with anxiety were trait anxiety, single and divorced, time of operation and income. Factors which were shown to reduce anxiety were preoperative anxiety related information provision and afternoon operation. Health professionals working in the hospital should provide anxiety related

  10. Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Martha A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods : Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results : During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion : New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards.

  11. Animal Classification. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They learn what the terms "kingdom", "phylum", and "order" mean, and discover how the 3.5 million-plus organisms found on Earth fit into…

  12. Marine & Other Invertebrates. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Invertebrate animals include a vast array of spineless creatures. In this video, students discover marine lifeforms such as jellyfish,…

  13. Real Talk: Interviews, Radio Broadcasts and Videotaping as Context in Advanced Italian Conversation Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Clara

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problems faced by teachers of third-year (i.e. advanced) Italian language courses, particularly in developing students' speaking skills. Stresses the importance of "real talk" and discusses relevant student activities such as interviewing native speakers, preparing live radio broadcasts, and videotaping students speeches and…

  14. Amphibians. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Students find out about the world of amphibians as they examine their physical characteristics, environments, and life cycles, as well as…

  15. Camera Perspective Bias in Videotaped Confessions: Experimental Evidence of Its Perceptual Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Jennifer J.; Lassiter, G. Daniel; Schmidt, Heather C.; Snyder, Celeste J.

    2006-01-01

    The camera perspective from which a criminal confession is videotaped influences later assessments of its voluntariness and the suspect's guilt. Previous research has suggested that this camera perspective bias is rooted in perceptual rather than conceptual processes, but these data are strictly correlational. In 3 experiments, the authors…

  16. Robert Sylwester on Social Interaction and Brain Development. Windows to the Mind, Volume 1. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Robert

    This videotape explores the relationship between the child's social world and cognitive development. The first part of the video examines why the social environment is important to brain development. This section looks at the amount of time a child spends in a social environment, and the anatomy of the developing brain. The second part of the…

  17. Insects & Other Arthropods. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They also learn that there are more species of insects than any other animal class in the world. Insects are incredible creatures with many…

  18. The Importance of Child Development in Education: A Conservation with James Comer and Chip Wood. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, James; Wood, Chip

    Taped before an audience of teachers from around the country, this 65-minute videotape presents a discussion between James Comer and Chip Wood, noted experts in child development and education, in which they converse and respond to questions about critical issues confronting educators today. During the first part of the video, Comer and Wood…

  19. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  20. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  1. Birds. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. There are many different types of birds, over 9,000 different species. While not all birds take to the air, they all have feathers. Students…

  2. A system for sampling changes in blood pressure from a videotape, using Finapres(TM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Wittebrood, J.; Staak, C. van der; DeMey, H.; Schaap, C.

    1996-01-01

    A system is described that measures blood pressure noninvasively and continuously during a videotaped verbal interaction. The system incorporates the use of the Finapres to nonintrusively and continuously measure BP during a verbal interaction. Segments from the interaction, in which blood pressure

  3. How To Dance through Time. Volume II: Dances of the Ragtime Era, 1910-1920. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 59-minute VHS videotape is the second in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It provides 44 step combinations and how-to instructions to help viewers learn to dance the most popular dances of the early 20th century (the ragtime era), including: the wild animal dances (fox trot, horse trot, kangaroo hop, duck waddle, squirrel,…

  4. Presenting Social Issues with Videotape [and] Teaming Up to Take a Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Diana; Jackson, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the use of media in schools. One describes the use of videotapes to present social issues; the second describes the use of an integrated learning system with ninth and tenth grade at-risk students to improve their rate of attendance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (LRW)

  5. Reptiles. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The ancestors of reptiles date back to the dinosaurs. After the dinosaurs died out, it was one of the best-adapted species that survived and…

  6. Food Chains. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The food chain provides a clear example of how life continues year after year. Students learn how the cycle of energy starts with the sun,…

  7. Teaching patient care to students: A blended learning approach in radiography education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleiker, Jill, E-mail: j.bleiker@ex.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Knapp, Karen M.; Frampton, Ian [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Understanding the complexity of the patient-practitioner interaction is a challenging area for radiography students early in their programmes. A small scale research project was undertaken to develop blended learning resources for the teaching of patient care to radiography students. Its purpose was to utilise experiences gathered from interviews with ex-patients to produce video clips of patient-practitioner interactions so that students might gain some insight into the reality of the clinical setting, thus enabling them to link theory with practice. A total of eight interviews with ex-patients were carried out and the transcripts used to generate scripts which were enacted and filmed by a professional acting company. Thematic analysis of the study data initiated the generation of scenarios, which formed the basis of the videos. Twelve scenes showing patient-practitioner interactions in various parts of a medical imaging department and four 'talking heads' clips were produced. These were loaded onto the university's virtual learning environment and made available for viewing together with self-test and evaluation questionnaires. A pilot study was carried out; evaluation of the videos by second year student radiographers was positive. The main study was carried out using first year students with similarly positive findings and the videos are now publically available for teaching purposes. Further work in this promising area of e-learning could further utilise patients' experiences, and using the same technology, might offer students of other professions the opportunity to gain vicarious experience prior to their first encounters with patients and the general public. In conclusion, research leading to the production of simulations of real-life patient-practitioner interactions delivered using blended learning is a useful pedagogical tool in the education of radiography students.

  8. Non-pharmacological management of patients hospitalized with heart failure at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Eneida R; Aliti, Graziella B; Goldraich, Lívia; Domingues, Fernanda B; Clausell, Nadine; Rohde, Luis E

    2006-09-01

    To describe non-pharmacological management of patients admitted with heart failure (HF) in a teaching hospital. A cohort longitudinal study of patients diagnosed with HF according to the Boston score. Within the first 72 hours of admission, the nursing staff of the HF clinic conducted structured interviews and medical chart reviews. Two hundred and eighty-three admissions of 239 patients (age = 64 +/- 15 years) were evaluated; approximately 50% of the patients were male and 37% had heart failure of ischemic etiology Non-pharmacological measures included salt restriction in 97%, urine output monitoring in 85%, fluid balance in 75%, weight monitoring in 61%, and fluid restriction in only 25% of the patients. However, they were often not carried out by the team in charge (p < 0.01 for all comparisons). Irregular use of prescribed drugs in the week prior to admission was 22% and 21% in non-readmitted and readmitted patients, respectively (p = 1.00). Readmitted patients (n = 38) had severe systolic dysfunction, more previous hospitalizations, and longer duration of HF symptoms, as compared to those non-readmitted; in addition they had better knowledge related to self-care (p values < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, only duration of symptoms remained as an independent predictor of re-admissions. Our data suggest that, even at a teaching hospital, important gaps exist between prescribing non-pharmacological measures for HF patients and their being carried out. Readmitted patients seem to have good understanding of their condition; this finding, however, is significantly associated with HF severity and time of onset.

  9. Telephone interpreter discrepancies: videotapes of Hmong medication consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Maichou; Chewning, Betty

    2016-02-01

    Over 25 million people in the USA have limited English proficiency (LEP). Interpreters are often used to facilitate communication with health care providers. Little is currently known about interpreter quality. To explore the quality of telephone interpretation during medication consultations between Hmong clients and their pharmacists. This descriptive study analyzed transcripts from videos of consultations between six triads of Hmong patients, pharmacy students and interpreters. Analysis was divided into two segments: (1) pharmacy: communication from student pharmacist the interpreter to patient and (2) patient: communication from patient to interpreter to student pharmacist. Researchers coded transcripts separately then compared codes. The six encounters yielded 496 communications with 275 discrepancies including omissions, additions, and word substitutions. Pharmacy to patient communications included, 45% (118/262) of omissions, 27.5% (72/262) of substitutions, and 15.6% (41/262) of additions. The patient to provider communications included, 8.1% (19/234) of omissions, 6.0% (14/234) of substitutions, and 4.2% (10/234) of word additions. Some omissions, additions, and substitutions in the pharmacy to patient communications were classified as potentially clinically relevant. Significantly, substantial discrepancies between the student pharmacists' comments and the interpretation to patients had potential for hindering relationship building between patients and their providers. Pharmacists may assume that the presence of an interpreter ensures accurate communication from pharmacist to patient and from patient to pharmacist. This study confirms that those assumptions may not be valid. These findings highlight the need to improve pharmacy education and interventions to improve pharmacist communication with LEP patients. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Characteristics of quality and patient safety curricula in major teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, Susan K; Davis, David A; Dickler, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    The authors recently discovered 2 quality and patient safety curricula for internal medicine and general surgery residents in major teaching hospitals: an infrequent formal curriculum developed by the university and a positive informal curriculum found in the teaching hospital. A hidden curriculum was postulated. These data were gathered through applied qualitative research methodology. In this article, curricular characteristics of the formal, informal, and hidden curricula are described and analyzed. Themes evaluated were planning, delivery, evaluation, drivers, responsible entity, and resources. The data show different curricular characteristics in each theme, especially for the formal and informal curricula. Understanding curricular characteristics represents the next step in understanding the environments of resident quality and safety learning, especially in the academic hospital setting. Aligning the formal and informal curricula as well as leveraging all curricula could improve educational venues for quality and safety and institutional clinical performance, and promote a learning health care system.

  11. Incorporating a Video-Editing Activity in a Reflective Teaching Course for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadde, Peter J.; Aud, Susan; Gilbert, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Research and practice going back to the 1960s support the use of videotaping to facilitate preservice teachers' development of reflective teaching skills. Emerging research suggests that additional video-based activities, including editing video vignettes of teaching, can deepen preservice teachers' reflection. This action research study describes…

  12. Clinical course teaching in transport of critically ill patients: Small group methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Beigmohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patient transfer is potentially risky and may be lead to morbidity and mortality. Physicians' skill is very important for safe transport. We want to evaluate the effect of clinical course teaching on the promotion of physicians' abilities in the transport of critically ill patients. In an interventional study, 320 interns, male and female, were taught about patient transfer in two groups include in one day clinical course as the small group system (n=160 and other group the lecture base learning (n=160. In the clinical course, each participant under observation of an anesthesiologist in the operation room and ICU was acquainted with mask ventilation, intubation and learned to work with a defibrillator, infusion pump, portable ventilator and pulse oximeter. In lecture group, the anesthesiologist explained the topics by video and dummy. At the end of education course, the interns’ abilities were evaluated based on checklist method and scored by the project colleague in all educational items. Three hundred twenty interns, 122 males, and 198 females; were enrolled, two groups. The clinical course training caused improvements in the interns’ knowledge and abilities in intubation and use of the defibrillator and portable ventilator vs.lecture group significantly (P<0.005. The males were better than females in laryngoscopy, but the progress of the females was significantly better than males (P=0.003. The rate of adverse events was reduced significantly after clinical course teaching (P=0.041 Clinical course teaching could promote interns' clinical competencies in the transport of critically ill patients.

  13. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  14. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyder O Mirghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05. Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  15. Effectiveness of Teach-Back Self-Management Training Program on Happiness of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Rahnama, Mozhgan; Afshari, Mahdi; Asadi Bidmeshki, Elahe

    2016-10-01

    Self-management training is one of the ways to empower patients to cope with disease. The aim of this before-and-after quasi-experimental study was to determine effects of a teach-back self-management training method on breast cancer patient happiness. Fifty breast cancer patients who visited the Park-e Neshat Limited Surgery Clinic in Kerman, Iran were randomly divided into intervention and control groups after convenience sampling and checking for inclusion eligibility. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Inventory before and after teach-back training and analyzed using SPSS 23. Findings showed no significant difference between mean happiness scores in the two groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, the mean happiness score in the intervention group increased from 37.2 to 62.9, while it decreased from 41.4 to 29.8 in the control group. These changes were statistically significant (phistory of cancer education, the observed differences between the groups were statistically significant (pmanagement training program can increase happiness levels in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the use of this method is recommended to improve self-management and increase happiness. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. The effectiveness of using non-traditional teaching methods to prepare student health care professionals for the delivery of mental state examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huiting; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jia; Joon, Kum Eng; Parasuram, Rajni; Gunasekaran, Jamuna; Poh, Chee Lien

    2015-08-14

    validity prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument embedded within the System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion between the reviewers. Data was extracted using data extraction tools developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute Quantitative data was extracted from papers using standardized data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument. The included studies were found to be heterogeneous in terms of participants and teaching methods. Moreover, a wide variety of instruments were used to determine impact and outcomes of the teaching methods. Hence, findings of the included articles were presented in a narrative summary. A total of 12 articles were included in this review with consensus from all reviewers. The evidence retrieved in this study suggests that non-traditional teaching methods, such as videotapes, virtual simulation, standardized patients and reflection, improve learners' understanding and skills of mental state examination as opposed to traditional teaching methods like lectures and provision of reading materials. However, studies that specifically compared the effectiveness of one method over another were limited to comparison between lectures with videotaped interviews and virtual simulations. It was shown that both videotaped interviews and virtual simulations were superior to lectures. In videotaped teaching, interactions between patients and learners performing mental state examination were shown for the learner’s discussion while virtual simulations mimicked patient symptoms in computer applications. Virtual simulation was notably a unique learning opportunity for the learners as it allowed learning to take place without the use of

  17. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  18. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical management of patients with periodontal abscesses attending a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to examine the clinical management of patients who attended a Nigerian teaching hospital with periodontal abscesses. Setting and Design: This is a retrospective study among patients who attended the Periodontics Clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria, between January 2008 and December 2015. Patients and Methods: Information about the diagnosis was obtained from the departmental log book, and case notes were retrieved from record department. Data collection elicited information on age, sex, tribe, frequency of tooth brushing, dental attendance, medical history, clinical features, involved tooth/teeth, and treatment received. Statistical Analysis Used: Epi info version 3.5.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients aged between 15 and 87 years, with a mean age of 35.53 ± 19.30 years. Majority of patients were males, had minor ethnic extractions, had some form of education, first dental clinic attendees, indulged in once-daily toothbrushing, fully dentate, and had fair/poor oral hygiene. A total of 8.8% and 31.6% of the participants smoked cigarettes and consumed alcohol, respectively. A fifth of the participants had systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcer disease. Majority of the participants (91.2% had severe pain. About two-fifths had periodontal abscess around the incisors and the molars. The upper right quadrant was mostly involved (31.6%. Two-fifth of the patients had extraction done. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed periodontal abscess as a severely painful condition in naÏve dental patients, successfully treated mainly through extraction of the implicated tooth/teeth. This implies that oral health awareness and regular dental attendance may prevent its occurrence.

  19. RN Evaluation of Errorless Methods in Teaching Discharge Medications to Cognitively Challenged Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Patiag, Maricel; Farrar Highfield, Martha E

    To identify (1) effectiveness of current registered nurse (RN) strategies in teaching discharge medications to cognitively challenged patients and (2) whether errorless teaching/learning (ETL) with pictorial medication cards improves such instruction. Cross-sectional, qualitative, pretest/posttest. Open-ended interviews and a class on ETL were conducted with a purposive sample of 10 expert staff RNs from rehabilitation and neurological telemetry units in a 377-bed, not-for-profit hospital. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Informants reported current practices that were not adapted for the cognitively challenged population (n = 10). They also found the new ETL easy, effective, and useful in promoting safety and satisfaction but reported that writing on the cards was too time-consuming (n = 7). Although not generalizable, outcomes suggest value in revising and evaluating ETL with a pictorial card for teaching this population. Discharge medication knowledge is critical to safe self-management, and using ETL with cognitively challenged persons may promote learning.

  20. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

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    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  1. Residents' Perspectives on Patient Safety in University and Community Teaching Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety is an important concept in resident education. To date, few studies have assessed resident perceptions of patient safety across different specialties. Objective The study explored residents' views on patient safety across the specialties of internal medicine, general surgery, and diagnostic radiology, focusing on common themes and differences. Methods In fall 2012, interviews of small groups of senior residents in internal medicine, general surgery, and diagnostic radiology were conducted at 3 academic medical centers and 3 community teaching hospitals in 3 major US metropolitan areas. In total, 33 residents were interviewed. Interviews used interactive discussion to explore multiple facets of patient safety. Results Residents identified lack of information, common errors, volume and acuity of patients, and inadequate supervision as major risks to patient safety. Specific threats to patient safety included communication problems, transitions of care, information technology interface issues, time constraints, and work flow. Residents disclosed that reporting safety issues was viewed as burdensome and carrying some degree of risk. There was variability as to whether residents would report safety threats they encountered. Conclusions Residents are aware of threats to patient safety and have a unique perspective compared with other health care professionals. Transitions of care and communication problems were the most common safety threats identified by the residents interviewed. PMID:26279801

  2. [The scientific videotape with digital processing in surgery. The new opportunities offered surgery for videotape recording and postprocessing with the use of information and digital technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, N

    1999-01-01

    The facility of the tape recording of a surgical operation, by means of simple manageable apparatuses and at low costs, especially in comparison with the former cinematography, makes it possible for all surgeons to record their own operative activity. Therefore at present the demonstration in video of surgical interventions is very common, but very often the video-tapes show surgical events only in straight chronological succession, as for facts of chronicle news. The simplification of the otherwise sophisticated digital technology of informatics elaboration of images makes more convenient and advisable to assemble the more meaningful sequences for a final product of higher scientific value. The digital technology gives at the best its contribution during the phase of post-production of the video-tape, where the surgeon himself can assemble an end product of more value because aimed to a scientific and rational communication. Thanks to such an elaboration the video-tape can aim not simply to become a good documentary, but also to achieve an educational purpose or becomes a truly scientific film. The initial video will be recorded following a specific project, the script, foreseeing and programming what has to be demonstrated of the surgical operation, establishing therefore in advance the most important steps of the intervention. The sequences recorded will then be assembled not necessarily in a chronological succession but integrating the moving images with static pictures, as drawings, schemes, tables, aside the picture-in picture technique, and besides the vocal descriptive comment. The cinema language has accustomed us to a series of passages among the different sequences as fading, cross-over, "flash-back", aiming to stimulate the psychological associative powers and encourage those critical. The video-tape can be opportunely shortened, paying attention to show only the essential phases of the operation for demonstrate only the core of the problem and utilize

  3. Short Report: Students' perception of different teaching aids in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical teachers have conventionally been using different teaching methods to educate medical students previously dominated by blackboard and slide projectors. More recently audiovisual aids such as videotapes and multimedia have been introduced. Critics of multimedia feel that it is expensive, too time consuming, ...

  4. Prevalence of infection in patients with temporary catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital

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    Palmiane de Rezende Ramim Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of infection related to the provisional catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital and evaluate the risk factors associated with these infections.  A cross-sectional study analyzed by descriptive statistics and parametric tests. It was found that out of 129 patients, 48.8 % had catheter-related infection in hemodialysis, 65 % were male, 33.3 % were 60 years old and over, and 88 % of patients were admitted to intensive care unit. The prevalence of infection in this group was high, and the vast majority of diagnoses of infection were empirical. Given this, it is suggested to establish the routine culture of the catheter tip in all cases of suspected catheter infection to improve the quality of patient care, and the relentless pursuit of the causes that trigger the infection process in line with good practice from across the healthcare team.

  5. Teaching while learning while practicing: reframing faculty development for the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Michael A; Sikon, Andrea L; Lypson, Monica L; Gomez, Arthur; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bowen, Judith L

    2013-09-01

    Soaring costs of health care, patients living longer with chronic illnesses, and continued attrition of interest in primary care contribute to the urgency of developing an improved model of health care delivery. Out of this need, the concept of the team-based, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has developed. Amidst implementation in academic settings, clinical teachers face complex challenges not previously encountered: teaching while simultaneously learning about the PCMH model, redesigning clinical delivery systems while simultaneously delivering care within them, and working more closely in expanded interprofessional teams.To address these challenges, the authors reviewed three existing faculty development models and recommended four important adaptations for preparing clinical teachers for their roles as system change agents and facilitators of learning in these new settings. First, many faculty find themselves in the awkward position of teaching concepts they have yet to master themselves. Professional development programs must recognize that, at least initially, health professions learners and faculty will be learning system redesign content and skills together while practicing in the evolving workplace. Second, all care delivery team members influence learning in the workplace. Thus, the definition of faculty must expand to include nurses, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants, patients, and others. These team members will need to accept their roles as educators. Third, learning to deliver health care in teams will require support of both interprofessional collaboration and intraprofessional identity development. Fourth, learning to manage change and uncertainty should be part of the core content of any faculty development program within the PCMH.

  6. Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery manual test: is videotaped performance assessment an option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Deborah M; Brissman, Inga C; Finks, Jonathan F; Gauger, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    In efforts to maintain standards required to evaluate the high-stakes assessment, Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) requires all new proctors to complete the train-the-proctor workshop. As the pool of FLS proctors expands, new methods to streamline training and quality assurance programs should be considered. We propose that videotaped performances of the FLS manual tasks may be an alternative proxy to live assessment for training of new proctors, but evaluation of proctors' measures from videotaped FLS performances is required before implementation. A 2-phased research consisted of capturing newly trained proctors' (n = 20) ratings of 3 similar FLS performances across 3 stations-live (Live), videotaped-laparoscopic only (Lap Only) view, and videotaped-dual (Dual) views, during the 2012 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons FLS train-the-proctor workshop. A month later, a sample of proctors (n = 9) viewed videotaped versions of live FLS performances originally observed during the workshop. Captured metrics include recognition of a predefined critical error for each task (dichotomously scored and summed) and time to complete each of the 5 tasks. Analysis of variance compared the proctors' summed ratings for similar performances across Live, Lap Only, and Dual views, whereas paired t test compared recorded times of Lap Only vs Dual views, Live vs web ratings, and proctors' recorded times across the Lap Only and Dual views. There were neither differences in ratings across Live, Lap Only, and Dual views (p = 0.49) nor in recorded times for performances viewed across Lap Only and Dual viewing options (p = 0.29 and 0.76, respectively). Mean summed performance ratings observed live (4.6) were higher than those observed via the web (4.0), although not significant (p = 0.051). There were no differences in recorded times for identical performances across Live and web observations (p

  7. Progress in Teaching Physician–Patient Communication in Medical School; Personal Observations and Experience of a Medical Educator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Glick

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the enormous progress of Western medicine during the past century there has not be a concomitant rise in the public’s satisfaction with the medical profession. Much of the discontent relates to problems in physician–patient communication. The multiple advantages of good communication have been clearly demonstrated by numerous careful studies. While the past few decades have witnessed much more attention given to teaching communication skills in medical schools, there are a number of factors that create new problems in physician–patient communication and counteract the positive teaching efforts. The “hidden curriculum”, the increased emphasis on technology, the greater time pressures, and the introduction of the computer in the interface between physician and patient present new challenges for the teaching of physician-patient communication.

  8. Progress in teaching physician-patient communication in medical school; personal observations and experience of a medical educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Shimon

    2011-04-01

    In spite of the enormous progress of Western medicine during the past century there has not be a concomitant rise in the public's satisfaction with the medical profession. Much of the discontent relates to problems in physician-patient communication. The multiple advantages of good communication have been clearly demonstrated by numerous careful studies. While the past few decades have witnessed much more attention given to teaching communication skills in medical schools, there are a number of factors that create new problems in physician-patient communication and counteract the positive teaching efforts. The "hidden curriculum", the increased emphasis on technology, the greater time pressures, and the introduction of the computer in the interface between physician and patient present new challenges for the teaching of physician-patient communication.

  9. Common concepts in separate domains? Family physicians' ways of understanding teaching patients and trainees, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Berg, Mattias; Scott, Ian; Bates, Joanna

    2015-06-27

    Medical education is increasingly expanding into new community teaching settings and the need for clinical teachers is rising. Many physicians taking on this new role are already skilled patient educators. The purpose of this research was to explore how family physicians conceptualize teaching patients compared to the teaching of trainees. Our aim was to understand if there is any common ground between these two roles in order to support faculty development based on already existing skills. Semi-structured interviews with twenty-five family physician preceptors were conducted in Vancouver, Canada and thematically analyzed. We identified four key areas of overlap between the two fields (being learner-centered; supporting the acquisition, application and integration of knowledge; role modeling and self-disclosure; and facilitating autonomy) and three areas of divergence (aim of teaching and setting the learning objectives; establishing rapport; and providing feedback). Finding common ground between these two teaching roles would support knowledge translation and inquiry between the domains of teaching patients and trainees. It would furthermore open up new avenues for improving training and practice for clinical teachers by better linking faculty development and continuing medical education (CME).

  10. Patient's Perception of Nursing Care at a Large Teaching Hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samina, Mufti; Gj, Qadri; Tabish, Sa; Samiya, Mufti; Riyaz, R

    2008-07-01

    As focus has shifted from the healthcare providers to the healthcare consumers; patient satisfaction is being increasingly used worldwide for the assessment of quality of services provided by healthcare institutions. To understand patient satisfaction, "patient's perception" of care must first be understood. Of all the healthcare workers nurses spend maximum time with the patients. Therefore, the nurse is in a unique position to influence and promote effective consumer relationships. Though patient satisfaction surveys with nursing care are routinely conducted in the developed world to monitor and improve the quality of care, the same is not true for the developing world especially in the Indian subcontinent. To conduct a study of patient's perception of nursing care in a large teaching hospital. A prospective study spread over a period of one year was carried out. Sample size consisted of seven percent of patients each admitted as emergency and routine. All the randomly selected patients were administered questionnaires, thus obtaining a sample size of 2600. Of these 2500 questionnaires were usable for data analysis (valid response rate of 81.6%). The results of the study revealed a relatively higher percentage of patients with poor perception regarding 'explanation and information', and 'caring attitude' aspects of nursing care (31.6% and 11.5% respectively). However more than 95% patients had good perception of 'responsiveness', 'availability' and 'ward organization' capability of the nurse. Patient satisfaction surveys should become a regular outcome monitoring feature in all the hospitals. Also In-service training programs for nurses, with special emphasis on communication are need of the hour and should become a regular exercise.

  11. The Learning Facilitation Effects of the Videotaped Teaching-Materials in High School Technology Education - Teaching-Material Development -

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 恭三; Sato, Kyozo

    1980-01-01

    In the high school technology lessons, learning of the wood and metal working requires an understanding of the difficult cutting mechanism.The visual aids, such as figures, pictures, and film strips have been utilized to help the students understand. However, it is difficult to show the complicated cutting mechanism by such visual aids.The author has recently devised models to enable the students to observe the students to observe the production processes of wood and metal shavings.By utilizi...

  12. Sugar or high fructose corn syrup-what should nurses teach patients and families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Linda L; Dalby, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    There is lack of consensus in the lay literature to support consumption of table sugar as a preferred sweetener when compared to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The purpose of this study was to search the literature for evidence to determine the health effects of consumption of table sugar (sucrose) and HFCS on blood glucose, lipid levels, obesity, and appetite as well as to make recommendations for patient and family teaching of those at risk for developing negative health outcomes, including coronary heart disease. Nursing and health-related databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and Health and Wellness were searched for research articles, which were compared and evaluated for purpose, sample size, procedure, findings, and level of evidence. Five studies that met inclusion criteria were evaluated. No difference was found in changes in blood glucose levels, lipid levels, or appetite between table sugar consumption and HFCS consumption. When only fructose was consumed, lipid levels were significantly increased. The evidence suggests that fructose, found in both table sugar and HFCS, has a negative effect on health outcomes. Clinicians should teach patients and families that all sugar consumption should be closely monitored and kept below the 40 g/day recommended by the World Health Organization. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Medical students' assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Greisen, Gorm Ole

    2014-11-13

    We introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching and examination for pediatric medicine. Medical students on a pediatric clerkship at the University of Copenhagen assessed eight short pediatric video cases during autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Two independent observers evaluated a subset of records in a pilot study. A blind evaluation was made of the written records of 37 students before, and 58 students after, the introduction of the program using a Rubric score with four domains. The intraobserver interclass correlation coefficient was 0.94 and the interobserver interclass correlation was 0.71(n=25). The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (ppediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program. The impact on real-life situations remains to be established.

  14. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  15. A Web-based Game for Teaching Facial Expressions to Schizophrenic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülkesen, Kemal Hakan; Isleyen, Filiz; Cinemre, Buket; Samur, Mehmet Kemal; Sen Kaya, Semiha; Zayim, Nese

    2017-07-12

    Recognizing facial expressions is an important social skill. In some psychological disorders such as schizophrenia, loss of this skill may complicate the patient's daily life. Prior research has shown that information technology may help to develop facial expression recognition skills through educational software and games. To examine if a computer game designed for teaching facial expressions would improve facial expression recognition skills of patients with schizophrenia. We developed a website composed of eight serious games. Thirty-two patients were given a pre-test composed of 21 facial expression photographs. Eighteen patients were in the study group while 14 were in the control group. Patients in the study group were asked to play the games on the website. After a period of one month, we performed a post-test for all patients. The median score of the correct answers was 17.5 in the control group whereas it was 16.5 in the study group (of 21) in pretest. The median post-test score was 18 in the control group (p=0.052) whereas it was 20 in the study group (pgames may be used for the purpose of educating people who have difficulty in recognizing facial expressions.

  16. The challenges of teaching universal precautions to multicultural, diverse patients and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, K

    1995-01-01

    Teaching universal precautions to culturally diverse groups, whether healthcare workers, patients, or family members, is a unique challenge. In the environment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, it involves honest and realistic appraisal of the modes of transmission and the risks involved. In addition, we must understand the fears involved, as well as the cultural perspectives that may alter the perception of the situation. This article will discuss the many cultural problems, briefly review what information needs to be included in any educational program, and focus on how we can realistically assess the risks involved and communicate those risks to healthcare workers, patients, and family members. When these risks are addressed honestly and without fear, implementation of and compliance with universal precautions will become easier, both in acute care and home care settings.

  17. Pain, role play, and videotape. Pain management staff development in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroszewski, E B; Meehan, D A

    1997-01-01

    Videotaped role play was an effective staff development strategy used as an initial exercise in a five-part class to update the pain management skills of experienced nurses. It engaged the participants in learning and stimulated discussion and provided concrete feedback of current clinical practices for comparison with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research pain management guidelines (Acute Pain Management Guideline Panel, 1992).

  18. Teaching medical communication skills: a call for greater uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyck, David; Lang, Forrest

    2002-05-01

    Evidence suggests that strategies used in teaching communication skills vary widely among, and within, medical education programs. Such variance also exists in the amount of emphasis placed on specific communication skills. This study examines the degree of variability among medical faculty in identifying opportunities for teaching communication skills. Sixty-seven medical faculty (physicians and behavioral scientists) reviewed a videotaped interview of a clinician with a standardized patient. Using a transcript of the interview, participants identified moments in the tape they believed warranted an instructional intervention to reinforce or modify the clinician's communication skills. Items identified by the participants were compared to items identified by a panel of experts. Frequencies and ANOVAs were used to report on consistency and on consistency as a function of faculty experience and educational background. Faculty demonstrated marked differences in identifying teachable moments across all six communication categories: (1) rapport building, (2) agenda setting, (3) information management, (4) active listening for the patient's perspective, (5) responding to emotion, and(6) skills in reaching common ground. Of 67 respondents, 29.6% identified none of the opportunities to teach rapport building, while only 31% identified all opportunities; 32.8% identified none of the information management opportunities, 26.9% identified all; 77.6% failed to identify the agenda-setting opportunity, 22% did identify the opportunity; 25.4% identified none of the active listening opportunities, 9% identified all; 57.6% identified none of the responding to emotion opportunities, 18% identified all; 35.8% did not identify the opportunity for reaching common ground, 64% did identify the opportunity. Our findings demonstrate that faculty who teach communications vary widely in the issues that they identify and about which they chose to teach. Recommendations are made for further

  19. Teaching and testing physical examination skills without the use of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Bernard; Thornton, William; Frye, Ann W

    2002-07-01

    To design a cardiopulmonary physical exam curriculum that does not involve the use of patients. Bedside teaching is becoming a lost art, and the use of alternative methods of instruction such as simulation has become increasingly important. Simulators have been shown to enhance physical examination skills of students and physicians in training.(1) In 1995, a program was started to improve cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis and the teaching of auscultation at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB). The teaching manikin "Harvey" played a vital role in the development of the new curriculum. In 1997, UTMB adopted an organ-based approach to the basic science curriculum. The cardiopulmonary module in the basic science curriculum was a ten-week course taught in the second year of medical school. The physical diagnosis section of that course involved six instructional hours; four of the six hours were dedicated to cardiac auscultation and two hours to pulmonary auscultation. Only simulators and CD-ROMs were used for instruction. The 184 second-year medical students at UTMB were formed into small groups for instruction and practice. Although "Harvey" was an effective teaching tool, other simulators had to be developed for testing students' skills after instruction. It would be very difficult to administer a skills OSCE for 184 students without the development of several smaller transportable simulators. A commercially available blood pressure simulator from the Medical Plastics Laboratory, Inc., Gatesville, TX, was used to test the accuracy of students' blood pressure readings. Small auscultation transducers combined with a palpable pulse simulator, developed by one of the authors (WT) in collaboration with Andries Acoustics, Spicewood, TX, were used to efficiently test students' proficiency in cardiopulmonary auscultation. Digital simulated cardiopulmonary sounds were recorded onto a standard CD-ROM mini-disc and transmitted to the small transducers

  20. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  1. Effects on postoperative salivary cortisol of relaxation/music and patient teaching about pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marion; Albert, Jeffrey M; Arafah, Baha; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Wotman, Stephen; Cong, Xiaomei; Lane, Deforia; Ahn, Sukhee

    2013-07-01

    The physiological and psychological stress of surgery and postoperative pain can leave patients more susceptible to infection and complications. The present study was designed to determine whether two interventions, patient teaching (PT) for pain management and relaxation/music (RM), reduced cortisol levels, an indicator of stress, following abdominal surgery. Patients (18-75 years) were randomly assigned to receive PT, RM, a combination of the two, or usual care; the 205 patients with both pre- and posttest cortisol values were analyzed. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to compare groups for PT effects and RM effects. Stress was measured by salivary cortisol before and after 20-min tests of the interventions in the morning and afternoon of postoperative Day 2. Saliva was stimulated with lemon juice and analyzed with high-sensitivity salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay. Comparisons using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for baseline levels, showed no PT effect or RM effect on cortisol in the morning or afternoon. Post hoc ANCOVA showed no significant effects when intervention groups were compared to the control group. Although in previous studies, RM reduced pain and music reduced cortisol on Day 1, in the present study the cortisol response to surgery was not attenuated by PT or RM on Day 2. The RM intervention can be used for pain but needs to be further tested for effects on plasma cortisol in abdominal surgery patients on their first postoperative day.

  2. Demographic survey of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Joyce

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the increasing use of alternative therapies for children, it is appropriate to determine the demographic profile of pediatric patients entering a chiropractic clinic. Methods Collection of demographic data including age, gender, condition at presentation, previous clinicians consulted and medical referral rates of pediatric patients presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic between 2006 and 2010. Results Over-all, 20.5% of patients were aged between two days and 15 years and classified as pediatric patients. The most common presenting complaint was musculoskeletal (35%. Excess crying (30% was the most common complaint in the largest presenting age group which was under 12 weeks of age (62.3%. All children had previously presented for medical care for the same condition. Most (83% of the infant patients under 12 weeks of age were referred for care by a medical practitioner. Conclusion Parents commonly presented their child for care at this chiropractic clinic with a recommendation from a medical practitioner. The most common complaints were musculoskeletal and excessive crying conditions and the most prevalent age group was under 12 weeks of age.

  3. Quality of nursing care and satisfaction of patients attended at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana Santana de; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Minamisava, Ruth; Bezerra, Ana Lúcia Queiroz; Sousa, Maiana Regina Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    assess the quality of nursing care, the patients' satisfaction and the correlation between both. cross-sectional study, involving 275 patients hospitalized at a teaching hospital in the Central-West of Brazil. The data were collected through the simultaneous application of three instruments. Next, they were included in an electronic database and analyzed in function of the positivity, median value and Spearman's correlation coefficients. among the nursing care assessed, only two were considered safe--hygiene and physical comfort; nutrition and hydration--while the remainder were classified as poor. Nevertheless, the patients were satisfied with the care received in the domains assessed: technical-professional, confidence and educational. This can be justified by the weak to moderate correlation that was observed among these variables. Despite the quality deficit, the patients' satisfaction level with the nursing care received was high. These results indicate that the institution needs to center its objectives on a continuing evaluation system of the care quality, aiming to attend to the patients' expectations.

  4. Patient safety in obstetrics and gynecology departments of two teaching hospitals in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindiya Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS, respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10 were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error.

  5. A pharmacovigilance study on patients of bronchial asthma in a teaching hospital

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    A N Jamali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The present study was conducted to monitor adverse drug reactions in patients of bronchial asthma in outpatient department and inpatient department of a university teaching hospital in South Delhi. Materials and Methods : About 200 patients irrespective of age and sex with established asthma were interviewed during the time period of January 2006 to April 2006 using structured questionnaire. Naranjo′s adverse drug reaction probability scale was used to assess the adverse drug reactions. Results : A total of 15 adverse drug reactions were reported in 13 out of 200 asthmatic patients. Among the 13 patients reported with adverse drug reactions, 5 (38.5% were male and 8 (61.5% patients were female. Maximum percentage of ADRs (2 in 15 prescriptions, 13.3% observed with montelukast, followed by beclomethasone (1 in 12 prescriptions, 8.3%, salbutamol (6 in 109 prescriptions, 5.5%, and ipratropium (3 in 63 prescriptions, 4.8%. Conclusions : Montelukast was found to be associated with greater percentage of adverse drug reactions as compared to other antiasthamatics. The above findings are constrained by a small sample size and need to be corroborated by conducting long-term studies using a larger sample size.

  6. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (Pimportance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. A trial of patient-oriented problem-solving system for immunology teaching in China: a comparison with dialectic lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiren; Liu, Wei; Han, Junfeng; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-01-28

    The most common teaching method used in China is lecturing, but recently, efforts have been widely undertaken to promote the transition from teacher-centered to student-centered education. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that permits students to work in small groups to solve clinical problems, promotes self-learning, encourages clinical reasoning and develops long-lasting memory. To our best knowledge, however, POPS has never been applied in teaching immunology in China. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching immunology and assess students' and teachers' perception to POPS. 321 second-year medical students were divided into two groups: I and II. Group I, comprising 110 students, was taught by POPS, and 16 immunology teachers witnessed the whole teaching process. Group II including the remaining 211 students was taught through traditional lectures. The results of the pre- and post-test of both groups were compared. Group I students and teachers then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis before a discussion meeting attended only by the teachers was held. Significant improvement in the mean difference between the pre- and post-test scores of those in Groups I and II was seen, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS teaching. Most students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps them to understand topics and creates interest, and 88.12% of students favored POPS over simple lectures. Moreover, while they responded that POPS facilitated student learning better than lectures, teachers pointed out that limited teaching resources would make it difficult for wide POPS application in China. While POPS can break up the monotony of dialectic lectures and serve as a better teaching method, it may not be feasible for the current educational environment in China. The main reason for this is the relative shortage of teaching resources such as space, library facilities

  8. Effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtak, Mohammad; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Rjaei-Khiavi, Abdollah

    2017-10-01

    Many of the cognitive behavioral models and therapeutic protocols developed so far for psychological disorders and chronic diseases have proved effective through clinical research. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients. This controlled clinical trial study was conducted in 2015 with 76 patients selected by census and treated with a hemodialysis machine in the dialysis department of Vali-Asr Hospital in the city of Meshkinshahr. A total of four patients were excluded because of their critical conditions while the rest, who were recruited, were randomly divided into two equal groups of 36 patients as the intervention and control groups. First, the locus of control was measured in both groups through a pretest, and cognitive-behavioral techniques were then taught to the intervention group during eight 45 to 90-minute sessions. The locus of control in patients of both groups was finally re-measured through a posttest. Data were collected using Rotter's Locus of Control Inventory. The Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were respectively used in SPSS18 for data analysis. In the pretest and posttest stages respectively, 4.8% and 14.3% of samples in the control group as well as 14.3% and 33.3% of samples in the intervention group enjoyed internal locus of control. The difference between the pretest and posttest scores of internal locus of control in the intervention group was significant (p=0.004), which indicates the positive effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapeutic intervention on internalization of locus of control in this group. Given the external locus of control in most of the study patients and also the positive significant effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy on internalization of locus of control in this group of patients, it appears necessary to have a psychology resident present in the hemodialysis department to teach the necessary cognitive

  9. Evaluation of Patient-Oriented Standards of Joint Commission International in Gilan and Mazandaran Teaching Hospitals

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    Ghaseminejhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Medical tourism, a multi-million-dollar industry, has had a significant effect in economic flourishing, creating jobs, and preventing the outflow of currency. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, according to joint commission international (JCI standards. Methods This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during year 2015. To collect data and evaluate the hospitals, patient-oriented standards of JCI was applied. Results Amongst the eight standards, international patient safety goals (IPSG (with a score of 87.5% had the highest, and patient and family education (PFE (with a score of 53.75% had the lowest score. Hospital “4” with a score of 90.41%, had the highest, and hospital “7” with 58.90%, had the lowest rate of compliance to the standards. According to the Mann-Whitney test, the observed statistics considering a P value of ≤ 0.05 level, was not significant, therefore on a 95% certainty level, there was no significant difference between hospitals in Gilan and Mazandaran, regarding compliance with standards. Overall, the hospitals under study were relatively prepared for attracting medical tourists. Conclusions According to the results, it seems that more planning and implementation of projects is required to strengthen the axes of the joint commission regarding accreditation of hospitals and attraction of medical tourists to these centers, especially foreign tourists. Researchers are recommended to pay special attention to the university of medical sciences of two provinces for the establishment of standards and utilization of professional consultants.

  10. The use of virtual patient scenarios as a vehicle for teaching professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, H F; Al-Eraky, M M; Almasoud, N N; Donkers, J; Van Merrienboer, J J G

    2017-07-10

    This study aimed to measure students' perceptions of virtual patient scenarios (VPs) for developing ethical reasoning skills and to explore features in VP design that are necessary to promote professionalism. Sixty-five dental students participated in learning sessions that involved collaborative practice with five VPs (four high fidelity and one low fidelity), followed by reflection sessions. Students' perceptions towards the use of VPs in developing ethical reasoning skills were assessed using a questionnaire that involved 10 closed and three open-ended questions. High-fidelity VPs were perceived as significantly better for developing ethical reasoning skills than low-fidelity VPs. Analyses of answers to open-ended questions revealed two new features that are specific for VPs intended for teaching professionalism, which are VP dramatic structure and how it should end. VPs intended for teaching professionalism need to have high fidelity, follow a specific dramatic structure and should include multiple plausible endings. The use of VPs as part of a collaborative activity that is followed by a reflection session is perceived as an effective tool for the development of ethical reasoning skills in dental education. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evidence-guided education: patients' outcome data should influence our teaching priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Thomas H

    2005-02-01

    How should medical educators choose learning objectives and teaching content in clinical education? Given the information chain reaction, coverage of all significant topics in sufficient depth is not possible. Choosing subjects of high priority is essential if education is to have maximum impact on quality of care. These priorities should not derive from tradition and opinion, but should be informed by patient outcomes, the ultimate standard for assessing educational effectiveness. Building upon prior initiatives linking education to practice, the author uses the term "evidence-guided education" to express the process of influencing curricular choices with evidence from health outcomes. Sources of outcome evidence include incident reports, morbidity and mortality conferences, surveillance of quality of care in particular venues, case series, surveys of adverse events and "near-misses," and malpractice claims. Starting with anecdotal occurrences, additional case-finding may establish patterns of poor outcomes, some of which may be preventable. Credible research data on outcomes can inform prioritization for objectives and content at successive institutional levels, which should improve practices and outcomes, completing the loop of feedback, implementation, and improved health. The closer the educational intervention is to practice, the more accountable it becomes. Thus, EGE is more amenable to evaluation at residents' and practitioners' levels and more difficult at the undergraduate level. However, outcome evidence should still inform undergraduate teaching, since this constitutes the platform for future learning. Severe constraints on learning time mandate prioritization of content and suggest the need for the judicious application of outcome evidence in place of mere opinion.

  12. Epidemiology of benign eyelid lesions in patients presenting to a teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Faky, Yasser H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the relative frequency of benign eyelid lesions presented to a teaching hospital in Saudi population. Patients and methods Charts of patients with benign eyelid lesions were retrospectively reviewed from January 2003 to December 2008. Clinical details included demographic data, symptoms and signs, surgical findings, primary diagnosis, and indication for biopsy were analyzed in a histopathologically confirmed benign eyelid lesions. Eyelid lesions were arranged according to their order of frequencies. Results A total of 222 biopsies were evaluated from 181 patients (male 39.2% and female 60.8%). The age of the patient at the time of biopsy ranged from 2 to 87 years old. The most common benign eyelid lesion encountered in our practice was sweat gland hidrocystoma followed by chalazion, skin tag, epidermal cyst, nevus, seborrheic keratosis, xanthelasma, and molluscum contagiosum respectively. Histopathological studies confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 95.9% (213/222) of specimens and was different from the clinical diagnosis in 4.1% (9/222) of the lesions which included seborrheic keratosis (n = 3), pilomatrixoma, steatocystoma, hemangioendothelioma, juvenile xanthogranuloma, calcinosis cutis, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum. No malignant lesion was labeled as benign. Conclusion Epidemiology of benign eyelid lesions in Saudi population is different from Far East or Western populations. Sweat gland hidrocystoma with classical clinical features and straightforward diagnosis is the most frequent lesion in our series which could be due to characteristic dry climate. PMID:23960994

  13. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC

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    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the patient safety culture from the viewpoint of 522(Qazvin: 200, Tehran: 312, Alborz: 40 individuals who were randomly selected as workers of the hospitals. The collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results:The mean positive response to 12 aspects of the patient safety was 62.9%. “Organizational learning” had the highest proportion of positive response (71.18% and “Handoffs & Transitions” had the lowest (54.49%. There was a statistically significant difference in scores of “Teamwork within Units”(p=0.006(,”Manager Expectations & actions promoting”(p=0.014,”organizational learning and continuous improvement”(p=0.001, “Management support”(p=0.007, “Feedback and communication”(p=0.012, and “Communication openness”(p=0.003 among the provinces, respectively. Conclusion: We performed a full assessment of the patient safety culture in the studied provinces. Organizational learning was satisfactory in the hospitals. The studied hospitals need arrangement of safety-based programs and supports of senior administrators to perform more sophisticated efforts and improve the patient safety culture.

  14. Students’ Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Holdgaard, Martin Møller; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    on students' patient-centeredness. Video-based patient cases are probably more effective than text-based patient cases in fostering patient-centered perspectives in medical students. Teachers sharing stories from their own clinical experiences stimulates both engagement and excitement, but may also provoke......' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed....... Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. CONCLUSION: The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact...

  15. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP) - Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Henrike; Freytag, Julia; Sonntag, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long) for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts. Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects) were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester. Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training. Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers' self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  16. Reduction of preoperative anxiety in pediatric surgery patients using age-appropriate teaching interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jennifer Nadine; Hooper, Vallire D; Masiongale, James

    2012-04-01

    More than 5 million children in the United States undergo surgery annually. Of those 5 million children, 50% to 75% experience considerable fear and anxiety preoperatively. Preoperative anxiety in children is associated with a number of adverse postoperative outcomes, such as increased distress in the recovery phase, and postoperative regressive behavioral disturbances, such as nightmares, separation anxiety, eating disorders, and bedwetting. Preparing the pediatric patient adequately for surgery can prevent many behavioral and physiological manifestations of anxiety. Children are most susceptible to the stress of surgery owing to their limited cognitive capabilities, greater dependence on others, lack of self-control, limited life experience, and poor understanding of the health care system. This article will review the literature on preoperative interventional teaching strategies to reduce preoperative anxiety in children and discuss the methods available for evidence-based preparation of children undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Intestinal parasitosis and shigellosis among diarrheal patients in Gondar teaching hospital, northwest Ethiopia

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    Huruy Kahsay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal diseases are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing world. Understanding the etiologic agents of diarrheal diseases and their association with socio-demographic characteristics of patients would help to design better preventive measures. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria in diarrheic patients. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 384 consecutive diarrheal patients who visited Gondar teaching hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia from October 2006 to March 2007 was conducted. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria following standard parasitological and microbiological procedures. Results Intestinal parasites were diagnosed in 36.5% of the patients. The most frequently encountered protozoan parasite was Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.3% followed by Giardia lamblia (5.0%, Cryptosporidium parvum (1.8% and Isospora belli (1.3%. The dominant helminthic parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (5.5% followed by Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni (3.1% each, hookworm infection (1.8%, and Hymenolepis species (1.3%. Multiple infections of intestinal parasites were also observed in 6.3% of the patients. Among the enteropathogenic bacteria Shigella and Salmonella species were isolated from 15.6% and 1.6%, respectively, of the patients. Escherichia coli O57:H7 was not found in any of the stool samples tested. Eighty eight percent and 83.3% of the Shigella and Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more commonly used antibiotics, respectively. Intestinal parasitosis was higher in patients who live in rural area, in patients who were washing their hands after visiting toilet either irregularly with soap and without soap or not at all, in patients who used well and spring water for household consumption, and in patients who had nausea (P P Conclusions The high

  18. Sleep quality assessment in 35 Parkinson's disease patients in the Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, B; Diop, M S; Sangare, M; Dembele, K; Cisse, L; Kone, O; Seck, L B; Landoure, G; Guinto, C O; Ndiaye, M; Ndiaye, M M

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disorders are diverse in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the quality of sleep in patients with Parkinson's disease in an African population. In a transversal and prospective study from April to June 2014, all parkinsonian patients followed at the Fann Teaching Hospital Neurology Clinic (Dakar, Senegal) were assessed using the Hoehn and Yahr's scale and filled out the following questionnaires: Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A PDSS score5 indicated poor quality or impaired sleep. An ESS score>10 indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. We used the Pearson coefficient to search for correlation between age, disease stage, disease duration, and the importance of sleep impairment. Hoehn and Yahr staging was 2.42±0.90 in the 35 patients (60% male, mean age 65.7±7.4years, disease duration 32.4±23.4months). The mean total PDSS score was 99.5±24.1 and 74.3% of the patients had an abnormally high PSQI score, indicating high frequency and intensity of sleep disorders. Most frequent disorders were pain or cramps interrupting sleep, night waking to urinate and fatigue or sleepiness on waking. Patients exhibited excessive diurnal sleepiness in 22.9% of the cases; they often had an abnormal PSQI score. Both the total PDSS score and the difficulty to sleep increased with disease stage, but not with age or disease duration. We found evidence of major alteration of sleep quality in Senegalese Parkinson patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of simulation-based teaching on home hemodialysis patient training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Doris T; Faratro, Rose; Chan, Christopher T

    2015-10-01

    Simulation has been associated with positive educational benefits in the training of healthcare professionals. It is unknown whether the use of simulation to supplement patient training for home hemodialysis (HHD) will assist in improving a patient's transition to home. We aim to assess the impact of simulation training on home visits, retraining and technique failure. Since February 2013, patients training for HHD are required to dialyze independently in a dedicated training room (innovation room) which simulates a patient's home prior to graduation from the program. We performed a single-center retrospective, observational, cohort study comparing patients who completed training using the innovation room (n = 28) versus historical control (n = 21). The outcome measures were number of home visits, retraining visits and technique failure. Groups were matched for age, gender, race, body mass index and comorbidities. Compared with controls, significantly more cases had a permanent vascular access at the commencement of training (57.1 versus 28.6%, χ(2) P = 0.04). Cases spent a median of 2 days [IQR (1.75)] in the innovation room. Training duration was not statistically different between groups {cases: median 10.0 weeks [IQR (6.0)] versus controls: 11.0 [IQR (4.0)]}. Compared with controls, cases showed a trend towards needing less home visits with no difference in the number of re-training session or technique failure. Simulation-based teaching in NHHD training is associated with a trend to a reduction in the number of home visits but had no effect on the number of re-training sessions or proportion of patients with technique failure.

  20. Maxillofacial and concomitant injuries in multiple injured patients at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, G; Boamah, M O; Avogo, D; Ndanu, T; Nuamah, I K

    2014-01-01

    Patients with maxillofacial injuries may sustain concomitant injuries. The presentation of other injuries may be the initial focus of attention of the primary attending surgeon who may miss the maxillofacial injuries to the detriment of the patient. To determine the incidence of injuries associated with maxillofacial injuries at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) from January 2009 to December 2010. A prospective study was carried out on patients who were referred to the Maxillofacial Unit of the University of Ghana Dental School and KBTH over the two years with maxillofacial injuries. Their age, sex, type of injury in the maxillofacial region, its aetiology and concomitant injuries were charted. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.0 software. Two hundred and fifty eight (258) patients were seen of which 67 (26.0%) had concomitant injuries. The average age was 29.1 years. The peak incidence was in the age group 21-30 (N=73, 28.3%). 74% were male and 26.0% female. The commonest cause of injury was road traffic accident (RTA) (N=142;55.0%). 52.7% (N=136) of the patients had injuries of the maxillofacial region. 26.7% (N=69) had mandibular fractures, 19.4% (N=50) had middle third fractures and 8.1% (N=21) had fractures of both. Concomitant injuries were mainly orthopaedic (N=31;12%) and the head and spinal region (N=29;11.2%). A significant number of patients who suffer maxillofacial injuries also sustain injuries of other parts of the body at KBTH. Prompt multidisciplinary management may contribute to improved outcomes.

  1. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Vitamin Supplementation among Patients visiting Out-Patient Physicians in a Teaching Hospital in Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Waris; Samani, Zahra Aziz; Azam, Iqbal; Lalani, Saima

    2012-03-01

    To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding the use of vitamin supplements among patients visiting Out-Patient clinics of a teaching hospital. Four hundred patients were interviewed during the period of July to September 2008, at the Out-patient clinics, Aga Khan University hospital, Karachi. A pre-tested and structured questionnaire was used to collect information. It consisted of questions regarding demographics, awareness of vitamin supplements and its consumption, reasons for usage and its effects. The purpose of the study was explained and assurance of confidentiality was given. After obtaining written consent, eligible individuals were interviewed. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19.0 was used to analyze the data. The results revealed that 98% of the respondents were aware of vitamin supplements. The most known vitamin was found to be Vitamin C (16.9%) with Vitamin K being the least well-known (0.4%); while 51.8% of the respondents were unaware of the harmful effects of vitamin supplements. The results also showed that 84.8% of the study population had taken vitamin supplements, and 79% of the participants considered that vitamin supplements to be helpful. Taking vitamin supplements as a compensation for the deficiencies in the body was the most frequently chosen answer (17.7%) as the reason for use of vitamin supplements. On the other hand, a majority of the population was unaware of the indications for use of vitamin supplements. This study highlights a very significant yet ignored issue of vitamin supplementation in Pakistan. A need exists to inform the general population about the use of vitamin supplementation. The media and the medical community are required to play their role in this regard. Short/ refresher training courses are needed for doctors to update and disseminate adequate knowledge of vitamin supplementation to their patients.

  2. A standardized patient model to teach and assess professionalism and communication skills: the effect of personality type on performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing professionalism and interpersonal communication skills can be more difficult for surgical residency programs than teaching medical knowledge or patient care, for which many structured educational curricula and assessment tools exist. Residents often learn these skills indirectly, by observing the behavior of their attendings when communicating with patients and colleagues. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of an educational curriculum we created to teach and assess our residents in professionalism and communication. We assessed resident and faculty prior education in delivering bad news to patients. Residents then participated in a standardized patient (SP) encounter to deliver bad news to a patient's family regarding a severe burn injury. Residents received feedback from the encounter and participated in an education curriculum on communication skills and professionalism. As a part of this curriculum, residents underwent assessment of communication style using the Myers-Briggs type inventory. The residents then participated in a second SP encounter discussing a severe pulmonary embolus with a patient's family. Resident performance on the SP evaluation correlated with an increased comfort in delivering bad news. Comfort in delivering bad news did not correlate with the amount of prior education on the topic for either residents or attendings. Most of our residents demonstrated an intuitive thinking style (NT) on the Myers-Briggs type inventory, very different from population norms. The lack of correlation between comfort in delivering bad news and prior education on the subject may indicate the difficulty in imparting communication and professionalism skills to residents effectively. Understanding communication style differences between our residents and the general population can help us teach professionalism and communication skills more effectively. With the next accreditation system, residency programs would need to

  3. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

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    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  4. Evaluation of Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization in Patients Hospitalized in a Referral Teaching Hospital

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    Rasool Soltani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid drugs are the most effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Rates of opioid use are influenced by a variety of factors. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of use of parenteral opioid drugs in hospitalized patients in a referral teaching hospital. Methods: In a retrospective study, required data were extracted from medical records of adult patients who had received any parenteral opioid analgesic in the 6-month period from March 2013 to September 2013. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification/Defined Daily Doses (ATC/DDD system method was used for evaluation of opioid analgesic use in patients.Results: The overall usage of parenteral opioid analgesics was 730.51 DDDs with meperidine (Pethidine having the most amounts of use (588.69 DDDs and 33.23 DDDs/100 bed-days. Overall, the male surgery ward and emergency department had the most amounts of use based on the number of DDDs (445.8 DDDs and per 100 bed-days (1046 DDDs/100 bed-days, respectively. Methadone use was most in the infectious diseases ward.Conclusion: The trend of parenteral opioid analgesics consumption is increasing in this hospital. Therefore, better adherence to pain treatment guidelines by medical staff is necessary for rational use of these drugs.

  5. Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing

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    Erica Borgstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Methods Two studies have explored students’ perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Results Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1 dedicated time with patients, (2 learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3 practicing communication skills, and (4 learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. Conclusion It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these

  6. Learning to care: medical students' reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstrom, Erica; Morris, Rachel; Wood, Diana; Cohn, Simon; Barclay, Stephen

    2016-11-25

    Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Two studies have explored students' perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1) dedicated time with patients, (2) learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3) practicing communication skills, and (4) learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these encounters valuable and many wrote about the benefit of formally

  7. Prevalence of taurodontism among the patients visiting a dental teaching hospital in Pune, India: A retrospective orthopantomogram study

    OpenAIRE

    Dipali Shah; Vikram Garcha; Janardan Garde; Devendra Ekhande

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Taurodontism is a morpho-anatomic variation in the shape of teeth that chiefly affects molars in primary as well as secondary dentition. Aim: The aim was to assess the prevalence of taurodontism in premolars and molars by studying the orthopantomogram (OPGs) of the patients visiting a dental teaching hospital in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out, wherein the panoramic radiographs of 525 randomly selected patients were eval...

  8. Smear Posetive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) Prevalence Amongst Patients at Agaro Teaching Health Center, South West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussen; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Mekonnen, Abiyu; Abera, Solomon; Ali, Solomon

    2012-03-01

    World Health organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis as a global emergency because it poses a serious public health threat in different countries especially, in Africa. According to WHO report of 2007, Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) coverage in Ethiopia reached 95 percent of the population; despite this fact the trend of tuberculosis in most of the districts of Ethiopia is not known. Hence, this study has revealed the trend and determined the overall prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in five years (2005/6-2009/10) in Agaro teaching health center, south west Ethiopia. A retrospective study based on record review was conducted at Agaro Teaching Health center on sputum examination record of patient's from 2005/6-2009/10(five years). Socio demographic data and sputum laboratory results were collected using pre-designed questionnaire and the data was entered into a computer using SPSS version 16 for windows. Finally, cross tab analysis and Chi-square was calculated at P-value less than 0.05 to check possible association between socio-demographic variables and smear positivity. The overall five years prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis was found out to be 10.9%. On the other hand, the percentage of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases showed gradual decrease from 19.5% in 2005/6 to 5.8% cases in 2009/10. Tuberculosis is still the major problem of Agaro health center catchment area even though there is a decrease in trend from year to year. Hence, the respective health bureau and other stake holders should still need to strengthen their effort to control it.

  9. Use of videotape to assess mobility in a controlled randomized crossover trial of physiotherapy in chronic multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Newcombe, R G; Fuller, K J; Jones, A; Price, M

    2003-05-01

    To determine to what degree assessment of mobility based on comparison of videotape recordings before and after courses of physiotherapy in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis (MS) is reliable, correlates with 'live' assessments and indicates benefit. Prospective data collection within a randomized crossover controlled trial of physiotherapy at home, as an outpatient, or 'no therapy' in 40 patients. Hospital outpatients: outpatient and home physiotherapy. Mobility change based on a comparison of short video recordings before and after each treatment period was scored independently by two physiotherapists blinded to therapy type and other measures of outcome. Scores were compared with changes in the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI) and other indices assessed by a physiotherapist in the patient's home. The two video observers agreed substantially on patient outcome. Changes in walking based on video correlated with RMI for home treatment (r = 0.41, p = 0.008) but not for hospital or no treatment periods (r = 0.14 and 0.15): video changes correlated with the 'live' assessor's global change score inconsistently ('no therapy' r = 0.48, p = 0.002, hospital r = 0.30, p = 0.06 and home r = 0.17, p = 0.30 treatment periods). Based on video data alone, improved mobility was evident following home therapy for only one observer but not for the other or the averaged scores of both. There was substantial agreement between two observers deciding on change in mobility based on independent blinded evaluation of short video sequences. However the correlations of these with 'live' assessments were variable. Physiotherapy had a less clear benefit on mobility based on video analysis alone compared with 'live' assessments. The study highlights the need for more objective measures of habitual mobility over longer periods.

  10. Antifungal agent utilization evaluation in hospitalized neutropenic cancer patients at a large teaching hospital

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    Vazin A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Vazin,1 Mohammad Ali Davarpanah,2 Setareh Ghalesoltani3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2HIV Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 3International Branch of Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Abstract: To evaluate pattern of using of three antifungal drugs: fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole, at the hematology–oncology and bone marrow transplant wards of one large teaching hospital. In a prospective cross-sectional study, we evaluated the appropriateness of using antifungal drugs in patients, using Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines. All the data were recorded daily by a pharmacist in a form designed by a clinical pharmacist and infectious diseases specialist, for antifungals usage, administration, and monitoring. During the study, 116 patients were enrolled. Indications of prescribing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole were appropriate according to guidelines in 83.4%, 80.6%, and 76.9% respectively. The duration of treatments were appropriate according to guidelines in 75%, 64.5%, and 71.1% respectively. The dose of voriconazole was appropriate according to guidelines in 46.2% of patients. None of the patients received salt loading before administration of amphotericin B. The most considerable problems with the mentioned antifungals were about the indications and duration of treatment. In addition, prehydration for amphotericin B and dosage of voriconazole were not completely compatible with the mentioned guidelines. A suitable combination of controlling the use of antifungals and educational programs could be essential for improving the general process of using antifungal drugs at our hospital. Keywords: utilization evaluation, fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole, neutropenia

  11. Nutritional Assessment in Elderly Hospitalized Patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals in 2011

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    Azam Ghorbani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nutritional status in the elderly is an important issue in developing countries has been little attention to it. It results from complex interaction between personal and environmental factors that have a considerable effect on mortality, morbidity and quality of life of elderly people especially the hospitalized ones. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional status in elderly hospitalized patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals and know Influential factors to plan appropriate programs for improving their health. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study 233 elderly (151 women and 171 men aging more than 60 years, hospitalized in two hospitals in Qazvin city were studied. Nutritional status were evaluated using Mini Nutritional Assessment, The nutritional status was classified into: malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. Results: Among the assessed elderly 29.8% were well nourish, 13.4% malnourished and 42.95 at risk of malnutrition. There was more malnutrition in females compared to males (25.8% vs 7.2 P=23(62.5% vs. 12.6% P<0.001, Statistical analysis of the studied variables showed that nutritional status were significantly associated with Age, BMI, WC and WHR Conclusion: This study confirms a high prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized elderly patients. The assessment of nutritional status with MNA that can facilitate evaluation of the nutritional status of elderly individuals in hospitals

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING CHOICE OF ORAL HYGIENE PRODUCTS BY DENTAL PATIENTS IN A NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITAL.

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    Opeodu, O I; Gbadebo, S O

    2017-06-01

    Several factors, such as cost, branding, packaging and family influence, had been implicated as influencing the choice of toothpastes and toothbrushes by individuals. Media advertisement is also considered a very strong factor influencing consumer's choice. To assess the extent to which some factors influenced the choice of toothpastes and toothbrushes among dental patients in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Two-hundred and two patients were interviewed on factors that influenced their choice of toothbrush and toothpaste. Some of the factors considered include the cost, packaging, brand, media advertisement and their previous experience. Factors that affected choice of toothbrush by respondents included texture (89.6%), brand (62.9%), previous experience (64.4%) and for toothpaste, fluoride content (62.4%), previous experience (69.3%), and advice by a dentist (55.0%). Media advertisement was the least influential in their choice of toothpaste (29.2%) and toothbrush (24.3%). Consideration for fluoride was a stronger factor than herbal contents in the choice of toothpaste (Ptoothbrush and toothpaste in this study, which suggest that for as long as the respondents are satisfied with a particular product, they will stick to it.

  13. How Students Learn to Teach? A Case Study of Instrumental Lessons Given by Latvian Undergraduate Performer Students without Prior Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, Manuel Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and discuss the way students of the Latvian Academy of Music teach before having entered a teacher training programme. Five hours of students' teaching work was video-taped, analysed and discussed with them between the spring of 2010 and the winter of 2011. The descriptive and analytic results of this…

  14. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  15. Incidence of extreme hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients during the month of July in teaching hospitals

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    Mansur Shomali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood glucose control has been found to be an important component in the care of hospitalized patients. Maintaining blood glucose within a target range using insulin intensively is a challenging task for physicians and requires skill and experience. We hypothesized that there may be more hyper- and hypoglycemia in July in teaching hospitals when new resident physicians begin their training. Methods: We reviewed point-of-care blood glucose data from hospitalized patients at four community teaching hospitals for 2010. We defined severe hypoglycemia as blood glucose < 41 mg/dL and severe hyperglycemia as blood glucose > 399 mg/dL. Occurrence of hyper- and hypoglycemic events was assessed overall at the particular hospital globally and based on individual nursing units. Monthly occurrence rates were compared against the annual mean for that unit. Results: The occurrence of hyper- and hypoglycemic events in July 2010 did not differ from the mean annual percentage of events at the applicable hospital. However, when the data were analyzed by the nursing unit, these extreme glucose events were significantly more common in 4 of the 11 units studied. Three of those four units were resident teaching units. Conclusions: These data suggest that there is some potential for increased risk of extreme hyper- and hypoglycemia at teaching hospitals in July, when new residents begin training.

  16. Safety and effectiveness of outpatient laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a teaching hospital: a prospective study of 110 consecutive patients

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    Polymeneas Georgios

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of outpatient laparoscopic cholecystectomy (OLC in a day surgery unit in a teaching hospital. OLC was offered to patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis who met the following established inclusion criteria: ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology physical status classification class I and II; age: 18 - 70 years; body mass index (BMI 2; patient acceptance and cooperation (informed consent; presence of a responsible adult to accompany the patient to his residency; patient residency in Athens. The primary study end-point was to evaluate success rates (patient discharge on the day of surgery, postoperative outcome (complications, re-admissions, morbidity and mortality and patient satisfaction. A secondary endpoint was to evaluate its safe performance under appropriate supervision by higher surgical trainees (HSTs. Findings 110 consecutive patients, predominantly female (71% and ASA I (89% with a mean age 40.6 ± 8.1 years underwent an OLC. Surgery was performed by a HST in 90 patients (81.8%. A mean postoperative pain score 3.3 (range 0-6 occurred in the majority of patients and no patient presented postoperative nausea or vomiting. Discharge on the day of surgery occurred in 95 cases (86%, while an overnight admission was required for 15 patients (14%. Re-admission following hospital discharge was necessary for 2 patients (1.8% on day 2, due to persistent pain in the umbilical trocar site. The overall rate of major (trocar site bleeding and minor morbidity was 15.5% (17 patients. At 1 week follow-up, 94 patients (85% were satisfied with their experience undergoing OLC, with no difference between grades of operating surgeons. Conclusions This study confirmed that OLC is clinical effective and can be performed safely in a teaching hospital by supervised HSTs.

  17. Examining the Intersections of Music Making and Teaching for Four String Teachers

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    Pellegrino, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to examine the intersections of music making and teaching for four string teachers. Data included background surveys, three interviews per participant, videotaped classroom observations (jointly viewed during the second interview), and a focus group interview that included music making. Findings…

  18. Using Qualitative Data Analysis Software in Teaching about Group Work Practice

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    Macgowan, Mark J.; Beaulaurier, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Courses on social group work have traditionally relied on in-class role plays to teach group work skills. The most common technological aid in such courses has been analog videotape. In recent years new technologies have emerged that allow the instructor to customize and tailor didactic experiences to individual classes and individual learners.…

  19. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  20. Methods of Analysis and Overall Mathematics Teaching Quality in At-Risk Prekindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Patrick R.; Kinzie, Mable; Thunder, Kateri; Berry, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study analyzed the quality of teacher-child interactions across 10 videotaped observations drawn from 5 different prekindergarten classrooms delivering the same mathematics curriculum: "MyTeachingPartner-Math." Interactions were coded using 2 observational measures: (a) a general measure, the Classroom Assessment…

  1. Self-Monitoring as a Strategy to Increase Student Teachers' Use of Effective Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    Student teachers in classrooms for students with moderate-severe disabilities used self-monitoring to increase their use of effective teaching strategies. In the first study, the participant videotaped daily instructional sessions and collected data on her use of varied praise statements and the number of opportunities to respond in a multiple…

  2. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, Maria A; Rimondini, Michela; Deveugele, Myriam; Zimmermann, Christa; Moretti, Francesca; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Deledda, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Ian; Bensing, Jozien

    2015-10-01

    The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes 'good communication' by evoking their reactions to variations in physician communication. Lay people from four different countries watched the same videotaped standardized medical encounters and discussed their preferences in gender-specific focus groups who were balanced in age groups. Two hundred and fifty-nine lay people (64 NL, 72 IT, 75 UK and 48 BE) distributed over 35 focus groups of 6-8 persons each. Comments on doctors' behaviours were classified by the GULiVer framework in terms of contents and preferences. Participants prevalently discussed 'task-oriented expressions' (39%: competency, self-confident, providing solutions), 'affective oriented/emotional expressions' (25%: empathy, listening, reassuring) and 'process-oriented expressions' (23%: flexibility, summarizing, verifying). 'Showing an affective attitude' was most appreciated (positive percentage within category: 93%, particularly facilitations and inviting attitude), followed by 'providing solution' (85%). Among disfavoured behaviour, repetitions (88%), 'writing and reading' (54%) and asking permission (42%) were found. Although an affective attitude is appreciated by nearly everybody, people may vary widely in their communication needs and preferences: what is 'good communication' for one person may be disliked or even a source of irritation for another. A physician should be flexible and capable of adapting the consultation to the different needs of different patients. This challenges the idea of general communication guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  4. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajjel-Aghdam, Alireza; Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Khameneh, Saied; Moghaddam, Sara

    2013-09-01

    Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective. A descriptive study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13. Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  5. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Suhail, Agha Mohammad; Malik, Abdul Razzaq; Imran, Mian Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. Materials and Methods: All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI), by a...

  6. Mortality among High Risk Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Admitted to U.S. Teaching-Intensive Hospitals in July: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Anupam B.; Sun, Eric C.; Romley, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of whether inpatient mortality in U.S. teaching hospitals rises in July as a result of organizational disruption and relative inexperience of new physicians (‘July effect’) find small and mixed results, perhaps because study populations primarily include low-risk inpatients whose mortality outcomes are unlikely to exhibit a July effect. Methods and Results Using the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient sample, we estimated difference-in-difference models of mortality, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rates, and bleeding complication rates, for high and low risk patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) admitted to 98 teaching-intensive and 1353 non-teaching-intensive hospitals during May and July 2002 to 2008. Among patients in the top quartile of predicted AMI mortality (high risk), adjusted mortality was lower in May than July in teaching-intensive hospitals (18.8% in May, 22.7% in July, pmortality (low risk), adjusted mortality was similar in May and July in both teaching-intensive hospitals (2.1% in May, 1.9% in July, p=0.45) and non-teaching-intensive hospitals (2.7% in May, 2.8% in July, p=0.21). Differences in PCI and bleeding complication rates could not explain the observed July mortality effect among high risk patients. Conclusions High risk AMI patients experience similar mortality in teaching- and non-teaching-intensive hospitals in July, but lower mortality in teaching-intensive hospitals in May. Low risk patients experience no such “July effect” in teaching-intensive hospitals. PMID:24152859

  7. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Mortimer B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. Methods A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient's medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of €638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. Results A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4% and 64 women (40.6%. The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years. Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70, followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23 and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18 were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed

  8. Teaching and learning about chronic conditions management for undergraduate medical students: utilizing the patient-as-teacher approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, E; McBain, L; Gray, B

    2009-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact on medical student learning of a revised chronic conditions teaching programme based on the chronic care model utilizing patients-as-teachers. A qualitative questionnaire was completed by students at the start of a primary healthcare rotation to determine existing impressions/understandings about chronic conditions. Following the revised teaching programme, a reflective essay about a home-visit to a person with chronic conditions was completed by students at the end of the rotation. Analysis of the questionnaire at the start of the rotation showed students have some knowledge of the differences between acute and chronic care, have rather negative impressions of what it means to have chronic conditions and know little of overall patient management including the work of an interdisciplinary team. Analysis of the reflective essays completed by students at the end of the rotation showed an increased understanding of chronic conditions, what it means to have a chronic condition and who supports management. A structured chronic conditions teaching programme including patient-as-teacher is an effective way of building knowledge and changing students' impressions of what it means to have a chronic condition.

  9. A Study of Behavioral Change in 50 Severely Multi-Sensorily Handicapped Children Through Application of the Video-Tape Recorded Behavioral Evaluation Protocol. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, W. Scott

    Examined with 49 deaf-blind children (under 9 years old) was the use of the Telediagnostic Behavior Evaluation Protocol, a video-tape recorded evaluation protocol. To further develop the Telediagnostic Protocol and delineate the characteristics of the Ss observed during the process of test development, Ss were video-taped in eight 3-minute…

  10. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient passessment tool has high reliability and can be used to facilitate the acquisition of teaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five--year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Belay; Muche, Abebe; Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich

    2009-10-04

    In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS) started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO), treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%), smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9%) and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8%) cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%), defaulted in 730 (18.3%), died in 403 (10.1%), treatment failed in six (0.2%) and transferred out in 1680 (42.0%) patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2%) to 228(42.9%). Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%). A high proportion of patients died (10.1%) or defaulted (18.3%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently.

  12. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five - year retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Belay; Muche, Abebe; Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Background In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS) started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO), treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. Results From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%), smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9%) and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8%) cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%), defaulted in 730 (18.3%), died in 403 (10.1%), treatment failed in six (0.2%) and transferred out in 1680 (42.0%) patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2%) to 228(42.9%). Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. Conclusion The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%). A high proportion of patients died (10.1%) or defaulted (18.3%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently. PMID:19799801

  13. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five - year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekele Assegedech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO, treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. Results From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%, smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9% and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8% cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%, defaulted in 730 (18.3%, died in 403 (10.1%, treatment failed in six (0.2% and transferred out in 1680 (42.0% patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2% to 228(42.9%. Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. Conclusion The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%. A high proportion of patients died (10.1% or defaulted (18.3%, which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently.

  14. Patient and disease profile of emergency medical readmissions to an Irish teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Moloney, E.; Bennett, K.; Silke, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there was a relationship between coded diseases at the time of hospital discharge, a pattern of ordering investigations, and hospital readmission in a major teaching hospital.

  15. Situation analysis of patients attending TU Teaching Hospital after medical abortion with problems and complications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ojha, Neebha; Bista, Kesang D B

    2013-01-01

    In Nepal medical abortion has been approved for use since 2009. There were many cases coming to Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital coming with problems and complications following medical abortion...

  16. Effect of a PBL teaching method on learning about nursing care for patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Ruiz de Alegría, Begoña; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a worldwide public health problem that requires the attention of qualified health professionals. The training of skilled nurses is a challenge for nursing instructors due to the complexity of this pathology. The aim was to analyse the declarative and argumentative knowledge acquired about depression by students receiving traditional expository instruction versus students receiving problem-based learning instruction. Quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test design in experimental and control group to measure differences in the improvement of declarative and argumentative knowledge. Non parametric tests were used to compare the scores between the experimental group and the control group, and between the pre-test and post-test in each group. 114 students participated in the study. Implementation of the study took place during the 2014-2015 academic year in the third year of the Nursing undergraduate degree courses in the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) as part of the Mental Health Nursing subject. The data indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the two methodologies in regard to declarative knowledge in the care of patients with depression. Nevertheless, the argumentative capacity of the experimental group improved significantly with the problem-based learning methodology (p=0.000). The results of the implementation indicated that problem-based learning was a satisfactory tool for the acquisition of argumentative capacity in depression nursing care. Still, working examples of teaching sequences that bridge the gap between general clinical practice and classroom practice remain an important goal for continuing research in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of postgraduate training on communication skills teaching: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Cerutti, Bernard; van der Vleuten, Cees P; Dolmans, Diana

    2014-04-14

    Observation of performance followed by feedback is the key to good teaching of communication skills in clinical practice. The fact that it occurs rarely is probably due to clinical supervisors' perceived lack of competence to identify communication skills and give effective feedback. We evaluated the impact of a faculty development programme on communication skills teaching on clinical supervisors' ability to identify residents' good and poor communication skills and to discuss them interactively during feedback. We conducted a pre-post controlled study in which clinical supervisors took part to a faculty development program on teaching communication skills in clinical practice. Outcome measures were the number and type of residents' communication skills identified by supervisors in three videotaped simulated resident-patient encounters and the number and type of communication skills discussed interactively with residents during three feedback sessions. 48 clinical supervisors (28 intervention group; 20 control group) participated. After the intervention, the number and type of communication skills identified did not differ between both groups. There was substantial heterogeneity in the number and type of communication skills identified. However, trained participants engaged in interactive discussions with residents on a significantly higher number of communication items (effect sizes 0.53 to 1.77); communication skills items discussed interactively included both structural and patient-centered elements that were considered important to be observed by expert teachers. The faculty development programme did not increase the number of communication skills recognised by supervisors but was effective in increasing the number of communication issues discussed interactively in feedback sessions. Further research should explore the respective impact of accurate identification of communication skills and effective teaching skills on achieving more effective communication

  18. The Teaching of Photojournalism Ethics: Help from the Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Lester

    1988-01-01

    無The methods used to teach photojournalism ethics can be divided into two groups. There is the lecture method and the simulation method. The lecture method combines the photojournalism instructor or a guest (preferably a professional) with the traditional instructional materials of photographic prints, slides, films, and videotapes. Lectures should be structured with the audio-visual materials so that students will understand why and how a photographer acted given a specific set of circumstan...

  19. General Practitioner Supervisor assessment and teaching of Registrars consulting with Aboriginal patients - is cultural competence adequately considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope; Reath, Jennifer; Gordon, Elaine; Dave, Darshana; Harnden, Chris; Hu, Wendy; Kozianski, Emma; Carriage, Cris

    2014-08-13

    General Practitioner (GP) Supervisors have a key yet poorly defined role in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars who provide healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during their training placements. Given the markedly poorer health of Indigenous Australians, it is important that GP training and supervision of Registrars includes assessment and teaching which address the well documented barriers to accessing health care. A simulated consultation between a GP Registrar and an Aboriginal patient, which illustrated inadequacies in communication and cultural awareness, was viewed by GP Supervisors and Medical Educators during two workshops in 2012. Participants documented teaching points arising from the consultation which they would prioritise in supervision provided to the Registrar. Content analysis was performed to determine the type and detail of the planned feedback. Field notes from workshop discussions and participant evaluations were used to gain insight into participant confidence in cross cultural supervision. Sixty four of 75 GPs who attended the workshops participated in the research. Although all documented plans for detailed teaching on the Registrar's generic communication and consultation skills, only 72% referred to culture or to the patient's Aboriginality. Few GPs (8%) documented a plan to advise on national health initiatives supporting access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. A lack of Supervisor confidence in providing guidance on cross cultural consulting with Aboriginal patients was identified. The role of GP Supervisors in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients could be strengthened. A sole focus on generic communication and consultation skills may lead to inadequate consideration of the health disparities faced by Indigenous peoples and of the need to ensure Registrars utilise health supports designed to decrease the

  20. Teaching idiomatic expressions. A comparison of two instructional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, R K; Kenyon, P L

    1990-10-01

    Twenty hearing-impaired children enrolled in a state residential school for deaf students in a large south central U.S. city participated in a study that compared the efficacy of two instructional designs used to teach idiomatic expressions. One of the methods consisted of videotape presentations followed by classroom discussion, and the other consisted of extended classroom discussions. The children ranged in age from 13 to 16 years, with a mean age of 13 years, 11 months. Their reading grade level scores ranged from 1.9 to 6.9, with a mean of 3.5. Sixteen popular idiomatic expressions were selected and original scripts depicting the expressions were prepared and then performed by members of the local deaf acting club. Each expression was also captioned on the tape. At the conclusion of the filming, the skits were edited into two videotapes consisting of eight idioms each. The children were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the videotape group or the classroom discussion group. Both groups improved their understanding of the idioms significantly over the course of the study. However, improvement was significantly greater when the children received instruction under the videotape method. Tests given to the students 8 and 16 weeks after the experiment showed that they had retained the knowledge.

  1. Prevalence of taurodontism among the patients visiting a dental teaching hospital in Pune, India: A retrospective orthopantomogram study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipali Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Taurodontism is a morpho-anatomic variation in the shape of teeth that chiefly affects molars in primary as well as secondary dentition. Aim: The aim was to assess the prevalence of taurodontism in premolars and molars by studying the orthopantomogram (OPGs of the patients visiting a dental teaching hospital in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out, wherein the panoramic radiographs of 525 randomly selected patients were evaluated for taurodontism. A detailed medical and family history record of the patients was also obtained. Radiographic analysis for taurodontism was carried out in premolars and molars. Prevalence of taurodontism was assessed, and a comparison among male and female prevalence was done using the z-test. Results: Prevalence of taurodontism was 11.8%. Taurodontism was exhibited in 12.5% females and 9.7% males. Unilateral taurodontism was seen in 24 (4.57% and bilateral taurodontism in 38 (7.23% of the 525 OPGs. Mandibular second molars were the teeth most commonly affected by taurodontism. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of taurodontism in patients visiting the dental teaching institute. Orthopantamogram can be used effectively to detect taurodontism. The findings of this study revealed that premolars may also be affected with taurodontism.

  2. Prospective randomized crossover study of simulation vs. didactics for teaching medical students the assessment and management of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Christopher Eric; Menchine, Michael; Anderson, Craig; Kollen, Robert; Langdorf, Mark I; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-04-01

    Simulation (SIM) allows medical students to manage high-risk/low-frequency cases in an environment without patient risk. However, evidence for the efficacy of SIM-based training remains limited. To compare SIM-based training to traditional didactic lecture (LEC) for teaching medical students to assess and manage critically ill patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and anaphylaxis. Prospective, randomized, non-blinded crossover study of 28 fourth-year medical students. Students were oriented to the human patient simulator, then randomized to SIM or LEC between August and December 2007. The SIM group learned to manage MI using SIM training and the LEC group learned via PowerPoint lecture. All subjects' assessment and management skills were then evaluated during a simulation session of MI. During a second instruction session, the students crossed over and were taught anaphylaxis using the opposite modality and similar assessments were conducted. Completion of critical actions for each case were scored, converted to percentages, and analyzed via signed rank test. Of 28 subjects, 27 performed better when trained with SIM compared with LEC (p didactic lecture for teaching fourth-year medical students to assess and manage simulated critically ill MI and anaphylaxis patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Pais, Vanessa G; Silva, Filipa R; Martins, Raquel; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Pedrosa, Raquel; Almeida, Susana S; Correia, Luís; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Teles, Ana; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2014-05-09

    Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers' communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants' confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients' assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. The program's positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients.

  4. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at Zhejiang University Teaching Hospital Zhuji Hospital, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lisong; Jin, Ketao; He, Kuifeng; Bian, Chunge; Chen, Weili; Fu, Kaiyan; Zhu, Tieming; Jin, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is garnering increasing interest and acceptance among the general population throughout the world. The use of CAM by cancer patients is very common in China. The referenced English literature has no rural community-based study from China on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and reasons for using CAM by cancer patients at Zhejiang University Teaching Hospital Zhuji Hospital (ZUTH-ZJH), China. Face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the Department of Surgical Oncology of ZUTH-ZJH, from September 2009 to February 2010. One hundred and twenty one patients were interviewed; 64 (52.9%) were males and 57 (47.1%) were females. One hundred and thirteen patients (93.4%) have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness, fifty two (46.0%) are female and sixty one (54.0%) are male patients; 8 (6.6%) patients have not used any form of CAM. Chinese medicine (73.5.0%) was the most commonly reported CAM modality. Over 71.7% of those who used CAM were satisfied, only 28.3% were disappointed. Twenty eight users (24.8%) did not see any benefit from the CAM, but eighty one patients (71.7%) could describe some specific benefits. Only one patient will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, almost all patients will continue to use CAM in the future. CAM use is very common among cancer patients in local area of China. Most users obtain the expected benefits, and adverse events are uncommon. It is imperative that oncologists should explore the use of CAM with their cancer patients and work towards an integrated model of health-care provision. This knowledge will enable oncologists to better counsel the patients.

  5. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Moghaddam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13.Results: Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. Conclusion: According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  6. Using standardized patient with immediate feedback and group discussion to teach interpersonal and communication skills to advanced practice nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Chao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih

    2013-06-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (IPCS) are essential for advanced practice nursing (APN) in our increasingly complex healthcare system. The Standardized Patient (SP) is a promising innovative pedagogy in medical and healthcare education; however, its effectiveness for teaching IPCS to graduate nursing students remains unclear. We examined the effectiveness of using SP with SP feedback and group discussion to teach IPCS in graduate nursing education. Randomized-controlled study. First-year APN students in Taiwan. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (SP assessments with SP feedback and group discussion) or control (SP assessments only) group. There were two outcome indicators: IPCS and student learning satisfaction (SLS). The IPCS were assessed before and after the study in interviews with the SPs. SLS was measured when the study ended. All participants expressed high SLS (94.44%) and showed significant (p ≤ 0.025) improvements on IPCS total scores, interviewing, and counseling. However, there were no significant differences between groups. Qualitative feedback from encounters with SPs is described. Using SPs to teach IPCS to APN students produced a high SLS. The students learned and significantly improved their IPCS by interviewing SPs, but future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SP feedback and group discussions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Teaching skills to resolve conflicts with acute confusional syndrome patients in nursing using the Case Method (CM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Caballero, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This study sets out to design and implement a teaching sequence that offers students the opportunity to acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to deal with a confrontational patient. When designing the teaching methodology, we chose an active teaching strategy, commonly entitled the Case Method. The case was developed during the 2011-2012 academic year and implemented across the curriculum in the 2012-2013 academic year, in the "Relations and Communications in Nursing Care" and "Geriatric Nursing" subject modules, in the second year undergraduate nursing course at the University of the Basque Country. Implementation results indicate that the Case Method is a satisfactory tool to facilitate acquisition of the chosen skills, as well as being a learning method that is well received by students. At the end of the process, 72.8% of them shared the opinion that "this methodology has helped me more or much more than traditional 'chalk and talk' expository methodology". Moreover, 93% of the students successfully achieved at least the minimum learning results required. Nevertheless, students said that they felt overwhelmed on more than one occasion. The study has provided evidence that the Case Method contributes to acquiring skills that every nurse will need during their career. This should spur us on to continue extending the range of possibilities offered by active methodologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Knowledge of diabetes and its associated ocular manifestations by diabetic patients: A study at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Godwin O; Abokyi, Samuel; Koffuor, G A; Abokyi, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a significant cause of visual impairment, hence adequate knowledge on this condition and its ocular manifestations is of immense importance to diabetic patients. To assess the knowledge of diabetic patients on the disorder and its ocular manifestations, and their attitude towards ocular examinations. A cross-sectional survey involving the use of a structured interview was conducted among diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Clinic of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Using Fishers Exact Chi-square (χ(2)) and Odds Ratios (ORs), data obtained was analyzed. Only 103 (26.4%) patients knew the type of diabetes mellitus they were suffering from. Knowledge on ocular effects of diabetes mellitus was low and only 15 (3.8%) knew that it could affect the ocular refraction with no patient mentioning that diabetes mellitus could cause cataract or diabetic retinopathy. Attitude to routine eye examination was poor. As much as 135 (34.6%) had never had an eye examination since being diagnosed of diabetes. Knowledge of the type of diabetes mellitus the individual had or any ocular complication of this disorder was significantly related (OR: 4.22; P attitude to seeking eye care. Diabetic patients' knowledge on diabetes mellitus and its ocular manifestations, and the attitude of diabetic patients towards eye examination were poor. Intensive health education by diabetes care givers and leaders of the Ghana Diabetic Association for diabetic patient is therefore required to improve attitude towards eye care to prevent visual impairment.

  9. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

  10. The power of patient-side teaching – still of benefit to student and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-18

    Apr 18, 2006 ... In-service training facilitates integration of theory and practice on the part of the medical student and is .... and reinforcement of learning through providing positive and gentle corrective feedback. ... ABC of learning and teaching in medicine: Applying educational theory in practice. BMJ 2003; 326: 213-216.

  11. The effects of using a human patient simulator compared to a CD-ROM in teaching critical thinking and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Don; Johnson, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Military healthcare personnel, including nurse anesthetists, must have the knowledge and skills to care for the extensive, severe injuries incurred on the battlefield. No studies have compared the 2 teaching strategies of using the human patient simulator (HPS) and a CD-ROM in caring for combat injuries relative to critical thinking and performance using nurse anesthesia participants. A prospective, pretest-posttest experimental, mixed design (within and between) was used to determine if there were statistically significant differences in HPS and CD-ROM educational strategies relative to caring for patients who have trauma. Two instruments were used: critical thinking, which consisted of multiple-choice questions; and a combat performance instrument that measured ability to care for patients. A repeated analysis of variance and a least significant difference post-hoc test were used to analyze the data. The HPS group performed better than the CD-ROM and control groups relative to performance (P=.000) but not on critical thinking (P=.239). There was no difference between the CD-ROM and control group (P=.171) on the combat performance instrument. In this study, the HPS method of instruction was a more effective method of teaching than the CD-ROM approach.

  12. Communication about standard treatment options and clinical trials: can we teach doctors new skills to improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Jürg; Butow, Phyllis; Aldridge, Julie; Juraskova, Ilona; Ribi, Karin; Brown, Richard

    2012-12-01

    The International Breast Cancer Study Group conducted a phase III trial in Australian/New Zealand (ANZ) and Swiss/German/Austrian (SGA) centres on training doctors in clear and ethical information delivery about treatment options and strategies to encourage shared decision making. Medical, surgical, gynaecological and radiation oncologists, and their patients for whom adjuvant breast cancer therapy was indicated, were eligible. Doctors were randomised to participate in a workshop with standardised teaching material and role playing. Patients were recruited in the experimental and control groups before and after the workshop. In ANZ centres, 21 eligible doctors recruited a total of 304 assessable patients. In SGA centres, 41 doctors recruited 390 patients. The training was well accepted. There was no overall effect on patient decisional conflict (primary endpoint) 2 weeks after the consultation. Overall, patients were satisfied with their treatment decision, their consultation and their doctors' consultation skills. Considerable variation was observed in patient outcomes between SGA and ANZ centres; the effect sizes of the intervention were marginal (<0.2). Shared decision making remains a challenge. A sustained training effect may require more intensive training tailored to the local setting. Cross-cultural differences need attention in conducting trials on communication interventions. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Teaching in hunter–gatherer infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Barry S.; Roulette, Casey J.

    2016-01-01

    A debate exists as to whether teaching is part of human nature and central to understanding culture or whether it is a recent invention of Western, Educated, Industrial, Rich, Democratic cultures. Some social–cultural anthropologists and cultural psychologists indicate teaching is rare in small-scale cultures while cognitive psychologists and evolutionary biologists indicate it is universal and key to understanding human culture. This study addresses the following questions: Does teaching of infants exist in hunter–gatherers? If teaching occurs in infancy, what skills or knowledge is transmitted by this process, how often does it occur and who is teaching? The study focuses on late infancy because cognitive psychologists indicate that one form of teaching, called natural pedagogy, emerges at this age. Videotapes of Aka hunter–gatherer infants were used to evaluate whether or not teaching exists among Aka hunter–gatherers of central Africa. The study finds evidence of multiple forms of teaching, including natural pedagogy, that are used to enhance learning of a variety of skills and knowledge. PMID:26909166

  14. A videotaped intervention to enhance child control and reduce anxiety of the pain of dental injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Raadal, M; Naidu, S; Yoshida, T; Kvale, G; Milgrom, P

    2003-12-01

    While the psychological literature shows that perceptions of uncontrollability contribute to anxiety and other pathologies, interventions that enhance perceived control have been shown to reduce anxiety. This study attempted to assess a brief videotape to enhance child perceived control in a dental setting. 101 children aged 7-9 years completed warm-up procedures and viewed either: a) the experimental intervention, a 2 minutes video of a dentist explaining what an injection will feel like and proposing hand raising as a signal mechanism; or b) the control condition, a 2 minutes video of Disneyland. Fear of dental injections was assessed on a 10 cm visual analogue scale before and after the intervention. In the experimental group there was a significant fear reduction from pre- to post-intervention, while this was not the case in the control group. Children with higher pre-existing levels of fear benefited more from the intervention than children with lower levels of fear. The results of this pilot study suggest that intervention packages that impact child control have promise in lowering anxiety.

  15. Quality of life during hemodialysis and study dialysis treatment in patients referred to teaching hospitals in Urmia-Iran in 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Samad Zadeh, Saeed; Toupchi, Vahid; Toupchi, Saeed; Rahbar, Narges

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients on chronic Hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) has rarely been carried out. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life during hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis treatment in patients referred to teaching hospitals in Urmia, Iran.

  16. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  17. Assessment of quality of glycemic control in intensive care patients treated with an insulin infusion at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Lyne; Ferguson, Jessica; Dubé, Anne-Isabelle; Nguyen, Patrick Viet-Quoc; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Boutin, Jean-Marie

    2014-04-01

    To describe the quality of glycemic control in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) treated with an intravenous (IV) insulin infusion at a teaching hospital. This retrospective study included patients admitted to the ICU and treated with an IV insulin infusion for at least 12 h between August 1 and November 30, 2011. Medical charts were reviewed. The primary quality indicator for glycemic control was the mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L target range. A total of 351 patients were included; 61.5% of subjects had no known diabetes. Admissions were mainly for surgery (61.3%). The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 16.8±7.3. The mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L range was 35% for all subjects and 26.2% for patients with diabetes. If a target of 6.1 to 10 mmol/L was considered, those values became 63% and 54.6%. At least 1 episode of hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (insulin protocol is currently being tested. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey of Cancer Patient Safety Culture: A Comparison of Chemotherapy and Oncology Departments of Teaching Hospitals of Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissi, Pouran; Sharifi, Marziye; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-10-26

    Background: Patient safety culture plays an important role in healthcare systems, especially in chemotherapy and oncology departments (CODs), and its assessment can help to improve quality of services and hospital care. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate and compare items and dimensions of patient safety culture in the CODs of selected teaching hospitals of Iran and Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical crosssectional survey was conducted during a six-month period on 270 people from chemotherapy and oncology departments selected through a cluster sampling method. All participants answered the standard questionnaire for “Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture” (HSOPSC). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS/18 software. Results: The average score for patient safety culture was three for the majority of the studied CODs. Statistically significant differences were observed for supervisor actions, teamwork within various units, feedback and communications about errors, and the level of hospital management support. (ppatient safety culture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that the overall status of patient safety culture is not good in the studied CODs. In particular, teamwork across different units and organizational learning with continuous improvement were the only two properly operating items among 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. Therefore, systematic interventions are strongly required to promote communication. Creative Commons Attribution License

  19. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghataliya, Kunal J; Kapadia, Jigar D; Desai, Mira K; Mehariya, K M; Rathod, G H; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Gajjar, M D

    2017-01-01

    Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events. To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed. A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in

  20. Inappropriateness of medication prescriptions about chronic kidney disease patients without dialysis therapy in a Chinese tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ping Yang, Na Chen, Rong-Rong Wang, Lu Li, Sai-Ping Jiang Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: With the increasing incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD, inappropriate use of medicine in CKD patients is an important issue, as it may cause adverse effects in patients and progression to chronic renal failure.Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of inappropriate medicine use among CKD patients.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to December 1, 2014 in a Chinese teaching tertiary hospital. All medication prescriptions for CKD patients with serum creatinine level above normal value were enrolled. The prescriptions, including unreasonable dosage, contraindicated, and cautiously used medicines in CKD patients, were evaluated and the related medications were also analyzed and classified.Results: Two hundred and two patients were included, and a total of 1,733 lines of medication prescriptions were evaluated. The prevalence of inappropriate medication prescriptions in CKD patients was 15.18%, of which, unreasonable dosage (n=56, contraindicated (n=46, and cautiously used medicines (n=161 accounted for 3.23%, 2.65%, and 9.29%, respectively. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient implied that there was a significant correlation between the severity of renal insufficiency and frequency of inappropriate medication prescriptions (P=0.02, r=0.056. Among the inappropriate medication prescriptions, nutraceutical and electrolytes (n=65, 24.71%, cardiovascular drugs (n=61, 23.19%, and antimicrobial drugs (n=55, 20.91% represented the top three medicine categories in CKD patients.Conclusion: The study confirmed that inappropriate medication prescriptions were prevalent in CKD patients. Improving the quality of medication prescriptions in CKD patients is necessary. Keywords: inappropriateness of

  1. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Noordman, J; van Dulmen, S; Hiddink, G J

    2014-01-01

    To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were selected. An observational checklist was developed to assess frequency and content. Personalization of advices was scored, as also the guidelines on which PNs based their advices. Content analysis was used to identify different categories of advices. About one quarter of advices concerned weight, over two-thirds nutrition and one-third physical activity. Lose weight, eat less fat and be more physically active in general were the main categories for each type of advice. Despite high clarity of advices, lower scores were found for specificity and personalization. Very few nutrition advices were provided in combination with physical activity advices. Weight advices often related to the patient's complaint. PNs seldom set a concrete weight goal. Although benefits of physical activity were discussed, often no practical advices were provided about how to achieve this. Integrated lifestyle advice was not common: advices about nutrition and physical activity were fragmented throughout the consultation. Obesity prevention needs more emphasis in PNs' educational programs.

  2. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 608 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  4. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  5. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  6. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  8. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  9. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  10. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  11. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  12. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  13. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  14. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  15. Utilization Evaluation of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Cancer Patients in a Teaching hospital: Urgent of Drug Utilization Evaluation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamishehkar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 80% of patients with hematologic malignancies will develop fever during more than one chemotherapy cycle combined with neutropenia. We aim to evaluate empiric antibiotic strategies in Febrile Neutropenic (FN cancer patients.Methods: This is a concurrent study performed in the “Shahid Ghazi” teaching hospital, hematology-oncology center of Tabriz, Iran during the period of December 2011 to September2012. During this period, patients with FN were evaluated in view of antibiotics utilization based on Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN instructions.Results: Seventy patients had a total of 91 episodes of FN in the duration of this study. Among them 63 (90% patients were the cases of acute leukemia. For 88 (96.7 % patients, imipenem was used as the initial empirical antibiotic regimen. It was changed to piperacillin/tazobactam in 8 (8.8% of them without indication. Cultures didn’t obtain before the initiation of empirical therapy in 19 (20.9% episodes. Empiric vancomycin didn’t discontinue after 3 days even if it was not warranted in 23 episodes. In 16 cases vancomycin was switched to teicoplanin. The fluconazole dosages generally given to patients were all suboptimal. Adjusting the dosages of vancomycin or imipenem was not done correctly in 13 (14.29% episodes.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that choosing antimicrobial agents and their dosing for prophylaxis and treatment of FN patients and discharge antimicrobial planning of FN patients do not follow the evaluated guidelines. Drug Usage Evaluation studies need to be done regularly in such a center.

  16. Bedside Teaching on Time to Disposition Improves Length of Stay for Critically-ill Emergency Departments Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourmand, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We tested the effect of a brief disposition process intervention on residents’ time todisposition and emergency department (ED length of stay (LOS in high acuity ED patients.Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study design in a single teaching hospital where ED residentsare responsible for administrative bed requests for patients. Enrollment was performed for interventionand control groups on an even-odd day schedule. Inclusion criteria were ED patients triaged asEmergency Severity Index (ESI 1 and 2. In the intervention group, the attending physician prompted theresident to make the disposition immediately after the evaluation of resuscitation patients. In the controlgroup, the attending physicians did not intervene in the disposition process unless more than 2 hourspassed without a disposition. Main outcomes were time to disposition and total ED LOS.Results: A total of 104 patients were enrolled; 53 (51% in the intervention group and 51 (49% inthe control group. After controlling for ESI and resident training year, mean disposition time wassignificantly shorter in the intervention group by 41.4 minutes (95% CI: 32.6-50.1. LOS was alsoshorter in the intervention group by 93.3 minutes (95% CI: 41.9-144.6.Conclusion: Prompting residents to enter administrative disposition orders in high acuity patientsis associated with significant reduction in both time to disposition and ED LOS.

  17. Patients' satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and referral hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulisa, Teshome; Tessema, Fasil; Merga, Hailu

    2017-06-26

    Patient satisfaction, one of the main components of quality of care, is a crucial phenomenon for the overall health care delivery system. Even though a number of studies have been conducted about patient satisfaction in different health services, studies in radiology services are flimsy in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing patient satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and Referral hospital. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 321 adult patients presented for radiological service in the study area using stratified sampling technique. Patient satisfaction was measured using SERVQUAL (Service Quality) tool that consisted of seven items: accessibility, quality of radiological service, courtesy of radiology staff, existence of good communication with service provider and desk worker, physical environment and privacy technique. Exit interviews of patients were conducted using a structured and pretested questionnaire. Data was collected by three grade ten completed trained data collectors from May 12 to May 28, 2016. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify independent factors associated with patient satisfaction on radiological services using SPSS version 21. The overall patient satisfaction towards radiological service was 71.6%. Satisfaction to accessibility of the service was 84.5% while it was 80.6% to courtesy of the staff. Similarly, 81.6% reported satisfied with quality of the service and 59.4% and 71% of reported satisfied with physical environment and radiological service provider respectively. On the other hand, 99.7% of the respondents were dissatisfied with privacy of the service. The study revealed that patients who attended primary school (AOR = 0.317, 95% CI: 0.11-0.88), unemployed patients (AOR = 0.067, 95% CI: 0.007-0.622) and patients who had short waiting time to enter into examination room less than one hour (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI: 1.4-11.62) were

  18. Bloodstream infection in patients with end-stage renal disease in a teaching hospital in central-western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Trelha Gauna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis is considered a critical determinant of bloodstream infection (BSI and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of BSI in patients with end-stage renal disease using central venous catheters for hemodialysis. Methods A cohort study was conducted in a public teaching hospital in central-western Brazil from April 2010 to December 2011. For every patient, we noted the presence of hyperemia/exudation upon catheter insertion, as well as fever, shivering, and chills during hemodialysis. Results Fifty-nine patients were evaluated. Thirty-five (59.3% patients started dialysis due to urgency, 37 (62.7% had BSI, and 12 (20% died. Hyperemia at the catheter insertion site (64.9% was a significant clinical manifestation in patients with BSI. Statistical analysis revealed 1.7 times more cases of BSI in patients with hypoalbuminemia compared with patients with normal albumin levels. The principal infective agents identified in blood cultures and catheter-tip cultures were Staphylococcus species (24 cases, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (7 cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and 5 cases of Chryseobacterium indologenes, and Candida species (6. Among the Staphylococci identified, 77.7% were methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococci. Of the bacteria isolated, the most resistant were Chryseobacterium indologenes and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions Blood culture was demonstrated to be an important diagnostic test and identified over 50% of positive BSI cases. The high frequency of BSI and the isolation of multiresistant bacteria were disturbing findings. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated microorganism, although Gram-negative bacteria predominated overall. These results highlight the importance of infection prevention and control measures in dialysis units.

  19. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaitey Yaw

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH in Ghana between April and December 2008. Findings This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500 prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300 in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500 and 14% (70/500 respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500 of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500 and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300. Most, 60 (86% out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47% out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. Conclusion G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

  20. Teaching culturally appropriate therapeutic touch to nursing students in the Sultanate of Oman: reflections on observations and experiences with Muslim patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Muliira, Rhoda Suubi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a valid nursing intervention but some patients feel uncomfortable with it because of personal beliefs. This commentary presents observations and experiences of the use of TT during care of Muslim patients in the Sultanate of Oman. There is need to teach nursing students deliberate steps when considering its use in Muslim patients because they increase acceptability and implementation in a culturally sensitive manner.

  1. Shared decision making: Prostate cancer patients' appraisal of treatment alternatives and oncologists' eliciting and responding behavior, an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Arwen H.; Henselmans, Inge; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Koning, Caro C. E.; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinicians' use of shared decision making (SDM) skills, enabling patient treatment evaluations (appraisals); and varieties of patient appraisals and clinicians' preceding and following utterances. Methods: Two coders rated videotaped initial visits of 25 early-stage prostate

  2. The reliability of echocardiographic left ventricular wall motion index to identify high-risk patients for multicenter studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Gunnar H; Gadsbøll, Niels; Quinones, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether the use of echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) wall motion index (WMI) is a dependable parameter for identifying patients with LV dysfunction to be enrolled in multicenter trials. METHODS: Videotaped echocardiographic examinations from 200 randomly selected patient...

  3. L'enseignement du francais a des clienteles allophones: aspects discursifs de la langue ecrite (Teaching French to Language Minority Clienteles: Discourse Aspects of Written Language).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Michel

    This study investigated the discourse elements that teachers focus on in teaching French to multiethnic groups, and examined the extent to which teachers take into account the different cultural backgrounds of these students. Data are derived primarily from the observation of videotaped classroom activities. The subjects in the study were students…

  4. Preoperative assessment and patient teaching : preoperative forms and guidelines for a LEIKO unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ijäs, Erja; Suni, Alina

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative phase begins when the decision of the procedure is made and ends when the patient enters the operation room. The purpose of good preoperative care aims to decrease risks during and after the procedure, to speed up the healing process of the patient, to enhance time management and to minimize costs. It is important for the patient to receive the preoperative guidance both orally and in written form. When guiding the patient it is essential to take into consideration the patien...

  5. Proportion of Helicobacter pylori Among Dyspeptic Patients Detected by Molecular Methods in a Teaching Hospital in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L. Nushka L. Ubhayawardana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is considered as a major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. More than half of the world’s population is infected with H. pylori. In Sri Lanka various groups have reported a prevalence ranging from 3% to 70% over the last decade. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the current proportion of H. pylori and risk factors for H. pylori infections. Patients and Methods: The study was a cross sectional, descriptive study in which 100 dyspeptic patients who were required to undergo endoscopy examination were included. The study was carried out at a Teaching Hospital in Sri Lanka. In-house urease test and PCR amplification of the glmM gene of H. pylori was performed to diagnose H. pylori infection. A questionnaire was filled to collect sociodemographic data from the dyspeptic patients. Results: Eighteen dyspeptic patients were positive for H. pylori by both in-house CLO (Campylobacter-like organism test test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Ten of cases were male (18% while eight were female (17%. There was no association between the demographic factors and risk of H. pylori infection. Conclusions: The proportion of H. pylori infections was found to be 18% in the study population. There was no significant association with H. pylori and the studied demographic factors.

  6. Caregiver burden in families of patients with depression attending Obafemi Awolowo University teaching hospitals complex Ile-Ife Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olawale, Kamildeen Oladimeji; Mosaku, Kolawole Samuel; Fatoye, 'Femi Olusegun; Mapayi, Boladale Moyosore; Oginni, Olakunle Ayokunmi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess caregiver burden among relatives of patients on treatment for depressive disorder attending the psychiatry outpatient clinic of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile Ife, Nigeria. A cross sectional design was used. Hundred caregivers of patients with ICD-10 diagnosis of depression, on outpatient treatment for at least six months were recruited from the psychiatric outpatient clinic. Caregivers completed a semi-structured socio-demographic questionnaire, the Zarit Burden Interview and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12. Descriptive statistics were used to describe socio-demographic variables; association between dependent and independent variables were assessed using Pearson's correlation, chi squared and t test as appropriate. The mean ZBI score was 41.32 (S.D. = 9.82), 45% of respondents reported moderate to severe burden, spouses constituted 57% of caregivers. Age at onset of depression (t = 2.46, P = .02) number of hospitalization,(χ(2) = 9.82, P = 0.001), and current active symptoms (χ(2) = 36.1, P = .001) were all significantly associated with burden score. Severity of symptoms (r = 0.48, P burden scores, while GHQ score among caregivers also correlated significantly with burden scores (r = 0.52, P burden. Caring for the depressed need to change from a patient focused approach to a combined patient and caregiver approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost estimation of patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a case study of the Teaching University Hospital of Thessaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitona, Mary; Androutsou, Lorena; Theodoratou, Dorina

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the cost of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Teaching University Hospital of Thessaly (TUHT) in 2006 and to demonstrate discrepancies between actual hospitalisation cost and social funds' reimbursement. Cost analysis was performed using a macro-costing approach, which focused on the estimation of nominal and actual cost per ICU patient. Data were derived from the annual records of resources consumed in each hospital unit and from hospital balance sheets. Sensitivity analysis was also performed by inflating nominal costs to present values. There were 312 patients admitted to the ICU. Mean actual cost per ICU patient was estimated at €16,516, whereas actual reimbursement from social funds was only €1,671. This means that reimbursement accounted for just 10% of the actual hospitalisation cost. Once nominal costs were inflated to present values, the reimbursement accounted for 25% of the actual hospitalisation cost. The major cost drivers of ICU hospitalisation were personnel costs followed by infrastructure, hotel services and pharmaceutical expenditure. These results may be limited by a lack of consideration for clinical outcomes along with a high level of aggregation in cost data. Reimbursement should be re-adjusted in order to balance public hospital deficits and make public-private mix viable. This way, intensive care capacity would increase and allow a more equitable distribution of healthcare resources.

  8. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwanja Kakusa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality.

  9. Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, George W; Chou, Calvin L; Satterfield, Jason; Teherani, Arianne; Hauer, Karen; Poncelet, Ann; Chen, Huiju Carrie

    2014-01-01

    To encourage medical students' use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients' level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41); traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n = 185). Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students' understanding of patients' health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

  10. In-depth analysis of delays to patient discharge: a metropolitan teaching hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, P; Patel, J H; Kordbacheh, T; Laskar, N; Harbord, M

    2012-08-01

    Delayed patient discharge will likely exacerbate bed shortages. This study prospectively determined the frequency, causes and potential cost implications of delays for 83 consecutive patients, who were inpatients for a total of 888 days. 65% of patients experienced delay whilst awaiting a service. 48% of patients experienced delays that extended their discharge date. Discharge delays accounted for 21% of the cohort's inpatient stay, at an estimated cost of 565 sterling pounds per patient; 77% of these hold-ups resulted from delays in the provision of social and therapy requirements. Discharge delays are costly for hospitals and depressing for patients. Investment is required to enable health and social-care professionals to work more closely to improve the patient journey.

  11. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP – Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölzer, Henrike

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts.Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester.Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training.Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers’ self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  12. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...... a teacher needs to do in order to make sure all types of students actually learn what the teacher intends....

  13. Ambulatory-based residency education: improving the congruence of teaching, learning, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartman, S A; O'Sullivan, P S; Cyr, M G

    1992-06-15

    Residency education in internal medicine should be based in the ambulatory setting. The challenge in ambulatory education lies not only in the unique opportunities afforded by the setting but also in the careful implementation of a program based on sound educational principles. We have designed a new ambulatory-based model of internal medicine residency that adheres to the principles of adult learning theory. Four aspects of the proposed residency model are discussed: the setting, the teaching-learning model, the curriculum, and the schedule. Potential barriers to implementation of the model are reviewed, and solutions are suggested. Residency programs in internal medicine are at an important crossroad. Either we can substantially change the programs' content and focus, or we can risk the continued unpopularity and "second-class" status of the programs among medical students. Internal medicine needs to be recognized and accepted as a fundamental primary care discipline to justify continued public support in an era of overspecialization.

  14. Prevalence of obesity and systemic hypertension among diabetes mellitus patients attending an out-patient diabetes clinic in a Ghanaian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Abedandi, Robert; Salifu, Zenabankara S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is now a prevalent disease in both developed and developing countries. Overweight/obesity and hypertension are potential modifiable risk factors for diabetes mellitus and persist during the course of the disease. This study was aimed at reporting the prevalence of overweight/obesity and systemic hypertension and their association to blood glucose levels in persons with diabetes mellitus attending a diabetic clinic in Ghanaian Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending a diabetic clinic at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Anthropometric variables of age, weight and height were measured with appropriate instruments, computed into BMI and classified according to WHO classifications. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured by an appropriate instrument and classified by WHO standards. Fasting plasma glucose levels of the study participants were recorded from their personal health folder. All data was analysed by GraphPad prism version 5. In general, 7.0% of the participants were underweight and 32.0% were overweight or obese. The mean±SD weight, height and BMI of the participants were 67.53±13.32, 1.68±0.12 and 24.18±5.32. Twenty-one percent of the studied participants were hypertensive. Mean±SD fasting plasma glucose of 7.94±2.82 was observed among the diabetic patients. As the prevalence of hyperglycaemia was higher among patients aged ≤40 years (88.9% vs. 75.8%), normoglycaemia (11.1% vs. 24.2%) was higher among those over 40 years. The differences were not significant. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia was significantly higher in participants with overweight/obese (0.0% vs. 41.6%, phypertension was found. Hyperglycaemia was more prevalent among overweight/obese participants. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anarado Agnes N

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu (UNTH-E, Nigeria Method Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the core surgical units of the UNTH- E, from June 2003 to September 2005. Results 160 patients were interviewed; 68 (42.5% were males and 94 (57.5% were females. Ages ranged from 13–86 years. Breast, urogenital system, gastrointestinal system, and soft tissue cancers predominated. One hundred and four patients (65.0% have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness; 56 (35.0% patients have not used any form of CAM. There were more females than males among the non-CAM users. The use of CAM was not affected by age, marital status, level of education, religious affiliation, or socioeconomic status. The most frequently used CAMs were herbs (51.9%, faith/prayer healing (49.4%, aloe vera (23.1%, Forever Living Products (16.3%, medicinal tea (14.4%, and Blackstone (12.5%. Over 23% of those who used CAM were satisfied, but 68.3% were disappointed. Most users (67.3% did not see any benefit from the CAM, but 25% could describe some specific benefits. More than 21% of users reported various unwanted effects. While 86.5% of CAM users will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, 9.6% will use the two together to help each other. Most users (79.8% will not repeat CAM or recommend its use for cancer. The majority of patients (55.8% did not mention their use of CAM to their doctors – mostly because the doctor did not ask

  16. Assessing patient-centred communication in teaching: a systematic review of instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Marianne; Rasenberg, Ellemieke; van Weel, Chris; Laan, Roland; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn

    2017-11-01

    Patient-centred communication is a key component of patient centredness in medical care. Therefore, adequate education in and assessment of patient-centred communication skills are necessary. In general, feedback on communication skills is most effective when it is provided directly and is systematic. This calls for adequate measurement instruments. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic review of existing instruments that measure patient centredness in doctor-patient communication and can be used to provide direct feedback. A systematic review was conducted using an extensive validated search strategy for measurement instruments in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The databases were searched from their inception to 1 July 2016. Articles describing the development or evaluation of the measurement properties of instruments that measure patient centredness (by applying three or more of the six dimensions of a published definition of patient centredness) in doctor-patient communication and that can be used for the provision of direct feedback were included. The methodological quality of measurement properties was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Thirteen articles describing 14 instruments measuring patient centredness in doctor-patient communication were identified. These studies cover a wide range of settings and patient populations, and vary in the dimensions of patient centredness applied and in methodological quality on aspects of reliability and validity. This review gives a comprehensive overview of all instruments available for the measurement of patient centredness in doctor-patient communication that can be used for the provision of direct feedback and are described in the literature. Despite the widely felt need for valid and reliable instruments for the measurement of patient-centred communication, most of the instruments currently available have not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, we recommend further research into and

  17. Assessment of death anxiety among medical and surgery clinics patients of a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintistan, Sevilay; Cilingir, Dilek; Pekmezci, Hilal

    2016-07-01

    To determine the level of death anxiety among inpatients in Medical and Surgery clinics. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Medical and Surgery clinics of the University Hospital of Trabzon, Turkey, from June 15 to October 15, 2014. Data was gathered using a questionnaire and Death Anxiety Scale was applied. There were 170 subjects in the study. Mean death anxiety score was 7.82±2.73 among Medical patients, while it was 8.09±2.73 for surgical patients. Those who stayed at Medical Clinic showed statistically significant differences between death anxiety and gender, patients' profession, the type of patient room, and patients' previous surgeries (panxiety and age, marital status, having visitors, frequency of thoughts about death and sharing thoughts of death with others (panxiety was higher among patients who stayed at the Surgery Clinic than those at the Medical Clinic.

  18. Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Saba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To encourage medical students’ use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients’ level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. Methods: The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41; traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n =185. Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Results: Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students’ understanding of patients’ health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. Conclusion: A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

  19. Disseminated cryptococcosis in a patient with HIV/AIDS at a teaching hospital in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KP Akakpo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To raise awareness of the existence of cryptococcal infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Ghana. Method: Detailed postmortem gross and histopathological analysis of an HIV/AIDS patient suspected to have cryptococcal meningitis was carried out and histopathological findings correlated with clinical findings. Results: showed disseminated Cryptococcosis in an HIV/AIDS patient which was confirmed with special stains. Conclusion: cryptococcal infection occurs in HIV /AIDS patients in Ghanaian and when clinically suspected the diagnosis should be pursued vigorously.

  20. Health care-seeking behavior among patients with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional study of patients presenting at a single teaching hospital in Lagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babawale Taslim Bello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health care-seeking behavior of individuals determines how early they present for appropriate care. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, late presentation to the nephrologist is associated with poor outcomes. This study aims to describe the health care-seeking behavior of patients with CKD attending the nephrology outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital located in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted on 104 consecutive adult patients with CKD, presenting for the first time at the nephrology outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital located in Lagos, South West Nigeria. Information was retrieved from the study participants using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire, entered into an Excel spreadsheet, and analyzed using Epi Info® statistical software version 7.0. Results: Overall, 74 (71.2% patients sought help, first from a trained health care provider, and their health care-seeking behavior was adjudged to be appropriate. Compared to patients with appropriate health care-seeking behavior, those with inappropriate health care-seeking behavior had a lower mean age (40.4 ± 13.7 years vs 47.3 ± 15.6 years;P = 0.03, were less likely to see their illness as a medical problem (46.7% vs 67.6%;P = 0.04, more likely to have a monthly income less than N25,000 ($150 (80.0% vs 59.5%;P = 0.04, and have received below tertiary level education (20.0% vs 48.6%; P < 0.01. They were also more likely to have consulted more than one health care provider before being referred to our clinic. The factors predicting inappropriate health care-seeking behavior were education below the tertiary level and age less than 45 years. Conclusion: Though health care-seeking behavior was appropriate in majority of our patients with CKD, there remains a need for improved public health awareness.

  1. ICU Utilization by Cardio-Thoracic Patients in a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thoracic patients week. The nurse-patient ratio averages 1: 2. Our bed occupancy per time is ..... Really Simple Syndication (RSS) helps you to get alerts on new publication right on your desktop without going to the journal's website. You need a ...

  2. Epidemiological and microbiological analysis of ventilator-associated pneumonia patients in a public teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Manoel da Silva Júnior

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most commonly-acquired infection in patients in intensive care units. We analyzed epidemiological and microbiological characteristics and the outcome, in a cohort of critically-ill patients with confirmed diagnosis of VAP. All patients who had been on mechanical ventilation (MV for more than 48 hours were included in our study; material collection for microbiological analysis was done within the first 24 hours after beginning treatment or after changing antibiotics. There were 55/265 (20.7% VAP cases diagnosed, at a rate of 21.6 episodes per 1,000 days of mechanical ventilation. Mean age of the patients was 66 years, with a mean APACHE II score of 26.7 + 7.0; male patients were more prevalent. The mortality rates in the intensive care unit (ICU and during the hospital stay were 71% and 80%, respectively. MV duration in patients with VAP was 17 (range 3-43 days and among patients who had not developed VAP, 6 (2-32 days (p < 0.0001. 98.2% of the samples were positive, with a high prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria, mainly Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Risk factors for death included age, MV duration and surgery. VAP incidence in this sample of critically-ill patients was high, with a high mortality rate. Control and prevention strategies based on continuing education of healthcare workers, developed by a multidisciplinary team, should be encouraged to minimize morbimortality of this infection.

  3. Hearing loss in post-meningitis patients in Komfo Anokye Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningitis is one of the infective disorders which can complicate with hearing loss. This study evaluates the incidence of hearing loss in patients who had suffered from a bacterial meningitis infection. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence rate of hearing loss in patients after recovering from meningitis.

  4. Bacterial skin flora of diabetic patients in the Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetics frequently are afflicted with bacterial skin infections because of the high circulating blood sugar. The frequent skin infections in these patients may be a result of change in normal skin flora. This study was carried out to find out the normal skin flora of these patients. Ninety four (50 study and 44 control) consecutive ...

  5. ICU Utilization by Cardio-Thoracic Patients in a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The underlying pathological conditions in cardiothoracic patients, anesthetic and operative interventions often lead to complex physiological interactions that necessitate ICU care. Our objectives were to determine the intensive care unit (ICU) utilization by cardio-thoracic patients in our centre, highlight the ...

  6. Constructivist teaching behaviors of recipients of Presidential Awards for Excellence in mathematics and science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Hector

    This study examined philosophies, beliefs, and teaching practices of teachers who were cited for excellence in science teaching through receipt of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) in 2003. Subgroups were compared based on educational preparation, professional development attendance, and teaching level, i.e., middle school or high school. Teaching strategies used by these PAEMST awardees were compared to another teacher group reported as using constructivist teaching practices. Four tools were used to gather information. These included A Survey of Classroom Practices, Constructivist Learning Environment Survey, Philosophy of Teaching and Learning Survey, and Science Classroom Observation Rubric (SCOR) from the Expert Science Teacher Educational Evaluation Model (ESTEEM). The rubric was used to review videotapes that were submitted as part of the application process for the PAEMST. Major findings for these PAEMST awardees include: (1) They held constructivist beliefs. (2) They perceived their classroom learning environments to be constructivist. (3) Twelve teachers had composite scores on the SCOR that identified them as expert, nine as proficient, and four as competent. (4) The group was homogenous in terms of the impact of the variables examined for differences in beliefs, classroom environment, and teaching strategies. The only significant difference among the PAEMST group was found for the measure of "attitude toward class" on the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey. Teachers with a Masters in Science Education scored significantly higher than teachers without such a Masters degree. (5) The PAEMST group differed significantly from a teacher group that had participated in staff development on use of constructivist teaching practices. The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is intended to recognize exemplary teachers. These teachers were exemplary in their beliefs

  7. Transforming management of patients undergoing splenectomy in an Irish teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-splenectomy infection has a mortality rate of up to 70%. Previously we have published data confirming the poor adherence to best practice guidelines with relation to management of the asplenic patient. A defined protocol of care was established, staff education commenced and a \\'patient information leaflet\\' made available. AIM: To ascertain whether management of the asplenic patient has improved since the implementation of a structured programme of care. METHOD: Retrospective chart review of all splenectomies performed in Beaumont Hospital between 2002 and 2008. RESULTS: Overall, 75.9% of patients were documented as having received the recommended vaccinations. Of these, 48.7% were not timed according to recommended guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotics were documented as prescribed in all but five patients discharged. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate an improvement in post-splenectomy care between 2002 and 2008. However, further improvements are necessary.

  8. Transforming management of patients undergoing splenectomy in an Irish teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-06

    BACKGROUND: Post-splenectomy infection has a mortality rate of up to 70%. Previously we have published data confirming the poor adherence to best practice guidelines with relation to management of the asplenic patient. A defined protocol of care was established, staff education commenced and a \\'patient information leaflet\\' made available. AIM: To ascertain whether management of the asplenic patient has improved since the implementation of a structured programme of care. METHOD: Retrospective chart review of all splenectomies performed in Beaumont Hospital between 2002 and 2008. RESULTS: Overall, 75.9% of patients were documented as having received the recommended vaccinations. Of these, 48.7% were not timed according to recommended guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotics were documented as prescribed in all but five patients discharged. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate an improvement in post-splenectomy care between 2002 and 2008. However, further improvements are necessary.

  9. A study of drug-drug interactions in cancer patients of a south Indian tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kannan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Drug interactions in oncology are of particular importance owing to the narrow therapeutic index and the inherent toxicity of anticancer agents. Interactions with other medications can cause small change in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic agents that could significantly alter their safety and efficacy. Aim : To identify and document the potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions of patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. Settings and Design : A tertiary care teaching hospital based prospective study. Materials and Methods : Patients admitted in the medical oncology wards with different types of malignancies and receiving cancer chemotherapy during the period of June 2009 to November 2009 were included in the study. A detailed data collection was done in a specially designed proforma with ethical approval and consent of patients and their prescriptions were subjected to drug-drug interaction screening using Drug Interaction Fact Software Version-4 and standard references. Incidence of drug-drug interactions, their types, correlation between age, cancer type, number of drugs prescribed and incidence of drug interactions were analyzed. Statistical Analysis : Logistic regression analysis and Odds ratio were performed to identify the incidence of drug-drug interactions and their correlation with the factors above mentioned. Results : A total of 75 patients (32 males and 43 females; median age 56 years, age range 23-74 were enrolled in the study and their prescriptions were screened. 213 interactions were identified of which, 21 were major, 121 were moderate and 71 were minor. There were 13 (6.1% clinically significant interactions between anticancer drugs and 14 (6.5% drug-drug interactions between anticancer drugs and other drugs prescribed for co-morbidities. There was a positive correlation between number of drugs prescribed and drug interactions (P=0.011; OR 0.903. Conclusion : Though there was not any

  10. Bringing Rounds Back to the Patient: A One-Year Evaluation of the Chiefs' Service Model for Inpatient Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nadia L; Flesch, Judd D; Cronholm, Peter; Reilly, James B; Ende, Jack

    2017-04-01

    The Chiefs' Service (CS), a structured approach to inpatient teaching rounds, focuses on resident education and patient-centered care without disrupting patient census sizes or admitting cycles. It has five key elements: morning huddles; bedside rounds; diagnostic "time-outs"; day-of-discharge rounds; and postdischarge follow-up rounds. The authors hypothesized the CS model would be well received by residents and considered more effective than more-traditional rounds. The CS was implemented on Penn Presbyterian Medical Center's general medicine inpatient service using a quasi-experimental design. Its first year (January 2013-January 2014) was evaluated with a mixed-methods approach. Residents completed end-of-rotation evaluation questionnaires; 20 CS and 10 traditional service (TS) residents were interviewed. Measures of resident agreement on questionnaire items were compared across groups using independent sample t testing. A modified grounded theory approach was used to assess CS residents' perspectives on the CS elements and identify emergent themes. The questionnaires were completed by 183/188 residents (response rate 97%). Compared with TS residents, CS residents reported significantly greater satisfaction in the domains of resident education and patient care, and they rated the overall value of the rotation significantly higher. The majority of CS residents found the CS elements to be effective. CS residents described the CS as focused on resident education, patient-centered care, and collaboration with an interdisciplinary team. The CS approach to inpatient rounding is seen by residents as valuable and is associated with positive outcomes in terms of residents' perceptions of learning, interdisciplinary communication, and patient care.

  11. 'I take for granted that patients know' - oral health professionals' strategies, considerations and methods when teaching patients how to use fluoride toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, O; Gabre, P; Sköld, U M; Birkhed, D; Povlsen, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the oral health professionals' (OHPs') perspectives regarding their strategies, considerations and methods when teaching their patients the most effective way of toothbrushing with fluoride (F) toothpaste. A qualitative research method was used to collect data. To stimulate interactivity among the participants, interviews were performed in focus groups. Five groups of OHPs, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses, were interviewed a total of 23 individuals. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent qualitative content analysis. Data were systematically condensed and coded to the relevant phrases that identified their content. Three categories were identified in the manifest and latent content analysis: (i) strategies and intentions, (ii) providing oral hygiene information and instruction and (iii) barriers to optimal oral healthcare education. Health promotion and seeing to the patients' best interest were driving forces among the OHPs as well as personal success in their preventive work. They focused on toothbrushing techniques more than on how to use F toothpaste. Barriers to oral health information were cost to the patients and, to some extent, the opinion of the OHPs that some patients were impossible to motivate or that patients already know what to do. The OHPs described toothbrushing with F toothpaste as very important, although the plaque removal perspective dominated. They did not focus on how to use F toothpaste, because they believed that knowledge about and appropriate behaviour concerning F toothpaste were already familiar to their patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Situation analysis of patients attending TU Teaching Hospital after medical abortion with problems and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Neebha; Bista, Kesang D B

    2013-01-01

    In Nepal medical abortion has been approved for use since 2009. There were many cases coming to Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital coming with problems and complications following medical abortion. Thus the objective of this study was to analyze the cases that came to TUTH following medical abortion with problems and complications. This is a prospective study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of TUTH. Study was carried from 1st August 2011 to 30th November 2012. Women who came to TUTH with any complaints following medical abortion were interviewed, examined and treatment provided. Relevant clinical finding were noted. There were a total of 57 cases during the study. Most (66.6%) of the women were in age group 20-29 years age. There were 45 (79%) women who had abortion up to 9 weeks. Medical shop was the main place where most of the women (45.6%) directly come to know about medical abortion. More than 34 (77.2%) received the service from medical shops without any supervision. Most 31 (54.4%) presented with incomplete abortion. There were three cases of continuing pregnancy and four presented with ectopic pregnancy. Eighteen (31.6%) cases needed admission. Fifty six percent of the cases were treated with manual vacuum aspiration, six cases underwent laparotomy and there was one maternal mortality. There is a need for proper dissemination and implementation of guideline for management of these women and adequate supervision to reduce the problems and complications.

  13. Airway Management of Patients With Craniofacial Abnormalities: 10-year Experience at a Teaching Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lun Chen

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: Managing the airway of patients with craniofacial abnormalities can potentially be difficult. It should be carried out by experienced anesthesiologists, with assistance from an otolaryngologist when necessary. A variety of different airway devices should be available if needed.

  14. Study of drug–Drug interactions among the hypertensive patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansha Subramanian

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The study highlighted that patients with hypertension are particularly vulnerable to DDI. The comorbidities, advanced age, and polypharmacy are the important factors associated with the occurrence of DDI.

  15. Using simulation to teach patient safety behaviors in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Laura T; Webb-Corbett, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how our college of nursing began to integrate patient safety instruction into simulation experiences for undergraduate nursing students. A system for evaluating and grading students was developed. Data on student safety behaviors were collected before and after implementation of instruction designed to improve adherence to hand washing and patient identification procedures. In the first semester in which data were collected, students did not demonstrate satisfactory performance of either hand hygiene or patient identification 61% of the time. After instruction, students still did not perform these procedures consistently 38% of the time. Lessons learned and future plans for addressing these problems with basic patient safety behaviors are discussed. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Suture complications in a teaching institution among patients undergoing uterosacral ligament suspension with permanent braided suture

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdany, Tajnoos; Yip, Sallis; Bhatia, Narender N.; Nguyen, John N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our study aimed to identify the rate of suture complications over a 5-year period using braided permanent suture for uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) surgery. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent vaginal uterosacral ligament suspensions using braided polyester suture. Outcome measures included rate and timing of suture complications, patient symptoms post-operatively, efficacy of treatment modalities and surgical success. Results ...

  17. ICU utilization by cardio-thoracic patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital: Any role for HDU?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde B Osinaike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The underlying pathological conditions in cardio-thoracic patients, anesthetic and operative interventions often lead to complex physiological interactions that necessitate ICU care. Our objectives were to determine the intensive care unit (ICU utilization by cardio-thoracic patients in our centre, highlight the common indications for admission; and evaluate the interventions provided in the ICU and the factors that determined outcome. Materials and Methods: The intensive care unit (ICU records of University College Hospital, Ibadan for a period of 2 years (October 2007 to September 2009 were reviewed. Data of cardio-thoracic patients were extracted and used for analysis. Information obtained included the patient demographics, indications for admission, interventions offered in the ICU and the outcome. Results: A total of 1, 207 patients were managed in the ICU and 206 cardio-thoracic procedures were carried out during the study period. However, only 96 patients were admitted into the ICU following cardio-thoracic procedures, accounting for 7.9% of ICU admissions and 46.6% of cardio-thoracic procedures done within the review period. The mean length of stay and ventilation were 5.71 ± 5.26 and 1.30 ± 2.62 days. The most significant predictor of outcome was endotracheal intubation (P = 0.001 and overall mortality was 15%. Conclusion: There is a high utilization of the ICU by cardio-thoracic patients in our review and post-operative care was the main indication for admission. Some selected cases may be managed in the HDU to reduce the burden on ICU resources. We opine that when endotracheal intubation is to continue in the ICU, a 1:1 patient ratio should be instituted.

  18. Standardized Patient's Views About their Role in the Teaching-Learning Process of Undergraduate Basic Science Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Pathiyil Ravi; Dwivedi, Neelam Rekha

    2016-06-01

    Standardized Patients (SPs) are widely used in medical education. SPs have a number of advantages but also have certain limitations. At the institution, SPs have been used since January 2013 for both teaching-learning and assessment during the basic science years of the undergraduate medical program. The present study was conducted to investigate the perception of SPs about various aspects of the program and obtain suggestions for further improvement. A Focus Group Discussion (FGD) was conducted with a group of five SPs during the second week of November 2015. Respondents were explained the aims and objectives of the study and invited to participate. Written informed consent was obtained. The FGD was conducted using a discussion guide and was audio recorded. Various aspects of the SP program at the institution were discussed. Motivation/s for joining the program and suggestions for further improvement were obtained. Transcripts were created after listening to the recordings and were read through multiple times. Similar responses were coded. Items with similar codes were grouped together into themes. Three respondents were female while two were male. The major advantage of SPs was their flexibility and ability to present a standardized response to the student. Students become familiar and comfortable with SPs. However, as a SP is simulating an illness s/he may not always be able to do complete justice to the role. The process used by SPs to prepare themselves to portray various diseases was highlighted. The use of SPs both during teaching-learning and assessment was also discussed. Some SPs are trained to provide feedback to students. Most SPs joined the program based on invitations from their friends who were already SPs. Challenges in recruiting SPs in a small island were discussed. Suggestions for further improvement were obtained. The present study obtained the perception of SPs regarding various aspects of the SP program at the institution. The overall opinion

  19. Causes and patterns of loss of permanent teeth among patients attending a dental teaching institution in south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Pradeep S; Kuriakose, Sobha

    2009-09-01

    The aims of the present study are to determine the causes and pattern of loss of permanent teeth among patients attending a dental teaching institution in southern India. Data collected from patients attending the outpatient wing of the Sri Sankara Dental College, Kerala, during a three month period was used for the study. The cause for extraction was classified as follows: (1) caries and its sequelae, (2) periodontal disease, (3) orthodontic purposes, (4) impactions, (5) prosthodontic purposes, and (6) other reasons. A total of 1791 permanent teeth were extracted of which 708 (39.5%) teeth were extracted due to caries and its sequelae, 508 (28.4%) due to periodontal disease, 347 (19.4%) for orthodontic purposes, 29 (1.6%) due to impactions, 155 (8.7%) for prosthodontic purposes, and 44 (2.5%) for other reasons. The results of the present study suggest caries and periodontal disease are the major causes of tooth mortality in the study population. Data regarding the causes of tooth loss indirectly provides invaluable information on the pattern of oral health in a population which can be utilized for planning public health policies designed to address the burden of oral diseases.

  20. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Suhail, Agha Mohammad; Malik, Abdul Razzaq; Imran, Mian Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI), by a single examiner during September to November 2012. An association of age, gender, smoking habit, systemic conditions, and oral hygiene measures with periodontal status ([periodontitis CPI score ≥3]/nonperiodontitis [CPI score ≤2]) was analyzed by applying Chi-square test and forward selection stepwise regression analysis. One thousand nine hundred and eighteen patients were examined during the study period. The findings revealed that 63.5% of the subjects had CPI score ≤2 (nonperiodontitis), while 34.5% were found with CPI score ≥3 (periodontitis). Age, gender, occupation, smoking, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, stress, medications, and oral hygiene habits of using tooth powder or tooth brushing were significantly (P ≤ 0.037) associated with periodontal status. Regression analysis showed a significant association of age, occupation, and smoking with periodontitis. This study observed prevalence of periodontitis in one-fourth of study sample. The study confirmed various socio-demographic risk factors/indictors associated with increased risk of periodontitis.

  1. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Akhtar Hussain Bokhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. Materials and Methods: All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI, by a single examiner during September to November 2012. An association of age, gender, smoking habit, systemic conditions, and oral hygiene measures with periodontal status ([periodontitis CPI score ≥3]/nonperiodontitis [CPI score ≤2] was analyzed by applying Chi-square test and forward selection stepwise regression analysis. Results: One thousand nine hundred and eighteen patients were examined during the study period. The findings revealed that 63.5% of the subjects had CPI score ≤2 (nonperiodontitis, while 34.5% were found with CPI score ≥3 (periodontitis. Age, gender, occupation, smoking, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, stress, medications, and oral hygiene habits of using tooth powder or tooth brushing were significantly (P ≤ 0.037 associated with periodontal status. Regression analysis showed a significant association of age, occupation, and smoking with periodontitis. Conclusion: This study observed prevalence of periodontitis in one-fourth of study sample. The study confirmed various socio-demographic risk factors/indictors associated with increased risk of periodontitis.

  2. The Use of Video-Taped Lectures and Web-Based Communications in Teaching: A Distance-Teaching and Cross-Atlantic Collaboration Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, P. M.; Subrahmanian, E.; Talukdar, S.; Turk, A. L.; Westerberg, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    Explains distance education approach applied to the 'Engineering Design Problem Formulation' course simultaneously at the Delft University of Technology (the Netherlands) and at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU, Pittsburgh, USA). Uses video taped lessons, video conferencing, electronic mails and web-accessible document management system LIRE in the…

  3. Comparison of standardized patients and real patients as an experiential teaching strategy in a nutrition counseling course for dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Vicki S; Rothpletz-Puglia, Pamela; Denmark, Robert; Byham-Gray, Laura

    2015-02-01

    To compare the quality of communication and behavioral change skills among dietetic students having two nutrition encounters with either a real patient or a standardized patient in the simulation laboratory at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States. A retrospective analysis of video recordings (n=138) containing nutrition encounters of dietetic students (n=75) meeting with a standardized patient (SP) or a real patient (RP). Trained raters evaluated communication skills with the 28 item Calgary Cambridge Observation Guide (CCOG) and skills promoting behavior change using the 11 item Behavior Change Counseling Index (BECCI) tool. Using the CCOG, there was a significantly greater mean score in the SP group for the category of "Gathering Information" in encounter one (p=0.020). There were good to excellent ratings in all categories of the CCOG and the BECCI scores for the SP and the RP groups at both encounters. There was no significant differences in change scores from encounter one to encounter two between groups. Encounters with SPs and RPs are both effective strategies for dietetic students to demonstrate their communication and behavior change skills. Utilizing SPs is an effective experiential strategy for nutrition counseling curricula. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Bed blockers: A study on the elderly patients in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study of in-patients over the age of 60 years was conducted at district McGann Hospital, Shimoga on patients who were classified as bed blockers. Level of dependency and cognitive function of these patients were assessed using Barthel scale and Abbreviated mental test (AMT respectively. Median age of the study population was 67 years; majority of them were men. Most of them were admitted in the medical ward and the median time to be labeled as bed blocker was 32 days. These bed blockers were a weak group of patients with an average 3.1 pathology per case. Majority of them suffered from neurological disorders and cardiovascular disease. High level of dependence was noted with a mean Barthel score of 29.68 (Range 0 -100. Low levels of cognitive function was also noted among these patients with a mean AMT of 4.76 (Range 0 -10.These findings demonstrate that the bed blockers in McGann hospital suffer not only from genuine health problems but also have a high dependency level in activities of daily living which hamper their discharge to the community. Community based rehabilitation using an intersectoral approach may help at least the less dependent to return home.

  6. How Patient Educators Teach Students: “Giving a Face to a Story”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Hedge, BS, MOTS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient Educators are persons with specific pathologies that have participated in an education program in which they learn how to instruct students on physical examinations. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of graduate student experiences with Patient Educators during coursework on occupational therapy clinical internships. A phenomenological design was used to explore the lived experiences of students through a qualitative interview. As participants described their experiences with the Patient Educators, three primary themes emerged: (a self-awareness, (b confidence, and (c empathy. The quotes from the transcriptions were organized into four sequential plot categories: (a Before the Interaction, (b During the Interaction, (c Immediate Change, and (d Impact on Clinical Internship. The results reveal a narrative of the learning process experienced by students from before the Patient Educators lab through clinical internships. These results suggest that incorporating Patient Educators in the classroom could be a critical component in preparing students for clinical internship and future clinical practice.

  7. Discharge teaching. Work strategies of patients and families for care in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeling, H V; Biordi, D L; Theis, S L

    1999-01-01

    To better understand how care givers, and their care receivers who have experienced mobility limitations over a period of time, enhance the work of care in the home. The qualitative method of grounded theory was used to identify work strategies enacted by care dyads consisting of informal (family) care givers and their care receivers. The sample consisted of 60 care dyads. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews conducted in the care receiver's home. After leaving the home, interviewers completed end notes describing the care situation. MAIN RESEARCH CLASSIFICATION: Nursing Research, Orthopaedic Nursing, Home Health Nursing. Content analysis revealed five interpersonal and informational work strategies, used by both care givers and care receivers, to facilitate the work of care: Sharing Ideas and Feelings, Delegating, Achieving a Common Goal, Identifying Sources of New Information, and Creative Problem Solving. End note data substantiated the benefits of using these strategies. Although providing care to a family member in the home is frequently thought of as "work," few analysts have described the nature of this work or considered the care receiver as a worker. This study identified the important role of the care receiver in the work of care in the home and delineated five specific Work Strategies used by informal care givers and their care receivers to facilitate such care. Ongoing research is needed for further clarification of these strategies and for development of innovative ways to teach the strategies to informal care givers and their care receivers as they prepare to live with mobility limitations in the home setting.

  8.  Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Vitamin Supplementation among Patients visiting Out-Patient Physicians in a Teaching Hospital in Karachi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Azam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding the use of vitamin supplements among patients visiting Out-Patient clinics of a teaching hospital.Methods: Four hundred patients were interviewed during the period of July to September 2008, at the Out-patient clinics, Aga Khan University hospital, Karachi. A pre-tested and structured questionnaire was used to collect information. It consisted of questions regarding demographics, awareness of vitamin supplements and its consumption, reasons for usage and its effects. The purpose of the study was explained and assurance of confidentiality was given. After obtaining written consent, eligible individuals were interviewed. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19.0 was used to analyze the data.Results: The results revealed that 98�0of the respondents were aware of vitamin supplements. The most known vitamin was found to be Vitamin C (16.9�20with Vitamin K being the least well known(0.4� while 51.8�0of the respondents were unaware of the harmful effects of vitamin supplements. The results also showed that 84.8�0of the study population had taken vitamin supplements, and 79�0of the participants considered that vitamin supplementsto be helpful. Taking vitamin supplements as a compensation for the deficiencies in the body was the most frequently chosen answer (17.7�20as the reason for use of vitamin supplements. On the other hand, a majority of the population was unaware of the indications for use of vitamin supplements.Conclusion: This study highlights a very significant yet ignored issue of vitamin supplementation in Pakistan. A need exists to inform the general population about the use of vitamin supplementation. The media and the medical community are required to play their role in this regard. Short/ refresher training courses are needed for doctors to update and disseminate adequate knowledge of vitamin supplementation to their patients.

  9. [Evidence based medicine (EBM) in health care system and treatment of individual patient. Part iii. Teaching of epidemiological methodology and statistics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Włodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    The question arises--what role the doctor will meet in the web society. Is it going to be a creative person in the assessment of knowledge and application at the bedside of the patient, disciplined executor of he clinical guidelines, or a loyal client of pharmaceutical companies. Medical theories are usually at the high degree of complexity, so the evaluation of the validity of the research questions, the adequacy ot models, appraisal of clinical trials, and the use of statistical analysis requires new teaching. Teaching epidemiology and statistics for EBM is designed to prepare doctors for applyinig scientific advances in clinical practice, skills in appraisal and use of the publicated results. Effects of teaching on courses organised by CMKP shows that the barrier in learning of statistical concepts are caused by defective curricula and their faulty implementation, and not by narrow perception of physicians. According to the author, such teaching should also be applied during graduated medical studies, as optional. After co-ordination with the physiology, genetics, biochemistry, informatics EBM oriented teaching would be particularly attractive for students who have a view on the work of research and research careers. Bearing in mind the time needed for implementation, it is urgent need to start this work as soon as possible.

  10. Epidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections in a teaching hospital: factors related to the carbapenem resistance and patient mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections (KP-BSIs have recently attracted attention due to an alarming raise in morbidity and mortality, there have been few reports on the epidemiology of KP-BSIs in mainland China. We sought to describe the epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of KP-BSIs, focusing on the risk factors of carbapenem resistance and patient mortality. Methods A retrospective analysis of WHONET data of KP-BSI patients admitted to a teaching hospital in Shanghai, China, between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015 was performed, and the annual percentage of patients with carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP was determined. Risk factors related to the carbapenem resistance and patient mortality were analyzed using binary logistic regression model. The genetic relatedness of CRKP strains isolated from intensive care unit (ICU patients was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Results A total of 293 incidences of KP-BSIs were identified in a 5-year period, 22.18% of these (65/293 were CRKP strains, and the proportion of CRKP-BSI in ICU was 59.62% (31/52, equaling the levels observed in the epidemic regions. A number of KP-BSIs (114, obtained from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2015, were further investigated. Skin and soft tissue infection source (odds ratio [OR] 26.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.8–146.8 and ICU-acquired infection (OR 5.82, 95% CI 2.0–17.2 was shown to be powerful risk factors leading to the development of CRKP-BSI. The crude 28-day mortality rates of KP-BSI and CRKP-BSI patients were 22.8% and 33.3%, respectively. Lung as the probable source of infection (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.0–17.3, and high Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.2–1.6 were strong prognostic factors determining crude 28-day KP-BSI mortality rates. PFGE analysis demonstrated that 10/11 random CRKP isolates in ICU belonged to the same

  11. Potentially inappropriate medication use in elderly patients: A study of prevalence and predictors in two teaching hospitals

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    Harugeri A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Geriatrics is an emerging clinical specialty in India. Information about the appropriateness of prescription medication use among the elderly in India is limited. Aims: To determine the prevalence and predictors of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM use, and assess the relationship between PIM use and adverse drug reactions (ADRs in the hospitalized elderly. Settings: Medicine wards at two teaching hospitals. Design: Prospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Patients aged > 60 years admitted to medicine wards between January 2008 and June 2009 were included and reviewed for PIM use according to the Beers Criteria 2003 (BC. Severity of PIM use was classified as per BC as ′high′ or ′low′. ADRs observed in the study patients were also recorded. Statistical Analysis: Association between ADRs and PIM use was assessed using Chi Square test. Bivariate analysis and subsequently multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PIM use. Results: PIM use was observed in 191 of 814 enrolled patients. At least one PIM at admission and during hospital stay was received by 2.4% (20 and 22.1% (180 patients respectively. High-severity PIM use showed a higher prevalence compared to low severity [26.8% (218 vs. 5.5% (45]. Amongst the patients who received polypharmacy (> 5 concurrent medications, 1.4% (5/362 and 22.1% (163/736 patients received PIMs at admission and during hospital stay respectively. Use of aspirin/clopidogrel/diclofenac in the presence of blood clotting disorder or anticoagulant therapy (8.3% was the most commonly encountered PIM use. Medications not listed in BC were associated with increased occurrence of ADRs compared to medications listed in BC (349 vs. 11 (χ2 =98.4, P<0.001. Increased number of concurrent medications′ use (≥9 during the stay in medicine wards was identified as an influential predictor of PIM use [Odds ratio: 1.9, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.34-2.69, P<0.001 in

  12. Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulations in Teaching Clinical Communication Skills to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Carly T; Tilashalski, Ken R; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; White, Marjorie Lee

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' long-term retention of clinical communication skills learned in a second-year standardized patient simulation at one U.S. dental school. Retention was measured by students' performance with an actual patient during their fourth year. The high-fidelity simulation exercise focused on clinical communication skills took place during the spring term of the students' second year. The effect of the simulation was measured by comparing the fourth-year clinical performance of two groups: those who had participated in the simulation (intervention group; Class of 2016) and those who had not (no intervention/control group; Class of 2015). In the no intervention group, all 47 students participated; in the intervention group, 58 of 59 students participated. Both instructor assessments and students' self-assessments were used to evaluate the effectiveness of key patient interaction principles as well as comprehensive presentation of multiple treatment options. The results showed that students in the intervention group more frequently included cost during their treatment option presentation than did students in the no intervention group. The instructor ratings showed that the intervention group included all key treatment option components except duration more frequently than did the no intervention group. However, the simulation experience did not result in significantly more effective student-patient clinical communication on any of the items measured. This study presents limited evidence of the effectiveness of a standardized patient simulation to improve dental students' long-term clinical communication skills with respect to thorough presentation of treatment options to a patient.

  13. Assessment of Drug Related Problems in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

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    Javedh Shareef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Drug related problems can be defined as any event (or circumstance involving the drug treatment, which interferes or potentially interferes with the patient in achieving an optimum outcome of medical care. The aim of the study was to identify drug therapy problems and to assess the pharmacist interventions in patients with cardiovascular diseases.Methods: The inpatient case records including drug history and other relevant details of the admitted patients under the cardiology department were collected and reviewed by the clinical pharmacist for drug related problems. In case if any drug related problem was identified, was discussed with the concerned physician and suitable interventions was provided and documented.Results: A total of 112 patient case sheets were reviewed during the study period, out of which 53 drug related problems were identified from 44 patients. The most common drug related problem was found to be drug Interactions (49.05% followed by Adverse Drug Reaction (18.86%, and failure to receive drugs (9.43%. The most frequent suggestions provided by the intervening pharmacist were cessation of drug (24.52%, followed by Change in frequency of administration (22.64%, change in drug dose (20.75%. The majority of level of significance of drug related problems was seen to have moderate significance in grade. The acceptance rate of recommendations and change in drug therapy was found to be high (96.21%.Conclusion: The current study highlights the importance of a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary team of routinely reviewing the drug therapy for identification and resolution of drug related problems which helps in achieving better therapeutic outcomes and improved patient care.

  14. Doctors′ experience and response to unexpected patient death in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

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    Y O Oshodi

    2013-01-01

    medication and 42% had appetite problems after the loss. There were no statistically significant differences between surgical and non-surgical specialties. Conclusion: There are mental health and emotional effects following unexpected patient death among doctors. Routes for support and institutional guidelines are encouraged in tertiary institutions of care. Such guidelines should be made available for doctors and other members of the health team.

  15. Pattern of limb amputations in male patients in a sub-urban teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Extremity amputations represent a major disability and it is compounded by the difficulty in obtaining prosthesis in developing nations. The consequences of loss of earning abilities, particularly when the patient is the only wage earner in a large extended family is high. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ...

  16. The Efficacy of Standardized Patient Feedback in Clinical Teaching: A Mixed Methods Analysis

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    Lisa Doyle Howley, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of oral feedback from standardized patients on medical students’ overall perceptions of an educational exercise. We chose a mixed-methods approach to better understand the following research questions: Does satisfaction with the standardized patient exercise differ among those students who receive oral feedback and those who do not? What is the quality of oral feedback provided by standardized patients? Procedures. In order to address the first question, a basic randomized design comparing treatment (or those receiving SP feedback to control (those not receiving SP feedback was conducted. To address the second question, students in the treatment group were surveyed about their impressions of the quality of the feedback provided to them by their SP. One hundred and thirty six first year medical students were divided into treatment and control groups and interviewed one standardized patient during a single 20-minute encounter. Standardized patients were trained to simulate one of two outpatient cases and provide feedback using standard training materials. Both treatment and control groups completed a rating scale and questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the encounter and students in the treatment group responded to additional questions regarding the quality of the SP feedback. Results. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA revealed significant differences among control and treatment groups on the seven combined dependent variables, Wilks’ =.890, F(7, 127=2.25, p<.034, ?2=.110. Students reported that the quality of SP feedback was very strong and additional qualitative analysis revealed further evidence to support the efficacy of providing oral SP feedback in a formative pre-clinical educational activity.

  17. Adverse drug reactions amongst adult patients admitted in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderemi-Williams, R I; Awodele, O; Boyle, C A

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is a global drug therapy problem. It has been rated as one of the top leading causes of morbidity and mortality. In Nigeria, not much is known about ADRs especially with the existing weak post marketing surveillance for monitoring drug use, and its effect on the population. The study is aimed at determining the incidence of ADRs, presentations of ADRs, classes of drugs that frequently cause ADRs and predictors of ADRs in adult medical in-patients in LASUTH. A retrospective study of six hundred and twenty four (624) case notes of all patients admitted to the medical wards in LASUTH between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2009 was carried out. Information obtained included age, gender, and adverse drug reaction and drug details. The results obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 16 statistical software. Level of significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. A total of 624 case notes consisting of 358 males and 266 females were assessed. The number of patients who experienced adverse drug reactions was 67 (n = 624, 10.7%). The incidence rate of ADRs in LASUTH from the study was 10.7 per 100 patients' population. Most of the ADRs observed were type A reactions (97.8%). Mostly implicated classes of drugs were antidiabetics (26.7%) and NSAIDs (29.3%). The incidence rate of ADRs was 10.7%. ADRs which are predictable and preventable occur in hospitalized patients, such may be prevented or minimized by implementing measures to target specific drugs that are commonly suspected.

  18. Nurse-patient communication in cancer care: does responding to patient's cues predict patient satisfaction with communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitterhoeve, R.; Bensing, J.; Dilven, E.; Donders, R.; deMulder, P.; Achterberg, T. van

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim is to investigate the relationship between nurses' cue-responding behaviour and patient satisfaction. Methods: One hundred patient-nurse conversations about present concerns were videotaped and patients' expression of emotional cues and nurses' cue responses were coded using the

  19. Nurse-patient communication in cancer care : does responding to patient's cues predict patient satisfaction with communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitterhoeve, R.J.; Bensing, J.; Dilven, E.; Donders, A.R.T.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim is to investigate the relationship between nurses' cue-responding behaviour and patient satisfaction. METHODS: One hundred patient-nurse conversations about present concerns were videotaped and patients' expression of emotional cues and nurses' cue responses were coded using the

  20. The Effect of Structured Preadmission Preoperative Teaching on Patient Outcomes After Abdominal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, gastric surgery, ventral hernlorrhaphy, bowel resection without ostomy , laparotomy). 3.) Patients with the following...and patterns Eliminative aids used at home Ostomies Diaphioresis Other excretions ACTIVITY AND REST Usual activitieS Ability to perform ADL Tolerance...pressuretemperature) Sensory aids Speechilanguage Orientation to pe~son. place. time Mental Status ROLES/ SEXUALITY Soc:a, roles Family/significant other support

  1. Music in the operating theatre: opinions of staff and patients of a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makama, J G; Ameh, E A; Eguma, S A

    2010-12-01

    The role of music during surgery has been studied, including its effect on theatre staff, users and patients. However, little attention has been paid to its application especially in our environment. It was a prospective study, involving theatre staff, users, and patients. Their opinions on acceptability and the role of music in operating theatre were determined. Information was obtained by questionnaire. There were 162 respondents; age range 25 to 76 years (median age 39). There were 109 (67.2%) males and 53 (32.7%) female. One hundred and forty five (89.5%) respondents agree that music should be played in the operating theatre. One fifty eight, (97.5%) considered low tone of music to be most appropriate in the theatre while 3(1.9%), and 1(0.6%) considered moderate and high tone respectively to be most appropriate. One hundred and sixteen, (71.6%) preferred jazz music while 19(11.7%) reggae, 11(6.8%) African music, 13 (8.0%) others (not specify), 2 (1.2%) classical, and 1(0.6%) Irish folk. The majority of the respondents were aware of the role of music in terms of its anxiolytic effect, reduction of stress and enhancement of performance when familiar music is played. Music in the operating theatre has immeasurable effects. It can prevent distraction, minimize annoyance, reduce stress and diminish the anxiety of patients, staff and users.

  2. Psychological assessment of patients undergoing cardiac transplant in a teaching hospital (2004 to 2012

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    Sara dos Santos Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the psychological evaluations of patients with heart failure waiting for heart transplantation. Methods: The data were obtained from patient records containing pre-surgery psychological evaluations performed by psychologists from the multidisciplinary cardiology team. The evaluation protocol included the Quality of Life Questionnaire (SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory, and an interview script. Results: The results of psychological evaluations performed between 2004 and 2012 for 60 candidates for heart transplantation were analyzed: 43 men and 17 women aged between 16 and 66 years (Mean=45.18; SD=11.91, predominantly from the São José do Rio Preto area (São Paulo state, Brazil (83%, with incomplete elementary education (68%, and who were in stable relationships (73%. Although women presented higher mean scores for depression (21.41 than men (14.61, there was no significant difference between genders. Women's quality of life was impaired in all domains compared to men (below 50% and was significantly poorer in the physical functioning (P=0.01, vitality (P=0.00, emotional role functioning (P=0.04, and mental health (P=0.02 domains. Conclusion: Patients with psychosocial vulnerability (e.g., depression identified before transplantation should receive psychological treatment.

  3. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a teaching hospital in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluseyi, Adejumo; Enajite, Okaka

    2016-03-01

    Malnutrition is a complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) known to affect quality of life and prognosis although not often diagnosed. It is associated with rapid progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality. Early identification and treatment will slow down progression to ESRD and mortality. To determine the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition in pre-dialysis CKD patients in Southern Nigeria. One hundred and twenty consecutive pre-dialysis CKD and 40 control subjects without CKD were studied. Data obtained from participants were demographics, body mass index (BMI), and aetiology of CKD. Indices used to assess presence of malnutrition were low BMI, hypocholesterolaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. Statistical significance was taken at 0.05 level. The mean age of the CKD subjects was 48.8±16.6years with a male: female ratio of 1.7:1. Prevalence of malnutrition in the CKD subjects was 46.7%, higher than 27.5% observed in the controls (p=0.033). Prevalence of malnutrition increased significantly across CKD stages 2 to 5 (p=0.020). It was significantly commoner in elderly patients (p=0.047) but not significantly different between males and females(p=0.188). Malnutrition is common in pre-dialysis CKD patients even in early CKD stages. Prevalence of malnutrition increases with worsening kidney function and increasing age.

  4. Managing myelodysplastic syndromes in very old patients: a teaching case report

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    Niscola P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pasquale Niscola, Massimiliano Palombi, Malgorzata Monika Trawinska, Andrea Tendas, Marco Giovannini, Laura Scaramucci, Alessio Perrotti, Paolo de Fabritiis Hematology Unit, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: The introduction of hypomethylating agents in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS has significantly changed the clinical scenario of these diseases, which afflict predominantly older individuals. However, some concerns regarding the optimal application of these innovative and costly agents in the treatment of geriatric high-risk MDS remain. We report here the case of a nonagenarian treated with hypomethylating agents achieving a long-lasting clinical response and a significant improvement in her functional status. Our case confirmed that functional status and biological status, rather than the chronological age alone, can substantially guide the plan of an appropriate treatment strategy in high-risk MDS patients; moreover, the current case emphasizes the need for targeted studies in the field of geriatric MDS in order to formulate guidelines on the appropriate use of these costly agents, so that candidate patients can receive adequate treatment to preserve their quality of life and life expectancy, but at the same time avoiding unnecessary costs deriving from the use of high-cost drugs for those in whom a significant therapeutic result cannot be reasonably expected. Keywords: myelodysplastic syndromes, azacitidine, older patients

  5. Does teaching non-technical skills to medical students improve those skills and simulated patient outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Vera; Herbstreit, Frank; Kehren, Clemens; Chittamadathil, Jilson; Wolfertz, Sandra; Dirkmann, Daniel; Kluge, Annette; Peters, Jürgen

    2017-03-29

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a tailor-made, non-technical skills seminar on medical student's behaviour, attitudes, and performance during simulated patient treatment. Seventy-seven students were randomized to either a non-technical skills seminar (NTS group, n=43) or a medical seminar (control group, n=34). The human patient simulation was used as an evaluation tool. Before the seminars, all students performed the same simulated emergency scenario to provide baseline measurements. After the seminars, all students were exposed to a second scenario, and behavioural markers for evaluating their non-technical skills were rated. Furthermore, teamwork-relevant attitudes were measured before and after the scenarios, and perceived stress was measured following each simulation. All simulations were also evaluated for various medical endpoints. Non-technical skills concerning situation awareness (ptechnical skills to improve student's non-technical skills. In a next step, to improve student's handling of emergencies and patient outcomes, non-technical skills seminars should be accompanied by exercises and more broadly embedded in the medical school curriculum.

  6. Improving Inquiry Teaching through Reflection on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Christine R.; Miller, Cory

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we explore middle school science teachers' learning of inquiry-based instructional strategies through reflection on practice teaching sessions during a summer enrichment program with middle level students. The reflection sessions were part of a larger year-long inquiry professional development program in which teachers learned science content and inquiry pedagogy. The program included a 2-week summer institute in which teachers participated in science content sessions, practice teaching to middle level students, and small group-facilitated reflection sessions on their teaching. For this study, data collection focused on teachers' recorded dialogue during the facilitator - run reflection sessions, the teachers' daily written reflections, a final written reflection, and a written reflection on a videotaped teaching session. We investigated the teachers' reflection levels and the themes teachers focused on during their reflection sessions. Teachers were found to reflect at various reflection levels, from simple description to a more sophisticated focus on how to improve student learning. Recurrent themes point to the importance of providing situated learning environments, such as the practice teaching with immediate reflection for teachers to have time to practice new instructional strategies and gain insight from peers and science educators on how to handle student learning issues.

  7. Teaching the Emergency Department Patient Experience: Needs Assessment from the CORDEM Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London, Kory S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of HCAHPS Patient Satisfaction (PS scores, Patient Experience (PE has become a metric that can profoundly affect the fiscal balance of hospital systems, reputation of entire departments and welfare of individual physicians. While government and hospital mandates demonstrate the prominence of PE as a quality measure, no such mandate exists for its education. The objective of this study was to determine the education and evaluation landscape for PE in categorical Emergency Medicine (EM residencies.This was a prospective survey analysis of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD membership. Program directors (PDs, assistant PDs and core faculty who are part of the CORD listserv were sent an email link to a brief, anonymous electronic survey. Respondents were asked their position in the residency, the name of their department, and questions regarding the presence and types of PS evaluative data and PE education they provide.146 responses were obtained from 139 individual residencies, representing 72% of all categorical EM residencies. This survey found that only 27% of responding residencies provide PS data to their residents. Of those programs, 61% offer simulation scores, 39% provide third party attending data on cases with resident participation, 37% provide third party acquired data specifically about residents and 37% provide internally acquired quantitative data. Only 35% of residencies reported having any organized PE curricula. Of the programs that provide an organized PE curriculum, most offer multiple modalities. 96% provide didactic lectures, 49% small group sessions, 47% simulation sessions and 27% specifically use standardized patient encounters in their simulation sessions. The majority of categorical EM residencies do not provide either PS data or any organized PE curriculum. Those that do utilize a heterogeneous set of data collection modalities and educational techniques. AOA and ACGME

  8. Assessment Of Patient Problems Encountered With Total Hip Replacement At Baghdad Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Fauze Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total hip replacements conduct highly effective in relieving pain dysfunction for patients who suffer from hip inflammation and a variety of reasons however after several decades of success in hip replacement there was also an increase in cases of fractures after you perform a detailed switch and attributed this The increase in the prevalence of a large fraction of the increase in the number of switch detailed and increasing age and poverty operations. Objectives The study aims toAssess the pre operation physical and psychosocial problems of patients with total hip replacement. To Assess the post operation physical and psychosocial problems of patients with total hip replacement. To find out the relationship between pre post physical and psychosocial problems with age gender duration of illness and type of operation. Design of the study A descriptive design study was carried out in Nursing Home hospital and Ghazi AL-Hariri for specialized surgical hospitals starting from January 13th 2015 to September 1st 2015 The study Sample A non- probability purposive sample of 50 patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery who have several problems before and after surgery. The study Instrument The study instrument was composed of three parts which as socio demographic information was included age group gender marital status level of education occupational economic part two consist of medical information was comprised of 7 items and part three contain physical and psychosocial problems through Hamilton anxiety scale consist of 84 items. Validity and Reliability The content validity of the instrument was established through a panel of 14 experts the reliability of the items was based on the internal consistency of the questionnaire was assessed by calculating Cronbach s Coefficient alpha which as 0.73. Statistical Analysis The researchers used the appropriate statistical methods for data analysis which include the descriptive data

  9. Study of adverse drug reactions in out-patient departments of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinnat Ara Begum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted in the Medicine and Skin outpatient departments of Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka revealed 19 cases (7 males, 12 females of adverse drug reactions (ADR out of 160 patients. 31.58% ADRs were of mild type, 42.1% were of moderate and 26.32% were of severe in nature. Gastrointestinal complications were the most frequent adverse effect (56%. Antimicrobial drugs were the most common cause of ADR (42.86% followed by NSAIDs (33.33%. This study is a preliminary study for getting information on the pattern of ADRs in Bangladesh needing further studies.

  10. Teaching material for nursing students: nursing care of mastectomy patients undergoing plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Helle, Jasmin; Ojaranta, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this thesis was to make a project for Turku University of Applied Sci-ences, comparing alternative options for breast reconstruction patients after mastectomy and nursing care. We found out that the most used methods in Finland are Autologous flaps and tissue expander and implant reconstruction. Autologous flaps include Tram-flap, Diep-flap and LD-flap. Tissue expander is a temporary solution before the final reconstruction. For the nurs-ing care part we focused on th...

  11. Frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Qidwai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODOLOGY: A cross sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at the Community Health Centre (CHC, Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan from September to November 2009. All individuals, visiting the CHC and aged 65 years or above were interviewed after taking written informed consent. RESULTS: A total of 400 elderly completed the interview. Majority were females, 65-69 years age, More than half of the individuals ie: 227 (85% had received Care Giver experience for assistance and among these 195(72% had care provided by an immediate family member. A large proportion of them stated that their Care Givers managed to provide less than four hours in a day for care giving. Around 37% showed substantial improvement in their relationship with the care givers. About 70% of the respondents stated that the care provided by the Care Giver improved their quality of life. CONCLUSION: Elderly care is provided by majority of the family members resulting in increased satisfaction level, however small number still not satisfied due to unfulfilled need of these older people. This demands that efforts should be made to strengthen the family support by increasing awareness regarding elderly care and arranging support system by the government.

  12. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Can You Even Imagine Teaching Medical Students How to End Their Patients' Lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, J Donald

    2011-01-01

    The peer-reviewed literature includes numerous well-informed opinions on the topics of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. However, there is a paucity of commentary on the interface of these issues with medical education. This is surprising, given the universal assumption that in the event of the legalization of euthanasia, the individuals on whom society expects to confer the primary responsibility for carrying out these acts are members of the medical profession. Medical students and residents would inevitably and necessarily be implicated. It is my perspective that everyone in the profession, including those charged with educating future generations of physicians, has a critical interest in participating in this ongoing debate. I explore potential implications for medical education of a widespread sanctioning of physician-inflicted and physician-assisted death. My analysis, which uses a consequential-basis approach, leads me to conclude that euthanasia, when understood to include physician aid in hastening death, is incommensurate with humanism and the practice of medicine that considers healing as its overriding mandate. I ask readers to imagine the consequences of being required to teach students how to end their patients' lives and urge medical educators to remain cognizant of their responsibility in upholding long-entrenched and foundational professional values. PMID:22319424

  13. An observational study investigating the impact of simulated patients in teaching communication skills in preclinical dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Davidson, Z E

    2016-08-01

    Simulated patients (SPs) are often used in dietetics for the teaching and assessment of communication skills. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a SP encounter on communication skills in undergraduate preclinical dietetic students in the context of the resources required for delivering this educational strategy. This observational study collected assessment data from four cohorts of third-year dietetic students to examine the effect of participation in SP-embedded Objective Structured Clinical Exams. Students completed two SP interviews, 2 weeks apart, and communication skills were measured on both occasions. A subgroup of students received a video of their SP encounter. Differences between the two SP interview scores were compared to assess the impact of the SP encounter on communication skills. The required staff and resources were described. Data were collected involving 215 students. Out of 30 marks, there was a modest mean (SD) improvement in communication skills from the first to the second SP interview of 2.5 (4.2) (P communication skills, with failing students demonstrating the greatest improvement between SP encounters. There were no observed benefits for the subset of students who received videos. Providing repeat SP interview opportunities results in only modest improvement in communication skills for most students. The use of SPs needs to be considered in context of the substantial costs and resources involved and tailored to student ability. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  14. ADAM, a hands-on patient simulator for teaching principles of drug disposition and compartmental pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuna, Ines; Holt, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    To design, construct and validate a pharmacokinetics simulator that offers students hands-on opportunities to participate in the design, administration and analysis of oral and intravenous dosing regimens. The Alberta Drug Administration Modeller (ADAM) is a mechanical patient in which peristaltic circulation of water through a network of silicone tubing and glass bottles creates a representation of the outcomes of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Changing peristaltic pump rates and volumes in bottles allows values for pharmacokinetic constants to be varied, thereby simulating differences in drug properties and in patient physiologies and pathologies. Following administration of methylene blue dye by oral or intravenous routes, plasma and/or urine samples are collected and drug concentrations are determined spectrophotometrically. The effectiveness of the simulator in enhancing student competence and confidence was assessed in two undergraduate laboratory classes. The simulator effectively models one- and two-compartment drug behaviour in a mathematically-robust and realistic manner. Data allow calculation of numerous pharmacokinetic constants, by traditional graphing methods or with curve-fitting software. Students' competence in solving pharmacokinetic problems involving calculations and graphing improved significantly, while an increase in confidence and understanding was reported. The ADAM is relatively inexpensive and straightforward to construct, and offers a realistic, hands-on pharmacokinetics learning opportunity for students that effectively complements didactic lectures. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Perceptions of burden of caregiving by informal caregivers of cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan-Idiok, Paulina Ackley; Anarado, Agnes Nonye

    2014-01-01

    Cancer care is devastating to families. This research studied the informal caregivers' perceptions of burden of caregiving to cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. The research adopted a cross-sectioned descriptive design and 210 caregivers providing care to advanced cancer patients were purposively selected. Data were collected using a researcher developed questionnaire and standardized Zarit Burden Interview scale (ZBIS). Data collected were analysed using descriptive and chi-square statistics with the help of SPSS 18.0 and PAS 19.0 softwares. The results indicated that the caregivers were in their youthful and active economic age, dominated by females, Christians, spouses, partners and parents. The burden levels experienced by the caregivers were as follows: severe (46.2%), moderate (36.2%) and trivial of no burden (17.6%). The forms of burden experienced were physical (43.4%), psychological (43.3%), financial (41.1%) and social (46.7%), quite frequently and nearly always. Psychological and social forms of burden had the highest weighted score of 228 in terms of magnitude of burden. The result further showed that there was a significant (P = 0.001) and inverse association between caregivers' burden and the care receivers' functional ability. The level of burden also increased significantly (P = 0.000) with the duration of care, while there was also a significant (P = 0.01) relationship between caregivers' experience of burden and their desire to continue caregiving. Caregiving role can be enhanced by provision of interventions such as formal education programme on cancer caregiving, oncology, home services along side with transmural care.

  16. Teaching the Emergency Department Patient Experience: Needs Assessment from the CORD-EM Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Kory S; Druck, Jeffrey; Silver, Matthew; Finefrock, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Since the creation of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient satisfaction (PS) scores, patient experience (PE) has become a metric that can profoundly affect the fiscal balance of hospital systems, reputation of entire departments and welfare of individual physicians. While government and hospital mandates demonstrate the prominence of PE as a quality measure, no such mandate exists for its education. The objective of this study was to determine the education and evaluation landscape for PE in categorical emergency medicine (EM) residencies. This was a prospective survey analysis of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) membership. Program directors (PDs), assistant PDs and core faculty who are part of the CORD listserv were sent an email link to a brief, anonymous electronic survey. Respondents were asked their position in the residency, the name of their department, and questions regarding the presence and types of PS evaluative data and PE education they provide. We obtained 168 responses from 139 individual residencies, representing 72% of all categorical EM residencies. This survey found that only 27% of responding residencies provide PS data to their residents. Of those programs, 61% offer simulation scores, 39% provide third-party attending data on cases with resident participation, 37% provide third-party acquired data specifically about residents and 37% provide internally acquired quantitative data. Only 35% of residencies reported having any organized PE curricula. Of the programs that provide an organized PE curriculum, most offer multiple modalities; 96% provide didactic lectures, 49% small group sessions, 47% simulation sessions and 27% specifically use standardized patient encounters in their simulation sessions. The majority of categorical EM residencies do not provide either PS data or any organized PE curriculum. Those that do use a heterogeneous set of data collection modalities

  17. Risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients at teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abougalambou, Salwa Selim Ibrahim; Abougalambou, Ayman S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and it is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults aged 20-74. It is estimated that about 20% of patients with type 2 DM have evidence of diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis with diabetes. To evaluate the prevalence of DR and to determine risk factors related to diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients attending endocrinology clinics at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The study design was observational prospective longitudinal follow-up study, the study was conducted with sample of 1077 type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatient recruited via attended the diabetes clinics at HUSM. Diagnosis of retinopathy is based on finding the diagnostic signs of retinopathy on eye exams by fundoscopy. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent variables that affect the development of retinopathy. The prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3%. It has been noticed from this study findings, that the progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is highly prevalent among type 2 DM. The progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is a serious diabetic complication and public health strategies are required in order to reduce its risk factors and decrease its prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Denture care practice among patients attending the prosthetic clinic in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunrinde, Tunde Joshua; Opeodu, Olanrewaju Ige

    2015-01-01

    Background: Good denture care practice by individuals using Removable Partial Denture (RPD) is an important component of oral health measures. An assessment of denture care practice of such individuals by dental care practitioners is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the denture care practice among prosthetics patients attending a tertiary Hospital Dental Centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain information from RPD wearers that were willing to participate. The questionnaire assessed among other things, patients’ bio-data, frequency, techniques and device used for cleaning their dentures. Data was analyzed using Chi-square test (P denture wearers consisting of 100 (50.5%) males and 98 (49.5%) females participated in the study. Majority 110 (55.6%) cleaned their dentures once daily and toothbrush and pastes were used by 105 (53%) of the participants. More than 70% of the respondents removed their dentures at night. One hundred and sixty-six (83.8%) visited the dentist only when they needed treatment. There was a statistical significant relationship between frequency and technique of cleaning denture, and denture cleanliness (P dentures and cleaning the denture with rest of the teeth are ineffective in prevention of plaque accumulation. PMID:26229229

  19. Conveying practical clinical skills with the help of teaching associates-a randomised trial with focus on the long term learning retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Sebastian H; Sterz, Jasmina; Bender, Bernd; Stefanescu, Maria-Christina; Theis, Marius; Walcher, Felix; Sader, Robert; Ruesseler, Miriam

    2017-03-28

    Ensuring that all medical students achieve adequate clinical skills remains a challenge, yet the correct performance of clinical skills is critical for all fields of medicine. This study analyzes the influence of receiving feedback by teaching associates in the context of achieving and maintaining a level of expertise in complex head and skull examination. All third year students at a German university who completed the obligatory surgical skills lab training and surgical clerkship participated in this study. The students were randomized into two groups. lessons by an instructor and peer-based practical skills training. Intervention group: training by teaching associates who are examined as simulation patients and provided direct feedback on student performance. Their competency in short- and long-term competence (directly after intervention and at 4 months after the training) of head and skull examination was measured. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Statistics version 19 (IBM, Armonk, USA). Parametric and non-parametric test methods were applied. As a measurement of correlation, Pearson correlations and correlations via Kendall's-Tau-b were calculated and Cohen's d effect size was calculated. A total of 181 students were included (90 intervention, 91 control). Out of those 181 students 81 agreed to be videotaped (32 in the control group and 49 in the TA group) and examined at time point 1. At both time points, the intervention group performed the examination significantly better (time point 1, p = teaching associates for teaching complex practical skills is effective for short- and long-term retention. We anticipate the method could be easily translated to nearly every patient-based clinical skill, particularly with regards to a competence-based education of future doctors.

  20. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students' preference for POPS over didactic lectures. One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and posttest numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis. The mean (SD) difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18) and 7.79 (2.52), respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.

  1. A Videotaped Self-Modelling and Self-Monitoring Treatment Program to Decrease Off-Task Behaviour in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Catherine; Cole, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The value of a videotaped self-modelling and self-monitoring treatment program was investigated in the present study. The focus was the effect of the treatment program on the off-task classroom behaviour of 3 male children with autism. The participants were aged between 9 and 11 years. Two of the children were described as severely autistic and…

  2. Accelerated discharge of patients in the event of a major incident: observational study of a teaching hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Challen, Kirsty; Walter, Darren

    2006-01-01

    ... from PCTs in order to achieve this. Repeated survey over 12 days in 3 months of hospital bed occupancy by type of condition and discharge capacity in an 855-bed UK tertiary teaching hospital also providing secondary care services...

  3. On bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCombe, M A

    1997-02-01

    Actual teaching at the bedside during attending rounds, with emphasis on history taking and physical diagnosis, has declined from an incidence of 75% in the 1960s to an incidence of less than 16% today. Profound advances in technology, in imaging, and in laboratory testing and our fascination for these aspects of patient care, account for part of this decline, but faculty must also assume responsibility for the present lack of bedside teaching. If we are to reverse this trend, we will need to realize the barriers to bedside teaching, both real and imagined, and overcome them. And if we are to become effective bedside teachers, as were our mentors, we will need to sharpen our own physical diagnostic skills. We will need to learn how to be gentle with students and housestaff, how to better communicate with patients, and how to teach ethics and professionalism with the patient at hand.

  4. Improving patient care: the use of a digital teaching file to enhance clinicians' access to the intellectual capital of interdepartmental conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsted, Mark J; Perry, Laurie A; Cripe, Timothy P; Collins, Margaret H; Jakobovits, Rex; Benton, Corning; Halsted, David G

    2004-02-01

    We describe a simple method for creating teaching cases from clinical data, radiologic images, surgical images, and images from pathologic slides that are presented at tumor board conferences. The resulting interdisciplinary case files are of educational value both during and after conference presentations and can be used by clinicians to gather appropriate historical, laboratory, imaging, surgical, and pathologic data on their patients. This system improves the efficiency and accuracy in gathering patient histories when care is transferred among clinics, the emergency department, and wards.

  5. Using the Youk-Kevorkian case to teach about euthanasia and other end-of-life issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, J L

    2001-03-01

    Dr. Jack Kevorkian's actions have generated much controversy and press coverage during the past decade. His appearance on a nationally televised newsprogram with a videotape showing him deliberately causing the death of a man led to his imprisonment. This article discusses how Kevorkian's euthanasia case can be used to teach undergraduate students about end-of-life issues, especially psychosocial aspects of the debate over hastened death.

  6. Evaluation Of Prescription Pattern And Medication Adherence Of Antihypertensive Drugs In Stage 1 Essential Hypertensive Patients At Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital Of Central India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan S. Urade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives- To study the prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs and analyze the medication adherence to antihypertensive drugs at rural tertiary care teaching hospital.Materials and Methods- Prospective, observational, 12 weeks, questionnaire based study, conducted in rural tertiary care teaching hospital of central India. 214 antihypertensive prescriptions were analyzed by Morisky medication adherence scale. Statistical analysis was done by MS Excel and Graph pad prism 6.0.Results- 28.03% patients were not aware about the medicines taken, 29.90% patients were unacquainted about dose and route of administration whereas 32.71% patients were unfamiliar about frequency of administration of medicines. 53.27% patients were unaware about precautions to be taken while consuming medicines.  58.68% & 12.67% patients consumed amlodipine & atenolol respectively. In 16.43% patients, atenolol + amlodipine combination therapy was prescribed.  Amongst 214 patients 12, 58 & 144 showed high, medium & low adherence respectively.  No significant difference was found on gender basis at any level of adherence.Conclusion- In this study, physicians given preference to amlodipine than other antihypertensive drugs. However, thiazide is a first line drug in stage 1 hypertension, recommended by JNC VII guideline. This indicates that there is need of creating awareness about current management of hypertension to clinicians by organizing various workshops. We observed only 5.60% patients showed high adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Therefore educational strategies must be carried out for physicians focusing on causes for nonadherence to antihypertensive medications. Also raising patient trust in their physicians may improve patient motivation to prescribed medication. 

  7. Using the health-care matrix to teach and improve patient safety culture in an OB/GYN residency training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Steve; Ogunyemi, Dotun

    2012-12-01

    To assess the utility of health-care matrix in teaching patient safety in terms of the Institute of Medicine Aims for health-care improvement and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. As part of residency education, health-care matrix conference is held monthly. A multidisciplinary team is invited. Residents choose cases and develop a draft matrix under faculty supervision. The matrix is presented, and consensus action plan is generated after discussion. Approximately 2 years after initiation of the program, residents completed an anonymous 15-item survey. The study included 26 health-care matrix conferences from 2007 to 2009. Main reasons for residents' selection of cases were management issues (42%), bleeding complications (35%), and medication errors (23%). Major contributors to patient safety concerns by Institute of Medicine Aims were timeliness (65%), and those by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies were system issues (77%), medical knowledge (69%), and communication issues (66%).Residents agreed that the program was useful. No resident thought that the program should be cancelled. Only 39% feel their communication skills were improved, 48% felt that preparation was time consuming, and 29% felt awkward presenting errors of superiors. Review of action plans developed after each matrix showed that implementation of recommendations was initiated in 92% of the cases. The health-care matrix curriculum can be used to teach patient safety culture, assess system processes, and improve patient care. This report highlights the importance of system issues, timeliness, medical knowledge, and communication for patient safety concerns.

  8. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samba Adama Sangare

    Full Text Available The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE, is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali, which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI, were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3% were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21] and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]. Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae. The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6% among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  9. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Samba Adama; Rondinaud, Emilie; Maataoui, Naouale; Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Guindo, Ibrehima; Maiga, Aminata; Camara, Namory; Dicko, Oumar Agaly; Dao, Sounkalo; Diallo, Souleymane; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Andremont, Antoine; Maiga, Ibrahim Izetiegouma; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E) and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE), is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali), which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI), were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3%) were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21]) and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]). Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae). The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata) were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6%) among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  10. The profile of mental disorders based on consultation psychiatry in patients of the multidisciplinary children’s teaching hospita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Kądziela-Olech

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Consultation psychiatry plays an important role in developmental medicine. The concept of consultation psychiatry in general medicine includes diagnosis, support and assistance in solving psychiatric, psychological or psychosocial problems of the patient. Child psychopathology, which results from the interaction of biological and psychosocial factors, may be manifested by categorical psychiatric disorders, which may coexist with somatic diseases, and may also be a secondary reaction in response to other illnesses. The disorganisation of behaviour in patients at the developmental period may also result from the response to the disease or hospitalisation. On the other hand, mental disorders can significantly hamper the treatment of somatic diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the spectrum of psychopathology and to analyse the reasons for psychiatric consultation on the multidisciplinary wards of the University Children’s Teaching Hospital. During 9 years, 741 psychiatric consultations were carried out. The results obtained indicate that anxiety, stress-related and somatoform disorders were the most common category of mental disorders (30.5% observed in consulted girls (30.0% and boys (31.5%. Emotional and conduct disorders were found in 22.8% of the consulted children. There was a significant difference (p = 0.02 between boys (31% and girls (18.3%. Eating disorders were identified in 17% of the examined group. This category, which includes anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia and bulimia, was significantly more frequently (p < 0.001 observed in girls (23.9% than boys (3.6%. A refusal to eat (24.4% was, next to deliberate intake of pharmacological agents (21.7%, the most common reason for psychiatric consultations in the examined group.

  11. Risk factors for surgical site infection in a teaching hospital: a prospective study of 1,138 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Keping Cheng, Jiawei Li, Qingfang Kong, Changxian Wang, Nanyuan Ye, Guohua Xia Department of Infection Control, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI in a teaching hospital.Methods: A prospective study was initiated to investigate risk factors for SSI at a university-affiliated tertiary care center from July 2013 to December 2014. The chi-square test for categorical variables was used to determine the significance of association, whereas the multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine independent risk factors for SSI.Results: A total of 1,138 patients met the inclusion criteria, in whom 36 cases of infection occurred during the hospitalization period and two cases occurred after discharge. Univariate analysis showed that SSI was associated with the type of operation, wound classification, volume of blood loss, blood transfusion, American Society of Anesthesiology score before surgery, risk index, duration of surgery, diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal catheter, urinary catheter, postoperative drainage, and preprocedural white blood cell count. Multivariate analysis identified six independent parameters correlating with the occurrence of SSI: diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 6.400; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.582–15.866; P=0.000; cancer (OR 2.427; 95% CI 1.028–5.732; P=0.043; preprocedural white blood cell count more than 10×109/L (OR 6.988; CI 3.165–15.425; P=0.000; wound classification (clean contaminated [OR: 7.893; CI: 2.244–27.762; P=0.001]; contaminated [OR: 7.031; CI: 1.652–29.922; P=0.008]; dirty [OR: 48.778; CI: 5.418–439.164; P=0.001]; operative duration more than 120 minutes (OR 4.289; CI 1.773–10.378; P=0.001; and postoperative drainage (OR 3.957; CI 1.422–11.008; P=0.008.Conclusion: Our data suggest that all these risk factors

  12. A Structured Approach to End-of-Life Decision Making Improves Quality of Care for Patients With Terminal Illness in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Ama Kyerewaa; Johnson McGee, Summer; Opare-Lokko, Edwina Addo; Gyakobo, Mawuli Kotope

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether a structured approach to end-of-life decision-making directed by a compassionate interdisciplinary team would improve the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in a teaching hospital in Ghana. A retrospective analysis was done for 20 patients who consented to participate in the structured approach to end-of-life decision-making. Twenty patients whose care did not follow the structured approach were selected as controls. Outcome measures were nociceptive pain control, completing relationships, and emotional response towards dying. These measures were statistically superior in the study group compared to the control group. A structured approach to end-of-life decision-making significantly improves the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in the domains of pain control, completing relationships and emotional responses towards dying. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Standardized patient simulation versus didactic teaching alone for improving residents' communication skills when discussing goals of care and resuscitation: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downar, James; McNaughton, Nancy; Abdelhalim, Tarek; Wong, Natalie; Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Seccareccia, Dori; Miller, Kim; Dev, Shelly; Ridley, Julia; Lee, Christie; Richardson, Lisa; McDonald-Blumer, Heather; Knickle, Kerry

    2017-02-01

    Communication skills are important when discussing goals of care and resuscitation. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of standardized patients for teaching medical trainees to communicate about goals of care. To determine whether standardized patient simulation offers benefit over didactic sessions alone for improving skill and comfort discussing goals of care. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of didactic teaching plus standardized patient simulation versus didactic teaching alone. First-year internal medicine residents. Changes in communication comfort and skill between baseline and 2 months post-training assessed using the Consultation and Relational Empathy measure. We enrolled 94 residents over a 2-year period. Both groups reported a significant improvement in comfort when discussing goals of care with patients. There was no difference in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores following the workshop ( p = 0.79). The intervention group showed a significant increase in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores post-workshop compared with pre-workshop (35.0 vs 31.7, respectively; p = 0.048), whereas there was no improvement in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores in the control group (35.6 vs 36.0; p = 0.4). However, when the results were adjusted for baseline differences in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores in a multivariable regression analysis, group assignment was not associated with an improvement in Consultation and Relational Empathy score. Improvement in comfort scores and perception of benefit were not associated with improvements in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores. Simulation training may improve communication skill and comfort more than didactic training alone, but there were important confounders in this study and further studies are needed to determine whether simulation is better than didactic training for this purpose.

  14. Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    communication skills can be taught, although proven learning strategies should be the basis of any communication teaching. It is reported that the communication skills teachers themselves be trained in communication skills and assessment of communication skills should be an important component of the health professionals' accreditation. Not only should the communication skills of the teacher be evaluated but the teaching modules within the program should also be evaluated on a regular basis.In all cases of communication teaching, strong faculty support is required for any communication skills programme to be successful. Early introduction of communication skills programmes, which are continued throughout all the years of the curriculum, has been shown to be effective in improving confidence and reducing the number of errors made and establishing a more permanent understanding of communication. Throughout the undergraduate degree, increased integration between communication and clinical teaching is important in learning to use the two skill sets together, so as to closely reflect what happens in clinical practice. Research suggests that communication training is most effective when longitudinal in nature and coincides with ongoing professional practice education.Many studies have shown that communication skills programmes with a strong experimental and/or practical component are more effective than programmes that are solely theory or discussion based. Simulations and role-play are effective instructional methods for developing communication skills including opening and closing consultations, conducting the consultation in a logical manner, improving body language, using language at the level of understanding of the patient and using clear verbal and written communication. One particular strategy that has been shown to be effective is the use of videotaped consultations with standardised patients.Although measuring the effectiveness of communication skills training is difficult

  15. Clinical Profile of Suspected and Confirmed H1N1 Influenza Infection in Patients admitted at a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

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    Basavaraju Jayadeva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the clinical profile and outcomes of adult patients screened and diagnosed with H1N1 influenza infection at a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: This retrospective  study was conducted on all adult patients suspected of H1N1 influenza admitted at a teaching hospital during the epidemic period of January-March 2015. Patients were screened and classified into three categories of A, B, and C based on international guidelines. Home confinement was recommended for patients in category A, and subjects in category B received treatment with Oseltamivir capsules. In addition, patients in category C received inpatient treatment with oseltamivir capsules. Results: In total, 695 patients were screened for H1N1 influenza infection during the epidemic, out of whom 380 patients (54.6% were in category A, 264 (37.9% were in category B, and 51 (7.3% were in category C. Throat swabs were collected and examined for 192 ( 27.6% patients, and 59 ( 8.4% cases were positive for H1N1 infection. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, close vigilance over the symptoms of patients infected with H1N1 influenza is more important than treatment and screening of suspicious cases during the epidemics of this infection. This is a retrospective cross sectional study. Hence, there were no comparative controls. The limitation of this study is,  thus the lack of control.

  16. A study evaluating prevalence of hypertension and risk factors affecting on blood pressure control among type 2 diabetes patients attending teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abougalambou, Salwa Selim Ibrahim; Abougalambou, Ayman S

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is extremely common disease found in patients with diabetes mellitus. Eighty to 90% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus will develop hypertension, and about 20% of hypertensive patients develop diabetes. The aim of this study was designed to assess the prevalence of hypertension and factors affecting the control of hypertension among type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 1077 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were included in this study who attended at diabetes clinic of Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) teaching hospital in Kelantan. All these patients were prospectively followed from January to December 2008. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of variables on hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension (BP>130/80 or on medication for high blood pressure) was 92.7%. A total 471 (47.2%) patients had achieved blood pressure targets ≤ 130/80 mmHg. The logistic regression indicated that hypertension was positively associated with age (P=0.040), BMI (P=0.027), HbA1c (P=0.046), and level of education (P=0.039). Hypertension is a common co-morbidity among diabetic patients. Hypertension was not controlled to the recommended levels of blood pressure in about one-half (52.8%) of diabetes patients. Age, BMI, HbA1c and level of education are factors affecting on hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Nursing care for the patient with disruptions in the integrity of the skin: an account of teaching-learning experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Maria José; Vilela, Elaine Morelato; Takeda, Elisabete; Santos, Ione Ferreira

    2002-12-01

    The Nursing Course at the Medicine College in Marília, has been making every efforts to create the Integrate Curriculum, making use of the questionable methodology. In this study, the authors present the student' expected performances and the sequency of activities create to teach the precautions of Nursing for the adult and elder people taking away some changes na the cutaneous integrity, that makes the student implement the knowlege. During the activities it was proved that this kind of challenge has showed a progress in the teaching and learning process, but there are some difficulties to be conquered.

  18. Teaching history taking to medical students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifenheim, Katharina E; Teufel, Martin; Ip, Julianne; Speiser, Natalie; Leehr, Elisabeth J; Zipfel, Stephan; Herrmann-Werner, Anne

    2015-09-28

    This paper is an up-to-date systematic review on educational interventions addressing history taking. The authors noted that despite the plethora of specialized training programs designed to enhance students' interviewing skills there had not been a review of the literature to assess the quality of each published method of teaching history taking in undergraduate medical education based on the evidence of the program's efficacy. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, opengrey, opendoar and SSRN were searched using key words related to medical education and history taking. Articles that described an educational intervention to improve medical students' history-taking skills were selected and reviewed. Included studies had to evaluate learning progress. Study quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Seventy-eight full-text articles were identified and reviewed; of these, 23 studies met the final inclusion criteria. Three studies applied an instructional approach using scripts, lectures, demonstrations and an online course. Seventeen studies applied a more experiential approach by implementing small group workshops including role-play, interviews with patients and feedback. Three studies applied a creative approach. Two of these studies made use of improvisational theatre and one introduced a simulation using Lego® building blocks. Twenty-two studies reported an improvement in students' history taking skills. Mean MERSQI score was 10.4 (range 6.5 to 14; SD = 2.65). These findings suggest that several different educational interventions are effective in teaching history taking skills to medical students. Small group workshops including role-play and interviews with real patients, followed by feedback and discussion, are widespread and best investigated. Feedback using videotape review was also reported as particularly instructive. Students in the early preclinical state might profit from approaches helping

  19. Communication with Alzheimer's Patients: An Analysis of Caregiver Listening Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Hollis R.

    1991-01-01

    Examined caregiver listening responses as they occurred in conversations with an Alzheimer's patient. Videotaped 26 episodes of conversations between caregivers and patients in adult day health care setting. Found that sensitive listening and partial entry into the patient's frame (reality) may be effective response to prevent behavior and…

  20. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  1. A ten-year review of the literature on the use of standardized patients in teaching and learning: 1996-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Win; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Justin P

    2009-06-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature on the educational use of standardized patients (SP) in teaching and learning, there have been no reviews on their value. To determine whether the educational use of SPs has an effect on the knowledge, skills, and behaviour of learners in the health professions. English-language articles covering the period 1996-2005 were reviewed to address the issue of to what extent has the use of SPs affected the knowledge, skills and performance of learners. Out of 797 abstracts, 69 articles, which met the review criteria, were selected. An adaptation of Kirkpatrick's model was used to classify and analyse the articles. Most of the learners were students in medicine and nursing. SPs were used mostly to teach communication skills and clinical skills. The study designs were case-control (29%), pre-test/post-test (24.6%), post-test only (26.1%) and qualitative studies (20.3%). METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES: Most of the studies had weak research designs. More rigorous designs with control or comparison groups should be used in future research. Most studies reported that the educational use of SPs was valuable. More rigorous studies would support the evidence-based use of SPs in teaching and learning.

  2. Chi-Square Test of Word of Mouth Marketing with Impact on the Evaluation of Patients' Hospital and Services: An Application in Teaching and Research Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENER, Yelda; BEHDİOĞLU, Sema

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study, using data provided from 223 inpatients in a teaching and research hospital, hospital’s preference is to explain the effect of word of mouth marketing. For this purpose, word of mouth marketing process is evaluated in terms of providing information about the hospital and the patient’s level of intimacy, both of patients and information provider’s level of expertise with related to hospital and services, the patient’s perceived level of risk for hospitals and service...

  3. Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

  4. Teaching to Teach in Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Kien; Waddell, Andrea E.; Lofchy, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The training objectives for postgraduate education in the United States and Canada both state that teaching skills should be formally developed during training. This article reviews the development of the Teaching-to-Teach program at the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry, the current curriculum, evaluation, and future…

  5. Evaluating the Trends of Bloodstream Infections among Pediatric and Adult Patients at a Teaching Hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal: Role of Drug Resistant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infections (BSIs are among the significant causes of morbidity and mortality for patients of all age groups. However, very little is known about the trends of bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibilities among pediatric and adult population from Nepal. In this study, we have investigated the different etiological agents responsible for bloodstream infections among pediatric and adult patients and the role of drug resistant organisms in these infections at a tertiary care teaching hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal. A total of 3,088 blood culture specimens obtained from pediatric and adult patients suspected to have bloodstream infections were processed by standard microbiological methods. Significant bacterial pathogens were identified by morphological, biochemical, and serological methods as suggested by American Society for Microbiology. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and interpreted according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Overall, incidence of bloodstream infections among the suspected patients was 7.48%. Pediatric patients (n=90, 9.37% were the significant subgroup of patients affected with bloodstream infections compared to adults (p<0.05, CI-95%. Gram positive (n=49, 54.4% bacteria in pediatric and gram negative bacteria (n=141, 78.7% in adult patients were the most common isolates for BSI. Staphylococcus aureus (n=41, 45.6% in pediatric patients and Salmonella enterica (n=40, 28.3% in adult patients were the leading pathogens. Trends of antimicrobial resistance among isolated bacterial strains were significantly high in adults compared to pediatric patients. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA (31.4%, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL (12.5%, and metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL (3.9% producing gram negatives were major resistant strains. Our study shows higher rates of bloodstream infections in

  6. A Novel Pilot Study of Internet-stored Videotapes and Pediatric Dentists Predicting Behavior of Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Jennifer; Wilson, Stephen; Chu, Michael; Turner, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a web-based technology as a means of clinical research in assessing pediatric dentists' accuracy in predicting patient behaviors during a clinical procedure based on pre-procedural behaviors shown in vignettes. A private web-based server was used to house six two-minute vignettes and a questionnaire on children's behaviors and temperament characteristics. An electronic link via an e-mail invitation was sent to a sample of pediatric dentists. Six patients undergoing a clinical examination were pre-rated using the Ohio State Behavior Rating Scale and classified each as cooperative, potentially cooperative, and uncooperative. The vignettes displayed the children prior to undergoing an examination. Pediatric dentists were asked to predict the children's behaviors and temperament during the clinical examination based on the behavior in the vignettes. Results indicated that 89 percent of the respondents were able to correctly classify and predict behaviors in at least four of the six vignettes. Respondents were less confident and accurate in their predictions for children who were rated as uncooperative (48 percent and 33 percent, respectively). Web-based technology may be a promising tool for studies in pediatric dentistry. Pediatric dentists can rapidly perceive cues in classifying and discriminating behaviors.

  7. The Teaching of Photojournalism Ethics: Help from the Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Lester

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available 無The methods used to teach photojournalism ethics can be divided into two groups. There is the lecture method and the simulation method. The lecture method combines the photojournalism instructor or a guest (preferably a professional with the traditional instructional materials of photographic prints, slides, films, and videotapes. Lectures should be structured with the audio-visual materials so that students will understand why and how a photographer acted given a specific set of circumstances. The student should also understand why and how the photograph was used in the newspaper. The simulation method can include in-class role playing games, complex environmental re-creations, ethics surveys, or interactive software on a computer. The fol1owing is a discussion of the various methods used to teach photojournalism ethics with an extended explanation of an interactive computer software program developed by the author.

  8. Matching music teacher’s self conception with students’ perception on teaching effectiveness in an unfavourable secondary classroom context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wah Leung

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and recording good music teaching practices that promote social inclusion, and at developing effective teaching strategies that incorporate student perspectives into the pedagogies. A music teacher in Hong Kong was selected for this study, and two different classes of Form 2 (ages 12-13 were observed. The teaching process was videotaped and reviewed. Afterwards the teacher and a group of students were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview to solicit their ideas towards good practice of music teaching. Findings reveal that the good practices observed were attributed to four factors: 1 teacher’s personality, 2 teacher’s pedagogy, 3 teacher’s musical competence, and 4 teacher’s philosophy of teaching.

  9. Nutritional risk screening and clinical outcome assessment among patients with community-acquired infection: A multicenter study in Beijing teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yan; Yu, Kang; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yu-Fang; Li, Rong-Rong; Li, Chun-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to implement nutritional risk screening in patients with community-acquired infection (CAI) and analyze its relationship with clinical outcomes. We consecutively assessed 595 patients with CAI from two teaching hospitals for eligibility during this study. Their nutritional risk was evaluated using Nutritional Risk Screening-2002. The hospital length of stay (LOS), rate of readmission, and nutritional support were recorded. In all, 336 patients with CAI were recruited. Of these, 40.61% were at nutritional risk at admission. The prevalence of nutritional risk in those patients age ≥70 y was significantly higher than in younger patients (51.38% versus 37.29%; P = 0.017). There was significant increase in the prevalence of nutritional risk from admission to 2-wk post-admission in all patients (40.61% versus 48.93%; P = 0.036) and in elderly patients (51.38% versus 69.90%; P = 0.010). Of the at-risk patients, the LOS (19.6 ± 12.2 d versus 11.2 ± 5.3 d; P nutritional support was a protective factor for longer LOS when adjusted for confounders (odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.68; P nutritional support and the average ratio of parenteral to enteral nutrition was 4.2:1. Many patients with CAI were at nutritional risk and tended to worsen during hospitalization, which has been associated with increased LOS and rate of readmission. Nutritional support might be beneficial to the patients by shortening LOS. Inappropriate use of nutritional support was observed in patients with CAI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  11. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  12. Preparation and Support of Patients through the Transplant Process: Understanding the Recipients' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Mauthner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for heart transplant commonly includes booklets, instructional videos, personalized teaching sessions, and mentorship. This paper explores heart transplant recipients’ thoughts on their preparation and support through the transplant process. Twenty-five interviews were audio-/videotaped capturing voice and body language and transcribed verbatim. Coding addressed language, bodily gesture, volume, and tone in keeping with our visual methodology. Recipients reported that only someone who had a transplant truly understands the experience. As participants face illness and life-altering experiences, maintaining a positive attitude and hope is essential to coping well. Healthcare professionals provide ongoing care and reassurance about recipients’ medical status. Mentors, family members, and close friends play vital roles in supporting recipients. Participants reported that only heart transplant recipients understood the experience, the hope, and ultimately the suffering associated with living with another persons’ heart. Attention needs to be focused not solely on the use of teaching modalities, but also on the development of innovative support networks. This will promote patient and caregiver engagement in self-management. Enhancing clinicians’ knowledge of the existential aspects of transplantation will provide them with a nuanced understanding of the patients’ experience, which will ultimately enhance their ability to better prepare and support patients and their caregivers.

  13. E-Learning in Urology: Implementation of the Learning and Teaching Platform CASUS® - Do Virtual Patients Lead to Improved Learning Outcomes? A Randomized Study among Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anna-Teresa; Albers, Peter; Müller-Mattheis, Volker

    2015-01-01

    E-learning is playing an increasing role in medical education, supporting a problem-based and practical oriented education without putting patients at risk and compensating for the decrease in instructor-centered teaching. Not much research has been done concerning learning effects and reaction on behalf of the students. We created computer-based cases for four important diagnoses in urology using the authoring system CASUS®. Fourth-year medical school students were randomized into two groups: (1) the CASUS® group, using the online cases for preparation, and (2) the book group, using a textbook. A multiple-choice test referring to the prepared topic had to be completed at the beginning of each lecture and the results were analyzed. Evaluation of the students concerning the acceptance of the program was done at the end of the semester. Members of the CASUS® group scored significantly higher with an average of 20% better test results than students using textbooks for preparation. Evaluation regarding the program showed a highly positive rating. Limitations include the small study population and the possibly biased test performance of the students. Computerized patient cases facilitate practice-oriented teaching and result in an interesting and engaging learning model with improved learning outcomes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Online Learning of Safe Patient Transfers in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hayden D. H. Ed., OTR/L, CHT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Online higher education is steadily increasing. For programs in allied health to be offered effectively in an elearning format, clinical psychomotor skills need to be addressed. The aim of this research was to design, implement, and evaluate an online safe patient transfers module for occupational therapy assistant (OTAstudents. The efficacy of teaching safe patient transfers in an e-learning environment was appraised using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The applied research project was completed at a Tennessee community college. A convenience sample of eighteen students participated in the pilot study. Twenty-five studentsparticipated in the subsequent study. The instructional design of the course was based on Mager’s CriterionReferenced Instruction model. Streaming video was used as the delivery method for course material. A pretest/posttest evaluated the students’ cognitive knowledge of safe patient transfers. A behavioral transferscompetency checklist was used to rate videotapes of students’ performance of assisted stand pivot and dependent sliding board transfers. Research findings indicated students were able to learn this psychomotor clinical skill online with beginning proficiency. A paired t-test showed marked improvement of cognitive knowledge. A student learning survey revealed the majority of students preferred at least one hands-on classroom session where instructor feedback and interaction with classmates confirmed safe and effectiveclinical technique.

  15. Incidence of leaving against medical advice (LAMA) among patients admitted at the accident and emergency unit of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udosen, A M; Glen, E; Ogbudu, S; Nkposong, E

    2006-12-01

    The causes and incidence of the commonly observed phenomenon of leaving against medical advice (LAMA) in our hospitals have not been studied. This retrospective study was aimed at evaluating its incidence and pattern in order to suggest possible solutions. The case files of patients who left against medical advice at the Casualty unit of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital between July 2002 and December 2003 were retrieved from the Medical Records Department and information regarding age, sex, education/occupation, religion, diagnosis, reason(s) for leaving and duration of stay in casualty were extracted. A total of 3708 patients were seen at the casualty unit within this period. Ninety-seven patients left against medical advice but only ninety case notes were analyzable. Seven folders had incomplete information. Male/Female ratio was 2:1 and the ages ranged between 7 and 70 years (average 31.5 years). The average duration of stay in Hospital was 2.4 days (110 days). Sixty-five patients (72.2%) were those who had various forms of trauma while 8 (8.8%) had general surgical problems. 19% (17) patients had medical emergencies. The youths are the most vulnerable group and the principal causes in our environment are ignorance and poverty. Because of poor documentation in our centres, it was not possible to know where these patients go and the results of their treatments. There is therefore a need for further studies.

  16. Can we rely on simulated patients' satisfaction with their consultation for assessing medical students' communication skills? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, T; Grimstad, H; Holen, A; Anvik, T; Baerheim, A; Fasmer, O B; Hjortdahl, P; Vaglum, P

    2015-12-18

    In medical education, teaching methods offering intensive practice without high utilization of faculty resources are needed. We investigated whether simulated patients' (SPs') satisfaction with a consultation could predict professional observers' assessment of young doctors' communication skills. This was a comparative cross-sectional study of 62 videotaped consultations in a general practice setting with young doctors who were finishing their internship. The SPs played a female patient who had observed blood when using the toilet, which had prompted a fear of cancer. Immediately afterwards, the SP rated her level of satisfaction with the consultation, and the scores were dichotomized into satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Professional observers viewed the videotapes and assessed the doctors' communication skills using the Arizona Communication Interview Rating Scale (ACIR). Their ratings of communication skills were dichotomized into acceptable versus unacceptable levels of competence. The SPs' satisfaction showed a predictive power of 0.74 for the observers' assessment of the young doctors and whether they reached an acceptable level of communication skills. The SPs' dissatisfaction had a predictive power of 0.71 for the observers' assessment of an unacceptable communication level. The two assessment methods differed in 26% of the consultations. When SPs felt relief about their cancer concern after the consultation, they assessed the doctors' skills as satisfactory independent of the observers' assessment. Accordance between the dichotomized SPs' satisfaction score and communication skills assessed by observers (using the ACIR) was in the acceptable range. These findings suggest that SPs' satisfaction scores may provide a reliable source for assessing communication skills in educational programs for medical trainees (students and young doctors). Awareness of the patient's concerns seems to be of vital importance to patient satisfaction.

  17. Chi-Square Test of Word of Mouth Marketing with Impact on the Evaluation of Patients' Hospital and Services: An Application in Teaching and Research Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda ŞENER

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study, using data provided from 223 inpatients in a teaching and research hospital, hospital’s preference is to explain the effect of word of mouth marketing. For this purpose, word of mouth marketing process is evaluated in terms of providing information about the hospital and the patient’s level of intimacy, both of patients and information provider’s level of expertise with related to hospital and services, the patient’s perceived level of risk for hospitals and services and providing information’s level of impact on patient being treated in hospital. The obtain data, after evaluation by frequency distributions these factors impact on word of mouth marketing is demonstrated by descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and pearson’s correlation analysis. As a result of this study is concluded word of mouth marketing on the training and research hospital is preferred by the patints to have a significant impact.

  18. Non-verbal behaviour in nurse-elderly patient communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Bensing, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study explores the occurence of non-verbal communication in nurse-elderly patient interaction in two different care settings: home nursing and a home for the elderly. In a sample of 181 nursing encounters involving 47 nurses a study was made of videotaped nurse-patient communication. Six

  19. Patterns of Patient Flow to Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex’s Cancer Treatment Centre, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatimehin Oyekanmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the spatial dimensions of patronage of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex’s Cancer Treatment Centre, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria, with a view to provide information on the sphere of influence of the centre and to inform future locational decisions. The geographic coordinates of relevant phenomena were obtained using a GPS receiver. Also, the medical records of cancer patients were assessed for relevant information. The collected data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics, and geo-spatial techniques. The data showed that a total of 1809 patients from 15 states in Nigeria were enrolled for the treatment of cancer at the hospital. The volume of patronage at the centre was seen to be inversely related to the distance travelled by patients (r = −.657, p>0.05. For instance, 85% of the patients came from the three (3 states nearest to the health facility, with Osun, the host State, accounting for about half (50.6% of the total number. Additionally, the study revealed some demographic and socio-economic peculiarities among the cancer patients.

  20. Self-identification and management of hand-foot syndrome (HFS): effect of a structured teaching program on patients receiving capecitabine-based chemotherapy for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kalaivani; Ostwal, Vikas; Carvalho, Maria Deo; D'souza, Anita; Achrekar, Meera S; Govindarajan, Shrinivasan; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-06-01

    Capecitabine is an oral prodrug of 5-fluorouracil and is commonly used oral chemotherapeutic drugs for advanced gastric and colorectal cancer. However, hand-foot syndrome (HFS) has high incidence, and once developed, the symptoms significantly impair quality of life (QOL), leading to a reduction in the dosage or discontinuation of the treatment. Effective health education should be offered to patients to promote self-identification and management on how to recognize HFS and use self-management techniques at the very beginning of chemotherapy. The present study intended to evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching program on knowledge related to self-identification and management of HFS among patients receiving chemotherapy for colon cancer at tertiary cancer care center. Participants who fulfilled the criteria were selected using non-probability purposive sampling. The sample selected were 40 participants (20 participants in experimental group and 20 participants in control group). Among the group of 40 patients, 17 (85 %) participants in the experimental group and 17 (85 %) participants in the control group were receiving capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) chemotherapy treatment protocol. Five (25 %) participants in the experimental group and ten (50 %) participants in the control group were receiving drug capecitabine at a dose of 2500 mg. The mean knowledge (knowledge related to self-identification and management of HFS) pretest score was 6.75 and mean knowledge posttest score was 10.25 in the experimental group which was statistically significant (p = 0.000) (p  0.05). The study showed a statistically significant improvement in knowledge scores of participants that occurred due to intervention of structured teaching program. This can be used to assess reduction in incidence of HFS in the future.

  1. Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training: Implications for Teaching and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Justin L; Boscardin, Christy K; Young, John Q; Ten Cate, Olle; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load among learners performing a specific procedure, colonoscopy, to identify implications for procedural teaching. Data were collected through an electronically administered survey sent to 1,061 U.S. gastroenterology fellows during the 2014-2015 academic year; 477 (45.0%) participated. Participants completed the survey immediately following a colonoscopy. Using multivariable linear regression analyses, the authors identified sets of features associated with intrinsic, extraneous, and germane loads. Features associated with intrinsic load included learners (prior experience and year in training negatively associated, fatigue positively associated) and patient/tasks (procedural complexity positively associated, better patient tolerance negatively associated). Features associated with extraneous load included learners (fatigue positively associated), setting (queue order positively associated), and supervisors (supervisor engagement and confidence negatively associated). Only one feature, supervisor engagement, was (positively) associated with germane load. These data support practical recommendations for teaching procedural skills through the lens of cognitive load theory. To optimize intrinsic load, level of experience and competence of learners should be balanced with procedural complexity; part-task approaches and scaffolding may be beneficial. To reduce extraneous load, teachers should remain engaged, and factors within the procedural setting that may interfere with learning should be minimized. To optimize germane load, teachers should remain engaged.

  2. Teaching Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard-Clouston, M.

    2013-01-01

    Vocabulary is central to English language teaching. Without sufficient vocabulary, students cannot understand others or express their own ideas. Teachers who find the task of teaching English vocabulary a little daunting are not alone! This book presents important issues from recent vocabulary research and theory so that teachers may approach…

  3. Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  4. Teaching Portfolio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Fischer

    The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark.......The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark....

  5. Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Grammar is a component in all language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers need to know rules of grammar (teacher knowledge) as well as techniques that help students use grammar effectively and effortlessly (teaching knowledge). Using reflective practice to help teachers become comfortable with teaching grammar, this…

  6. Team Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to review current developments in team teaching and to assess its potential in the Calgary, Alberta, schools. An investigation into team teaching situations in schools in the eastern half of the United States and Canada revealed characteristics common to successful programs (e.g., charismatic leadership and innovative…

  7. Rational Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, C. J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The recognition of teaching as a special relationship among individuals is currently being overlooked in much contemporary educational research and policymaking. The author examines the philosophy of rationality in teaching and relates it to the educational vision presented in George Orwell's novel, "Nineteen Eighty-Four." (CB)

  8. Teaching Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kathleen, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Five ideas to aid in teaching health are offered including the use of discarded household items as visual aids in health and safety; media use in health education; relating GPA to teaching competence; the use of feature films to promote health concepts and examine health problems; and identification of environmental health issues. (JMF)

  9. Activating teaching methods in french language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kulhánková, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is activating teaching methods in french language teaching. This thesis outlines the issues acitvating teaching methods in the concept of other teaching methods. There is a definition of teaching method, classification of teaching methods and characteristics of each activating method. In the practical part of this work are given concrete forms of activating teaching methods appropriate for teaching of french language.

  10. Two dimensional and Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of patients presenting at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex Ile Ife Nigeria a prospective study of 2501 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo RA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rasaaq Ayodele Adebayo,1 Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,2 Michael Olabode Balogun,1 Anthony Olubunmi Akintomide,1 Victor Oladeji Adeyeye,1 Olugbenga Olusola Abiodun,1 Luqman Adeleke Bisiriyu,3 Suraj Adefabi Ogunyemi,1 Ebenezer Adekunle Ajayi,4 Olufemi Eyitayo Ajayi,1 Adebayo Tolulope Oyedeji5 1Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 2Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, 3Department of Demography and Social Statistics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 4Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, 5Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria Background: Echocardiography remains a key noninvasive cardiac investigative tool in the management of patients, especially in a developing economy like Nigeria. In this study, we investigated the indications for transthoracic echocardiography and spectrum of cardiac disease found in patients referred to our cardiac unit for echocardiography. Methods: A prospective two-dimensional, pulsed, continuous, and color-flow Doppler echocardiographic evaluation was done using the transthoracic approach in 2501 patients over an eight-year period. Univariate data analysis was performed for mean age, gender, clinical indications, and diagnoses. Results: The subject age range was less than 12 months to 97 years (mean 52.39 years. There were 1352 (54.06% males and 1149 (45.94% females. The most common indication for echocardiography was hypertension (52.1% followed by congestive cardiac failure (13.9%. Others were for screening (6.1%, arrhythmias (5%, cerebrovascular disease (5%, chest pain (3.3%, chronic kidney disease (3.2%, congenital heart disease (2.6%, cardiomyopathy (1.8%, rheumatic heart disease (1.7%, diabetes mellitus (1.3%, thyrocardiac disease (1.2%, ischemic heart

  11. Randomized controlled trial of teaching practice nurses to carry out structured assessments of patients receiving depot antipsychotic injections.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, T; Millar, E; Garland, C; Kendrick, T; Chisholm, B; Ross, F

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A third of patients with schizophrenia are out of contact with secondary services. Many of these patients receive maintenance medication as depot antipsychotics from practice nurses, most of whom have negligible training in mental health. AIM: To examine the impact of a structured assessment on the process of care and clinical status of schizophrenia patients by practice nurses who received a one-day training course. METHOD: All identified patients were randomly allocated to struc...

  12. Evaluation of Admission Indications, Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Obstetric Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a Teaching Hospital Center: A Five-Year Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Farnoush; Mirmansouri, Ali; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Biazar, Gelareh; Yazdipaz, Shima

    2017-06-01

    Care of obstetric patients has always been a challenge for critical care physicians, because in addition to their complex pregnancy-related disease, fetal viability is considered. The aim of this study was to review the admission indications, clinical characteristics and outcomes of obstetric patients, admitted to the intensive care unit of Alzzahra teaching hospital affiliated to Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on pregnant /post-partum (up to 6 weeks) patients admitted to the ICU over a 5-year period from April 2009 to April, 2014. Data from 1019 subjects were analyzed. Overall, 90.1% of the patients were admitted in the postpartum period. The most common indications for admission were pregnancy related hypertensive disorders (27.5%) and obstetric hemorrhage (13.5%). Epilepsy (5.4%) and cardiac disease (5.2%) were the most common non-obstetric indications. Pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders and obstetric hemorrhage were the main reasons for admission, and epilepsy and cardiac disease were the most common non-obstetric indications. Efforts must be concentrated on increasing antenatal care.

  13. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of OXA-23- and OXA-143-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in ICU patients at a teaching hospital, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francelli Cordeiro Neves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb is an important cause of nosocomial infections especially in intensive care units. This study aimed to assess clinical aspects and the genetic background of CRAb among ICU patients at a Brazilian teaching hospital. Methods: 56 critically ill patients colonized or infected by CRAb, during ICU stay, were prospectively assessed. Based on imipenem MIC ≥ 4 µg/mL, 28 CRAB strains were screened for the presence of genes encoding metallo-β-lactamases and OXA-type β-lactamases. The blaOXA-type genes were characterized by PCR using primers targeting ISAba-1 or -3. Genetic diversity of blaOXA-positive strains was determined by ERIC-PCR analysis. Results: Patient's mean age (±SD was 61 (±15.1, and 58.9% were male. Eighty-percent of the patients presented risk factors for CRAb colonization, mainly invasive devices (87.5% and previous antibiotic therapy (77.6%. Thirty-three patients died during hospital stay (59.0%. Resistance to carbapenems was associated with a high prevalence of blaOXA-23 (51.2% and/or blaOXA-143 (18.6% genes. ERIC-PCR genotyping identified 10 clusters among OXA-producing CRAb. Three CRAb strains exhibited additional resistance to polymyxin B (MIC ≥ 4 µg/mL, whereas 10 CRAb strains showed tigecycline MICs > 2 µg/mL. Conclusions: In this study, clonally unrelated OXA-123- and OXA-143-producing A. baumannii strains in ICU patients were strongly correlated to colonization with infected patients being associated with a poor outcome.

  14. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  15. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  16. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  17. Bedside teaching in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeen, Amer Z; Gisondi, Michael A

    2006-08-01

    Bedside teaching is a valuable instructional method that facilitates the development of history and physical examination skills, the modeling of professional behaviors, and the direct observation of learners. The emergency department (ED) is an ideal environment for the practice of bedside teaching, because its high patient volume, increased acuity of illness, and variety of pathology provide plentiful patient-centered teaching opportunities. Unfortunately, the pressures of ED overcrowding at many institutions now limit the available time for formal bedside teaching per patient. This article will discuss the historical decline of bedside teaching on the wards, address obstacles to its use in the ED, and reestablish its specific benefits as a unique educational tool. The authors propose several practical strategies to increase bedside teaching by academic emergency physicians (EPs). These techniques emphasize careful preparation and a focused teaching approach to overcome the inherent challenges of a typically busy ED shift.

  18. Middle school science teachers' perspectives and practices of teaching through inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Harry Alton

    This research examined middle school teachers' perspectives and practices of teaching through inquiry and the effect of a professional development institute on effecting change in those teachers' perspectives and practices. The professional development institute consisted of 16 days of content and pedagogical instruction, practice teaching, and reflection. Teachers' perspectives of inquiry were established through semi-structured interviews, journals, and written reflections. Teacher practices were assessed through analysis of videotaped lessons using a rubric designed to measure reformed teaching. Teachers' perspectives of inquiry were compared to their practices and to the National Science Education Standards. Through qualitative and quantitative analysis of data it has been found that teacher change is very complex. Professional development must address teacher beliefs, practices, and curriculum. Teachers can adopt the language of reform and imitate reform practices through the use of reform-based curriculum; however, for substantial change in classroom practice to occur, teachers must believe that all students are capable of learning through inquiry.

  19. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, O. K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Among the total cases, 36 (41.4% showed at least one pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus (16.1%, Staphylococcus Saprophyticus (9.1%, Escherichia Coli (6.9% Proteus mirabilis (3.4% Klebsiella spp (2.3% Pseudomonas aerouginosa (1.1% and Proteus vulgaris (2.3%. There was a significant relation between bacteriospermia and the rate of number of total motility and morphologically abnormal sperms (p 0.05. It seems that leukocytopermia is not a good maker to predict bacteriospermia.

  20. A Teaching Tool for Establishing Risk of Oral Health Deterioration in Elderly Patients: Development, Implementation, and Evaluation at a U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Leonardo; Hartshorn, Jennifer E; Cowen, Howard; Dawson, Deborah V; Johnsen, David C

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a learning strategy using critical thinking to teach dental students how to assess the risk of rapid oral health deterioration (ROHD) among elderly patients. A learning guide was developed using risk factors identified in the literature and the steps that expert faculty members apply in their clinical decision making, summarized in a set of ten steps. A new system of labeling risk was developed for the elderly population, which correlates the level of risk with the amount of disease. Participants in the study were all 91 fourth-year dental students in two subsequent classes who took part in a five-week Geriatrics and Special Needs Clinic rotation in the spring of 2015 and 2016. The students were introduced to the ROHD concept and asked to use the guide in a presentation during their rotation. The students were graded on an A, G, or M scale (Applied concept, Grasped and applied concept, or Missed application of concept). Students were also asked to assess their learning experience, and their answers were thematically grouped and analyzed. For eight of the ten steps, at least 93% of the students were graded A or G. The exceptions were the steps about developing a communications plan, which was missed by 23.1%, and self-assessment, which was missed by 30.8%. Interexaminer agreement on students' applying (A + G grades) versus missing the step was moderate or high on six of ten items. Nearly all the students (98.7%) considered assessing the risk of ROHD an important or very important skill. In this study, a learning strategy to teach dental students how to assess the risk of ROHD among elderly patients was developed and successfully implemented.

  1. Knowledge of diabetes and its associated ocular manifestations by diabetic patients: A study at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Godwin O.; Samuel Abokyi; G A Koffuor; Eric Abokyi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a significant cause of visual impairment, hence adequate knowledge on this condition and its ocular manifestations is of immense importance to diabetic patients. Aim: To assess the knowledge of diabetic patients on the disorder and its ocular manifestations, and their attitude towards ocular examinations. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey involving the use of a structured interview was conducted among diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Clin...

  2. Teaching Idiomatic Expressions: A Comparison of Two Instructional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert K.; Kenyon, Patricia L.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty hearing-impaired adolescents were taught idiomatic expressions using captioned videotape presentations followed by classroom discussion, or by extended classroom discussions. Improvement in understanding idioms was significantly greater under the videotape method. (Author/JDD)

  3. Teaching Criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joseph W.

    1986-01-01

    This article surveys information resources, contemporary issues and trends, and selected instructional strategies useful in teaching undergraduate criminology. Instructional resources reviewed include textbooks, professional journals, and reference works. Twelve issues and trends are identified and three exemplary learning activities are…

  4. Health education to diabetic patients before the start of Ramadan: Experience from a teaching hospital in Dammam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musally, Rayyan M; Al-Sardi, Mais A; Al-Elq, Zainab A; Elahi, Afnan H; Alduhailan, Rawan K; Al-Elq, Muslim A; Zainuddin, Fatma A; Alsafar, Noura A; Altammar, Jannat A; Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that pre-Ramadan structured educational program for patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is beneficial. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the degree of adherence of treating physicians to such programs and their influence on the patient's knowledge and behavior. This cross-sectional study was carried out on adult patients with DM attending a university hospital, who were observed while fasting during Ramadan 1436/2015. Data was collected using a questionnaire-based interview. Baseline characteristics were obtained, and patients were asked whether they had had pre-Ramadan education or not and who the provider was. Patients' knowledge of the components of the recommended structured pre-Ramadan educational program was also tested. Comparison between patients who had the education and those who did not was done using Chi-square test and independent samples Student's t-test; p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 298 patients with type 1 or type 2 DM were included in the study; 75.5% of the patients were aged 40 years or older. Only 30% had pre-Ramadan education delivered mainly by diabetic educators or the treating physicians (52% and 44%, respectively). Patients who had the education were younger (mean age: 45.6 ± 17.4 vs. 50.3 ± 14.4, respectively, p = 0.0048), had higher educational qualifications, were more likely to be employed, and self-monitored their blood glucose more frequently (p = 0.0001). There was no difference between the two groups with regard to their knowledge of diet and exercise. The adherence to the pre-Ramadan educational program by the treating physician was low. It is necessary to increase the awareness about the importance of these programs among health-care professionals. The programs should target the less educated, the unemployed, and older patients.

  5. Teaching collocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revier, Robert Lee; Henriksen, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    Very little pedadagoy has been made available to teachers interested in teaching collocations in foreign and/or second language classroom. This paper aims to contribute to and promote efforts in developing L2-based pedagogy for the teaching of phraseology. To this end, it presents pedagogical...... insight obtained from a cross-sectional study of Danish EFL learners' knowledge and use of collocations in their written L2 and L1 production....

  6. Knowledge and attitude of physicians in a major teaching hospital towards atherosclerotic risk reduction therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Omran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Al-OmranDepartment of Surgery, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is a marker of advanced atherosclerosis with an elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Although intensive risk reduction therapy is critical in reducing the adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with PAD, the awareness of this information among all physicians is felt to be low. Given the role of family physicians (FP, general internists (GI, cardiologists (C, and vascular surgeons (VS in treating patients with PAD, we sought to determine their perceptions and knowledge of risk reduction therapy in these patients.Methods and results: We conducted a cross-sectional self-administered survey of 84 physicians who work at a major teaching hospital. FP, GI, C, and VS represent 39%, 33%, 16%, and 12% of the surveyed physicians, respectively. The recommended targets of LDL-cholesterol, blood glucose and blood pressure in PAD patients were known to 37.3%, 94.1% and 35.3% of physicians, respectively. The majority of physicians reported to screen for risk factors in PAD. Although 86.3% of physicians would recommend antiplatelets therapy in PAD, only 17.6% would recommend angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors; 25.5% would recommend nicotine replacement therapy for smokers and 62.7% would recommend statins. Compared to other specialties, cardiologists had the lowest threshold, whereas GI had the highest threshold for initiating antiplatelets and statins for patients with PAD.Conclusion: The perceptions towards risk reduction in PAD identify glaring knowledge and action gaps. Effective strategies to encourage health professionals to use risk reduction therapy are needed.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, risk reduction, atherosclerosis

  7. Frequency, diagnostic performance of coproantigen detection and genotyping of the Giardia among patients referred to a multi-level teaching hospital in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Ujjala; Shukla, Ratnakar; Pant, Priyannk; Ghoshal, Uday C

    Giardiasis, a common gastrointestinal parasitic infection in tropics, is diagnosed on stool microscopy (gold standard); however, its sensitivity is low due to intermittent fecal shedding. Coproantigen detection (ELISA) is useful but requires further evaluation. We aimed to study: (a) detection of Giardia by stool microscopy and/or coproantigen, (b) diagnostic performance of fecal antigen detection and microscopy, and c) genotypic characterization of G. lamblia using PCR specific for triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) gene. Stool samples from 2992 patients were examined by microscopy from March 2013 to March 2015 in a multi level teaching hospital in northern India. Giardia coproantigen detection was performed by ELISA in a subset of patients. Genetic characterization of G. lamblia was performed by PCR targeting tpi gene in a subset of microscopy positive stool samples. Of 2992 patients, 132 (4.4%) had Giardia by microscopy (cyst/trophozoite) and/or ELISA. ELISA was performed in 264 patients; of them, 127 were positive by microscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ELISA were 91, 91, 94, and 91%, respectively, using microscopy as a gold standard. PCR was performed in 116 randomly selected samples having Giardia using tpi gene. Assemblages A and B were found among 44 (38%) and 72 (62%) patients, respectively. Assemblage B was more often associated with malnutrition and loss of appetite than A (48/72 [67%] vs. 21/44 [48%], P = 0.044 and 17/72 [24%] vs. 14/44 [32%], P = 0.019). We conclude that 4.4% of studied population had giardiasis. Fecal antigen is a useful method for diagnosis and assemblage B is the most common genotype.

  8. Uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients on follow-up at Jimma University Teaching and Specialized Hospital: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bekele Tesfaye,1 Dessalegn Haile,1 Benalfew Lake,1 Tefera Belachew,2 Temamen Tesfaye,3 Habtamu Abera4 1Department of Nursing, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, 2Department of Population and Family Health, 3Department of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Science, Jimma University, Jimma, 4Department of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Introduction: Hypertension, including poorly controlled blood pressure, is the major global health problem that affects one billion people worldwide. Limited studies have been conducted on prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients in Ethiopia.Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients at Jimma University Teaching and Specialized Hospital.Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted at the chronic illness clinic of Jimma University Specialized and Teaching hospital from March 09 to April 13, 2016. A total of 345 hypertensive patients were selected using systematic sampling technique. Data were collected using structured questionnaire through face-to-face exit interview and chart review. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0 software. The bivariate and multivariable analysis was done to identify factors of uncontrolled hypertension.Results: More than half, 52.7%, of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension. Lack of awareness of hypertension-related complications (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.140, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.272–3.600, p=0.004, nonadherent to smoking abstinence (AOR=3.935, 95% CI=1.065–14.535, p=0.004, nonadherent to alcohol abstinence (AOR=2.477, 95% CI=1.074–5.711, p=033, Khat (Catha edulis chewing (AOR=2.518, 95% CI=1.250–5

  9. Physician Posture at the Bedside: A Study of African-American and Hispanic Patient Preferences at a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Madhavapeddi, Sai; Das, Avash; Harris, Samar; Naina, Harris

    2015-01-01

    The physician-patient interaction is central to any clinical encounter. Although the technical components of the interaction are conveyed by verbal communication, the nonverbal cues are instrumental in setting up the physician-patient relationship and carrying it forward. Often, patient preferences in terms of non-verbal communication cues depend on the ethnicity of the patient. In this article, we present a study of Hispanic and African-American patients regarding their preference of physician posture. Together, these groups represent almost one third of the U.S. population. In our study, a majority of patients preferred their physicians to be seated during the medical interview. Although these results were similar across cultural groups, subtle differences were observed in patient preference regarding other nonverbal communication methods by physicians. It is important for physicians to be aware of these differences. Including course-work that highlights cultural sensitivities in the medical school curriculum is a good way to create awareness among the next generation of physicians.

  10. Towards a framework for teaching about information technology risk in health care: Simulating threats to health data and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author describes work towards developing an integrative framework for educating health information technology professionals about technology risk. The framework considers multiple sources of risk to health data quality and integrity that can result from the use of health information technology (HIT and can be used to teach health professional students about these risks when using health technologies. This framework encompasses issues and problems that may arise from varied sources, including intentional alterations (e.g. resulting from hacking and security breaches as well as unintentional breaches and corruption of data (e.g. resulting from technical problems, or from technology-induced errors. The framework that is described has several levels: the level of human factors and usability of HIT, the level of monitoring of security and accuracy, the HIT architectural level, the level of operational and physical checks, the level of healthcare quality assurance policies and the data risk management strategies level. Approaches to monitoring and simulation of risk are also discussed, including a discussion of an innovative approach to monitoring potential quality issues. This is followed by a discussion of the application (using computer simulations to educate both students and health information technology professionals about the impact and spread of technology-induced and related types of data errors involving HIT.

  11. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  12. Unused Medications Disposal Practice: The case of Patients Visiting University of Gondar Specialized Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tadele Atinafu; Abayneh Takele; Adeladlew Kassie; Adane Yehualaw; Getu Tesfaw; Tesfanesh Desseno; Tadesse Mekonnen; Mulugeta Fentie

    2014-01-01

    Background: The disposal of unwanted medications has been a concern in many countries, as pharmaceutical waste enters the ecosystem, ultimately having an effect on human health and environment. The main objective of this study was to assess unused medications disposal practice of patients Method: Institution based cross sectional study was used. Patients were systematically selected and interviewed using structured questionnaires. The Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: Out of...

  13. Incidence and diagnosis of Acute kidney injury in hospitalized adult patients: a retrospective observational study in a tertiary teaching Hospital in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyan; Wu, Buyun; Liu, Yun; Mao, Huijuan; Xing, Changying

    2017-06-24

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) places a heavy burden on the healthcare system in China and is usually misdiagnosed. However, there are limited studies that have described the epidemiology and diagnosis of AKI in China. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and diagnosis of AKI in hospitalized adult patients in a tertiary teaching hospital in southeast China. All adult patients hospitalized from October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University were screened using the Lab Administration Network. AKI definition and staging were based on the KDIGO AKI criteria. Demographic characteristics, laboratory examination, clinical data, and clinical outcomes of AKI patients were recorded and analyzed. The incidence of AKI was 1.6% (1401/87196). The 30-day mortality was 35.3%. AKI stage 1, 2, 3 and RRT accounted for 38.0% (532/1401), 22.0% (309/1401), 40.0% (560/1401), and 16.3% (228/1401) of patients, respectively. The Renal, other Internal Medicine, Surgery, and ICU Departments accounted for 7.4%, 37.1%, 30.1%, and 25.4% of AKI patients, respectively. The timely diagnosis rate, delayed diagnosis rate, and missed diagnosis rate were 44% (616/1401), 3.3% (46/1401), and 52.7% (739/1401), respectively. Patients hospitalized in the Renal Department had the highest AKI diagnosis rate (89.3%, 88/103), while missed diagnosis rate of the surgical patients was as high as 75.1% (317/422). Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that presence of tumors, higher serum albumin, and AKI stage 1 were associated with failure to timely diagnose AKI, whereas presence of chronic kidney disease, oliguria, higher blood urea nitrogen, and greater number of organ failures correlated with earlier diagnosis. AKI was characterized by a high incidence, high short-term mortality, and high missed diagnosis rate in hospitalized adult patients in our hospital. Interventions for improving diagnosis of AKI are urgently needed.

  14. Patient safety culture in a large teaching hospital in Riyadh: baseline assessment, comparative analysis and opportunities for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the immense attention given to patient safety, this paper details the findings of a baseline assessment of the patient safety culture in a large hospital in Riyadh and compares results with regional and international studies that utilized the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. This study also aims to explore the association between patient safety culture predictors and outcomes, considering respondent characteristics and facility size. Methods This cross sectional study adopted a customized version of the HSOPSC and targeted hospital staff fitting sampling criteria (physicians, nurses, clinical and non-clinical staff, pharmacy and laboratory staff, dietary and radiology staff, supervisors, and hospital managers). Results 3000 questionnaires were sent and 2572 were returned (response rate of 85.7%). Areas of strength were Organizational Learning and Continuous Improvement and Teamwork within units whereas areas requiring improvement were hospital non-punitive response to error, staffing, and Communication Openness. The comparative analysis noted several areas requiring improvement when results on survey composites were compared with results from Lebanon, and the United States. Regression analysis showed associations between higher patient safety aggregate score and greater age (46 years and above), longer work experience, having a Baccalaureate degree, and being a physician or other health professional. Conclusions Patient safety practices are crucial toward improving overall performance and quality of services in healthcare organizations. Much can be done in the sampled organizations and in the context of KSA in general to improve areas of weakness and further enhance areas of strength. PMID:24621339

  15. Doctor-patient communication and the quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This large scale study clearly shows that 'the spoken language is a most important tool in medicine'. The study unravels which elements in the doctor-patient communication provide for the quality of care. A thorough analysis of over 3000 videotaped general practice consultations reveales that the

  16. Using an online quiz-based reinforcement system to teach healthcare quality and patient safety and care transitions at the University of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Afsar-Manesh, Nasim; Amin, Alpesh N; Clay, Brian; Ranji, Sumant R

    2017-10-01

    Implementing quality improvement (QI) education during clinical training is challenging due to time constraints and inadequate faculty development in these areas. Quiz-based reinforcement systems show promise in fostering active engagement, collaboration, healthy competition and real-time formative feedback, although further research on their effectiveness is required. An online quiz-based reinforcement system to increase resident and faculty knowledge in QI, patient safety and care transitions. Experts in QI and educational assessment at the 5 University of California medical campuses developed a course comprised of 3 quizzes on Introduction to QI, Patient Safety and Care Transitions. Each quiz contained 20 questions and utilized an online educational quiz-based reinforcement system that leveraged spaced learning. Approximately 500 learners completed the course (completion rate 66-86%). Knowledge acquisition scores for all quizzes increased after completion: Introduction to QI (35-73%), Patient Safety (58-95%), and Care Transitions (66-90%). Learners reported that the quiz-based system was an effective teaching modality and preferred this type of education to classroom-based lectures. Suggestions for improvement included reducing frequency of presentation of questions and utilizing more questions that test learners on application of knowledge instead of knowledge acquisition. A multi-campus online quiz-based reinforcement system to train residents in QI, patient safety and care transitions was feasible, acceptable, and increased knowledge. The course may be best utilized to supplement classroom-based and experiential curricula, along with increased attention to optimizing frequency of presentation of questions and enhancing application skills.

  17. Teaching and learning in the Biosciences: the development of an educational programme to assist student nurses in their assessment and management of patients with wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Catherine; Davies, Carmel; Cornally, Deirdre; Fegan, Marianne; O'Toole, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an educational package for undergraduate student nurses that would provide them with the theoretical knowledge and clinical judgement skills to care for a patient with a wound. Internationally there is concern over the adequacy of preparation of undergraduate nurses for the clinical skill of wound care. Deficits have also been identified in the underpinning biological sciences needed for this skill. Expectations associated with wound management have altered significantly in the last two decades with decision making around wound care coming under the scope of practice of nurses. The treatment and care options for patients with wounds must be based on a sound knowledge of how wounds are formed and healed. If nurses do not have the evidence-based knowledge, it can affect wound healing adversely leading to increased patient suffering, pain and delayed healing. From an organisational perspective, delayed healing will increase the cost of care. This project used constructivism learning theory to provide a framework for the development of a wound care educational package for undergraduate Irish nurses in their penultimate year of training. Collaboration was formed with key stake holders. Pertinent curriculum content was mapped. Learning strategies to suit the incoming student learning styles were incorporated into newly developed theoretical content and practical skill sessions. The developed educational programme will assist student nurses in their care of patients with wounds. This study provides a model that can be followed to develop small units of the study to keep abreast of changes in health care delivery and the changing scope of practice of nurses. It also contributes to the debate on the teaching and learning of biosciences as it highlights the depth of biological knowledge required as a basis for good evidence-based nursing care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A 5-year retrospective study of rampant dental caries among adult patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Deborah M; Abiodun-Solanke, Iyabode M F; Gbadebo, Shakeerah O

    2015-01-01

    Rampant caries in adults has not been a focus of many researches unlike the childhood form of the disease. The disease is an interesting finding in an adult patient. When the condition occurs in children, it has been described as nursing bottle caries, baby bottle tooth decay, and the most recently adopted term, "early childhood caries". The aim was to determine the prevalence of rampant caries among adult patients. Cases of rampant caries were identified from the records of all the patients treated during a 5-year period. Variables considered included the socio-demographic data, frequency of consumption of cariogenic diet, social habits, decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT), socioeconomic status (SES), and oral hygiene (OH), etc. Data were analyzed using student's t-test and one-way ANOVA for continuous variables, while Fishers exact test was adopted for categorical variables. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Less than 1% (21 out of 3458) of patients treated during the period had adult rampant caries, but only 17 patients with complete data were analyzed. The age range of the patients was 22-61 years with a median of 36 years. The number of teeth with open carious cavities ranged from 8 to 18, with a mean of 11.6 ± 3.3 teeth. A statistically significant difference was found in the number of open carious cavities and gender (P = 0.03), and between the SES and OH (P = 0.001). Patients in low SES had the poorest OH, The number of open carious lesion was higher in those that consumed refined sugar regularly. Occurrence of rampant caries was low and related to low socioeconomic status and regular consumption of cariogenic diet.

  19. Estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem na enfermagem: análise pela Escala de Coma de Glasgow Estrategias de enseñanza y aprendizaje en enfermería: análisis por la Escala de coma de Glasgow Teaching-learning strategies in nursing: analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva Morita

    2009-09-01

    el resultado después del auto aprendizaje. No hubo diferencia en el grado de conocimiento adquirido entre los grupos.Using the Glasgow Coma Scale (ECGl as a subject, this paper aims to analyze and verify the apprehension of knowledge towards the teaching-learning and self-learning offered to nursing workers, and to check the degree of knowledge acquired during the process and possible results stemming from the nursing student/nursing worker association. This descriptive, quantitative-based study counted on the participation of 62 currently enrolled students in the first semester of the 4th year of nursing. The following teaching-learning strategies were used: expositive classes with the use of slides and videotape, and a basic text. Among participants, 41.9% were nursing workers; 61.3% informed to have taken care of patients with high alteration of the consciousness level, predominantly located in their working group. Statistically, there has been a successful improvement in the percentage of correct actions after the expositive class and videotape. Self-learning results showed no alteration either. Intergroup correlations displayed no disparity in the degree of acquired knowledge.

  20. Clinical Study of Obesity and associated morbidities in patients admitted to College of Medical Sciences Teaching-Hospital, Bharatpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Pradhan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study was conducted with objective to study the incidence of obesity and associated co-morbidities in patients admitted to CMS-TH, Bharatpur.Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty consecutive overweight patients from the January 2009 to December 2012 with Basal metabolic index (BMI>25 and obese patients (BMI>30 were included in this hospital based prospective study. Detailed evaluation of risk factors and family history of other diseases were taken, other obesity related indicators like WPRO, 2000 for BMI, waist circumference (NCEP ATP III and NCEP for South Asian ethnicity NCEP– National Cholesterol Education Program and waist hip ratio (WHO criteria were measured and comparison done in order to detect best method for application. These cases were evaluated for associated co-morbid condition and metabolic syndrome which were diagnosed using NCEP ATP III criteria.Results: The mean age of patients was 52.7 years. Commonest co-existing risk factors were alcohol consumption, smoking, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Evaluation based on WHO criteria revealed that 56.7% patients were overweight, 38.7 % were obese class II and 4.6 % were class II. While 45.1% male and 69.1% female patients had central obesity. The figure was 81.7 % for males and 94.1% for females with WHO criteria using waist hip ratio. Risk factors like alcohol consumption (52.7%, smoking (52.7% and fatty liver disease (22.66% were the commonest co-morbid conditions.Conclusion: In the present study, risk factors of alcohol, smoking and hypertension and co-morbid conditions diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, stroke and fatty liver were noted. Waist hip ratio was the best indicator to detect central obesity and co-morbid conditions and recommended to be used for Nepali population.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:16-19

  1. Quality of life and psychological morbidity in vitiligo patients: A study in a teaching hospital from north-east India

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    Lucybeth N Sangma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitiligo is an acquired discoloration of skin and mucous membrane of great cosmetic importance affecting 1-4% of the world′s population. It causes disfiguration in all races, more so in dark-skinned people because of strong contrast. Men, women, and children with vitiligo face severe psychological and social disadvantage. Aim: To assess the impact of the disease on the quality of life of patients suffering from vitiligo, also to ascertain any psychological morbidity like depression associated with the disease and to compare the results with that of healthy control group. Materials and Methods : Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD are administered to 100 vitiligo patients presenting to the Dermatology OPD and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Results were analyzed and compared with that of control group. Findings are also correlated in relation to demographic and clinical profile of the disease. Statistical analysis is made to see the significance. Results : Vitiligo-affected patients had significantly elevated total DLQI scores (P < 0.001 compared to healthy controls. There is increase in parameters like itch, embarrassment, social and leisure activities in the patient cohort than the control group. Patients of vitiligo are also found to be more depressed (P < 0.001 than the controls. Conclusion : Quality of life (QOL in patients affected with vitiligo declined more severely, and also there is increase in incidence of depression than in the control group. These changes are critical for the psychosocial life of the affected people.

  2. Awareness and perceptions of electroconvulsive therapy among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional survey from teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan

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    Choudhary Maria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is shown to be effective in many psychiatric illnesses, but its distorted projection by the Pakistani media and its unregulated use by many physicians across the country have adversely affected its acceptability. Given this situation we aimed to assess the awareness and perceptions regarding ECT as a treatment modality among the psychiatric patients. Methods This was a questionnaire based cross-sectional study carried out at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Results We interviewed 190 patients of which 140 were aware of ECT. The study showed that the level of education had a significant impact on the awareness of ECT (p = 0.009. The most common source of awareness was electronic and print media (38%, followed by relatives (24% and doctors (23%. Physical injuries (42% and neurological (12% and cognitive disturbances (11% were the commonly feared side effects. The most popular belief about ECT was that it was a treatment of last resort (56%. Thirty-nine percent thought that ECT could lead to severe mental and physical illness and 37% considered it inhumane. Patients' willingness to receive ECT was dependant on whether or not they were convinced of its safety (p = 0.001 and efficacy (p = 0.0001. Conclusion We identified a serious lack of dissemination of information regarding ECT by the psychiatrists and the mental health care providers. This may be the result of an inadequate postgraduate training in Pakistan or just a lack of concern about the mentally ill patients. The media seemed to be the major source of information for our patients. We also saw the prevalence of a variety of myths regarding ECT in our society, which we feel may be responsible for the patients' adverse attitudes. Given the widespread applicability of ECT there is a dire need to dispel these misconceptions and improve its acceptability.

  3. Health education to diabetic patients before the start of Ramadan: Experience from a teaching hospital in Dammam

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    Rayyan M Al-Musally

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The adherence to the pre-Ramadan educational program by the treating physician was low. It is necessary to increase the awareness about the importance of these programs among health-care professionals. The programs should target the less educated, the unemployed, and older patients.

  4. Epidemiology of injuries and outcomes among trauma patients receiving prehospital care at a tertiary teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda

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    Gabin Mbanjumucyo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: A linked prehospital and hospital database provided critical epidemiological information describing trauma patients in a low-resource setting. Blunt trauma from motor vehicle collisions involving young males constituted the majority of traumatic injury. Among this cohort, hospital resource utilisation was high as was mortality. This data can help guide the implementation of interventions to improve trauma care in the Rwandan setting.

  5. Prevalence and Aetiology of Left Ventricular Thrombus in Patients Undergoing Transthoracic Echocardiography at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital

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    Mohammed Abdullahi Talle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We sought to determine the prevalence and aetiology of LVT among patients undergoing echocardiography. Methods. We reviewed case notes and echocardiographic data of patient diagnosed with LVT using noncontrast transthoracic echocardiography. Definition of various conditions was made using standard guidelines. Mean ± SD were derived for continuous variables and comparison was made using Student’s t-test. Results. Total of 1302 transthoracic echocardiograms were performed out of which 949 adult echocardiograms were considered eligible. Mean age of all subjects with abnormal echocardiograms was 44.73 (16.73 years. Abnormalities associated with LVT were observed in 782/949 (82.40% subjects among whom 84/782 (8.85% had LVT. The highest prevalence of 39.29% (33/84 was observed in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by myocardial infarction with a prevalence of 29.76% (25/84. Peripartum cardiomyopathy accounted for 18/84 (21.43% cases with some having multiple thrombi, whereas hypertensive heart disease was responsible for 6/84 (7.14% cases. The lowest prevalence of 2.38% (2/84 was observed in those with rheumatic heart disease. Left ventricular EF of <35% was recorded in 55/84 (65.48%. Conclusions. Left ventricular thrombus is common among patients undergoing echo, with dilated cardiomyopathy being the most common underlying aetiology followed by myocardial infarction. Multiple LVTs were documented in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  6. "When are you seeing my patient?"--an analysis of the cardiology consultation service in a teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, E

    2010-05-01

    The provision of an efficient consultation service is essential to the efficient functioning of any hospital. Surprisingly little is known about this activity. We present the first reported evaluation of a cardiology consultation service in an attempt to determine the characteristics, efficiency and workload implications of such a service. We performed an audit of the in-patient cardiology consultation service over a four week period. During this period, 125 consultations were seen, of which 85 (68%) were requested by medical specialties. Consultations were seen in a timely fashion, with 76 (61%) being seen on the same day that the request was received. The most common problem was chest pain, (49 patients; 38%) which was felt to be of cardiac origin in only a minority (20; 40%) of cases. Consultations had significant resource implications for our department, with 35 (28%) procedures being performed, 25 (20%) patients\\' care being taken over, and a further 27 (21.6%) new out-patient referrals generated. Our results indicate that the consultation service considered was efficiently delivered but contributed significantly to the department\\'s workload. The most frequent consultation request was for chest pain that was often non-cardiac in nature.

  7. The prescription talk – an approach to teach patient-physician conversation about drug prescription to medical students

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    Hauser, Katarina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication communication from physicians to patients often is poor, by this among others enhancing the risk of non-adherence. In this context, a neglect regarding the prescription talk has been complained.Aim of the project: In a newly developed elective medical students work on physician-patient conversations dealing with drug prescription. Essential aspects related to an effective and safe drug treatment are combined with steps of shared decision-making. Together with a tutor, students develop a (model conversation guide that might be tailored according to individual needs and views.Description/Methods: In a one-week course 3rd-5th year medical students treat a paper case according to problem-based learning. This is accompanied by a one-hour lecture and literature provided on an online learning platform (ILIAS. During a workshop, aspects of drug treatment and patient participation are integrated into a guide for a prescription talk. At the end of the week the students are invited to apply the (if need be individualized guide in a simulated physician-patient communication with an actor. The conversation is evaluated using a checklist based upon the (model conversation guide.Results: Informal and formalized feedback indicate high acceptance and satisfaction of participants with this elective. The checklist turned out to be of acceptable to good reliability with mostly selective items. Portfolio entries and written evaluation suggest that participants’ positions and attitudes are influenced.

  8. Patients choice for method of early abortion among comprehensive abortion care (CAC) clients at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital (KMCTH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, R; Shrestha, N S; Koirala, B; Kandel, P; Shrestha, S

    2007-01-01

    The over all objective of the study was to determine different methods of abortion opted by CAC clients at KMCTH. The specific objective of the study was to know the reasons for pregnancy termination and to know the reasons opted for either medical or surgical method of abortion. A hospital based prospective study was carried out for a period of six months at KMCTH from 1st January 2006 to 31st June 2006. All the patient undergoing CAC services were included for the study. Clients were provided with written and verbal information regarding the methods of terminating early abortion and its associated complications. After that they were asked to give their informed choice and decision. All the pertinent information was entered on pre-structured questionnaire. During the study period a total of 100 patients underwent CAC services. The commonest reason for termination pregnancy was no desire for additional children (60%) followed by youngest child too small or short spacing (21%). 74% of the patients opted for surgical abortion, 23% patient opted for medical abortion and 3% of the patient remain undecided. Reasons for favouring surgical method of abortion was that surgical abortion is complete (35), repeated visits are avoided (18), quick (10) would be with service provider and feel safe (5), lack of expectancy (2) side effect of medical treatment (1), twin pregnancy (1), easy (1), fear of pain (1). Medical method of abortion was favoured due to fear of surgery (9), easy and less painful (8) and maintains privacy (6). Factors affecting the choice of abortion method appear to be numerous and complex. Providers need to be sensitive to differences in women's values and life circumstances when counselling them about an abortion method. In particular, providers should incorporate into their counselling sessions what women need to know about the characteristics of abortion methods and help women to identify what is the best option for them. Key words: Early abortion medical

  9. Teaching artfully

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    -building by means of artefacts, integrated use of visuals in lectures, and dramaturgical structure in educational design. My objective in teaching creatively is to inspire my students, who are educators-to-be or facilitators of educational processes and are used to problem-based-learning approaches (PBL), to (more......In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor...

  10. CREATIVE TEACHING

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    Abd. Ghofur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this writing is asking English teachers to make a creative teaching, to endeavor increasing their quality in teaching learning process. In these cas the classroom teacher can choose the methods and materials according to the needs of the learners, the preferences teacher, and the constrainst of the school or educational setting and the methods is considered in terms of its links to more general linguistics, psychological, or educational traditions. Finally it will enable teachers to become better informed about the nature, strengths, and weaknesses of methods and approaches so they can better arrive at their own judgement and decisions.

  11. Investigation of final causes of death in 5360 deceased patients within a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran

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    Zahra Tolou-Ghamari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To increase quality of care for critically ill patients admitted to hospitals, understanding various causes of death could provide better quality of care. In this study, medical records of 5360 deceased patientswere reviewed with reference to the mortality reports.A total of 2019 deceased females and 3341deceased males were studied from 2011 to 2013. Neurologic disorders could be categorized as the highest cause of mortality report (25%. Pulmonary, gastrointestinal and heart diseases could be expressed as 17%, 17% and 15% of death episodes respectively. Stroke caused mortality among neurologic disorders in 35% at the minimum age of 27 and maximum age of 94 years old. To prevent worse outcome in critically ill patients admitted to hospital, quality of care related to neurological, pulmonary, heart and gastrointestinal disorders was suggested to be upgrading. To avoid financial burden to the family of deceased related to population that stayed more than a month in hospital, further study is recommended in advance.

  12. Mortality pattern of burn patients admitted in S. G. M. Hospital Rewa: A teaching institute of central India

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    S Lal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn injuries rank among the most severe types of injuries suffered by the human body with an attendant high mortality and morbidity rate. In previous studies, incidence, severity and deaths due to burn were found higher in young married women in India. Study to find out mortality pattern in burn patient was not carried out in this part of country. Objective: To identify demographic and sociocultural factors, type, modes, causes and risk factors for burn injuries and their gender-wise association. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study. Data were collected from all burn patients who admitted and died while on the treatment from 2004 to 2009. A total of 586 patients were included in this study. Data were gathered from hospital records and entered in the excel sheet. Analysis of data was done by using SPSS version 17 statistical software. Results: The mean age of patients was 22.66 years (range 1 m to 80 years. Episodes of burn were 4.63 times common in female (82.25% than in male (17.75%. It was statistically significant in females of age group 21-30 years (93.93% vs. 15.33% P < 0.0001. Married females (86.80% burned more commonly than married males (13.19% P < 0.0001. Flame burn was the major cause of death (95.56%. Kerosene was the most common (69% source of flame burn. Clothes caught fire while working on Chullha were 25% cases ( P < 0.0001. Accidental (86.44% burn was the most common intention of injury. The majority of burn deaths (68% occurred within one week of the incident due to septicemia (57%. Conclusion: Factors associated with an increase in mortality were accidental burns, burn size, young age, married women, and flame burns. For planning and implementing prevention programs, the approach has to be multidisciplinary and coordinated.

  13. Health and needs assessment of geriatric patients: results of a survey at a teaching hospital in Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Ganatra, Hammad Ashraf; Tehseen, Sarah; Qidwai, Waris

    2006-10-01

    To study the health and needs of geriatric patients A questionnaire based survey of patients visiting the out-patient department of Aga Khan University was carried out. Ethical requirements were met and included administration of informed consent and provision of confidentiality to patients. Convenience sampling was used without any randomization for interviews. Epi-info and SPSS software were used for data management. Four hundred and two (402) subjects above the age of 65 were surveyed. Most of the subjects were retired (40.5%) married (76.4%) men (69.7%). Ages ranged from 65 to 90 years, the mean being 70.57 years and 291 (72.4%) had five or more health problems. Mobility impairment, urinary incontinence, dyspnoea, fatigue and visual impairment had the worst impact on the life of the individual. Hypertension (42.5%), diabetes mellitus (28.1%) and arthritis (26.6%) were the most commonly reported chronic ailments. Two hundred and three (50.5%) respondents were taking three or more different medications daily. A large number of people had religion (61.4%), reading (36.1%), socializing (53%) and watching television (49.5%) as a regular activity. Eighty five (21.1%) respondents reported having financial problems. Three hundred and sixty five (90.8%) respondents had spiritual needs and 264 (72.3%) reported that their spiritual needs increased with aging. We documented health and needs of the elderly population which need to be taken into account by practicing family physicians, social service workers and also the policy makers of the country.

  14. The range of diagnoses for oral soft-tissue biopsies of geriatric patients in a Saudi Arabian teaching hospital

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    Ahmed Qannam

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The range of lesions seen in Saudi geriatric patients were similar to those reported for other parts of the world, although the lesions were more similar to those reported from developing countries. The very high rate of oral cancer, however, is expected to take the majority of the resources allocated to geriatric oral health care, except if a strong, population-based prevention program is initiated immediately.

  15. Bridging the gap between textbook and maternity patient: a nurse-developed teaching model for first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, Nancy Rumsey

    2010-12-01

    Providing more opportunities for first-year medical students to interact with patients in clinical settings is a current discussion topic in medical student education reform. Early clinical experience helps students bridge the gap between textbook and patient while observing patient-centered care, and serves as a first step for students to develop the skills needed to work cooperatively as members of a multidisciplinary health care team. The author developed a model to provide perinatal education to first-year medical students, consistent with the concept of interprofessional education. Primarily first-year medical students participated in the nurse-developed education model, a component of a noncredit extracurricular, student-run perinatal program at a Midwestern university medical center. Students were placed at the bedsides of hospitalized women to provide support and education to them during perinatal procedures, labor, childbirth, and cesarean delivery. A total of 350 students participated over a period of 13 school calendar years. Students remarked that participation in the program reinforced the importance of their concurrent anatomy and physiology classes. They observed interdependence and cooperation among the members of the health care team caring for women, and their evaluations of their experiences at the bedside were highly positive. Women consistently expressed appreciation for the additional individualized attention and education received from our student and nurse team. Nurses can enhance the learning of first-year medical students in the maternity care clinical setting. This nurse-developed education program provided students with a variety of vivid clinical experiences with maternity patients. © 2010, Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Can narrative medicine be an answer to patient physician relationship teaching according to students' demand in medical education curricula?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupy, François; Abgrall-Barbry, Gaëlle; Aslangul, Elisabeth; Chahwakilian, Anne; Delaitre, Didier; Girard, Thomas; Lassaunière, Jean-Michel; Roche, Nicolas; Szwebel, Tali-Anne; Dantchev, Nicolas; Triadou, Patrick; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Coming from literature and medicine and medical humanities north American seminars, narrative medicine has applied narratology for analyzing patients' discourse and has been taught during a decade. At Paris Descartes School of Medicine a twenty-hour narrative medicine elective program including whole class lectures and writing and reading small group exercises for second year medical students has been assessed using satisfaction questionnaires. Although several students were uncomfortable with the first writing and reading exercises, the whole satisfaction scores demonstrate that this new program is very well appreciated even when students did not choose this program because they were interested with the patient physician relationship. These results have been confirmed when all students state this program should be continued and when half of them state this program should be offered to more students or made mandatory. The primary focus on literary characteristics of patients' and physicians' discourses, without ignoring psychoanalysis theory, has shown to be safe for young students. Writing exercises are encouraged but not mandatory, and reading is optional if ever they feel embarrassed after producing their own texts. Narrative medicine impact on students' attitudes and behaviors has now to be assessed before implementing new educational programs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Teaching Strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    Intended primarily for use by instrumental music teachers who do not have a major concentration in strings, this guide provides pertinent basic resources, materials, teaching--learning expectation, and a general overall guide to achievement levels at various stages of development. Discussions are presented of Choosing the Proper Method Book,…

  18. Enthusiastic Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Virginia M.

    1982-01-01

    Since teacher enthusiasm affects student learning and attitudes, physical educators must be able to select teaching behaviors indicative of enthusiasm. Three chief categories which are necessary to the communication of enthusiasm are identified as: (1) participation; (2) encouragement; and (3) praise. (JN)

  19. Teaching Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Outlines nine objectives students should be able to accomplish after completing the activities in the unit on typography presented in the previous articles in this journal. Offers eight tips for teaching typography. Includes a short list of books about typography and a list of seven organizations. (SR)

  20. Teaching Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Dwight

    2002-01-01

    If history teachers' aim is to teach students how to think, why not ask: What forms of thought do historians use, and what specific techniques will inculcate these forms? In this article, the author proposes a fundamental shift, from courses with a focus on the mastery of data to courses with a priority on learning the historian's craft. The…