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Sample records for videotaped teaching patients

  1. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

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    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  2. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Khorasani, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2015-04-01

    Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students' ability intaking informed consent from patients. This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students  of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics coursebefore their 'clinical clerkship'training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group(n=28) was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1(n=22) were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issuesthrough the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics ofinformed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anovatest.P-Value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. The mean scores results of A2, A1and B groupwere found to be7.21 , 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8,respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (plecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better.it should be considered that mixed methodsof teaching should be used together for better result.

  3. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

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    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  4. Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said--Gender, Language, & Communication [and] Deborah Tannen: In Depth. Part 2. [Videotapes and Teaching Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    These curriculum-related materials include two videotapes and a 36-page teaching guide. The first videotape, "Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said," with a running time of 50 minutes discusses: boys and girls, status and connection, directness and indirectness, public talk and private talk, ritual opposition, and conversational style, and a…

  5. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical…

  6. Tale of the Tape: International Teaching Assistant Noticing during Videotaped Classroom Observations

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    Williams, Gwendolyn M.; Case, Rod E.

    2015-01-01

    International teaching assistants face challenges in learning the norms for teaching in American universities. In order to address this learning curve this article describes a qualitative study of twenty international teaching assistants that examined how these participants viewed observations as part of their professional development. The study…

  7. Instructional Uses of Videotape: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Harold E.; And Others

    This collection of seven articles for the college teacher of speech relates specific ways that videotape has been used in training teachers and in teaching the fundamentals of speech, advanced public speaking, and discussion. Included are articles by (1) Harold E. Nelson, who explains how videotape is used in college speech classes to aid in…

  8. How do lay people assess the quality of physicians' communicative responses to patients' emotional cues and concerns? An international multicentre study based on videotaped medical consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzi, M.A.; Bensing, J.; Rimondini, M.; Fletcher, I.; Vliet, L. van; Zimmermann, C.; Deveugele, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish which kind of physician communicative responses to patient cues and concerns are appreciated by lay people. Methods: A balanced sample (259 people) was recruited in public places to participate in a full day observation of four videotaped standardized medical consultations.

  9. Promoting Student Teachers' Content Related Knowledge in Teaching Systems Thinking: Measuring Effects of an Intervention through Evaluating a Videotaped Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkränzer, Frank; Kramer, Tim; Hörsch, Christian; Schuler, Stephan; Rieß, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of complex, dynamic and animate systems has a special standing in education for sustainable development and biology. Thus one important role of science teacher education is to promote student teachers' Content Related Knowledge (CRK) for teaching systems thinking, consisting of extensive Content Knowledge (CK) and well formed…

  10. The Use of Videotape Recordings to Teach Clinical Skills (Evaluation and Remediation) In the Fields of Communicative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeaud, Frances P.

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the benefits derived by speech and language pathology students who used video tape recordings to learn diagnosis of communication disorders, to observe professional therapists and therapy programs, and to improve their own clinical techniques through self-observation. The use of video tapes to teach clinical…

  11. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bakker Dinny H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners' (GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for providing mental health care. We investigated if GPs who feel burnt out or dissatisfied with the time available for their patients, are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose their distress, and have shorter consultations, in order to gain time and energy. This may result in less psychological evaluations of patients' complaints. Methods We used 1890 videotaped consultations from a nationally representative sample of 126 Dutch GPs to analyse GPs' communication and the duration of their consultations. Burnout was subdivided into emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced accomplishment. Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate which subgroups of GPs differed significantly. Results GPs with feelings of exhaustion or dissatisfaction with the available time have longer consultations compared to GPs without these feelings. Exhausted GPs, and GPs with feelings of depersonalisation, talk more about psychological or social topics in their consultations. GPs with feelings of reduced accomplishment are an exception: they communicate less affectively, are less patient-centred and have less eye contact with their patients compared to GPs without reduced accomplishment. We found no relationship between GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the available time and their psychological evaluations of patients' problems. Conclusion GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the time available for their patients do not obstruct their diagnosis and awareness of patients' psychological problems. On the contrary, GPs with high levels of exhaustion or depersonalisation, and GPs who are dissatisfied with the

  12. Effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education: a systematic review and practice guideline recommendations.

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    Friedman, Audrey Jusko; Cosby, Roxanne; Boyko, Susan; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Turnbull, Gale

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE). A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games, computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration, and role playing. Methods of delivery focused on how to deliver the teaching strategies. Teaching strategies that increased knowledge, decreased anxiety, and increased satisfaction included computer technology, audio and videotapes, written materials, and demonstrations. Various teaching strategies used in combination were similarly successful. Moreover, structured-, culturally appropriate- and patient-specific teachings were found to be better than ad hoc teaching or generalized teaching. Findings provide guidance for establishing provincial standards for the delivery of PE. Recommendations concerning the efficacy of the teaching strategies and delivery methods are provided.

  13. Cultural diversity and patient teaching.

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    Price, J L; Cordell, B

    1994-01-01

    Cultural diversity challenges health care providers to facilitate bridging cross-cultural gaps with clients. It is through providing culturally relevant care that health care practitioners truly serve the needs of all clients in our diverse society. A theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality offers a framework for building linkages of clinical knowledge to cultural care. A four-step approach to providing culturally sensitive patient teaching is described: (1) health care providers should assess their own cultural beliefs and be aware of general ethnic, regional, and religious beliefs and practices in their area; (2) develop a teaching plan; (3) implement the plan; (4) evaluate the success of the teaching-learning process and make alterations based on evaluation. When providers assess clients' beliefs and practices and incorporate them into the teaching plan design, teaching becomes more relevant and clients become more successful at learning.

  14. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, E.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bakker, D.H. de; Meer, K. van der; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: General practitioners' (GPs') feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for

  15. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? : A study of videotaped consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, Else M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; de Bakker, Dinny H.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: General practitioners' (GPs') feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for

  16. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  17. [Virtual Patients and Medical Teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Narváez, Yamile Reveiz

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical advancements have evolved to the point where teaching software may be implemented to represent real-life scenarios. Virtual Patients or VPs are software programs that simulate clinical scenarios allowing students to generate a diagnosis and make treatment decisions. In this article, advantages and disadvantages regarding the use of this state-of-the-art technology are discussed. VP is a useful technique for psychiatry students. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Library orientation on videotape: production planning and administrative support.

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    Shedlock, J; Tawyea, E W

    1989-01-01

    New student-faculty-staff orientation is an important public service in a medical library and demands creativity, imagination, teaching skill, coordination, and cooperation on the part of public services staff. The Northwestern University Medical Library (NUML) implemented a video production service in the spring of 1986 and used the new service to produce an orientation videotape for incoming students, new faculty, and medical center staff. Planning is an important function in video production, and the various phases of outlining topics, drafting scripts, matching video sequences, and actual taping of video, voice, and music are described. The NUML orientation videotape demonstrates how reference and audiovisual services merge talent and skills to benefit the library user. Videotape production, however, cannot happen in a vacuum of good intentions and high ideals. This paper also presents the management support and cost analysis needed to make video production services a reality for use by public service departments.

  19. Internet Roadside Cafe #6. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This 30-minute videotape takes an in-depth look at World Wide Web business transactions, potential risks, client privacy and security issues by asking businesses and consumers how they do business on the Internet. Also featured in the program is advice about choosing a secure password, the use of credit cards for Web purchasing and a review of…

  20. Improving Instruction through a Videotape Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batesky, James

    1979-01-01

    Videotape and a videotape library can be used to expand the quality of instruction of a physical education program by allowing greater diversity of material taught and increased use of professionals and experts in various sports. (JMF)

  1. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  2. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  3. Feasibility of Incorporating Alternative Teaching Methods into Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Judith; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction, interactive video, and videotapes as alternative methods of instruction in clinical clerkship modules on diabetes and hypertension. The 17 participants were more interested in balancing time between patient contact and alternative teaching methods and had better knowledge,…

  4. The use of virtual patients to teach medical students history taking and communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Amy; Hernandez, Jonathan; Johnsen, Kyle; Dickerson, Robert; Raij, Andrew; Harrison, Cyrus; DiPietro, Meredith; Allen, Bryan; Ferdig, Richard; Foti, Sebastian; Jackson, Jonathan; Shin, Min; Cendan, Juan; Watson, Robert; Duerson, Margaret; Lok, Benjamin; Cohen, Marc; Wagner, Peggy; Lind, D Scott

    2006-06-01

    At most institutions, medical students learn communication skills through the use of standardized patients (SPs), but SPs are time and resource expensive. Virtual patients (VPs) may offer several advantages over SPs, but little data exist regarding the use of VPs in teaching communication skills. Therefore, we report our initial efforts to create an interactive virtual clinical scenario of a patient with acute abdominal pain to teach medical students history-taking and communication skills. In the virtual scenario, a life-sized VP is projected on the wall of an examination room. Before the virtual encounter, the student reviews patient information on a handheld tablet personal computer, and they are directed to take a history and develop a differential diagnosis. The virtual system includes 2 networked personal computers (PCs), 1 data projector, 2 USB2 Web cameras to track the user's head and hand movement, a tablet PC, and a microphone. The VP is programmed with specific answers and gestures in response to questions asked by students. The VP responses to student questions were developed by reviewing videotapes of students' performances with real SPs. After obtaining informed consent, 20 students underwent voice recognition training followed by a videotaped VP encounter. Immediately after the virtual scenario, students completed a technology and SP questionnaire (Maastricht Simulated Patient Assessment). All participants had prior experience with real SPs. Initially, the VP correctly recognized approximately 60% of the student's questions, and improving the script depth and variability of the VP responses enhanced most incorrect voice recognition. Student comments were favorable particularly related to feedback provided by the virtual instructor. The overall student rating of the virtual experience was 6.47 +/- 1.63 (1 = lowest, 10 = highest) for version 1.0 and 7.22 +/- 1.76 for version 2.0 (4 months later) reflecting enhanced voice recognition and other

  5. Postpartum Patient Teaching Success: Implications from Nursing and Patient Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    A recent examination of postpartum patient satisfaction scores in an inner-city hospital revealed decreased satisfaction of discharge teaching practices. Guided by Knowles' model of andragogy and Donabedian's model of structure-process-outcome, the purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how the structure and process of discharge…

  6. Teaching medical students to express empathy by exploring patient emotions and experiences in standardized medical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moral, Roger; Pérula de Torres, Luis; Monge, Diana; García Leonardo, Cristina; Caballero, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    To increase medical students' ability to detect contextual and emotional cues and to respond empathetically to patients. a training course in communication skills and patient-centered care with different teaching activities (didactic, reflective and interactive: workshops and encounters with simulated patients) was delivered to third-year medical students just before their clerkships. The program was evaluated by an external observer (OE) and simulated patients (SP) in 2 or 3 videotaped encounters. Students improved significantly from baseline to 3rd interview in all communicative skills and domains explored both in OE (32.4%) and SP (38.3%) measurement. At the end of the course students detected significantly more clues and made more empathetic expressions. The course seems to improve the ability of students to explore the illness experience, showing more empathy in a more genuine way. This was carried out in consultations lasting 10min. The program is effective and feasible to be applied as a regular formative activity. Further research is needed to assess whether this training program is applicable to students in more advanced educational levels and if it has any additional outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  8. Adding Feminist Therapy to Videotape Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Jennifer L.; Yoder, Janice D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides directions for presenting a 32-minute series of four videotape segments that highlights the fundamental features of four approaches to psychotherapy, extending its reach to include a feminist perspective. Describes the approaches and included segments. Reports that students' comments demonstrate that the video sequence provided a helpful…

  9. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  10. Laboratories and Demonstrations in Child Development with Unedited Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Debra Ann

    1986-01-01

    Multipurpose demonstrations of child development are easy to produce by videotaping children while they interact with parents, siblings, or friends. Unlike commercial films, videotapes without narration allow students to formulate and test their own research questions. This article describes how to use unedited videotapes for laboratories in…

  11. "Yes! Animation Is Possible with Your Videotape Recorder!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alfreda; Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project in which students are involved in producing an animated videotape recording and discusses the advantages of modern videotape equipment over other film media. An outline of the process covers materials used, storyboard and artwork production, videotaping procedures, and audio dubbing. (CLB)

  12. Bedside teaching with unwell patients: Can it ever be appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish

    2017-03-01

    Bedside teaching has seen a decline in its popularity since the heady days of Boerhaave and Osler; a number of hurdles have been noted in the literature including time constraints on senior clinicians. While organizing a bedside teaching course for final-year medical students, it was apparent that the availability of suitable patients was also a limiting factor. Often, we would be turned away from patients with physical signs because they were deemed to be too unwell for an examination. However, the benefits to medical students of examining unwell patients with physical signs cannot be underestimated. Identifying the unwell patient, and the associated physical signs relevant to the underlying diagnosis, should be a priority; although simulation is increasingly being used in teaching, it cannot fully replicate the learning experience gained in bedside teaching. As long as the patient is not under duress, bedside teaching with unwell patients should be encouraged.

  13. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Marwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods: Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures. Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8% believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion: Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate.

  14. Interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlack, M E; Arvidson, J; Snyder-Mackler, L; Danoff, J V; McGarvey, C L

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis (VOGA) assessments. Fifty-four licensed physical therapists with varying amounts of clinical experience served as raters. Three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated an abnormal gait pattern served as subjects for the videotape. The raters analyzed each patient's most severely involved knee during the four subphases of stance for the kinematic variables of knee flexion and genu valgum. Raters were asked to determine whether these variables were inadequate, normal, or excessive. The temporospatial variables analyzed throughout the entire gait cycle were cadence, step length, stride length, stance time, and step width. Generalized kappa coefficients ranged from .11 to .52. Intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1) and (3,1) were slightly higher. Our results indicate that physical therapists' VOGA assessments are only slightly to moderately reliable and that improved interrater reliability of the assessments of physical therapists utilizing this technique is needed. Our data suggest that there is a need for greater standardization of gait-analysis training.

  15. Patient Satisfaction With Postpartum Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Debra L; Washington, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum discharge instructions are a crucial part of a mother's birth experience. Finding the method to provide those discharge instructions in a manner that increases the mother's satisfaction with her hospital experience is important. This quasi-experimental study examined the relationship between new mothers' interaction with nurses providing postpartum instructions by the traditional and class methods and their satisfaction with discharge teaching. The results indicated new mothers were satisfied with both methods of discharge teaching; however, they were more likely to report stronger agreement with overall satisfaction with the traditional method of discharge teaching than with attending the discharge class.

  16. Use of peer teaching to enhance student and patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priharjo, Robert; Hoy, Georgina

    This article describes an evaluation of a peer-teaching project undertaken by second-year nursing students at a higher education institution in England. The initiative has enhanced the students' understanding of peer education. The importance of the nurse's role in patient education is emphasised. It is hoped that the experience of peer teaching will prepare nursing students for their future roles as nurse educators for patients, students and other staff.

  17. Legal IEPs: A Common Sense Approach with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    In this 2-hour videotape workshop designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman answers many key questions that have been raised about Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) since the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the 1999 regulations. The videotape reviews the…

  18. All about Mammals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this videotape, students learn more about the characteristics of common warm-blooded mammals and what makes them different from other animals. Children also find out how humans are more advanced in structure than other mammals, but how they still share the same basic traits. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education…

  19. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Interprofessional Competencies to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Patrick L; Scherer, Yvonne Krall; Hatton, Michael; Antonson, Donald; Austin-Ketch, Tammy; Campbell-Heider, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a novel interprofessional standardized patient exercise (ISPE) with oral-systemic and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) components. Dental students and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students at one U.S. university participated in the simulation, which was primarily designed to test their teamwork skills. In spring 2014, DNP students worked in the dental clinics with dental students under the supervision of nursing and dental faculty members. To test the teamwork outcomes for both groups of students, a standardized patient (SP) scenario was designed to include multiple chronic medical diagnoses and an oral-systemic component. The exercise was filmed for later review. Outcomes measures included SP and student self-evaluations and faculty evaluation of student documentation. The primary outcome of interest from a dental standpoint was faculty evaluation of IPCP competencies derived from the Core Competencies of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and were deemed to be observable by faculty when viewing the videotaped scenario. Eight teams of students participated with an SP trained in the scenario. Each team consisted of a DNP student, a fourth-year dental student, and a second-year dental student. All eligible students in the DNP class (n=20) and eight students from each dental class (approximately 110 each) participated. The results showed that the teams scored highest on the role/responsibilities subscale, indicating students were respectful of each other's roles and expertise and effectively engaged each other to develop strategies to meet the patient's needs. Scores on the three other subscales (values/ethics, interprofessional communication, and teams/teamwork) were also high. These findings appeared to support IPCP as a method to foster knowledge and respect for other roles and responsibilities, improve appreciation of teamwork, and encourage better communication among health

  20. Racial Disparity in Duration of Patient Visits to the Emergency Department: Teaching Versus Non-teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zynal Karaca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sources of racial disparity in duration of patients’ visits to emergency departments (EDs have not been documented well enough for policymakers to distinguish patient-related factors from hospital- or area-related factors. This study explores the racial disparity in duration of routine visits to EDs at teaching and non-teaching hospitals.Methods: We performed retrospective data analyses and multivariate regression analyses to investigate the racial disparity in duration of routine ED visits at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD were used in the analyses. The data include 4.3 million routine ED visits encountered in Arizona, Massachusetts, and Utah during 2008. We computed duration for each visit by taking the difference between admission and discharge times.Results: The mean duration for a routine ED visit was 238 minutes at teaching hospitals and 175 minutes at non-teaching hospitals. There were significant variations in duration of routine ED visits across race groups at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The risk-adjusted results show that the mean duration of routine ED visits for Black/African American and Asian patients when compared to visits for white patients was shorter by 10.0 and 3.4%, respectively, at teaching hospitals; and longer by 3.6 and 13.8%, respectively, at non-teaching hospitals. Hispanic patients, on average, experienced 8.7% longer ED stays when compared to white patients at non-teaching hospitals.Conclusion: There is significant racial disparity in the duration of routine ED visits, especially in non-teaching hospitals where non-White patients experience longer ED stays compared to white patients. The variation in duration of routine ED visits at teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals was smaller across race groups. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:529–541.

  1. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  2. Radiologic evaluation of the globus symptom using videotape recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Chang, Tae Young; Park, In Yong

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined barium swallow in 213 patients with globus symptom and 79 patients with vague gastric problems without globus symptom. Abnormal findings were more frequently detected on videorecording than on conventional esophagogram. Radiologic findings were transient cricopharyngeal indentation (CPI), residual barium collection and delayed clearing from hypopharynx (RB), laryngeal penetration of barium, barium retention in vallecula and or pyriform sinuses. Among them residual barium in hypopharynx was more frequently detected in patients with globus symptom than in patients without globus symptom. Globus symptom was more frequent in adult women, but age and sex difference did not affect the incidence of the abnormal radiologic findings. Cricopharyngeal indentation was most frequently seen at the level of C5-6 interspace and had a tendency of moving upward gradually during the indentation in about half of the cases. Most of the CPI was seen in early phase of swallowing and was visible within 1 sec. Residual barium collection was mostly seen in C6 or C6-7 level. RB had no cause and effect relationship with CPI, and it was not secondary result of obstructive effect of CPI. The authors think that videotape recording can be a useful method for evaluation of globus symptom. The residual barium collection in hypopharynx can be a significant finding in globus symptom

  3. Depressed patients seen at the University of Benin Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    of 522 patients attended to in the mental health clinic of a teaching hospital, over a six-year period. .... Table 1 shows that there were more females (55.3%) than .... depression.22,23 These events include stress at work .... Prusoff B, et al.

  4. Effect of bedside teaching activities on patients' experiences at an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items where respondents scored less than the median of 67 (interquartile range 21) were categorised as displaying a negative attitude. Results. Patients (60%) did not favour the bedside teaching activities. No significant association was found with age, sex, occupation, literacy level, duration of hospital stay, and ward.

  5. Using Simulated Patients to Teach Clinical Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. Gregory; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Clinical Nutrition in an Interdisciplinary Setting" is a course designed to introduce basic nutrition knowledge and concepts of nutritional assessment, counseling, and intervention in the clinical care of patients. Provides a brief course overview and descriptions of its development, use, and preliminary evaluation of the patient simulation…

  6. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  7. The use of standardized patients in the plastic surgery residency curriculum: teaching core competencies with objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Drew; Lee, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    As of 2006, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education had defined six "core competencies" of residency education: interpersonal communication skills, medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Objective structured clinical examinations using standardized patients are becoming effective educational tools, and the authors developed a novel use of the examinations in plastic surgery residency education that assesses all six competencies. Six plastic surgery residents, two each from postgraduate years 4, 5, and 6, participated in the plastic surgery-specific objective structured clinical examination that focused on melanoma. The examination included a 30-minute videotaped encounter with a standardized patient actor and a postencounter written exercise. The residents were scored on their performance in all six core competencies by the standardized patients and faculty experts on a three-point scale (1 = novice, 2 = moderately skilled, and 3 = proficient). Resident performance was averaged for each postgraduate year, stratified according to core competency, and scored from a total of 100 percent. Residents overall scored well in interpersonal communications skills (84 percent), patient care (83 percent), professionalism (86 percent), and practice-based learning (84 percent). Scores in medical knowledge showed a positive correlation with level of training (86 percent). All residents scored comparatively lower in systems-based practice (65 percent). The residents reported unanimously that the objective structured clinical examination was realistic and educational. The objective structured clinical examination provided comprehensive and meaningful feedback and identified areas of strengths and weakness for the residents and for the teaching program. The examination is an effective assessment tool for the core competencies and a valuable adjunct to residency training.

  8. A multimedia patient simulation for teaching and assessing endodontic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, John H; Demps, Elaine L; Keiser, Karl; Chatterjee, Lipika; Yuan, Cheng H; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2003-06-01

    Teaching and assessing diagnostic skills are difficult due to relatively small numbers of total clinical experiences and a shortage of clinical faculty. Patient simulations could help teach and assess diagnosis by displaying a well-defined diagnostic task, then providing informative feedback and opportunities for repetition and correction of errors. This report describes the development and initial evaluation of SimEndo I, a multimedia patient simulation program that could be used for teaching or assessing endodontic diagnosis. Students interact with a graphical interface that has four pull-down menus and related submenus. In response to student requests, the program presents patient information. Scoring is based on diagnosis of each case by endodontists. Pilot testing with seventy-four junior dental students identified numerous needed improvements to the user interface program. A multi-school field test of the interface program using three patient cases addressed three research questions: 1) How did the field test students evaluate SimEndo I? Overall mean evaluation was 8.1 on a 0 to 10 scale; 2) How many cases are needed to generate a reproducible diagnostic proficiency score for an individual student using the Rimoldi scoring procedure? Mean diagnostic proficiency scores by case ranged from .27 to .40 on a 0 to 1 scale; five cases would produce a score with a 0.80 reliability coefficient; and 3) Did students accurately diagnose each case? Mean correct diagnosis scores by case ranged from .54 to .78 on a 0 to 1 scale. We conclude that multimedia patient simulations offer a promising alternative for teaching and assessing student diagnostic skills.

  9. Patient outcomes with teaching versus nonteaching healthcare: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis N Papanikolaou

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive debate exists in the healthcare community over whether outcomes of medical care at teaching hospitals and other healthcare units are better or worse than those at the respective nonteaching ones. Thus, our goal was to systematically evaluate the evidence pertaining to this question. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed all studies that compared teaching versus nonteaching healthcare structures for mortality or any other patient outcome, regardless of health condition. Studies were retrieved from PubMed, contact with experts, and literature cross-referencing. Data were extracted on setting, patients, data sources, author affiliations, definition of compared groups, types of diagnoses considered, adjusting covariates, and estimates of effect for mortality and for each other outcome. Overall, 132 eligible studies were identified, including 93 on mortality and 61 on other eligible outcomes (22 addressed both. Synthesis of the available adjusted estimates on mortality yielded a summary relative risk of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-1.00 for teaching versus nonteaching healthcare structures and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.99-1.10 for minor teaching versus nonteaching ones. There was considerable heterogeneity between studies (I(2 = 72% for the main analysis. Results were similar in studies using clinical and those using administrative databases. No differences were seen in the 14 studies fully adjusting for volume/experience, severity, and comorbidity (relative risk 1.01. Smaller studies did not differ in their results from larger studies. Differences were seen for some diagnoses (e.g., significantly better survival for breast cancer and cerebrovascular accidents in teaching hospitals and significantly better survival from cholecystectomy in nonteaching hospitals, but these were small in magnitude. Other outcomes were diverse, but typically teaching healthcare structures did not do better than nonteaching ones. CONCLUSIONS: The

  10. Depression in myocardial infarction patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, S.; Khan, M.N.; Hayat, U.

    2017-01-01

    There is a considerably high prevalence of depression in post myocardial infarction (MI) patients. This study was designed with an aim to detect depression in patients with acute MI admitted to the CCU at Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study enrolled 246 male and female patients with acute MI. The patients were interviewed on the 3rd day of admission and their answers were marked according to the HADS-D scale. Results: With a cut-off score of 11, the frequency of depression in study participants was 27.24% (n=67). No statistically significant association was found between the age and sex of patients and depression. Conclusion: Depression is fairly common following acute MI and the management plans should include a consultation with psychiatric for individualized management of depression in post myocardial infarction patients. (author)

  11. Teaching diagnostic approach to a patient through cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder

    2011-11-01

    Films are produced with the aim of entertaining people, but recently there has been increasing use of films to educate medical trainees about various disorders, symptoms of these disorders, patient-therapist interactions, and various other medical and psychiatric issues. Discussions in academic circles have moved from criticism of negative portrayals of mental illness in earlier films to their use in teaching sessions. Films can be used either in full length or clip format to conduct training modules. Use of the film Stigmata to train residents about diagnostic dilemmas and taking a diagnostic approach to patients is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  13. Master's degree in nuclear engineering by videotaped courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, a group of northern midwest utilities met with faculty from the nuclear engineering department at the University of Wisconsin (UW) to discuss the possibility of offering graduate courses by videotape for academic credit and earning a master's degree. Four years later, two utility employees from Northern States Power (NSP) and Wisconsin Electric Power Companies (WEPCO) graduated from the University of Wisconsin with master's degrees earned entirely by taking videotape graduate courses at their individual nuclear power plant sites. Within these 4 years, more than a dozen videotaped graduate courses were developed by the faculty of the department in a formalized master's degree program in nuclear engineering and engineering physics. This paper outlines the program's development and its current features

  14. Evaluation of two videotape instruction programmes on how to break bad news--for Cantonese-speaking medical students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, C L; Fielding, R; Wong, G; Chung, S F; Nestel, D F

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate a culture-specific videotape on how to 'break bad news' and another videotape produced by a western university, and to determine if the language of presentation influenced the students' perceived abilities to execute basic skills. Third year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong. Longitudinal study with experimental design. Two instructional tapes on breaking bad news; one using Chinese speaking role models and one using English. In both groups, self-efficacy summed scores increased from 26.8 (95% CI = 25.9-27.7) at the pre-test to 29.0 (95% CI = 28.4-29.6). The biggest changes occurred in perceived self-efficacy regarding specific skills. However, students using the Chinese tape rated skills as more useful than those using the English tape. The videotapes were useful in teaching communication skills. Culturally relevant audiovisual materials were more effective.

  15. Methods for teaching effective patient communication techniques to radiography students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makely, S

    1990-07-01

    Teaching students to communicate effectively with patients has always been part of the radiography curriculum in the USA. However, developing these skills has become even more important in recent times due to several factors. Patients who have been well versed in what to expect from the examination being conducted are in a better position to co-operate with the radiographer. This increases the chances of producing optimal results from an examination at the first attempt, thus reducing radiation exposure, patient discomfort and the overall cost of conducting the procedure. Also, increased competition among health care providers has resulted in more emphasis being placed on patient, or customer, satisfaction. Radiographers are in the 'front line' of patient care. Patients often have more interaction with radiographers than with physicians or other medical specialists. Radiographers who practise effective communication techniques with their patients can alleviate anxiety and make an important contribution to the overall satisfaction of the patient with respect to the quality of service and care they receive. This article describes instructional methods being used in the USA to help develop effective patient communication techniques, and reports the findings of a study among radiography educators as to which of these methods are thought to be most successful.

  16. Educating patients: understanding barriers, learning styles, and teaching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beagley, Linda

    2011-10-01

    Health care delivery and education has become a challenge for providers. Nurses and other professionals are challenged daily to assure that the patient has the necessary information to make informed decisions. Patients and their families are given a multitude of information about their health and commonly must make important decisions from these facts. Obstacles that prevent easy delivery of health care information include literacy, culture, language, and physiological barriers. It is up to the nurse to assess and evaluate the patient's learning needs and readiness to learn because everyone learns differently. This article will examine how each of these barriers impact care delivery along with teaching and learning strategies will be examined. Copyright © 2011 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  18. Tips & Techniques: Storytelling with Puppets and Props. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    On this 20-minute videotape, two accomplished storytellers share their expertise on using puppets and props to enhance the art of storytelling. Schroeder Cherry uses several types of puppets to tell his educational story about the Underground Railroad, while Karen Quinn-Wisniewski entertains her audience of young children with classic fables,…

  19. Educators Using Information Technology. GIS Video Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A M Productions Inc., Vancouver (British Columbia).

    This 57-minute videotape covers the "Florida Educators Using Information Technology" session of the "Eco-Informa '96" conference. Two speakers presented examples of environmental educators using information technology. The first speaker, Brenda Maxwell, is the Director and Developer of the Florida Science Institute based at…

  20. All about Fish. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    There is a completely new world to discover in the oceans, lakes, and rivers--a world filled with an amazing variety of fish. While all fish live and breathe underwater, each type looks very different and develops its own unique living habits. In this videotape, students learn more about the body structures of fish as well as how they reproduce…

  1. Me & Isaac Newton. [Videotape and] KIDSNET Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This videotape records the stories of 7 scientists, 3 women and 4 men who range in age from 33 to 81. Beginning with their earliest scientific questions and including their most personal ponderings, the scientists reveal their histories and professional obligations to affect the world. Director Michael Apted allows the personal adventures of the…

  2. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  3. Doing Things. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. It contains activities from students' everyday life such as eating, washing, and playing. These daily processes are then…

  4. All about Animal Adaptations. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Animals change to better adapt to their environment. Over long periods of time, nature helps the animals adapt by changing their body shape and color as well as adjusting their methods of getting and eating food, defending themselves, and caring for their young. In this videotape, students learn what changes different animals go through in order…

  5. All about Dinosaurs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs were the rulers of the land 65 million years ago. In this videotape, children learn more about the different kinds of dinosaurs by viewing vivid illustrations and fossil discoveries. Students compare the dinosaurs to their modern kin--snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Students also listen to different theories to try to answer the big…

  6. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  7. All about Food Chains. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Whether animals are herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, each one is part of an eternal food chain that carries on from one generation to the next. In this videotape, students learn more about terms like "predator,""pre-consumer" and "producer," as well as the cycles of food chains and food webs and how they support…

  8. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical…

  9. Relationship between Teach-back and patient-centered communication in primary care pediatric encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaczewski, Adam; Bauman, Laurie J; Blank, Arthur E; Dreyer, Benard; Abrams, Mary Ann; Stein, Ruth E K; Roter, Debra L; Hossain, Jobayer; Byck, Hal; Sharif, Iman

    2017-07-01

    We proposed and tested a theoretical framework for how use of Teach-back could influence communication during the pediatric clinical encounter. Audio-taped pediatric primary care encounters with 44 children with asthma were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System to measure patient-centered communication and affective engagement of the parent. A newly created Teach-back Loop Score measured the extent to which Teach-back occurred during the clinical encounter; parental health literacy was measured by Newest Vital Sign. Logistic regression was used to test the relationship between Teach-back and features of communication. Focus groups held separately with clinicians and parents elicited perceptions of Teach-back usefulness. Teach-back was used in 39% of encounters. Visits with Teach-back had more patient centered communication (p=0.01). Adjusting for parent health literacy, parent age, and child age, Teach-back increased the odds of both patient centered communication [proportional AOR (95% CI)=4.97 (4.47-5.53)]and negative affect [AOR (95% CI)=5.39 (1.68-17.31)]. Focus group themes common to clinicians and parents included: Teach-back is effective, could cause discomfort, should be used with children, and nurses should use it. Teach-back was associated with more patient-centered communication and increased affective engagement of parents. Standardizing Teach-back use may strengthen patient-centered communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  11. Pattern of Leukaemia Patients Admitted in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Any tissue of the body can give rise to cancer. However, those tissues which multiply rapidly are at high risk of developing cancer and haematopoietic system is one of them. Neoplasms of this system are known as leukaemia and lymphoma, according to the types of white cells involved.Study of cancer patterns in different societies, however can contribute a substantial knowledge about the aetiology of cancer. The present Study was designed and aimed to estimate the frequency of different types of leukaemia in patients admitted in Ayub Teaching hospital Abbottabad. Methods: Data from the patients admitted at oncology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 2010 to 2015 was collected and analysed to calculate cumulative and year-wise frequency of leukaemia and its major types. Frequency distribution with reference to gender and age was also calculated. Results: In our analysis about 16 percent patients had acute myelocytic leukaemia and 32 percent patients had acute lymphocytic leukaemia; while chronic myeloid leukaemia outnumbered chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (11 percent and 3 percent); Hodgkin lymphoma was seen in 18 percent cases while Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was present in 20 percent cases. Out of the total, 150 cases (75 percent) belonged to mountainous areas of Hazara, i.e., 40 cases belonged to Kohistan, another 40 cases were residents of Battagram, 45 cases belonged to hilly areas of Mansehra and 25 cases to Kaghan valley, while only 50 (25 percent) cases were from the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts, i.e., 20 and 30 cases respectively. Conclusion: Leukaemia is more common in hilly areas of Hazara, since majority of the cases belonged to well-known mountainous regions of Kohistan, Battagram, Kaghan or Mansehra and only few cases belonged to the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts. (author)

  12. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  13. Empirical development of brief smoking prevention videotapes which target African-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, S; Parker, V C; Lopes, C; Crippens, D L; Elder, P; Scholl, D

    1995-07-01

    Two studies are described which provide evaluations for two brief videotapes developed as supplemental materials in the prevention of tobacco use among African-American adolescents. One videotape (the "soap opera") provides a more general audience-oriented presentation of prevention material and it was filmed primarily at a shopping mall, whereas the other videotape (the "rap") provides a "hip-hop generation" presentation, and it was filmed primarily at an outdoor hangout. The first study compared the two videotapes against each other. The second study compared the two videotapes combined in the same presentation, controlling for order of presentation, against a discussion group control. The results of the two studies indicated few differences in receptivity to the two videotapes among primarily African-American and Latino young adolescents. The rap videotape was rated as more accurate in its depiction of the African-American lifestyle, although both videotapes were equally liked. When shown together, the videotapes were not found to be superior in decreasing behavioral intention to smoke compared to a discussion group control. No change in trial of smoking was observed within or across conditions measured over a pre-post summer interval. These data suggest that "culturally sensitive" videotapes have no more of a short-term effect on youth than do other types of brief interventions which involve minority implementers.

  14. Look and Do Ancient Greece. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Greek Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource, containing a teacher's manual, reproducible student workbook, and a color teaching poster, is designed to accompany a 21-minute videotape program, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "Greek Architecture," looks at elements of architectural construction as applied to Greek structures, and…

  15. An interprofessional course using human patient simulation to teach patient safety and teamwork skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Deepti; McCulloh, Russell; Dyer, Carla; Gregory, Gretchen; Higbee, Dena

    2012-05-10

    To assess the effectiveness of human patient simulation to teach patient safety, team-building skills, and the value of interprofessional collaboration to pharmacy students. Five scenarios simulating semi-urgent situations that required interprofessional collaboration were developed. Groups of 10 to 12 health professions students that included 1 to 2 pharmacy students evaluated patients while addressing patient safety hazards. Pharmacy students' scores on 8 of 30 items on a post-simulation survey of knowledge, skills, and attitudes improved over pre-simulation scores. Students' scores on 3 of 10 items on a team building and interprofessional communications survey also improved after participating in the simulation exercise. Over 90% of students reported that simulation increased their understanding of professional roles and the importance of interprofessional communication. Simulation training provided an opportunity to improve pharmacy students' ability to recognize and react to patient safety concerns and enhanced their interprofessional collaboration and communication skills.

  16. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  17. Teaching and testing basic surgical skills without using patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, clinical skills centers are important structural components of authentic universities in the world. These centers can be use for tuition of cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills. In this study we have designed a surgical course, consist of 19 theoretical knowledge (cognitive skills and 10 procedural skills. Purpose: teaching and testing the designed course. Methods: This study has been conducted on 678 medical students at clerkship stage. Pre and post-self assessment technique has been used to assess learning progress. A multivariate statistical comparison were adapted for Judgments of learning achievement, Hotelling’s T-square has been used to ascertain the differences between pre and post tests score. For measuring the reliability of the test items. Cronbach's Alpha has been used to measure the reliability of test item. Results: The reliability of the test was 0.84 for cognitive skills and 0.92 for procedural skills. The two tailed test for comparing each pairs of score of 19 cognitive items showed a significant statistical difference between 13 items (P=0.000. For procedural skills the differences between the mean score of 9 items were significant (P=0.000. These results indicate learning achievements by students. Conclusion: This study suggests that, the ability of trainees in both cognitive and psychomotor skills can be improved by tuition of basic surgical skills in skill Lab. (without use of patients. Key words: BASIC SURGICAL SKILLS, CSC, (CLINICAL SKILLS CENTER PRE AND POST SELF-ASSESSMENT

  18. The power of patient-side teaching – still of benefit to student and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-18

    Apr 18, 2006 ... around professional performance and builds on what learners already know. ... follows that if professional competence is the aim of teaching and learning ... approach to patient care, and incorporation of communication skills ...

  19. Collaborative learning in nursing simulation: near-peer teaching using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Amy M; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    Simulation in nursing education uses specific patient scenarios to provide students with hands-on learning experiences. A near-peer teaching experience, using upper-level nursing students as standardized patients, was created as an educational intervention. The premises of social cognitive theory, which include cognitive, behavioral, and environmental factors, were incorporated into this teaching activity. The upper-level students played the role of a patient, while they also practiced leadership, teaching, and mentoring of first-semester nursing students. In the scenario, the first-semester students provided care to the patient, while focusing on safety, identifying the problem, and practicing clinical decision making. Faculty were present to provide guidance and promote communication in debriefing. Near-peer teaching provided a learning opportunity for all students, facilitated teamwork, and encouraged knowledge and skills attainment. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Teaching points-do they occur and what do they contain? An observation study concerning the general practice rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gertrude Florence; Roth, Lisa Marie; Donner-Banzhoff, Nobert; Boesner, Stefan

    2016-04-18

    A general practice rotation is mandatory in most undergraduate medical education programs. However, little is known about the student-teacher interaction which takes place in this setting. In this study we analyzed occurrence and content of teaching points. From April to December 2012, 410 individual patient consultations were observed in twelve teaching practices associated with the Philipps University Marburg, Germany. Material was collected using structured field-note forms and videotaping. Data analysis was descriptive in form. A teaching point is defined here as a general rule or specific, case-related information divulged by the teaching practitioner. According to the analysis of 410 consultations, teaching points were made in 66.3% of consultations. During these consultations, 74.3% general- and 46.3% case related teaching points occurred; multiple categorizations were possible. Of seven possible topics, therapy was most common, followed, in frequency of occurrence, by patient history, diagnostic procedure, physical examination, disease pathology, differential diagnosis, risk factors and case presentation. The majority of consultations conducted within student presence contained teaching points, most frequently concerning therapy. General teaching points were more common than specific teaching points. Whilst it is encouraging that most consultations included teaching points, faculty development aimed at raising awareness for teaching and learning techniques is important.

  1. Teaching aids for nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides teachers with a set of resources to use in teaching modern nuclear chemistry in their classrooms. Included in the resources are references to recent articles on nuclear science, some preprints and abstracts of articles, ideas of where to go for help, lab experiments, and a videotape of simulated nuclear reactions

  2. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  3. How To Dance through Time. Volume V: Victorian Era Couple Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 55-minute VHS videotape is the fifth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It continues the tradition of the romance of the mid-19th century couple dances, focusing on Victorian era couple dances. The videotape offers 35 variations of the renowned 19th century couple dances, including the waltz, the polka, the galop,…

  4. Technology Is the Answer, But What Was the Question? Audiotape vs. Videotape for Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Barbara Gerson; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In an evaluation of supplementary learning aids students were assigned to one of four learning conditions: (1) videotape plus worksheet, (2) audiotape plus worksheet, (3) combination of audio- and videotape plus worksheet, and (4) worksheet only. Results reported include test scores and ratings of helpfulness, as well as student preferences and…

  5. Good Morning, Good Night. A Day on the Farm. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. The videotape provides activities from children's' daily routines, such as eating, playing, and sleeping. It also…

  6. Journey to Planet Earth: The Urban Explosion. The Public Television Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape attempts to show students how the uncontrolled development of the world's major cities has led to a series of problems such as air pollution, water pollution, limited room for waste disposal, housing shortages, and loss of farmland. The videotape profiles four mega-cities: Mexico City, Shanghai, Istanbul, and New York City. Students…

  7. Vicarious Desensitization of Test Anxiety Through Observation of Video-taped Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jay

    1972-01-01

    Procedural variations were compared for a vicarious group treatment of test anxiety involving observation of videotapes depicting systematic desensitization of a model. The theoretical implications of the present study and the feasibility of using videotaped materials to treat test anxiety and other avoidance responses in school settings are…

  8. Begin with Love[R]. The First Three Months: Connecting with Your Child. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIVITAS Initiative, Chicago, IL.

    Hosted by Oprah Winfrey and featuring Dr. Kyle Pruett, this videotape focuses on new parents' relationship with their infant in the first 3 months of life. The 30-minute videotape begins with footage of infants during the newborn period and depicts parents talking about their emotional response to their infant's birth. The video focuses on…

  9. Factors associated with Salmonella shedding among equine colic patients at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L M; Morley, P S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Salman, M D; Gentry-Weeks, C

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate factors potentially associated with fecal Salmonella shedding among equine patients hospitalized for colic at a veterinary teaching hospital and to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on fecal Salmonella shedding and clinical signs. Longitudinal study and controlled trial. 246 equine colic patients. History and medical information were obtained from patient records. Fecal and environmental samples were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture for Salmonella enterica. Fifty-one patients were treated with a commercially available probiotic; 46 were treated with a placebo. Logistic regression was used to evaluate data. Salmonella organisms were detected in feces from 23 (9%) patients at least once during hospitalization. Patients were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms if diarrhea was evident equine patients hospitalized at a veterinary teaching hospital because of colic and that pathogen monitoring in patients and the hospital environment and use of barrier nursing precautions for equine colic patients are beneficial.

  10. The teaching of self-care to ostomy patients and their families: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman de Felício Bortucan Lenza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the national and international literature on the teaching of selfcare to bowel ostomates and their relatives. Methods: It is an integrative review, in LILACS and MEDLINE electronic databases, in the period from 1996 to 2006, with the keywords ‘teaching’, ‘ostomates’ and ‘nursing’. Results: The sample was composed of eight articles, which reported the importance of teaching strategies applied with patients and their families regarding self-care and management of the stoma and collectors, however, no study has brought specific and systematized teaching strategies. Conclusion: The analyzed literature has demonstrated the importance of teaching strategies addressing the issue of self-care for the ostomates, but expressed the lack of researches and publications on the implementation of contextualized actions and with appropriate language for these patients and their families.

  11. The teaching of self-care to ostomy patients and their families: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman de Felício Bortucan Lenza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the national and international literature on the teaching of selfcare to bowel ostomates and their relatives. Methods: It is an integrative review, in LILACS and MEDLINE electronic databases, in the period from 1996 to 2006, with the keywords ‘teaching’, ‘ostomates’ and ‘nursing’. Results: The sample was composed of eight articles, which reported the importance of teaching strategies applied with patients and their families regarding self-care and management of the stoma and collectors, however, no study has brought specific and systematized teaching strategies. Conclusion: The analyzed literature has demonstrated the importance of teaching strategies addressing the issue of self-care for the ostomates, but expressed the lack of researches and publications on the implementation of contextualized actions and with appropriate language for these patients and their families.

  12. R.E.A.C.H. to Teach: Making Patient and Family Education "Stick".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilli, Carolyn Crane

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals teach patients and families about their health every day. Regulatory and accreditation organizations mandate patient and family education to promote better health outcomes. And recently, financial rewards for healthcare organizations are being tied to patient satisfaction (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-HCAHPS). A University of Pennsylvania Health System group of staff and patients, devoted to excellence in patient and family education, developed the graphic "R.E.A.C.H. to Teach." The purpose of the graphic is to make evidence-based practice (EBP) for patient and family education "stick" with staff. The group used concepts from the marketing book, Made to Stick, to demonstrate how to develop effective staff and patient and family education. Ideas (education) that survive ("stick") have the following attributes: simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and narrative (story). This article demonstrates how to apply these principles and EBP to patient and family education.

  13. NOTES FOR THE PRIMARY CARE TEACHERS: TEACHING DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION IN FAMILY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Yong Rafidah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor-patient communication skills are important in family medicine and can be taught and learned. This paper summarisesthe salient contents and main methods of the teaching and learning of doctor-patient communication, especially thoseapplicable to the discipline.

  14. A "Prepaid Package" for Obstetrics: Effect on Teaching and Patient Care in a University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip E.

    1976-01-01

    The changing social milieu has removed the charity patient but not the need for a teaching population. The University Hospital's program is described, in which patients prepaid a fixed, single fee for all obstetrics-related care through the third post partum day. (LBH)

  15. Before the teaching begins: Managing patient anxiety prior to providing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pamela L

    2006-04-01

    Patients experiencing cancer also can experience anxiety. Moderate to severe levels of anxiety can interfere with patients' ability to concentrate and comprehend new information. The condition is particularly troublesome when trying to present educational material related to recommended treatment interventions. Patients' understanding of the material is critical to ensure informed consent. Informed consent can be compromised if patients are unable to understand the information being provided. Nurses must be cognizant of the impact that anxiety has on patient education and assess patients prior to initiating patient teaching. By managing anxiety before beginning education, nurses can provide an environment more conducive to learning.

  16. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-02-01

    The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction.

  17. Teaching Death Management Skills: Health Professionals Confront Patient Avoidance Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Raymond; And Others

    Health professionals tend to view dying patients with two intertwined attitudes. On one hand the patient possesses an irreversible pathological condition and the doctor is obliged to help that patient embrace death with as much dignity as possible. On the other hand, the patient's imminent death is daily testimony to the limits of the doctor's…

  18. Teaching cardiopulmonary auscultation in workshops using a virtual patient simulation technology - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, D; Gomes, P; Faria, S; Cruz-Correia, R; Coimbra, M

    2016-08-01

    Auscultation is currently both a powerful screening tool, providing a cheap and quick initial assessment of a patient's clinical condition, and a hard skill to master. The teaching of auscultation in Universities is today reduced to an unsuitable number of hours. Virtual patient simulators can potentially mitigate this problem, by providing an interesting high-quality alternative to teaching with real patients or patient simulators. In this paper we evaluate the pedagogical impact of using a virtual patient simulation technology in a short workshop format for medical students, training them to detect cardiac pathologies. Results showed a significant improvement (+16%) in the differentiation between normal and pathological cases, although longer duration formats seem to be needed to accurately identify specific pathologies.

  19. Learning outcomes of "The Oncology Patient" study among nursing students: A comparison of teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Judith; Reguant, Mercedes; Canet, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Teaching strategies are essential in order to facilitate meaningful learning and the development of high-level thinking skills in students. To compare three teaching methodologies (problem-based learning, case-based teaching and traditional methods) in terms of the learning outcomes achieved by nursing students. This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the Nursing Degree programme in a group of 74 students who explored the subject of The Oncology Patient through the aforementioned strategies. A performance test was applied based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. A significant correlation was found between the intragroup theoretical and theoretical-practical dimensions. Likewise, intergroup differences were related to each teaching methodology. Hence, significant differences were estimated between the traditional methodology (x-=9.13), case-based teaching (x-=12.96) and problem-based learning (x-=14.84). Problem-based learning was shown to be the most successful learning method, followed by case-based teaching and the traditional methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Participant Reactivity in Dyads Performing a Videotaped Conflict-Management Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk, Yulia Y; Riesch, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    Videotaping is used frequently in nursing research. A threat to the validity of videotaping is participant reactivity, that is, being recorded by a camera may influence the behavior of interest. This paper's purpose is to report how youth ages 10 to 14 years old and their parent viewed participation in a videotaped conflict-management task. Five dyads, who were part of a randomized clinical trial testing an intervention to promote parent-child communication, participated in a structured interview. All parents were mothers. Youth were eighth graders. Three were boys and two were girls. Findings indicated that (a) dyads felt that the videotaped interaction had a progression of feeling unnatural in the beginning to feeling natural toward the end, (b) dyads found it relatively easy to choose a topic of discussion, and (c) dyads felt that the discussions were meaningful. Based on these data, recommendations for researchers to reduce participant reactivity are provided.

  1. Integration of Mobile Devices to Facilitate Patient Care and Teaching During Family-Centered Rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Angela S; McMahon, Pamela M; Vath, Richard J; Bolton, Michael; Roy, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of mobile devices in clinical settings has the potential to improve both patient care and education. The benefits are particularly promising in the context of family-centered rounds in inpatient pediatric settings. We aimed to increase mobile device usage by inpatient rounding teams by 50% in 6 months. We hoped to demonstrate that use of mobile devices would improve access to patient care and educational information and to determine if use would improve efficiency and perceptions of clinical teaching. We designed a mixed-methods study involving pre- and post-implementation surveys to residents, families, and faculty as well as direct observations of family-centered rounds. We conducted rapid cycles of continual quality improvement by using the Plan-Do-Study-Act framework involving 3 interventions. Pre-intervention, the mobile computing cart was used for resident education on average 3.3 times per rounding session. After cycle 3, teaching through the use of mobile devices increased by ∼79% to 5.9 times per rounding session. On the basis of survey data, we determined there was a statistically significant increase in residents' perception of feeling prepared for rounds, receiving teaching on clinical care, and ability to teach families. Additionally, average time spent per patient on rounds decreased after implementation of mobile devices. Integration of mobile devices into a pediatric hospital medicine teaching service can facilitate patient care and perception of resident teaching by extending the utility of electronic medical records in care decisions and by improving access to knowledge resources. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students......' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed...

  3. Patients' satisfaction with eye care services in a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... will recommend the hospital to others strongly, 145 (47.2%) will do so hesitantly. Conclusion: Majority of the patients were satisfied with the services received. The major dissatisfaction points were cost of services and inadequate toilet facilities. Key words: Developing country, eye care services, patient satisfaction ...

  4. Mind Map: a new way to teach patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, C A

    2000-05-01

    As home care agencies look for new ways to achieve patient outcomes and staff competencies in a cost-effective manner, Mind Map is a method that can be used to quickly organize patient and staff education while evaluating the learner's comprehension of critical information.

  5. Patients as partners in radiology education: an innovative approach to teaching and assessing patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Beth A; Sasson, J Pierre; Hinrichs, Peg

    2008-04-01

    Effective communication is essential for high quality care, yet little is known about radiologists' communication with patients, what constitutes "best communication practices," and how best to teach and evaluate it. We piloted educational strategies and an assessment instrument to teach and evaluate radiologists' communication skills. We focused on communication in the diagnostic mammography suite, where patient-radiologist interactions are often intense and stressful. We adapted existing instruments to create a Radiology Communication Skills Assessment Tool (RCSAT). We piloted an educational program that included patients as teachers and raters of interpersonal and communication skills, and implemented a radiology objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). We measured radiology residents' self-assessed skills, confidence and stress, as well as patient-rated communication skills using the RCSAT. Residents' baseline self-assessed communication skills regarding abnormal mammograms were fair, confidence in their communication was minimal, and they found this communication stressful. Overall baseline communication skills, rated by patient-teachers using the RCSAT, were 3.62 on a 5-point scale (1 = poor to 5 = excellent). Analysis of post-OSCE debriefing comments yielded nine themes regarding effective radiology communication, as well as residents' reflections on the communication challenges they experience. The themes were integrated into subsequent RCSAT revisions. Residents' reflections were used to inform teaching workshops. Educational curricula on communication about difficult information can be implemented in radiology training programs. Radiology residents' performance can be assessed using a communication skills assessment tool during standardized patient-teacher encounters. Further research is necessary in this important domain.

  6. Teaching inhaler use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareau, Suzanne C; Hodder, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To review barriers to the successful use of inhalers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) in facilitating optimum inhaler use. Review of the national and international scientific literature. Pharmacologic treatment of COPD patients comprises mainly inhaled medications. Incorrect use of inhalers is very common in these individuals. Some of the consequences of poor inhaler technique include reduced therapeutic dosing, medication adherence, and disease stability, which can lead to increased morbidity, decreased quality of life, and a high burden on the healthcare system. Knowledgeable evaluation and frequent reassessment of inhaler use coupled with education of patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals can significantly improve the benefits COPD patients derive from inhaled therapy. Patient education is vital for correct use of inhalers and to ensure the effectiveness of inhaled medications. The NP has a critical role in assessing potential barriers to successful learning by the patient and improving inhaler technique and medication management. The NP can also facilitate success with inhaled medications by providing up-to-date inhaler education for other healthcare team members, who may then act as patient educators. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals.

  8. Patients' satisfaction with eye care services in a Nigerian teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... Background: Understanding the patients' perception of services received is ... The questionnaire asked questions regarding satisfaction with the time spent in the .... corresponding values for the aforementioned studies were.

  9. A model to teach concomitant patient communication during psychomotor skill development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Delwyn; Sweet, Linda; Muller, Amanda; Hyett, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Many health professionals use psychomotor or task-based skills in clinical practice that require concomitant communication with a conscious patient. Verbally engaging with the patient requires highly developed verbal communication skills, enabling the delivery of patient-centred care. Historically, priority has been given to learning the psychomotor skills essential to clinical practice. However, there has been a shift towards also ensuring competent communication with the patient during skill performance. While there is literature outlining the steps to teach and learn verbal communication skills, little is known about the most appropriate instructional approach to teach how to verbally engage with the patient when also learning to perform a task. A literature review was performed and it identified that there was no model or proven approach which could be used to integrate the learning of both psychomotor and communication skills. This paper reviews the steps to teach a communication skill and provides a suggested model to guide the acquisition and development of the concomitant -communication skills required with a patient at the time a psychomotor skill is performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching strategies for self-care of the intestinal stoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching self-care must ensure the intestinal stoma patient more independence concerning the family and health professionals. The planning involves the assessment of the clinical and socio-demographic data, and the conditions for the self-care. This study aimed at identifying strategies to teach self-care for intestinal stoma patients in the scientific production. We used an integrative review on MEDLINE, PUBMED, LILACS, CINAHL and COCHRANE bases from 2005 to 2011, 7 papers were selected. In the perioperative teaching, multimedia, telephone follow-up, personal meetings, interactive material through the Internet were used, besides the continuing education of the health professionals. These different strategies profess the needs of each individual that promote self-care learning about the surgery and its consequences, skills development and the necessary adaptation of the condition of a stoma patient. The nurse needs to have technical and scientific knowledge on surgical technique, demarcation, treatment, complications, and skills for the teaching of self-care.

  11. Patient Storytelling in the Classroom: A Memorable Way to Teach Spiritual Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L

    2016-01-01

    Storytelling is an evidence-based teaching and learning strategy that engages students and promotes critical thinking. Although most nursing textbooks incorporate spiritual nursing care, the texts lack examples of how to tie evidence-based spiritual interventions to specific medical-suigical content. Stories told from the patient's perspective can communicate insights that nurses and students can use when planning spiritual carefor patients. Stories shared by patients with undergraduate nursing students were effective in promoting learning and offered concrete examples of supportive spiritual resources for patients.

  12. Standardized Patients to Teaching Medical Students about Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heron, Sheryl L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To use 360-degree evaluations within an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE to assess medical student comfort level and communication skills with intimate partner violence (IPV patients.Methods: We assessed a cohort of fourth year medical students’ performance using an IPV standardized patient (SP encounter in an OSCE. Blinded pre- and post-tests determined the students’ knowledge and comfort level with core IPV assessment. Students, SPs and investigators completed a 360-degree evaluation that focused on each student’s communication and competency skills. We computed frequencies, means and correlations.Results: Forty-one students participated in the SP exercise during three separate evaluation periods. Results noted insignificant increase in students’ comfort level pre-test (2.7 and post-test (2.9. Although 88% of students screened for IPV and 98% asked about the injury, only 39% asked about verbal abuse, 17% asked if the patient had a safety plan, and 13% communicated to the patient that IPV is illegal. Using Likert scoring on the competency and overall evaluation (1, very poor and 5, very good, the mean score for each evaluator was 4.1 (competency and 3.7 (overall. The correlations between trainee comfort level and the specific competencies of patient care, communication skill and professionalism were positive and significant (p<0.05.Conclusion: Students felt somewhat comfortable caring for patients with IPV. OSCEs with SPs can be used to assess student competencies in caring for patients with IPV. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:500-505.

  13. [Teaching doctor-patient communication - a proposal in practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Pais, Vanessa G; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Teles, Ana; Almeida, Susana S; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, doctor-patient communication was considered a matter of and , and a topic for informal learning. Recently, studies have shown the importance of communication skills in medical practice. Doctor-patient communication skills, such as knowing how to listen, how to observe, and how to inform are today considered important components of Medical Education, although they are often difficult to integrate in Medical Curricula. In the current work, the authors describe the program of Communication in the Doctor-Patient Relationship, initiated in 2001 in the Medical School of the University of Porto, part of its undergraduate program. Future studies will allow us to assess the effectiveness of the learning and application of these skills in clinical practice.

  14. Balancing patient care and student education: learning to deliver bad news in an optometry teaching clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M; Schryer, Catherine F; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of seven senior optometry students and six optometrist instructors at a Canadian optometry teaching clinic. The participants described their experiences in learning to deliver bad news. Using a grounded theory approach, our analysis was informed by situated learning and activity theory. Optometry students received formal classroom training regarding how to deliver bad news, including exposure to the medically-based six-step SPIKES protocol (Baile et al. The Oncologist, 5, 302-311, 2000). Yet, application of this protocol to the teaching clinic was limited by the lack of exposure most instructors had received to this strategy. Determinants of the students' complex learning process during their clinical apprenticeship, included: (i) knowing one's place, (ii) knowing one's audience, (iii) knowing through feedback, and (iv) knowing who speaks. The experiences of these participants pointed toward the need for: (1) more instructional "scaffolding" (Bruner and Sherwood Play: Its role in development and evolution, p. 280, 1976) in the clinical setting when the learning task is complex, and (2) explicit discussions about the impacts that unfold when the activities of patient care and student education overlap. We reflect on the possible consequences to student education and patient care in the absence of these changes.

  15. (ANC) patients at the Lagos state university teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Pearson's correlation matrices and student t-test of data were generated and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULT. Results were compared for parity, age of patient, ges- tational age of pregnancy, booking weight, blood group and genotype, and haemoglobin status. In this study, the.

  16. Efficiency of teaching patients with early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Vladislavovna Orlova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Education programs are an important part of the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Objective: to develop a unified model of an education program for RA patients and to evaluate its efficiency at the early stage of the disease.Material and methods. A group education program was worked out with the support of the All-Russian public organization of the disabled “The Russian rheumatology organization “Nadezhda” (Hope” and encompassed 4 daily classes lasting 90 min. All information was presented by a multidisciplinary team of specialists (rheumatologists, a cardiologist, a psychologist, a physiotherapist, and a physical trainer. The study included 55 patients with early RA (89.1% of women aged 18 to 62 years; the duration of the disease was 2 to 22 months; of them 25 were taught using the education program (a study group; 30 received drug therapy only (a control group. Following 3 and 6 months, the number of tender and swollen joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and pain were determined applying a 100-ml VAS, DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3. Adherence to non-drug treatments was assessed employing a special patient questionnaire.Results. Three and six months after being taught, two patient groups showed increases in adherence to joint protection methods by 13 and 10 times (p<0.01, regular physical training by 4 and 3.25 times (p<0.01, uses of orthoses for the wrist joint by 2 times and 75% (p<0.01 and knee orthoses by 33.3 and 50.0% (p<0.01, and orthopedic insoles by 71.4 and 57.1% (p<0.01, respectively. Following 6 months, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in most parameters (p<0.05, except for ESR, CRP, and DAS28 (p>0.05. Further more, a good response to treatment was significantly more common in these periods, as shown by the EULAR response criteria (DAS28: 56.3% versus 40% in the control group (p<0.05.Conclusion. The education program decreases the intensity

  17. Candiduria in hospitalized patients in teaching hospitals of Ahvaz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, A; Zarrin, M; Ghanatir, F; Vazirianzadeh, B

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are usually acquired during hospitalization. Fungal infection of the urinary tract is increasing due to predisposing factors such as; antibacterial agents, indwelling urinary catheters, diabetes mellitus, long hospitalization, immunosuppressive agents, use of IV catheters, radiation therapy, malignancy. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of candiduria and urinary tract infection in patients admitted in Golestan and Emam Khomeini hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. During 14 months, a total of 744 urine samples were collected and transferred to medical mycology laboratory immediately. Ten µl of uncentrifuged sample was cultured on CHROM agar Candida plates and incubated at 37°C for 24-48h aerobically. Candida species were identified based on colony morphology on CHROM agar Candida, germ tube production and micro-morphology on corn meal agar including 1% Tween 80. In the present study, 744 hospitalized patients were sampled (49.5%, female; 50.5%, male). The prevalence of candiduria in subjects was 16.5% that included 65.1% female and 34.9% male. The most common isolates were C. albicans (53.3%), followed by C. glabrata (24.4%), C. tropicalis (3.7%), C. krusei (2.2%), and Geotrichum spp. (0.7%) Urine cultures yielded more than 10,000 yeast colonies in 34.1% of cases, and the major predisposing factor associated with candiduria was antibiotic therapy (69.1%). Candiduria is relatively common in hospitalized patients in educational hospitals of Ahvaz. In addition, there is a strong correlation between the incidence of candiduria in hospitalized patients and broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy.

  18. The state of quality improvement and patient safety teaching in health professional education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Stolarek, Iwona; Wells, Susan; Bohm, Gillian

    2017-10-27

    To investigate how quality and patient safety domains are being taught in the pre-registration curricula of health profession education programmes in New Zealand. All tertiary institutions providing training for medicine, nursing, midwifery, dentistry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dietetics and 11 other allied health professions in New Zealand were contacted and a person with relevant curriculum knowledge was invited to participate. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide to explore nine quality and safety domains; improvement science, patient safety, quality and safety culture, evidence-based practice, patient-centred care, teamwork and communication, leadership for change, systems thinking and use of information technology (IT). Transcribed data were extracted and categorised by discipline and domain. Two researchers independently identified and categorised themes within each domain, using a general inductive approach. Forty-nine institutions were contacted and 43 (88%) people were interviewed. The inclusion and extent of quality and safety teaching was variable. Evidence-based practice, patient-centred care and teamwork and communication were the strongest domains and well embedded in programmes, while leadership, systems thinking and the role of IT were less explicitly included. Except for two institutions, improvement science was absent from pre-registration curricula. Patient safety teaching was focused mainly around incident reporting, and to a lesser extent learning from adverse events. Although a 'no blame' culture was articulated as important, the theme of individual accountability was still apparent. While participants agreed that all domains were important, the main barriers to incorporating improvement science and patient safety concepts into existing programmes included an 'already stretched curriculum' and having faculty with limited expertise in these areas. Although the building blocks for improving the quality and safety of

  19. Patient safety: the experience of an Italian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marchetti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction The risk management project of The University Hospital “A. Gemelli” aims to define the necessary procedures to manage clinical risk, by identifying the structures involved within this process, so that all of the personnel can contribute to a measurable improvement in the safety of both patients and staff.

    Methods The Risk Management Program is comprised of 5 long-term phases: Phase 1 - Strategy Definition and Communication: a clear and shared Risk Management Strategy is indispensable to guarantee a coordinated action plan, in order to focus all of the interventions towards the achievement of common and measurable results. Phase 2 - Risk Management System Governance: all of the organisational structures have been activated in order to effectively manage the Risk Management System. The system has been introduced to interact within all areas of the hospital and to transfer information. Phase 3 - Promotion within the Organisation: this phase fosters the aims of the project within the whole organisation, by stressing the concept of “learning from errors”. This is crucial if organisational and healthcare workers are to understand the true aims of risk prevention and protection and offer to contribute to the process. Phase 4 - Risk Assessment: a data survey system was created and institutionalized. This phase begins with an analysis of the information flow, in order to estimate the probabilities that certain risks occur, and ends with defining the interventions to undertake. Risk assessment makes it possible to forecast the consequences of certain risks and thus prioritise those for prevention. Phase 5 - Risk Management: this consists of planning and implementing all of the actions necessary to prevent risks, protect and finance (in terms of prevention A. Gemelli University Hospital.

    Results The results achieved are remarkable especially when one

  20. Life after Tracheostomy: Patient and Family Perspectives on Teaching, Transitions, and Multidisciplinary Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Michael E; Ward, Erin; Roberson, David W; Shah, Rahul K; Stachler, Robert J; Brenner, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    To report patient/family experiences and outcomes after tracheostomy International survey of patients and families with tracheostomy. Collaboration of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the Global Tracheostomy Collaborative. A 50-item survey was developed with multistakeholder collaboration. The survey was disseminated via international social networks used by patients with a tracheostomy and their families. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed. Of 220 respondents, 90% cared for a pediatric patient with a tracheostomy. Only 48% of respondents felt "very prepared" at time of discharge, and 11% did not receive emergency preparedness training prior to discharge. Home nursing needs were inadequately met in 17% of families, with resulting difficulties shortly after discharge; 14% sought emergent care within 1 week of discharge. Nearly half of respondents indicated a desire to have met with a patient with a tracheostomy prior to surgery but were not offered that opportunity. Fragmented care or limited teamwork was reported by 32% of respondents, whereas tracheotomy care was described as "integrated" or "maximally integrated" for 67%. While many families report satisfaction with tracheostomy care, opportunities remain for improving care. This study highlights the importance of teaching, teamwork, and smoothing transition from the hospital. Potential quality improvement areas include standardizing tracheostomy teaching for routine and emergency needs and optimizing postdischarge support and coordination. Prior to surgery, connecting families to people with a tracheostomy may also be beneficial. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  1. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  2. Teaching French Transformational Grammar by Means of Computer-Generated Video-Tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred; Thomas, Jean Jacques

    This paper describes a pilot program in an integrated media presentation of foreign languages and the production and usage of seven computer-generated video tapes which demonstrate various aspects of French syntax. This instructional set could form the basis for CAI lessons in which the student is presented images identical to those on the video…

  3. A Critical Review of the Effectiveness of "Teach-Back" Technique in Teaching COPD Patients Self-Management Using Respiratory Inhalers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantic, Dennis Emralino

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine and discuss the evidence base behind the effectiveness of the "teach-back" technique as an educational intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient self-management using respiratory inhalers. Design: A systematic literature review Method: A search was conducted through Medline, CINAHL…

  4. Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

  5. Comparison of a Web-Based Teaching Tool and Traditional Didactic Learning for In Vitro Fertilization Patients: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, Tannys Dawn Reiko; Allison, David J; Vause, Tricia; Tekok-Kilic, Ayda; Ditor, David S; Min, Jason K

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this prospective RCT was to compare the efficacy of a web-based teaching tool to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients. Forty women undergoing their first IVF cycle were randomly allocated to an interactive web-based teaching session or a nurse-led didactic teaching session. The primary outcome measure was participant knowledge regarding the IVF process, risks, and logistics assessed before and after the respective teaching session. Secondary outcomes included patient stress, assessed before and after the respective teaching session, and patient satisfaction, assessed following the respective teaching session and on the day of embryo transfer (following implementation of the teaching protocol). Both groups demonstrated similar and significant improvements in knowledge and stress after exposure to their respective teaching sessions. The web-based group was significantly more satisfied than the didactic teaching group. Web-based teaching was also shown to be equally effective for participants of high versus low income and education status for knowledge, stress, and satisfaction. This study provides preliminary support for the use of web-based teaching as an equally effective tool for increasing knowledge and reducing stress compared to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients, with the added benefit of increased patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching patient care to students: A blended learning approach in radiography education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleiker, Jill, E-mail: j.bleiker@ex.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Knapp, Karen M.; Frampton, Ian [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Understanding the complexity of the patient-practitioner interaction is a challenging area for radiography students early in their programmes. A small scale research project was undertaken to develop blended learning resources for the teaching of patient care to radiography students. Its purpose was to utilise experiences gathered from interviews with ex-patients to produce video clips of patient-practitioner interactions so that students might gain some insight into the reality of the clinical setting, thus enabling them to link theory with practice. A total of eight interviews with ex-patients were carried out and the transcripts used to generate scripts which were enacted and filmed by a professional acting company. Thematic analysis of the study data initiated the generation of scenarios, which formed the basis of the videos. Twelve scenes showing patient-practitioner interactions in various parts of a medical imaging department and four 'talking heads' clips were produced. These were loaded onto the university's virtual learning environment and made available for viewing together with self-test and evaluation questionnaires. A pilot study was carried out; evaluation of the videos by second year student radiographers was positive. The main study was carried out using first year students with similarly positive findings and the videos are now publically available for teaching purposes. Further work in this promising area of e-learning could further utilise patients' experiences, and using the same technology, might offer students of other professions the opportunity to gain vicarious experience prior to their first encounters with patients and the general public. In conclusion, research leading to the production of simulations of real-life patient-practitioner interactions delivered using blended learning is a useful pedagogical tool in the education of radiography students.

  7. The readmission rates in patients with versus those without diabetes mellitus at an urban teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Halis; Kambo, Varinder; Avtanski, Dimiter; Lutsky, Larry; Poretsky, Leonid

    2017-12-01

    We examined the 30-day hospital readmission rates and their association with the admission diagnosis and the length of stay (LOS) in patients with diabetes versus those without diabetes mellitus (DM) in an urban teaching hospital. In this retrospective study, we compared the 30-day readmission rates in patients with DM (n=16,266) versus those without DM (n=86,428) at an urban teaching hospital between January 1, 2013, and September 30, 2015. In individuals with a secondary diagnosis of DM, we analyzed the relationship between readmission rates and the ten most common Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs). Additionally, we examined the relationship between the LOS and readmission rates in patients with diabetes and those without DM. The 30-day readmission rates adjusted for age and gender were higher in patients with DM compared to those without DM (15.3% vs. 8.4%, respectively, readmissions was present both in patients with a primary or a secondary diagnosis of DM. For the secondary diagnosis of DM, statistically significant difference was present for two out of the ten most common DRGs (DRG # 313 [chest pain], and # 392 [esophagitis, gastroenteritis, and miscellaneous digestive disorders], p=0.045 and 0.009, respectively). There was a direct correlation between LOS and readmission rates in both patients with diabetes and those without DM (preadmission rates are higher in patients with DM compared to patients without DM. DM is an independent risk factor for hospital readmissions. The readmission rates correlate directly with LOS in both patients with diabetes and those without DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Teaching patient care to students: A blended learning approach in radiography education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleiker, Jill; Knapp, Karen M.; Frampton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the complexity of the patient-practitioner interaction is a challenging area for radiography students early in their programmes. A small scale research project was undertaken to develop blended learning resources for the teaching of patient care to radiography students. Its purpose was to utilise experiences gathered from interviews with ex-patients to produce video clips of patient-practitioner interactions so that students might gain some insight into the reality of the clinical setting, thus enabling them to link theory with practice. A total of eight interviews with ex-patients were carried out and the transcripts used to generate scripts which were enacted and filmed by a professional acting company. Thematic analysis of the study data initiated the generation of scenarios, which formed the basis of the videos. Twelve scenes showing patient-practitioner interactions in various parts of a medical imaging department and four 'talking heads' clips were produced. These were loaded onto the university's virtual learning environment and made available for viewing together with self-test and evaluation questionnaires. A pilot study was carried out; evaluation of the videos by second year student radiographers was positive. The main study was carried out using first year students with similarly positive findings and the videos are now publically available for teaching purposes. Further work in this promising area of e-learning could further utilise patients' experiences, and using the same technology, might offer students of other professions the opportunity to gain vicarious experience prior to their first encounters with patients and the general public. In conclusion, research leading to the production of simulations of real-life patient-practitioner interactions delivered using blended learning is a useful pedagogical tool in the education of radiography students.

  9. Brief Report: Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder before One Year of Age: A Retrospective Study Based on Home Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Emily; Dawson, Geraldine; Osterling, Julie; Dinno, Nuhad

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study compared videotape footage at 8-10 months of 15 children later known to have autism spectrum disorder and videotapes of 15 same-age children with typical development. The strongest finding was that infants with early onset autism were much less likely to orient when their name was called than typically developing infants.…

  10. Clinical course teaching in transport of critically ill patients: Small group methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Beigmohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patient transfer is potentially risky and may be lead to morbidity and mortality. Physicians' skill is very important for safe transport. We want to evaluate the effect of clinical course teaching on the promotion of physicians' abilities in the transport of critically ill patients. In an interventional study, 320 interns, male and female, were taught about patient transfer in two groups include in one day clinical course as the small group system (n=160 and other group the lecture base learning (n=160. In the clinical course, each participant under observation of an anesthesiologist in the operation room and ICU was acquainted with mask ventilation, intubation and learned to work with a defibrillator, infusion pump, portable ventilator and pulse oximeter. In lecture group, the anesthesiologist explained the topics by video and dummy. At the end of education course, the interns’ abilities were evaluated based on checklist method and scored by the project colleague in all educational items. Three hundred twenty interns, 122 males, and 198 females; were enrolled, two groups. The clinical course training caused improvements in the interns’ knowledge and abilities in intubation and use of the defibrillator and portable ventilator vs.lecture group significantly (P<0.005. The males were better than females in laryngoscopy, but the progress of the females was significantly better than males (P=0.003. The rate of adverse events was reduced significantly after clinical course teaching (P=0.041 Clinical course teaching could promote interns' clinical competencies in the transport of critically ill patients.

  11. Teaching hospital financial status and patient outcomes following ACGME duty hour reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navathe, Amol S; Silber, Jeffrey H; Small, Dylan S; Rosen, Amy K; Romano, Patrick S; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Jingsan; Halenar, Michael J; Volpp, Kevin G

    2013-04-01

    To examine whether hospital financial health was associated with differential changes in outcomes after implementation of 2003 ACGME duty hour regulations. Observational study of 3,614,174 Medicare patients admitted to 869 teaching hospitals from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005. Interrupted time series analysis using logistic regression to adjust for patient comorbidities, secular trends, and hospital site. Outcomes included 30-day mortality, AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), failure-to-rescue (FTR) rates, and prolonged length of stay (PLOS). All eight analyses measuring the impact of duty hour reform on mortality by hospital financial health quartile, in postreform year 1 ("Post 1") or year 2 ("Post 2") versus the prereform period, were insignificant: Post 1 OR range 1.00-1.02 and Post 2 OR range 0.99-1.02. For PSIs, all six tests showed clinically insignificant effect sizes. The FTR rate analysis demonstrated nonsignificance in both postreform years (OR 1.00 for both). The PLOS outcomes varied significantly only for the combined surgical sample in Post 2, but this effect was very small, OR 1.03 (95% CI 1.02, 1.04). The impact of 2003 ACGME duty hour reform on patient outcomes did not differ by hospital financial health. This finding is somewhat reassuring, given additional financial pressure on teaching hospitals from 2011 duty hour regulations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Effectiveness of Teach-Back Self-Management Training Program on Happiness of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Rahnama, Mozhgan; Afshari, Mahdi; Asadi Bidmeshki, Elahe

    2016-10-01

    Self-management training is one of the ways to empower patients to cope with disease. The aim of this before-and-after quasi-experimental study was to determine effects of a teach-back self-management training method on breast cancer patient happiness. Fifty breast cancer patients who visited the Park-e Neshat Limited Surgery Clinic in Kerman, Iran were randomly divided into intervention and control groups after convenience sampling and checking for inclusion eligibility. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Inventory before and after teach-back training and analyzed using SPSS 23. Findings showed no significant difference between mean happiness scores in the two groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, the mean happiness score in the intervention group increased from 37.2 to 62.9, while it decreased from 41.4 to 29.8 in the control group. These changes were statistically significant (phappiness levels in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the use of this method is recommended to improve self-management and increase happiness. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyder O Mirghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05. Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  14. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, Hyder O; Elnour, Mohammed A; Taha, Akasha M; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S

    2016-01-01

    Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05). Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  15. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  16. Animal Classification. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They learn what the terms "kingdom", "phylum", and "order" mean, and discover how the 3.5 million-plus organisms found on Earth fit into…

  17. All about Endangered and Extinct Animals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    While there are thousands of different animals in the world, some have been extinct for many years and others are on the verge of extinction. In this videotape, students learn about the natural and man-made factors that lead to the endangerment and extinction of animals. Children find out why it is essential for people to help all forms of…

  18. Endangered & Extinct Animals. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Due to environmental factors and human interference, many of Earth's creatures have ceased to exist or are on the verge of extinction. In…

  19. Understanding IDEA 1997 and the 1999 Regulations with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    The United States Congress amended the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1997 to reflect changes in the special education field over the previous twenty years. In this 2-hour videotape recording designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman presents her insights about changes in IDEA law and…

  20. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  1. Fish. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. There are many types of fish that live in oceans, lakes, and streams. Students learn about fish characteristics and environmental habitats,…

  2. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  3. Photocopying and Videotaping for Educational Purposes: The Doctrine of Fair Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Photocopying guidelines of the 1976 amendments to the Copyright Act have been further legitimized by a 1982 settlement involving New York University. Important recent developments concerning videotape copyrights include the 1981 guidelines of the House Judiciary Committee and the 1984 United States Supreme Court case, "Sony Corporation v.…

  4. Marine & Other Invertebrates. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Invertebrate animals include a vast array of spineless creatures. In this video, students discover marine lifeforms such as jellyfish,…

  5. The Effectiveness of Substance Abuse Prevention Videotapes with Mexican American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Joan M.; Buki, Lydia P.; Horan, John J.; Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Burows, Deborah Dyer

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of three substance-abuse-prevention videotapes derived from contrasting theoretical frameworks was evaluated using 312 rural Mexican-American students in grades seven through eight. The assertion-training video produced higher levels of assertiveness among ninth-graders; the others had no impact. Discusses the importance of…

  6. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  7. Reptiles. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The ancestors of reptiles date back to the dinosaurs. After the dinosaurs died out, it was one of the best-adapted species that survived and…

  8. How To Dance through Time. Volume III: The Majesty of Renaissance Dance. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 42-minute VHS videotape is the third in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It highlights the intricacies of an Italian court dance suite, which mirrors the episodic changes of courtship. Nido D'Amore" (The Nest of Love) exposes the technique for all the dance suites of the era, and features The Opening (which…

  9. Insects & Other Arthropods. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They also learn that there are more species of insects than any other animal class in the world. Insects are incredible creatures with many…

  10. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Initiative and Social Relations. [with] Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Michelle

    As preschoolers develop the ability to carry out their ideas and play alone and with others, they are developing the foundation for social competence. This booklet and a companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support nine High/Scope key experiences in initiative and social relations: (1) making and expressing choices, plans,…

  11. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Language and Literacy. [with]Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Nancy A.

    During the preschool years, children experience great strides in their ability to use language. This booklet and companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support six High/Scope key experiences in language and literacy: (1) talking with others about personally meaningful experiences; (2) describing objects, events, and relations;…

  12. Animal Interdependency. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. No organism on Earth can exist independently. Students find out more about animal relationships such as predator/prey relationships and…

  13. Presenting Social Issues with Videotape [and] Teaming Up to Take a Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Diana; Jackson, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the use of media in schools. One describes the use of videotapes to present social issues; the second describes the use of an integrated learning system with ninth and tenth grade at-risk students to improve their rate of attendance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (LRW)

  14. Food Chains. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The food chain provides a clear example of how life continues year after year. Students learn how the cycle of energy starts with the sun,…

  15. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical management of patients with periodontal abscesses attending a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to examine the clinical management of patients who attended a Nigerian teaching hospital with periodontal abscesses. Setting and Design: This is a retrospective study among patients who attended the Periodontics Clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria, between January 2008 and December 2015. Patients and Methods: Information about the diagnosis was obtained from the departmental log book, and case notes were retrieved from record department. Data collection elicited information on age, sex, tribe, frequency of tooth brushing, dental attendance, medical history, clinical features, involved tooth/teeth, and treatment received. Statistical Analysis Used: Epi info version 3.5.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients aged between 15 and 87 years, with a mean age of 35.53 ± 19.30 years. Majority of patients were males, had minor ethnic extractions, had some form of education, first dental clinic attendees, indulged in once-daily toothbrushing, fully dentate, and had fair/poor oral hygiene. A total of 8.8% and 31.6% of the participants smoked cigarettes and consumed alcohol, respectively. A fifth of the participants had systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcer disease. Majority of the participants (91.2% had severe pain. About two-fifths had periodontal abscess around the incisors and the molars. The upper right quadrant was mostly involved (31.6%. Two-fifth of the patients had extraction done. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed periodontal abscess as a severely painful condition in naÏve dental patients, successfully treated mainly through extraction of the implicated tooth/teeth. This implies that oral health awareness and regular dental attendance may prevent its occurrence.

  16. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR PAIN DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS ATTENDING LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL, LAGOS, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweka, O M; Ogundana, O M; Agbelusi, G A

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) is the most common temporomandibular disorder. This condition presents with symptoms of pain, restricted jaw movement and joint noise. Other symptoms include otalgia, headache, neck pain and trismus. To determine the pattern of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome patients managed at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. A descriptive study of patients with signs and symptoms of Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome attending the Oral Medicine Clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Twenty-one patients with Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome were enrolled into the study, out of which 10(48%) were females and 11(52%) were males. The age range was 23-81years with a mean of 45.2 ± 18.9 years. Majority of the patients 20(95.2%) complained of pain around the joint, in the pre-auricular region, in the muscles of mastication and the ear. While 7(35%) complained of clicking sounds, 10(47.6%) complained of pain on mouth opening and during mastication only. In all 5(23.8%) had impaired movement of the jaws, mouth opening was normal in 18(85.7%) but reduced in 3(14.3%) patients. Over half of patients 12(57%) experienced clicking sounds, there was tenderness around the temporomandibular joint in 16(76.2%) cases, pain in the ear of 7(33.3%) patients and 13(61.9%) people presented with tenderness of the muscles of mastication. Conservative management of all the cases resulted in resolution of the symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome has diverse clinical presentation and though distressing, it responds to prompt and effective conservative management.

  17. Characterizing Mathematics Teaching Research Specialists' Mentoring in the Context of Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feishi; Gu, Lingyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how mathematics teaching research specialists mentor practicing teachers during post-lesson debriefs of a lesson study in China. Based on a systematic, fine-grained analysis of 107 h of videotaped mentoring meetings of 20 groups of teachers and teaching research specialists from different elementary schools, this study reveals…

  18. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  19. Prevalence of infection in patients with temporary catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiane de Rezende Ramim Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of infection related to the provisional catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital and evaluate the risk factors associated with these infections.  A cross-sectional study analyzed by descriptive statistics and parametric tests. It was found that out of 129 patients, 48.8 % had catheter-related infection in hemodialysis, 65 % were male, 33.3 % were 60 years old and over, and 88 % of patients were admitted to intensive care unit. The prevalence of infection in this group was high, and the vast majority of diagnoses of infection were empirical. Given this, it is suggested to establish the routine culture of the catheter tip in all cases of suspected catheter infection to improve the quality of patient care, and the relentless pursuit of the causes that trigger the infection process in line with good practice from across the healthcare team.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Food Services in Teaching Hospitals of Tabriz; 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massumeh gholizadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Results of the previous studies indicate that nutrition as one of the basic elements in patient safety is neglected or plays a minor role in treatment process. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction with food services in teaching hospitals of Tabriz University of medical sciences. Materials and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted in teaching hospitals of Tabriz University of medical sciences. A total 314 number of available beds were selected. Data gathering tool was a LIKERT-based researcher–made questionnaire with 15 questions. Validity and reliability of the tool were verified by Delphi method and Cronbach’s alpha test of 0.91. Sample t-test and ANOVA were used to analyze data. Results: This study’s findings declared the minimum satisfaction about hospitals’ food services include: patients’ demands, assistance while eating, the effect of food on improving health conditions, clean appearance of meal services, observing health standards and respect by distributors .The findings revealed a significant difference among different nutritional services in studied hospitals. However, there was not a meaningful relationship between the level of satisfaction and gender, occupation, education and place of residence.  Conclusion : Based on the results of this study, hospital managers are recommended to carry out activities to promote awareness of food services staff regarding food safety programs, employing more nutritionists and their active presence at the patient’s bedside and providing freedom of choice for patients. ​

  1. Prescription Pattern of Analgesic Drugs for Patients Receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Vishma Hydie; Nair, Shoba N; Soumya, M S; Tarey, S D

    2016-01-01

    Drugs used in the palliative care unit for managing symptoms are major contributors toward the expenditure occurring in palliative care. This study was conducted to understand the prescription pattern of analgesic drugs in the patients who are receiving palliative care in a teaching hospital in India by a retrospective study of case records. Case record based, retrospective, descriptive study was conducted at the Pain and Palliative Care Department of St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bengaluru. Case record files of all patients referred to Pain and Palliative Care Department for the treatment of pain in the year of 2012 were studied. Patients' age, gender, diagnoses, numerical pain rating scale (0-10), drugs prescribed, dosage, frequency, route of administration were recorded. The difference in drug utilization between the genders was done using Chi-square test. Data were collected from 502 patients of which 280 (56%) were males and 222 (44%) were females. Twelve percent of patients had mild pain (1-3), 34% had moderate pain (4-6), and 54% had severe pain (7-10). The most commonly used analgesic drugs were opioids (47%), followed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (36%). The opioids used were tramadol (56%), and morphine (38%). Ninety percent of patients with numerical pain scale more than 6 received morphine. There was no difference in analgesic drug utilization with regards to gender. Prescription pattern differed depending on the severity of pain. Opioids were the most commonly used drugs for pain management. The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted.

  2. The effectiveness of using non-traditional teaching methods to prepare student health care professionals for the delivery of mental state examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huiting; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jia; Joon, Kum Eng; Parasuram, Rajni; Gunasekaran, Jamuna; Poh, Chee Lien

    2015-08-14

    validity prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument embedded within the System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion between the reviewers. Data was extracted using data extraction tools developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute Quantitative data was extracted from papers using standardized data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument. The included studies were found to be heterogeneous in terms of participants and teaching methods. Moreover, a wide variety of instruments were used to determine impact and outcomes of the teaching methods. Hence, findings of the included articles were presented in a narrative summary. A total of 12 articles were included in this review with consensus from all reviewers. The evidence retrieved in this study suggests that non-traditional teaching methods, such as videotapes, virtual simulation, standardized patients and reflection, improve learners' understanding and skills of mental state examination as opposed to traditional teaching methods like lectures and provision of reading materials. However, studies that specifically compared the effectiveness of one method over another were limited to comparison between lectures with videotaped interviews and virtual simulations. It was shown that both videotaped interviews and virtual simulations were superior to lectures. In videotaped teaching, interactions between patients and learners performing mental state examination were shown for the learner’s discussion while virtual simulations mimicked patient symptoms in computer applications. Virtual simulation was notably a unique learning opportunity for the learners as it allowed learning to take place without the use of

  3. Students’ Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Holdgaard, Martin Møller; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    ' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed....... Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. CONCLUSION: The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact...... unintended stigma and influence an authoritative approach in medical students towards managing patients in clinical psychiatry....

  4. A trial of patient-oriented problem-solving system for immunology teaching in China: a comparison with dialectic lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Zhiren; Liu Wei; Han Junfeng; Guo Sheng; Wu Yuzhang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The most common teaching method used in China is lecturing, but recently, efforts have been widely undertaken to promote the transition from teacher-centered to student-centered education. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that permits students to work in small groups to solve clinical problems, promotes self-learning, encourages clinical reasoning and develops long-lasting memory. To our best knowledge, however, P...

  5. [The scientific videotape with digital processing in surgery. The new opportunities offered surgery for videotape recording and postprocessing with the use of information and digital technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, N

    1999-01-01

    The facility of the tape recording of a surgical operation, by means of simple manageable apparatuses and at low costs, especially in comparison with the former cinematography, makes it possible for all surgeons to record their own operative activity. Therefore at present the demonstration in video of surgical interventions is very common, but very often the video-tapes show surgical events only in straight chronological succession, as for facts of chronicle news. The simplification of the otherwise sophisticated digital technology of informatics elaboration of images makes more convenient and advisable to assemble the more meaningful sequences for a final product of higher scientific value. The digital technology gives at the best its contribution during the phase of post-production of the video-tape, where the surgeon himself can assemble an end product of more value because aimed to a scientific and rational communication. Thanks to such an elaboration the video-tape can aim not simply to become a good documentary, but also to achieve an educational purpose or becomes a truly scientific film. The initial video will be recorded following a specific project, the script, foreseeing and programming what has to be demonstrated of the surgical operation, establishing therefore in advance the most important steps of the intervention. The sequences recorded will then be assembled not necessarily in a chronological succession but integrating the moving images with static pictures, as drawings, schemes, tables, aside the picture-in picture technique, and besides the vocal descriptive comment. The cinema language has accustomed us to a series of passages among the different sequences as fading, cross-over, "flash-back", aiming to stimulate the psychological associative powers and encourage those critical. The video-tape can be opportunely shortened, paying attention to show only the essential phases of the operation for demonstrate only the core of the problem and utilize

  6. Diagnostic outcome of patients presenting with severe thunderclap headache at saidu teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Khan, P.; Ahmad, K.; Syed, A.

    2008-01-01

    To find out the frequency of patients attending Casualty department of a Teaching Hospital with sudden severe thunderclap headache, their diagnostic out-come and follow up. The study was conducted in Casualty and Medical, Departments of Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif, from January 2006 to December 2006. Out of 22,000 patients with different Medical problems attended Casualty department during study period of which 128 cases had acute severe thunderclap headache. Age range was 15 to 80 years with mean age of 46+-10 years. Seventy eight patients (61%) were female and fifty (39%) were male. Protocol included proper clinical examination, basic laboratory investigations, admission to the General medical ward / Intensive care unit for observation, treatment and follow-up. CT scan of brain and or lumber puncture was performed in all the studied patients. The in-hospital follow up period was from two to fourteen days. The patients were reviewed one month later after discharge from hospital. Out of 120 patients twenty cases (15.6%) had Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) seven patients (5.4%) had Cerebral infarction, five patients (3.9%) had an Intracerebral Haematoma. Five patients (3.9%) had aseptic meningitis. Two cases (1.5%) were reported as cerebral edema. One case (0.8%) had venous sinus thrombosis. As there was no specific finding on investigations and follow up of 88 cases (69%): these were labeled as idiopathic thunder-clap headache. Past history of not more than three similar episodes was present in 33 cases (25.78%). Out of these 33 cases, thirty belonged to the benign group of 88; other three cases had organic causes. Clinical diagnosis of Migraine was made in 37 cases out of these 88 cases. Attack of severe thunderclap headache is not an un-common emergency. Attack due to Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) or other serious underlying disease cannot be distinguished from non specific headaches on clinical grounds alone. It is recommended that all such patients be

  7. Patients characteristics and perception of quality of care in a teaching hospital in Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelumadu, O F; Ndulue, C N

    2012-01-01

    Patients' assessment of quality of health care despite its importance in uptake of available services has not been closely examined in developing countries. The main objective of this study was to assess patient's perception of the quality of healthcare services as offered at the General Outpatients Department (GOPD) of a teaching hospital in order to obtain rational information for effective policy formulation on improved patient care in our hospitals. This was a four-week duration descriptive cross-sectional study involving three hundred and ninety (390) new adult patients seen at the General Out-Patients' Department of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi. Using a self-administered pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire in English language, relevant information was obtained from the participants. A total of 390 adult new patients with mean age 31.4 years participated in the study of which females 216 (55.5%) were slightly more than males 174 (45.5%). About 225 (57.7%) of the respondents received at most a primary school education. The major reasons for seeking care at the GOPD were expectations of being attended to by qualified doctors and nurses (38%); receiving efficient and quality service (36%) and obtaining cheaper and affordable drugs (14.5%). A quarter ofthe patients (25%) waited for up to one hour to register, while 38% spent more than an hour before being attended to by a doctor. Seventy percent (70%) of thepatients opined that the nurses were friendly, 94.5% of the patients rated the doctors as being friendly while 82.5% expressed satisfaction with the care received from the doctors. The conditions of the waiting hall were deemed very comfortable by 42%,and 42% felt hat it was uncomfortable. In all 79% of the patients felt at the quality of care was good and 82% were willing to return for consultations in future if need be. The waiting time for obtaining the patients card and doctors' consultation appeared to be acceptably long in this

  8. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Kathleen; Garnier, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Using the Trends in International Mathematics and Science (TIMSS) video study, the authors compare science teaching practices in the United States and in four other countries that outperformed the United States: Australia, the Czech Republic, Japan, and the Netherlands. Their observations of videotapes from 100 8th-grade science lessons in each…

  9. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte; Mors, Ole; Ringsted, Charlotte; Morcke, Anne Mette

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed interviews. Students taught with text-based patient cases emphasized excitement and drama towards the personal clinical narratives presented by the teachers during the course, but never referred to the patient cases. Authority and boundary setting were regarded as important in managing patients. Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact on students' patient-centeredness. Video-based patient cases are probably more effective than text-based patient cases in fostering patient-centered perspectives in medical students. Teachers sharing stories from their own clinical experiences stimulates both engagement and excitement, but may also provoke unintended stigma and influence an authoritative approach in medical students towards managing patients in clinical psychiatry.

  10. Sugar or high fructose corn syrup-what should nurses teach patients and families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Linda L; Dalby, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    There is lack of consensus in the lay literature to support consumption of table sugar as a preferred sweetener when compared to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The purpose of this study was to search the literature for evidence to determine the health effects of consumption of table sugar (sucrose) and HFCS on blood glucose, lipid levels, obesity, and appetite as well as to make recommendations for patient and family teaching of those at risk for developing negative health outcomes, including coronary heart disease. Nursing and health-related databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and Health and Wellness were searched for research articles, which were compared and evaluated for purpose, sample size, procedure, findings, and level of evidence. Five studies that met inclusion criteria were evaluated. No difference was found in changes in blood glucose levels, lipid levels, or appetite between table sugar consumption and HFCS consumption. When only fructose was consumed, lipid levels were significantly increased. The evidence suggests that fructose, found in both table sugar and HFCS, has a negative effect on health outcomes. Clinicians should teach patients and families that all sugar consumption should be closely monitored and kept below the 40 g/day recommended by the World Health Organization. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Evaluation of APACHE II system among intensive care patients at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio Chiavone

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The high-complexity features of intensive care unit services and the clinical situation of patients themselves render correct prognosis fundamentally important not only for patients, their families and physicians, but also for hospital administrators, fund-providers and controllers. Prognostic indices have been developed for estimating hospital mortality rates for hospitalized patients, based on demographic, physiological and clinical data. OBJECTIVE: The APACHE II system was applied within an intensive care unit to evaluate its ability to predict patient outcome; to compare illness severity with outcomes for clinical and surgical patients; and to compare the recorded result with the predicted death rate. DESIGN: Diagnostic test. SETTING: Clinical and surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary-care teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: The study involved 521 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit from July 1998 to June 1999. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: APACHE II score, in-hospital mortality, receiver operating characteristic curve, decision matrices and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 50 ± 19 years and the APACHE II score was 16.7 ± 7.3. There were 166 clinical patients (32%, 173 (33% post-elective surgery patients (33%, and 182 post-emergency surgery patients (35%, thus producing statistically similar proportions. The APACHE II scores for clinical patients (18.5 ± 7.8 were similar to those for non-elective surgery patients (18.6 ± 6.5 and both were greater than for elective surgery patients (13.0 ± 6.3 (p < 0.05. The higher this score was, the higher the mortality rate was (p < 0.05. The predicted death rate was 25.6% and the recorded death rate was 35.5%. Through the use of receiver operating curve analysis, good discrimination was found (area under the curve = 0.80. From the 2 x 2 decision matrix, 72.2% of patients were correctly classified (sensitivity = 35.1%; specificity = 92.6%. Linear

  12. A Web-based Game for Teaching Facial Expressions to Schizophrenic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülkesen, Kemal Hakan; Isleyen, Filiz; Cinemre, Buket; Samur, Mehmet Kemal; Sen Kaya, Semiha; Zayim, Nese

    2017-07-12

    Recognizing facial expressions is an important social skill. In some psychological disorders such as schizophrenia, loss of this skill may complicate the patient's daily life. Prior research has shown that information technology may help to develop facial expression recognition skills through educational software and games. To examine if a computer game designed for teaching facial expressions would improve facial expression recognition skills of patients with schizophrenia. We developed a website composed of eight serious games. Thirty-two patients were given a pre-test composed of 21 facial expression photographs. Eighteen patients were in the study group while 14 were in the control group. Patients in the study group were asked to play the games on the website. After a period of one month, we performed a post-test for all patients. The median score of the correct answers was 17.5 in the control group whereas it was 16.5 in the study group (of 21) in pretest. The median post-test score was 18 in the control group (p=0.052) whereas it was 20 in the study group (pgames may be used for the purpose of educating people who have difficulty in recognizing facial expressions.

  13. Teaching and testing physical examination skills without the use of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Bernard; Thornton, William; Frye, Ann W

    2002-07-01

    To design a cardiopulmonary physical exam curriculum that does not involve the use of patients. Bedside teaching is becoming a lost art, and the use of alternative methods of instruction such as simulation has become increasingly important. Simulators have been shown to enhance physical examination skills of students and physicians in training.(1) In 1995, a program was started to improve cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis and the teaching of auscultation at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB). The teaching manikin "Harvey" played a vital role in the development of the new curriculum. In 1997, UTMB adopted an organ-based approach to the basic science curriculum. The cardiopulmonary module in the basic science curriculum was a ten-week course taught in the second year of medical school. The physical diagnosis section of that course involved six instructional hours; four of the six hours were dedicated to cardiac auscultation and two hours to pulmonary auscultation. Only simulators and CD-ROMs were used for instruction. The 184 second-year medical students at UTMB were formed into small groups for instruction and practice. Although "Harvey" was an effective teaching tool, other simulators had to be developed for testing students' skills after instruction. It would be very difficult to administer a skills OSCE for 184 students without the development of several smaller transportable simulators. A commercially available blood pressure simulator from the Medical Plastics Laboratory, Inc., Gatesville, TX, was used to test the accuracy of students' blood pressure readings. Small auscultation transducers combined with a palpable pulse simulator, developed by one of the authors (WT) in collaboration with Andries Acoustics, Spicewood, TX, were used to efficiently test students' proficiency in cardiopulmonary auscultation. Digital simulated cardiopulmonary sounds were recorded onto a standard CD-ROM mini-disc and transmitted to the small transducers

  14. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  15. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (Pimportance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  17. A trial of patient-oriented problem-solving system for immunology teaching in China: a comparison with dialectic lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The most common teaching method used in China is lecturing, but recently, efforts have been widely undertaken to promote the transition from teacher-centered to student-centered education. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that permits students to work in small groups to solve clinical problems, promotes self-learning, encourages clinical reasoning and develops long-lasting memory. To our best knowledge, however, POPS has never been applied in teaching immunology in China. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching immunology and assess students’ and teachers’ perception to POPS. Methods 321 second-year medical students were divided into two groups: I and II. Group I, comprising 110 students, was taught by POPS, and 16 immunology teachers witnessed the whole teaching process. Group II including the remaining 211 students was taught through traditional lectures. The results of the pre- and post-test of both groups were compared. Group I students and teachers then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis before a discussion meeting attended only by the teachers was held. Results Significant improvement in the mean difference between the pre- and post-test scores of those in Groups I and II was seen, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS teaching. Most students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps them to understand topics and creates interest, and 88.12% of students favored POPS over simple lectures. Moreover, while they responded that POPS facilitated student learning better than lectures, teachers pointed out that limited teaching resources would make it difficult for wide POPS application in China. Conclusions While POPS can break up the monotony of dialectic lectures and serve as a better teaching method, it may not be feasible for the current educational environment in China. The main reason for this is the relative shortage of teaching

  18. A trial of patient-oriented problem-solving system for immunology teaching in China: a comparison with dialectic lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiren; Liu, Wei; Han, Junfeng; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-01-28

    The most common teaching method used in China is lecturing, but recently, efforts have been widely undertaken to promote the transition from teacher-centered to student-centered education. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that permits students to work in small groups to solve clinical problems, promotes self-learning, encourages clinical reasoning and develops long-lasting memory. To our best knowledge, however, POPS has never been applied in teaching immunology in China. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching immunology and assess students' and teachers' perception to POPS. 321 second-year medical students were divided into two groups: I and II. Group I, comprising 110 students, was taught by POPS, and 16 immunology teachers witnessed the whole teaching process. Group II including the remaining 211 students was taught through traditional lectures. The results of the pre- and post-test of both groups were compared. Group I students and teachers then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis before a discussion meeting attended only by the teachers was held. Significant improvement in the mean difference between the pre- and post-test scores of those in Groups I and II was seen, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS teaching. Most students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps them to understand topics and creates interest, and 88.12% of students favored POPS over simple lectures. Moreover, while they responded that POPS facilitated student learning better than lectures, teachers pointed out that limited teaching resources would make it difficult for wide POPS application in China. While POPS can break up the monotony of dialectic lectures and serve as a better teaching method, it may not be feasible for the current educational environment in China. The main reason for this is the relative shortage of teaching resources such as space, library facilities

  19. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in patients at a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin-Taleb, Ali K.; Razzaq, Riyadh A.; Al-Kathiri, Zaki O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to explore and analyze the current status in management of patients with perforated peptic ulcers (PPU). A retrospective study carried out at the Surgical Department, Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, Yemen. Patients admitted with perforated benign peptic ulcers from January 1997 to December 2006 were included in the study. A total of 156 patients, 138 (88.5%) male and 18 (11.5%) female, with an overall mean age of 39.08 years (range 14-75 years) and a higher frequency of PPU were noted in patients 21-40 years (58.3%). The perforated duodenal ulcer and perforated gastric ulcer ratio was 4.8:1. The mean time of presentation was 16.5 hours, and operative intervention after admission was 5.25 hours. Simple perforation closure was used in 91.7% of the patients. Postoperative complication rate was 41% (statistically significant in cases admitted later than 12 hours) wound sepsis making the majority at 55.2%, 6 deaths (3.9%), the correlation with presentation time was not significant. The overall mean post-operative hospitalization period was 12.76 days; 14.7% of the patients stayed more than 3 weeks. Younger patients (21-40 years) were frequently affected. Emphasis should be placed on shortening the time to surgery. Simple closure remains the selected treatment in the majority of patients. Overall post-operative mortality was low (3.9%). Improving the surgical skills, wound care, administrative regulations, hospital environment and the equipments are needed to reduce the high rate of complications. (author)

  20. Management of perforated peptic ulcer in patients at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Taleb, Ali K; Razzaq, Riyadh A; Al-Kathiri, Zaki O

    2008-02-01

    To explore and analyze the current status in management of patients with perforated peptic ulcers (PPU). A retrospective study carried out at the Surgical Department, Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, Yemen. Patients admitted with perforated benign peptic ulcers from January 1997 to December 2006 were included in the study. A total of 156 patients, 138 (88.5%) male and 18 (11.5%) female, with an overall mean age of 39.08 years (range 14-75 years) and a higher frequency of PPU was noted in patients 21-40 years (58.3%). The perforated duodenal ulcer and perforated gastric ulcer ratio was 4.38:1. The mean time of presentation was 16.5 hours, and operative intervention after admission was 5.25 hours. Simple perforation closure was used in 91.7% of the patients. Postoperative complication rate was 41% (statistically significant in cases admitted later than 12 hours), wound sepsis making the majority at 55.2%, 6 deaths (3.9%), the correlation with presentation time was not significant. The overall mean post-operative hospitalization period was 12.76 days; 14.7% of the patients stayed more than 3 weeks. Younger patients (21-40 years) were frequently affected. Emphasis should be placed on shortening the time to surgery. Simple closure remains the selected treatment in the majority of patients. Overall post-operative mortality was low (3.9%). Improving the surgical skills, wound care, administrative regulations, hospital environment, and equipment are needed to reduce the high rate of complications.

  1. Effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtak, Mohammad; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Rjaei-Khiavi, Abdollah

    2017-10-01

    Many of the cognitive behavioral models and therapeutic protocols developed so far for psychological disorders and chronic diseases have proved effective through clinical research. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients. This controlled clinical trial study was conducted in 2015 with 76 patients selected by census and treated with a hemodialysis machine in the dialysis department of Vali-Asr Hospital in the city of Meshkinshahr. A total of four patients were excluded because of their critical conditions while the rest, who were recruited, were randomly divided into two equal groups of 36 patients as the intervention and control groups. First, the locus of control was measured in both groups through a pretest, and cognitive-behavioral techniques were then taught to the intervention group during eight 45 to 90-minute sessions. The locus of control in patients of both groups was finally re-measured through a posttest. Data were collected using Rotter's Locus of Control Inventory. The Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were respectively used in SPSS18 for data analysis. In the pretest and posttest stages respectively, 4.8% and 14.3% of samples in the control group as well as 14.3% and 33.3% of samples in the intervention group enjoyed internal locus of control. The difference between the pretest and posttest scores of internal locus of control in the intervention group was significant (p=0.004), which indicates the positive effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapeutic intervention on internalization of locus of control in this group. Given the external locus of control in most of the study patients and also the positive significant effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy on internalization of locus of control in this group of patients, it appears necessary to have a psychology resident present in the hemodialysis department to teach the necessary cognitive

  2. Evaluation of Patient-Oriented Standards of Joint Commission International in Gilan and Mazandaran Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaseminejhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Medical tourism, a multi-million-dollar industry, has had a significant effect in economic flourishing, creating jobs, and preventing the outflow of currency. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, according to joint commission international (JCI standards. Methods This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during year 2015. To collect data and evaluate the hospitals, patient-oriented standards of JCI was applied. Results Amongst the eight standards, international patient safety goals (IPSG (with a score of 87.5% had the highest, and patient and family education (PFE (with a score of 53.75% had the lowest score. Hospital “4” with a score of 90.41%, had the highest, and hospital “7” with 58.90%, had the lowest rate of compliance to the standards. According to the Mann-Whitney test, the observed statistics considering a P value of ≤ 0.05 level, was not significant, therefore on a 95% certainty level, there was no significant difference between hospitals in Gilan and Mazandaran, regarding compliance with standards. Overall, the hospitals under study were relatively prepared for attracting medical tourists. Conclusions According to the results, it seems that more planning and implementation of projects is required to strengthen the axes of the joint commission regarding accreditation of hospitals and attraction of medical tourists to these centers, especially foreign tourists. Researchers are recommended to pay special attention to the university of medical sciences of two provinces for the establishment of standards and utilization of professional consultants.

  3. Association between placental abruption and caesarean section among patients at Khyber teaching hospital Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, S.; Jamal, T.; Rana, G.E.; Majid, A.; Iqbal, M.; Abrar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ante partum haemorrhage remains to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. 30 percentage of this haemorrhage is attributed to placental abruption. Along with other adverse maternal outcomes, it increases the risk of Caesarean sections in patients, which is a public health concern. This study was conducted to find out whether any significant association exists between placental abruption and C-section in our set up. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 26th, 2011 to May 1st, 2013 (i.e., 21 months) in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar on a sample of 334 patients who presented with antepartum haemorrhage after 28 weeks of gestation. All those patients with and without placental abruption were followed throughout pregnancy and labour to detect the risk of caesarean section. Results: Among study participants, parity had the highest dispersion while gestational age had the lowest. Caesarean section was performed on 26.3 percentage (95 percentage CI) of the study participants. Proportion of placental abruption among patients presenting with ante partum haemorrhage was 20.6 percentage, (95 percentage CI) out of which 7.5 percentage underwent C-section. Association between placental abruption and C-section was found significant at a=0.05 (ρ=0.03). Conclusion: Risk of caesarean section is increased in pregnancies complicated by placental abruption as compared to pregnancies complicated by other causes of ante partum haemorrhage. (author)

  4. Sickness absence among depressed patients attending the General Out Patients Department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goar, G S; Moses, D A; Micheal, T A

    2013-01-01

    Depression has been associated with low productivity and long absence from work. This has a serious consequence for the individuals, the employer and the society. The objectives of this study were to determine sickness absence from work among depressed patients attending General Out Patients Department (GOPD) in the preceding 12 months, to assess socio-demographic correlates of sickness absence in these patients and lastly, to determine the effect of depression on perception of work performance. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study among 200 consecutive patients attending the General Out Patients Department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital from November 2006 to March 2007. A semi-structured questionnaire designed by the authors was used to collect socio-demographic variables, self-reported perception of work and sickness absence days in the 12 months prior to the study. Depression was assessed using Structured clinical Interview for DSM- IV (SCID) axis 1 disorder. A total of 51(25.4%) of the 200 patients met the DSM IV diagnostic criteria for major depression. The depressed respondents significantly had higher mean and cumulative days of sickness absence compared to the non-depressed (p marital status (p = 0.867) were associated with sickness absence. Older age (P = 0.001) was associated with sickness absence in the non-depressed while gender (p = 0.117), and marital status (p = 0.752) were not. Having a diagnosis of depression was associated with poor work performance compared with the non-depressed (p productivity and toprevent long spells of sickness absence.

  5. PATIENT'S PERCEPTION ON THE QUALITY OF RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES IN TWO TEACHING HOSPITALS IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowunmi, Anthonia C; Fatiregun, Omolara Amina; Alabi, Adewumi O; Zaccheus, Ibitoye A; Kingsley, Irurhe A; Oyedeji, S A

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. A review of quality of services from the patient's perspective could be a method of assessing in order to improve services and achieve total quality management. This study was designed to assess patients' perception on the quality of Radiotherapy services in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Lagos and University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan. This study is a cross-sectional study. This research lasted for a period of two months and all patients receiving radiotherapy within is period were included in this study. A total of 246 questionnaires were completed (152 and 94 in LUTH and UCH respectively) and the data collection was by semi-structured questionnaire. Data obtained were collected and analyzed using SPSS statistics [Social Sciences Statistical Package] 17.0 version. The findings of this research indicated that 68.4% in LUTH and 53.2% in UCH of the patients experienced good care. It also revealed that there is good interaction between the staff and the patient. Most of the patients spent more than 3 hours before receiving treatment and also the reason for such delay were not explained to them. The rate of preferential treatment was noted to be high. This study will contribute positively towards achieving effective and qualitative radiotherapy services by creating awareness for the need to minimize patient waiting time as well as the need to explain the reason for such delays. The department should adopt better ways of appointment system so that treatment will be on first come first serve basis. This study will contribute positively towards achieving effective and qualitative radiotherapy services by creating awareness for the need to minimize patient waiting time

  6. Math Is More than Numbers: Beginning Bilingual Teachers' Mathematics Teaching Practices and Their Opportunities to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Cathery

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author provides results from a 3-year, longitudinal study that examined two novice bilingual teachers' mathematics teaching practices and their professional opportunities to learn to teach. Primary data sources included videotaped mathematics lessons, teacher interviews, and field notes of their teacher preparation methods…

  7. Teaching methotrexate self-injection with a web-based video maintains patient care while reducing healthcare resources: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Leung, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare standard nurse-led methotrexate self-injection patient education to a web-based methotrexate self-injection education video in conjunction with standard teaching on patient self-confidence for self-injection, as well as patient satisfaction, patient knowledge and teaching time. Consecutive rheumatology patients seen for methotrexate self-injection education were enrolled. Prior to education, patient self-confidence for self-injection, age, gender and education were recorded. Patients were randomized 1:1 to standard teaching or the intervention: a 12-min methotrexate self-injection education video followed by further in-person nurse education. Patients recorded their post-education confidence for self-injection, satisfaction with the teaching process and answered four specific questions testing knowledge on methotrexate self-injection. The time spent providing direct education to the patient was recorded. Twenty-nine patients participated in this study: 15 had standard (C) teaching and 14 were in the intervention group (I). Average age, gender and education level were similar in both groups. Both groups were satisfied with the quality of teaching. There was no difference in pre-confidence (C = 5.5/10 vs. I = 4.7/10, p = 0.44) or post-confidence (C = 8.8, I = 8.8, p = 0.93) between the groups. There was a trend toward improved patient knowledge in the video group versus the standard group (C = 4.7/6, I = 5.5/6, p = 0.15). Nurse teaching time was less in the video group (C = 60 min, I = 44 min, p = 0.012), with men requiring longer education time than women across all groups. An education video may be a good supplement to standard in-person nurse teaching for methotrexate self-injection. It equals the standard teaching practise with regard to patient satisfaction, confidence and knowledge while decreasing teaching time by 25 %.

  8. The pattern of neurological disorders in patients admitted to El shaab teaching hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Taj Eldin Hag Osman [Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1999-07-01

    This thesis was designed to study the pattern of neurological disorders of admitted patients to the neurology centre at El shaab teaching hospital in the period from january 1997 to december 1998. 402 cases were admitted. (35%) were in the age group 21-40, 30% in 41-60, 20% in 61-80, 14% in 0-20 and 1% in >81 males constituted 72% and females 28%. Cerebrovascular diseases top the list with 18.9%, followed by paraplegia's with 17.4%, peripheral neuropathies 11.7, (guillain barre was the most common). Brain space occupying lesions 10.4% (tumors and tuberculomas was the most common),movement disorders with 10% (Parkinson's disease was the most encountered), muscle disorders 6.2% (myasthenia gravis was the commonest). Ataxias 5.5%, headache and migraine was the least group of disorders.

  9. The pattern of neurological disorders in patients admitted to El shaab teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Taj Eldin Hag Osman

    1999-01-01

    This thesis was designed to study the pattern of neurological disorders of admitted patients to the neurology centre at El shaab teaching hospital in the period from january 1997 to december 1998. 402 cases were admitted. (35%) were in the age group 21-40, 30% in 41-60, 20% in 61-80, 14% in 0-20 and 1% in >81 males constituted 72% and females 28%. Cerebrovascular diseases top the list with 18.9%, followed by paraplegia's with 17.4%, peripheral neuropathies 11.7, (guillain barre was the most common). Brain space occupying lesions 10.4% (tumors and tuberculomas was the most common),movement disorders with 10% (Parkinson's disease was the most encountered), muscle disorders 6.2% (myasthenia gravis was the commonest). Ataxias 5.5%, headache and migraine was the least group of disorders

  10. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP) - Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Henrike; Freytag, Julia; Sonntag, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long) for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts. Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects) were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester. Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training. Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers' self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  11. Intestinal parasitosis and shigellosis among diarrheal patients in Gondar teaching hospital, northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huruy Kahsay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal diseases are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing world. Understanding the etiologic agents of diarrheal diseases and their association with socio-demographic characteristics of patients would help to design better preventive measures. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria in diarrheic patients. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 384 consecutive diarrheal patients who visited Gondar teaching hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia from October 2006 to March 2007 was conducted. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria following standard parasitological and microbiological procedures. Results Intestinal parasites were diagnosed in 36.5% of the patients. The most frequently encountered protozoan parasite was Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.3% followed by Giardia lamblia (5.0%, Cryptosporidium parvum (1.8% and Isospora belli (1.3%. The dominant helminthic parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (5.5% followed by Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni (3.1% each, hookworm infection (1.8%, and Hymenolepis species (1.3%. Multiple infections of intestinal parasites were also observed in 6.3% of the patients. Among the enteropathogenic bacteria Shigella and Salmonella species were isolated from 15.6% and 1.6%, respectively, of the patients. Escherichia coli O57:H7 was not found in any of the stool samples tested. Eighty eight percent and 83.3% of the Shigella and Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more commonly used antibiotics, respectively. Intestinal parasitosis was higher in patients who live in rural area, in patients who were washing their hands after visiting toilet either irregularly with soap and without soap or not at all, in patients who used well and spring water for household consumption, and in patients who had nausea (P P Conclusions The high

  12. Using newly deceased patients in teaching clinical skills: its ethical and educational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Mahboobeh; Enjoo, Seyed Ali; Mahboudi, Ali; Tabei, Seyed Ziaadin

    2018-04-01

    The newly deceased patients have long been used in medical schools to teach clinical skills without any challenges as it helps to train skilled doctors. Nowadays, the use of moulages and simulators are common in teaching clinical skills since these tools provide the opportunity for frequent practice without any pain and injury. There are specific procedures which still require the use of cadavers. However, the increased significance of patient rights has generally challenged the practicality of using the deceased bodies for this purpose. This study was designed with the aim of determining to what extent clinical skill training is dependent on the recently deceased patients. This was a cross-sectional mixed-method triangulation design conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a researcher-made questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data of the medical students and residents. The data were used to assess the frequency of experience. In the second stage, semi-structured interviews were conducted with faculty members and fellows in order to evaluate the educational impact of this type of procedure and the influential factors. The quantitative data were analyzed using statistical software, and the qualitative codes were extracted following a content analysis. Finally, a comparative analysis was performed. Twenty five residents (26%) and seven medical students (14%) had the experience of performing procedures on the recently deceased patients for training purposes. About half of the residents and 33% of the medical students had observed their colleagues practicing procedures on cadavers. In the qualitative phase, the main categories included professional ethics, law and educational requirements. A relatively low number of medical students and residents had experienced procedures on the newly deceased patients. In this regard, ethical, religious and legal concerns might have played a part despite the desire to learn. It would be effective to direct these

  13. Sleep quality assessment in 35 Parkinson's disease patients in the Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, B; Diop, M S; Sangare, M; Dembele, K; Cisse, L; Kone, O; Seck, L B; Landoure, G; Guinto, C O; Ndiaye, M; Ndiaye, M M

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disorders are diverse in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the quality of sleep in patients with Parkinson's disease in an African population. In a transversal and prospective study from April to June 2014, all parkinsonian patients followed at the Fann Teaching Hospital Neurology Clinic (Dakar, Senegal) were assessed using the Hoehn and Yahr's scale and filled out the following questionnaires: Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A PDSS score5 indicated poor quality or impaired sleep. An ESS score>10 indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. We used the Pearson coefficient to search for correlation between age, disease stage, disease duration, and the importance of sleep impairment. Hoehn and Yahr staging was 2.42±0.90 in the 35 patients (60% male, mean age 65.7±7.4years, disease duration 32.4±23.4months). The mean total PDSS score was 99.5±24.1 and 74.3% of the patients had an abnormally high PSQI score, indicating high frequency and intensity of sleep disorders. Most frequent disorders were pain or cramps interrupting sleep, night waking to urinate and fatigue or sleepiness on waking. Patients exhibited excessive diurnal sleepiness in 22.9% of the cases; they often had an abnormal PSQI score. Both the total PDSS score and the difficulty to sleep increased with disease stage, but not with age or disease duration. We found evidence of major alteration of sleep quality in Senegalese Parkinson patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. A standardized patient model to teach and assess professionalism and communication skills: the effect of personality type on performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing professionalism and interpersonal communication skills can be more difficult for surgical residency programs than teaching medical knowledge or patient care, for which many structured educational curricula and assessment tools exist. Residents often learn these skills indirectly, by observing the behavior of their attendings when communicating with patients and colleagues. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of an educational curriculum we created to teach and assess our residents in professionalism and communication. We assessed resident and faculty prior education in delivering bad news to patients. Residents then participated in a standardized patient (SP) encounter to deliver bad news to a patient's family regarding a severe burn injury. Residents received feedback from the encounter and participated in an education curriculum on communication skills and professionalism. As a part of this curriculum, residents underwent assessment of communication style using the Myers-Briggs type inventory. The residents then participated in a second SP encounter discussing a severe pulmonary embolus with a patient's family. Resident performance on the SP evaluation correlated with an increased comfort in delivering bad news. Comfort in delivering bad news did not correlate with the amount of prior education on the topic for either residents or attendings. Most of our residents demonstrated an intuitive thinking style (NT) on the Myers-Briggs type inventory, very different from population norms. The lack of correlation between comfort in delivering bad news and prior education on the subject may indicate the difficulty in imparting communication and professionalism skills to residents effectively. Understanding communication style differences between our residents and the general population can help us teach professionalism and communication skills more effectively. With the next accreditation system, residency programs would need to

  15. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  16. Clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Akpan, N.A.; Essien, I.O.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is emerging as a major health challenge with the incidence and prevalence of the disease on the increase. It also contributes to overall morbidity and mortality with complications like cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and lower extremity amputation. There are few local studies on the clinical characteristics of the disease in our wet up and this study therefore set out to characterize the clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients in a health facility in Nigeria. It is a cross sectional, descriptive study carried out at the diabetes clinic of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and September 2008. Data obtained included age, sex, anthropometric indices, symptomatology, co-morbidities, complications and treatment of diabetes. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. A total of two hundred and seventy patients were studied (120 males, 150 females). About 89.2% were Type 2 DM patients and majority of the study subjects were overweight. Diabetic neuropathy was the commonest complication present in 38.8% of the subjects. Polyuria was the commonest symptom and hypertension the commonest comorbidity. Majority of the subjects were on oral hypolgycaemic agents for the management of their disease with the sulphonyureas and biguanides being the most common medication that was taken by them. A few of the patients were also taking herbal medication for treatment of their disease. Majority of the patients presenting in our facility have Type 2 diabetes, were hypertensive and overweight. Hypertension was the commonest co-morbidity and diabetic neuropathy the commonest complication. Adequate health education, subsidies on medications and proper funding of the health sector is necessary to stem the tide of the burden attributable to the disease. (author)

  17. "Chase CRP", "Review patient": Improving the Quality of Weekend Medical Handover at a London Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifuddin, Aamir; Magee, Lucia; Barrett, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Clinical handover has been identified as a "major preventable cause of harm" by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP). Whilst working at a London teaching hospital from August 2013, we noted substandard weekend handover of medical patients. The existing pro forma was filled incompletely by day doctors so it was difficult for weekend colleagues to identify unwell patients, with inherent safety implications. Furthermore, on-call medical staff noted that poor accessibility of vital information in patients' files was affecting acute clinical management. We audited the pro formas over a six week period (n=83) and the Friday ward round (WR) entries for medical inpatients over two weekends (n=84) against the RCP's handover guidance. The results showed poor documentation of several important details on the pro formas, for example, ceiling of care (4%) and past medical history (PMH) (23%). Problem lists were specified on 62% of the WR entries. We designed new handover pro formas and 'Friday WR sheets' to provide prompts for this information and used Medical Meetings and emails to explain the project's aims. Re-audit demonstrated significant improvement in all parameters; for instance, PMH increased to 52% on the pro formas. Only 10% of Friday WR entries used our sheet. However, when used, outcomes were much better, for example, problem list documentation increased to 100%. In conclusion, our interventions improved the provision of crucial information needed to prioritise and manage patients over the weekend. Future work should further highlight the importance of safe handover to all doctors to induce a shift in culture and optimise patient care.

  18. Learning to care: medical students’ reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Borgstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Methods Two studies have explored students’ perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Results Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1 dedicated time with patients, (2 learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3 practicing communication skills, and (4 learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. Conclusion It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these

  19. Patient dose assessment from fluoroscopic procedures at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyekye, P. K.

    2008-06-01

    Organ and effective dose to ninety (90) patients undergoing myelogram, urethrogram, barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema examinations at the KorIe-Bu Teaching Hospital was estimated using the Monte Carlo Code (PCXMC). Free in air measurements were made with a calibrated ionisation chamber to estimate the entrance surface air kerma for each examination. Evaluation of fluoroscopy beam on time and number of radiographs taken per patient was done for all the examinations considered and studies were done on how they affect patient dose. Dose area product (DAP) was calculated from the entrance surface air kerma and the area of the beam on the surface of the patient and compared with internationally accepted reference levels. Excess relative risk of site specific solid cancer and all solid cancers excluding thyroid and Non-melanoma skin cancers incidences were estimated for the various examinations using Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII Committee risk model from the knowledge of the mean effective doses for each examination. The mean effective dose was found to be 0.29 :±: 0.07 mSv for urethrogram, 0.84:±: 0.13 mSv for barium swallow, 3.15 :±: 0.44 mSv for barium meal, 6.24 :±: 0.7 mSv for barium enema and 0.38 :I: 0.05 mSv for myelogram examinations. The estimated mean dose area product (DAP) was found to be 3.55 :±: 0.95 Gycm2 for urethrogram, 16.44:1: 2.60 Gycm2 for barium swallow, 50.81 :±: 7.04 Gycm2 for barium meal, 99.69 :±: 10.85 Gycm2 for barium enema and 9.32 :±: 0.99 Gycm2 for myelogram examinations. The estimated excess relative risk for the occurrence of all solid cancer was found to be 9.5700E-S and 1.6530E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing urethrogram examination, 2.7720E-4 and 4.7880E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing barium swallow examination, 1.0395E-3 and 1.7955E-3 for males and females respectively undergoing barium meal examination, 2.0592E-3 and 3.5568E-3 for males and females respectively

  20. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching of Patient-Centered Interviewing for Early Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Stacey; Talisman, Nicholas; Pennestri, Susan; Syverson, Eleri; Arthur, Paige; Vovides, Yianna

    2018-06-01

    Effective strategies for teaching communication skills to health professions students are needed. This article describes the design and evaluation of immersive and interactive video simulations for medical students to practice basic communication skills. Three simulations were developed, focusing on patient-centered interviewing techniques such as using open-ended questions, reflections, and empathic responses while assessing a patient's history of present illness. First-year medical students were randomized to simulation or education-as-usual arms. Students in the simulation arm were given access to three interactive video simulations developed using Articulate Storyline, an e-learning authoring tool, to practice and receive feedback on patient-centered interviewing techniques to prepare for their Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Trained raters evaluated videos of two OSCE cases for each participant to assess specific communication skills used during the history of present illness component of the interview. Eighty-seven percent of the students in the simulation arm interacted with at least one simulation during the history of present illness. For both OSCE cases, students in the simulation arm asked significantly more open-ended questions. Students in the simulation arm asked significantly fewer closed-ended questions and offered significantly more empathic responses in one OSCE case. No differences were found for reflections. Students reported that the simulations helped improve their communication skills. The use of interactive video simulations was found to be feasible to incorporate into the curriculum and was appealing to students. In addition, students in the simulation arm displayed more behaviors consistent with the patient-centered interviewing model practiced in the simulations. Continued development and research are warranted.

  1. Nutritional Assessment in Elderly Hospitalized Patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ghorbani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nutritional status in the elderly is an important issue in developing countries has been little attention to it. It results from complex interaction between personal and environmental factors that have a considerable effect on mortality, morbidity and quality of life of elderly people especially the hospitalized ones. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional status in elderly hospitalized patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals and know Influential factors to plan appropriate programs for improving their health. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study 233 elderly (151 women and 171 men aging more than 60 years, hospitalized in two hospitals in Qazvin city were studied. Nutritional status were evaluated using Mini Nutritional Assessment, The nutritional status was classified into: malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. Results: Among the assessed elderly 29.8% were well nourish, 13.4% malnourished and 42.95 at risk of malnutrition. There was more malnutrition in females compared to males (25.8% vs 7.2 P=23(62.5% vs. 12.6% P<0.001, Statistical analysis of the studied variables showed that nutritional status were significantly associated with Age, BMI, WC and WHR Conclusion: This study confirms a high prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized elderly patients. The assessment of nutritional status with MNA that can facilitate evaluation of the nutritional status of elderly individuals in hospitals

  2. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient pteaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A trial of patient-oriented problem-solving system for immunology teaching in China: a comparison with dialectic lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common teaching method used in China is lecturing, but recently, efforts have been widely undertaken to promote the transition from teacher-centered to student-centered education. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS system is an innovative teaching-learning method that permits students to work in small groups to solve clinical problems, promotes self-learning, encourages clinical reasoning and develops long-lasting memory. To our best knowledge, however, POPS has never been applied in teaching immunology in China. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching immunology and assess students’ and teachers’ perception to POPS. Methods 321 second-year medical students were divided into two groups: I and II. Group I, comprising 110 students, was taught by POPS, and 16 immunology teachers witnessed the whole teaching process. Group II including the remaining 211 students was taught through traditional lectures. The results of the pre- and post-test of both groups were compared. Group I students and teachers then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis before a discussion meeting attended only by the teachers was held. Results Significant improvement in the mean difference between the pre- and post-test scores of those in Groups I and II was seen, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS teaching. Most students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps them to understand topics and creates interest, and 88.12% of students favored POPS over simple lectures. Moreover, while they responded that POPS facilitated student learning better than lectures, teachers pointed out that limited teaching resources would make it difficult for wide POPS application in China. Conclusions While POPS can break up the monotony of dialectic lectures and serve as a better teaching method, it may not be feasible for the current educational environment in China. The main reason for this is the

  4. Combining Simulated Patients and Simulators: Pilot Study of Hybrid Simulation in Teaching Cardiac Auscultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Hendrik; Weissenstein, Anne; Ligges, Sandra; Möller, David; Becker, Jan C.; Marschall, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Auscultation torsos are widely used to teach position-dependent heart sounds and murmurs. To provide a more realistic teaching experience, both whole body auscultation mannequins and torsos have been used in clinical examination skills training at the Medical Faculty of the University of Muenster since the winter term of 2008-2009. This training…

  5. The Effect of Maternal Teaching Talk on Children's Emergent Literacy as a Function of Type of Activity and Maternal Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which maternal education affects mothers' teaching talk level as a function of activity (book reading vs. looking at a family photo album), and the contribution of maternal teaching talk level during these activities to 88 five- to six-year old children's emergent literacy. Videotaped mother-child interactions…

  6. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  7. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  8. Methods and results of implementing a commercially available videotaped health physics training program in a multi-disciplined DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia, a prime contractor for DOE, is a multi-disciplined research and development laboratory. Its various activities include the operations of two nuclear reactors, several multi-kilocurie gamma irradiation facilities, a transuranic hot cell facility, various and numerous particle accelerators and x-ray generators, and many other areas involving employees working with or around radioactive materials or radiation producing machines. Since March 1979, Sandia has conducted a formalized basic radiation safety training program using a commercially available videotaped training package. The videotapes are generic in nature and are accompanied with hard copy text material, vu-graphs, quizzes, and an instructor's guide. Sandia's overall training program and the methods, results, and problem areas of implementing an off the shelf, commercially available videotaped training program are described. Results are summarized using an instructor/course/student evaluation form

  9. A controlled evaluation of an eating disorders primary prevention videotape using the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Twigg, Kylie; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Paxton, Susan J

    2002-11-01

    The aim was to extend findings related to a previously reported eating disorders prevention program by comparing treatment and control groups, adding a follow-up, and examining whether receiver characteristics, personal relevance and need for cognition (NFC), could predict attitude change in early adolescent girls. Grade 7 girls were either shown a brief prevention videotape on dieting and body image (n = 104) or given no intervention (n = 114). All girls completed pre-, post- and 1-month follow-up questionnaires. The intervention group resulted in significantly more positive changes in attitude and knowledge at post-intervention, but only in knowledge at follow-up. There was no strong evidence that pre-intervention characteristics of recipients predicted responses to the videotape intervention when changes were compared to the control group. This prevention videotape appeared to have positive immediate effects, but additional intervention (e.g., booster sessions) may be required for longer-term change. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  10. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajjel-Aghdam, Alireza; Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Khameneh, Saied; Moghaddam, Sara

    2013-09-01

    Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective. A descriptive study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13. Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  11. A microteaching application on a teaching practice course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahide Can

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated effectivenes of a teaching practice course which realized using the microteaching methods. Theparticipants of the study were six student teachers who experienced teaching practices for two times in a real classroomenvironment. Each of the two teaching practices of the student teachers were videotaped. Having observed of the first videorecords the instructur gave the student teachers feedback about their effectiveness in teaching. Analysis of the video recordsrevealed that student teachers achieved a better performance in their second teachings in terms of explaining basic theoriesand principles, identifying and observing necessary teaching roles and behaviours, preparing lesson plans, and conducting moreeffective teaching practices. In light of the these findings, it is suggested that this method should be integrated into teachingpractice courses.

  12. Applying the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion to a videotape-based eating disorders primary prevention program for adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Wertheim, Eleanor H

    2004-01-01

    This study applied principles from the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion to the prevention of disordered eating. Early adolescent girls watched either a preventive videotape only (n=114) or video plus post-video activity (verbal discussion, written exercises, or control discussion) (n=187); or had no intervention (n=104). Significantly more body image and knowledge improvements occurred at post video and follow-up in the intervention groups compared to no intervention. There were no outcome differences among intervention groups, or between girls with high or low elaboration likelihood. Further research is needed in integrating the videotape into a broader prevention package.

  13. Exploration of problem-based learning combined with standardized patient in the teaching of basic science of ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect of problem-based learning(PBLcombined with standardized patient(SPin the teaching of basic science of ophthalmology. METHODS: Sixty-four students of Optometry in grade 2012 were randomly divided into experimental group(n=32and control group(n=32. Traditional teaching method was implemented in control group while PBL combined with SP was applied in experimental group. At the end of term students were interviewed using self-administered questionnaire to obtain their evaluation for teaching effect. Measurement data were expressed as (-overx±s and analyzed by independent samples t test. Enumeration data were analyzed by χ2 test, and PRESULTS:The mean scores of theory test(83.22±3.75and experimental test(94.28±2.20in experimental group were significantly higher than theory test(70.72±3.95and experimental test(85.44±3.52in control group(all PPPCONCLUSION:Using PBL combined with SP teaching mode in basic science of ophthalmology can highly improve learning enthusiasm of students and cultivate self-learning ability of students, practice ability and ability of clinical analysis.

  14. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, Maria A; Rimondini, Michela; Deveugele, Myriam; Zimmermann, Christa; Moretti, Francesca; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Deledda, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Ian; Bensing, Jozien

    2015-10-01

    The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes 'good communication' by evoking their reactions to variations in physician communication. Lay people from four different countries watched the same videotaped standardized medical encounters and discussed their preferences in gender-specific focus groups who were balanced in age groups. Two hundred and fifty-nine lay people (64 NL, 72 IT, 75 UK and 48 BE) distributed over 35 focus groups of 6-8 persons each. Comments on doctors' behaviours were classified by the GULiVer framework in terms of contents and preferences. Participants prevalently discussed 'task-oriented expressions' (39%: competency, self-confident, providing solutions), 'affective oriented/emotional expressions' (25%: empathy, listening, reassuring) and 'process-oriented expressions' (23%: flexibility, summarizing, verifying). 'Showing an affective attitude' was most appreciated (positive percentage within category: 93%, particularly facilitations and inviting attitude), followed by 'providing solution' (85%). Among disfavoured behaviour, repetitions (88%), 'writing and reading' (54%) and asking permission (42%) were found. Although an affective attitude is appreciated by nearly everybody, people may vary widely in their communication needs and preferences: what is 'good communication' for one person may be disliked or even a source of irritation for another. A physician should be flexible and capable of adapting the consultation to the different needs of different patients. This challenges the idea of general communication guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pushing the Comfort Zone: Confronting the Perceptions of Teaching and Classroom Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, Marcia K.

    Preservice teachers have pre-existing conceptions of teaching that develop throughout many years of being students in the presence of teachers. Teacher educators are faced with the challenge of making the invisible parts of being a teacher visible to their students. This paper presents some of the activities, especially related to videotaped case…

  16. Examining the Intersections of Music Making and Teaching for Four String Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to examine the intersections of music making and teaching for four string teachers. Data included background surveys, three interviews per participant, videotaped classroom observations (jointly viewed during the second interview), and a focus group interview that included music making. Findings…

  17. Self-Monitoring as a Strategy to Increase Student Teachers' Use of Effective Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    Student teachers in classrooms for students with moderate-severe disabilities used self-monitoring to increase their use of effective teaching strategies. In the first study, the participant videotaped daily instructional sessions and collected data on her use of varied praise statements and the number of opportunities to respond in a multiple…

  18. Mathematics Teaching as Problem Solving: A Framework for Studying Teacher Metacognition Underlying Instructional Practice in Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzt, Alice F.; Armour-Thomas, Eleanor

    1998-01-01

    Uses a "teaching as problem solving" perspective to examine the components of metacognition underlying the instructional practice of seven experienced and seven beginning secondary-school mathematics teachers. Data analysis of observations, lesson plans, videotapes, and audiotapes of structured interviews suggests that the metacognition of…

  19. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  20. Teaching patient safety in the medical undergraduate program at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohomol, Elena; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the Educational Project of the undergraduate medical course to verify what is taught regarding Patient Safety and to enable reflections on the educational practice. A descriptive study, using document research as strategy. The document of investigation was the Educational Project of the medical course, in 2006, at the Escola Paulista de Medicina of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo. The theoretical framework adopted was the Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide of the World Health Organization, which led to the preparation of a list with 153 tracking terms. We identified 65 syllabus units in the Educational Project of the course, in which 40 (61.5%) addressed topics related to Patient Safety. Themes on the topic "Infection prevention and control" were found in 19 (47.5%) units and teaching of "Interaction with patients and caregivers" in 12 (32.5%); however content related to "Learning from errors to prevent harm" were not found. None of the framework topics had their proposed themes entirely taught during the period of education of the future physicians. Patient safety is taught in a fragmented manner, which values clinical skills such as the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, post-treatment, surgical procedures, and follow-up. Since it is a recent movement, the teaching of patient safety confronts informative proposals based on traditional structures centered on subjects and on specific education, and it is still poorly valued.

  1. A Systematic Review of Studies Regarding Applying Standardized Patients for Teaching Communication Skills to Medical Students Between 2000 - 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Standardized patients, people who are prepared to act as patient as if they are factual and proven performance.   Methods : BEME systematic review of the current approach was for the first time. Databases searched in this study, Scopus, Medline Cinahl, Web of science, Eric, Cochrane, Jama, Ebsco. According to the study, the general criteria for inclusion of articles to study 42 papers were accepted for inclusion into the check list. Check list used is taken from the BEME coding sheet that fits certain criteria, it was added to the study objectives and was developed.   Results : 42 Articles entered into the study, all articles were searched using electronic search. According to a Check list design , types of communication skills that have been studied in this way that doctors and patients communicate Article 7 , Article 2 to start the discussion with the patient, listening skills Article 7 , Article 16 verbal communication with the patient, patient 18, article nonverbal communication , such as body movements , eye contact , etc. 7 articles to gather information , to communicate article 5 , article 5 to understand the patient's perspective , article 13 words, bad news patient (e.g. adversity , cancer, etc , articles 10 to empathize with the patient.   Conclusions : Standardized patients as a teaching method and teaching and assessment practices in recent years have been considered. The lack of articles in the area, the possibility of a vacuum in the decisions of the causes that systematic crossings are operating, particularly the kind of BEME and update that due to the growth of the papers in this area, partly to solve this problem will help.

  2. Effect of a PBL teaching method on learning about nursing care for patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Ruiz de Alegría, Begoña; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a worldwide public health problem that requires the attention of qualified health professionals. The training of skilled nurses is a challenge for nursing instructors due to the complexity of this pathology. The aim was to analyse the declarative and argumentative knowledge acquired about depression by students receiving traditional expository instruction versus students receiving problem-based learning instruction. Quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test design in experimental and control group to measure differences in the improvement of declarative and argumentative knowledge. Non parametric tests were used to compare the scores between the experimental group and the control group, and between the pre-test and post-test in each group. 114 students participated in the study. Implementation of the study took place during the 2014-2015 academic year in the third year of the Nursing undergraduate degree courses in the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) as part of the Mental Health Nursing subject. The data indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the two methodologies in regard to declarative knowledge in the care of patients with depression. Nevertheless, the argumentative capacity of the experimental group improved significantly with the problem-based learning methodology (p=0.000). The results of the implementation indicated that problem-based learning was a satisfactory tool for the acquisition of argumentative capacity in depression nursing care. Still, working examples of teaching sequences that bridge the gap between general clinical practice and classroom practice remain an important goal for continuing research in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kawanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    Describes the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video survey of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. Part of the Third International Mathematics and Science study, this research project is the first study of videotaped records from national probability samples. (SLD)

  4. Enhancing traditional, televised, and videotaped courses with Web-based technologies: a comparison of student satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, M L; Lindquist, M

    2001-01-01

    Varied distance learning strategies can be used to deliver nursing courses, including interactive television, videotape, and Web-based approaches. (1) To assess student assess student satisfaction with a critical care elective course offered simultaneously via traditional and distance learning formats in which Web-based strategies were added, and (2) to compare satisfaction of students taking the traditional course versus those taking the class via distance technology. Students (n = 113) who took the course during the spring 1998 and 1999 semesters completed a teacher-constructed evaluation at the end of the semester. Mean ratings on the evaluation were positive. Ratings of interaction, communication with instructor, and facilitation of learning were higher from students who took the traditional course. The application of Web-based technologies may be one factor for the overall course satisfaction. However, it is important to continue to evaluate strategies that work best for students taking courses via distance technology.

  5. Flow observation by rod lens and low-light video (videotape script: January 4, 1977)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The script of a demonstration videotape made to show the possibilities of coupling rod lenses to low-light video systems to observe internal flow conditions is presented. The illustrations accompanying the text were photographed directly from the video screen. Some up-dated comments appear as footnotes to the original script and a description of the multiscan low-light television system developed to measure velocity is included in the epilogue. The combination of rod lens and low-light video system makes it possible to observe dynamic events in hitherto inaccessible volumes. The pressure and temperature capabilities of the rod lens make it applicable to many engineering uses. This system, in conjunction with electronic image enhancement systems, provides a new dimension in engineering analysis

  6. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  7. Impact of postgraduate training on communication skills teaching: a controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Observation of performance followed by feedback is the key to good teaching of communication skills in clinical practice. The fact that it occurs rarely is probably due to clinical supervisors’ perceived lack of competence to identify communication skills and give effective feedback. We evaluated the impact of a faculty development programme on communication skills teaching on clinical supervisors’ ability to identify residents’ good and poor communication skills and to discuss them interactively during feedback. Methods We conducted a pre-post controlled study in which clinical supervisors took part to a faculty development program on teaching communication skills in clinical practice. Outcome measures were the number and type of residents’ communication skills identified by supervisors in three videotaped simulated resident-patient encounters and the number and type of communication skills discussed interactively with residents during three feedback sessions. Results 48 clinical supervisors (28 intervention group; 20 control group) participated. After the intervention, the number and type of communication skills identified did not differ between both groups. There was substantial heterogeneity in the number and type of communication skills identified. However, trained participants engaged in interactive discussions with residents on a significantly higher number of communication items (effect sizes 0.53 to 1.77); communication skills items discussed interactively included both structural and patient-centered elements that were considered important to be observed by expert teachers. Conclusions The faculty development programme did not increase the number of communication skills recognised by supervisors but was effective in increasing the number of communication issues discussed interactively in feedback sessions. Further research should explore the respective impact of accurate identification of communication skills and effective teaching

  8. Impact of postgraduate training on communication skills teaching: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Cerutti, Bernard; van der Vleuten, Cees P; Dolmans, Diana

    2014-04-14

    Observation of performance followed by feedback is the key to good teaching of communication skills in clinical practice. The fact that it occurs rarely is probably due to clinical supervisors' perceived lack of competence to identify communication skills and give effective feedback. We evaluated the impact of a faculty development programme on communication skills teaching on clinical supervisors' ability to identify residents' good and poor communication skills and to discuss them interactively during feedback. We conducted a pre-post controlled study in which clinical supervisors took part to a faculty development program on teaching communication skills in clinical practice. Outcome measures were the number and type of residents' communication skills identified by supervisors in three videotaped simulated resident-patient encounters and the number and type of communication skills discussed interactively with residents during three feedback sessions. 48 clinical supervisors (28 intervention group; 20 control group) participated. After the intervention, the number and type of communication skills identified did not differ between both groups. There was substantial heterogeneity in the number and type of communication skills identified. However, trained participants engaged in interactive discussions with residents on a significantly higher number of communication items (effect sizes 0.53 to 1.77); communication skills items discussed interactively included both structural and patient-centered elements that were considered important to be observed by expert teachers. The faculty development programme did not increase the number of communication skills recognised by supervisors but was effective in increasing the number of communication issues discussed interactively in feedback sessions. Further research should explore the respective impact of accurate identification of communication skills and effective teaching skills on achieving more effective communication

  9. General Practitioner Supervisor assessment and teaching of Registrars consulting with Aboriginal patients - is cultural competence adequately considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope; Reath, Jennifer; Gordon, Elaine; Dave, Darshana; Harnden, Chris; Hu, Wendy; Kozianski, Emma; Carriage, Cris

    2014-08-13

    General Practitioner (GP) Supervisors have a key yet poorly defined role in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars who provide healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during their training placements. Given the markedly poorer health of Indigenous Australians, it is important that GP training and supervision of Registrars includes assessment and teaching which address the well documented barriers to accessing health care. A simulated consultation between a GP Registrar and an Aboriginal patient, which illustrated inadequacies in communication and cultural awareness, was viewed by GP Supervisors and Medical Educators during two workshops in 2012. Participants documented teaching points arising from the consultation which they would prioritise in supervision provided to the Registrar. Content analysis was performed to determine the type and detail of the planned feedback. Field notes from workshop discussions and participant evaluations were used to gain insight into participant confidence in cross cultural supervision. Sixty four of 75 GPs who attended the workshops participated in the research. Although all documented plans for detailed teaching on the Registrar's generic communication and consultation skills, only 72% referred to culture or to the patient's Aboriginality. Few GPs (8%) documented a plan to advise on national health initiatives supporting access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. A lack of Supervisor confidence in providing guidance on cross cultural consulting with Aboriginal patients was identified. The role of GP Supervisors in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients could be strengthened. A sole focus on generic communication and consultation skills may lead to inadequate consideration of the health disparities faced by Indigenous peoples and of the need to ensure Registrars utilise health supports designed to decrease the

  10. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Pais, Vanessa G; Silva, Filipa R; Martins, Raquel; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Pedrosa, Raquel; Almeida, Susana S; Correia, Luís; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Teles, Ana; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2014-05-09

    Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers' communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants' confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients' assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. The program's positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients.

  11. Knowledge and Performance about Nursing Ethic Codes from Nurses' and Patients' Perspective in Tabriz Teaching Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Moghaddam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing profession requires knowledge of ethics to guide performance. The nature of this profession necessitates ethical care more than routine care. Today, worldwide definition of professional ethic code has been done based on human and ethical issues in the communication between nurse and patient. To improve all dimensions of nursing, we need to respect ethic codes. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge and performance about nursing ethic codes from nurses' and patients' perspective.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study Conducted upon 345 nurses and 500 inpatients in six teaching hospitals of Tabriz, 2012. To investigate nurses' knowledge and performance, data were collected by using structured questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive and analytic statistics, independent t-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient, in SPSS13.Results: Most of the nurses were female, married, educated at BS degree and 86.4% of them were aware of Ethic codes also 91.9% of nurses and 41.8% of patients represented nurses respect ethic codes. Nurses' and patients' perspective about ethic codes differed significantly. Significant relationship was found between nurses' knowledge of ethic codes and job satisfaction and complaint of ethical performance. Conclusion: According to the results, consideration to teaching ethic codes in nursing curriculum for student and continuous education for staff is proposed, on the other hand recognizing failures of the health system, optimizing nursing care, attempt to inform patients about Nursing ethic codes, promote patient rights and achieve patient satisfaction can minimize the differences between the two perspectives.

  12. [Preoperative structured patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, D

    1993-04-01

    This article describes the factors that motivated the nursing staff of the cardiac surgery unit at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, to revise their preoperative teaching program. The motivating factors described are the length of the preoperative waiting period; the level of preoperative anxiety; the decreased length of hospital stay; the dissatisfaction of the nursing staff with current patient teaching practices; and the lack of available resources. The reorganization of the teaching program was based upon the previously described factors combined with a review of the literature that demonstrated the impact of preoperative anxiety, emotional support and psycho-educational interventions upon the client's recovery. The goals of the new teaching program are to provide the client and the family with cognitive and sensory information about the client's impending hospitalization, chronic illness and necessary lifestyle modifications. The program consists of a system of telephone calls during the preoperative waiting period; a videotape viewing; a tour of the cardiac surgery unit; informal discussion groups; and the availability of nursing consultation to decrease preoperative anxiety. The end result of these interventions is more time for client support and integration of necessary information by the client and family. This kind of program has the potential to provide satisfaction at many levels by identifying client's at risk; increasing client knowledge; increasing support; decreasing anxiety during the preoperative waiting period; and decreasing the length of hospital stay. The nursing staff gained a heightened sense of accomplishment because the program was developed according to the nursing department's philosophy, which includes primary nursing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Teaching skills to resolve conflicts with acute confusional syndrome patients in nursing using the Case Method (CM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Caballero, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This study sets out to design and implement a teaching sequence that offers students the opportunity to acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to deal with a confrontational patient. When designing the teaching methodology, we chose an active teaching strategy, commonly entitled the Case Method. The case was developed during the 2011-2012 academic year and implemented across the curriculum in the 2012-2013 academic year, in the "Relations and Communications in Nursing Care" and "Geriatric Nursing" subject modules, in the second year undergraduate nursing course at the University of the Basque Country. Implementation results indicate that the Case Method is a satisfactory tool to facilitate acquisition of the chosen skills, as well as being a learning method that is well received by students. At the end of the process, 72.8% of them shared the opinion that "this methodology has helped me more or much more than traditional 'chalk and talk' expository methodology". Moreover, 93% of the students successfully achieved at least the minimum learning results required. Nevertheless, students said that they felt overwhelmed on more than one occasion. The study has provided evidence that the Case Method contributes to acquiring skills that every nurse will need during their career. This should spur us on to continue extending the range of possibilities offered by active methodologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaitey, Yaw Agyekum; Nkrumah, Bernard; Idriss, Ali; Tay, Samuel Crowther Kofi

    2012-08-21

    Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana between April and December 2008. This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500) prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300) in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500) and 14% (70/500) respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500) of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500) and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300). Most, 60 (86%) out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47%) out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

  15. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

  16. General Practitioner Supervisor assessment and teaching of Registrars consulting with Aboriginal patients – is cultural competence adequately considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background General Practitioner (GP) Supervisors have a key yet poorly defined role in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars who provide healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during their training placements. Given the markedly poorer health of Indigenous Australians, it is important that GP training and supervision of Registrars includes assessment and teaching which address the well documented barriers to accessing health care. Methods A simulated consultation between a GP Registrar and an Aboriginal patient, which illustrated inadequacies in communication and cultural awareness, was viewed by GP Supervisors and Medical Educators during two workshops in 2012. Participants documented teaching points arising from the consultation which they would prioritise in supervision provided to the Registrar. Content analysis was performed to determine the type and detail of the planned feedback. Field notes from workshop discussions and participant evaluations were used to gain insight into participant confidence in cross cultural supervision. Results Sixty four of 75 GPs who attended the workshops participated in the research. Although all documented plans for detailed teaching on the Registrar’s generic communication and consultation skills, only 72% referred to culture or to the patient’s Aboriginality. Few GPs (8%) documented a plan to advise on national health initiatives supporting access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. A lack of Supervisor confidence in providing guidance on cross cultural consulting with Aboriginal patients was identified. Conclusions The role of GP Supervisors in promoting the cultural competence of GP Registrars consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients could be strengthened. A sole focus on generic communication and consultation skills may lead to inadequate consideration of the health disparities faced by Indigenous peoples and of the need to ensure Registrars utilise

  17. English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Richard P

    2013-02-01

    The number of households in the United States that are not proficient in the English language is growing and presenting a challenge to the health care system. Over nineteen percent of the US population speak a language other than English in the home. This increase in language discordance generates a greater need to find and implement accommodations in the clinical setting to insure accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment as well as provide for patient safety. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of patients accessing the chiropractic college teaching clinics who are not proficient in the English language and to what extent the colleges provide accommodations for that language disparity. The clinic directors and deans of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges were surveyed via an on-line survey engine. The survey queried the percentage of the patient population that is not English language proficient, the accommodations the college currently has in place, if the college has a language specific consent to treat document and if the college has a written policy concerning patients without English proficiency. Fifty percent of the contacted chiropractic colleges responded to the survey. In the respondent college clinics 16.5% of the patient population is not proficient in English, with over 75% speaking Spanish. All but one of the respondents provide some level of accommodation for the language non-concordance. Forty five percent of the responding colleges employ a language specific consent to treat form. The implementation of accommodations and the use of a language specific consent to treat form is more prevalent at colleges with a higher percentage of non-English speaking patients. The percentage of patients with limited English proficiency accessing services at the teaching clinics of the chiropractic colleges mirrors the numbers in the general population. There is a wide disparity in the accommodations that the individual colleges make

  18. Assessment of quality of glycemic control in intensive care patients treated with an insulin infusion at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Lyne; Ferguson, Jessica; Dubé, Anne-Isabelle; Nguyen, Patrick Viet-Quoc; Beauchesne, Marie-France; Boutin, Jean-Marie

    2014-04-01

    To describe the quality of glycemic control in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) treated with an intravenous (IV) insulin infusion at a teaching hospital. This retrospective study included patients admitted to the ICU and treated with an IV insulin infusion for at least 12 h between August 1 and November 30, 2011. Medical charts were reviewed. The primary quality indicator for glycemic control was the mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L target range. A total of 351 patients were included; 61.5% of subjects had no known diabetes. Admissions were mainly for surgery (61.3%). The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 16.8±7.3. The mean percent of blood glucose values per patient in the 6.1 to 8 mmol/L range was 35% for all subjects and 26.2% for patients with diabetes. If a target of 6.1 to 10 mmol/L was considered, those values became 63% and 54.6%. At least 1 episode of hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (quality of glycemic control in patients in the ICU at our hospital needs to be improved. A new computerized IV insulin protocol is currently being tested. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Video-Taped Examples of Stand-Up Comedy Routines To Teach Principles of Public Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Paul J., III

    This paper investigates the use of stand-up comedy routines to demonstrate principles of public speaking to college students in communication classes. The paper examines particular elements of the public speaking process, which include the structural elements of speeches: (1) introductions; (2) the body of the speech, including organization,…

  20. Satisfaction with Dental Appearance and Attitude toward improving Dental Esthetics among Patients attending a Dental Teaching Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghaireh, Ghada A; Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors influencing the satisfaction of dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetics among patients attending a dental teaching center. A questionnaire was used to collect data of four background variables among 450 patients attended a dental teaching center in the city of Irbid in Jordan. The questionnaire enclosed self-reported questions about the appearance of anterior teeth, received esthetic treatment and desired treatment for improving esthetics. Descriptive, multiple logistic regression and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The 450 participants consisted of (66.2%) male and (33.8%) female. Of these, 69.3% were satisfied with their dental appearance and 58.0% with the color of their teeth. Esthetic restorations were the most received treatment (39.8%) and whitening of teeth was the most desired treatment (55.3%). The patients' satisfaction with dental appearance was influenced by teeth color, crowding and receiving whitening (p < 0.05. r = 0.561, r(2) = 0.315). The most desired esthetic treatments influenced by the satisfaction with dental appearance were esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p < 0.05. r = 0.223, r(2) = 0.05). Significantly more female reported having esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p = 0.008, 0.000) and desired to have orthodontic, crowns or veneers and esthetic restorations (p = 0.000, 0.015, 0.028). Satisfaction with dental appearance was affected by teeth color, feeling teeth are crowded, desire for esthetic restorations and orthodontic treatment. A high percentage of patients were not satisfied with the color of their teeth. Recognizing the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with their present dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetic can guide clinicians to strategies to improve esthetics.

  1. Preoperative fasting in the day care patient population at a tertiary care, teaching institute: A prospective, cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Shalini Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Patients are fasting for inappropriately long duration preoperatively despite the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA recommendations for liberal fasting guidelines. There is paucity of data on preoperative fasting duration in the day care patient population from India; hence, we studied the preoperative fasting status in the day care patient population. Aims: This study aims to study the preoperative fasting duration for solids and clear fluids and to compare the fasting times in the patients posted for the morning slot and the afternoon slot. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational, cross-sectional study at a tertiary care, teaching institute. Subjects and Methods: All Consenting adults, ASA grade 1 or 2, of either gender, presenting for day care surgery were included in the study. Data collected included the demographic profile, duration of fasting for solids, and clear fluids. The patients rated their hunger and thirst on a ten point numeric rating scale. We compared the fasting durations for solids and clear fluids in the patients presenting for the morning slot and afternoon slot for surgery. Statistical Analysis Used: T-test was used for analysis of continuous data with normal distribution and Mann–Whitney U-test for data with nonnormal distribution. Chi-square test was performed for categorical variables. Differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: The mean duration of preoperative fasting for solids was 12.58 ± 2.70 h and for clear fluids was 9.02 ± 3.73 h. The mean fasting duration for solids in the patients presenting for the afternoon slot was significantly longer (P < 0.0001 than those presenting for the morning slot. The mean preoperative fasting duration for clear fluids was comparable among these patient groups (P = 0.0741. Conclusions: Patients are following inappropriately prolonged fasting routines, and there is a need to enforce liberal preoperative fasting guidelines

  2. Clinical profile and outcome of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES patients treated in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhjung J Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute encephalitis syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Although Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV was thought to be a major cause for acute encephalitis syndrome, more non-Japanese encephalitis virus cases are reported. The outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome is variable. Our study was designed to study the clinical profile and outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome managed in tertiary care center in central Nepal. Methods: The record of patients admitted with diagnosis of acute encephalitis syndrome,from January 2010 to December 2010 in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital (CMS-TH was reviewed. They were classified clinically as meningitis, encephalitis and meningoencephalitis. The clinical details and reports of the patients were recorded and analyzed. Results: Total of 85 cases of meningitis and encephalitis were identified. Mean age was 19.18 years. Fifty-six (65.9% patients were males and 29 (34.1% were females. Sixty (70.58% patients had meningitis, 8 (9.41% had encephalitis, and 17 (20.0% had meningoencephalitis. JE serology was positive in 4 patients (4.7%. Seventy-two (84.7% patients made full recovery and were discharged from hospital. Thirteen (15.3% patients left against medical advice (LAMA. Conclusion: Acute encephalitis syndrome is still a major public health problem in Nepal. Few of these patients have Japanese Encephalitis. There is a trend towards improved outcome because of availability of improved health services. However, financial constraint remains a challenge in management of acute encephalitis syndrome. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-2, 31-37 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i2.9685

  3. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T O Carlucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. METHODS: Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. FINDINGS: Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (P<0.001 and young adults (18-35 years (P=0.04 with ASA physical status IV or V (P<0.001 undergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (P<0.001. Motor vehicle crashes and violence were the main causes of trauma (P<0.001. Uncontrolled hemorrhage or head injury were the most significant associated factors of intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality (P<0.001. All cardiac arrests and deaths reported were totally related to trauma patient condition. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  4. Teaching Pragmatic Particles in the LCTL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizah Sari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The success and effectiveness of teaching the LCTL class-room depend on the LCTL research. The study investigated the into-nation contours of seven Indonesian pragmatic particles (kan, ya, kok, lho, dong, deh, and sih to review the functions of the particles. Vide-otaped data of naturally occurring conversations by native speakers of Indonesian were collected. Results indicated the number of into-nation contours for the Indonesian pragmatic particles used by the speakers to organize information (for example, to extend common ground and mark shared knowledge and to convey the speaker’s ex-pression (for example, surprise and emphasis. The particle contour analysis forms a natural link between grammatical and interactional competence and bears an important LCTL pedagogical consequence in terms of both improving teaching materials and bringing the cul-ture closer to the learner. Based on the findings, four strategies in teaching the LCTL classroom are recommended.

  5. A videotaped intervention to enhance child control and reduce anxiety of the pain of dental injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Raadal, M; Naidu, S; Yoshida, T; Kvale, G; Milgrom, P

    2003-12-01

    While the psychological literature shows that perceptions of uncontrollability contribute to anxiety and other pathologies, interventions that enhance perceived control have been shown to reduce anxiety. This study attempted to assess a brief videotape to enhance child perceived control in a dental setting. 101 children aged 7-9 years completed warm-up procedures and viewed either: a) the experimental intervention, a 2 minutes video of a dentist explaining what an injection will feel like and proposing hand raising as a signal mechanism; or b) the control condition, a 2 minutes video of Disneyland. Fear of dental injections was assessed on a 10 cm visual analogue scale before and after the intervention. In the experimental group there was a significant fear reduction from pre- to post-intervention, while this was not the case in the control group. Children with higher pre-existing levels of fear benefited more from the intervention than children with lower levels of fear. The results of this pilot study suggest that intervention packages that impact child control have promise in lowering anxiety.

  6. Border Collie Collapse: Owner Survey Results and Veterinary Description of Videotaped Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan; Minor, Katie; Shmon, Cindy L; Shelton, G Diane; Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R

    Completed surveys were obtained from owners of 165 border collies experiencing repeated episodes of abnormal gait or collapse during strenuous exercise. Unremarkable veterinary evaluation and lack of disease progression over time made common systemic, cardiac, and neurologic causes of exercise intolerance unlikely. Survey questions addressed signalment, age of onset, description of episodes, and owner perception of factors associated with collapse. Most dogs were young adults (median 2 yr) when episodes began, and they had experienced from 2 to more than 100 episodes (median 6) prior to their owners completing the survey. Retrieving was the activity most commonly associated with episodes (112/165 dogs, 68%), followed by herding stock (39/165 dogs, 24%). Owners reported that high environmental temperatures (111/165 dogs, 67%) and excitement (67/165 dogs, 41%) increased the likelihood of their dog having an episode during strenuous activity. Veterinary evaluation of videotapes of presumed border collie collapse (BCC) episodes (40 dogs) were used to provide a description of the typical features of BCC episodes. Altered mentation, symmetrical ataxia affecting all four limbs, increased pelvic limb extensor tone and toe scuffing or knuckling, truncal swaying, and falling to the side were common features, suggesting that BCC may be an episodic diffuse central nervous system disorder.

  7. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  8. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  9. The workload of general practitioners does not affect their awareness of patients' psychological problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, E.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bakker, D.H. de; Kerssens, J.J.; Meer, K. van der; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if general practitioners (GPs) with a higher workload are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose psychological problems, and are less aware of their patients' psychological problems. METHODS: Data from 2095 videotaped consultations from a representative

  10. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  11. Frequency of risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. a study of 100 cases in naseer teaching hospital, peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeer, M.; Tariq, M.; Rehman, U.U.

    2008-01-01

    To study the risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. It is a descriptive hospital based study conducted at the Department of Medicine, Naseer Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from January 2005 to December 2005. One hundred patients of stroke with cerebral infarction confirmed on C.T. scan brain and more than twenty years of age were included. Risk factors for cerebral infarction were defined in terms of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, smoking, dyslipidaemia, TIAs (transient ischemic attacks), carotid artery stenosis and family history of stroke. Data of 100 cases with cerebral infarction was recorded. Most of the patients had more than one risk factors for cerebral infarction. hypertension was commonest risk factor (55%), smoking (30%), ischemic heart disease (34%), diabetes mellitus) (26%), hyperlipedaemia (30%), atrial fibrillation (25%), carotid artery stenosis (27%), obesity (15%) and family history of stroke (12%). 39% of patients had physical inactivity. Males were slightly predominant than females (51% vs 49%) and mean age was 50 years. females were rather older with mean age of 53 years. Cerebral infarction accounts for 80% to 85% of cases of stroke, which is a common neurological disorder. It increases a burden of disability and misery for patients and their families. Most of the risk factors of cerebral infarction are modifiable, its prevention should be the main cause of concern for the community. (author)

  12. Screening of 110 cirrhotic patients for hepatitis B and C at Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif, Swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, B.; Khan, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Cirrhosis liver is amongst the commonest clinical conditions in Pakistan. Besides other causes, it is mostly related to previous viral infection, in this part of the world. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of HBsAg and anti HCV in cirrhotic patients of Swat district. This Prospective Study was conducted in the Medical unit of Saidu Teaching Hospital, Saidu Sharif from January 2006 to December 2006. One hundred and ten Cirrhotic Patients, 62 Male and 48 Female aged from 14 to 75 years were included in this study. Sera were tested by third generation Elisa method. Fifty-nine out of 110 (53.6%) patients were positive for anti HCV antibodies. Twenty-four (21.81%) Patients were positive for HBsAg. Eleven (10%) patients were positive for both HBsAg and anti HCV anti bodies. Sixteen (14.54%) were negative for both sero maker of hepatitis B and C. It is evident from this study that Hepatitis C, is a leading cause of cirrhosis in District Swat followed by HBV. Both the viruses account for at least three fourths of the total Cirrhotic. (Author)

  13. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  14. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  15. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  16. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  17. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  18. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  19. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  20. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  1. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  2. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Patients' satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and referral hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulisa, Teshome; Tessema, Fasil; Merga, Hailu

    2017-06-26

    Patient satisfaction, one of the main components of quality of care, is a crucial phenomenon for the overall health care delivery system. Even though a number of studies have been conducted about patient satisfaction in different health services, studies in radiology services are flimsy in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing patient satisfaction towards radiological service and associated factors in Hawassa University Teaching and Referral hospital. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 321 adult patients presented for radiological service in the study area using stratified sampling technique. Patient satisfaction was measured using SERVQUAL (Service Quality) tool that consisted of seven items: accessibility, quality of radiological service, courtesy of radiology staff, existence of good communication with service provider and desk worker, physical environment and privacy technique. Exit interviews of patients were conducted using a structured and pretested questionnaire. Data was collected by three grade ten completed trained data collectors from May 12 to May 28, 2016. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify independent factors associated with patient satisfaction on radiological services using SPSS version 21. The overall patient satisfaction towards radiological service was 71.6%. Satisfaction to accessibility of the service was 84.5% while it was 80.6% to courtesy of the staff. Similarly, 81.6% reported satisfied with quality of the service and 59.4% and 71% of reported satisfied with physical environment and radiological service provider respectively. On the other hand, 99.7% of the respondents were dissatisfied with privacy of the service. The study revealed that patients who attended primary school (AOR = 0.317, 95% CI: 0.11-0.88), unemployed patients (AOR = 0.067, 95% CI: 0.007-0.622) and patients who had short waiting time to enter into examination room less than one hour (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI: 1.4-11.62) were

  4. Bloodstream infection in patients with end-stage renal disease in a teaching hospital in central-western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Trelha Gauna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis is considered a critical determinant of bloodstream infection (BSI and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of BSI in patients with end-stage renal disease using central venous catheters for hemodialysis. Methods A cohort study was conducted in a public teaching hospital in central-western Brazil from April 2010 to December 2011. For every patient, we noted the presence of hyperemia/exudation upon catheter insertion, as well as fever, shivering, and chills during hemodialysis. Results Fifty-nine patients were evaluated. Thirty-five (59.3% patients started dialysis due to urgency, 37 (62.7% had BSI, and 12 (20% died. Hyperemia at the catheter insertion site (64.9% was a significant clinical manifestation in patients with BSI. Statistical analysis revealed 1.7 times more cases of BSI in patients with hypoalbuminemia compared with patients with normal albumin levels. The principal infective agents identified in blood cultures and catheter-tip cultures were Staphylococcus species (24 cases, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (7 cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and 5 cases of Chryseobacterium indologenes, and Candida species (6. Among the Staphylococci identified, 77.7% were methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococci. Of the bacteria isolated, the most resistant were Chryseobacterium indologenes and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions Blood culture was demonstrated to be an important diagnostic test and identified over 50% of positive BSI cases. The high frequency of BSI and the isolation of multiresistant bacteria were disturbing findings. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated microorganism, although Gram-negative bacteria predominated overall. These results highlight the importance of infection prevention and control measures in dialysis units.

  5. Teaching culturally appropriate therapeutic touch to nursing students in the Sultanate of Oman: reflections on observations and experiences with Muslim patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Muliira, Rhoda Suubi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a valid nursing intervention but some patients feel uncomfortable with it because of personal beliefs. This commentary presents observations and experiences of the use of TT during care of Muslim patients in the Sultanate of Oman. There is need to teach nursing students deliberate steps when considering its use in Muslim patients because they increase acceptability and implementation in a culturally sensitive manner.

  6. iPod™ technology for teaching patients about anticoagulation: a pilot study of mobile computer-assisted patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizard-Thompson, Nancy R; Singh, Sonal; Stevens, Sheila R; Miller, David P; Wofford, James L

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether an educational strategy using a handheld, multimedia computer (iPod™) is practical and sustainable for routine office-based patient educational tasks. With the limited amount of time allotted to the office encounter and the growing number of patient educational tasks, new strategies are needed to improve the efficiency of patient education. Education of patients anticoagulated with warfarin is considered critical to preventing complications. Despite the dangers associated with the use of warfarin, educational practices are variable and often haphazard. During a four-month period, we examined the implementation of a three-part series of iPod™-based patient educational modules delivered to anticoagulated patients at the time of routine INR (International Normalized Ratio) blood tests for outpatients on the anticoagulation registry at an urban community health center. A total of 141 computer module presentations were delivered to 91 patients during the four-month period. In all, 44 patients on the registry had no INR checkups, and thus no opportunity to view the modules, and 32 patients had at least three INR checkups but no modules were documented. Of the 130 patients with at least one INR performed during the study period, 22 (16.9%) patients completed all three modules, 91 (70.0%) patients received at least one module, and nine (7.6%) patients refused to view at least one module. Neither of the two handheld computers was lost or stolen, and no physician time was used in this routine educational activity. Patients reported that the audio and visual quality was very good, (9.0/10); the educational experience of the patient was helpful (7.4/10) compared with the patient's previous warfarin education (6.3/10), and the computer strategy extended the INR visit duration by 1-5 min at most. The computer-assisted patient educational strategy was well received by patients, and uptake of the intervention by the clinic was successful and durable. The i

  7. HIV and intestinal parasites in adult TB patients in a teaching hospital in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Afework; Mengistu, Getahun; Ayele, Belete; Diro, Ermias; Mekonnen, Firew; Ketema, Dereje; Moges, Feleke; Mesfin, Tsehay; Getachew, Assefa; Ergicho, Bahiru; Elias, Daniel; Wondmikun, Yared; Aseffa, Abraham; Ota, Fusao

    2007-10-01

    The level of HIV infection and intestinal parasitoses among TB patients was assessed in a hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 257 patients in Gondar, Ethiopia. In TB patients, our study reported co-infection with HIV (52.1%) and intestinal parasites (40.9%) The high prevalence of HIV and intestinal parasites indicates an increased morbidity inTB patients and emphasized the importance of continued HIV sero-surveillance, stool analysis and treatment.

  8. The immunological response of HIV-positive patients initiating HAART at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annison, L; Dompreh, A; Adu-Sarkodie, Y

    2013-12-01

    The study sought to document the experience of immunological improvement among Ghanaian PLHIV on HAART comparing different categories of patients. Serology Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. The study comprised a convenient sample of 303 treatment naïve HIV patients due to start HAART. Questionnaires were used to collect patient demographic and clinical data. Four CD4 counts were measured at six-monthly intervals to determine rates of CD4 change. These were pre-therapy, 1(st) post-therapy, 2(nd) post-therapy, and 3(rd) post-therapy counts. The rates of CD4 change among the different categories of patients were also compared. At baseline, women had higher CD4 count (mean of 77.4 cells/μl), and mean age of participants was 40 years. The CD4 count increased from a mean baseline of 70.2 cells/μl to 229.2, 270.0, and 297.6 cells/μl at 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment respectively (P response. There was no difference (P=0.18) in treatment response comparing those with CD4 immunological recovery during 12 months of treatment The study, therefore, concludes that significant immunological improvement is possible among Ghanaian PLHIV on HAART as long as a high level of treatment adherence is observed.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use among elderly patients living with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Asnakew Achaw; Tegegn, Henok Getachew; Haile, Kaleab Taye; Belachew, Sewunet Admasu; Mersha, Amanual Getnet; Erku, Daniel Asfaw

    2017-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients with chronic diseases has grown rapidly worldwide. Yet, little has been known about CAM use by elderly patients with chronic diseases in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence and reasons for CAM utilization among elderly patients living with chronic diseases in Ethiopia. An institution-based quantitative cross-sectional survey was conducted among elderly patients with chronic disease attending outpatient ambulatory clinics of University of Gondar referral and teaching hospital (UoGRTH). An interviewer-administered and semi-structured questionnaire were utilized to collect the data. Of the total respondents, 240 (74%) reported the use of CAM, with herbal medicine and spiritual healing being the most commonly utilized CAM modalities (50.4% and 40.8% respectively). Dissatisfaction with conventional therapy (40.8%) and belief in the effectiveness of CAM (30.8%) are the most commonly cited reasons for the use of CAM therapies. Rural residency, higher educational status, higher average monthly income and presence of co-morbidity were positively associated with the use of CAM. This survey revealed a higher rate of CAM use among elderly patients with chronic diseases, along with a very low rate of disclosing their use to their health care providers. Special attention should be given for these patient population due to the potentially harmful interaction of different herbal remedies with the prescribed medications, thereby predisposing the patient to untoward adverse effects and compromised overall health outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The opinion of patients at a local South Africa teaching hospital on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine how South African patients at a regional state hospital perceived the practice of physicians accepting gifts from the pharmaceutical industry. The physician-patient relationship is built on trust, with an understanding that the physician will act ethically and in patients' best interests.

  11. Assessing patient-centred communication in teaching: a systematic review of instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.H.; Rasenberg, E.M.C.; Weel, C. van; Laan, R.F.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Patient-centred communication is a key component of patient centredness in medical care. Therefore, adequate education in and assessment of patient-centred communication skills are necessary. In general, feedback on communication skills is most effective when it is provided directly and is

  12. Evaluation of antioxidant status of female diabetic patients in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Anambra State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuonghae, E O P; Onyenekwe, C C; Ahaneku, J E; Ukibe, N R; Nwani, P O; Asomugha, A L; Osakue, N O; Aidomeh, F; Awalu, C C

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become an onerous disease to developing countries such as Nigeria. Rapid acceptance of urbanisation and sedentary life styles pose an encumbrance to its prevention and management. Increased oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus has been implicated as a culprit in perpetuating antioxidant depletion and diabetic complications in diabetes mellitus individuals. This study aims to evaluate the level of antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) female participants visiting the out-patient diabetic clinic of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria. A total of 86 participants aged 51±10 years were recruited for this study. The test group consists of 43 already confirmed type 2 diabetes mellitus females, while the control group consists of 43 apparently healthy females. The test subjects were further subgrouped into good and poor glycaemic control groups, using a cut-off of 0.05). This study concludes that there is antioxidant depletion in females with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Prevalence of obesity and systemic hypertension among diabetes mellitus patients attending an out-patient diabetes clinic in a Ghanaian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Abedandi, Robert; Salifu, Zenabankara S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is now a prevalent disease in both developed and developing countries. Overweight/obesity and hypertension are potential modifiable risk factors for diabetes mellitus and persist during the course of the disease. This study was aimed at reporting the prevalence of overweight/obesity and systemic hypertension and their association to blood glucose levels in persons with diabetes mellitus attending a diabetic clinic in Ghanaian Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending a diabetic clinic at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Anthropometric variables of age, weight and height were measured with appropriate instruments, computed into BMI and classified according to WHO classifications. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured by an appropriate instrument and classified by WHO standards. Fasting plasma glucose levels of the study participants were recorded from their personal health folder. All data was analysed by GraphPad prism version 5. In general, 7.0% of the participants were underweight and 32.0% were overweight or obese. The mean±SD weight, height and BMI of the participants were 67.53±13.32, 1.68±0.12 and 24.18±5.32. Twenty-one percent of the studied participants were hypertensive. Mean±SD fasting plasma glucose of 7.94±2.82 was observed among the diabetic patients. As the prevalence of hyperglycaemia was higher among patients aged ≤40 years (88.9% vs. 75.8%), normoglycaemia (11.1% vs. 24.2%) was higher among those over 40 years. The differences were not significant. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia was significantly higher in participants with overweight/obese (0.0% vs. 41.6%, phypertension was found. Hyperglycaemia was more prevalent among overweight/obese participants. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anarado Agnes N

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu (UNTH-E, Nigeria Method Face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the core surgical units of the UNTH- E, from June 2003 to September 2005. Results 160 patients were interviewed; 68 (42.5% were males and 94 (57.5% were females. Ages ranged from 13–86 years. Breast, urogenital system, gastrointestinal system, and soft tissue cancers predominated. One hundred and four patients (65.0% have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness; 56 (35.0% patients have not used any form of CAM. There were more females than males among the non-CAM users. The use of CAM was not affected by age, marital status, level of education, religious affiliation, or socioeconomic status. The most frequently used CAMs were herbs (51.9%, faith/prayer healing (49.4%, aloe vera (23.1%, Forever Living Products (16.3%, medicinal tea (14.4%, and Blackstone (12.5%. Over 23% of those who used CAM were satisfied, but 68.3% were disappointed. Most users (67.3% did not see any benefit from the CAM, but 25% could describe some specific benefits. More than 21% of users reported various unwanted effects. While 86.5% of CAM users will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, 9.6% will use the two together to help each other. Most users (79.8% will not repeat CAM or recommend its use for cancer. The majority of patients (55.8% did not mention their use of CAM to their doctors – mostly because the doctor did not ask

  15. Management of radiation dose to paediatric patients undergoing CT examination at Korle-bu Teaching Hospital, Accra-Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedel, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work management of paediatric patients doses for Computed Tomography examinations have been studied at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. The assessment of the management system involved: evaluation of the frequency of examinations, comparison of techniques factors used for adult and children; estimation of CTDI w , CTDI vol , DLP and effective dose; evaluation of quality assurance and quality control programmes to optimise paediatric patient doses. The frequency of CT examinations for paediatric patients accounted for 1300 out 5200 examinations (25%) of the total examinations recorded for the year 2008 which is five times that of the East European countries, indicating an overuse of CT examinations for children not taking into account paediatric patient anatomy and the section of the body being scanned. Adult CT exposure parameters such as the KV, mAs, scan length, pitch, and collimation values were being used in paediatric CT examination. Effective dose estimated for children were higher than that for adults by factors 5.1, 1.8, 3.1 and 3.9 more for head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations respectively. From the questionnaire administered and dosimetry results there was no established justification policy, procedures and referral criteria for CT examination requests for children. There was no Quality Assurance Committee to see to the implementation of dose management system dedicated to paediatrics patients. There was the need for the Hospital Authorities to formulate policies in the training of CT equipment operators, radiographers and radiographers and radiologist in modern CT technology as well as in the selection of appropriate parameters tailored to individual patient size that can achieve desirable diagnostic image quality at low doses. (au)

  16. Assessing patient-centred communication in teaching: a systematic review of instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Marianne; Rasenberg, Ellemieke; van Weel, Chris; Laan, Roland; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn

    2017-11-01

    Patient-centred communication is a key component of patient centredness in medical care. Therefore, adequate education in and assessment of patient-centred communication skills are necessary. In general, feedback on communication skills is most effective when it is provided directly and is systematic. This calls for adequate measurement instruments. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic review of existing instruments that measure patient centredness in doctor-patient communication and can be used to provide direct feedback. A systematic review was conducted using an extensive validated search strategy for measurement instruments in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The databases were searched from their inception to 1 July 2016. Articles describing the development or evaluation of the measurement properties of instruments that measure patient centredness (by applying three or more of the six dimensions of a published definition of patient centredness) in doctor-patient communication and that can be used for the provision of direct feedback were included. The methodological quality of measurement properties was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Thirteen articles describing 14 instruments measuring patient centredness in doctor-patient communication were identified. These studies cover a wide range of settings and patient populations, and vary in the dimensions of patient centredness applied and in methodological quality on aspects of reliability and validity. This review gives a comprehensive overview of all instruments available for the measurement of patient centredness in doctor-patient communication that can be used for the provision of direct feedback and are described in the literature. Despite the widely felt need for valid and reliable instruments for the measurement of patient-centred communication, most of the instruments currently available have not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, we recommend further research into and

  17. Socio-economics: a propensity of self-medication among OPD patients of a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Subha Sankar Chattopadhyay; Angana Datta; Aritra Ghosh; Suvadip Biswas; Krishnendu Mandal; Supreeti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Use of over the counter (OTC) drug is very much common in India. Not only medical professionals or educated urban population but also it is common in rural area and low educated person. This study was done to assess the extent of knowledge and practices of OTC drugs among OPD patients of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A questionnaire based study was conducted among 1680 Medicine OPD (outpatient department) patients. Results: Among the participants, 62% patients taking ...

  18. Patient Motivators for Emergency Department Utilization: A Pilot Cross-Sectional Survey of Uninsured Admitted Patients at a University Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Karla; Ogbu, Uzor C; Amin, Alpesh; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2015-08-01

    During the past several decades, emergency department (ED) increasing volume has proven to be a difficult challenge to address. With the advent of the Affordable Care Act, there is much speculation on the impact that health care coverage expansion will have on ED usage across the country. It is currently unclear what the effects of Medicaid expansion and a decreased number of uninsured patients will have on ED usage. We sought to identify the motivators behind ED use in patients who were admitted to a university teaching hospital in order to project the possible impact of health care reform on ED utilization. We surveyed a convenience sample of uninsured patients who presented to the ED and were subsequently admitted to the inpatient setting. Our respondents sought care in the ED primarily because they perceived their condition to be a medical emergency. Their lack of insurance and associated costs of care resulted in delays in seeking care, in reduced access, and a limited ability to manage chronic health conditions. Thus, contributing to their admission. Affordability will reduce financial barriers to health care insurance coverage. However, efficient and timely access to primary care is a stronger determinant of ED usage in our sample. Health insurance coverage does not guarantee improved health care access. Patients may continue to experience significant challenges in managing chronic health conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Health care-seeking behavior among patients with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional study of patients presenting at a single teaching hospital in Lagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babawale Taslim Bello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health care-seeking behavior of individuals determines how early they present for appropriate care. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, late presentation to the nephrologist is associated with poor outcomes. This study aims to describe the health care-seeking behavior of patients with CKD attending the nephrology outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital located in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted on 104 consecutive adult patients with CKD, presenting for the first time at the nephrology outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital located in Lagos, South West Nigeria. Information was retrieved from the study participants using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire, entered into an Excel spreadsheet, and analyzed using Epi Info® statistical software version 7.0. Results: Overall, 74 (71.2% patients sought help, first from a trained health care provider, and their health care-seeking behavior was adjudged to be appropriate. Compared to patients with appropriate health care-seeking behavior, those with inappropriate health care-seeking behavior had a lower mean age (40.4 ± 13.7 years vs 47.3 ± 15.6 years;P = 0.03, were less likely to see their illness as a medical problem (46.7% vs 67.6%;P = 0.04, more likely to have a monthly income less than N25,000 ($150 (80.0% vs 59.5%;P = 0.04, and have received below tertiary level education (20.0% vs 48.6%; P < 0.01. They were also more likely to have consulted more than one health care provider before being referred to our clinic. The factors predicting inappropriate health care-seeking behavior were education below the tertiary level and age less than 45 years. Conclusion: Though health care-seeking behavior was appropriate in majority of our patients with CKD, there remains a need for improved public health awareness.

  20. Determination of doses and cancer risk to patients undergoing digital x-ray examinations at the Tamale Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweligiba, S.A.

    2015-07-01

    Entrance surface and effective doses as well as cancer risk to patients for three common radiological examinations were estimated at the radiology department of the Tamale Teaching Hospital. The quality control assessment indicated that the digital x-ray equipment used, performed self-consistently in line with acceptable performance criteria. The study included eighty-two (82) adult patients undergoing three x-ray imaging modalities; Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis Examinations. From the study the mean entrance dose to abdomen and pelvis were found to be 0.6 ± 0.2 mGy whiles that of chest was found to be 0.2 ± 0.1 mGy. These were found to be lower than results of studies carried out elsewhere. The effective dose to patient was computed using PCXMC 2.0 software. The results shows an average effective dose of 0.036 mSv, 0.084 mSv and 0.067 mSv for chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations respectively. The risk of radiation induced cancer as a result to entrance surface dose was found to be 5.68 x 10-5 %, 1.58 x 10-4 % and 1.49 x 10-4 % for Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis examinations respectively. The third quartile values of the entrance surface dose were found to be lower than recommended diagnostic reference levels published by NRPB, UK and the IAEA for the examinations under study. (author)

  1. ICU Utilization by Cardio-Thoracic Patients in a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) of the 5 patients with Tetralogy of Fallot that had Blallock-Taussig shunt and all (100%) the 3 patients with tracheoesophageal fistula that had a one-stage repair admitted into the ICU had ventilatory support as part of their management and.

  2. Bacterial skin flora of diabetic patients in the Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetics frequently are afflicted with bacterial skin infections because of the high circulating blood sugar. The frequent skin infections in these patients may be a result of change in normal skin flora. This study was carried out to find out the normal skin flora of these patients. Ninety four (50 study and 44 control) consecutive ...

  3. Teaching About the Doctor-Patient Relationship in the First Postgraduate Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledge, William H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Introduction of a course on the doctor-patient relationship in the clinically demanding first postgraduate year encountered two problems: student perceptions that the content was not necessary or was too burdensome, and the tendency of residents to feel guilty or inadequate in patient relationships at that stage of training. (MSE)

  4. Transforming management of patients undergoing splenectomy in an Irish teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-splenectomy infection has a mortality rate of up to 70%. Previously we have published data confirming the poor adherence to best practice guidelines with relation to management of the asplenic patient. A defined protocol of care was established, staff education commenced and a \\'patient information leaflet\\' made available. AIM: To ascertain whether management of the asplenic patient has improved since the implementation of a structured programme of care. METHOD: Retrospective chart review of all splenectomies performed in Beaumont Hospital between 2002 and 2008. RESULTS: Overall, 75.9% of patients were documented as having received the recommended vaccinations. Of these, 48.7% were not timed according to recommended guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotics were documented as prescribed in all but five patients discharged. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate an improvement in post-splenectomy care between 2002 and 2008. However, further improvements are necessary.

  5. Transforming management of patients undergoing splenectomy in an Irish teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-06

    BACKGROUND: Post-splenectomy infection has a mortality rate of up to 70%. Previously we have published data confirming the poor adherence to best practice guidelines with relation to management of the asplenic patient. A defined protocol of care was established, staff education commenced and a \\'patient information leaflet\\' made available. AIM: To ascertain whether management of the asplenic patient has improved since the implementation of a structured programme of care. METHOD: Retrospective chart review of all splenectomies performed in Beaumont Hospital between 2002 and 2008. RESULTS: Overall, 75.9% of patients were documented as having received the recommended vaccinations. Of these, 48.7% were not timed according to recommended guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotics were documented as prescribed in all but five patients discharged. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate an improvement in post-splenectomy care between 2002 and 2008. However, further improvements are necessary.

  6. Clinical Teaching of Prosthodontics in Undergraduate Courses in a German Dental School: Patients, Visits, Efforts, and Incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettig, Fabian; Behrend, Florian

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown what disadvantages are faced by patients deciding for a prosthodontic treatment by inexperienced students. Commonly, the related extra effort and time are compensated by cost reduction of treatment fees. Thereby, the dental schools subsidize treatments to teach clinical prosthodontics. The aim of this study was to clarify the benefits to patients as well as the efforts of the dental school. Data collected from three courses in a dental school in Germany were patient gender, age, occupation, zip code, number of visits, scope of treatment including costs, financial discount, and remaining copayment. Travel costs were calculated based on zip code. Balance of travel costs and treatment discount was defined as financial benefit. The results showed that 185 patients (95 male) aged 32 to 82 years (median=58) were treated with fixed restorations (FR, n=110), telescopic dentures (TD, n=87), complete dentures (CD, n=17), or other (RD, n=3). The mean number of visits was 11 for FR, 12 for TD, and 9 for CD. Single distance to the clinic ranged from 0.6 to 65 miles (median=12). Total costs of prosthodontics were reduced by 19% on average. The mean financial benefit was 429 USD (median=298, min=-482, max=4025). The financial benefits were found to differ widely, including additional expenditures of patients. Participation, travel burden, and copayment did not depend on age, gender, or occupation. The financial benefit was relativized because students needed at least twice the sessions of a dentist. As a result, the financial efforts of dental schools are significant and compromise a cost-covering education.

  7. Study of drug–Drug interactions among the hypertensive patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansha Subramanian

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The study highlighted that patients with hypertension are particularly vulnerable to DDI. The comorbidities, advanced age, and polypharmacy are the important factors associated with the occurrence of DDI.

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Isolated Calf Vein Thrombosis in a Large Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santin Brian

    2011-01-01

    Methods. A retrospective review of the records of 100 consecutive patients diagnosed with ICDVT by DUS was conducted. Results. Patients (59% male were predominantly Caucasian (86% and inpatients (69% with an average age of 53 years. The most frequent risk factors were malignancy (22%, immobility (18%, and previous DVT (13%. Thrombus was present in named tibial veins in 58% and muscular branches in 42%. The peroneal vein was most frequently involved (39/117, 33% followed by the gastrocnemius veins (29/117, 22% and muscular calf tributaries (14%. Conclusions. Our patient population with ICDVT was predominantly symptomatic, in-patient cohort with a high incidence of risk factors such as malignancy, immobility, previous DVT, trauma, and postoperative status. Partial or complete resolution was documented by DUS in 53%.

  9. Comparison of standardized patients and real patients as an experiential teaching strategy in a nutrition counseling course for dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Vicki S; Rothpletz-Puglia, Pamela; Denmark, Robert; Byham-Gray, Laura

    2015-02-01

    To compare the quality of communication and behavioral change skills among dietetic students having two nutrition encounters with either a real patient or a standardized patient in the simulation laboratory at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States. A retrospective analysis of video recordings (n=138) containing nutrition encounters of dietetic students (n=75) meeting with a standardized patient (SP) or a real patient (RP). Trained raters evaluated communication skills with the 28 item Calgary Cambridge Observation Guide (CCOG) and skills promoting behavior change using the 11 item Behavior Change Counseling Index (BECCI) tool. Using the CCOG, there was a significantly greater mean score in the SP group for the category of "Gathering Information" in encounter one (p=0.020). There were good to excellent ratings in all categories of the CCOG and the BECCI scores for the SP and the RP groups at both encounters. There was no significant differences in change scores from encounter one to encounter two between groups. Encounters with SPs and RPs are both effective strategies for dietetic students to demonstrate their communication and behavior change skills. Utilizing SPs is an effective experiential strategy for nutrition counseling curricula. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kaposi Sarcoma among HIV Infected Patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: A 14-Year Retrospective Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakanmi Akinde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the increased incidence of Kaposi sarcoma (KS resulting from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS pandemic, there is still significant underreporting of KS in this environment. Objectives. This study was aimed at determining the incidence and clinicopathologic patterns of KS among HIV infected patients in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Nigeria, over a 14-year period: January 2000 to December 2013. Methodology. The materials for this study included patients’ hospital clinical files, duplicate copies of histopathologic reports, and tissue blocks and corresponding archival slides in the Anatomic and Molecular Pathology Department and the HIV/AIDS unit of the Department of Haematology. Results. Within the study period, 182 cases of KS were diagnosed, accounting for 1.2% of all patients managed for HIV/AIDS and 2.99% of solid malignant tumours. The male-to-female ratio and modal age group were 1 : 1.3 and 5th decade, respectively. Most cases (90% had purely mucocutaneous involvement with the lower limb being the commonest site (65.8%. The majority of lesions were plaques (65.8%. Vascular formation was the predominant histologic type seen (43.5%. Conclusion. KS in Lagos followed the same epidemiologic trend as other centers in Nigeria, with an increasing incidence in this era of HIV/AIDS.

  11. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12.  Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Vitamin Supplementation among Patients visiting Out-Patient Physicians in a Teaching Hospital in Karachi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Azam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding the use of vitamin supplements among patients visiting Out-Patient clinics of a teaching hospital.Methods: Four hundred patients were interviewed during the period of July to September 2008, at the Out-patient clinics, Aga Khan University hospital, Karachi. A pre-tested and structured questionnaire was used to collect information. It consisted of questions regarding demographics, awareness of vitamin supplements and its consumption, reasons for usage and its effects. The purpose of the study was explained and assurance of confidentiality was given. After obtaining written consent, eligible individuals were interviewed. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19.0 was used to analyze the data.Results: The results revealed that 98�0of the respondents were aware of vitamin supplements. The most known vitamin was found to be Vitamin C (16.9�20with Vitamin K being the least well known(0.4� while 51.8�0of the respondents were unaware of the harmful effects of vitamin supplements. The results also showed that 84.8�0of the study population had taken vitamin supplements, and 79�0of the participants considered that vitamin supplementsto be helpful. Taking vitamin supplements as a compensation for the deficiencies in the body was the most frequently chosen answer (17.7�20as the reason for use of vitamin supplements. On the other hand, a majority of the population was unaware of the indications for use of vitamin supplements.Conclusion: This study highlights a very significant yet ignored issue of vitamin supplementation in Pakistan. A need exists to inform the general population about the use of vitamin supplementation. The media and the medical community are required to play their role in this regard. Short/ refresher training courses are needed for doctors to update and disseminate adequate knowledge of vitamin supplementation to their patients.

  13. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging in a teaching hospital on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hailey, D M; Crowe, B L [Australian Inst. of Health, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Health Technology Div.; Burgess, I A [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia); Khangure, M S; Morris, I [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1993-05-01

    An observational study was undertaken to obtain measures of the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on diagnosis, patient management and patient outcome. A minimum data set at the time of examination was used for 1119 consecutive patients referred by specialists for MRI of the brain or spine. Three months follow up of 707 brain examinations and 235 spinal examinations were undertaken using a questionnaire on diagnosis and patient management. Magnetic resonance imaging made a dominant contribution to final diagnoses of neoplasia and vascular disorders, but was less significant for white matter disease. In a high proportion of cases other types of examination also influenced the final diagnosis. It was concluded that magnetic resonance imaging affected patient management in a high proportion of spinal examinations and in cases of cerebral neoplasm, with lesser contributions to cases of cerebrovascular disorder and white matter disease. While MRI was considered superior to other imaging methods, which it could often replace, in practice it will form only one input to the diagnostic decision. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Use of identification wristbands among patients receiving inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louíse Viecili Hoffmeister

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the use of identification wristbands among patients hospitalized in inpatient units.METHOD: quantitative, descriptive and transversal research, with a sample of 385 patients. Data collection occurred through the observational method through the filling out of a structured questionnaire which aimed to check the presence of the identification wristband and the identifiers used. Descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies was used for analysis.RESULTS: it was obtained that 83.9% of the patients were found to have the correctly identified wristband, 11.9% had a wristband with errors, and 4.2% of the patients were without a wristband. The main nonconformities found on the identification wristbands were incomplete name, different registration numbers, illegibility of the data and problems with the physical integrity of the wristbands.CONCLUSION: the study demonstrated the professionals' engagement in the process of patient identification, evidencing a high rate of conformity of the wristbands. Furthermore, it contributed to identify elements in the use of wristbands which may be improved for a safe identification process.

  15. Use of identification wristbands among patients receiving inpatient treatment in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Louíse Viecili; de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the use of identification wristbands among patients hospitalized in inpatient units. quantitative, descriptive and transversal research, with a sample of 385 patients. Data collection occurred through the observational method through the filling out of a structured questionnaire which aimed to check the presence of the identification wristband and the identifiers used. Descriptive statistics with absolute and relative frequencies was used for analysis. it was obtained that 83.9% of the patients were found to have the correctly identified wristband, 11.9% had a wristband with errors, and 4.2% of the patients were without a wristband. The main nonconformities found on the identification wristbands were incomplete name, different registration numbers, illegibility of the data and problems with the physical integrity of the wristbands. the study demonstrated the professionals' engagement in the process of patient identification, evidencing a high rate of conformity of the wristbands. Furthermore, it contributed to identify elements in the use of wristbands which may be improved for a safe identification process.

  16. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging in a teaching hospital on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hailey, D.M.; Crowe, B.L.; Khangure, M.S.; Morris, I.

    1993-01-01

    An observational study was undertaken to obtain measures of the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on diagnosis, patient management and patient outcome. A minimum data set at the time of examination was used for 1119 consecutive patients referred by specialists for MRI of the brain or spine. Three months follow up of 707 brain examinations and 235 spinal examinations were undertaken using a questionnaire on diagnosis and patient management. Magnetic resonance imaging made a dominant contribution to final diagnoses of neoplasia and vascular disorders, but was less significant for white matter disease. In a high proportion of cases other types of examination also influenced the final diagnosis. It was concluded that magnetic resonance imaging affected patient management in a high proportion of spinal examinations and in cases of cerebral neoplasm, with lesser contributions to cases of cerebrovascular disorder and white matter disease. While MRI was considered superior to other imaging methods, which it could often replace, in practice it will form only one input to the diagnostic decision. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Improving efficiency and patient satisfaction in a tertiary teaching hospital preoperative clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Miriam J P; Correll, Darin J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Bader, Angela M; Hepner, David L

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and organizational aspects of the preoperative visit can have a significant impact on patient satisfaction. The authors' previous work demonstrated that communication of information from the clinician to the patient was found to be the most positively rated component, whereas organizational issues, particularly waiting time, were the most negative. This study compares two yearly cycles of patient satisfaction surveys to assess the process and impact of implementation of changes. The authors distributed a one-page questionnaire, consisting of elements evaluating satisfaction with clinical providers and with organizational aspects of the visit, to patients in their preoperative clinic during two different time periods. Fourteen different questions had five Likert scale options ranging from excellent to poor. Changes implemented included clerical, scheduling, and clinical changes. The overall collection rate of completed questionnaires was 79%. The scores for each question in Cycle 2 were higher for all questions, with 3 of 14 reaching statistical significance (P customer service, and implementation of changes in provider roles. These modifications resulted in an improvement in patient satisfaction and a reduction in waiting time with minimal economic impact.

  18. Bed blockers: A study on the elderly patients in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study of in-patients over the age of 60 years was conducted at district McGann Hospital, Shimoga on patients who were classified as bed blockers. Level of dependency and cognitive function of these patients were assessed using Barthel scale and Abbreviated mental test (AMT respectively. Median age of the study population was 67 years; majority of them were men. Most of them were admitted in the medical ward and the median time to be labeled as bed blocker was 32 days. These bed blockers were a weak group of patients with an average 3.1 pathology per case. Majority of them suffered from neurological disorders and cardiovascular disease. High level of dependence was noted with a mean Barthel score of 29.68 (Range 0 -100. Low levels of cognitive function was also noted among these patients with a mean AMT of 4.76 (Range 0 -10.These findings demonstrate that the bed blockers in McGann hospital suffer not only from genuine health problems but also have a high dependency level in activities of daily living which hamper their discharge to the community. Community based rehabilitation using an intersectoral approach may help at least the less dependent to return home.

  19. Rectal dose estimation for cervical cancer patients at the radiotherapy department of Komfo Anokye teaching hospital, using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahadzie, C.

    2012-12-01

    The research was aimed at evaluating the rectal dose of cervical cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi. This was done by using TLD, anthropomorphic phantom and a cohort of patients selected on consent. TLD chips of dimension 0.125x0.125x0.35mm were placed on each patient and external treatment was planned to deliver 200 cGy of radiation to each patient as prescribed by the Radiation Oncologist. The result shows a 3.39 percentage difference between the predicted dose by the TPS and that measured by the TLD. This percentage difference is below the limit of 5 percent set by Hanson et al. Rectal dose was evaluated using anthromorphic phantom and a cohort of patients. The pelvic section of the phantom was located; TLD chips inserted into the plugs at the positions of the rectal volume for each of the 8 sections of the anthropomorphic phantom and exposure of 200 cGy of radiation for 25 fractions of external beam. The dose was measured as 213.28 cGy and was used to calculate the biological effective dose (BED). The BED was added to the rectal dose from intracavitary brachytherapy to get the total rectal dose (TRD) for each patient. The least rectal dose from the patient studied is 22.123Gy which is far below the TD 5/5 and TD 5 0 /5 for the volumes of 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3. Emami et al. gave a threshold doses of 85Gy for 1/3 volume, 70 Gy for 2/3 and 60 Gy for 3/3 volume. The highest rectal dose was 63.76 Gy comparing to the TD 5/5 (Gy) values shows as that the measured rectal dose is on the high size. Emami et al. gave for 1/3 volume 61.38 Gy, 2/3 volume 60.50 Gy and 60 Gy for 3/3. Exceeding TD5/5 means that there is 5 percent probability of having complication such as severe proctitis, necrosis or fistula. For TD50/5, Emami et al. gave 81.38 Gy for partial volume of 1/3, 80.50 Gy for 2/3 volume and 80 Gy for 3/3 volume. The highest rectal dose recorded is 63.78 Gy which is far below threshold by Emami et al. (1991). (au)

  20. Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulations in Teaching Clinical Communication Skills to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Carly T; Tilashalski, Ken R; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; White, Marjorie Lee

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' long-term retention of clinical communication skills learned in a second-year standardized patient simulation at one U.S. dental school. Retention was measured by students' performance with an actual patient during their fourth year. The high-fidelity simulation exercise focused on clinical communication skills took place during the spring term of the students' second year. The effect of the simulation was measured by comparing the fourth-year clinical performance of two groups: those who had participated in the simulation (intervention group; Class of 2016) and those who had not (no intervention/control group; Class of 2015). In the no intervention group, all 47 students participated; in the intervention group, 58 of 59 students participated. Both instructor assessments and students' self-assessments were used to evaluate the effectiveness of key patient interaction principles as well as comprehensive presentation of multiple treatment options. The results showed that students in the intervention group more frequently included cost during their treatment option presentation than did students in the no intervention group. The instructor ratings showed that the intervention group included all key treatment option components except duration more frequently than did the no intervention group. However, the simulation experience did not result in significantly more effective student-patient clinical communication on any of the items measured. This study presents limited evidence of the effectiveness of a standardized patient simulation to improve dental students' long-term clinical communication skills with respect to thorough presentation of treatment options to a patient.

  1. The opinion of patients at a local South Africa teaching hospital on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-24

    Sep 24, 2012 ... Gift giving is a technique that is commonly used by the pharmaceutical industry to generate feelings of reciprocity and obligation in physicians, and research has clearly demonstrated that physicians are susceptible to this practice.1-3 As a result, the pharmaceutical industry spends. The opinion of patients ...

  2. Drug Utilization Pattern In Psychiatry Outdoor Patients At Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital Of Bastar Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Tabish

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychotropic drugs have had a remarkable impact in psychiatric practice. However, their utilization in actualClinical practice, effectiveness and safety in real life situation need continuous study.Aim: To evaluate the utilization pattern of antipsychotics drugs in the OPD of Psychiatry department.Materials and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was     undertaken for a period of three months.   The total number of prescriptions that were analyzed were 264. Patients of all ages and both sexes were included in the study while inpatients,Referred patients and patients of epilepsy were excluded.Results: Out of 264 patients, 180(68.18% were males and84 (31.81% were females. Depression (30.6% was the commonest psychotic ailment. Fluoxetine (34% was the most common antidepressant prescribed for its treatment.Anxiety comprised the second commonest category of psychotic disorder (24.4% followed by Schizophrenia (22%. Lorazepam (43.4% was the most prescribed anxiolytic whereas      Risperidone (46.6% was used to treat it.Conclusion:  Depression was the commonest psychotic ailment followed by anxiety and schizophrenia. Polypharmacy was found in 45% of prescriptions. Risperidone + Trihexyphenidyl was the commonest fixed dose combination used for Schizophrenia and Psychosis followed by amitriptyline+Chlordiazepoxide for anxiety and depression.

  3. Dyslipidemias in type II mellitus patients in a teaching hospital of Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naheed, T.; Khan, A.; Masood, G.; Bilal-Bin-Yunus; Chaudhry, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Subject: One hundred consecutive type II diabetics between the age of 40-70 years. Those who had hyperlipidemia due to other causes e.g. nephrotic syndrome, hypothyroidism and type-I diabetes mellitus were excluded. Results: One hundred patients suffering from type II diabetes were included in the study. Out of these 64% were females and 36% were males. The age range was 41-70 years with mean of 56.1 plus minus 9.38. Out of these 100 patients, duration of diabetes mellitus of less than 10 years was noted in 43% of patients and more than 10 years in 57%. Random blood sugar was 229.34 plus minus 6.23 and fasting blood sugar was 153.5 plus minus 4.45 when it was seen in the total study subjects, random blood sugar 210.51 plus minus 7.68 and fasting blood sugar 143.83 plus minus 5.35 in sub group whose duration of illness was less than 10 years. In sub group whose DM was more than 10 years random blood sugar was 257.91 plus minus 12.81 and fasting blood sugar was 171.21 plus minus 8.14. Serum cholesterol was 226.88 plus minus 18.48 in the patients as one group, in illness of less than 10 years, it was 191.72 plus minus 5.72 and in illness of more than 10 years duration it was 213.11 plus minus 6.70. Serum triglyceride in illness of less than 10 years duration was 191.83 plus minus 8.05 and where it was more than 10 years, it was 210.04 plus minus 8.90. Serum HDL-C was 36.25 plus minus 0.45 in patients illness of less than 10 years and 35.57 plus minus 0.60 in more than 10 years. Serum LDL - C was 127.1 plus minus 3.99 in patients with less than 10 years of diabetes mellitus and 147.5 plus minus 5.20 in patients with more than 10 years of illness. Fifty-eight patients were hypertensive, 43% of the male patients were smokers. Conclusions: Diabetic dyslipidemia in an important cause of morbidity. Duration of diabetes is associated with higher incidence of dyslipidemia. Type II DM is associated with marked increase in the risk of CHD. Dyslipidemia is believed to be a major

  4. Dyslipidemias in type II mellitus patients in a teaching hospital of Lahore, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naheed, T [King Edward Medical College, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Medicine; Khan, A; Masood, G; Bilal-Bin-Yunus,; Chaudhry, M A [Fatima Jinnah Medical College, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Medicine

    2003-12-01

    Subject: One hundred consecutive type II diabetics between the age of 40-70 years. Those who had hyperlipidemia due to other causes e.g. nephrotic syndrome, hypothyroidism and type-I diabetes mellitus were excluded. Results: One hundred patients suffering from type II diabetes were included in the study. Out of these 64% were females and 36% were males. The age range was 41-70 years with mean of 56.1 plus minus 9.38. Out of these 100 patients, duration of diabetes mellitus of less than 10 years was noted in 43% of patients and more than 10 years in 57%. Random blood sugar was 229.34 plus minus 6.23 and fasting blood sugar was 153.5 plus minus 4.45 when it was seen in the total study subjects, random blood sugar 210.51 plus minus 7.68 and fasting blood sugar 143.83 plus minus 5.35 in sub group whose duration of illness was less than 10 years. In sub group whose DM was more than 10 years random blood sugar was 257.91 plus minus 12.81 and fasting blood sugar was 171.21 plus minus 8.14. Serum cholesterol was 226.88 plus minus 18.48 in the patients as one group, in illness of less than 10 years, it was 191.72 plus minus 5.72 and in illness of more than 10 years duration it was 213.11 plus minus 6.70. Serum triglyceride in illness of less than 10 years duration was 191.83 plus minus 8.05 and where it was more than 10 years, it was 210.04 plus minus 8.90. Serum HDL-C was 36.25 plus minus 0.45 in patients illness of less than 10 years and 35.57 plus minus 0.60 in more than 10 years. Serum LDL - C was 127.1 plus minus 3.99 in patients with less than 10 years of diabetes mellitus and 147.5 plus minus 5.20 in patients with more than 10 years of illness. Fifty-eight patients were hypertensive, 43% of the male patients were smokers. Conclusions: Diabetic dyslipidemia in an important cause of morbidity. Duration of diabetes is associated with higher incidence of dyslipidemia. Type II DM is associated with marked increase in the risk of CHD. Dyslipidemia is believed to be a major

  5. Some lessons in mathematics: a comparison of mathematics teaching in Japan and America

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keith

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), a representative sample of Year 9 classrooms in Japan and the United States were video-taped. Analysis of this data is enabling comparisons to be made of the teaching methods typically employed in these two countries. Findings suggest that while the typical US lesson emphasised skill acquisition, the typical Japanese lesson focused on the solving of complex problems through pupil exploration and presentation.

  6. Endodontic flare-ups: comparison of incidence between single and multiple visits procedures in patients attending a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, Ao; Udoye, C I

    2004-12-01

    The present study was performed to compare the incidence of endodontic flare ups in single with multiple visits treatment procedures, to establish the relationship between pre-operative and post obturation pain in patients attending for endodontic therapy in a Nigerian teaching Hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to either single visit or multiple visits group. Data collected at root canal treatment appointment and recall visits (1st, 7th and 30th day post obturation) include pulp vitality status, the presence or absence of pre-operative pain, presence and degree of post obturation pain. Presence of endodontic flare-ups (defined as either patient's report of pain not controlled with over the counter medication and or increasing swelling). The compiled data were analyzed using chi-square where applicable. P level endodontic flare-ups (8.1 %) were recorded in the multiple visits group compared to 19 (18,3%) flare-ups for the single visit group, P = 0.02. For both single and multiple visits procedures, there were statistically significant correlations between pre operative and post obturation pain (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0004 respectively). Teeth with vital pulps reported the lowest frequency of post obturation pain (48.8%), while those with non vital pulps were found to have the highest frequency oh post obturation pain (50,3%), P = 0.9. Although the present study reported higher incidences for post obturation pain and flare-ups following the single visit procedures, single visit endodontic therapy has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative to multiple visits treatment.

  7. The Effect of Structured Preadmission Preoperative Teaching on Patient Outcomes After Abdominal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, gastric surgery, ventral hernlorrhaphy, bowel resection without ostomy , laparotomy). 3.) Patients with the following...materials I hope will be helpful to you in the study you are planning. I think most of these measures are far more elaborate than what you need, but they...and patterns Eliminative aids used at home Ostomies Diaphioresis Other excretions ACTIVITY AND REST Usual activitieS Ability to perform ADL Tolerance

  8. Design and implementation of a simulation exercise for teaching confidentiality of patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J R

    1982-05-01

    Allied health students, making the transition from a purely academic to a professional school setting, are suddenly faced with judgment decisions about disclosure of medical information. Obscure guidelines and new interpersonal relationships with other members of the health care team complicate this transition and pose a threat to confidentiality of patient information. This article describes the design and implementation of a simulation exercise to reinforce lecture guidelines specifying disclosure of medical information without risk to the patient or student. The simulation is comprised of 10 critical incidents calling for responses ranging from logical to judgmental. Although written primarily for medical technologists, with emphasis on limitations governing release of patient laboratory data, the simulation approach is presented here as a model for other allied health professions. The use of a latent image format provides learners with positive or negative reinforcement as they learn the consequences of their decisions. The simulation activity described is easily adapted to small group discussion or computer-assisted instruction. While the simulation appears to be an accurate representation of reality, peer and real-life pressures could not be totally simulated.

  9. Does teaching non-technical skills to medical students improve those skills and simulated patient outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Vera; Herbstreit, Frank; Kehren, Clemens; Chittamadathil, Jilson; Wolfertz, Sandra; Dirkmann, Daniel; Kluge, Annette; Peters, Jürgen

    2017-03-29

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a tailor-made, non-technical skills seminar on medical student's behaviour, attitudes, and performance during simulated patient treatment. Seventy-seven students were randomized to either a non-technical skills seminar (NTS group, n=43) or a medical seminar (control group, n=34). The human patient simulation was used as an evaluation tool. Before the seminars, all students performed the same simulated emergency scenario to provide baseline measurements. After the seminars, all students were exposed to a second scenario, and behavioural markers for evaluating their non-technical skills were rated. Furthermore, teamwork-relevant attitudes were measured before and after the scenarios, and perceived stress was measured following each simulation. All simulations were also evaluated for various medical endpoints. Non-technical skills concerning situation awareness (ptechnical skills to improve student's non-technical skills. In a next step, to improve student's handling of emergencies and patient outcomes, non-technical skills seminars should be accompanied by exercises and more broadly embedded in the medical school curriculum.

  10. Music in the operating theatre: opinions of staff and patients of a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makama, J G; Ameh, E A; Eguma, S A

    2010-12-01

    The role of music during surgery has been studied, including its effect on theatre staff, users and patients. However, little attention has been paid to its application especially in our environment. It was a prospective study, involving theatre staff, users, and patients. Their opinions on acceptability and the role of music in operating theatre were determined. Information was obtained by questionnaire. There were 162 respondents; age range 25 to 76 years (median age 39). There were 109 (67.2%) males and 53 (32.7%) female. One hundred and forty five (89.5%) respondents agree that music should be played in the operating theatre. One fifty eight, (97.5%) considered low tone of music to be most appropriate in the theatre while 3(1.9%), and 1(0.6%) considered moderate and high tone respectively to be most appropriate. One hundred and sixteen, (71.6%) preferred jazz music while 19(11.7%) reggae, 11(6.8%) African music, 13 (8.0%) others (not specify), 2 (1.2%) classical, and 1(0.6%) Irish folk. The majority of the respondents were aware of the role of music in terms of its anxiolytic effect, reduction of stress and enhancement of performance when familiar music is played. Music in the operating theatre has immeasurable effects. It can prevent distraction, minimize annoyance, reduce stress and diminish the anxiety of patients, staff and users.

  11. Psychological assessment of patients undergoing cardiac transplant in a teaching hospital (2004 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara dos Santos Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the psychological evaluations of patients with heart failure waiting for heart transplantation. Methods: The data were obtained from patient records containing pre-surgery psychological evaluations performed by psychologists from the multidisciplinary cardiology team. The evaluation protocol included the Quality of Life Questionnaire (SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory, and an interview script. Results: The results of psychological evaluations performed between 2004 and 2012 for 60 candidates for heart transplantation were analyzed: 43 men and 17 women aged between 16 and 66 years (Mean=45.18; SD=11.91, predominantly from the São José do Rio Preto area (São Paulo state, Brazil (83%, with incomplete elementary education (68%, and who were in stable relationships (73%. Although women presented higher mean scores for depression (21.41 than men (14.61, there was no significant difference between genders. Women's quality of life was impaired in all domains compared to men (below 50% and was significantly poorer in the physical functioning (P=0.01, vitality (P=0.00, emotional role functioning (P=0.04, and mental health (P=0.02 domains. Conclusion: Patients with psychosocial vulnerability (e.g., depression identified before transplantation should receive psychological treatment.

  12. Teaching the Emergency Department Patient Experience: Needs Assessment from the CORDEM Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London, Kory S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of HCAHPS Patient Satisfaction (PS scores, Patient Experience (PE has become a metric that can profoundly affect the fiscal balance of hospital systems, reputation of entire departments and welfare of individual physicians. While government and hospital mandates demonstrate the prominence of PE as a quality measure, no such mandate exists for its education. The objective of this study was to determine the education and evaluation landscape for PE in categorical Emergency Medicine (EM residencies.This was a prospective survey analysis of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD membership. Program directors (PDs, assistant PDs and core faculty who are part of the CORD listserv were sent an email link to a brief, anonymous electronic survey. Respondents were asked their position in the residency, the name of their department, and questions regarding the presence and types of PS evaluative data and PE education they provide.146 responses were obtained from 139 individual residencies, representing 72% of all categorical EM residencies. This survey found that only 27% of responding residencies provide PS data to their residents. Of those programs, 61% offer simulation scores, 39% provide third party attending data on cases with resident participation, 37% provide third party acquired data specifically about residents and 37% provide internally acquired quantitative data. Only 35% of residencies reported having any organized PE curricula. Of the programs that provide an organized PE curriculum, most offer multiple modalities. 96% provide didactic lectures, 49% small group sessions, 47% simulation sessions and 27% specifically use standardized patient encounters in their simulation sessions. The majority of categorical EM residencies do not provide either PS data or any organized PE curriculum. Those that do utilize a heterogeneous set of data collection modalities and educational techniques. AOA and ACGME

  13. Study of adverse drug reactions in out-patient departments of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinnat Ara Begum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted in the Medicine and Skin outpatient departments of Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka revealed 19 cases (7 males, 12 females of adverse drug reactions (ADR out of 160 patients. 31.58% ADRs were of mild type, 42.1% were of moderate and 26.32% were of severe in nature. Gastrointestinal complications were the most frequent adverse effect (56%. Antimicrobial drugs were the most common cause of ADR (42.86% followed by NSAIDs (33.33%. This study is a preliminary study for getting information on the pattern of ADRs in Bangladesh needing further studies.

  14. An observational study investigating the impact of simulated patients in teaching communication skills in preclinical dietetic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Davidson, Z E

    2016-08-01

    Simulated patients (SPs) are often used in dietetics for the teaching and assessment of communication skills. The present study aimed to determine the impact of a SP encounter on communication skills in undergraduate preclinical dietetic students in the context of the resources required for delivering this educational strategy. This observational study collected assessment data from four cohorts of third-year dietetic students to examine the effect of participation in SP-embedded Objective Structured Clinical Exams. Students completed two SP interviews, 2 weeks apart, and communication skills were measured on both occasions. A subgroup of students received a video of their SP encounter. Differences between the two SP interview scores were compared to assess the impact of the SP encounter on communication skills. The required staff and resources were described. Data were collected involving 215 students. Out of 30 marks, there was a modest mean (SD) improvement in communication skills from the first to the second SP interview of 2.5 (4.2) (P skills, with failing students demonstrating the greatest improvement between SP encounters. There were no observed benefits for the subset of students who received videos. Providing repeat SP interview opportunities results in only modest improvement in communication skills for most students. The use of SPs needs to be considered in context of the substantial costs and resources involved and tailored to student ability. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints.

  16. ADAM, a hands-on patient simulator for teaching principles of drug disposition and compartmental pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuna, Ines; Holt, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    To design, construct and validate a pharmacokinetics simulator that offers students hands-on opportunities to participate in the design, administration and analysis of oral and intravenous dosing regimens. The Alberta Drug Administration Modeller (ADAM) is a mechanical patient in which peristaltic circulation of water through a network of silicone tubing and glass bottles creates a representation of the outcomes of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Changing peristaltic pump rates and volumes in bottles allows values for pharmacokinetic constants to be varied, thereby simulating differences in drug properties and in patient physiologies and pathologies. Following administration of methylene blue dye by oral or intravenous routes, plasma and/or urine samples are collected and drug concentrations are determined spectrophotometrically. The effectiveness of the simulator in enhancing student competence and confidence was assessed in two undergraduate laboratory classes. The simulator effectively models one- and two-compartment drug behaviour in a mathematically-robust and realistic manner. Data allow calculation of numerous pharmacokinetic constants, by traditional graphing methods or with curve-fitting software. Students' competence in solving pharmacokinetic problems involving calculations and graphing improved significantly, while an increase in confidence and understanding was reported. The ADAM is relatively inexpensive and straightforward to construct, and offers a realistic, hands-on pharmacokinetics learning opportunity for students that effectively complements didactic lectures. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Improving Inquiry Teaching through Reflection on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Christine R.; Miller, Cory

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we explore middle school science teachers' learning of inquiry-based instructional strategies through reflection on practice teaching sessions during a summer enrichment program with middle level students. The reflection sessions were part of a larger year-long inquiry professional development program in which teachers learned science content and inquiry pedagogy. The program included a 2-week summer institute in which teachers participated in science content sessions, practice teaching to middle level students, and small group-facilitated reflection sessions on their teaching. For this study, data collection focused on teachers' recorded dialogue during the facilitator - run reflection sessions, the teachers' daily written reflections, a final written reflection, and a written reflection on a videotaped teaching session. We investigated the teachers' reflection levels and the themes teachers focused on during their reflection sessions. Teachers were found to reflect at various reflection levels, from simple description to a more sophisticated focus on how to improve student learning. Recurrent themes point to the importance of providing situated learning environments, such as the practice teaching with immediate reflection for teachers to have time to practice new instructional strategies and gain insight from peers and science educators on how to handle student learning issues.

  18. Cancer risk assessment of patients undergoing computed tomography examination at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackey, T.A.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the effective dose and assess the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence of patients undergoing computed tomography scan at the korle-bu Teaching Hospital. Data on volume CT dose index (CTDI vol) and dose length product (DLP ) displayed on the scanner control console was recorded after confirmation of the results by performing independent checks on a phantom. The effective doses were estimated using the displayed and the anatomic region specific conversion factors (K ). The average effective dose for the head, abdomen, chest, neck, and pelvis were 3.63± 2.39mSv, 15.37±8.49 mSv, 12.72 ± 13.97 mSv, 4.04 ± 1.47 mSv and 15.8 ± 3.59 mSv respectively. Effective doses for the head and neck were within the typical range of (1-10mSv) for CT examinations whilst abdomen, chest and pelvis were above 10mSv. The average life attributable risk of cancer incidence for each region of examination were determined from the effective dose, sex and age using the model proposed in BEIR VII report . The average cancer risk incidence for head, neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations were low in the range 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 1,000. There were wide variations in the effective dose values obtained for the same region under examination. This trend calls for the optimization of CT examination protocols to be established to ensure that patient doses are as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. (author)

  19. Perceptions of burden of caregiving by informal caregivers of cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan-Idiok, Paulina Ackley; Anarado, Agnes Nonye

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer care is devastating to families. This research studied the informal caregivers’ perceptions of burden of caregiving to cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Methods The research adopted a cross-sectioned descriptive design and 210 caregivers providing care to advanced cancer patients were purposively selected. Data were collected using a researcher developed questionnaire and standardized Zarit Burden Interview scale (ZBIS). Data collected were analysed using descriptive and chi-square statistics with the help of SPSS 18.0 and PAS 19.0 softwares. Results The results indicated that the caregivers were in their youthful and active economic age, dominated by females, Christians, spouses, partners and parents. The burden levels experienced by the caregivers were as follows: severe (46.2%), moderate (36.2%) and trivial of no burden (17.6%). The forms of burden experienced were physical (43.4%), psychological (43.3%), financial (41.1%) and social (46.7%), quite frequently and nearly always. Psychological and social forms of burden had the highest weighted score of 228 in terms of magnitude of burden. The result further showed that there was a significant (P = 0.001) and inverse association between caregivers’ burden and the care receivers’ functional ability. The level of burden also increased significantly (P = 0.000) with the duration of care, while there was also a significant (P = 0.01) relationship between caregivers’ experience of burden and their desire to continue caregiving. Conclusion Caregiving role can be enhanced by provision of interventions such as formal education programme on cancer caregiving, oncology, home services along side with transmural care. PMID:25419297

  20. Maximizing your teaching moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may help to give your patient written or audiovisual resources before your meeting. This may help reduce ... As you are teaching, provide reinforcement for learning. Reinforce your ... Offer hints, tips, and strategies that you have gathered ...

  1. Risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients at teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abougalambou, Salwa Selim Ibrahim; Abougalambou, Ayman S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and it is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults aged 20-74. It is estimated that about 20% of patients with type 2 DM have evidence of diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis with diabetes. To evaluate the prevalence of DR and to determine risk factors related to diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients attending endocrinology clinics at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The study design was observational prospective longitudinal follow-up study, the study was conducted with sample of 1077 type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatient recruited via attended the diabetes clinics at HUSM. Diagnosis of retinopathy is based on finding the diagnostic signs of retinopathy on eye exams by fundoscopy. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent variables that affect the development of retinopathy. The prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3%. It has been noticed from this study findings, that the progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is highly prevalent among type 2 DM. The progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is a serious diabetic complication and public health strategies are required in order to reduce its risk factors and decrease its prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Arjun

    2010-01-01

    Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, asse...

  3. Challenges faced by primary care physicians when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellappans, Renukha; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2015-08-27

    The aim of this study was to identify the challenges faced by primary care physicians (PCPs) when prescribing medications for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia. 3 focus group discussions were conducted between July and August 2012 in a teaching primary care clinic in Malaysia. A topic guide was used to facilitate the discussions which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. PCPs affiliated to the primary care clinic were purposively sampled to include a range of clinical experience. Sample size was determined by thematic saturation of the data. 14 family medicine trainees and 5 service medical officers participated in this study. PCPs faced difficulties in prescribing for patients with chronic diseases due to a lack of communication among different healthcare providers. Medication changes made by hospital specialists, for example, were often not communicated to the PCPs leading to drug duplications and interactions. The use of paper-based medical records and electronic prescribing created a dual record system for patients' medications and became a problem when the 2 records did not tally. Patients sometimes visited different doctors and pharmacies for their medications and this resulted in the lack of continuity of care. PCPs also faced difficulties in addressing patients' concerns, and dealing with patients' medication requests and adherence issues. Some PCPs lacked time and knowledge to advise patients about their medications and faced difficulties in managing side effects caused by the patients' complex medication regimen. PCPs faced prescribing challenges related to patients, their own practice and the local health system when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases. These challenges must be addressed in order to improve chronic disease management in primary care and, more importantly, patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  4. Teaching autistic children conversational speech using video modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlop, M H; Milstein, J P

    1989-01-01

    We assessed the effects of video modeling on acquisition and generalization of conversational skills among autistic children. Three autistic boys observed videotaped conversations consisting of two people discussing specific toys. When criterion for learning was met, generalization of conversational skills was assessed with untrained topics of conversation; new stimuli (toys); unfamiliar persons, siblings, and autistic peers; and other settings. The results indicated that the children learned through video modeling, generalized their conversational skills, and maintained conversational speech over a 15-month period. Video modeling shows much promise as a rapid and effective procedure for teaching complex verbal skills such as conversational speech. PMID:2793634

  5. Mealtime behavior among siblings and body mass index of 4-8 year olds: a videotaped observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosli, Rana H; Miller, Alison L; Kaciroti, Niko; Peterson, Karen E; Rosenblum, Katherine; Baylin, Ana; Lumeng, Julie C

    2015-07-15

    Being a last-born child and having a sister have been associated with higher body mass index (BMI). Encouragement to eat that overrides children's self-regulation has been reported to increase the risk of obesogenic eating behaviors. This study sought to test the hypothesis that encouragement to eat during mealtime from older siblings and sisters mediates associations of being last-born or having a sister with higher BMI. Children aged 4-8 years (n = 75) were videotaped while eating a routine evening meal at home with one sibling present. Encouragement to eat (defined as direct prompts to eat or general positive statements about food) delivered to the index child (IC) from the sibling was coded from the videotape. Path analysis was used to examine associations between IC's birth order, sibling's sex, encouragement counts, and IC's measured BMI z-score (BMIz). Being the younger sibling in the sibling dyad was associated with the IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling (β: 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.59, 1.26, p eat from the sibling (β: 0.18, 95 % CI: -0.09, 0.47, p = 0.20). The IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling was associated with lower IC BMIz (β: -0.06, 95 % CI: -0.12, 0.00, p = 0.05). Children were more likely to receive encouragements to eat from older siblings than younger siblings. Being the recipient of encouragements to eat from a sibling was associated with lower, not higher, child BMIz, which may reflect sibling modeling of maternal behavior. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine whether encouragements to eat from siblings lead to increase in BMI over time. Encouragements from siblings may be a novel intervention target for obesity prevention.

  6. Evaluation Of Prescription Pattern And Medication Adherence Of Antihypertensive Drugs In Stage 1 Essential Hypertensive Patients At Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital Of Central India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan S. Urade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives- To study the prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs and analyze the medication adherence to antihypertensive drugs at rural tertiary care teaching hospital.Materials and Methods- Prospective, observational, 12 weeks, questionnaire based study, conducted in rural tertiary care teaching hospital of central India. 214 antihypertensive prescriptions were analyzed by Morisky medication adherence scale. Statistical analysis was done by MS Excel and Graph pad prism 6.0.Results- 28.03% patients were not aware about the medicines taken, 29.90% patients were unacquainted about dose and route of administration whereas 32.71% patients were unfamiliar about frequency of administration of medicines. 53.27% patients were unaware about precautions to be taken while consuming medicines.  58.68% & 12.67% patients consumed amlodipine & atenolol respectively. In 16.43% patients, atenolol + amlodipine combination therapy was prescribed.  Amongst 214 patients 12, 58 & 144 showed high, medium & low adherence respectively.  No significant difference was found on gender basis at any level of adherence.Conclusion- In this study, physicians given preference to amlodipine than other antihypertensive drugs. However, thiazide is a first line drug in stage 1 hypertension, recommended by JNC VII guideline. This indicates that there is need of creating awareness about current management of hypertension to clinicians by organizing various workshops. We observed only 5.60% patients showed high adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Therefore educational strategies must be carried out for physicians focusing on causes for nonadherence to antihypertensive medications. Also raising patient trust in their physicians may improve patient motivation to prescribed medication. 

  7. Post diagnosis reaction, perceived stigma and sexual behaviour of HIV/AIDS patients attending Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, Zubairu; Abubakar, Isa S; Musa, Babashani; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2011-01-01

    The process of becoming aware of one's serostatus, immediate and delayed responses of the individual, family and community have profound implications on health seeking behaviour of PLWHAs especially in developing countries. We investigated post-diagnosis reactions, disclosure, perceived stigmatization and sexual behaviour of PLWHAs in northern Nigeria. A triangulation of methods consisting of structured interviewer questionnaire administered on 205 respondents and two Focus Group Discussions with PLWHAs receiving care at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital was used. HIV serodiagnosis, immediate and delayed reaction to serostatus and responses of family, friends and community members were elicited in addition to perceived stigma and sexual behaviour. Overall, 111 (54.1%) of the 205 patients were counseled before being tested for HIV infection. Majority of women 59 (51.8%) were tested and informed during antenatal care or 46 (40.4%) following diagnostic workup for symptoms related to AIDS. Most men 69 (75.8%) came to know during diagnostic workup or as part of screening for blood transfusion 5 (5.5%). Up to 37.2% of the respondents had kept their serostatus secret. Disclosures were more likely to mothers (51.9%), sisters (31.0%), brothers (11.0%) and spouses (6.1%). Of all respondents, 149 (72.6%) said they were shocked, afraid, angry and sad while 29 (14.1%) reported being indifferent. A higher proportion of females 68 (59.7%) were shocked, sad and angry than males 36 (39.6%) (Pworkplace and the remaining 17 (37.8%) among friends. Of 85 (41.5%) that were sexually active, 78 (91.8%) reported protecting their partners through use of condoms. The sub-optimal counseling resulted in strong emotional reactions that threatened the strong social support system of PLWHAs. Supportive counseling could improve VCT uptake and well being of PLWHAs in northern Nigeria.

  8. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students' preference for POPS over didactic lectures. One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and posttest numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis. The mean (SD) difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18) and 7.79 (2.52), respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures. It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.

  9. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  10. eLearning to enhance physician patient communication: a pilot test of "doc.com" and "WebEncounter" in teaching bad news delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daetwyler, Christof J; Cohen, Diane G; Gracely, Edward; Novack, Dennis H

    2010-01-01

    Physician-patient communication skills help determine the nature and quality of diagnostic information elicited from patients, the quality of the physician's counseling, and the patient's adherence to treatment. In spite of their importance, surveys have demonstrated a wide variability and deficiencies in the teaching of these skills. Describe two specific methodologies for teaching physician-patient communication skills developed at our institution and pilot test them for effectiveness. Between 2004 and 2009 we developed "doc.com," a series of 41 media-rich online modules on all aspects of healthcare communication jointly with the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. Starting in 2006, we expanded our pre-existing experience with the videoconferencing system "WebOSCE" into the online application "WebEncounter." This new methodology combines practice of communication skills on standardized patients with structured assessment and constructive feedback. We had three randomized groups: controls who did only the assessment parts of a WebOSCE on two occasions, a doc.com group who had doc.com in between the assessment occasions, and a combined group that had both doc.com and a WebEncounter between assessments. We found significant improvement in skills as components were added, and the training program was well received.

  11. The profile of mental disorders based on consultation psychiatry in patients of the multidisciplinary children’s teaching hospita

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    Halina Kądziela-Olech

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Consultation psychiatry plays an important role in developmental medicine. The concept of consultation psychiatry in general medicine includes diagnosis, support and assistance in solving psychiatric, psychological or psychosocial problems of the patient. Child psychopathology, which results from the interaction of biological and psychosocial factors, may be manifested by categorical psychiatric disorders, which may coexist with somatic diseases, and may also be a secondary reaction in response to other illnesses. The disorganisation of behaviour in patients at the developmental period may also result from the response to the disease or hospitalisation. On the other hand, mental disorders can significantly hamper the treatment of somatic diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the spectrum of psychopathology and to analyse the reasons for psychiatric consultation on the multidisciplinary wards of the University Children’s Teaching Hospital. During 9 years, 741 psychiatric consultations were carried out. The results obtained indicate that anxiety, stress-related and somatoform disorders were the most common category of mental disorders (30.5% observed in consulted girls (30.0% and boys (31.5%. Emotional and conduct disorders were found in 22.8% of the consulted children. There was a significant difference (p = 0.02 between boys (31% and girls (18.3%. Eating disorders were identified in 17% of the examined group. This category, which includes anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia and bulimia, was significantly more frequently (p < 0.001 observed in girls (23.9% than boys (3.6%. A refusal to eat (24.4% was, next to deliberate intake of pharmacological agents (21.7%, the most common reason for psychiatric consultations in the examined group.

  12. A Structured Approach to End-of-Life Decision Making Improves Quality of Care for Patients With Terminal Illness in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Ama Kyerewaa; Johnson McGee, Summer; Opare-Lokko, Edwina Addo; Gyakobo, Mawuli Kotope

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether a structured approach to end-of-life decision-making directed by a compassionate interdisciplinary team would improve the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in a teaching hospital in Ghana. A retrospective analysis was done for 20 patients who consented to participate in the structured approach to end-of-life decision-making. Twenty patients whose care did not follow the structured approach were selected as controls. Outcome measures were nociceptive pain control, completing relationships, and emotional response towards dying. These measures were statistically superior in the study group compared to the control group. A structured approach to end-of-life decision-making significantly improves the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in the domains of pain control, completing relationships and emotional responses towards dying. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Standardized patient simulation versus didactic teaching alone for improving residents' communication skills when discussing goals of care and resuscitation: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downar, James; McNaughton, Nancy; Abdelhalim, Tarek; Wong, Natalie; Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Seccareccia, Dori; Miller, Kim; Dev, Shelly; Ridley, Julia; Lee, Christie; Richardson, Lisa; McDonald-Blumer, Heather; Knickle, Kerry

    2017-02-01

    Communication skills are important when discussing goals of care and resuscitation. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of standardized patients for teaching medical trainees to communicate about goals of care. To determine whether standardized patient simulation offers benefit over didactic sessions alone for improving skill and comfort discussing goals of care. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of didactic teaching plus standardized patient simulation versus didactic teaching alone. First-year internal medicine residents. Changes in communication comfort and skill between baseline and 2 months post-training assessed using the Consultation and Relational Empathy measure. We enrolled 94 residents over a 2-year period. Both groups reported a significant improvement in comfort when discussing goals of care with patients. There was no difference in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores following the workshop ( p = 0.79). The intervention group showed a significant increase in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores post-workshop compared with pre-workshop (35.0 vs 31.7, respectively; p = 0.048), whereas there was no improvement in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores in the control group (35.6 vs 36.0; p = 0.4). However, when the results were adjusted for baseline differences in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores in a multivariable regression analysis, group assignment was not associated with an improvement in Consultation and Relational Empathy score. Improvement in comfort scores and perception of benefit were not associated with improvements in Consultation and Relational Empathy scores. Simulation training may improve communication skill and comfort more than didactic training alone, but there were important confounders in this study and further studies are needed to determine whether simulation is better than didactic training for this purpose.

  14. Clinical Profile of Suspected and Confirmed H1N1 Influenza Infection in Patients admitted at a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

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    Basavaraju Jayadeva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the clinical profile and outcomes of adult patients screened and diagnosed with H1N1 influenza infection at a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: This retrospective  study was conducted on all adult patients suspected of H1N1 influenza admitted at a teaching hospital during the epidemic period of January-March 2015. Patients were screened and classified into three categories of A, B, and C based on international guidelines. Home confinement was recommended for patients in category A, and subjects in category B received treatment with Oseltamivir capsules. In addition, patients in category C received inpatient treatment with oseltamivir capsules. Results: In total, 695 patients were screened for H1N1 influenza infection during the epidemic, out of whom 380 patients (54.6% were in category A, 264 (37.9% were in category B, and 51 (7.3% were in category C. Throat swabs were collected and examined for 192 ( 27.6% patients, and 59 ( 8.4% cases were positive for H1N1 infection. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, close vigilance over the symptoms of patients infected with H1N1 influenza is more important than treatment and screening of suspicious cases during the epidemics of this infection. This is a retrospective cross sectional study. Hence, there were no comparative controls. The limitation of this study is,  thus the lack of control.

  15. Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    communication skills can be taught, although proven learning strategies should be the basis of any communication teaching. It is reported that the communication skills teachers themselves be trained in communication skills and assessment of communication skills should be an important component of the health professionals' accreditation. Not only should the communication skills of the teacher be evaluated but the teaching modules within the program should also be evaluated on a regular basis.In all cases of communication teaching, strong faculty support is required for any communication skills programme to be successful. Early introduction of communication skills programmes, which are continued throughout all the years of the curriculum, has been shown to be effective in improving confidence and reducing the number of errors made and establishing a more permanent understanding of communication. Throughout the undergraduate degree, increased integration between communication and clinical teaching is important in learning to use the two skill sets together, so as to closely reflect what happens in clinical practice. Research suggests that communication training is most effective when longitudinal in nature and coincides with ongoing professional practice education.Many studies have shown that communication skills programmes with a strong experimental and/or practical component are more effective than programmes that are solely theory or discussion based. Simulations and role-play are effective instructional methods for developing communication skills including opening and closing consultations, conducting the consultation in a logical manner, improving body language, using language at the level of understanding of the patient and using clear verbal and written communication. One particular strategy that has been shown to be effective is the use of videotaped consultations with standardised patients.Although measuring the effectiveness of communication skills training is difficult

  16. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  17. 'Out of hours' adult CT head interpretation by senior emergency department staff following an intensive teaching session: a prospective blinded pilot study of 405 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Karim; Mandel, Laura; Jamal, Leila; Gilani, Shamim

    2014-06-01

    Cranial CT is the gold standard for the investigation of intracranial emergencies. The aim of this pilot study was to audit whether senior emergency physicians were able to report CT head scans accurately and reliably having attended structured teaching. Senior emergency physicians attended a 3 h teaching session. Following this, they independently reported adult CT head scans between 22:00 and 08:00 using a pro forma. CT head examinations performed in this 'out of hours' period were formally reported by a consultant radiologist on the following morning. Data were collected in a blinded fashion over an 8-month period. 405 adult CT head examinations were performed. 360 pro formas were available for analysis, and the rest were excluded either because a consultant radiologist had been rung to discuss the results (five patients) or because the pro forma was not completed (40 patients). Concordance between consultant radiologists and emergency physicians was found in 339 (94%) of the cases (κ coefficient 0.78). None of the discordant cases was managed inappropriately or had an adverse clinical outcome. All cases of extradural, subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage were detected by emergency physicians. In conclusion, we feel that this model can be employed as a safe and long-term alternative provided that the radiology department are committed to providing ongoing teaching and that a database is maintained to highlight problem areas. Emergency physicians need to remember that the clinical status of the patient must never be ignored, irrespective of their CT head findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Transfusion practice in anemic, non-bleeding patients: Cross-sectional survey of physicians working in general internal medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Babo, Michelle; Chmiel, Corinne; Müggler, Simon Andreas; Rakusa, Julia; Schuppli, Caroline; Meier, Philipp; Fischler, Manuel; Urner, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Transfusion practice might significantly influence patient morbidity and mortality. Between European countries, transfusion practice of red blood cells (RBC) greatly differs. Only sparse data are available on transfusion practice of general internal medicine physicians in Switzerland. In this cross-sectional survey, physicians working in general medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland were investigated regarding their self-reported transfusion practice in anemic patients without acute bleeding. The definition of anemia, transfusion triggers, knowledge on RBC transfusion, and implementation of guidelines were assessed. 560 physicians of 71 hospitals (64%) responded to the survey. Anemia was defined at very diverging hemoglobin values (by 38% at a hemoglobin Switzerland. Identifying and subsequently correcting this deficit in knowledge translation may have a significant impact on patient care.

  19. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students’ preference for POPS over didactic lectures.Method: One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and post-test numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis.Results: The mean (SD difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18 and 7.79 (2.52, respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P < 0.0001, as determined by the z-test. Improvement in post-test performance of group A was significantly greater than of group B, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures.Conclusion: It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.Keywords: medical education, problem-solving exercise, problem-based learning

  20. Teaching history taking to medical students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifenheim, Katharina E; Teufel, Martin; Ip, Julianne; Speiser, Natalie; Leehr, Elisabeth J; Zipfel, Stephan; Herrmann-Werner, Anne

    2015-09-28

    This paper is an up-to-date systematic review on educational interventions addressing history taking. The authors noted that despite the plethora of specialized training programs designed to enhance students' interviewing skills there had not been a review of the literature to assess the quality of each published method of teaching history taking in undergraduate medical education based on the evidence of the program's efficacy. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, opengrey, opendoar and SSRN were searched using key words related to medical education and history taking. Articles that described an educational intervention to improve medical students' history-taking skills were selected and reviewed. Included studies had to evaluate learning progress. Study quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Seventy-eight full-text articles were identified and reviewed; of these, 23 studies met the final inclusion criteria. Three studies applied an instructional approach using scripts, lectures, demonstrations and an online course. Seventeen studies applied a more experiential approach by implementing small group workshops including role-play, interviews with patients and feedback. Three studies applied a creative approach. Two of these studies made use of improvisational theatre and one introduced a simulation using Lego® building blocks. Twenty-two studies reported an improvement in students' history taking skills. Mean MERSQI score was 10.4 (range 6.5 to 14; SD = 2.65). These findings suggest that several different educational interventions are effective in teaching history taking skills to medical students. Small group workshops including role-play and interviews with real patients, followed by feedback and discussion, are widespread and best investigated. Feedback using videotape review was also reported as particularly instructive. Students in the early preclinical state might profit from approaches helping

  1. Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits – analysis of video-taped general practice visits

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    van Dulmen Sandra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general practitioner (GP can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals. Methods For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001. Results The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes. In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84, but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%, most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17% the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all. Conclusion In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

  2. Patient satisfaction with the perioperative surgical services and associated factors at a University Referral and Teaching Hospital, 2014: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhn, Endale Gebreegziabher; Lemma, Girmay Fitiwi

    2017-01-01

    Globally, increasing consideration has been given to the assessment of patient satisfaction as a method of monitor of the quality of health care provision in the health institutions. Perioperative patient satisfaction has been contemplated to be related with the level of postoperative pain intensity, patients' expectation of the outcome, patient health provider relationship, inpatient services, hospital facilities, access to care, waiting time, cost and helpfulness of treatments received. The study aimed to assess the level of patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services and associated factors. Hospital based quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted in University of Gondar teaching hospital from April1-30, 2014. Structured Amharic version questionnaire and checklist used for data collection. All patients who operated upon during the study period were included. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression model used to identify the variables which had association with the dependent variable. P-values patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services was 98.1%. The variables that had association with the outcome variable from the multivariate analysis were patient admission status (AOR=0.073, CI=0.007-0.765, P=0.029), information about the disease and operation (AOR=0.010, CI=0.001-0.140, P=0.001) and operation theatre staff attention to the patients complains (AOR=0.028, CI=0.002-0.390, P=0.008) respectively. The level of patient satisfaction with perioperative surgical services was high compared with previous studies conducted in the country and other countries in the world. Health professionals need to give emphasis for information on care provision processes, patients' health progress and patients' complaints.

  3. Evaluating the Trends of Bloodstream Infections among Pediatric and Adult Patients at a Teaching Hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal: Role of Drug Resistant Pathogens

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    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infections (BSIs are among the significant causes of morbidity and mortality for patients of all age groups. However, very little is known about the trends of bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibilities among pediatric and adult population from Nepal. In this study, we have investigated the different etiological agents responsible for bloodstream infections among pediatric and adult patients and the role of drug resistant organisms in these infections at a tertiary care teaching hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal. A total of 3,088 blood culture specimens obtained from pediatric and adult patients suspected to have bloodstream infections were processed by standard microbiological methods. Significant bacterial pathogens were identified by morphological, biochemical, and serological methods as suggested by American Society for Microbiology. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and interpreted according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Overall, incidence of bloodstream infections among the suspected patients was 7.48%. Pediatric patients (n=90, 9.37% were the significant subgroup of patients affected with bloodstream infections compared to adults (p<0.05, CI-95%. Gram positive (n=49, 54.4% bacteria in pediatric and gram negative bacteria (n=141, 78.7% in adult patients were the most common isolates for BSI. Staphylococcus aureus (n=41, 45.6% in pediatric patients and Salmonella enterica (n=40, 28.3% in adult patients were the leading pathogens. Trends of antimicrobial resistance among isolated bacterial strains were significantly high in adults compared to pediatric patients. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA (31.4%, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL (12.5%, and metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL (3.9% producing gram negatives were major resistant strains. Our study shows higher rates of bloodstream infections in

  4. Courteous but not curious: how doctors' politeness masks their existential neglect. A qualitative study of video-recorded patient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agledahl, Kari Milch; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Førde, Reidun; Wifstad, Åge

    2011-11-01

    To study how doctors care for their patients, both medically and as fellow humans, through observing their conduct in patient-doctor encounters. Qualitative study in which 101 videotaped consultations were observed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach, generating explanatory categories through a hermeneutical analysis of the taped consultations. A 500-bed general teaching hospital in Norway. 71 doctors working in clinical non-psychiatric departments and their patients. The doctors were concerned about their patients' health and how their medical knowledge could be of service. This medical focus often over-rode other important aspects of the consultations, especially existential elements. The doctors actively directed the focus away from their patients' existential concerns onto medical facts and rarely addressed the personal aspects of a patient's condition, treating them in a biomechanical manner. At the same time, however, the doctors attended to their patients with courteousness, displaying a polite and friendly attitude and emphasising the relationship between them. The study suggests that the main failing of patient-doctor encounters is not a lack of courteous manners, but the moral offence patients experience when existential concerns are ignored. Improving doctors' social and communication skills cannot resolve this moral problem, which appears to be intrinsically bound to modern medical practice. Acknowledging this moral offence would, however, be the first step towards minimising the effects thereof.

  5. Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

  6. Teaching Morally and Teaching Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Gary D.; Osguthorpe, Richard D.; Sanger, Matthew N.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce what they believe is an important distinction between teaching morality and teaching morally. In P-12 schools, the moral education debate often focuses on character education programs or other moral curricula. Such programs and curricula are championed as a means of teaching morality and transmitting moral…

  7. Use and toxicity of traditional and complementary medicine among patients seeking care at an emergency department of a teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatau, Abubakar Ibrahim; Aung, Myat Moe Thwe; Kamauzaman, Tuan Hairulnizam Tuan; Ab Rahman, Ab Fatah

    2018-05-01

    Traditional and Complementary Medicines (TCM) are widely used worldwide, and many of them have the potential to cause toxicity, interaction with conventional medications and non-adherence to prescribed medications due to patients' preference for the TCM use. However, information regarding their use among patients seeking care at emergency departments (ED) of a healthcare facility is limited. The study aimed to evaluate the TCM use among patients attending the ED of a teaching hospital in Malaysia. A sub-analysis of data from a prevalence study of medication-related visits among patients at the ED of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia was conducted. The study took place over a period of six weeks from December 2014 to January 2015 involving 434 eligible patients. Data on demography, conventional medication, and TCM uses were collected from patient interview and the medical folders. Among this cohort, 66 patients (15.2%, 95%CI 12.0, 19.0) reported concurrent TCM use. Sixteen (24.2%) of the TCM users were using more than one (1) type of TCM, and 17 (25.8%) came to the ED for medication-related reasons. Traditional Malay Medicine (TMM) was the most frequently used TCM by the patients. Five patients (7.6%) sought treatment at the ED for medical problems related to use of TCM. Patients seeking medical care at the ED may be currently using TCM. ED-physicians should be aware of these therapies and should always ask patients about the TCM use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ibadin, O. K.; Ibeh, I. N.

    2008-01-01

    Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF) of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Amo...

  9. E-Learning in Urology: Implementation of the Learning and Teaching Platform CASUS® - Do Virtual Patients Lead to Improved Learning Outcomes? A Randomized Study among Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anna-Teresa; Albers, Peter; Müller-Mattheis, Volker

    2015-01-01

    E-learning is playing an increasing role in medical education, supporting a problem-based and practical oriented education without putting patients at risk and compensating for the decrease in instructor-centered teaching. Not much research has been done concerning learning effects and reaction on behalf of the students. We created computer-based cases for four important diagnoses in urology using the authoring system CASUS®. Fourth-year medical school students were randomized into two groups: (1) the CASUS® group, using the online cases for preparation, and (2) the book group, using a textbook. A multiple-choice test referring to the prepared topic had to be completed at the beginning of each lecture and the results were analyzed. Evaluation of the students concerning the acceptance of the program was done at the end of the semester. Members of the CASUS® group scored significantly higher with an average of 20% better test results than students using textbooks for preparation. Evaluation regarding the program showed a highly positive rating. Limitations include the small study population and the possibly biased test performance of the students. Computerized patient cases facilitate practice-oriented teaching and result in an interesting and engaging learning model with improved learning outcomes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A Survey on Awareness about the Role of Anesthesia and Anesthesiologists among the Patients Undergoing Surgeries in a Tertiary Care Teaching Women and Children Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Nethra, H N

    2017-01-01

    Although anesthesiology has grown tremendously and although anesthesiologists play a crucial role in the perioperative management of patients and also outside operating theater (OT) such as critical care, pain clinic, and labor analgesia, they do not get due recognition. We conducted a study to assess the awareness about the role of anesthesia and anesthesiologists among patients scheduled to undergo surgery in a Government Tertiary Care Teaching Women and Children Hospital. A prospective cross-sectional survey with a sample size of 100 patients. Patients scheduled to undergo elective surgery in the age group of 18-65 years with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Grades 1 and 2, who are willing to participate and given written informed consent. Patients whose age 0.05) between those with previous surgery and those without previous surgery regarding their knowledge of anesthesiology and anesthesiologist. Ninety percent did not know the complications, types of anesthesia and 44% did not know that anesthesiologist is a doctor. Most of the participants were not aware of the role of anesthesia and anesthesiologists inside and outside OT. Although this could be attributed to their lower level of education, the fraternity of anesthesiologists has to educate patients and surgeons about the role of anesthesia.

  11. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients undergoing upper GI endoscopy at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, Timothy N A; Asmah, Richard H; Wiredu, Edwin K; Gyasi, Richard K; Nkrumah, Kofi N

    2016-06-01

    There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub-Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 - 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk factors despite accumulating evidence indicating that gastroduodenal disease is common in Ghana. This study investigates risk factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. This study utilized a cross-sectional design to consecutively recruit patients referred with upper gastro-intestinal symptoms for endoscopy. The study questionnaire was administered to study participants. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by rapid-urease examination at endoscopy. Of 242 patients sampled; 64 had duodenal ulcer, 66 gastric ulcer, 27gastric cancer and 64 non-ulcer dyspepsia. Nineteen (19) had duodenal and gastric ulcer while 2 had gastric ulcer and cancer. A third (32.6%) of patients had history of NSAID-use. H. pyloriwas associated with gastric ulcer (p=0.033) and duodenal ulcer (p=0.001). There was an increased prevalence of duodenal ulcer in H. pylori-infected patients taking NSAIDs, P=0.003. H. pylori was a major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease. However, NSAID-related gastro-duodenal injury has been shown to be common in H. pylori infected patients. It highlights the need for awareness of the adverse gastro-intestinal effects in a H. pylori endemic area.

  12. Effect of teaching motivational interviewing via communication coaching on clinician and patient satisfaction in primary care and pediatric obesity-focused offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Kathryn I; Nagy, Paul; Bigger, John; Bilheimer, Alicia; Lyna, Pauline; Gao, Xiaomei; Lancaster, Michael; Watkins, R Chip; Johnson, Fred; Batish, Sanjay; Skelton, Joseph A; Armstrong, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Studies indicate needed improvement in clinician communication and patient satisfaction. Motivational interviewing (MI) helps promote patient behavior change and improves satisfaction. In this pilot study, we tested a coaching intervention to teach MI to all clinic staff to improve clinician and patient satisfaction. We included four clinics (n=29 staff members). In the intervention clinics (one primary care and one pediatric obesity-focused), we trained all clinic staff in MI through meetings as a group seven times, directly observing clinicians in practice 4-10 times, and providing real-time feedback on MI techniques. In all clinics, we assessed patient satisfaction via anonymous surveys and also assessed clinician burnout and self-rated MI skills. Clinicians in the intervention clinics reported improvements in burnout scores, self-rated MI skills, and perceived cohesion whereas clinicians in the control clinic reported worse scores. Patient satisfaction improved in the intervention clinics more than in the control clinics. This is the first study to find some benefit of training an entire clinic staff in MI via a coaching model. It might help to train staff in MI to improve clinician satisfaction, team cohesion, perceived skills, and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chi-Square Test of Word of Mouth Marketing with Impact on the Evaluation of Patients' Hospital and Services: An Application in Teaching and Research Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda ŞENER

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study, using data provided from 223 inpatients in a teaching and research hospital, hospital’s preference is to explain the effect of word of mouth marketing. For this purpose, word of mouth marketing process is evaluated in terms of providing information about the hospital and the patient’s level of intimacy, both of patients and information provider’s level of expertise with related to hospital and services, the patient’s perceived level of risk for hospitals and services and providing information’s level of impact on patient being treated in hospital. The obtain data, after evaluation by frequency distributions these factors impact on word of mouth marketing is demonstrated by descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis and pearson’s correlation analysis. As a result of this study is concluded word of mouth marketing on the training and research hospital is preferred by the patints to have a significant impact.

  14. Matching music teacher’s self conception with students’ perception on teaching effectiveness in an unfavourable secondary classroom context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wah Leung

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and recording good music teaching practices that promote social inclusion, and at developing effective teaching strategies that incorporate student perspectives into the pedagogies. A music teacher in Hong Kong was selected for this study, and two different classes of Form 2 (ages 12-13 were observed. The teaching process was videotaped and reviewed. Afterwards the teacher and a group of students were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview to solicit their ideas towards good practice of music teaching. Findings reveal that the good practices observed were attributed to four factors: 1 teacher’s personality, 2 teacher’s pedagogy, 3 teacher’s musical competence, and 4 teacher’s philosophy of teaching.

  15. Preparation and Support of Patients through the Transplant Process: Understanding the Recipients' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Mauthner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for heart transplant commonly includes booklets, instructional videos, personalized teaching sessions, and mentorship. This paper explores heart transplant recipients’ thoughts on their preparation and support through the transplant process. Twenty-five interviews were audio-/videotaped capturing voice and body language and transcribed verbatim. Coding addressed language, bodily gesture, volume, and tone in keeping with our visual methodology. Recipients reported that only someone who had a transplant truly understands the experience. As participants face illness and life-altering experiences, maintaining a positive attitude and hope is essential to coping well. Healthcare professionals provide ongoing care and reassurance about recipients’ medical status. Mentors, family members, and close friends play vital roles in supporting recipients. Participants reported that only heart transplant recipients understood the experience, the hope, and ultimately the suffering associated with living with another persons’ heart. Attention needs to be focused not solely on the use of teaching modalities, but also on the development of innovative support networks. This will promote patient and caregiver engagement in self-management. Enhancing clinicians’ knowledge of the existential aspects of transplantation will provide them with a nuanced understanding of the patients’ experience, which will ultimately enhance their ability to better prepare and support patients and their caregivers.

  16. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  17. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  18. Online Learning of Safe Patient Transfers in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hayden D. H. Ed., OTR/L, CHT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Online higher education is steadily increasing. For programs in allied health to be offered effectively in an elearning format, clinical psychomotor skills need to be addressed. The aim of this research was to design, implement, and evaluate an online safe patient transfers module for occupational therapy assistant (OTAstudents. The efficacy of teaching safe patient transfers in an e-learning environment was appraised using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The applied research project was completed at a Tennessee community college. A convenience sample of eighteen students participated in the pilot study. Twenty-five studentsparticipated in the subsequent study. The instructional design of the course was based on Mager’s CriterionReferenced Instruction model. Streaming video was used as the delivery method for course material. A pretest/posttest evaluated the students’ cognitive knowledge of safe patient transfers. A behavioral transferscompetency checklist was used to rate videotapes of students’ performance of assisted stand pivot and dependent sliding board transfers. Research findings indicated students were able to learn this psychomotor clinical skill online with beginning proficiency. A paired t-test showed marked improvement of cognitive knowledge. A student learning survey revealed the majority of students preferred at least one hands-on classroom session where instructor feedback and interaction with classmates confirmed safe and effectiveclinical technique.

  19. Teaching Electronic Health Record Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Sandoval, Marie; Hart, Vicki; Drill, Clarissa

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated nurse practitioner students' communication skills when utilizing the electronic health record during history taking. The nurse practitioner students (n = 16) were videotaped utilizing the electronic health record while taking health histories with standardized patients. The students were videotaped during two separate sessions during one semester. Two observers recorded the time spent (1) typing and talking, (2) typing only, and (3) looking at the computer without talking. Total history taking time, computer placement, and communication skills were also recorded. During the formative session, mean history taking time was 11.4 minutes, with 3.5 minutes engaged with the computer (30.6% of visit). During the evaluative session, mean history taking time was 12.4 minutes, with 2.95 minutes engaged with the computer (24% of visit). The percentage of time individuals spent changed over the two visits: typing and talking, -3.1% (P = .3); typing only, +12.8% (P = .038); and looking at the computer, -9.6% (P = .039). This study demonstrated that time spent engaged with the computer during a patient encounter does decrease with student practice and education. Therefore, students benefit from instruction on electronic health record-specific communication skills, and use of a simple mnemonic to reinforce this is suggested.

  20. Can we rely on simulated patients' satisfaction with their consultation for assessing medical students' communication skills? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, T; Grimstad, H; Holen, A; Anvik, T; Baerheim, A; Fasmer, O B; Hjortdahl, P; Vaglum, P

    2015-12-18

    In medical education, teaching methods offering intensive practice without high utilization of faculty resources are needed. We investigated whether simulated patients' (SPs') satisfaction with a consultation could predict professional observers' assessment of young doctors' communication skills. This was a comparative cross-sectional study of 62 videotaped consultations in a general practice setting with young doctors who were finishing their internship. The SPs played a female patient who had observed blood when using the toilet, which had prompted a fear of cancer. Immediately afterwards, the SP rated her level of satisfaction with the consultation, and the scores were dichotomized into satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Professional observers viewed the videotapes and assessed the doctors' communication skills using the Arizona Communication Interview Rating Scale (ACIR). Their ratings of communication skills were dichotomized into acceptable versus unacceptable levels of competence. The SPs' satisfaction showed a predictive power of 0.74 for the observers' assessment of the young doctors and whether they reached an acceptable level of communication skills. The SPs' dissatisfaction had a predictive power of 0.71 for the observers' assessment of an unacceptable communication level. The two assessment methods differed in 26% of the consultations. When SPs felt relief about their cancer concern after the consultation, they assessed the doctors' skills as satisfactory independent of the observers' assessment. Accordance between the dichotomized SPs' satisfaction score and communication skills assessed by observers (using the ACIR) was in the acceptable range. These findings suggest that SPs' satisfaction scores may provide a reliable source for assessing communication skills in educational programs for medical trainees (students and young doctors). Awareness of the patient's concerns seems to be of vital importance to patient satisfaction.

  1. Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training: Implications for Teaching and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Justin L; Boscardin, Christy K; Young, John Q; Ten Cate, Olle; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load among learners performing a specific procedure, colonoscopy, to identify implications for procedural teaching. Data were collected through an electronically administered survey sent to 1,061 U.S. gastroenterology fellows during the 2014-2015 academic year; 477 (45.0%) participated. Participants completed the survey immediately following a colonoscopy. Using multivariable linear regression analyses, the authors identified sets of features associated with intrinsic, extraneous, and germane loads. Features associated with intrinsic load included learners (prior experience and year in training negatively associated, fatigue positively associated) and patient/tasks (procedural complexity positively associated, better patient tolerance negatively associated). Features associated with extraneous load included learners (fatigue positively associated), setting (queue order positively associated), and supervisors (supervisor engagement and confidence negatively associated). Only one feature, supervisor engagement, was (positively) associated with germane load. These data support practical recommendations for teaching procedural skills through the lens of cognitive load theory. To optimize intrinsic load, level of experience and competence of learners should be balanced with procedural complexity; part-task approaches and scaffolding may be beneficial. To reduce extraneous load, teachers should remain engaged, and factors within the procedural setting that may interfere with learning should be minimized. To optimize germane load, teachers should remain engaged.

  2. Teaching Professional Boundaries to Psychiatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Glen O.; Crisp-Han, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors demonstrate that the teaching of professional boundaries in psychiatry is an essential component of training to prevent harm to patients and to the profession. Methods: The authors illustrate overarching principles that apply to didactic teaching in seminars and to psychotherapy supervision. Results: The teaching of…

  3. Teaching methods in PE teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Šekeljić, Goran V.; Stamatović, Milovan V.

    2016-01-01

    The methods used in teaching physical education, as well as in every other very specific teaching area, have their own uniqueness and enormous importance in teaching. In the last fifty years literature showed many different methods systematized by several different criteria. Some were just taken from general didactics, some were tailored to the needs of physical education classes, and a few new ones were discovered. The special value of this work is that the existing methods are supplemented ...

  4. Non-verbal behaviour in nurse-elderly patient communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Bensing, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study explores the occurence of non-verbal communication in nurse-elderly patient interaction in two different care settings: home nursing and a home for the elderly. In a sample of 181 nursing encounters involving 47 nurses a study was made of videotaped nurse-patient communication. Six

  5. Two dimensional and Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of patients presenting at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex Ile Ife Nigeria a prospective study of 2501 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo RA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rasaaq Ayodele Adebayo,1 Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,2 Michael Olabode Balogun,1 Anthony Olubunmi Akintomide,1 Victor Oladeji Adeyeye,1 Olugbenga Olusola Abiodun,1 Luqman Adeleke Bisiriyu,3 Suraj Adefabi Ogunyemi,1 Ebenezer Adekunle Ajayi,4 Olufemi Eyitayo Ajayi,1 Adebayo Tolulope Oyedeji5 1Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 2Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, 3Department of Demography and Social Statistics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 4Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, 5Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria Background: Echocardiography remains a key noninvasive cardiac investigative tool in the management of patients, especially in a developing economy like Nigeria. In this study, we investigated the indications for transthoracic echocardiography and spectrum of cardiac disease found in patients referred to our cardiac unit for echocardiography. Methods: A prospective two-dimensional, pulsed, continuous, and color-flow Doppler echocardiographic evaluation was done using the transthoracic approach in 2501 patients over an eight-year period. Univariate data analysis was performed for mean age, gender, clinical indications, and diagnoses. Results: The subject age range was less than 12 months to 97 years (mean 52.39 years. There were 1352 (54.06% males and 1149 (45.94% females. The most common indication for echocardiography was hypertension (52.1% followed by congestive cardiac failure (13.9%. Others were for screening (6.1%, arrhythmias (5%, cerebrovascular disease (5%, chest pain (3.3%, chronic kidney disease (3.2%, congenital heart disease (2.6%, cardiomyopathy (1.8%, rheumatic heart disease (1.7%, diabetes mellitus (1.3%, thyrocardiac disease (1.2%, ischemic heart

  6. Incidence of Road Traffic Injury and Associated Factors among Patients Visiting the Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bewket Tadesse Tiruneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Road traffic injuries are a major public health issue. The problem is increasing in Africa. Objective. To assess the incidence of road traffic injury and associated factors among patients visiting the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study design was conducted. A total of 356 systematically selected study subjects were included in the study. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify associated factors with road traffic injury. Odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the level of significance. Results. The incidence of road traffic injury in the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital was 36.8%. Being a farmer (AOR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.06–10.13, conflict with family members (AOR = 7.7; 95% CI = 3.49–8.84, financial problem (AOR = 9.91; 95% CI = 4.79–6.48, psychological problem (AOR = 17.58; 95% CI = 7.70–12.14, and alcohol use (AOR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.61–5.27 were independently associated with road traffic injury. Conclusion and Recommendation. In this study the incidence of road traffic injury was high. Alcohol is one of the most significant factors associated with Road Traffic Injury. Thus urgent education on the effect of alcohol is recommended.

  7. Considering social ergonomics: the effects of HIT on interpersonal relationships between patients and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur

    2012-01-01

    This study explored physicians' interactions with EHRs to understand the qualities that contribute to patient satisfaction with their use of the technologies and patient satisfaction with physician. Video-taped observations of 100 medical consultations were used to distinguish interaction patterns between physicians and EHRs. Quantified observational methods were used to contribute to ecological validity. Ten primary care physicians and 100 patients from five clinics participated in the study. Visits were videotaped and coded using an objective coding methodology to understand how physicians interacted with electronic health records. Results indicate, a variety of EHR interaction styles may be effective in providing patient-centered care.

  8. Activating teaching methods in french language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kulhánková, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is activating teaching methods in french language teaching. This thesis outlines the issues acitvating teaching methods in the concept of other teaching methods. There is a definition of teaching method, classification of teaching methods and characteristics of each activating method. In the practical part of this work are given concrete forms of activating teaching methods appropriate for teaching of french language.

  9. Teaching collocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revier, Robert Lee; Henriksen, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    Very little pedadagoy has been made available to teachers interested in teaching collocations in foreign and/or second language classroom. This paper aims to contribute to and promote efforts in developing L2-based pedagogy for the teaching of phraseology. To this end, it presents pedagogical...

  10. Teaching Portfolio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Fischer

    The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark.......The present teaching portfolio has been submitted for evaluation in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the teacher training programme for Assistant Professors at Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark....

  11. Teaching Grammar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Swan

    2008-01-01

    @@ The trouble with teaching grammar is that we are never quite sure whether it works or not:its effects are uncertain and hard to assess.Michael Swan looks at grammar teaching and the carry-over to spontaneous production by students.

  12. Teaching Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    "Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

  13. Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Grammar is a component in all language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers need to know rules of grammar (teacher knowledge) as well as techniques that help students use grammar effectively and effortlessly (teaching knowledge). Using reflective practice to help teachers become comfortable with teaching grammar, this…

  14. Integrative teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; Smids, Annejoke; Kors, Ninja

    2007-01-01

    This is an article about the integration of instrumental teaching, aural skills and keyboard skills and music theory at the pre-tertiary level. Team teaching and discipline crossover offer a possible solution to students’ inability to apply skills taught by specialists in separate fields. A personal

  15. Teaching Medical Students Clinical Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Saundra E

    2018-05-01

    There are many reasons for evaluating our approach and improving our teaching of America's future doctors, whether they become anesthesiologists (recruitment) or participate in patient management in the perioperative period (general patient care). Teaching medical students the seminal aspects of any medical specialty is a continual challenge. Although no definitive curricula or single clinical approach has been defined, certain key features can be ascertained from clinical experience and the literature. A survey was conducted among US anesthesiology teaching programs regarding the teaching content and approaches currently used to teach US medical students clinical anesthesia. Using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website that lists 133 accredited anesthesiology programs, residency directors were contacted via e-mail. Based on those responses and follow-up phone calls, teaching representatives from 125 anesthesiology departments were identified and asked via e-mail to complete a survey. The survey was returned by 85 programs, yielding a response rate of 68% of individuals contacted and 63% of all departments. Ninety-one percent of the responding departments teach medical students, most in the final 2 years of medical school. Medical student exposure to clinical anesthesia occurred as elective only at 42% of the institutions, was requirement only at 16% of responding institutions, and the remainder had both elective and required courses. Anesthesiology faculty at 43% of the responding institutions reported teaching in the preclinical years of medical school, primarily in the departments of pharmacology and physiology. Forty-five percent of programs reported interdisciplinary teaching with other departments teaching classes such as gross anatomy. There is little exposure of anesthesiology faculty to medical students in other general courses. Teaching in the operating room is the primary teaching method in the clinical years. Students are

  16. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  17. First-line antiretroviral treatment failure and associated factors in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Kumilachew, Dawit; Belay, Assefa; Getu, Samson; Teju, Derso; Endale, Desalegn; Tsegaye, Yemisirach; Wale, Zebiba

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores immune function and reduces HIV-related adverse outcomes. But treatment failure erodes this advantage and leads to an increased morbidity and compromised quality of life in HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with first-line ART failure in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. A retrospective study was conducted on 340 adults who had started ART during the period of September 2011 to May 2015. Data regarding patients' sociodemographics, baseline characteristics, and treatment-related information were collected through review of their medical charts. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary and multiple logistic regressions were utilized. Pfailure. The median duration of treatment failure from initiation of treatment was 17.5 months (8-36 months). Poor adherence to treatment and low baseline CD4 cell count were found to be significant predictors of treatment failure. The prevalence of first-line ART failure was 4.1%. Treatment failure was most likely to occur for the patients who had poor drug adherence and those who were delayed to start ART till their CD4 cell count became very low (<100 cells/mm(3)).

  18. Teaching and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. S. Bolhuis; L. Fluit

    2007-01-01

    This module of Professionalism in Patient Centred Acute Care Training (PACT) is part of an international multidisciplinary distance learning programme for intensive care training. Editor-in-chief: G. Ramsay Most trainees are involved in some sort of teaching and therefore fulfil trainee and trainer

  19. The influence of an inquiry professional development program on secondary science teachers' conceptions and use of inquiry teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotter, Christine

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated nine secondary science teachers' conceptions and use of inquiry teaching throughout a year-long professional development program. The professional development program consisted of a two-week summer inquiry institute and research experience in university scientists' laboratories, as well as three academic year workshops. Teachers' conceptions of inquiry teaching were established through both qualitative interviews and a quantitative instrument given before and after the summer institute and again at the end of the academic year. Videotapes of all nine teachers presenting inquiry lessons in their own classrooms were evaluated using an observation protocol that measured the teachers' degree of reform teaching. Three of the teachers were chosen for an in-depth case study of their classroom teaching practices. Data collected from each of the case study teachers included videotapes from classroom observations, responses to an inquiry survey, and transcripts from two additional qualitative interviews. Students' responses to their teachers' use of inquiry teaching were also investigated in the case study classrooms. Through their participation in the professional development experience, the teachers gained a deeper understanding of how to implement inquiry practices in their classrooms. The teachers gained confidence and practice with inquiry methods through developing and presenting their institute-developed inquiry lessons, through observing other teachers' lessons, and participating as students in the workshop inquiry activities. Data analysis revealed that the teachers' knowledge of inquiry was necessary but not sufficient for their implementation of inquiry teaching practices. The teachers' conceptions of science, their students, effective teaching practices, and the purpose of education were found to have a direct effect on the type and amount of inquiry instruction performed in the high school classrooms. The research findings suggest that

  20. Secure surveillance videotapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnik, W.M.; Kadner, S.P.; Olsen, R.; Chitumbo, K.; Pepper, S.

    1995-01-01

    With assistance from the US Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), Aquila Technologies Group developed the Tamper-Resistant Analog Media (TRAM-1000) system to provide standard VHS surveillance video tapes with an enhanced tamper-indicating capability. This project represents further implementation of the partnership approach in facilities including light water reactors with MOX facilities. These facilities use Uniplex Digiquad system video tapes. The partnership approach ensures that one organization can exchange the tapes in a machine without the presence of the other, without losing continuity of information. The TRAM-1000 system development project was accomplished in two stages. In the first stage of the project, the original system delivered to the IAEA, consists of three parts: (1) the tamper detection unit, (2) a specially augmented VHS video tape, and (3) an HP-95 reader. The tamper detection unit houses a VACOSS active fiber-optic seal and an electronic identification tag (E-TAG) reader. In the second stage of the project, the original TRAM-1000 was modified to its current design based on agency input. After delivery of the original TRAM-1000 system to the IAEA, it was reviewed by inspectors. The inspectors felt that the initial system's tape storage/transport method could be simplified. Rather than threading the fiber through the tape spindles, the inspectors suggested that the tape be placed in a bag capable of being sealed. Also, a more flexible fiber-optic cable was recommended. As a result of these suggestions, Aquila developed a tamper-proof bag specifically for holding a surveillance video tape and sealable with a VACOSS fiber optical seal

  1. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  2. Bug City: Bees [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  3. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  4. Nurses' Knowledge, Practices, and Barriers in Care of Patients with Pressure Ulcers in a Ugandan Teaching Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwebaza, Ivan; Katende, Godfrey; Groves, Sara; Nankumbi, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers have been identified as a major burden of hospitalization worldwide, and nurses are at the forefront of prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurses' knowledge and practices regarding risk factors, prevention, and management of pressure ulcers at a teaching hospital in Uganda. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional design. Fifty-six Ugandan registered practicing nurses were sampled. A composite self-administered questionnaire and an observation checklist were utilized. The nurses had limited knowledge about critical parameters of pressure ulcers. Prevention practices were observed to be unreliable and uncoordinated related to a significant shortage of staff and logistics for pressure ulcer prevention. Nurses had poor access to current literature on pressure ulcer prevention. Translation of nurses' knowledge into practice is possible if barriers like staff shortage, pressure relieving devices provision, and risk assessment tools are addressed at Mulago. PMID:24707398

  5. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, O. K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Among the total cases, 36 (41.4% showed at least one pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus (16.1%, Staphylococcus Saprophyticus (9.1%, Escherichia Coli (6.9% Proteus mirabilis (3.4% Klebsiella spp (2.3% Pseudomonas aerouginosa (1.1% and Proteus vulgaris (2.3%. There was a significant relation between bacteriospermia and the rate of number of total motility and morphologically abnormal sperms (p 0.05. It seems that leukocytopermia is not a good maker to predict bacteriospermia.

  6. Nurses’ Knowledge, Practices, and Barriers in Care of Patients with Pressure Ulcers in a Ugandan Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mwebaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers have been identified as a major burden of hospitalization worldwide, and nurses are at the forefront of prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurses’ knowledge and practices regarding risk factors, prevention, and management of pressure ulcers at a teaching hospital in Uganda. The study employed a descriptive cross-sectional design. Fifty-six Ugandan registered practicing nurses were sampled. A composite self-administered questionnaire and an observation checklist were utilized. The nurses had limited knowledge about critical parameters of pressure ulcers. Prevention practices were observed to be unreliable and uncoordinated related to a significant shortage of staff and logistics for pressure ulcer prevention. Nurses had poor access to current literature on pressure ulcer prevention. Translation of nurses’ knowledge into practice is possible if barriers like staff shortage, pressure relieving devices provision, and risk assessment tools are addressed at Mulago.

  7. Physicians' responses to patients' expressions of negative emotions in hospital consultations: a video-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjaaland, Trond A; Finset, Arnstein; Jensen, Bård Fossli; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2011-09-01

    Patients express their negative emotions in medical consultations either implicitly as cue to an underlying unpleasant emotion or explicitly as a clear, unambiguous concern. The health provider's response to such cues and concerns is important for the outcome of consultations. Yet, physicians often neglect patient's negative emotions. Most studies of this subject are from primary health care. We aimed to describe how physicians in a hospital respond to negative emotions in an outpatient setting. Ninety six consultations were videotaped in a general teaching hospital. The Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences was used to identify patients' expression of negative emotions in terms of cue and concern and to code physicians' subsequent responses. Cohen's kappa was used as interrater reliability measure. Acceptable kappa level was set to .60. We observed 163 expressions of negative emotions. In general, the physician responses to patients' cues and concerns did not include follow up or exploration. Concerns more often than cues led to lack of emotional exploration. When patients expressed negative emotions or cues to such, hospital physicians tended to move away from emotional communication, particularly if the emotion was expressed as an explicit concern. Medical training should enable physicians' to explore the patients' emotions in situations where it will improve the medical treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diarrhoea-associated parasites in HIV-1 seropositive and sero-negative patients in a teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andualem, Berhanu; Kassu, Afework; Moges, Feleke; Gedefaw, Molla; Diro, Ermias; Mengistu, Getahun; Andargie, Gashaw

    2007-04-01

    to determine the prevalence and type of intestinal parasites in HIV infected and uninfected patients with diarrhea. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar University hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, between March 2003 and October 2004. A total 312 consecutive diarrheic patients were included in the study. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites following direct, formol-ether concentration and modified acid fast staining methods. Among the patients, 63.8% were found to be HIV seropositive. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV seropositive and seronegative diarrheic patients was 30.6% and 33.6%, respectively. The most prevalent parasites were Strongyoides stercoralis (9.0%) and Entamoeba histolytica (8.3%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (5.4%) and Cryptosporidium species (5. 1%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites in diarrheic patients was very high. Institution of appropriate intervention measures are needed to reduce morbidity in such patients.

  9. The Reasons for Discontinuation of Infliximab Treatment in Patients with Crohn's Disease: A Review of Practice at NHS Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Krupa, Lukasz Z.; Kennedy, Hugh J.; Jamieson, Crawford P.; Fisher, Nicola; Hart, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. There is little information on the reasons for discontinuing infliximab treatment in patients with Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to document these reasons to determine if any were preventable which would allow patients to continue the therapy. Aims & Methods. A review of the medical notes was conducted at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital on patients with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab between 2002–2008 to determine the reasons for stopping it. Re...

  10. The influence of socioeconomic status on the hemoglobin level and anthropometry of sickle cell anemia patients in steady state at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animasahun, B A; Temiye, E O; Ogunkunle, O O; Izuora, A N; Njokanma, O F

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) has multisystemic manifestations and is associated with severe morbidity and high mortality. It commonly affects growth leading to wasting and stunting. This study aimed to determine the influence of socioeconomic status on the nutritional status using anthropometric measurements and steady-state hemoglobin, of children with homozygous SCA, aged 1 year to 10 years in steady state at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. This is a cross-sectional study involving 100 children with SCA and 100 age-, sex-, and social class-matched controls that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Social class was assessed using educational attainment and occupation of parents. Hemoglobin concentration was determined using the oxy-hemoglobin method. This study demonstrated a significantly lower mean weight and weight-for-height in the SCA patients than those of controls (P hemoglobin concentration were observed from social class 1 to 4; this was statistically significant in controls (P = 0.00) but not in subjects (P > 0.1). However, SCA patients had significantly lower values than controls in each of the social classes. Poor socioeconomic status has an adverse effect on the nutritional status and hemoglobin of SCA patients.

  11. Pattern of mri brain abnormalities in rheumatic patients with neurological involvement: a tertiary care teaching hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, K.; Arfaj, A.; Naseeb, F.; Daif, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pattern of abnormalities seen on MRI in rheumatic patients with neurological manifestations and to interpret the findings in relation to clinical picture. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Rheumatology unit, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to February 2014. Patients and Methods: We prospectively included rheumatic patients with neurological symptoms and signs. The clinical data were correlated with MRI findings by a team comprising of a rheumatologist, neurologist and neuro-radiologist. Data was analyzed using simple statistical analysis. Results: Fifty patients were recruited with a mean age of 36.4 ± 10.76 years (range 17-62). Among SLE patients with seizures, focal deficit and headache white matter hyperintensities were found in 9 (64.28%), 4 (50%), 4 (80%) patients respectively. Out of seven SLE patients with global dysfunction, 3 (42.85%) had brain atrophy and 2 (28.57%) normal MRI. In Behcet disease with focal deficit, 3 (75%) patients had white matter hyperintensities and 1 (25%) had brainstem involvement. In Behcet disease with headache, 2 (50%) had normal MRI, 1 (25%) brainstem hyper-intensities and 1 (25%) had subacute infarct. Two (66%) of three Primary APS patients had white matter hyperintensities while third (33%) had old infarct. Both patients of polyarteritisnodosa, had white matter hyperintensities. Out of two Wegener granulomatosis one had white matter hyperintensities and other had ischemic changes in optic nerves. The only one scleroderma patient had white matter hyperintensities. Conclusion: We found that white matter hyperintensities was the most common MRI abnormality in our study group which in most of the cases had poor clinical correlation. No distinct pattern of CNS involvement on MRI was observed in various rheumatic disorders. (author)

  12. Perceptions of stigma among medical and nursing students and tuberculosis and diabetes patients at a teaching hospital in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Manjulika; Travasso, Sandra M; Vaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Stigma has a significant impact on the diagnosis of a variety of illnesses, patients' compliance with treatment and their recovery from these diseases. However, the Indian medical and nursing curriculum has given relatively little attention to recognising and addressing the issue of stigma. This study compared the perception of stigma with respect to tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) among medical and nursing students to that among patients with these diseases. The Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) questionnaire was used for all patients and student groups. Focus group discussions were held with only the students to understand their concept of stigma and the challenges they face while addressing stigma, and to explore their role in addressing stigma. The data showed that patients with TB prefer not to disclose their illness, while DM is not perceived of as stigmatising by patients. As a group, medical and nursing students attached excessive stigma to patients with both DM and TB, and this may mean that medical professionals subconsciously do harm through their interactions with patients and the attitudes they project to society. The perceptions of stigma were linked to the patient's socioeconomic background, apart from the medical condition itself. The students recognised that they lacked the skills to understand and address stigma. We recommend that the subject of stigma be integrated into the curriculum of medical and nursing students.

  13. Casebook: a virtual patient iPad application for teaching decision-making through the use of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloice, Marcus D; Simonic, Klaus-Martin; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-08-07

    Virtual Patients are a well-known and widely used form of interactive software used to simulate aspects of patient care that students are increasingly less likely to encounter during their studies. However, to take full advantage of the benefits of using Virtual Patients, students should have access to multitudes of cases. In order to promote the creation of collections of cases, a tablet application was developed which makes use of electronic health records as material for Virtual Patient cases. Because electronic health records are abundantly available on hospital information systems, this results in much material for the basis of case creation. An iPad-based Virtual Patient interactive software system was developed entitled Casebook. The application has been designed to read specially formatted patient cases that have been created using electronic health records, in the form of X-ray images, electrocardiograms, lab reports, and physician notes, and present these to the medical student. These health records are organised into a timeline, and the student navigates the case while answering questions regarding the patient along the way. Each health record can also be annotated with meta-information by the case designer, such as insight into the thought processes and the decision-making rationale of the physician who originally worked with the patient. Students learn decision-making skills by observing and interacting with real patient cases in this simulated environment. This paper discusses our approach in detail. Our group is of the opinion that Virtual Patient cases, targeted at undergraduate students, should concern patients who exhibit prototypical symptoms of the kind students may encounter when beginning their first medical jobs. Learning theory research has shown that students learn decision-making skills best when they have access to multitudes of patient cases and it is this plurality that allows students to develop their illness scripts effectively

  14. Uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients on follow-up at Jimma University Teaching and Specialized Hospital: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bekele Tesfaye,1 Dessalegn Haile,1 Benalfew Lake,1 Tefera Belachew,2 Temamen Tesfaye,3 Habtamu Abera4 1Department of Nursing, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, 2Department of Population and Family Health, 3Department of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Science, Jimma University, Jimma, 4Department of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Introduction: Hypertension, including poorly controlled blood pressure, is the major global health problem that affects one billion people worldwide. Limited studies have been conducted on prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients in Ethiopia.Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension and associated factors among adult hypertensive patients at Jimma University Teaching and Specialized Hospital.Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted at the chronic illness clinic of Jimma University Specialized and Teaching hospital from March 09 to April 13, 2016. A total of 345 hypertensive patients were selected using systematic sampling technique. Data were collected using structured questionnaire through face-to-face exit interview and chart review. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0 software. The bivariate and multivariable analysis was done to identify factors of uncontrolled hypertension.Results: More than half, 52.7%, of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension. Lack of awareness of hypertension-related complications (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.140, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.272–3.600, p=0.004, nonadherent to smoking abstinence (AOR=3.935, 95% CI=1.065–14.535, p=0.004, nonadherent to alcohol abstinence (AOR=2.477, 95% CI=1.074–5.711, p=033, Khat (Catha edulis chewing (AOR=2.518, 95% CI=1.250–5

  15. Patients' bill of rights and effective factors of workplace violence against female nurses on duty at Ilam teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Menati, Waleyeh; Tavan, Hamed; Navkhasi, Sasan; Mehrdadi, Abuzar

    2017-01-01

    Workplace violence against female nurses is an increasing problem. In addition, recognition the rights of patients can reduce such violence against female nurses. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate workplace violence against female nurses in respect with patients' bill of rights at two public hospitals of Ilam in 2012. In a descriptive cross-sectional research, workplace violence against female nurses was studied. Data were gathered employing a researcher made questionnaire filled out by 106 female nurses. The questionnaire was on workplace, physical and verbal violence of patients and their attendants, and also the patient's rights as respected by nursing staff. Permission of university ethics committee was obtained. Data analyses were done by T-test and ANOVA in SPSS software. Totally, 90.6 % and 15.1 % of the participants were subjected to verbal and physical assaults by patients, respectively during last year of the study. Further, 92.5% and 11.3% of nurses experienced verbal and physical assaults by the patients' attendants, respectively. Most of the nursing staff believed that reporting aggressive attacks to the concerned officials would not be useful. A negative significant correlation was found between the aggressions of patients with age as well as marital status of nurses, (P= 0.04). Furthermore, a significant association was seen between physical violence of patients and the nurses' recognition of the patients' bill of rights (P= 0.03). Due to high rate of violence against female nurses, some proper and effective actions such as employing a trained security force along with legal punitive charges against violators through responsible officials are highly suggested. © 2017 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  16. Towards a framework for teaching about information technology risk in health care: Simulating threats to health data and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author describes work towards developing an integrative framework for educating health information technology professionals about technology risk. The framework considers multiple sources of risk to health data quality and integrity that can result from the use of health information technology (HIT and can be used to teach health professional students about these risks when using health technologies. This framework encompasses issues and problems that may arise from varied sources, including intentional alterations (e.g. resulting from hacking and security breaches as well as unintentional breaches and corruption of data (e.g. resulting from technical problems, or from technology-induced errors. The framework that is described has several levels: the level of human factors and usability of HIT, the level of monitoring of security and accuracy, the HIT architectural level, the level of operational and physical checks, the level of healthcare quality assurance policies and the data risk management strategies level. Approaches to monitoring and simulation of risk are also discussed, including a discussion of an innovative approach to monitoring potential quality issues. This is followed by a discussion of the application (using computer simulations to educate both students and health information technology professionals about the impact and spread of technology-induced and related types of data errors involving HIT.

  17. A 5-year retrospective study of rampant dental caries among adult patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    M Ajayi Deborah; M F Abiodun-Solanke Iyabode; O Gbadebo Shakeerah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rampant caries in adults has not been a focus of many researches unlike the childhood form of the disease. The disease is an interesting finding in an adult patient. When the condition occurs in children, it has been described as nursing bottle caries, baby bottle tooth decay, and the most recently adopted term, "early childhood caries". Aim: The aim was to determine the prevalence of rampant caries among adult patients. Materials and Methods: Cases of rampant caries were id...

  18. Unused Medications Disposal Practice: The case of Patients Visiting University of Gondar Specialized Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tadele Atinafu; Abayneh Takele; Adeladlew Kassie; Adane Yehualaw; Getu Tesfaw; Tesfanesh Desseno; Tadesse Mekonnen; Mulugeta Fentie

    2014-01-01

    Background: The disposal of unwanted medications has been a concern in many countries, as pharmaceutical waste enters the ecosystem, ultimately having an effect on human health and environment. The main objective of this study was to assess unused medications disposal practice of patients Method: Institution based cross sectional study was used. Patients were systematically selected and interviewed using structured questionnaires. The Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: Out of...

  19. Associated Factors of Low Back Pain in a Sample of Patients Attending Hawler Teaching Hospital/Erbil City A Case Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhan Izzaddin Sabir

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Low back pain (LBP is an important clinical, social, economic, and public health problem affecting the population erratically and random. The aim of the study was to determine the factors associated with low back pain among patients attending physiotherapy department at Hawler teaching hospital in Erbil City. Methods: the study was carried out from November 3rd, 2014 to November 3rd 2015. The study involved of 100 cases diagnosed with low back pain in the physiotherapy depart- ment at Hawler teaching hospital subjects in control group are of the same age and gender of those in the experiment group , and 100 participants as a 100 as control group free from low back pain. Result: Multiple logistic regression of risk factors of low back pain revealed that body mass index7.55 , non using lumbar support in sitting chair during work31.81, non-practice exercise 5.58, standing erect 34.836, sitting on a high backrest chair 27.986, sitting on a low backrest chair 65.167, drinking water per day 18.989, emotional stress 14.636 time have risky effect on low back affect low back pain respectively. Conclusion: The study concluded that most of the participants in the study were employers and they perform different types of positions such as bending, squatting and sitting during work time, there were statistical significant association between body mass index, lifting heavy objects, driving and emotional stress with development of low back pain

  20. Teaching Idiomatic Expressions: A Comparison of Two Instructional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert K.; Kenyon, Patricia L.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty hearing-impaired adolescents were taught idiomatic expressions using captioned videotape presentations followed by classroom discussion, or by extended classroom discussions. Improvement in understanding idioms was significantly greater under the videotape method. (Author/JDD)

  1. Radiology seminars using teaching kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    Clinco-radiological seminars are an effective method of teaching medical students. However, in busy departments it is often difficult to provide enough radiologists for small group instruction. This can be facilitated by the use of prepared teaching kits. Each kit contains a set of duplicated films and a syllabus which gives a short clinical history for each patient and a series of questions to be used to direct the discussion. Each diagnostic problem is chosen to demonstrate core material. We have been using these teaching kits for organ system teaching in the preclerkship year. Teaching kits offer several advantages. They make it easier to recruit seminar leaders through efficient use of their time. The use of duplicated films and a syllabus ensures that all students cover the same material. The syllabus can be used to generate examination questions for reinforcement of important concepts. The kits are also available to students to review alone and can be readily updated as required

  2. Transfusion practice in anemic, non-bleeding patients: Cross-sectional survey of physicians working in general internal medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle von Babo

    Full Text Available Transfusion practice might significantly influence patient morbidity and mortality. Between European countries, transfusion practice of red blood cells (RBC greatly differs. Only sparse data are available on transfusion practice of general internal medicine physicians in Switzerland.In this cross-sectional survey, physicians working in general medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland were investigated regarding their self-reported transfusion practice in anemic patients without acute bleeding. The definition of anemia, transfusion triggers, knowledge on RBC transfusion, and implementation of guidelines were assessed.560 physicians of 71 hospitals (64% responded to the survey. Anemia was defined at very diverging hemoglobin values (by 38% at a hemoglobin <130 g/L for men and by 57% at <120 g/L in non-pregnant women. 62% and 43% respectively, did not define anemia in men and in women according to the World Health Organization. Fifty percent reported not to transfuse RBC according to international guidelines. Following factors were indicated to influence the decision to transfuse: educational background of the physicians, geographical region of employment, severity of anemia, and presence of known coronary artery disease. 60% indicated that their knowledge on Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI did not influence transfusion practice. 50% of physicians stated that no local transfusion guidelines exist and 84% supported the development of national recommendations on transfusion in non-acutely bleeding, anemic patients.This study highlights the lack of adherence to current transfusion guidelines in Switzerland. Identifying and subsequently correcting this deficit in knowledge translation may have a significant impact on patient care.

  3. Using an online quiz-based reinforcement system to teach healthcare quality and patient safety and care transitions at the University of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Afsar-Manesh, Nasim; Amin, Alpesh N; Clay, Brian; Ranji, Sumant R

    2017-10-01

    Implementing quality improvement (QI) education during clinical training is challenging due to time constraints and inadequate faculty development in these areas. Quiz-based reinforcement systems show promise in fostering active engagement, collaboration, healthy competition and real-time formative feedback, although further research on their effectiveness is required. An online quiz-based reinforcement system to increase resident and faculty knowledge in QI, patient safety and care transitions. Experts in QI and educational assessment at the 5 University of California medical campuses developed a course comprised of 3 quizzes on Introduction to QI, Patient Safety and Care Transitions. Each quiz contained 20 questions and utilized an online educational quiz-based reinforcement system that leveraged spaced learning. Approximately 500 learners completed the course (completion rate 66-86%). Knowledge acquisition scores for all quizzes increased after completion: Introduction to QI (35-73%), Patient Safety (58-95%), and Care Transitions (66-90%). Learners reported that the quiz-based system was an effective teaching modality and preferred this type of education to classroom-based lectures. Suggestions for improvement included reducing frequency of presentation of questions and utilizing more questions that test learners on application of knowledge instead of knowledge acquisition. A multi-campus online quiz-based reinforcement system to train residents in QI, patient safety and care transitions was feasible, acceptable, and increased knowledge. The course may be best utilized to supplement classroom-based and experiential curricula, along with increased attention to optimizing frequency of presentation of questions and enhancing application skills. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with darunavir resistance mutations in multi-experienced HIV-1-infected patients failing other protease inhibitors in a referral teaching center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E Vidal

    Full Text Available Information about resistance profile of darunavir (DRV is scarce in Brazil. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of DRV resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitors (PI and to identify factors associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. All HIV-infected patients failing PI-based regimens with genotyping performed between 2007 and 2008 in a referral teaching center in São Paulo, Brazil, were included. DRV-specific resistance mutations listed by December 2008 IAS-USA panel update were considered. Two Poisson regression models were constructed to assess factors related to the presence of more DRV resistance mutations. A total of 171 HIV-infected patients with available genotyping were included. The number of patients with lopinavir, saquinavir, and amprenavir used in previous regimen were 130 (76%, 83 (49%, and 35 (20%, respectively. The prevalence of major DRV resistance mutations was 50V: 5%; 54M: 1%; 76V: 4%; 84V: 15%. For minor mutations, the rates were 11I: 3%; 32I: 7%; 33F: 23%; 47V: 6%; 54L: 6%; 74P: 3%; 89V: 6%. Only 11 (6% of the genotypes had > 3 DRV resistance mutations. In the clinical model, time of HIV infection of > 10 years and use of amprenavir were independently associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. In the genotyping-based model, only total number of PI resistance mutations was associated with our outcome. In conclusion, the prevalence of DRV mutations was low. Time of HIV infection, use of amprenavir and total number of PI resistance mutations were associated with having more DRV mutations.

  5. A retrospective non-comparative analysis of the quality of care for osteoarthritis at the general out-patient department of Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Festus E Osajie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a common condition in primary care and is often associated with disability and limitation of function requiring holistic care. Aim: The aim of this audit was to assess the quality of care provided by family physicians in the management of osteoarthritis at the General Out-patient Department (GOPD of Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH as well as ascertain if such care was in line with evidence-based medicine. Methods: This was a retrospective noncomparative study. The recommendations of the Nigerian Standard Treatment Guidelines 2008 and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 2014 guidelines were used to form standard targets for each of the structural, process and outcome components of the care process. Each of the consultation rooms was inspected for the structure components of the care process. For the process and outcome components of care, the medical records of all patients being managed for osteoarthritis at the GOPD of JUTH over a 1-year period were retrieved and studied. Results: For one aspect of the structural component (i.e. availability of weighing scale for each consultation room, 80% of the standard target was met which was below the standard target of 100%. The highest performance under the process component was for the documentation of risk associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and documentation for NSAID/cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors use with a gastro-protective agent. For both of these, 22.4% of the standard target was met; less than the standard target of 100% and 80% respectively. None of the standard targets for the outcome component were met. Conclusion: The quality of care for patients with osteoarthritis in this practice setting was sub-optimal. More can be done by family physicians with regards provision of comprehensive care for patients suffering from osteoarthritis.

  6. Clinico-pathological profile and treatment outcome in smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients at a teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabir, I.; Iqbal, R.; Khan, S.U.; Munir, K.; Nazir, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the single highest contributor to the world's morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is essential to prevent its transmission. To see the treatment response of anti tuberculosis drugs in smear negative patients and study the predictors of culture positive among smear negative tuberculosis patients. Ninety four sputum smear negative patients clinically and radiologically suggestive of tuberculosis were selected. These patients were put on anti tuberculosis drugs without waiting for their culture results. They were then followed for 8 months to see their treatment outcome. A total of 94 smear negative patients were selected and given anti tuberculosis treatment. Of these 37(39%) were culture positive and 57(61%) were culture negative. Of the 37 culture positive patients 36(97%) showed clinical or radiological improvement as compared to 46(81%) out of 57 in culture negative cases. Symptoms of cough with sputum production was significantly associated with culture positivity. On x-ray chest moderate lesion with diffuse infiltration was more common finding in 64% while extensive and cavitatory lesion was seen in 24% of all cases. Association of extensive and cavitatory lesion were seen in culture positive group. Response to anti tuberculosis drugs in sputum smear negative tubercolosis suspects was found to be effective in majority of the patients. Cough, sputum and extensive cavitatory lung lesion were the predictors of culture positive cases. There is need to train physicians on the use of anti tuberculosis therapy in smear negative suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases, especially if they have productive cough and cavitatory lung lesions. (author)

  7. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections at a quaternary-care teaching institution: effect of trainee involvement and patient body mass index on fluoroscopy time and patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs-Heiden, C.A.; Murthy, N.S.; Geske, J.R.; Diehn, F.E.; Schueler, B.A.; Wald, J.T.; Kaufmann, T.J.; Lehman, V.T.; Carr, C.M.; Amrami, K.K.; Morris, J.M.; Thielen, K.R.; Maus, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there are differences in fluoroscopy time and patient dose for fluoroscopically guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) performed by staff radiologists versus with trainees and to evaluate the effect of patient body mass index (BMI) on fluoroscopy time and patient dose, including their interactions with other variables. Materials and methods: Single-level lumbar TFESIs (n=1844) between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 were reviewed. Fluoroscopy time, reference point air kerma (K_a_,_r), and kerma area product (KAP) were recorded. BMI and trainee involvement were examined as predictors of fluoroscopy time, K_a_,_r, and KAP in models adjusted for age and gender in multivariable linear models. Stratified models of BMI groups by trainee presence were performed. Results: Increased age was the only significant predictor of increased fluoroscopy time (p<0.0001). K_a_,_r and KAP were significantly higher in patients with a higher BMI (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009). When stratified by BMI, longer fluoroscopy time predicted increased K_a_,_r and KAP in all groups (p<0.0001). Trainee involvement was not a statistically significant predictor of fluoroscopy time or K_a_,_r in any BMI category. KAP was lower with trainees in the overweight group (p=0.0009) and higher in male patients for all BMI categories (p<0.02). Conclusion: Trainee involvement did not result in increased fluoroscopy time or patient dose. BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time; however, overweight and obese patients received significantly higher K_a_,_r and KAP. Male patients received a higher KAP in all BMI categories. Limiting fluoroscopy time and good collimation practices should be reinforced in these patients. - Highlights: • Trainee involvement did not contribute to increased fluoroscopy time or dose. • BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time. • Overweight and obese patients received significantly higher Ka,r and KAP.

  9. A 5-year retrospective study of rampant dental caries among adult patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Deborah M; Abiodun-Solanke, Iyabode M F; Gbadebo, Shakeerah O

    2015-01-01

    Rampant caries in adults has not been a focus of many researches unlike the childhood form of the disease. The disease is an interesting finding in an adult patient. When the condition occurs in children, it has been described as nursing bottle caries, baby bottle tooth decay, and the most recently adopted term, "early childhood caries". The aim was to determine the prevalence of rampant caries among adult patients. Cases of rampant caries were identified from the records of all the patients treated during a 5-year period. Variables considered included the socio-demographic data, frequency of consumption of cariogenic diet, social habits, decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT), socioeconomic status (SES), and oral hygiene (OH), etc. Data were analyzed using student's t-test and one-way ANOVA for continuous variables, while Fishers exact test was adopted for categorical variables. Level of significance was set at P diet.

  10. Clinical Study of Obesity and associated morbidities in patients admitted to College of Medical Sciences Teaching-Hospital, Bharatpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Pradhan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study was conducted with objective to study the incidence of obesity and associated co-morbidities in patients admitted to CMS-TH, Bharatpur.Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty consecutive overweight patients from the January 2009 to December 2012 with Basal metabolic index (BMI>25 and obese patients (BMI>30 were included in this hospital based prospective study. Detailed evaluation of risk factors and family history of other diseases were taken, other obesity related indicators like WPRO, 2000 for BMI, waist circumference (NCEP ATP III and NCEP for South Asian ethnicity NCEP– National Cholesterol Education Program and waist hip ratio (WHO criteria were measured and comparison done in order to detect best method for application. These cases were evaluated for associated co-morbid condition and metabolic syndrome which were diagnosed using NCEP ATP III criteria.Results: The mean age of patients was 52.7 years. Commonest co-existing risk factors were alcohol consumption, smoking, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Evaluation based on WHO criteria revealed that 56.7% patients were overweight, 38.7 % were obese class II and 4.6 % were class II. While 45.1% male and 69.1% female patients had central obesity. The figure was 81.7 % for males and 94.1% for females with WHO criteria using waist hip ratio. Risk factors like alcohol consumption (52.7%, smoking (52.7% and fatty liver disease (22.66% were the commonest co-morbid conditions.Conclusion: In the present study, risk factors of alcohol, smoking and hypertension and co-morbid conditions diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, stroke and fatty liver were noted. Waist hip ratio was the best indicator to detect central obesity and co-morbid conditions and recommended to be used for Nepali population.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:16-19

  11. Awareness and perceptions of electroconvulsive therapy among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional survey from teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Maria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is shown to be effective in many psychiatric illnesses, but its distorted projection by the Pakistani media and its unregulated use by many physicians across the country have adversely affected its acceptability. Given this situation we aimed to assess the awareness and perceptions regarding ECT as a treatment modality among the psychiatric patients. Methods This was a questionnaire based cross-sectional study carried out at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Results We interviewed 190 patients of which 140 were aware of ECT. The study showed that the level of education had a significant impact on the awareness of ECT (p = 0.009. The most common source of awareness was electronic and print media (38%, followed by relatives (24% and doctors (23%. Physical injuries (42% and neurological (12% and cognitive disturbances (11% were the commonly feared side effects. The most popular belief about ECT was that it was a treatment of last resort (56%. Thirty-nine percent thought that ECT could lead to severe mental and physical illness and 37% considered it inhumane. Patients' willingness to receive ECT was dependant on whether or not they were convinced of its safety (p = 0.001 and efficacy (p = 0.0001. Conclusion We identified a serious lack of dissemination of information regarding ECT by the psychiatrists and the mental health care providers. This may be the result of an inadequate postgraduate training in Pakistan or just a lack of concern about the mentally ill patients. The media seemed to be the major source of information for our patients. We also saw the prevalence of a variety of myths regarding ECT in our society, which we feel may be responsible for the patients' adverse attitudes. Given the widespread applicability of ECT there is a dire need to dispel these misconceptions and improve its acceptability.

  12. Prevalence of hepatitis b and c in patients admitted in orthopedics department of ghurki trust teaching hospital, lahore, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Aziz, M.O.; Mahammad, I.; Zaman, A.U.; Akram, R.; Aziz, A.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C who deny or did not know of having a disease but are positive for it. Methodology: This cross sectional study was done on 8803 patients from January 2016 to December 2016. Hepatitis B and C screening were done using ELISA Kits. Results: Out of 8803 patients, 1531(17.39%) were positive for Hepatitis B, 562(6.38%) were positive for hepatitis C and 27(0.31%) were positive for both. Conclusion: The prevalence of viral hepatitis is high, especially hepatitis B. Proper health education and community programs are needed for awareness and prevention of it. (author)

  13. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  14. Health education to diabetic patients before the start of Ramadan: Experience from a teaching hospital in Dammam

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    Rayyan M Al-Musally

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The adherence to the pre-Ramadan educational program by the treating physician was low. It is necessary to increase the awareness about the importance of these programs among health-care professionals. The programs should target the less educated, the unemployed, and older patients.

  15. Social barriers to diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in patients presenting at a teaching hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Liese; Mumuni, Tolulope; Raikhel, Eugene; Ademola, Adeyinka; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Adenipekun, Adeniyi; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Ojengbede, Oladosu A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2015-01-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women, and stage at diagnosis is a key determinant of outcome. In low- to middle-income countries, including Nigeria, advanced stage diagnosis and delayed treatment represent a significant problem. That social barriers contribute to delay has been noted in previous research; however, few specific factors have been studied. Using semi-structured interviews, this study identifies social barriers to diagnosis and treatment for patients who presented at University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria. Transcripts from the interviews were coded and analysed thematically. Thirty-one patients and five physicians were interviewed. The median age of patients was 51 (range: 28 to above 80), 83% were Christian and 17% were Muslim. Preliminary analysis showed that delays in diagnosis reflected a lack of education as well as the utilisation of non-physician medical services such as pharmacists. Delays in treatment were often due to fear of unanticipated surgery and cost. The majority of women did not know the cause of their breast cancer, but some believed it was caused by a spiritual affliction. This study suggests that further education and awareness of breast cancer for both patients and providers is needed in order to increase early stage diagnosis.

  16. "When are you seeing my patient?"--an analysis of the cardiology consultation service in a teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, E

    2010-05-01

    The provision of an efficient consultation service is essential to the efficient functioning of any hospital. Surprisingly little is known about this activity. We present the first reported evaluation of a cardiology consultation service in an attempt to determine the characteristics, efficiency and workload implications of such a service. We performed an audit of the in-patient cardiology consultation service over a four week period. During this period, 125 consultations were seen, of which 85 (68%) were requested by medical specialties. Consultations were seen in a timely fashion, with 76 (61%) being seen on the same day that the request was received. The most common problem was chest pain, (49 patients; 38%) which was felt to be of cardiac origin in only a minority (20; 40%) of cases. Consultations had significant resource implications for our department, with 35 (28%) procedures being performed, 25 (20%) patients\\' care being taken over, and a further 27 (21.6%) new out-patient referrals generated. Our results indicate that the consultation service considered was efficiently delivered but contributed significantly to the department\\'s workload. The most frequent consultation request was for chest pain that was often non-cardiac in nature.

  17. Videoendoscopic and histological characterization of patients with colorectal cancer in the Teaching Clinico-surgical Hospital Comandante 'Faustino Perez Hernandez'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avalos Garcia, Roxana; Ramos Pachon, Carlos Manuel; Barbon Abreu, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    In Cuba, colorectal cancer is the third cause of mortality after lung and prostate cancer. We developed our work with the objective of arriving to an endoscopic and histological characterization of the patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed in the mentioned hospital

  18. The prescription talk – an approach to teach patient-physician conversation about drug prescription to medical students

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    Hauser, Katarina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication communication from physicians to patients often is poor, by this among others enhancing the risk of non-adherence. In this context, a neglect regarding the prescription talk has been complained.Aim of the project: In a newly developed elective medical students work on physician-patient conversations dealing with drug prescription. Essential aspects related to an effective and safe drug treatment are combined with steps of shared decision-making. Together with a tutor, students develop a (model conversation guide that might be tailored according to individual needs and views.Description/Methods: In a one-week course 3rd-5th year medical students treat a paper case according to problem-based learning. This is accompanied by a one-hour lecture and literature provided on an online learning platform (ILIAS. During a workshop, aspects of drug treatment and patient participation are integrated into a guide for a prescription talk. At the end of the week the students are invited to apply the (if need be individualized guide in a simulated physician-patient communication with an actor. The conversation is evaluated using a checklist based upon the (model conversation guide.Results: Informal and formalized feedback indicate high acceptance and satisfaction of participants with this elective. The checklist turned out to be of acceptable to good reliability with mostly selective items. Portfolio entries and written evaluation suggest that participants’ positions and attitudes are influenced.

  19. Improved quality of care for patients infected or colonised with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a French teaching hospital: impact of an interventional prospective study and development of specific tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondain, Véronique; Lieutier, Florence; Pulcini, Céline; Degand, Nicolas; Landraud, Luce; Ruimy, Raymond; Fosse, Thierry; Roger, Pierre Marie

    2018-05-01

    The increasing incidence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) in France prompted the publication of national recommendations in 2010. Based on these, we developed a toolkit and a warning system to optimise management of ESBL-E infected or colonised patients in both community and hospital settings. The impact of this initiative on quality of care was assessed in a teaching hospital. The ESBL toolkit was developed in 2011 during multidisciplinary meetings involving a regional network of hospital, private clinic and laboratory staff in Southeastern France. It includes antibiotic treatment protocols, a check list, mail templates and a patient information sheet focusing on infection control. Upon identification of ESBL-E, the warning system involves alerting the attending physician and the infectious disease (ID) advisor, with immediate, advice-based implementation of the toolkit. The procedure and toolkit were tested in our teaching hospital. Patient management was compared before and after implementation of the toolkit over two 3-month periods (July-October 2010 and 2012). Implementation of the ESBL-E warning system and ESBL-E toolkit was tested for 87 patients in 2010 and 92 patients in 2012, resulting in improved patient management: expert advice sought and followed (16 vs 97%), information provided to the patient's general practitioner (18 vs 63%) and coding of the condition in the patient's medical file (17 vs 59%), respectively. Our multidisciplinary strategy improved quality of care for in-patients infected or colonised with ESBL-E, increasing compliance with national recommendations.

  20. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in surgical patients presenting to a tertiary care teaching hospital in India: A preliminary study

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    Sanjay Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is often not diagnosed in patients presenting for surgical procedures thereby increasing the incidence of adverse perioperative course. Early diagnosis of this disease is important in modifying anesthetic management as well as utilizing specific means which may decrease the complications and improve the patient outcome. Methods: Patients greater than eighteen years of age, ASA I-III scheduled for elective surgical procedures under anesthesia were randomly selected. Their demographic data, diagnosis and nature of surgery were noted in a semi-structured performa. They were then screened for the presence of OSA with the help of a STOP BANG questionnaire. Results : This study included two hundred four patients randomly selected. Slight female predominance was seen in this sample (55.4%. Mean age of the subjects was 42.7 years (SD=15.08. 24.5% subjects were at high risk for OSA (STOP-BANG>3 with a male predominance (72% versus 37% in low risk group; X 2 =18.62; P<0.001. High risk OSA subjects had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (57% vs. 11.7% in low risk group; X 2 =33.35; P<0.001. Similarly, this group had a higher prevalence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (14% versus 3.8% in low risk group; X 2 =6.54; P=0.03. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (22% and hypothyroidism (6% was also higher in this group (5.2% and 1.9% in low risk group respectively; X 2 =15.42; P<0.001. Conclusion : High degree of suspicion and knowledge of association of OSA and medical diseases may help in detection of such cases and decrease the rate of perioperative complications thus improving patients safety.

  1. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients from Tc-99m during bone scan in nuclear medicine at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambara, T. L.

    2014-07-01

    Internal dosimetry deals with the measurement of the radiation dose absorbed internally by an organ after the administration of isotopes for diagnosis and treatment. In the present study radiation absorbed dose has been calculated for technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) which is used frequently for bone scan in Korle-Bu teaching hospital nuclear medicine department. In these cases a small amount of isotopes are accumulated in kidney, urinary bladder etc. Study on sixty-five patients undergoing bone scans has been performed quantitatively using e.soft software. The Tc-99m MDP doses were administered to the patients with activity ranging from 377.4 to 932.4 MBq depending on their weights, and were then scanned with an installed e.Cam SPECT system. A 256 × 1024 matrix size was used in acquiring the bone scans. Also the scans of five volunteer patients at three different times (1 hour, 2 hour and 3 hour after injection) were used to determine the residence time in the bladder and kidney. To determine the amount of activity in patient kidney and urinary bladder, conjugate view method was applied on images information. MIRD equation and OLINDA/EXM software were then used to estimate absorbed dose in different organs of patients. The absorbed value obtained from the two methods were compared. The activity in patient’s left kidney, right kidney and urinary bladder undergoing bone scan three hours after injection of Tc-99m were 1.52±0.48 MBq, 1.52±0.44 MBq 4.88±3.11MBq respectively. The residence time for the kidney and urinary bladder were 0.128±0.043 hour and 1.099±0.330 hour respectively. The absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (mGy/MBq) for bladder, kidneys, liver, lungs, red marrow, ovaries, pancreas, skin and spleen were calculated for the male and the female patients using the two methods. The absorbed dose values obtained from the two methods were compared. In the study for absorbed dose calculation, MIRD equation is in agreement with

  2. Risk factors for tooth wear lesions among patients attending the dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital, Benin City: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeigbemen A Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with tooth wear lesions in patients attending a dental clinic. Context: Tooth wear lesions entail the loss of dental hard tissues in the absence of caries or trauma. They include abrasion, attrition, and erosion. The etiology is often related to habits leading to insidious symptoms with similar presentations in both community and hospital patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved patients attending the outpatient dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital over a 3-month period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from the respondents. Results: A total of 152 respondents aged 17–80 years and above, comprising 86 males (56.6%, and 66 females (43.3% constituted the study population. The Binis were the most represented 34.2%, followed by the Esans 21.1%, while the least represented were the Yorubas (6.6%. The occupations represented in this study include civil servants (30.3%, unskilled workers (23.7%, and non-medical professionals (7.9%. Tooth wear lesions were present in 55.3% of the respondents. Attrition accounted for 29.6%, Abrasion (11.8%, combination of attrition and abrasion (4.6%, and abfraction (2.0%. There was a statistically significant association between tooth wear lesions and age, occupation, sensitivity or pain, tooth cleaning aids, toothbrush texture brushing technique, intake of carbonated beverages, and method of intake. Conclusion: Tooth wear lesions such as attrition and abrasion were prevalent among the respondents in this hospital setting and, therefore, represent an important group of dental problems among this population. It is, therefore, important to direct the appropriate oral health awareness program for the prevention, early detection, and management of these conditions.

  3. Estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem na enfermagem: análise pela Escala de Coma de Glasgow Estrategias de enseñanza y aprendizaje en enfermería: análisis por la Escala de coma de Glasgow Teaching-learning strategies in nursing: analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva Morita

    2009-09-01

    el resultado después del auto aprendizaje. No hubo diferencia en el grado de conocimiento adquirido entre los grupos.Using the Glasgow Coma Scale (ECGl as a subject, this paper aims to analyze and verify the apprehension of knowledge towards the teaching-learning and self-learning offered to nursing workers, and to check the degree of knowledge acquired during the process and possible results stemming from the nursing student/nursing worker association. This descriptive, quantitative-based study counted on the participation of 62 currently enrolled students in the first semester of the 4th year of nursing. The following teaching-learning strategies were used: expositive classes with the use of slides and videotape, and a basic text. Among participants, 41.9% were nursing workers; 61.3% informed to have taken care of patients with high alteration of the consciousness level, predominantly located in their working group. Statistically, there has been a successful improvement in the percentage of correct actions after the expositive class and videotape. Self-learning results showed no alteration either. Intergroup correlations displayed no disparity in the degree of acquired knowledge.

  4. Investigation of final causes of death in 5360 deceased patients within a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran

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    Zahra Tolou-Ghamari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To increase quality of care for critically ill patients admitted to hospitals, understanding various causes of death could provide better quality of care. In this study, medical records of 5360 deceased patientswere reviewed with reference to the mortality reports.A total of 2019 deceased females and 3341deceased males were studied from 2011 to 2013. Neurologic disorders could be categorized as the highest cause of mortality report (25%. Pulmonary, gastrointestinal and heart diseases could be expressed as 17%, 17% and 15% of death episodes respectively. Stroke caused mortality among neurologic disorders in 35% at the minimum age of 27 and maximum age of 94 years old. To prevent worse outcome in critically ill patients admitted to hospital, quality of care related to neurological, pulmonary, heart and gastrointestinal disorders was suggested to be upgrading. To avoid financial burden to the family of deceased related to population that stayed more than a month in hospital, further study is recommended in advance.

  5. The Re-contextualization of the Patient: What Home Health Care Can Teach Us About Medical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Erica K

    2015-06-01

    This article examines the role of context in the development and deployment of standards of medical decision-making. First, it demonstrates that bioethics, and our dominant standards of medical decision-making, developed out of a specific historical and philosophical environment that prioritized technology over the person, standardization over particularity, individuality over relationship and rationality over other forms of knowing. These forces de-contextualize the patient and encourage decision-making that conforms to the unnatural and contrived environment of the hospital. The article then explores several important differences between the home health care and acute care settings. Finally, it argues that the personalized, embedded, relational and idiosyncratic nature of the home is actually a much more accurate reflection of the context in which real people make real decisions. Thus, we should work to "re-contextualize" patients, in order that they might be better equipped to make decisions that harmonize with their real lives.

  6. Bridging the gap between textbook and maternity patient: a nurse-developed teaching model for first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, Nancy Rumsey

    2010-12-01

    Providing more opportunities for first-year medical students to interact with patients in clinical settings is a current discussion topic in medical student education reform. Early clinical experience helps students bridge the gap between textbook and patient while observing patient-centered care, and serves as a first step for students to develop the skills needed to work cooperatively as members of a multidisciplinary health care team. The author developed a model to provide perinatal education to first-year medical students, consistent with the concept of interprofessional education. Primarily first-year medical students participated in the nurse-developed education model, a component of a noncredit extracurricular, student-run perinatal program at a Midwestern university medical center. Students were placed at the bedsides of hospitalized women to provide support and education to them during perinatal procedures, labor, childbirth, and cesarean delivery. A total of 350 students participated over a period of 13 school calendar years. Students remarked that participation in the program reinforced the importance of their concurrent anatomy and physiology classes. They observed interdependence and cooperation among the members of the health care team caring for women, and their evaluations of their experiences at the bedside were highly positive. Women consistently expressed appreciation for the additional individualized attention and education received from our student and nurse team. Nurses can enhance the learning of first-year medical students in the maternity care clinical setting. This nurse-developed education program provided students with a variety of vivid clinical experiences with maternity patients. © 2010, Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mortality pattern of burn patients admitted in S. G. M. Hospital Rewa: A teaching institute of central India

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    S Lal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn injuries rank among the most severe types of injuries suffered by the human body with an attendant high mortality and morbidity rate. In previous studies, incidence, severity and deaths due to burn were found higher in young married women in India. Study to find out mortality pattern in burn patient was not carried out in this part of country. Objective: To identify demographic and sociocultural factors, type, modes, causes and risk factors for burn injuries and their gender-wise association. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study. Data were collected from all burn patients who admitted and died while on the treatment from 2004 to 2009. A total of 586 patients were included in this study. Data were gathered from hospital records and entered in the excel sheet. Analysis of data was done by using SPSS version 17 statistical software. Results: The mean age of patients was 22.66 years (range 1 m to 80 years. Episodes of burn were 4.63 times common in female (82.25% than in male (17.75%. It was statistically significant in females of age group 21-30 years (93.93% vs. 15.33% P < 0.0001. Married females (86.80% burned more commonly than married males (13.19% P < 0.0001. Flame burn was the major cause of death (95.56%. Kerosene was the most common (69% source of flame burn. Clothes caught fire while working on Chullha were 25% cases ( P < 0.0001. Accidental (86.44% burn was the most common intention of injury. The majority of burn deaths (68% occurred within one week of the incident due to septicemia (57%. Conclusion: Factors associated with an increase in mortality were accidental burns, burn size, young age, married women, and flame burns. For planning and implementing prevention programs, the approach has to be multidisciplinary and coordinated.

  8. The range of diagnoses for oral soft-tissue biopsies of geriatric patients in a Saudi Arabian teaching hospital

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    Ahmed Qannam

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The range of lesions seen in Saudi geriatric patients were similar to those reported for other parts of the world, although the lesions were more similar to those reported from developing countries. The very high rate of oral cancer, however, is expected to take the majority of the resources allocated to geriatric oral health care, except if a strong, population-based prevention program is initiated immediately.

  9. Teaching and assessing consultation skills: an evaluation of a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching and assessing consultation skills: an evaluation of a South African workshop ... of this work is unsupervised consultations with patients suffering from new or ... Their attitudes to the LAP and the forms of teaching that its use promotes ...

  10. Introduction and Assessment of a Blended-Learning Model to Teach Patient Assessment in a Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, William Allan; Woodruff, Ashley; Prescott, Gina M; Albanese, Nicole; Bernhardi, Christian; Doloresco, Fred

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To integrate a blended-learning model into a two-course patient assessment sequence in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program and to assess the academic performance and perceptions of enrolled students. Design. A blended-learning model consisting of a flipped classroom format was integrated into a patient assessment (PA) course sequence. Course grades of students in the blended-learning (intervention) and traditional-classroom (control) groups were compared. A survey was administered to assess student perceptions. Assessment. The mean numeric grades of students in the intervention group were higher than those of students in the traditional group (PA1 course: 92.2±3.1 vs 90.0±4.3; and PA2 course: 90.3±4.9 vs 85.8±4.2). Eighty-six percent of the students in the intervention group agreed that the instructional methodologies used in this course facilitated understanding of the material. Conclusion. The blended-learning model was associated with improved academic performance and was well-received by students.

  11. Nursing perception of the impact of automated dispensing cabinets on patient safety and ergonomics in a teaching health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochais, Elise; Atkinson, Suzanne; Guilbeault, Mélanie; Bussières, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate how nursing staff felt about the impact of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) on the safe delivery of health care and workplace ergonomics. To identify the main issues involved in the use of this technology and to describe the corrective measures implemented. Cross-sectional descriptive study with quantitative and qualitative components. A questionnaire that consisted of 33 statements about ADC was distributed from May 24 to June 3, 2011. A total of 172 (46%) of 375 nurses completed the questionnaire. Nursing staff considered the introduction of ADC made their work easier (level of agreement of 90%), helped to safely provide patients with care (91%), and helped to reduce medication incidents/accidents (81%). Nursing staff was particularly satisfied by the narcotic drugs management with the ADCs. Nursing staff were not satisfied with the additional delays in the preparation and administration of a medication dose and the inability to prevent a medication from being administered when stopped on the medication administration record (48%). The nursing staff members were satisfied with the use of ADC and believed it made their work easier, promoted safe patient care, and were perceived to reduce medication incidents/accidents.

  12. Nursing perception of the impact of medication carts on patient safety and ergonomics in a teaching health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochais, Élise; Atkinson, Suzanne; Bussières, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    In our Quebec (Canada) University Hospital Center, 68 medication carts have been implemented as part of a nationally funded project on drug distribution technologies. There are limited data published about the impact of medication carts in point-of-care units. Our main objective was to assess nursing staff's perception and satisfaction of medication carts on patient safety and ergonomics. Quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study. Data were gathered from a printed questionnaire administered to nurses and an organized focus group composed of nurses and pharmacists. A total of 195 nurses completed the questionnaire. Eighty percent of the nurses agreed that medication carts made health care staff's work easier and 64% agreed that it helped to reduce medication incidents/accidents. Only 27% and 43% agreed that carts' location reduces the risk of patients' interruptions and colleagues' interruptions, respectively. A total of 17 suggestions were extracted from the focus group (n = 7 nurses; n = 3 pharmacist) and will be implemented in the next year. This descriptive study confirms the positive perception and satisfaction of nurses exposed to medication carts. However, interruptions are a major concern and source of dissatisfaction. The focus group has revealed many issues which will be improved.

  13. Teaching Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Outlines nine objectives students should be able to accomplish after completing the activities in the unit on typography presented in the previous articles in this journal. Offers eight tips for teaching typography. Includes a short list of books about typography and a list of seven organizations. (SR)

  14. Teaching Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punske, Lori, Comp.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews teaching materials for use in multicultural education. Materials described include posters, novels, picture books, toys, games, and curriculum packages. Topics include religious diversity, values, children's stories, bilingual literature, human rights, Native Americans, women's studies, multicultural art, immigrant students, gender equity,…

  15. Teaching Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Review of research on trends in teaching second-language listening focuses primarily on strategy instruction and a strategy-based approach but also refers to developments in terms of listening and "high-tech contexts," interactive listening, and academic listening. Classroom listening textbooks are discussed, with attention to the mismatch between…

  16. Teaching Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the meaning of the word "symbiosis" be standardized and that it should be used in a broad sense. Also criticizes the orthodox teaching of general principles in this subject and recommends that priority be given to continuity, intimacy, and associated adaptations, rather than to the harm/benefit relationship. (Author/JN)

  17. Retinal Microvasculopathy Is Common in HIV/AIDS Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study at the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Kwasi Abu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ocular disorders in HIV positive patients attending the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Methods. A cross-sectional study using systematic random sampling was conducted on 295 HIV positive patients. Data collection consisted of semistructured questionnaires, laboratory investigation, medical profile, and ophthalmic examination. Statistical association tests including χ2, independent t-test, and ANOVA were done. A p value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Of the 295 participants, 205 (69.5% were on antiretroviral therapy while 90 (30.3% were not on therapy. Majority of the participants (162, 54.9% were in clinical stage two, followed by stages three (68, 23.1%, one (62, 21%, and four (3, 1%, respectively. The overall prevalence of ocular disorders was 5.8%. The most common HIV related ocular disorder was HIV retinal microvasculopathy (58.8%, followed by herpes zoster ophthalmicus and Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis, both representing 11.8% of ocular disorders seen. Cytomegalovirus retinitis, Bell’s palsy, and optic neuritis were the least common (5.9%. CMV retinitis recorded the highest viral load of 1,474,676 copies/mL and mean CD4 count of 136 cells/mm3. The mean CD4 count for participants with HIV related ocular disorders was significantly lower compared to participants without disorders (t=2.5, p=0.012. Participants with ocular disorders also recorded significantly higher mean viral loads than those who did not have ocular disorders (t=2.8, p=0.006. Conclusion. Lower CD4 counts and high viral load copies were associated with the manifestation of HIV related ocular disorders.

  18. Application of Barcoding to Reduce Error of Patient Identification and to Increase Patient's Information Confidentiality of Test Tube Labelling in a Psychiatric Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Chu; Li, Hsing; Chang, Hsin-Fei; Lu, Mei-Rou; Chen, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Learning from the experience of another medical center in Taiwan, Kaohsiung Municipal Kai-Suan Psychiatric Hospital has changed the nursing informatics system step by step in the past year and a half . We considered ethics in the original idea of implementing barcodes on the test tube labels to process the identification of the psychiatric patients. The main aims of this project are to maintain the confidential information and to transport the sample effectively. The primary nurses had been using different work sheets for this project to ensure the acceptance of the new barcode system. In the past two years the errors in the blood testing process were as high as 11,000 in 14,000 events per year, resulting in wastage of resources. The actions taken by the nurses and the new barcode system implementation can improve the clinical nursing care quality, safety of the patients, and efficiency, while decreasing the cost due to the human error.

  19. Tried and true: self-regulation theory as a guiding framework for teaching parents diabetes education using human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Johnson, Kimberly; Cullen, Karen; Hamm, Terry; Bisordi, Jean; Blaney, Kathleen; Maguire, Laura; Melkus, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Parents become emotionally upset when learning that their child has type 1 diabetes, yet they are expected to quickly learn functional diabetes management. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of self-regulation theory to guide a family-focused education intervention using human patient simulation to enhance the initial education of parents in diabetes management. A brief description is provided of the intervention framed by self-regulation theory. On the basis of the literature, we describe the educational vignettes used based on self-regulation in the randomized controlled trial entitled "Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes." Examples of theory-in-practice will be illustrated by parental learning responses to this alternative educational innovation.

  20. Using non-feature films to teach diversity, cultural competence, and the DSM-IV-TR outline for cultural formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Russell F; Diamond, Ronald J; Chang, Jacquelyn B; Primm, Annelle B; Lu, Francis G

    2008-01-01

    Feature films have been used for teaching in psychiatry for many years to demonstrate diagnoses, but the use of documentary and instructional films in resident and staff cultural competence training have not been extensively written about in the medical and psychological literature. This article will describe the films that have been used by the authors and suggest methods for their use in cultural competence and diversity training. A literature search was done using MEDLINE and PsychINFO and the authors were asked to describe their teaching methods. One article was found detailing the use of videotapes as a stimulus but not for cultural competence education, and two articles were found documenting the use of The Color of Fear as a stimulus for the discussion of racism. However, many educators use these films all across the country for the purpose of opening discussion about racism. Documentary, instructional, and public service announcements can be useful in teaching culturally competent assessment and treatment.

  1. The prevalence and bacteriology of asymptomatic bacteriuria among antenatal patients in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi; South Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oli, A N; Okafor, C I; Ibezim, E C; Akujiobi, C N; Onwunzo, M C

    2010-12-01

    Urinary tract infection in pregnancy leads to poor pregnancy outcome. Diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria markedly improves pregnancy outcome as well as reduce the incidence of acute pyelonephritis. To determine the prevalence and bacteriology of asymptomatic bacteriuria among Antenatal patients in our centre, and to know if routine screening will be justifiable. This was a prospective study carried out between April and August 2008. Sample size was statistically determined. Women who consented were interviewed and mid stream urine samples were collected and processed in the microbiology laboratory, using standard microbiological methods. Out of 357 women studied, 65(18.21%) had significant bacteriuria. Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (25.6%), while proteus mirabilis was the least frequent isolate (3.66%). Women in third trimester had the highest prevalence (25.68%) while those in the first trimester had the least (15.79%). Women that had only primary education had the highest prevalence (27.50%) while those that had tertiary education had the least prevalence (21.10%). The prevalence of significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among the women studied was high. Screening of all the pregnant women and treatment will reduce the incidence and complications of overt urinary tract infection in pregnancy among these women.

  2. Self-medication practices in patients attending a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Urban North-West India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to determine the frequency, reasons, and the association of self-medication with demographic and other factors reported by participants. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 500 patients visiting a tertiary hospital in Ludhiana, North Western India. Participants were interviewed with a preset questionnaire. Data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16. Frequencies and proportions were calculated. Results: Of 500 study participants, 93.8% reported self-medication with no gender difference. The participants who took self-medication were of the opinion that self-medication resulted in quick cure of illness 50.75%, saved their time 17.46%, and gave them a sense of independence in 17.06%, respectively. The common reasons self-medication 45.84% for fever, 18.34% for pain, and 10.87% for headache with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs 49.4% followed by antibiotics (11.6% be the common medication. The most common source of information is local chemists/pharmacy 39%. Conclusions: Self-medication is described as a double-edged sword in India, and regulation of over-the-counter sale of antibiotics prescription medication is necessary to safeguard the populace.

  3. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  4. Group B streptococcal bacteremia in a major teaching hospital in Malaysia: a case series of eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarian, N; Neela, V; Ismail, Z; Puzi, S M; Hamat, R A; Desa, M N M; Nordin, S A

    2013-09-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of infections such as meningitis and septicemia in neonates and pregnant women; however the significance of invasive GBS disease has not been clearly defined in non-pregnant adults. We reviewed the hospital records of 18 cases with GBS bacteremia who attended the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre from June 2010 to October 2011. We analyzed the clinical findings of both bacteremic adults and neonates and compared them to previous studies of GBS bacteremia. Serotyping was done by latex agglutination test using 10 distinct antisera (Ia, Ib, and II-IX). During the period of 1 year and 4 months, there were 18 patients with GBS bacteremia. Five cases occurred in neonates, one in a parturient woman, and 12 in other adults. All neonates with bacteremia were males and two of them were premature. Septicemia was the most common clinical presentation in neonates. They were treated with intravenous (IV) penicillin G and gentamicin. The adults included nine men (69%) and four women (31%). Their mean age was 60 years and all patients had more than two underlying conditions. The most common clinical syndrome was pneumonia (n=6, 46.5%). The others were peritonitis (n=3, 23.1%), primary bacteremia (n=2, 15.5%), septic arthritis (n=2, 15.5%), skin and soft tissue infection (n=1, 7.7%), meningitis (n=1, 8%), urinary tract infection (n=1, 8%), and intravascular device infection (n=1, 7.7%). Cardiovascular diseases (n=7, 53.8%) were the most common underlying conditions, and diabetes mellitus (n=5, 38.5%) was second. The other co-morbid conditions were hyperlipidemia (n=3, 23.1%), renal disease (n=3, 23.1%), liver disease and/or alcohol abuse (n=3, 23.1%), autoimmune disease or immunosuppressive condition (n=2, 15.5%), malignancy (n=2, 15.5%), respiratory disease (n=1, 8%), and postpartum condition (n=1, 8%), as well as miscellaneous conditions including intravenous drug abuse, HIV infection, and trauma (n=2, 15

  5. On teaching psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2006-08-01

    Teaching psychoanalysis is no less an art than is the practice of psychoanalysis. As is true of the analytic experience, teaching psychoanalysis involves an effort to create clearances in which fresh forms of thinking and dreaming may emerge, with regard to both psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. Drawing on his experience of leading two ongoing psychoanalytic seminars, each in its 25th year, the author offers observations concerning (1) teaching analytic texts by reading them aloud, line by line, in the seminar setting, with a focus on how the writer is thinking/writing and on how the reader is altered by the experience of reading; (2) treating clinical case presentations as experiences in collective dreaming in which the seminar members make use of their own waking dreaming to assist the presenter in dreaming aspects of his experience with the patient that the analytic pair has not previously been able to dream; (3) reading poetry and fiction as a way of enhancing the capacity of the seminar members to be aware of and alive to the effects created by the patient's and the analyst's use of language; and (4) learning to overcome what one thought one knew about conducting analytic work, i.e. learning to forget what one has learned.

  6. Teaching artfully

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor-bui......) critical and original thinking. The aspiration of the present contribution is to disseminate my thoughts, reflections, experiences and engage in a conversation with a scholarly field, to whom academia is much more than logical-verbal transmission of knowledge.......In this contribution I address the challenges and rewards that are brought by teaching creatively in higher education. By looking auto-ethnographically at my own practice as educator at undergraduate and graduate programs in Denmark, I describe a number of creative educational tools: metaphor...

  7. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States. A Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kwanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    This report presents the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video study of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. This exploratory research project is part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). The study included 231 eighth-grade mathematics…

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibody in HIV-infected patients at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osunkalu VO

    2011-09-01

    -IgG antibodies was lowest among the educated subjects (19% of the respondents with tertiary education and among females in both study groups. A higher proportion of the subjects with neurological complications had CD4 cell count <100 cells/µL compared with respondents without neurological defects (39% vs 22.7%; P = 0.000, but the seroprevalence of Toxo-IgG antibodies was higher in subjects without neurological complications (45% vs 31.3%; P = 0.000.Conclusion: Toxoplasmosis, though an important opportunistic infection in our environment, may not account for the majority of neurological complications observed in patients with HIV infection in our center.Keywords: Toxoplasma gondii antibody (Toxo-IgG, seroprevalence, neurological complication 

  9. Teaching Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Young McChesney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is targeted to faculty teaching race and ethnicity, racism, diversity, and multicultural courses. Many students equate race with skin color. The premise of this article is that to teach students about the social construction of race, teachers must first know enough science to teach students that race is not biological. This article examines the biology of race by showing how advances in DNA sequencing led to genetics research that supports arguments that race is not biological. DNA comparisons show that all human populations living today are one species that came from Africa. The article explains the migration of humans out of Africa about 60,000 years ago and how they populated Australia, then Asia, Europe, and the Americas. The article shows how recent research maps the timing of the migration and admixture of specific population groups into Europe and India. The article shows how a mutation in one nucleotide can result in a trait like blue eyes, or Hemoglobin S (which confers resistance to malaria, which can be subject to evolution through natural selection. DNA comparisons show how natural selection shaped the genetics of human skin color to adapt to less UV light in the northern latitudes of Europe and Asia. The article shows that there is no relation between skin color or other “racial” characteristics and complex traits like intelligence. The science in this article will help teachers explain that as race is not biological, race is socially constructed and culturally enacted.

  10. Teaching atlas of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabar, L.; Dean, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The illustrated case reports in this teaching atlas cover practically the entire range of possible pathological changes and are based on in-patient case material and 80,000 screening documents. The two basic approaches, - detection and analysis of changes -, are taught comprehensively and in great detail. A systematic procedure for analysing the mammographies, in order to detect even the very least changes, and its practical application is explained using mammographies showing unclear findings at first sight. A system of coordinates is presented which allows precise localisation of the changes. Exercises for practising the technique of identifying the pathological changes round up the methodolical chapters. Additional imaging technical enhancements and detail enlargements are of great help in interpreting the findings. The specific approach adopted for this teaching atlas is a 'reverse procedure', which leaves the beaten track and starts with analysing the mammographies and evaluating the radiographic findings, in order to finally derive the diagnosis. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Teaching Culture Through Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐婷

    2016-01-01

    Cultural teaching is an issue which is associated with complexity and paradox and also it is a big challenge for faculty. Teaching culture through films has become an important way of cross-cultural teaching This paper focuses on the reasons for teaching culture through films, the value and how it works. And finally it leads out the prospects of cultural teaching through films.

  12. Has Bedside Teaching Had Its Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zeshan; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Though a diverse array of teaching methods is now available, bedside teaching is arguably the most favoured. Students like it because it is patient-centred, and it includes a high proportion of relevant skills. It is on the decline, coinciding with declining clinical skills of junior doctors. Several factors might account for this: busier…

  13. The Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) among Lichen Planus Patients and Its Clinical Pattern at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (U.A.T.H), Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Ukonu Agwu; Augustine, Uhunmwangho

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between hepatitis C virus and Lichen Planus have been widely reported in the literature; although there are wide geographical variations in the reported prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with lichen planus. This study seeks to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus among lichen planus patients and its clinical morphological type in the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada Abuja, Nigeria. Materials/Methods: This study was conducted between January 2010 and December, 2011 at the out patients Dermatological unit of the department of medicine at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada Abuja, Nigeria. Consecutive patients who had body eruptions suspected to be lichen planus were recruited and histology done for confirmation. The control group included patients’ relations and some dermatology patients known to have low risk of hepatitis C virus infection and liver function tests done for both subjects and control after obtaining oral consent from them to participate in the study. Result: Anti- HCV antibodies were detected in nine cases (21.4%) and one case (3.3%) in the control group. This was statistically significant difference between the HCV antibody among the subject and control group (Plichen planus was the most frequent clinical type. Liver function test was not statistically significant among the subject and control group. Conclusion: Lichen planus and Hepatitis C virus appear to have a relationship and the prevalence rate was higher among the subject as compared to the control group in our environment. PMID:22980383

  14. Literature Teaching in ELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To show the importance of literature teaching in English language teaching (ELT),this paper explores the relations between language, culture and literature,examines the present problems in literature teaching and possible solutions are suggested as well.

  15. Preoperative patient education: evaluating postoperative patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, B J

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative teaching is an important part of patient care and can prevent complications, as well as promote patient fulfillment during hospitalization. A study was conducted at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, LA, in 1989, to determine the impact of a preoperative teaching program on the incidence of postoperative atelectasis and patient satisfaction. Results showed no significant difference of postoperative complications and patient gratification after participating in a structured preoperative teaching program. As part of this study, it was identified that a patient evaluation tool for a preoperative teaching class needed to be developed. The phases of this process are explained in the following article.

  16. Teaching Surgery without a Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the increasing use of virtual-reality devices at Pennsylvania State University's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and other institutions that allow medical residents to practice their skills in simulated operations. Notes that both students and professors are enthusiastic about the simulations but that the necessary technology and…

  17. Teen Use of a Patient Portal: A Qualitative Study of Parent and Teen Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, David A.; Brown, Nancy L.; Wilson, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative study of the attitudes of teens and parents toward the use of a patient portal. We conducted two teen and two parent focus groups, one teen electronic bulletin board, and one parent electronic bulletin board. Videotapes and transcripts from the groups were independently analyzed by two reviewers for significant themes, which were then validated by two other members ...

  18. Teaching Creatively and Teaching for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of generally accepted ideas about creativity, followed by examples of music teachers teaching creatively and teaching their students to be more creative. Implications for teacher education and policy recommendations for music education are discussed.

  19. Atrial fibrillation cases seen at the University of Nigeria Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG) of patients attending the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu. Subjects and Methods: Electrocardiograms done at the UNTH between April and September 2004 were analysed. The patients were mainly in-patients.

  20. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzi, M.A.; Rimondini, M.; Deveugele, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Moretti, F.; Vliet, L. van; Deledda, G.; Fletcher, I.; Bensing, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. Objective: To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes

  1. Expectations and satisfaction of denture patients in a university clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E L; Albino, J E; Tedesco, L A; Portenoy, B S; Ortman, L F

    1986-01-01

    These results indicate that patients' expectations of dentures before treatment were unrealistically high and that informational videotapes did not significantly affect these expectations. Satisfaction with current dentures was surprisingly high before treatment and increased significantly from pretreatment to postreatment for both groups in the study. While it is likely that this increase in satisfaction reflects a change from poor to excellent denture status, this finding may also be attributed to cognitive dissonance theory; that is, high satisfaction may represent the means by which patients justify the expenses of their denture treatment. Although the videotape presentations did not alter the expectations of patients and their satisfaction with dentures, the tapes represent a potential source of accurate, standardized information for both patient and student dentist.

  2. Science Teachers Taking their First Steps toward Teaching Socioscientific Issues through Collaborative Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Yang, Jung-eun

    2017-06-01

    This study presents two science teachers, Catherine and Jennifer, who took their first steps toward teaching socioscientific issues through collaborative action research. The teachers participated in the collaborative action research project because they wanted to address socioscientific issues but had limited experience in teaching them. The research questions included what kinds of challenges the teachers encountered when implementing socioscientific issues and to what extent they resolved the challenging issues as participating in collaborative action research. The primary data source consisted of audiotapes of regular group meetings containing information on the process of constructing and implementing lesson plans and reflecting on their teaching of socioscientific issues. We also collected classroom videotapes of the teachers' instruction and audiotapes of students' small group discussions and their worksheets. The findings indicated that when addressing socioscientific issues in the classes, the teachers encountered several challenging issues. We categorized them into four: (1) restructuring classroom dynamics and culture, (2) scaffolding students' engagement in socioscientific issues, (3) dealing with values, and (4) finding their niche in schools. However, this study showed that collaborative action research could be a framework for helping the teachers to overcome such challenges and have successful experiences of teaching socioscientific issues. These experiences became good motivation, to gradually develop their understanding of teaching socioscientific issues and instructional strategies for integrating the knowledge and skills that they had accumulated over the years.

  3. Simulation as a surgical teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gómez, José Luis; Martín-Parra, José Ignacio; González-Noriega, Mónica; Redondo-Figuero, Carlos Godofredo; Manuel-Palazuelos, José Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Teaching of surgery has been affected by many factors over the last years, such as the reduction of working hours, the optimization of the use of the operating room or patient safety. Traditional teaching methodology fails to reduce the impact of these factors on surgeońs training. Simulation as a teaching model minimizes such impact, and is more effective than traditional teaching methods for integrating knowledge and clinical-surgical skills. Simulation complements clinical assistance with training, creating a safe learning environment where patient safety is not affected, and ethical or legal conflicts are avoided. Simulation uses learning methodologies that allow teaching individualization, adapting it to the learning needs of each student. It also allows training of all kinds of technical, cognitive or behavioural skills. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. CONTEMPORARY TEACHING AIDS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS

    OpenAIRE

    Sead Rešić; Eldina Atić

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the application of contemporary teaching aids in Mathematics teaching in elementary school was analyzed from the aspect of teachers, students and parents. The application of contemporary teaching aids in Mathematics teaching was analyzed through a sample of 100 students, and attitudes about the aids were examined from the points of view of students, teachers and parents. In this research, descriptive method, questionnaire and test were used. Results of the resear...

  5. Teaching Teachers to Play and Teach Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven; McNeill, Michael; Fry, Joan; Wang, John

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the extent to which a technical and a tactical approach to teaching a basketball unit to physical education teacher education (PETE) students would each affect their games playing abilities, perceived ability to teach, and approach preference for teaching the game. Pre- and post-unit data were collected through…

  6. Development of innovative teaching materials: clinical pharmacology problem-solving (CPPS) units: comparison with patient-oriented problem-solving units and problem-based learning--a 10-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Claire M; Smith, Cedric M

    2002-05-01

    The First Teaching Clinic in Clinical Pharmacology, sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacology in September 1992, was designed for the preparation and development of new clinical pharmacology problem-solving (CPPS) units. CPPS units are case histories that illustrate pertinent principles in clinical pharmacology. Each unit consists of the following sections: introduction, learning objectives, pretest, four clinical pharmacology scenarios, posttest, answers to pre- and posttest questions, and selected references. The clinical pharmacology content of the CPPS units place greater emphasis on clinical information, drug selection, and risk/benefit analyses, and thus they complement the basic pharmacology presented in the patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) units. In general, the CPPS units are intended for use by students more advanced in clinical pharmacology than first- and second-year medical students. The CPPS unit "Clinical Pharmacology of Antiepileptic Drug Use: Clinical Pearls about the Perils of Patty" was developed for use by third- and fourth-year medical students doing rotations in neurology or clinical pharmacology; advanced pharmacy students; residents in neurology, pediatrics, internal medicine, and family practice; fellows in clinical pharmacology, and those taking the board examination in clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit titled "Geriatric Clinical Psychopharmacology" was written for third- and fourth-year medical students; residents in psychiatry, family practice, and internal medicine;fellows in clinical pharmacology; and those studying for boards in clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit "Anisocoria and Glaucoma" was written for more advanced students of clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit titled "Antiepileptic Drugs" was intended for second-year medical students. The second teaching clinic was held in November 1993 and focused on the development and editing of the CPPS units and their evaluations by faculty and students from

  7. Teaching Abroad: Why Teachers Prefer Teaching Overseas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Serbes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching overseas has always been a great opprotunity for academic and social development. Teachers who have international experiences stand a better chance of not only developing their teaching skills, communication skills and classroom management but also learning new languages and about other cultures. Teaching abroad can help teachers promote their skills for efficiency and effectiveness. It is important to stress that teachers with international experience can teach effectively and can contribute to the achievement of their students more. This paper focuses on five reasons why teachers prefer teaching overseas.

  8. Crafting a Teaching Persona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, James M.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author contemplates two books dealing with developing a teaching persona. These books are Elaine Showalter's "Teaching Literature" and Jay Parini's "The Art of Teaching". Showalter and Parini present very different perspectives on the issue. Showalter addresses it in a section called "Personae: The Teaching Self," in which she…

  9. Ensino de massoterapia: habilidades envolvidas na relação fisioterapeuta-paciente Massotherapy teaching: abilities involved in the therapist-patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Calil Padis Campos

    2009-03-01

    program was then applied to a class of 25 undergraduates, whose performance at the end of the program was assessed, in a practical test, as adequate, partially adequate, inadequate or not undertaken. Written final reports by students were also analysed. Twelve out of the 21 trained abilities were found to be adequately performed by all students; four abilities were partially adequately carried out by five students. There was no case of inadequate performance. The analysis of the written reports showed that 19 out of the 25 students approved of the training program, found relevant and necessary. The self-care training was pointed out as relevant for professional development and appropriate to the teaching context by 10 students. The program proved thus efficient in enabling students to perform with adequate therapist-patient relationship, being also well accepted by students.

  10. Indirect costs of teaching in Canadian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, T A; Willan, A R; Cox, M A; Green, A

    1991-01-01

    We sought to determine whether there are indirect costs of teaching in Canadian hospitals. To examine cost differences between teaching and nonteaching hospitals we estimated two cost functions: cost per case and cost per patient-day (dependent variables). The independent variables were number of beds, occupancy rate, teaching ratio (number of residents and interns per 100 beds), province, urbanicity (the population density of the county in which the hospital was situated) and wage index. Within each hospital we categorized a random sample of patient discharges according to case mix and severity of illness using age and standard diagnosis and procedure codes. Teaching ratio and case severity were each highly correlated positively with the dependent variables. The other variables that led to higher costs in teaching hospitals were wage rates and number of beds. Our regression model could serve as the basis of a reimbursement system, adjusted for severity and teaching status, particularly in provinces moving toward introducing case-weighting mechanisms into their payment model. Even if teaching hospitals were paid more than nonteaching hospitals because of the difference in the severity of illness there should be an additional allowance to cover the indirect costs of teaching. PMID:1898870

  11. A non-clinical randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of pharmaceutical care intervention on satisfaction level of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Dinesh Kumar; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Mishra, Pranaya; Alurkar, Vijay M

    2015-02-12

    Patient satisfaction is the ultimate goal of healthcare system which can be achieved from good patient-healthcare professional relationship and quality of healthcare services provided. Study was conducted to determine the baseline satisfaction level of newly diagnosed diabetics and to explore the impact of pharmaceutical care intervention on patients' satisfaction during their follow-ups in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. An interventional, pre-post non-clinical randomised controlled study was designed among randomly distributed 162 [control group (n = 54), test 1 group (n = 54) and test 2 group (n = 54)] newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients by consecutive sampling method for 18 months. Diabetes Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction scores at baseline, three, six, nine and, twelve months' follow-ups. Test groups patients were provided pharmaceutical care whereas control group patients only received their usual care from physician/nurses. The responses were entered in SPSS version 16. Data distribution was not normal on Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Non-parametric tests i.e. Friedman test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to find the differences among the groups before and after the intervention (p ≤0.05). There were significant (p patients' satisfaction scores in the test groups on Friedman test. Mann-Whitney U test identified the significant differences in satisfaction scores between test 1 and test 2 groups, control and test 1 groups and, control and test 2 groups at 3-months (p = 0.008), (p satisfaction level of diabetics in the test groups compare to the control group. Diabetic kit demonstration strengthened the satisfaction level among the test 2 group patients. Therefore, pharmacist can act as a counsellor through pharmaceutical care program and assist the patients in managing their disease. This will not only modify the patients' related outcomes and their

  12. Promovendo a argumentação no ensino superior de química Promoting argumentation in undergraduate chemistry teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Passos Sá

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated the importance of argumentation in science education. Based on this assertion, we have tried to develop argumentative abilities in chemistry undergraduate students through a teaching methodology based on case studies. The process culminated with class presentations by student groups about possible solutions for the cases. To assess the quality of students' argumentation, videotapes of group presentations were collected and analyzed using Toulmin's Argument Pattern (TAP. TAP illustrates the nature of an argument in terms of claims, data, warrants, backings, and rebuttals. The findings of this work support the idea that the case study approach is an effective strategy for enhancing students' ability to argument.

  13. Simulated interprofessional education: an analysis of teaching and learning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soeren, Mary; Devlin-Cop, Sandra; Macmillan, Kathleen; Baker, Lindsay; Egan-Lee, Eileen; Reeves, Scott

    2011-11-01

    Simulated learning activities are increasingly being used in health professions and interprofessional education (IPE). Specifically, IPE programs are frequently adopting role-play simulations as a key learning approach. Despite this widespread adoption, there is little empirical evidence exploring the teaching and learning processes embedded within this type of simulation. This exploratory study provides insight into the nature of these processes through the use of qualitative methods. A total of 152 clinicians, 101 students and 9 facilitators representing a range of health professions, participated in video-recorded role-plays and debrief sessions. Videotapes were analyzed to explore emerging issues and themes related to teaching and learning processes related to this type of interprofessional simulated learning experience. In addition, three focus groups were conducted with a subset of participants to explore perceptions of their educational experiences. Five key themes emerged from the data analysis: enthusiasm and motivation, professional role assignment, scenario realism, facilitator style and background and team facilitation. Our findings suggest that program developers need to be mindful of these five themes when using role-plays in an interprofessional context and point to the importance of deliberate and skilled facilitation in meeting desired learning outcomes.

  14. Alternate methods of teaching psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisook, Sidney; Benjamin, Sheldon; Balon, Richard; Glick, Ira; Louie, Alan; Moutier, Christine; Moyer, Trenton; Santos, Cynthia; Servis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews methods used to teach psychopharmacology to psychiatry residents that utilize principles of adult learning, enlist active participation of residents, and provide faculty with skills to seek, analyze, and use new information over the course of their careers. The pros and cons of five "nonlecture" methods of teaching are reviewed: 1) journal clubs, 2) problem-based learning, 3) formalized patient-centered training, 4) games, and 5) the use of modern technology. Several programs are beginning to find novel methods of teaching psychopharmacology that are effective and well received by trainees and faculty. Programs need to go beyond the traditional lecture and apprenticeship model of psychopharmacology education to help make learning more fun, useful, relevant and self-sustaining.

  15. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies.

  16. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Juriah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. Methods SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. Results The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p Conclusion Use of structured self-reflective and peer-interactive, practice based methods of SP training is recommended to improve SP performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  17. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jennifer; Perera, Joachim; Abdullah, Juriah; Lee, Nagarajah

    2009-06-29

    Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs) for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a) self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b) peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  18. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY SCAN FINDINGS OF PATIENTS PRESENTING WITH HEADACHE AT TRIPURA MEDICAL COLLEGE AND DR. B.R. AMBEDKAR MEMORIAL TEACHING HOSPITAL, HAPANIA, AGARTALA, TRIPURA- A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biplab Debbarma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Headache is one of the causes of discomfort to a human being and can be classified as primary or secondary headache. CT scan has proved to be useful when the neurological physical examination is abnormal. The aim of the study is to1. Determine the causes of headache of patients presenting with nontraumatic headache by CT scan at Tripura Medical College and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Memorial Teaching Hospital, Hapania, Agartala, West Tripura. 2. Correlate the clinical diagnosis and the CT scan findings of patients with nontraumatic headache. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 157 patients presented with nontraumatic headache underwent CT scan examination in the Radiodiagnosis Department of Tripura Medical College and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Memorial Teaching Hospital, Hapania, Agartala, West Tripura and scans were viewed for the presence of any secondary cause of headache and findings were expressed as frequency and percentage. Statistical Analysis- The data were entered in spreadsheet and analysed using SPSS 21 statistical software. Results were expressed as frequency and percentage. RESULTS In our study, female patients (50.96% were slightly more than the male (49.04% patients and majority of the patients were in the age group of >20 to ≤40 years (54.14% followed by >40 to ≤60 years (25.47%.Primary headache (73.89% was found to be more common than secondary headache (26.11%. Sinusitis (73.17% was the commonest cause of secondary headache. Prevalence of positive CT scans of patients presenting with headache was 26.11%. Most of the clinical diagnosis did not correlate (61.78% with the CT scan finding. Patients with clinical diagnosis of migraine correlates mostly with the CT scan finding (69.44%, which is one of commonest cause of primary headache where we got negative findings in CT scan followed by sinusitis (38.77%, CVA/ICH (cerebrovascular accident and intracerebral haemorrhage 32.25% and brain SOL (25%. CONCLUSION CT scan has a role in

  19. Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET: A Formative Peer Review Supporting Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Crabtree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET is a valid and reliable measure developed for formative peer evaluation of pharmacy faculty. The authors replicated a study conducted on the POET in pharmacy in order to report the instrument’s validity and reliability in occupational therapy and to explore its potential as a formative teaching evaluation for occupational therapy educators. To verify item importance, seven participants from the faculty in an occupational therapy department rated each item. To establish inter-rater reliability, the participants evaluated one videotaped 55 min lecture. The POET was reliable with ICC at 0.93. There were high levels of agreement with the importance ratings among the participants with all scales. The POET appears to be a valid and reliable formative measure of teaching. At a time of significant change in the level of occupational therapy education, this measure may be an important support for scholarly teaching in two ways: First, this measure offers several opportunities to document the instructor’s strengths and, second, it offers the instructor suggestions about ways to improve teaching quality. Finally, the POET may facilitate faculty professional growth and development through systematic, strategic, and constructive peer review feedback.

  20. From Classroom Teaching to Remote Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for teaching purpose on the Internet. It is also described how courses in the two different teaching environments can be maintained in one place. More professional teaching tools are available on the market, but the methods described in this paper are based on Luvit[1], an open low-cost web-based teaching tool...... and at the same time easy to learn and use by both developer and students. Two in-house project groups have tested the project work with success after a short learning period. 35 remote students under Open Education in Multimedia Industrial Information Technology (MII) are using the Luvit[1] tool and the methods...

  1. TEACH Kitchen: A Chronological Review of Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jung Hee; Ansa, Benjamin E.; Smith, Selina A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Eating and Cooking Healthy (TEACH) Kitchen was founded at the Medical College of Georgia in 2015 as a nutrition-based intervention to combat the high prevalence of obesity and obesity-related chronic diseases in the area of Augusta, Georgia. Despite the importance of diet in the management of chronic diseases, inadequate nutrition education among patients and healthcare providers presents a barrier. The purpose of TEACH Kitchen is to address this gap. Methods TEACH Kitchen is as a student-led initiative that promotes healthy cooking among medical students and patients with chronic diseases. Healthy nutrition and cooking classes are held during the academic year. Participants spend four weeks on each of four modules: obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. Data collection, which began in January 2017, is currently on going. TEACH Kitchen has collaborated with Augusta University, Sodexo, and Kohl’s. Results Currently, TEACH Kitchen has enrolled 14 patients and 6 children. Anticipated results include measurements of pre-and post-intervention changes in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and competence in nutrition, as well as differences in clinical indicators, including body mass index, blood pressure, lipid profile, and HbA1c. Conclusions TEACH Kitchen is the first medical school-based nutrition/cooking education initiative in Augusta, Georgia. It provides patients and medical students with hands-on healthy nutrition/cooking experience with the goal of decreasing the prevalence and improving the outcome of obesity-related diseases. PMID:28890945

  2. Academic detailing to teach aging and geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Ashley; Cuoco, Theresa; Pride, Pamela; Wiley, Kathy; Iverson, Patty J; Marsden, Justin; Moran, William; Caton, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is a required component of internal medicine training. Work hour rules and hectic schedules have challenged residency training programs to develop and utilize innovative teaching methods. In this study, the authors examined the use of academic detailing as a teaching intervention in their residents' clinic and on the general medicine inpatient wards to improve clinical knowledge and skills in geriatric care. The authors found that this teaching method enables efficient, directed education without disrupting patient care. We were able to show improvements in medical knowledge as well as self-efficacy across multiple geriatric topics.

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Two Teaching Strategies to Improve Nursing Students' Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes About Quality Improvement and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Karen L; Wright, Vivian H

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two teaching strategies with regard to quality and safety education for nurses content on quality improvement and safety. Two groups (total of 64 students) participated in online learning or online learning in conjunction with a flipped classroom. A pretest/posttest control group design was used. The use of online modules in conjunction with the flipped classroom had a greater effect on increasing nursing students' knowledge of quality improvement than the use of online modules only. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for safety.

  4. Using video modeling to teach reciprocal pretend play to children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Rebecca; Sacramone, Shelly; Mansfield, Renee; Wiltz, Kristine; Ahearn, William H

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to use video modeling to teach children with autism to engage in reciprocal pretend play with typically developing peers. Scripted play scenarios involving various verbalizations and play actions with adults as models were videotaped. Two children with autism were each paired with a typically developing child, and a multiple-probe design across three play sets was used to evaluate the effects of the video modeling procedure. Results indicated that both children with autism and the typically developing peers acquired the sequences of scripted verbalizations and play actions quickly and maintained this performance during follow-up probes. In addition, probes indicated an increase in the mean number of unscripted verbalizations as well as reciprocal verbal interactions and cooperative play. These findings are discussed as they relate to the development of reciprocal pretend-play repertoires in young children with autism.

  5. Teaching about Fractals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    Described is a course designed to teach students about fractals using various teaching methods including the computer. Discussed are why the course drew students, prerequisites, clientele, textbook, grading, computer usage, and the syllabus. (KR)

  6. Journal for Language Teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Journal for Language Teaching = Ijenali Yekufundzisa Lulwimi = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig ... SAALT was founded in 1964 for the benefit of language teaching and language teachers and ...

  7. Mathematical knowledge in teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This book examines issues of considerable significance in addressing global aspirations to raise standards of teaching and learning in mathematics by developing approaches to characterizing, assessing and developing mathematical knowledge for teaching.

  8. Teaching and Mother Love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J. Theodore

    1989-01-01

    The teaching context is analogous to the context of maternal practice, reflecting the nature of the relationship between adult and child; and as such, the appropriate practice of mother love is seen as an ideal for teaching. (IAH)

  9. Teaching Business Ethics or Teaching Business Ethically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stablein, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    Notes that one of the most important contexts for ethical decision-making is the nature and operation of "contemporary capitalisms." Suggests that rather than issuing a call for teaching business ethics, the author emphasizes the need for more ethical business teaching. (SG)

  10. Constructivism in Practice: an Exploratory Study of Teaching Patterns and Student Motivation in Physics Classrooms in Finland, Germany and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; von Arx, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    For the last three decades, moderate constructivism has become an increasingly prominent perspective in science education. Researchers have defined characteristics of constructivist-oriented science classrooms, but the implementation of such science teaching in daily classroom practice seems difficult. Against this background, we conducted a sub-study within the tri-national research project Quality of Instruction in Physics (QuIP) analysing 60 videotaped physics classes involving a large sample of students ( N = 1192) from Finland, Germany and Switzerland in order to investigate the kinds of constructivist components and teaching patterns that can be found in regular classrooms without any intervention. We applied a newly developed coding scheme to capture constructivist facets of science teaching and conducted principal component and cluster analyses to explore which components and patterns were most prominent in the classes observed. Two underlying components were found, resulting in two scales—Structured Knowledge Acquisition and Fostering Autonomy—which describe key aspects of constructivist teaching. Only the first scale was rather well established in the lessons investigated. Classes were clustered based on these scales. The analysis of the different clusters suggested that teaching physics in a structured way combined with fostering students' autonomy contributes to students' motivation. However, our regression models indicated that content knowledge is a more important predictor for students' motivation, and there was no homogeneous pattern for all gender- and country-specific subgroups investigated. The results are discussed in light of recent discussions on the feasibility of constructivism in practice.

  11. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

  12. Teaching concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of concrete structures has been revised and a number of new approaches have been developed, implemented and evaluated. Inductive teaching, E-learning and “patches” have been found to be improvements and may be an inspiration and help for others development of the teaching and learning...

  13. Creative Teaching in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Vikki; Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Young, Karen

    2018-01-01

    If Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines in higher education are to retain students, there needs to be a shift towards teaching in more enriching and interesting ways. Creative teaching needs to become more prominent in STEM. This article presents a study that defines creative teaching in the STEM context and…

  14. English Teaching in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses teaching English in Mexico, a country with important social, cultural, and economic ties to the United States. Looks at the various English teaching situations as well as teacher education for teachers in Mexico. Concludes that the English teaching situation in Mexico reflects great diversity and growth, and that the knowledge of English…

  15. My Teaching Learning Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjani, Neelam Saleem

    2014-01-01

    The heart of teaching learning philosophy is the concept of nurturing students and teaching them in a way that creates passion and enthusiasm in them for a lifelong learning. According to Duke (1990) education is a practice of artful action where teaching learning process is considered as design and knowledge is considered as colours. Teaching…

  16. Teaching Philosophy Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the rationale for my teaching philosophy. Using a personal perspective, I explain my objectives, mission, and vision in writing my philosophy of teaching statements. This article also creates a road map and reference points for educators who want to write their own teaching philosophy statements to help them make informed…

  17. From Teaching to Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A shift from teaching to learning is characteristic of the introduction of Problem Based Learning (PBL) in an existing school. As a consequence the teaching staff has to be trained in skills like facilitating group work and writing cases. Most importantly a change in thinking about teaching...

  18. Teaching Tourism Change Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stilling Blichfeldt, Bodil; Kvistgaard, Hans-Peter; Hird, John

    2017-01-01

    course that is part of a Tourism Master’s program, where a major challenge is not only to teach students about change and change agents, but to teach them how change feels and ho w to become change agents. The c hange management course contains an experiment inspired by experiential teaching literature...... change in tourism in the future....

  19. Technology and Teaching Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges faced when integrating new technologies into the classroom. Viewing the experiences of teaching a first year learning community through the lens of the principles of the Reflective Teaching Portfolio, the author looks to answer the question: "How should Technology relate to our Teaching Philosophy?"…

  20. Grammar and Teaching ESL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Glenda; Young, Barbara N.

    2005-01-01

    The variety of theories relating to teaching ESL learners leads to contradictory ideas about teaching a second language. This paper focuses on the continuing importance of grammar in teaching and the current resurgence in interest in returning to grammar as an important component in the classroom.