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Sample records for videotaped interviews differences

  1. The effect of videotaping students' interviews with patients for interview skill education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Ji Eun; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Park, Ki Heum; Sung, Nak-Jin

    2013-03-01

    The importance of communication between patients and physicians has been proven in many previous studies. The authors analyzed the effect of interview skill education through videotapes which recorded students' interviews with real patients in the outpatient department of family medicine. This study was conducted with all students who chose the elective course of family medicine and one randomly selected student every week from an 'infectious internal medicine' class at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital during the period from December 2008 to March 2011. All students performed a preliminary examination of a new patient at the outpatient department of family medicine. All consultations were videotaped. Feedback to the student was given on the same day by viewing the videotape together. After feedback, all students performed another preliminary examination of one new patient at the department of family medicine the same week. Three family medicine residents scored all videotapes using 10-item interview skill checklists. Many parts of the checklists were modified using the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scales. Thirty-three students participated. Of 10 items, nine showed increased scores after feedback. There was a significant change in four items after feedback: 'type of question' (before 2.36 ± 0.60, after 2.73 ± 0.72), 'timeline' (before 2.82 ± 0.68, after 3.18 ± 0.73), 'positive verbal reinforcement' (before 2.24 ± 0.56, after 2.61 ± 0.90), and the total score (before 21.70 ± 2.62, after 23.39 ± 3.13) (P skills using videotapes of students' preliminary consultations with real patients in outpatient settings, was effective in improving the interview areas of 'type of question,' 'timeline,' 'positive verbal reinforcement,' and the total interview scores.

  2. Real Talk: Interviews, Radio Broadcasts and Videotaping as Context in Advanced Italian Conversation Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Clara

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problems faced by teachers of third-year (i.e. advanced) Italian language courses, particularly in developing students' speaking skills. Stresses the importance of "real talk" and discusses relevant student activities such as interviewing native speakers, preparing live radio broadcasts, and videotaping students speeches and…

  3. Scars. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This 40-minute videotape tackles the issue of childhood bullying and unwanted teasing and torment. This videotape features real school children handling dramatic roles, and "doing the right thing" (aka "positive modeling.") The film is divided into two distinct parts: first act themes include bullying, girl bullies, children without one or both…

  4. DO TESTIMONIES OF TRAUMATIC EVENTS DIFFER DEPENDING ON THE INTERVIEWER?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebecca Brönnimann; Jane Herlihy; Julia Müller; Ulrike Ehlert

    2013-01-01

      While differences in witness narratives due to different interviewers may have implications for their credibility in court, this study considers how investigative interviews by different parties...

  5. Different Approaches to the Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1989-01-01

    Develops two models of reference interview behavior: the Needs-Oriented Model and the Question-Oriented Model. The models are tested by reanalysis of data from a 1978 dissertation on interviews in the public library setting. Results show the appropriateness of the models and indicate that the question-oriented interview was more prevalent. (eight…

  6. The Carrot Highway [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Ron

    "The Carrot Highway" is a 40-minute award-winning videotape that takes viewers on a whirlwind tour around the world to tell the story of the carrot. This videotape reveals the carrot in all its glory by cleverly integrating live-action, music, animation, videotape footage, and games. Viewers travel with a troupe of animated carrot characters to…

  7. Do interviewer-respondent interactions in CAPI and CATI-interviews show a difference in rapport?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, Yfke; Haan, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Various studies have shown that social desirability bias and satisficing are more prevalent in CATI than in CAPI surveys. Although this difference has theoretically been explained in terms of rapport (Holbrook et al 2003), it has not systematically been studied whether interviewer-respondent

  8. DO TESTIMONIES OF TRAUMATIC EVENTS DIFFER DEPENDING ON THE INTERVIEWER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Ehlert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While differences in witness narratives due to different interviewers may have implications for their credibility in court, this study considers how investigative interviews by different parties to the proceedings, as well as the gender and nationality of interviewers, can influence the testimony of witnesses in court who share comparable traumatic experiences. The foundation of the analysis was answers given to judges, prosecutors, civil party lawyers and defence lawyers in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC located in Phnom Penh. Transcribed testimonies of 24 victim witnesses and civil parties which were translated from Khmer into English were analysed using a computer-based text analysis program, the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC. Results showed that when answering questions by females, witnesses used significantly more cognitive process words. When interviewed by international rather than by Cambodian parties to the proceeding witness accounts were composed of significantly more verbal expressions of affective processes and of perceptual processes. Furthermore, witnesses used most cognitive and affective process words during the interview by civil party lawyers and defence lawyers. These results may be due to a prior supportive relationship between civil parties and their lawyers and due to a more interrogative question style by the defence lawyers, who attempt to undermine the credibility of the interviewed witnesses. Data shows that LIWC analysis is an appropriate method to examine witness accounts and, therefore, contributes to a better understanding of the complex relationship between testimony in events under litigation and credibility.

  9. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvale, Steinar; Brinkmann, Svend

    Interviewet spiller en afgørende rolle i en stor del kvalitativ forskning. Men det er samtidig en kompleks disciplin, der rummer mange faldgruber og kræver fintfølende analytiske kompetencer. I denne bog giver Steinar Kvale og Svend Brinkmann en introduktion til de teoretiske og praktiske aspekte...... disciplin gennem en præsentation af dets syv stadier, hvor forfatterne klæder læseren fagligt på til at planlægge og foretage interviews....

  10. Space Science in Action: Astronomy [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape recording teaches students about constellations, star movement, and how scientists have studied celestial bodies throughout history from Ptolemy to Copernicus to the work of the Hubble Space Telescope. An interview with Kathy Thornton, one of the astronauts who repaired the Hubble while in orbit, is featured. A hands-on activity…

  11. Evaluating the Reference Interview: Some Factors Influencing Patrons and Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, Gillian; Harris, Roma M.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined differences between public library patrons and librarians in their assessments of the competence of librarians they observed in videotaped reference interviews. Interviews varied in the level of nonverbal warmth shown by the librarian toward the patron and in the level of inclusion exhibited. (6 references) (Author/MES)

  12. Gender Differences in the Media Interviews of Bill and Hillary Clinton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Camelia; O'Connell, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Does gender make a difference in the way politicians speak and are spoken to in public? This paper examines perspective in three television interviews and two radio interviews with Bill Clinton in June 2004 and in three television interviews and two radio interviews with Hillary Clinton in June 2003 with the same interviewers. Our perspectival…

  13. All about Mammals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this videotape, students learn more about the characteristics of common warm-blooded mammals and what makes them different from other animals. Children also find out how humans are more advanced in structure than other mammals, but how they still share the same basic traits. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education…

  14. Teaching diagnostic reasoning: using a classroom-as-clinic methodology with videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neistadt, M E; Smith, R E

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a "classroom-as-clinic" format, using videotaped occupational therapy evaluations, on students' diagnostic reasoning skills. In the classroom-as-clinic format, students write a problem list on the basis of preliminary client information before viewing the videotape. A post-hoc experimental design was used to compare the accuracy of treatment plan problem lists for two groups of senior occupational therapy students--one group viewed two videotapes of client-therapist interactions without a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 82), and one group viewed the same videotapes within the context of a classroom-as-clinic format (n = 45). Both groups viewed the same two videotapes. Videotape 1 was of a client with a brain stem infarct, and Videotape 2 was of a client with traumatic brain injury. Subjects experiencing a classroom-as-clinic format identified significantly more occupational therapy problems for Videotape 1 than those who did not have preevaluation information. There was no significant difference between the two subject groups in the accuracy of their problem lists for Videotape 2. Only subjects in the non-classroom-as-clinic group showed a significant improvement from Videotape 1 to Videotape 2 in occupational therapy problem identification. This study suggests that to be truly effective when used videotapes, the classroom-as-clinic methodology needs to be combined with explicit coaching in problem sensing and problem definition.

  15. Differences in prevalence of diastolic arterial hypertension in 1423 young individuals in two different interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lena, S M; Gende, O A; Almirón, M A; Cingolani, H E

    1994-09-01

    To determine prevalence of diastolic arterial hypertension (DAH) in young individuals using different criteria. Secondly, to test the possible different blood pressure reactions to mental stress and hand grip in two groups: group A, a 'low blood pressure group', and group B, diastolic blood pressure 90 mmHg or greater in one interview and below these values in a second interview. A total of 1423 volunteer medical students was recruited at La Plata School of Medicine, average age 21 +/- 3 years. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured three times on two different occasions separated by one week. With the values obtained, prevalence of arterial hypertension was determined according to the criteria suggested by The Joint National Committee 4 (JNC-4) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and to statistical bases. Mental stress and hand grip tests were performed by groups A and B. The prevalence of DAH when only the first determination of the first interview was considered was 14.7%, 6.7% (considering the WHO criterion) or 5% (using the statistical criterion). These values are reduced if repeated measurements are averaged. The greatest reduction was obtained when the JNC-4 criterion was used (1.6%). The reactivity of stressors did not show any relationship with the initial blood pressure of the subjects. In epidemiological studies, the differences among the criteria should be considered when analyzing blood pressure of populations. Stress tests (mental stress and hand grip) do not help in identifying differences between the groups studied.

  16. Individual Difference Variables and the Occurrence and Effectiveness of Faking Behavior in Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Buehl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is widespread fear that applicants can fake during selection interviews and that this impairs the quality of selection decisions. Several theories assume that faking occurrence is influenced by personality and attitudes, which together influence applicants’ motivation to show faking behavior. However, for faking behavior to be effective, interviewees also need certain skills and abilities. To investigate the impact of several relevant individual difference variables on faking behavior and interview success, we conducted two studies. In Study 1, we surveyed 222 individuals to assess different personality variables, attitude toward faking, cognitive ability, self-reported faking behavior, and success in previous interviews, and in Study 2, we assessed cognitive ability, social skills, faking behavior, and interview performance in an interview simulation with 108 participants. Taken together, personality, as well as attitude toward faking, influenced who showed faking behavior in an interview, but there was no evidence for the assumed moderating effect of cognitive ability or social skills on interview success.

  17. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  18. From the Ground Up. [Videotape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Garry; And Others

    Through interviews with farmers, agricultural experts, and students, this video raises student's awareness of sustainable development issues in modern agriculture and food production. The video explores the following themes: agriculture and sustainable development, different approaches to farming, evaluation of farming practices in the context of…

  19. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  20. 'Let the heart speak out'--interviewing practices by psychiatrists from two different traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Diana; Ribeiro, Branca Telles; Lopes Dantas, Maria Tereza

    2005-01-01

    In the present article, we investigate the extent to which professional theories that underlie, inform, and guide the interviewing practices of two psychiatrists (a neuropsychiatrist and a psychoanalyst) are discursively displayed in their ways of conducting a psychiatric interview. This study analyses excerpts from two audio-recorded psychiatric interviews held at the Institute of Psychiatry of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. It follows theoretical and methodological frameworks derived from interactional sociolinguistics. Ethnographic data and research interviews with both clinicians also ground our discussion. Using frame analysis as a central tool, we found that the psychiatrist who subscribes to a neuropsychiatric orientation displays a concern on assessing the patient's cognitive processes, and shifts topics away from the patient's delusions to (re)introduce the institutional frame of the psychiatric interview. By contrast, the psychiatrist who holds a psychoanalytic orientation towards interviewing not only listens attentively to very personal topics introduced by the patient, but also sustains and develops these topics. Most of all, she proposes and stays within conversational frames. In keeping a dual understanding about their practices in the interview situation, both doctors balance the need to follow the institutional agenda and the need to listen to the patient, despite their different theoretical orientations.

  1. Exploring differences in the content of job interviews between youth with and without a physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; DePape, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although people with disabilities have great potential to provide advantages to work environments, many encounter barriers in finding employment, especially youth who are looking for their first job. A job interview is an essential component of obtaining employment. The objective of this study is to explore the content of the answers given in job interviews among youth with disabilities compared to typically developing youth. A purposive sample of 31 youth (16 with typical development and 15 with disability) completed a mock job interview as part of an employment readiness study. The interview questions focused on skills and experiences, areas for improvement, and actions taken during problem-based scenarios. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using a content analysis of themes that emerged from the interviews. We found several similarities and differences between youth with disabilities and typically developing youth. Similarities included giving examples from school, emphasizing their "soft skills" (i.e., people and communication skills) and giving examples of relevant experience for the position. Both groups of youth gave similar examples for something they were proud of but fewer youth with disabilities provided examples. Differences in the content of job interview answers between the two groups included youth with disabilities: (1) disclosing their condition; (2) giving fewer examples related to customer service and teamwork skills; (3) experiencing greater challenges in providing feedback to team members and responding to scenario-based problem solving questions; and (4) drawing on examples from past work, volunteer and extra curricular activities. Clinicians and educators should help youth to understand what their marketable skills are and how to highlight them in an interview. Employers need to understand that the experiences of youth with disabilities may be different than typically developing youth. Our findings also help to inform employment readiness

  2. Exploring differences in the content of job interviews between youth with and without a physical disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Lindsay

    Full Text Available Although people with disabilities have great potential to provide advantages to work environments, many encounter barriers in finding employment, especially youth who are looking for their first job. A job interview is an essential component of obtaining employment. The objective of this study is to explore the content of the answers given in job interviews among youth with disabilities compared to typically developing youth.A purposive sample of 31 youth (16 with typical development and 15 with disability completed a mock job interview as part of an employment readiness study. The interview questions focused on skills and experiences, areas for improvement, and actions taken during problem-based scenarios. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using a content analysis of themes that emerged from the interviews.We found several similarities and differences between youth with disabilities and typically developing youth. Similarities included giving examples from school, emphasizing their "soft skills" (i.e., people and communication skills and giving examples of relevant experience for the position. Both groups of youth gave similar examples for something they were proud of but fewer youth with disabilities provided examples. Differences in the content of job interview answers between the two groups included youth with disabilities: (1 disclosing their condition; (2 giving fewer examples related to customer service and teamwork skills; (3 experiencing greater challenges in providing feedback to team members and responding to scenario-based problem solving questions; and (4 drawing on examples from past work, volunteer and extra curricular activities.Clinicians and educators should help youth to understand what their marketable skills are and how to highlight them in an interview. Employers need to understand that the experiences of youth with disabilities may be different than typically developing youth. Our findings also help to inform employment

  3. All about Dinosaurs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs were the rulers of the land 65 million years ago. In this videotape, children learn more about the different kinds of dinosaurs by viewing vivid illustrations and fossil discoveries. Students compare the dinosaurs to their modern kin--snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Students also listen to different theories to try to answer the big…

  4. Combining Dual Scaling with Semi-Structured Interviews to Interpret Rating Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Childs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual scaling, a variation of multidimensional scaling, can reveal the dimensions underlying scores, such as raters' judgments. This study illustrates the use of a dual scaling analysis with semi-structured interviews of raters to investigate the differences among the raters as captured by the dimensions. Thirty applications to a one-year post-Bachelor's degree teacher education program were rated by nine teacher educators. Eight of the raters were subsequently interviewed about how they rated the responses. A three-dimensional model was found to explain most of the variance in the ratings for two of the questions and a two-dimensional model was most interpretable for the third question. The interviews suggested that the dimensions reflected, in addition to differences in raters' stringency, differences in their beliefs about their roles as raters and about the types of insights that were required of applicants.

  5. Patterns of Interaction in Police Interviews : The Role of Cultural Dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, K.; Giebels, Ellen; Taylor, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyzed authentic, videotaped police interviews (N = 27) to examine how the use of different influencing behaviors by police officers affects the provision of information by suspects. The analysis focused on variations in cue-response patterns across suspects from cultures that tend to

  6. Impact of customized videotape education on quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Thomas L; Dempsey, Edward C; Collins, Timothy; Pluss, William; Lipkus, Isaac; Cutter, Gary R; Chalmers, Robin; Mitchell, Amy; Weil, Kenneth C

    2006-01-01

    To compare the impact of a library of pulmonary rehabilitation videotapes versus an older videotape and usual care on quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living in persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Two hundred fourteen patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis were recruited and randomized to receive customized videotapes, standard videotapes, or usual care. Outcome measures included the Fatigue Impact Scale, Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire, and the SF-36(R) Health Survey. Differences in coping skills and emotional functioning on the Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire were found among the 174 subjects who completed the study. The customized videotape group improved by 8.6 and 4.8 points, respectively, whereas the score of the other groups decreased by less than 1 point for the coping skills, and the scores of the standard video and the control groups decreased by 3.0 and 2.1 points, respectively, for emotional functioning (P Impact Scale also improved for the customized videotape group, whereas the scores of the others remained unchanged. Videotape users demonstrated better conversion to and retention of exercise habits, with over 80% of customized videotape subjects who reported exercise habits at baseline continuing the habits as compared with 40% in the usual care group. Sedentary subjects at baseline were more likely to begin and maintain exercise if randomized to videotapes. These findings demonstrate increased quality of life, lower fatigue, and better compliance with a prescribed exercise regimen among subjects using the customized videotapes. There was a significant improvement in emotional functioning and coping skills among customized videotape subjects.

  7. INTERVIEWING EXPATRIATES AS A SOURCE FOR STUDENTS IN UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENCES IN CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Sri Adnyani,S.Pd.,M.Hum.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interviewing expatriates whom live in Bali was one of the projects that have been done in Cross Cultural Understanding class in the academic year of 2011/2012. The aims of the project was 1 students have direct communication with foreigners living in Bali, 2 students obtain information related to cultural differences experienced by expatriates and 3 students find out how the expatriates overcome cultural differences. The project was done by the students in six weeks. Each student had to contact an expatriate who can easily be found in Bali. They had to prepare an interview guide and put the result of their interview on paper. Each student had to present the result of their project to the class continued with classroom discussion. At the end of the presentation, the students conclude differences in cultural aspects experienced by the expatriates and how they handled those differences to be able to live in Bali. By interviewing expatriates, students had direct information about differences in cultural backgrounds and made Cross Cultural Understanding subject becomes a more realistic issue.

  8. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  9. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  10. All about Animal Behavior & Communication. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Why do animals do what they do? What is the difference between instinct and learned behavior? How do animals communicate? These questions are answered as children examine animal behaviors that help them find food, protect themselves, and care for their young. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education Standards for Life…

  11. Evaluation of Videotaped and Live Theatre Auditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William C.

    Theatre auditions by 24 semifinalists in the 1980 Scholars in the Arts program were evaluated under two conditions. Four judges ranked the live auditions, while five evaluated videotapes of the same performance of the high school seniors. The auditions were videotaped in black and white. A single camera was used, fixed at an intermediate distance…

  12. Training Parents with Videotapes: Recognizing Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brandon W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Among the many methods of teaching skills to parents of disruptive children, videotape modeling of specific parent-child interaction sequences has been particularly effective. Given the likelihood of timeout resistance in defiant children, the authors tested the effectiveness of videotape parent training with a sample of clinic referred,…

  13. Qualitative and Quantitative Aspects of InterviewingDifferent Communication and Interpreting Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Stoyanova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The books by M. Alvesson and J. Salmons deal with some different kinds of methodologies: qualitative (case study, grounded theory, phenomenology, and multiple qualitative methodologies, quantitative (experimental and quasi-experimental, and mixed methods. The trends in and the future of interview research, qualitative and mixed research methods are discussed.

  14. An interview study of how clinical teachers develop skills to attend to different level learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Fogh, Shannon; Kobashi, Brent; Teherani, Arianne; Ten Cate, Olle; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    One clinical teaching challenge is the engagement of learners at different levels. Faculty development offerings mostly address general strategies applicable to all learners. This study examined how clinical faculty members develop the skills to work with different level learners. We conducted semi-structured interviews with medical school faculty members identified as excellent clinical teachers teaching multiple levels of learners. They discussed how they developed their approach to teaching different level learners and how their teaching evolved over time. We performed thematic analysis of the interview transcripts using open and axial coding. We interviewed 19 faculty members and identified three themes related to development of teaching practices: teacher agency and work-based learning of teaching strategies, developmental trajectory of clinical teachers, and interplay between clinical confidence and teaching skills. Faculty members were proactive in using on-the-job experiences to develop their teaching practices. Their teaching practices followed a developmental trajectory towards learner centeredness, and this evolution was associated with the development of clinical skills and confidence. Learning skills to teach multi-level learners requires workplace learning. Faculty development should include workplace learning opportunities and use a developmental approach that accounts for the trajectory of teaching as well as clinical skills attainment.

  15. Applying Attribution Theory to Teaching of Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how to teach interviewing to journalism students. Advocates a course informed by attribution theory, based on a creative, dialogical definition of the interview. Suggests using tape recorders or videotapes to help students objectively evaluate their own and others' performances. (SR)

  16. Interviewing Suspects in Denial: On How Different Evidence Disclosure Modes Affect the Elicitation of New Critical Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Lennart; Granhag, Pär Anders; Tekin, Serra

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how different evidence disclosure modes affect the elicitation of new critical information. Two modes derived from the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework were compared against an early disclosure mode (i.e., the evidence was disclosed at the outset of the interview). Participants (N = 88) performed a mock crime consisting of several actions before they were interviewed as suspects. In both SUE conditions the interviewer elicited and disclosed statement-evidence inconsistencies in two phases after an introductory phase. For the SUE-Confrontation (SUE-C) condition, the interview was introduced in a business-like manner, and the interviewer confronted the suspects with the in/consistencies without giving them a chance to comment on these. For the SUE-Introduce-Present-Respond (SUE-IPR) condition, the interviewer introduced the interview in a non-guilt-presumptive way, presented the in/consistencies and allowed the suspects to comment on these, and then responded to their comments; at all times in a non-judgmental manner. Both SUE conditions generated comparatively more statement-evidence inconsistencies. The SUE-IPR condition resulted in more new critical information about the phase of the crime for which the interviewer lacked information, compared to the Early disclosure condition. A likely explanation for this was that (for the SUE-IPR condition) the interviewer used the inconsistencies to create a fostering interview atmosphere and made the suspects overestimate the interviewer's knowledge about the critical phase of the crime. In essence, this study shows that in order to win the game (i.e., obtaining new critical information), the interviewer needs to keep the suspect in the game (i.e., by not being too confrontational and judgmental).

  17. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  18. Space Science in Action: Stars [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape recording shows students the many ways scientists look at the stars and how they can use what they see to answer questions such as What are stars made of?, How far away are they?, and How old are the stars? Students learn about the life span of stars and the various stages they pass through from protostar to main sequence star to…

  19. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  20. Videotaping the Lifespan of a Soap Bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Goran

    1995-01-01

    Describes how the use of a videotape to record the history of a soap bubble allows a study of many interesting events in considerable detail including interference fringes, convection and turbulence patterns on the surface, formation of black film, and the ultimate explosion of the bubble. (JRH)

  1. Adding Feminist Therapy to Videotape Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Jennifer L.; Yoder, Janice D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides directions for presenting a 32-minute series of four videotape segments that highlights the fundamental features of four approaches to psychotherapy, extending its reach to include a feminist perspective. Describes the approaches and included segments. Reports that students' comments demonstrate that the video sequence provided a helpful…

  2. Assessment of Waco, Texas FLIR videotape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Donald S.

    2001-09-01

    The FLIR video recorded by the FBI on 19 April 1993, records the final assault on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, and the fire in which some 80 members of the sect died. Attention has focused on a number of flashes recorded on the videotape. The author has examined the 1993 videotape and the recorded videotapes of the re-enactment conducted at Fort Hood, Texas on 19 March 2000. The following conclusions have been reached: 1) The flashes seen on the tape cannot be weapons muzzle flash. Their duration is far too long and their spatial extent is far too great. They are almost certainly the result of solar energy or heat energy form nearby vehicles reflected toward the FLIR by debris or puddles. 2) The FLIR video technology has a very low probability of detecting small arms muzzle flash. 3) As a consequence of 2) above, the absence of muzzle flash detection on the FLIR tape does not prove that no weapons were actually fired during the final assault. Indeed, there is ample evidence (not presented here) that the Davidians fired at the federal agents, but none of their muzzle flashes are detectable on the videotape.

  3. Copyright Handbook for Videotapes and Microcomputer Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, David; And Others

    Developed to help library media personnel, administrators, and educators understand and work with the copyright law as it applies to videotape and microcomputer software, this handbook provides: (1) an overview of copyright, including rights granted to copyright holders and libraries and court interpretation of the copyright law; (2) suggestions…

  4. Characteristics and Gender Differences in the Medical Interview Skills of Japanese Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Akiko; Ishikawa, Kazunobu; Motoya, Ryo; Kobayashi, Gen; Moroi, Yoko; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of the communication skills of medical students, we observed their performance during introductory medical interview training with simulated patients (SPs). Methods The subjects of the present study included fifth-year medical students (male, n=180, female, n=99) who were undergoing clinical training in Japan from 2012 to 2014. Each student was assigned to one of four 10-minute clinical scenarios, which was conducted with an SP. Three or four teachers observed and assessed the performance of each of the students. The overall performance was rated on a 10-point scale, and nine basic communication skills that were common to each of the scenarios were rated using a four-point scale. The students also assessed their own performance on these items. The SPs assessed the students' performance from a patient's perspective on four items. Results There were significant correlations between the teacher and student scores. However, the students tended to score themselves significantly lower than the teachers. The female students were rated significantly higher by the teachers on the following four items; 'eye contact and appropriate attitude,' 'nodding and back-channeling,' 'giving empathic verbal responses,' and 'acquisition of patient's psychosocial information.' However, the self-assessments of the female students were only significantly higher than the male students in one item, 'acquisition of patient's psychosocial information.' In contrast, self-assessments of the male students were significantly higher in two items; none of their items was scored higher by the teachers. There was no significant gender difference in the assessments made by the SPs. Conclusion There were significant gender differences in the communication skills of the medical students during introductory training, suggesting the possibility that there were gender-specific traits and gender-based differences in the students' degrees of readiness.

  5. Ethnic Differences in the Quality of the Interview Process and Implications for Survey Analysis: The Case of Indigenous Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Comparable survey data on Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are highly sought after by policymakers to inform policies aimed at closing ethnic socio-economic gaps. However, collection of such data is compromised by group differences in socio-economic status and cultural norms. We use data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey and multiple-membership multilevel regression models that allow for individual and interviewer effects to examine differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in approximate measures of the quality of the interview process. We find that there are both direct and indirect ethnic effects on different dimensions of interview process quality, with Indigenous Australians faring worse than non-Indigenous Australians in all outcomes ceteris paribus . This indicates that nationwide surveys must feature interview protocols that are sensitive to the needs and culture of Indigenous respondents to improve the quality of the survey information gathered from this subpopulation. PMID:26091283

  6. Theory of Mind, Inhibitory Control, and Preschool-Age Children's Suggestibility in Different Interviewing Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullin, Matthew H.; Bonner, Karri

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the relations among 3- to 5-year-olds' theory of mind, inhibitory control, and three measures of suggestibility: yielding to suggestive questions (yield), shifting answers in response to negative feedback (shift), and accuracy in response to misleading questions during a pressured interview about a live event. Theory of…

  7. Promoting Effective Interviewing of Sexually Abused Children: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Monit

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study is centered on interviewing techniques with alleged child sexual abuse victims who do and do not disclose sexual abuse. Method: Ninety randomly selected videotapes are reviewed, and the interviewing techniques are recorded on a 69-item Child Sexual Abuse Interviewing Skills Instrument. Results: The nondisclosure children are…

  8. Prevalence estimates of asthma or COPD from a health interview survey and from general practitioner registration: what's the difference.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohangoo, A.D.; Linden, M.W. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Raat, H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare prevalence estimates of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) derived from self-report in a health interview survey and from general practitioners' (GPs') medical records, and to explain any differences. METHODS: the presence of

  9. Comparing Streaming Video and Videotapes: Can Streaming Video Convey Affective Meaning as Well as Videotape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Jay L.

    This study investigated whether or not low-bandwidth streaming video could be useful for affective purposes. A group of 30 students in a cinema course at a public, liberal arts university viewed a 10-minute dramatic video scene by either videotape or low-bandwidth streaming video. They also took a survey to determine their affective responses and…

  10. Birds. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. There are many different types of birds, over 9,000 different species. While not all birds take to the air, they all have feathers. Students…

  11. Waco investigation: analysis of FLIR videotapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Lena M.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents some of the image processing techniques that were applied to seek an answer to the question whether agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) directed gunfired against the Branch Davidian complex in the tragic event that took place in Waco, Texas, U.S., 1993. The task for this investigation was to provide a scientific opinion that clarified the cause of the questioned events, or flashes, that can be seen on one of the surveillance videotapes. These flashes were by several experts, concluded to be evidence of gunfire. However, there were many reasons to question the correctness of that conclusion, such as the fact that some of the flashes appeared on a regular basis. The main hypothesis for this work was that the flashes instead were caused by specular solar reflections. The technical approach for this work was to analyze and compare the flashes appearance. By reconstructing the spatial and temporal position of the sensor, the complex and the sun, the geometrical properties was compared to the theoretical appearance of specular solar reflections. The result showed that the flashes seen on the FLIR videotape, were caused by solar or heat reflections from single or multiple objects. Consequently, they could not form evidence of gunfire. Further, the result highlights the importance of considering the characteristics of the imaging system within investigations that utilizes images as information source. This is due to the need of separating real data from other phenomena (such as solar reflections), distortions and artifacts in a correct manner.

  12. Designing clinical interviewing training courses for psychiatric residents: a practical primer for interviewing mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Green, Ron; Barney, Christine; Cole, Stephen; Lapetina, Graciana; Baker, Bruce

    2007-06-01

    This article provides a no-nonsense primer for the design of effective clinical interviewing programs and the use of interviewing mentors. Principles for smoothly integrating educational tools such as direct observation, role-playing, the use of videotaping and facilic supervision are described. A sample core curriculum syllabus is provided including a comprehensive listing of core educational goals with regard to clinical interviewing skills.

  13. All about Bugs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Bugs fascinate children, and each kind of bug plays a special role in the circle of life. Some bugs pollinate plants, while others help to decompose plant and animal waste. In this videotape, students learn about the similar characteristics that all bugs share and compare them to their close cousins, the arachnids. This videotape correlates to the…

  14. Critical Time: Earthquake Response Planning and Schools. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    A videotape that describes what earthquakes are, and examines the disaster planning schools can develop during the first few minutes following an earthquake to assure students and staff survive. The kinds of destruction likely to happen during a damaging earthquake are highlighted. The videotape stresses the need for children and staff to know…

  15. All about Birds. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Winged, feathered friends helped to inspire the airplane and have always interested human bird watchers. In this videotape, children learn about the main characteristics of birds and look at their similar needs. Students find out about the process of egg laying and hatching in some of the most common birds. This videotape correlates to the…

  16. Understanding Women's Differing Experiences of Distress after Colposcopy: A Qualitative Interview Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Mairead

    2015-01-01

    Women who have an abnormal cervical cytology test may be referred for a colposcopy. Accumulating evidence suggests some women may experience distress after colposcopy. This exploratory study examined women\\'s differing experiences of post-colposcopy distress with the aim of identifying factors that are predictive of, or protective against, distress.

  17. Language Experience Interviews: What Can They Tell Us about Individual Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    While language learners and teachers have long known that individual differences (IDs) among students result in differential learning, we still do not know how traditional ID variables interact or the specific impact each one has on language learning. The present study proposes that instead of looking at isolated variables, researchers should…

  18. Getting More out of Your Interview Data: Toward a Framework for Debriefing the Transcriber of Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbaum, Rebecca K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    In most qualitative research studies involving the creation of interview transcriptions, researchers seldom demonstrate much reflexivity about the transcription process, rarely making mention of transcription processes as part of their reporting of data collection and analysis procedures beyond a simple statement that audio- or videotaped data…

  19. Effects of Ingratiation, Touch, and Use of Name on Evaluation of Job Applicants and Interviewers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneski, Richard A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Videotapes were made of male actors playing the roles of interviewers and job applicants in an interview for the position of research assistant. Behaviors of interviewers can influence perceptions of job applicants as well as perceptions of interviewers. Presented at the Western Psychological Association, Anaheim, California, 1973. (Author)

  20. Expressive behavior in Parkinson's disease as a function of interview context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takahashi, Kayoko; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Coster, Wendy J; Latham, Nancy K

    2010-01-01

    .... frustrating activity) during an assessment with a female or male interviewer. From videotaped clips, displays of 4 categories of motivation and 12 verbal and 18 nonverbal, behavioral patterns were rated...

  1. An equivalence study of interview platform: Does videoconference technology impact medical school acceptance rates of different groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballejos, Marlene P; Oglesbee, Scott; Hettema, Jennifer; Sapien, Robert

    2018-02-14

    Web-based interviewing may be an effective element of a medical school's larger approach to promotion of holistic review, as recommended by the Association of American Medical Colleges, by facilitating the feasibility of including rural and community physicians in the interview process. Only 10% of medical schools offer videoconference interviews to applicants and little is known about the impact of this interview modality on the admissions process. This study investigated the impact of overall acceptance rates using videoconference interviews and face-to-face interviews in the medical school selection process using an equivalence trial design. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine integrated a videoconferencing interview option for community and rural physician interviewers in a pseudo-random fashion during the 2014-2016 admissions cycles. Logistic regression was conducted to examine whether videoconference interviews impacted acceptance rates or the characteristics of accepted students. Demographic, admissions and diversity factors were analyzed that included applicant age, MCAT score, cumulative GPA, gender, underrepresented in medicine, socioeconomic status and geographic residency. Data from 752 interviews were analyzed. Adjusted rates of acceptance for face-to-face (37.0%; 95% CI 28.2, 46.7%) and videoconference (36.1%; 95% CI 17.8, 59.5%) interviews were within an a priori ± 5% margin of equivalence. Both interview conditions yielded highly diverse groups of admitted students. Having a higher medical college admission test score, grade point average, and self-identifying as disadvantaged increased odds of admission in both interview modalities. Integration of the videoconference interview did not impact the overall acceptance of a highly diverse and qualified group of applicants, and allowed rural and community physicians to participate in the medical school interview process as well as allowed campus faculty and medical student committee members

  2. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  3. Timeline interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain and discuss timeline interviews as a method for doing life history research. It is a ‘how to’ article explaining the strengths and weaknesses of using a timeline when conducting qualitative interviews. The method allows the interviewee to participate...... in the reporting of the interview which may give raise to ownership and sharing of the analytical power in the interview situation. Exactly for this reason, it may not be the most appropriate method for interviewing elites or for conducting insider interviews where positionality can be at play. The use...... of the timeline should not lead the nterviewer or the interviewee to assume linearity and coherence; it is an rganising principle for the events. It provides an opportunity for linking the story with the wider social, political and environmental context during the interview. hile the method is very suitable...

  4. Narrative interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  5. How different are premedical freshmen who enter after introducing a multiple mini-interview in a medical school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Hwang, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Jeong; Yoon, Hyun Bae; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seunghee

    2014-06-01

    Seoul National University College of Medicine (SNUMC) introduced a multiple mini-interview (MMI) to assess the noncognitive ability of applicants in 2013. This study aims to examine whether students differ with regard to their personal career values and academic achievements by admission type. We administered a survey about career values and self-perception of competencies. We then compared the survey results and academic achievements by admission type. Finally, the correlation coefficient between MMI score and academic achievement was calculated in the MMI group. The data were analyzed by t-test and correlation analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in career values between groups. For self-perception of competency, only the 'interact in heterogeneous groups' domain was higher for those who entered through the MMI. The MMI group had a higher and broader level of academic achievement. Within the MMI group, there was a significant correlation between grade point average and MMI station scores. The characteristics of students who entered through the MMI were more in accordance with the goals of SNUMC and the competency of future doctors. Considering the unique feature of premedical academic achievement, this result implies that such students have superior noncognitive abilities, such as self-development and internal motivation. How these differences change subsequently remains to be seen.

  6. Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery manual test: is videotaped performance assessment an option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Deborah M; Brissman, Inga C; Finks, Jonathan F; Gauger, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    In efforts to maintain standards required to evaluate the high-stakes assessment, Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) requires all new proctors to complete the train-the-proctor workshop. As the pool of FLS proctors expands, new methods to streamline training and quality assurance programs should be considered. We propose that videotaped performances of the FLS manual tasks may be an alternative proxy to live assessment for training of new proctors, but evaluation of proctors' measures from videotaped FLS performances is required before implementation. A 2-phased research consisted of capturing newly trained proctors' (n = 20) ratings of 3 similar FLS performances across 3 stations-live (Live), videotaped-laparoscopic only (Lap Only) view, and videotaped-dual (Dual) views, during the 2012 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons FLS train-the-proctor workshop. A month later, a sample of proctors (n = 9) viewed videotaped versions of live FLS performances originally observed during the workshop. Captured metrics include recognition of a predefined critical error for each task (dichotomously scored and summed) and time to complete each of the 5 tasks. Analysis of variance compared the proctors' summed ratings for similar performances across Live, Lap Only, and Dual views, whereas paired t test compared recorded times of Lap Only vs Dual views, Live vs web ratings, and proctors' recorded times across the Lap Only and Dual views. There were neither differences in ratings across Live, Lap Only, and Dual views (p = 0.49) nor in recorded times for performances viewed across Lap Only and Dual viewing options (p = 0.29 and 0.76, respectively). Mean summed performance ratings observed live (4.6) were higher than those observed via the web (4.0), although not significant (p = 0.051). There were no differences in recorded times for identical performances across Live and web observations (p

  7. Age and Gender Differences in Psychological Distress among African Americans and Whites: Findings from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daphne C; Johnson, Natasha C

    2018-01-17

    Previous studies report a race and mental health paradox: Whites score higher on measures of major depression compared to African Americans, but the opposite is true for psychological distress (i.e., African Americans score higher on distress measures compared to Whites). Independently, race, age, and gender outcomes for psychological distress are well documented in the literature. However, there is relatively little research on how psychological distress interferes with the lives of African Americans and Whites at the intersection of their various race, age, and gender identities. This study uses data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey to examine age and gender differences in psychological distress and how much psychological distress interferes with the lives of African Americans and Whites. Our study findings are contrary to the paradox such that young White women (M = 3.36, SD = 1.14) and middle-aged White men (M = 2.55, SD = 3.97) experienced higher psychological distress than all other race, age, and gender groups. Psychological distress interference was relatively high among the high distress groups, except for older African American men (M = 1.73, SD = 1.05) and young African American women (M = 1.93, SD = 0.95). Implications for studies that consider cultural experiences of psychological distress, and how it impacts different demographic groups are discussed.

  8. The cognitive interview: does it successfully avoid the dangers of forensic hypnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Wayne G; Orne, Emily Carota; Dinges, David F; Bates, Brad L; Nadon, Robert; Orne, Martin T

    2005-01-01

    Seventy-two undergraduates viewed a videotape of a bank robbery that culminated in the shooting of a young boy. Several days later, participants were interviewed about their recollection of events in the film through baseline oral and written narrative accounts followed by random assignment to a hypnosis (HYP) condition, the cognitive interview (CI), or a motivated, repeated recall (MRR) control interview. Participants also completed a forced interrogatory recall test, which indexed potential report criterion differences between the interview conditions. In terms of information provided for the first time during treatment interviews, HYP led to greater productivity than the CI or the MRR interview, which did not differ significantly from each other. Evidence that these differences in recall resulted primarily from report criterion differences rather than differences in accessible memory was obtained from the forced interrogatory recall test. In this test, no differences were observed between the three interview conditions. Finally, the data revealed that participants' hypnotic ability was associated with the recall of erroneous and confabulatory material for those tested in the HYP and CI conditions but not those in the MRR condition. This suggests that some CI mnemonics may invoke hypnotic-like processes in hypnotizable people.

  9. Exploring men's and women's experiences of depression and engagement with health professionals: more similarities than differences? A qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziebland Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is argued that the ways in which women express emotional distress mean that they are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, while men's relative lack of articulacy means their depression is hidden. This may have consequences for communicating with health professionals. The purpose of this analysis was to explore how men and women with depression articulate their emotional distress, and examine whether there are gender differences or similarities in the strategies that respondents found useful when engaging with health professionals. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews with 22 women and 16 men in the UK who identified themselves as having had depression, recruited through general practitioners, psychiatrists and support groups. Results We found gender similarities and gender differences in our sample. Both men and women found it difficult to recognise and articulate mental health problems and this had consequences for their ability to communicate with health professionals. Key gender differences noted were that men tended to value skills which helped them to talk while women valued listening skills in health professionals, and that men emphasised the importance of getting practical results from talking therapies in their narratives, as opposed to other forms of therapy which they conceptualised as 'just talking'. We also found diversity among women and among men; some respondents valued a close personal relationship with health professionals, while others felt that this personal relationship was a barrier to communication and preferred 'talking to a stranger'. Conclusion Our findings suggest that there is not a straightforward relationship between gender and engagement with health professionals for people with depression. Health professionals need to be sensitive to patients who have difficulties in expressing emotional distress and critical of gender stereotypes which suggest that women invariably find it easy to

  10. Exploring men's and women's experiences of depression and engagement with health professionals: more similarities than differences? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Carol; Ridge, Damien; Ziebland, Sue; Hunt, Kate

    2007-07-24

    It is argued that the ways in which women express emotional distress mean that they are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, while men's relative lack of articulacy means their depression is hidden. This may have consequences for communicating with health professionals. The purpose of this analysis was to explore how men and women with depression articulate their emotional distress, and examine whether there are gender differences or similarities in the strategies that respondents found useful when engaging with health professionals. In-depth qualitative interviews with 22 women and 16 men in the UK who identified themselves as having had depression, recruited through general practitioners, psychiatrists and support groups. We found gender similarities and gender differences in our sample. Both men and women found it difficult to recognise and articulate mental health problems and this had consequences for their ability to communicate with health professionals. Key gender differences noted were that men tended to value skills which helped them to talk while women valued listening skills in health professionals, and that men emphasised the importance of getting practical results from talking therapies in their narratives, as opposed to other forms of therapy which they conceptualised as 'just talking'. We also found diversity among women and among men; some respondents valued a close personal relationship with health professionals, while others felt that this personal relationship was a barrier to communication and preferred 'talking to a stranger'. Our findings suggest that there is not a straightforward relationship between gender and engagement with health professionals for people with depression. Health professionals need to be sensitive to patients who have difficulties in expressing emotional distress and critical of gender stereotypes which suggest that women invariably find it easy to express emotional distress and men invariably find it difficult

  11. An investigation of differing levels of experience and indices of task management in relation to scrub nurses' performance in the operating theatre: analysis of video-taped caesarean section surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ranieri Y I; Park, Taezoon; Wickens, Christopher D

    2014-09-01

    Literature has identified failures in task management as direct determinants leading to accidents in the operating theatre. However, very few studies have investigated the factors underlying task management that directly influence the performance of the scrub nurses. The traditional belief that expertise is a general indicator of performance has been empirically investigated with varying results, but none has attempted to identify the task management determinants affecting performance, as influenced by the level of expertise. (1) To examine any difference on task management behaviours between differing levels of experience during surgeries. (2) To correlate indices of task management with levels of performance evaluated by subject matter experts. 10 experienced and 10 novice scrub nurses were randomly selected from the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of a teaching hospital in Singapore. All nurses partook in a caesarean section surgery each, and their work processes were recorded via a scene camera donned by themselves. 20 scrub nurses. Two human factors experts independently mapped the task management processes onto a task management timeline, where individual tasks were coded, tallied and compared between levels of expertise. Reactive task management (task interruptions, task prioritizations), pro-active task management (anticipation, failures in anticipation), SPLINT scores (performance). Novice nurses showed lower resistance to interruptions during their tasks (58% more interruptions), especially to interruptions which were not triggered by the surgeon during their surgical counts (90% more interruptions). The novice nurses also displayed poorer/less ability to anticipate the surgeons' needs, taking longer time to handover instruments (39% longer) and making more mistakes (371% more errors). Subject matter experts rated the experienced nurses significantly higher in their cognitive non-technical skills performance than the novice nurses (32% higher

  12. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  13. Space Science for Children: All about Stars [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape features information, for children in grades K-4, about stars including their composition, brightness, and location. How stars are formed, why they seem to move across our sky, and how humans have used their patterns to form the constellations are discussed. A hands-on activity related to the reflecting telescope is also…

  14. Me & Isaac Newton. [Videotape and] KIDSNET Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This videotape records the stories of 7 scientists, 3 women and 4 men who range in age from 33 to 81. Beginning with their earliest scientific questions and including their most personal ponderings, the scientists reveal their histories and professional obligations to affect the world. Director Michael Apted allows the personal adventures of the…

  15. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  16. All about Food Chains. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Whether animals are herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, each one is part of an eternal food chain that carries on from one generation to the next. In this videotape, students learn more about terms like "predator,""pre-consumer" and "producer," as well as the cycles of food chains and food webs and how they support…

  17. [The scientific videotape with digital processing in surgery. The new opportunities offered surgery for videotape recording and postprocessing with the use of information and digital technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, N

    1999-01-01

    The facility of the tape recording of a surgical operation, by means of simple manageable apparatuses and at low costs, especially in comparison with the former cinematography, makes it possible for all surgeons to record their own operative activity. Therefore at present the demonstration in video of surgical interventions is very common, but very often the video-tapes show surgical events only in straight chronological succession, as for facts of chronicle news. The simplification of the otherwise sophisticated digital technology of informatics elaboration of images makes more convenient and advisable to assemble the more meaningful sequences for a final product of higher scientific value. The digital technology gives at the best its contribution during the phase of post-production of the video-tape, where the surgeon himself can assemble an end product of more value because aimed to a scientific and rational communication. Thanks to such an elaboration the video-tape can aim not simply to become a good documentary, but also to achieve an educational purpose or becomes a truly scientific film. The initial video will be recorded following a specific project, the script, foreseeing and programming what has to be demonstrated of the surgical operation, establishing therefore in advance the most important steps of the intervention. The sequences recorded will then be assembled not necessarily in a chronological succession but integrating the moving images with static pictures, as drawings, schemes, tables, aside the picture-in picture technique, and besides the vocal descriptive comment. The cinema language has accustomed us to a series of passages among the different sequences as fading, cross-over, "flash-back", aiming to stimulate the psychological associative powers and encourage those critical. The video-tape can be opportunely shortened, paying attention to show only the essential phases of the operation for demonstrate only the core of the problem and utilize

  18. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H

    2013-01-01

    of motivational interviewing (intervention group, n = 110), 64 received motivational support by phone or e-mail only and 13 women did not wish any motivational support (control group, n = 77). The mean weight loss and decrease in BMI was greater in the intervention group compared with the control group (9.3 kg...

  19. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    OpenAIRE

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, outlined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Video...

  20. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    OpenAIRE

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, out-lined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Vide...

  1. EMPIRICAL STUDY OF DIFFERENT FACTORS EFFECTS ON ARTICLES PUBLICATION REGARDING SURVEY INTERVIEWER CHARACTERISTICS USING MULTILEVEL REGRESSION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina MOROŞANU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research work is to evaluate the effects which some factors could have on articles publication regarding survey interviewer characteristics. For this, the author studied the existing literature from the various fields in which articles on survey interviewer characteristics has been published and which can be found in online articles database. The analysis was performed on 243 articles achieved by researchers in the time period 1949-2012. Using statistical software R and applying multilevel regression model, the results showed that the time period when the studied articles are made and the interaction between the number of authors and the number of pages affect the most their publication in journals with a certain level of impact factor.

  2. Annual Interviews

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Annex II, page 1, Section 3 of the Administrative Circular no. 26 (Rev. 5) states that "The annual interview shall usually take place between 15 November of the reference year and 15 February of the following year." Following the meeting of the Executive Board on 7 December 2004 and the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 19 January 2005, it has been decided, for the advancement exercise of 2005, to extend this period until 15 March 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  3. Motivational interviewing within the different stages of change: An analysis of practice nurse-patient consultations aimed at promoting a healthier lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Vet, de E.; Weijden, v.d. T.; Dulmen, van S.

    2013-01-01

    Combining the Stages of Change (SOC) model with Motivational Interviewing (MI) is seen as a helpful strategy for health care providers to guide patients in changing unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. SOC suggests that people are at different stages of motivational readiness for engaging in health

  4. 36 CFR 1280.50 - What will I be allowed to film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes? 1280.50 Section 1280.50 Parks, Forests, and Public... film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes? (a) NARA will permit you to film, photograph, or..., photograph, or videotape if you intend to use the film, photographs, or videotape for commercial, partisan...

  5. Age Differences in the Trends of Smoking Among California Adults: Results from the California Health Interview Survey 2001-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Wang, Weize; Wang, Ke-Sheng; Moore, Kevin; Dunn, Erin; Huang, Shi; Feaster, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    The aim is to study the trends of cigarette smoking from 2001 to 2012 using a California representative sample in the US. Data was taken from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2001 to 2012, which is a population-based, biennial, random digit-dial telephone survey of the non-institutionalized population. The CHIS is the largest telephone survey in California and the largest state health survey in the US. 282,931 adults (n = 184,454 with age 18-60 and n = 98,477 with age >60) were included in the analysis. Data were weighted to be representative and adjusted for potential covariance and non-response biases. During 2001-2012, the prevalence of current smoking decreased from 18.86 to 15.4 % among adults age 18-60 (β = -0.8, p = 0.0041). As for adults age >60, the prevalence of current smoking trend decreased with variations, started from 9.66 % in 2001, slightly increased to 9.74 % in 2003, but then gradually decreased, falling to 8.18 % in 2012. In 2012, there was a 14 % reduction of daily smoking adults age 18-60 (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76-0.93, p = 0.0006) compared to 2001, while no significant reduction of daily smoking was observed for those age >60. The reductions of smoking prevalence for adults younger than 60 are encouraging. However, there is a concern for smoking cessation rates among those older than 60 years of age, particularly for African Americans.

  6. Diversity, Difference and Diversity Management: A Contextual and Interview Study of Managers and Ethnic Minority Employees in Finland and France

    OpenAIRE

    Louvrier, Jonna

    2013-01-01

    In many countries diversity management has become an increasingly common way of treating differences between people in the world of work. Companies may sign diversity charters to show their engagement in promoting diversity, design and implement diversity management programmes, and communicate about their diversity initiatives to internal and external stakeholders. But what does diversity in the workplace mean? Who is defined as being different? And what do those defined as being different th...

  7. Videotaped recording as a method of participant observation in psychiatric nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latvala, E; Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes videotaped recording as a data collection method when conducting participant observation in a psychiatric nursing study. The videotaped episodes were part of the daily life of psychiatric nursing in a hospital environment. The advantages and limitations of using videotaped recording in nursing research will be discussed. This paper is based on two studies. The data consisted of 21 videotaped episodes of nursing report sessions or interdisciplinary team meetings in the psychiatric clinic of a university hospital. The participants consisted of patients, their significant others, nurses, doctors, social workers and physiotherapists. All videotaped material was transcribed verbatim. An essential advantage of videotaping is that most potentially useful interaction and behaviour can be captured. The advantage in terms of the credibility of videotaping was that the investigator was able to review the same videotaped situations again and again. Videotaped material is rich and provides several possibilities for analysing the data. In these studies data and source triangulation enabled the researchers to reduce personal influence on the results. The investigator must also be aware of the limitations concerning this method. The most essential limitations are mechanical problems and the influence of videotaping on behaviour. Careful ethical considerations are important concerning personal privacy, informed consent and respect for the self-determination of psychiatric patients.

  8. Zero Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Barbara A.; Frank, Austin C.

    1976-01-01

    Students who made an initial appointment for counseling but did not keep it are compared with students who kept appointments at a counseling center or psychiatric service. Impulsiveness appears to be the main characteristic distinguishing the "no shows" from the "shows". A few other differences were observed, especially for women. (Author)

  9. "Blind" interviewing: Is ignorance bliss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Jillian R; Pena, Michelle M; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2016-10-01

    Current investigative interviewing guidelines [e.g., Technical Working Group: Eyewitness evidence. (1999). Eyewitness evidence: A guide for law enforcement. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice. Retrieved from https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/178240.pdf ] suggest that interviewers review available case information prior to conducting a witness interview. The present study investigated the effect of interviewers' pre-interview awareness of crime details on eyewitnesses' memory and interviewer behaviour shortly after a mock crime or a week later. Results indicate that blind interviewers with no knowledge about the crime elicited more correct information than those who were correctly informed about the crime. Differences in interviewer behaviour emerged only in the very first question of the interview: Blind interviewers were more likely to begin the interview with a non-suggestive question than the informed interviewers. Blind interviewers also recalled more details than the informed interviewers when asked to generate a report after the witness interview documenting the witness' account.

  10. Early Book Stages, 0-5 Years [and] Creciendo con Libros (Growing [up] with Books). [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Roxanna

    Using a lighthearted and simple approach, this 23-minute videotape in English and Spanish versions presents interactions between parents and children while reading books. The children in the videotape range in age from 0 to 5 years. The video is introduced by scenes of children enjoying books while narration discussing the impact of reading to…

  11. Camera Perspective Bias in Videotaped Confessions: Evidence that Visual Attention Is a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lezlee J.; Lassiter, G. Daniel; Patterson, Stephen M.; Ransom, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Several experiments have demonstrated a "camera perspective bias" in evaluations of videotaped confessions: videotapes with the camera focused on the suspect lead to judgments of greater voluntariness than alternative presentation formats. The present research investigated potential mediators of this bias. Using eye tracking to measure visual…

  12. Videotape Helps Standardize and Increase Objectivity of Medical Exams Across the Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-minute videotape demonstrates how to stage six stations simulating medical emergency problems to be solved by emergency medical technicians (EMT's) taking the National Registry's 150-question written final examination. The videotape also details the logistics of arranging the entire one-hour examination, used in over 30 States. (AJ)

  13. Patients, doctors, and videotape: a prescription for creating optimal healing environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Sung, Sue Hee; Hsu, John T

    2005-01-01

    Despite repeated calls for greater patient autonomy, shared decision making, and exploration of patient preferences, relatively little is known about how patients actually experience care as a face-to-face interactional process. A selected review of the literature in this area suggests that important asymmetries exist. Key among them is the tendency to report experiences from the point of view of only one member of the doctor-patient dyad. Thus, patients might report on their experiences of the system gone awry or professionals might attempt to understand the root cause(s) of an error by describing the conditions under which it occurred. Either way, information about the experience of care tends to be reported as a "my side" telling. Optimal healing environments are defined as health care contexts that are based upon mutual respect and build positive, resilient relationships among participants, using the qualities and resources of those relationships to enhance health. Understanding optimal healing environments also requires a knowledge of how doctors and patients share time and space together in the consultation (an etic or outsider perspective) and also a knowledge of the participants' experience of their time together (an emic or insider perspective). After reviewing its methodological roots, the IMPACT approach (Interactive Methodology for Preserving and Analyzing Clinical Transactions) using videotaped encounters along with independent commentaries by participants is described and applied in two different types of analyses: one in which the doctor-patient dyad is the unit of measure; the second in which physicians are stratified by having historically high or low satisfaction scores. In the latter approach, doctors' and patients' comments are compared across strata. At the dyadic level, and despite large gaps in income and social status, doctors and patients exhibit a strong tendency to cluster in terms of where they comment, so much so that in a pilot study

  14. 36 CFR 1280.48 - How do I apply to film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes? 1280.48 Section 1280.48 Parks, Forests, and... film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for news purposes? (a) If you wish to film, photograph... wish to film, photograph, or videotape for news purposes at a Presidential library or at a regional...

  15. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  16. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  17. Computer-based desktop system for surgical videotape editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Hamelin, E; Sarmiento, J M; de la Puente, J M; Vicente, M

    1997-05-01

    The educational role of surgical video presentations should be optimized by linking surgical images to graphic evaluation of indications, techniques, and results. We describe a PC-based video production system for personal editing of surgical tapes, according to the objectives of each presentation. The hardware requirement is a personal computer (100 MHz processor, 1-Gb hard disk, 16 Mb RAM) with a PC-to-TV/video transfer card plugged into a slot. Computer-generated numerical data, texts, and graphics are transformed into analog signals displayed on TV/video. A Genlock interface (a special interface card) synchronizes digital and analog signals, to overlay surgical images to electronic illustrations. The presentation is stored as digital information or recorded on a tape. The proliferation of multimedia tools is leading us to adapt presentations to the objectives of lectures and to integrate conceptual analyses with dynamic image-based information. We describe a system that handles both digital and analog signals, production being recorded on a tape. Movies may be managed in a digital environment, with either an "on-line" or "off-line" approach. System requirements are high, but handling a single device optimizes editing without incurring such complexity that management becomes impractical to surgeons. Our experience suggests that computerized editing allows linking surgical scientific and didactic messages on a single communication medium, either a videotape or a CD-ROM.

  18. Gender differences in mental health problems among adolescents and the role of social support: results from the Belgian health interview surveys 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Droogenbroeck, Filip; Spruyt, Bram; Keppens, Gil

    2018-01-10

    To investigate how social support relates to mental health problems for Belgian late adolescents and young adults 15-25 years of age. Additionally, we examine changes in mental health problems between 2008 and 2013 and investigate gender differences. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to investigate (1) psychological distress, (2) anxiety and (3) depression among 713 boys and 720 girls taken from two successive waves (2008 and 2013) of a representative sample of the Belgian population (Belgian Health Interview survey). Psychological distress was measured by the General Health Questionnaire, anxiety and depression by the Symptom Check-List-90-Revised. Gender differences were found for psychological distress, anxiety and depression with girls reporting significantly higher scores than boys. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that adolescents who are dissatisfied with their social contacts and experience poor social support reported more psychological distress, anxiety and depression. In addition, young adult boys (20-25 years of age) were more likely to experience psychological distress when compared to late adolescent boys (15-19 years of age). Finally, the prevalence of anxiety and depression increased substantially between 2008 and 2013 for girls and to a lesser extent for boys. Especially girls and young people with poor social support experience mental health problems more frequently than boys and those with strong social support. Improving social support among young people may serve as a protective buffer to mental health problems.

  19. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  20. Sociodemographic Differences in Clients Preferring Video-Call Over In-person Interview: A Pilot Study of HIV Tele-partner Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeagu, Chi-Chi N; Shah, Sharmila; Toussaint, Magalieta M; Pickett, Leonard

    2017-11-01

    The New York City Department of Health Disease Intervention Specialists (DIS) routinely contact newly HIV-diagnosed persons via telephone calls and in-person meetings to conduct partner services (PS) interviews in order to elicit the names and contact information of the HIV-exposed partners for notification and HIV-testing, and to assist clients with linkage to care. From October 2013 to December 2015, we offered PS interviews conducted via video-call alongside voice-call and in-person modes in a selected geographic area of NYC. PS interviews were conducted according to the clients' preferred mode (in-person, voice- or video-call) and location (health care facility, clients' residences, or other NYC locations). At the conclusion of the PS interviews, DIS elicited responses from persons interviewed via video-call on their perception, satisfaction and personal experiences using video-call for public health and personal purposes. Acceptance and satisfaction with PS interviews via video-call were high among clients aged video-call interviews for specific populations.

  1. Videotape review: a valuable tool for self-assessment of teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleffner, J H; Hendricson, W D; Littlefield, J H; Hudepohl, N

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes the components of an instructor improvement program known as VISIT (Videotaping Instruction for Self-Assessment of Instructional Technique). Through the use of videotape recordings of classroom, laboratory or clinical teaching and observation by trained observers, faculty can pinpoint instructional strengths and problem areas, plan refinements and evaluate the impact of these refinements. Ten years of experience with VISIT indicates that post-lecture consultation sessions between the instructor and observer are vital to the success of this activity.

  2. Motivational interviewing within the different stages of change: an analysis of practice nurse-patient consultations aimed at promoting a healthier lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Janneke; de Vet, Emely; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    Combining the Stages of Change (SOC) model with Motivational Interviewing (MI) is seen as a helpful strategy for health care providers to guide patients in changing unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. SOC suggests that people are at different stages of motivational readiness for engaging in health behaviours and that intervention methods are most useful when tailored to a person's stage of change. However, it is unknown whether practice nurses (PNs) actually adapt their MI and more generic communication skills to a particular stage during real-life face-to-face consultations with their patients. The aim of this study was to explore whether and how PNs apply MI and general communication skills to the different SOC of patients, targeting behaviour change about smoking, alcohol use, dietary habits and/or physical activity. Real-life consultations between nineteen Dutch PNs and 103 patients were recorded on video between June 2010 and March 2011. All consultations focused on a discussion of patients' lifestyle behaviour. The Behaviour Change Counselling Index (BECCI) was used to code PNs' MI skills. Generic communication skills were rated with the MAAS-global. Patients' SOC was assessed for each consultation by observing the communication between patient and PN regarding the patient's current lifestyle behaviour. Multilevel analyses revealed that PNs adapt their MI skills to a patient's SOC to some extent. On average PNs apply MI skills more to patients in the preparation stage (P stages of change. PNs adjusted three MI skills and one generic communication skill to patients' SOC. This explorative study suggests that, at least to some extent, PNs intuitively assess the stage of patients' readiness to change and tailor their communication accordingly. However, differences between the stages were small. By teaching PNs to explicitly identify patients' SOC they could further enhance and adapt their MI and general communication skills to the individual. Copyright © 2013

  3. Language sample collection and analysis: interview compared to freeplay assessment contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J L; Craig, H K

    1992-04-01

    Spontaneous language samples elicited during freeplay and interview contexts were compared for 10 children who were specifically language impaired (SLI). Clinician-child videotaped interactions were analyzed for both structural and conversational behaviors. The results indicated that the interview was a reliable and valid assessment context, eliciting the same profile of behaviors as the freeplay context without altering diagnostic classifications. Most behaviors occurred significantly more often during the interview than during the freeplay context, indicating further that interviews are an efficient language sampling alternative for assessment purposes with elementary school-aged children with language disorders.

  4. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and children of different ages. When used for child obesity prevention, motivational interviewing was connected with dilemmas which should not be left to the individual nurse but be handled in practice by the school health service management. It is suggested to distinguish carefully between obesity prevention...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...... for what data told about motivational interviewing. Next, specifically according to the keywords of the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques. Key results : The study showed that the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques are integrated, inseparable, and adapted by the school nurses...

  5. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  6. Interview: Joseph Agassi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Agassi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Agassi is an Israeli scholar born in Jerusalem on May 7, 1927. He has many books and articles published contributing to the fields of logic, scientific method, foundations of sciences, epistemology and, most importantly for this Journal, in the historiography of science. He studied with Karl Popper, who was definitely his biggest influence. He taught around the world in different universities. He currently lives in Herzliya, Israel. For his important contribution to the historiography of science, we chose to open the first issue of this journal with this interview recognizing his importance for the field, as well as paying our homage to him.

  7. Interviewing Children: A Guide for Child Care and Forensic Practitioners. Wiley Series in Child Care and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Michelle; Wood, Joanne

    Because a child witness' account is often the only source of information about an alleged incidence of sexual abuse, it becomes imperative to obtain an accurate account from the child so that justice may be achieved. This book provides information on children's linguistic ability in relation to videotaped interviews conducted since the…

  8. Turning the spotlight: Looking at the interviewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Randi Skovbjerg

    an explanation for variations in interviewer behaviour? The point of departure of the study is two interviewers - a female and a male - who have conducted a range of sociolinguistic interviews for the LANCHART Centre. The studies show clear differences in what the interviewers classify as their best and worst...

  9. Producing Videotape Programs for Computer Training: An Example with AMA/NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novey, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    To facilitate user proficiency with AMA/Net, an 80-minute training videotape has been produced. The production was designed to use videotape's advantages, where information and emotion are combined; and to accommodate its chief disadvantage, lack of resolution for fine text, with close-ups and graphics. Content of the videotape was conceived, outlined, demonstrated with simultaneous text capture, edited into script form, narration added, and scripts marked for videotaping and narrating. Videotaping was performed with actual keyboard sounds for realism. The recording was divided into four areas: office mock-up, keyboard close-ups, scan-conversion and screen close-ups. Once the footage was recorded, it was logged and rough-edited. Care was taken to balance the pace of the program with visual stimulation and amount of narration. The final edit was performed as a culmination of all scripts, video materials and rough edit, with graphics and steady change of visual information offsetting the static nature of the screen display. Carefully planned video programs can be a useful and economical adjunct in the training process for online services.

  10. Modified personal interviews: resurrecting reliable personal interviews for admissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan Mahan; Woods, Nicole N; Fechtig, Lindsey; Anderson, Geoff

    2012-10-01

    Traditional admissions personal interviews provide flexible faculty-student interactions but are plagued by low inter-interview reliability. Axelson and Kreiter (2009) retrospectively showed that multiple independent sampling (MIS) may improve reliability of personal interviews; thus, the authors incorporated MIS into the admissions process for medical students applying to the University of Toronto's Leadership Education and Development Program (LEAD). They examined the reliability and resource demands of this modified personal interview (MPI) format. In 2010-2011, LEAD candidates submitted written applications, which were used to screen for participation in the MPI process. Selected candidates completed four brief (10-12 minutes) independent MPIs each with a different interviewer. The authors blueprinted MPI questions to (i.e., aligned them with) leadership attributes, and interviewers assessed candidates' eligibility on a five-point Likert-type scale. The authors analyzed inter-interview reliability using the generalizability theory. Sixteen candidates submitted applications; 10 proceeded to the MPI stage. Reliability of the written application components was 0.75. The MPI process had overall inter-interview reliability of 0.79. Correlation between the written application and MPI scores was 0.49. A decision study showed acceptable reliability of 0.74 with only three MPIs scored using one global rating. Furthermore, a traditional admissions interview format would take 66% more time than the MPI format. The MPI format, used during the LEAD admissions process, achieved high reliability with minimal faculty resources. The MPI format's reliability and effective resource use were possible through MIS and employment of expert interviewers. MPIs may be useful for other admissions tasks.

  11. Written on the Face: Self- and Expert-Rated Impairments in Personality Functioning Are Differently Related to the Expression of Disgust Toward an Interviewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Claudia; Zimmermann, Johannes; Peham, Doris; Bock, Astrid; Mitte, Kristin; Benecke, Cord

    2016-06-01

    Although current theories suggest that impairments in personality functioning are at the core of personality pathology, there is a lack of research on how these impairments play out behaviorally. The aim of the present study was to investigate disgust expressions as indicators of personality dysfunction. Facial expressions were investigated in a sample of 78 female participants during an in-depth clinical interview and coded with the Facial Action Coding System. Personality dysfunction was assessed with self- and expert ratings. By applying a joint regression analysis, the authors found that disgust expressions toward the interviewer were positively associated with expert ratings but negatively associated with self-ratings. In other words, disgust expressions were indicative of an underestimation of personality dysfunction by participants as compared with experts. This suggests that interactional expressions of disgust might be a behavioral marker of personality dysfunction when individuals are unaware of or deny impairments.

  12. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the performance appraisal of reference year 2003, the interview calendar has been fixed between 1 January and 31 March 2004. This new calendar gives a better time schedule to the supervisors to conduct the interviews. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of the new CERN structure as from 2004. With this later time limit, the new departments are invited to strictly respect the target date of 31 March. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage: http://cern.ch/hr-div will lead directly to the page with the form. The personal data for the first page of the form can be generated by each divisional hierarchy, by the Divisional Administrative Officer (DAO) or by the staff member himself via HRT. Following discussions about the first two years of MAPS, and in order to improve the performance appraisal process, some modifications have been brought to section 2 (Assessme...

  13. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...

  14. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    do not merely refer to passive entities but must be understood as matter that matters. To illustrate my points I will analyse how bringing a puppet with me to interviews with 4-6 year old children seemed to interfere with the interview situation creating unforeseen diversions in ways that influenced......In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it becomes...... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...

  15. Coding interview questions concepts, problems, interview questions

    CERN Document Server

    Karumanchi, Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Peeling Data Structures and Algorithms: * Programming puzzles for interviews * Campus Preparation * Degree/Masters Course Preparation * Instructor’s * GATE Preparation * Big job hunters: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Flip Kart, Adobe, IBM Labs, Citrix, Mentor Graphics, NetApp, Oracle, Webaroo, De-Shaw, Success Factors, Face book, McAfee and many more * Reference Manual for working people

  16. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  17. Twelve Years of Interviews with the Inupiat people of Arctic Alaska: Report from a Community Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, W. R.; Hinkel, K. M.; Cuomo, C.

    2015-12-01

    On 20 August 2015, a workshop was held in Barrow, Alaska, which presented the highlights of 12 years of research connecting local indigenous knowledge of landscape processes with scientific research on arctic lakes, tundra changes, and permafrost stability. Seventy-six Iñupiat elders, hunters, and other knowledge-holders from the North Slope villages of Barrow, Atqasuk, Wainwright, Nuiqsut, and Anaktuvuk Pass were interviewed, and over 75 hours of videotaped interviews were produced. The interviews provided information and observations on landforms, lakes, erosion, permafrost degradation and thermokarst, changes in the environment and in animal behavior, human modification of lakes, tundra damage from 4-wheel off-road vehicles, tundra trail expansion, and other phenomena. Community concerns regarding the impact of environmental change on food procurement, animal migration, human travel routes, and the future of subsistence practices were also prominent themes. Following an interview, each videotaped session was logged. Each time an elder pointed to a location on a map and explained a landscape event/observation or told a story, the time-stamp in the video was recorded. Each logged event consisted of a code and a short account of the observation. From these reference sheets, a Geographic Information System (GIS) dataset was created. A logged account for each videotape, with geographic coordinates, event code, and event description is available for each videotape. The goal of the workshop was to report on our findings, thank the community for their support, and collaboratively develop plans for archiving and disseminating this data. A complete video library and searchable, printed and digital issues of the logging dataset for archiving in the communities were also produced. Discussions with administrative personnel at the Tuzzy Library in Barrow and the Inupiat Heritage Center have enabled us to set standards and develop a timeline for turning over the library of

  18. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...... of the nomadic households and during these I came to understand the use of mobility in a complex context of continuity and change, identity and belonging in the Fulani community. Time line interviews became one of my favourite tool in the years to follow, a tool used both for my research in various settings...... of a time line for making life story interviews. I decided that the lack of authoritative literature should not omit me from teaching my students how to make a time line interview. After an introduction, they had to use the tool for making an interview each other concerning their learning journey to DPU...

  19. 36 CFR 1280.44 - May I film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for commercial purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I film, photograph, or videotape on NARA property for commercial purposes? 1280.44 Section 1280.44 Parks, Forests, and Public... Rules for Filming, Photographing, or Videotaping on NARA Property? § 1280.44 May I film, photograph, or...

  20. Merging the Power of the Computer and VCR: Interactive Videotape with the Mandell Instant-Active Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Mandell Instant-Active Device, a microcomputer-based system that enables teachers to add questions and/or statement prompts to an existing videotape without affecting the videotape itself. Applications, procedures, student feedback, and hardware requirements are discussed. Ordering information is included. (MES)

  1. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  2. Interview of Terry Doyle

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions

    2012-01-01

    An Interview with Terry Doyle, Director of Corporate Development, Nokia. This is part of a series of interviews organized by the SMS Interest Group of Strategy Practice, as part of the preparation for the 2013 SMS Special conference at Lake Geneva which is co-sponsored by ATLAS/CERN. For more information: http://geneva.strategicmanagement.net The purpose of the interviews is to provide input for academics, business practitioners and consultants about fundamental questions of strategy in enterprises.

  3. Det kvalitative interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    Bogen begynder med en teoretisk funderet introduktion til det kvalitative interview gennem en skildring af de mange forskellige måder, hvorpå samtaler er blevet brugt til produktion af viden. Opmærksomheden henledes specielt på de komplementære positioner, der kendetegner det oplevelsesfokuserede...... interview (fænomenologiske positioner) og det sprogfokuserede interview (diskursorienterede positioner), som henholdsvis fokuserer på interviewsamtalen som rapporter (om interviewpersonens oplevelser) og redegørelser (foranlediget af interviewsituationen). De følgende kapitler omhandler forskellige måder...... forskningsresultater baseret på kvalitative interview....

  4. Animal Classification. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They learn what the terms "kingdom", "phylum", and "order" mean, and discover how the 3.5 million-plus organisms found on Earth fit into…

  5. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical…

  6. Marine & Other Invertebrates. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Invertebrate animals include a vast array of spineless creatures. In this video, students discover marine lifeforms such as jellyfish,…

  7. Amphibians. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Students find out about the world of amphibians as they examine their physical characteristics, environments, and life cycles, as well as…

  8. Camera Perspective Bias in Videotaped Confessions: Experimental Evidence of Its Perceptual Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Jennifer J.; Lassiter, G. Daniel; Schmidt, Heather C.; Snyder, Celeste J.

    2006-01-01

    The camera perspective from which a criminal confession is videotaped influences later assessments of its voluntariness and the suspect's guilt. Previous research has suggested that this camera perspective bias is rooted in perceptual rather than conceptual processes, but these data are strictly correlational. In 3 experiments, the authors…

  9. Robert Sylwester on Social Interaction and Brain Development. Windows to the Mind, Volume 1. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Robert

    This videotape explores the relationship between the child's social world and cognitive development. The first part of the video examines why the social environment is important to brain development. This section looks at the amount of time a child spends in a social environment, and the anatomy of the developing brain. The second part of the…

  10. Insects & Other Arthropods. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They also learn that there are more species of insects than any other animal class in the world. Insects are incredible creatures with many…

  11. The Importance of Child Development in Education: A Conservation with James Comer and Chip Wood. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, James; Wood, Chip

    Taped before an audience of teachers from around the country, this 65-minute videotape presents a discussion between James Comer and Chip Wood, noted experts in child development and education, in which they converse and respond to questions about critical issues confronting educators today. During the first part of the video, Comer and Wood…

  12. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  13. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  14. Video-Taped Instruction Creates Listening and Visual Memory Integration for Higher Reading and Math Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erland, Jan

    This pre-post quasi-experimental study was conducted in a public school 5th grade class to determine the effects of video-taped instruction in teaching analysis and pattern finding skills. Methodology included guidelines from Cognitive Behavior Modification, Suggestopedia, and Guilford's Structure of Intellect Model within the Kaufman and Kaufman…

  15. A system for sampling changes in blood pressure from a videotape, using Finapres(TM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Wittebrood, J.; Staak, C. van der; DeMey, H.; Schaap, C.

    1996-01-01

    A system is described that measures blood pressure noninvasively and continuously during a videotaped verbal interaction. The system incorporates the use of the Finapres to nonintrusively and continuously measure BP during a verbal interaction. Segments from the interaction, in which blood pressure

  16. How To Dance through Time. Volume II: Dances of the Ragtime Era, 1910-1920. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 59-minute VHS videotape is the second in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It provides 44 step combinations and how-to instructions to help viewers learn to dance the most popular dances of the early 20th century (the ragtime era), including: the wild animal dances (fox trot, horse trot, kangaroo hop, duck waddle, squirrel,…

  17. Presenting Social Issues with Videotape [and] Teaming Up to Take a Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Diana; Jackson, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the use of media in schools. One describes the use of videotapes to present social issues; the second describes the use of an integrated learning system with ninth and tenth grade at-risk students to improve their rate of attendance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (LRW)

  18. Reptiles. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The ancestors of reptiles date back to the dinosaurs. After the dinosaurs died out, it was one of the best-adapted species that survived and…

  19. A Videotape Series for Teaching Physicians to Evaluate Sexually Abused Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jerry G.; Garrett, Judy; Worthington, Toss

    2004-01-01

    A free videotape subscription series was utilized to increase the knowledge of general physicians in clinical practice about the medical evaluation of sexually abused children. Of the 65 physicians who requested the first tape, 39 (60%) completed it. Fourteen of the 39 physicians who completed the first tape (36%) completed the 5-tape series.…

  20. Food Chains. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The food chain provides a clear example of how life continues year after year. Students learn how the cycle of energy starts with the sun,…

  1. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    to describe their everyday work life. By employing a methodological framework focusing on reflexive processes, interviews became consensual interactions, and the content of the interviews turned out to be analyses, interpretations and meaning making, that is, knowledge production. Interpretation and meaning...

  2. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  3. Interview, observation og dokumentanalyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer.......Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer....

  4. Interview with Danny Kaplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Kaplan, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Danny Kaplan is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester College. He received Macalester's Excellence in teaching Award in 2006 and the CAUSE/USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. This interview took place via email on March 4-June 17, 2017. Topics covered in the interview include: (1) the current state of…

  5. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  6. Doing Dirty Interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    in the position of a psychologist with past experiences within supervision and consultation/coaching. The framing of the interview was build around the theme “My role in keeping students out from dropping out of the Vocational Educational Training College.” We will discuss how both the interviewer...

  7. The E-Mail Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Eileen G.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses differences between e-mail reference interviews and those conducted using other media; presents a taxonomy of approaches to e-mail interviews; and introduces a model e-mail interview, based on a project at the University of Maryland's College of Library and Information Services. (Author/LRW)

  8. The interview in the admission process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Johnson, E K; Molidor, J B

    1990-03-01

    Significant demographic, legal, and educational developments during the last ten years have led medical schools to review critically their selection procedures. A critical component of this review is the selection interview, since it is an integral part of most admission processes; however, some question its value. Interviews serve four purposes: information gathering, decision making, verification of application data, and recruitment. The first and last of these merit special attention. The interview enables an admission committee to gather information about a candidate that would be difficult or impossible to obtain by any other means yet is readily evaluated in an interview. Given the recent decline in numbers of applicants to and interest in medical school, many schools are paying closer attention to the interview as a powerful recruiting tool. Interviews can be unstructured, semistructured, or structured. Structuring involves analyzing what makes a medical student successful, standardizing the questions for all applicants, providing sample answers for evaluating responses, and using panel interviews (several interviewers simultaneously with one applicant). Reliability and validity of results increase with the degree of structuring. Studies of interviewers show that they are often biased in terms of the rating tendencies (for instance, leniency or severity) and in terms of an applicant's sex, race, appearance, similarity to the interviewer, and contrast to other applicants). Training interviewers may reduce such bias. Admission committees should weigh the purposes of interviewing differently for various types of candidates, develop structured or semistructured interviews focusing on nonacademic criteria, and train the interviewers.

  9. Transitioning from Clinical to Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Hunt BSc (PT, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one aspect of the transition that must be made by experienced clinicians who become involved in conducting qualitative health research is examined, specifically, the differences between clinical and research interviewing. A clinician who is skillful and comfortable carrying out a clinical interview may not initially apprehend the important differences between these categories and contexts of interviewing. This situation can lead to difficulties and diminished quality of data collection because the purpose, techniques and orientation of a qualitative research interview are distinct from those of the clinical interview. Appreciation of these differences between interview contexts and genres, and strategies for addressing challenges associated with these differences, can help clinician researchers to become successful qualitative interviewers.

  10. Equity in interviews: do personal characteristics impact on admission interview scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Andrew B; Homer, Matthew; Miller, Amy

    2010-11-01

    Research indicates that some social groups are disadvantaged by medical school selection systems. The stage(s) of a selection process at which this occurs is unknown, but at interview, when applicant and interviewer are face-to-face, there is potential for social bias to occur. We performed a detailed audit of the interview process for a single-entry year to a large UK medical school. Our audit included investigating the personal characteristics of both interviewees and interviewers to find out whether any of these factors, including the degree of social matching between individual pairs of interviewees and interviewers, influenced the interview scores awarded. A total of 320 interviewers interviewed 734 applicants, providing complete data for 2007 interviewer-interviewee interactions. The reliability of the interview process was estimated using generalisability theory at 0.82-0.87. For both interviewers and interviewees, gender, ethnic background, socio-economic group and type of school attended had no influence on the interview scores awarded or achieved. Staff and student interviewer marks did not differ significantly. Although numbers in each group of staff interviewers were too small for formal statistical analysis, there were no obvious differences in marks awarded between different medical specialties or between interviewers with varying amounts of interviewing experience. Our data provide reassurance that the interview does not seem to be the stage of selection at which some social groups are disadvantaged. These results support the continued involvement of senior medical students in the interview process. Despite the lack of evidence that an interview is useful for predicting future academic or clinical success, most medical schools continue to use interviews as a fundamental component of their selection process. Our study has shown that at least this arguably misplaced reliance upon interviewing is not introducing further social bias into the selection

  11. Philosophical Hermeneutic Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne K. Vandermause PhD, RN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes, exemplifies and discusses the use of the philosophical hermeneutic interview and its distinguishing characteristics. Excerpts of interviews from a philosophical hermeneutic study are used to show how this particular phenomenological tradition is applied to research inquiry. The purpose of the article is to lay out the foundational background for philosophical hermeneutics in a way that clarifies its unique approach to interviewing and its usefulness for advancing health care knowledge. Implications for health care research and practice are addressed.

  12. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  13. Interview mit Hagen Keller

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmotti, Paola; Isabella, Giovanni; Tiziana LAZZARI; Varanini, Gian Maria

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this interview addresses the cultural, social and political milieu that shaped Hagen Keller’s education in Germany, the relations with both his mentor Gerd Tellenbach and the other scholars; the approach to prosopography to understand the power structures. Then the interview examines the Roman experience in the Sixties (a scientific and also human one); the book Adelsherrschaft und ständische Gesellschaft and the debate that has attracted; the relationship between local hist...

  14. Interview with Yakov Sinai

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society.......Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society....

  15. Interrogative pressure in simulated forensic interviews: the effects of negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGroarty, Allan; Baxter, James S

    2007-08-01

    Much experimental research on interrogative pressure has concentrated on the effects of leading questions, and the role of feedback in influencing responses in the absence of leading questions has been neglected by comparison. This study assessed the effect of negative feedback and the presence of a second interviewer on interviewee responding in simulated forensic interviews. Participants viewed a videotape of a crime, answered questions about the clip and were requestioned after receiving feedback. Compared with neutral feedback, negative feedback resulted in more response changes, higher reported state anxiety and higher ratings of interview difficulty. These results are consistent with Gudjonsson and Clark's (1986) model of interrogative suggestibility. The presence and involvement of a second interviewer did not significantly affect interviewee responding, although trait anxiety scores were elevated when a second interviewer was present. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are considered.

  16. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  17. Pain, role play, and videotape. Pain management staff development in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroszewski, E B; Meehan, D A

    1997-01-01

    Videotaped role play was an effective staff development strategy used as an initial exercise in a five-part class to update the pain management skills of experienced nurses. It engaged the participants in learning and stimulated discussion and provided concrete feedback of current clinical practices for comparison with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research pain management guidelines (Acute Pain Management Guideline Panel, 1992).

  18. Interview with Gavin Butt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina; Alexandra Sofie, Jönsson

    2008-01-01

    We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory.......We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory....

  19. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    There has been an upsurge of academic interest in using focus groups (FGs) as a main or stand-alone qualitative method. In this article, the authors introduce a recently developed ancillary method to FGs called interviewing the moderator. The method is employed immediately after an FG and consists...

  20. Interview without a subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2010-01-01

    for the accomplishment of interviews. The paper focuses on a discussion of theoretical and methodological considerations of design, approach and research strategy. These discussions are specified in relation to a project on gender and ethnicity in cultural encounters at Universities. In the paper, I introduce a research...

  1. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 9. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan. S Varadhan R Sujatha. Face to Face Volume 17 Issue 9 September 2012 pp 903-912. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/09/0903-0912 ...

  2. The Reference Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Geraldine B.

    1972-01-01

    Good reference librarians need to be good interviewers. Unfortunately most librarians have not learned to use the technique of open questions to obtain information about the user and what he is looking for. Examples of open and closed questions with typical responses are given. (4 references) (DH)

  3. Interview with Pierre Deligne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pierre Deligne is the recipient of the 2013 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. This interview was conducted in May 2013 in conjunction with the Abel Prize celebration. The article originally appeared in the September 2013 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical...

  4. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  5. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  6. Interview with Dennis Pearl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Pearl, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Dennis Pearl is Professor of Statistics at Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE). He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. This interview took place via email on November 18-29, 2016, and provides Dennis Pearl's background story, which describes…

  7. Het cultureel interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martine Lammertink; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    In Nurse Academy verscheen het volgende artikel met Martine Lammertink van PsyQ / Parnassia Groep als eerste auteur:Lammertink, M. & van Meijel, B. (2014). Het cultureel interview. Nurse Academy GGZ, 3, 32 - 35. Ook Robert Meijburg, opleider Parnassia Groep, en Diana Polhuis, Hoofdopleider GGZ-VS,

  8. Selection of different types of physics problems as a tool to guide cognitive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Truyol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use different types of word problems to study characteristics of problem-solving processes, understood as a modeling process. We work with a model of comprehension and we propose a classification for word problems around the idea of scientific model. An experimental set of two types of problems is constructed in relation to the explicit presence of the scientific model in the statement: undefined and well-defined. Subjects, two academics, were audio and video-taped during a problem-solving interview. The analysis of the interviews supports the hypothesis that differences in the statements generate different problem-solving processes. These differences seem to be associated with conceptual modeling skills. These results highlight some significant issues to be considered by teachers when selecting problems. We discuss criteria to guide the selection of one or another type of statement.

  9. Amalia Ballarino s interview

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Interview to Amalia Ballarino (CERN, TE) on the development of new electric power cables based on the superconducting material magnesium diboride (MgB2) for the Hi-Lumi LHC and for the transport of electricity from clean power plants . The development was carried out in collaboration with a team led by prof. Carlo Rubbia at the IASS (Institute for Advanced Sustainable Studies), Potsdam, Germany.

  10. Interview with Steve Mellema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Conducted by Ken; Membrey, Jill

    2000-11-01

    Dr Steven H Mellema is Associate Professor and Chair of Physics at Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, Minnesota, USA. He has been on the International Advisory Panel for Physics Education since 1997 and earlier this year he joined the journal's Editorial Board for its Spring meeting in London. He subsequently agreed to undergo a `People in physics' interview and the result of this is set out below.

  11. Client experiences of motivational interviewing: An interpersonal process recall study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah A; Latchford, Gary; Tober, Gillian

    2016-03-01

    To explore clients' experience of the therapy process in motivational interviewing (MI) for alcohol abuse. A qualitative study using grounded theory. Interviews with nine clients were conducted using interpersonal process recall (IPR), a methodology which utilizes a video recording as a cue to aid memory recall. Clients watched a videotape of their MI session and were asked to identify and describe the important moments in the therapy session. The transcribed interviews were then analysed using grounded theory. A single session of MI is seen by the clients in this study as a complex interpersonal interaction between client and therapist, which impacts on the client's cognitive and affective intrapersonal processes. The themes which emerged partly confirm processes of MI previously hypothesized to be important, but also highlight the importance of factors common to all therapeutic approaches. The aspects of therapy which clients in this study felt were important are similar to those hypothesized to underlie the effectiveness of MI, including a non-confrontational approach, affirmation, and developing discrepancies between beliefs and behaviour. These were embedded in aspects common to all therapies, including the qualities of the therapist and the therapeutic relationship. Client's perspectives on therapeutic processes are an important area of research, and IPR is a particularly suitable method. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Interview: Drew Feustel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Sliker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Andrew J. (Drew Feustel, Purdue alum, geophysicist and NASA astronaut. Dr. Feustel's first spaceflight in May 2009 (STS-125 repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. His second spaceflight in May 2011 (STS-134 was the penultimate journey of the Space Shuttle program. At Purdue University, Feustel served as a Residence Hall Counselor for two years at Cary Quadrangle and he was a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. His MS thesis investigated physical property measurements of rock specimens under elevated hydrostatic pressures simulating Earth’s deep crustal environments. While at Purdue, Feustel served for three years as Grand Prix Chairman and team Kart driver for Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity.

  13. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric...... person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform...... faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  14. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  15. Interview with Lenny Kaye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Garrigós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lenny Kaye has been Patti Smith’s long term guitarist, friend and collaborator, ever since they first began together in the early 1970s. He grew up between New York and New Jersey, graduating in American History from Rutgers University, where he later taught a course in the Department of American Studies on the History of American Rock, which became famous because of the large number of students who wanted to enroll in it. A very prolific writer and musician, he has produced an important number of records, as well as collaborated with numerous music magazines. He is the author of two books, Waylon Jennings: An Autobiography (1996 and You Call it Madness, The Sensuous Song of the Croon (2004. Nuggets (1972, his anthology of 60s garage music, is famous for defining the genre. This interview took place when he was visiting Spain in November 2012 with the Patti Smith Group. In it, we discussed the New York scene of the 70s, music, literature, drugs, politics, and many other things.

  16. Interview with Peter Jenni

    CERN Document Server

    PH Newsletter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Jenni, former spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration, discusses the challenges and satisfactions from his long-standing career in high-energy physics in this month’s PH Newsletter.   Peter Jenni. Following a long career at CERN that dates back to 1970 (ranging from Summer Student to Fellow and to Staff), Peter Jenni recently retired after about 40 years marked by exciting discoveries (from the first two-photon production of eta-prime at SPEAR to the Higgs boson at the LHC). Peter was involved in the LHC from its very beginnings and was spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration until February 2009. Peter Jenni will continue working with ATLAS as a guest scientist with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, and when he's not travelling he still spends most of his time in his office in Building 40, where he met with interviewer Panos Charitos. Panos Charitos: When did you first arrive to CERN? Peter Jenni: I first came to CERN as a Summer Student in ...

  17. Peer interviewing in medical education research: experiences and perceptions of student interviewers and interviewees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elaine; Brugha, Ruairi; Clarke, Eric; Lavelle, Aisling; McGarvey, Alice

    2015-09-30

    Interviewing is one of the main methods used for data collection in qualitative research. This paper explores the use of semi-structured interviews that were conducted by students with other students in a research study looking at cultural diversity in an international medical school. Specifically this paper documents and gives 'voice' to the opinions and experiences of interviewees and interviewers (the peers and the communities) on the value of peer interviewing in the study and outlines (1) the preparation made to address some of the foreseen challenges, (2) the challenges still faced, and (3) the benefits of using peer interviews with respect to the research study, the individual and the institution. Peer interviewing was used as part of a two-year phased-study, 2012-2013, which explored and then measured the impact of cultural diversity on undergraduate students in a medical higher education institution in Ireland. In phase one 16 peer interviewers were recruited to conduct 29 semi-structured interviews with fellow students. In order to evaluate the peer interviewing process two focus group discussions were he ld and an online survey conducted. Key findings were that substantial preparations in relation to training, informed consent processes and addressing positionality are needed if peer-interviewing is to be used. Challenges still faced included were related to power, familiarity, trust and practical problems. However many benefits accrued to the research, the individual interviewer and to the university. A more nuanced approach to peer interviewing, that recognises commonalities and differences across a range of attributes, is needed. While peer interviewing has many benefits and can help reduce power differentials it does not eliminate all challenges. As part of a larger research project and as a way in which to get 'buy-in' from the student body and improve a collaborative research partnership peer interviewing was extremely useful.

  18. Research Organizations Interview the Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carol H.

    1974-01-01

    Researchers who conducted 194 interviews surveys of low income populations returned mail questionnaires about their experiences; the results are interpreted as bearing upon both the ease or difficulty of interviewing poor people and how advisable it may be to employ interviewers matched to respondents by class and race/ethnicity in surveys of the…

  19. An Interview with Ralph Tyler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Jeri Ridings

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Ralph Tyler. This interview will be of interest to those entering the field of education as well as for those who have made their home within the field for some time now. In the interview, Dr. Tyler discusses work in education and educational evaluation that spans over a half a century. He describes issues…

  20. A Study of Behavioral Change in 50 Severely Multi-Sensorily Handicapped Children Through Application of the Video-Tape Recorded Behavioral Evaluation Protocol. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, W. Scott

    Examined with 49 deaf-blind children (under 9 years old) was the use of the Telediagnostic Behavior Evaluation Protocol, a video-tape recorded evaluation protocol. To further develop the Telediagnostic Protocol and delineate the characteristics of the Ss observed during the process of test development, Ss were video-taped in eight 3-minute…

  1. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  2. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  3. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, Maria A; Rimondini, Michela; Deveugele, Myriam; Zimmermann, Christa; Moretti, Francesca; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Deledda, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Ian; Bensing, Jozien

    2015-10-01

    The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes 'good communication' by evoking their reactions to variations in physician communication. Lay people from four different countries watched the same videotaped standardized medical encounters and discussed their preferences in gender-specific focus groups who were balanced in age groups. Two hundred and fifty-nine lay people (64 NL, 72 IT, 75 UK and 48 BE) distributed over 35 focus groups of 6-8 persons each. Comments on doctors' behaviours were classified by the GULiVer framework in terms of contents and preferences. Participants prevalently discussed 'task-oriented expressions' (39%: competency, self-confident, providing solutions), 'affective oriented/emotional expressions' (25%: empathy, listening, reassuring) and 'process-oriented expressions' (23%: flexibility, summarizing, verifying). 'Showing an affective attitude' was most appreciated (positive percentage within category: 93%, particularly facilitations and inviting attitude), followed by 'providing solution' (85%). Among disfavoured behaviour, repetitions (88%), 'writing and reading' (54%) and asking permission (42%) were found. Although an affective attitude is appreciated by nearly everybody, people may vary widely in their communication needs and preferences: what is 'good communication' for one person may be disliked or even a source of irritation for another. A physician should be flexible and capable of adapting the consultation to the different needs of different patients. This challenges the idea of general communication guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Garima; Sehgal, Stuti

    2012-01-30

    Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A) the video group, and B) the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  5. Crosstown: A Fox Family Channel Afternoon Special for Cable in the Classroom. [Videotape with] Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    "Crosstown," the television program featured in this videotape and teaching guide, depicts a teenager who is forced, due to her father's lack of child support payments, to leave her comfortable home four years after her parents' divorce and to move across town to an apartment in an inner city neighborhood. The teenager decides not to be…

  6. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a videotape programme on interobserver reliability in outcome assessment for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, N; Anjema, C; Alikhan, N; Chhina, T; Dhanoa, D; Edelist, D; Esufali, Z; Ismail, F; Hill, J; Campbell, J

    1999-01-01

    A study was designed to assess the effects of a standardized instructional videotape on training senior medical students to acceptable levels of reliability in performing several commonly used observer dependent outcome measures in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). During a single day, six third-year medical students independently examined six patients with OA in predetermined order using a Latin Square design, before and after viewing a standardized videotape demonstrating 13 examination techniques. Reliability coefficients were calculated based on variance components of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) table. Preslandardization reliability coefficients were goniometry were uniformly low. Following the intervention, all but four reliability coefficients were >/= 0.93. For many measures, high levels of interobserver agreement were noted prior to viewing the instructional videotape. This may represent the success of undergraduate clinical skills training programmes, or it may be the result of having reviewed an illustrated instructional text just prior to the initial patient examinations. The notable exception was knee goniometry. Despite apparent familiarity with the technique, prestandardization reliability coefficients were very low. However, following the intervention, all coefficients improved dramatically, two-thirds achieving very high levels. These data suggest that skills development in senior medical students is not uniform and that, while reliability is high for many, the assessment of knee range of movement can be improved by viewing an instructional videotape.

  7. Dynamics of verbal interaction between interviewer and child in interviews with alleged victims of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkman, Julia; Santtila, Pekka; Sandnabba, N Kenneth

    2006-04-01

    A number (n = 27) of investigative interviews with children were analyzed with a view to explore the verbal dynamics between interviewer and child. Different types of interviewer utterances and child responses were defined, and the interrelationships between these were explored. The effectiveness of different interviewer utterances in eliciting information from children as well as the type of utterance the interviewer used to follow up an informative answer by the child were investigated. Option-posing and suggestive utterances made up for more than 50% of interviewer utterances, the proportion of invitations being only 2%. Invitations and directive utterances were associated with an increase in informative responses by the child, the adverse being true for option-posing and suggestive utterances. Interestingly, even after the child had provided an informative answer, interviewers continued to rely on focused and leading interviewing methods--in spite of a slight improvement in interviewing behavior.

  8. Structured Interviewing: Raising the Psychometric Properties of the Employment Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Michael A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a highly structured six-step employment interviewing technique which includes asking the same questions, consistently administering the process to all candidates, and having an interview panel. Results of a field study of 243 job applicants using this technique demonstrated interrater reliability, predictive validity, test fairness for…

  9. Interviewers' challenging questions in British broadcast debate interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years some British broadcast panel interviews take a particularly confrontational form. In these debate interviews, news seems to be generated as arguments provided by the interviewees who participate as protagonists of opposite positions. This paper will briefly attempt to show...

  10. Interview with Leroy Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Leroy

    2013-06-01

    Leroy Hood has an MD from Johns Hopkins and a PhD from Caltech. He was a professor at Caltech for 22 years, at the University of Washington for 8 years, and has been President and co-founder of the Institute for Systems Biology for the past 13 years. His interests include technology development, molecular immunology, genomics, systems biology, cancer and neurodegeneration. He has published more than 700 papers, has 36 patents and has been involved in the start-up of 13 different companies. He has won numerous awards including the Lasker Award (1987), the Kyoto Prize (2002), the Russ Prize (2011) and, most recently, the Medal of Science (2011). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineer and the Institute of Medicine. He is currently focused on taking a systems approach to disease. Here he talks to Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  11. Motivational interviewing for medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Marissa C; Cannon-Breland, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    To familiarize pharmacists with motivational interviewing as a way to engage patients in discussions about medication adherence. Motivational interviewing is a collaborative, patient-centered communications skill set that can increase behavior change by stimulating a patient's own internal motivation for change. Pharmacists using motivational interviewing can explore factors associated with medication nonadherence, assess patient ambivalence and/or resistance, and educate a patient to promote medication-adherent behaviors. Pharmacists can use motivational interviewing to effectively engage patients in a conversation that addresses medication adherence.

  12. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hanley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method: 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results: SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10. Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024. For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions: In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring.

  13. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra; Charap, Joseph; Nicholson, Joseph; Disney, Lindsey; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS) skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP) interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10). Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024). For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring. PMID:25059835

  14. Interviewing like a researcher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard; Freytag, Per Vagn; Nielsen, Suna Løwe

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show the transformation that takes place when a ‘neutral’ research method is turned into a ‘paradigm-embedded’ research method. Because a paradigm consists of some ultimate presumptions (understood as philosophical hypothesis or normative theses), paradigms influ...... the foundation for a more nuanced understanding of how research methods in general can be used very differently depending on the paradigm researcher’s departure.......The purpose of this chapter is to show the transformation that takes place when a ‘neutral’ research method is turned into a ‘paradigm-embedded’ research method. Because a paradigm consists of some ultimate presumptions (understood as philosophical hypothesis or normative theses), paradigms...... influence the way in which researchers understand problems and how researchers look at existing and available sets of research methods and knowledge in general. The powers of paradigms thus are substantial and should be noted by researchers to provide context for their reflections. The paradigms we depart...

  15. Current Events. Interview: Nuyorican Dreamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainburn, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    Interviews Robert Torres, a Nuyorican who excelled at school and escaped the ghetto while his family remained, then made a documentary about the situation. This interview examines how poverty affects children; how teachers can help impoverished Hispanic students; how teachers helped him; how educators should be compensated; what making the…

  16. Aikido Politics in Interview Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Phyllis Ghim Lian

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes how less powerful subjects in an unequal encounter, an admission interview in an educational institution, were able to counter the power directed at them by the more powerful subject through "aikido" strategies. In the context of the interview, harmonizing with the ideological discursive formation of the institution in question…

  17. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  18. Systematic Interviewing Skills. Typescript Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Roy C.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    Part of a five-part package (see note) of training materials to teach interviewing skills to human services personnel, this typescript manual is intended for use as a visual reference to aid in understanding the taped dialogues of the packages tape/slide demonstrations of interview interaction, and for referral in class discussions. The typescript…

  19. BUSINESS ETIQUETTE IN JOB INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGEEVA JULIA VICTOROVNA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of job interview transcripts from the perspective of dominant communicant’s (HR manager communicative behavior. The interviewer uses various etiquette forms that facilitate a more productive dialogue and stipulate cooperative strategies and tactics in order to achieve the main goal - to determine whether the job applicant meets the requirements of the employer.

  20. Enriching Social Studies with Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Describes how an interview project used in conjunction with a primary sources based curriculum enhanced history learning. Students were involved in gaining information from community citizens. Outlines the procedures involved in the interviewing process and discusses the benefits to students including increased content acquisition, skills, and…

  1. Learning motivational interviewing: scripting a virtual patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaume, William A; Berger, Bruce A; Barker, Bradford N

    2006-04-15

    This article describes a written assignment for a first-year professional communication course to facilitate the understanding and mastery of motivational interviewing in dealing with patient ambivalence and resistance. The goal was to immerse students in how motivational interviewing differs from traditional biomedical counseling with regard to phrasing individual responses to the patient and managing the flow of interaction. Students were required to write a script for a working prototype of the Auburn University Virtual Patient. The script had to specify the text for the virtual patient's comments, 2-5 possible responses for the student pharmacist to choose from, and multiple interactional paths representing motivational interviewing, biomedical counseling, and a mix of the 2. Student feedback and test results are reported. Qualitative analysis of written student feedback indicated that (1) the project took too much time because of the complexities of the computer procedures resulting from the Virtual Patient being a prototype, and (2) the computer procedures deflected attention from the critical thinking involved in writing the script. Quantitative item analysis of final examination results indicated that students scored an average one full-letter grade better on the questions about motivational interviewing than on the questions covering other topics. The scriptwriting assignment is a challenging exercise in assimilating the verbal skills necessary for using motivational interviewing in patient counseling. Many students exhibited greater interest in motivational interviewing, greater knowledge of why motivational interviewing is successful, greater facility with wording responses, and greater confidence in their ability to use motivational interviewing in the future. Because almost all students had negative reactions to the difficulty and time involved in making their scripts actually work with the virtual patient prototype, future assignments should delete

  2. O uso de filmagem em pesquisas qualitativas El uso de la filmación en investigaciones cualitativas The use of videotaping in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Moreira Pinheiro

    2005-10-01

    soluciones se deben basar en acuerdos entre los investigadores y los participantes.Considering advancements in data collection methods, we explore the use of videotaping in qualitative research. This bibliographical study aims at developing reflections on the possibilities of using videotapes in research and at providing material to researchers. The video is used as an instrument of data collection and generation. We mention technical aspects, such as the utilization of a mobile or fixed camera. By means of the latter, the authors report their experience, emphasizing compliance with the neutrality principle and the possibility of editing the images obtained as a means of generating new data. The authors highlight that it was possible to detect contradictions between discourse and behavior through the use of videotaping and interviews. The authors also discuss the ethical principles set by CNS Resolution 196/96 and other ethical questions, whose solutions should be based on the agreement between researchers and subjects.

  3. Conceptual Dynamics in Clinical Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce; Lee, Victor R.; Krakowski, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    One of the main tools that we have for the study of student science conceptions is the clinical interview. Research on student understanding of natural phenomena has tended to understand interviews as tools for reading out a student's knowledge. In this paper, we argue for a shift in how we think about and analyze interview data. In particular, we argue that we must be aware that the interview itself is a dynamic process during which a sort of conceptual change occurs. We refer to these short time-scale changes that occur over a few minutes in an interview as conceptual dynamics. Our goal is to devise new frameworks and techniques for capturing the conceptual dynamics. To this end, we have devised a simple and neutral cognitive framework. In this paper, we describe this framework, and we show how it can be applied to understand interview data. We hope to show that the conceptual dynamics of interviews are complex, but that it nonetheless feasible to make them a focus of study.

  4. A videotaped intervention to enhance child control and reduce anxiety of the pain of dental injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Raadal, M; Naidu, S; Yoshida, T; Kvale, G; Milgrom, P

    2003-12-01

    While the psychological literature shows that perceptions of uncontrollability contribute to anxiety and other pathologies, interventions that enhance perceived control have been shown to reduce anxiety. This study attempted to assess a brief videotape to enhance child perceived control in a dental setting. 101 children aged 7-9 years completed warm-up procedures and viewed either: a) the experimental intervention, a 2 minutes video of a dentist explaining what an injection will feel like and proposing hand raising as a signal mechanism; or b) the control condition, a 2 minutes video of Disneyland. Fear of dental injections was assessed on a 10 cm visual analogue scale before and after the intervention. In the experimental group there was a significant fear reduction from pre- to post-intervention, while this was not the case in the control group. Children with higher pre-existing levels of fear benefited more from the intervention than children with lower levels of fear. The results of this pilot study suggest that intervention packages that impact child control have promise in lowering anxiety.

  5. Medical student selection: choice of a semi-structured panel interview or an unstructured one-on-one interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann Courneya, Carol; Wright, Kristin; Frinton, Vera; Mak, Edwin; Schulzer, Michael; Pachev, George

    2005-09-01

    Reliability has been shown to be higher in structured medical admissions interviews as compared to unstructured interviews. This study reports the comparison of a proposed semi-structured panel interview with a current individual unstructured medical admissions interview. Inter-rater reliability coefficients were calculated, and correlations were estimated between panel, individual and academic scores. Admission status in 2003 was related to these scores by means of logistic regression. Both individual and panel interviews were significantly correlated with admissions status. The inter rater reliability coefficient (from individual interviews) was 0.12 whereas the interpanel reliability coefficient was 0.52. Panel interview: good across panel and within panel consistency of scoring. No effect of who asked the questions, question order, or interview duration on scoring. No correlation between panel interview scores and academic variables (MCAT, GPA). We found good inter-panel reliability, a high consistency within and between interview panels, and uniformly positive questionnaire responses. The panel interview measures something different from academic variables. These data, in conjunction with a strong sense from the medical and psychological literature supporting the reliability and validity of a semi-structured panel interview, support our decision to replace our individual interview with the panel interview.

  6. A method of phenomenological interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    In this article I propose a method of interviewing for descriptive phenomenological research that offers an explicit, theoretically based approach for researchers. My approach enables application of descriptive phenomenology as a total method for research, and not one just focused on data analysis. This structured phenomenological approach to interviewing applies questions based on themes of experience contextualization, apprehending the phenomenon and its clarification. The method of questioning employs descriptive and structural questioning as well as novel use of imaginative variation to explore experience. The approach will help researchers understand how to undertake descriptive phenomenological research interviews.

  7. Interviewer Effects on a Network-Size Filter Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josten Michael

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that survey interviewers may be tempted to manipulate answers to filter questions in a way that minimizes the number of follow-up questions. This becomes relevant when ego-centered network data are collected. The reported network size has a huge impact on interview duration if multiple questions on each alter are triggered. We analyze interviewer effects on a network-size question in the mixed-mode survey “Panel Study ‘Labour Market and Social Security’” (PASS, where interviewers could skip up to 15 follow-up questions by generating small networks. Applying multilevel models, we find almost no interviewer effects in CATI mode, where interviewers are paid by the hour and frequently supervised. In CAPI, however, where interviewers are paid by case and no close supervision is possible, we find strong interviewer effects on network size. As the area-specific network size is known from telephone mode, where allocation to interviewers is random, interviewer and area effects can be separated. Furthermore, a difference-in-difference analysis reveals the negative effect of introducing the follow-up questions in Wave 3 on CAPI network size. Attempting to explain interviewer effects we neither find significant main effects of experience within a wave, nor significantly different slopes between interviewers.

  8. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  9. Interview with Martha C. Nussbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Abbate

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here's the interview granted by Martha Nussbaum to Fabrizia Abbate about the role of preference in social dynamics. How important are aesthetic preferences in the development of moral attitudes and choices ?

  10. Interview Questions with Bentham Scientific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    John Mather answers questions for an interview for the Bentham Science Newsletter. He covers topics ranging from his childhood, his professional career and his thoughts on research, technology and today's scientists and engineers.

  11. Interview of Haroon Ahmed - 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Haroon

    2009-01-01

    Filmed on 8th December 2009 by Alan Macfarlane and edited by Sarah Harrison Interview of the scientist and sometime Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Haroon Ahmed. A discussion of his life and work.

  12. BBB Interviews Wallace D. Muhammad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Books Bulletin, 1979

    1979-01-01

    In this interview, subjects covered include: changes in Islam, the spiritual greatness of America, Muslim businesses, interracial marriage, the World Community of Islam, and opening the doors of Islam to Caucasians. (WI)

  13. Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, E E; Bliddal, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2012-01-01

    Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study...

  14. The case for interactive interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Christopher; Kenny, Christine

    1994-04-01

    It is reported in the Penguin Book of Interviews ( 1 ) that Marlon Brando recalled an interview with Truman Capote as follows: 'The little bastard spent half the night telling me all his problems, I figured the least I could do was tell him a few of mine.' In sharing experiences with his interviewee, Capote had managed to extract information he would otherwise not have gained.

  15. Interviews: Linking Leadership Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah N.; Roebuck, Deborah B.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership educators use various tools to enable their students to learn about leadership. This article describes the assignment "Interview with a Leader" which the authors have incorporated into several different leadership courses. Grounded in constructivist and social learning theories, the authors have found this assignment to be…

  16. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  17. Item Nonresponse in Face-to-Face Interviews with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haunberger Sigrid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined item nonresponse and its respondent and interviewer correlates by means of a population-based, panel survey of children aged 8 to 11 who were surveyed using standardised, face-to-face interviews. Using multilevel, logistic analyses with cross-level interactions, this article aims to examine which effects of item nonresponse are subject to children as respondents or to the interviewers and the interview setting. Depending on the type of question, we found different effects for respondent and interviewer variables, as well as interaction effects between child age/interviewer age as well as child gender/interviewer gender. However, interviewer variance is for the most part not significant.

  18. Using Concept Mapping to Enhance the Research Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Kinchin BSc, MPhil, PhD, CBiol, FSB.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors report the use of concept mapping as a means of summarizing interview transcripts in the study of the information-seeking behavior of employees in an organization. Concept mapping differs from traditional methods of textual coding for interview analysis by making underlying cognitive structures transparent and giving a focus to the sets of propositions by which individuals construct meaning. Concept map structure correlates with the perceived richness of interview data. They provide quick summaries of the interview quality and may help to identify topics for further probing to elicit new information. In this study rich interviews provide complex concept map structures, whereas less successful interviews provide simpler, spoke structures. Issues in using concept maps with research interviews are discussed, including use as a retrospective interview probe, as a check on evidence saturation, as a form of data display or as a form of creative coding.

  19. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  20. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 608 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  1. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  2. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  4. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  5. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  6. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  8. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  9. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  10. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  11. Computational Complexities of University Interview Timetabling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Naoyuki; Kiyonari, Yuuki; Miyano, Eiji; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Yamanaka, Katsuhisa

    This paper introduces a new timetabling problem on universities, called interview timetabling. In this problem, some constant number, say three, of referees are assigned to each of 2n graduate students. Our task is to construct a presentation timetable of these 2n students using n timeslots and two rooms, so that two students evaluated by the same referee must be assigned to different timeslots. The optimization goal is to minimize the total number of movements of all referees between two rooms. This problem comes from the real world in the interview timetabling in Kyoto University. We propose two restricted models of this problem, and investigate their time complexities.

  12. Telling interviewers about sexual abuse: predictors of child disclosure at forensic interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Tonya; Cross, Theodore P; Jones, Lisa; Walsh, Wendy

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to identify characteristics that predict full disclosure by victims of sexual abuse during a forensic interview. Data came from agency files for 987 cases of sexual abuse between December 2001 and December 2003 from Children's Advocacy Centers (CACs) and comparison communities within four U.S. states. Cases of children fully disclosing abuse when interviewed were compared to cases of children believed to be victims who gave no or partial disclosures. The likelihood of disclosure increased when victims were girls, a primary caregiver was supportive, and a child's disclosure instigated the investigation. The likelihood of disclosure was higher for children who were older at abuse onset and at forensic interview (each age variable having an independent effect). Communities differed on disclosure rate, with no difference associated with having a CAC. Findings suggest factors deserving consideration prior to a forensic interview, including organizational and community factors affecting disclosure rates.

  13. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  14. The physics interviewing project: a tour of interviews in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, E; Scadron, M

    1978-06-02

    The Physics Interviewing Project assists graduate physics departments in evaluating foreign applicants. Supported by some 20 universities, two interviewers, both working scientists, travel abroad and interview students individually for about 1 hour each. Prospective teaching assistants are rated on physics knowledge, problem-solving ability, and English language proficiency. Ratings on all interviewees are sent to all supporting schools and other schools as requested. The Project aids able students from countries that have no physics Ph.D. programs (Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand) to obtain assistantships and Ph.D.'s abroad, assists in the technological development of those countries, and helps U.S. schools in selecting the most promising foreign candidates. A similar program should be beneficial in other sciences.

  15. Significant Others in Substance Abusers' Change Talk During Motivational Interviewing Sessions in the Finnish Probation Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarpavaara Harri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - This article explores the meanings substance-abusing clients attach to family and friendships during motivational interviewing (MI sessions in Probation Service. DATA - The analyses are based on videotaped and transcribed data consisting of 82 MI sessions. This database involves the first two counseling sessions of 41 client-counselor pairs. Sessions were videotaped in 12 Probation Service offices in Finland between 2007 and 2009. METHODS - The analysis relies on coding of client's change talk utterances and qualitative semiotic framework. RESULTS - The meanings of the significant others were diverse from the point of view of the client's motivation: family appeared as a support for change, an aspiration, a sufferer, or an obstacle to change; and friendship appeared as an obstacle to change, a surmounted obstacle, a cause to change, or a support to change. CONCLUSIONS - Significant others and their quality are important and diverse factors that promote or hinder change in substance abuser' change talk. Thus, it is suggested that the meaning of significant others should not be overlooked in MI and other substance abuse treatment.

  16. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  17. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bakker Dinny H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners' (GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for providing mental health care. We investigated if GPs who feel burnt out or dissatisfied with the time available for their patients, are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose their distress, and have shorter consultations, in order to gain time and energy. This may result in less psychological evaluations of patients' complaints. Methods We used 1890 videotaped consultations from a nationally representative sample of 126 Dutch GPs to analyse GPs' communication and the duration of their consultations. Burnout was subdivided into emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced accomplishment. Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate which subgroups of GPs differed significantly. Results GPs with feelings of exhaustion or dissatisfaction with the available time have longer consultations compared to GPs without these feelings. Exhausted GPs, and GPs with feelings of depersonalisation, talk more about psychological or social topics in their consultations. GPs with feelings of reduced accomplishment are an exception: they communicate less affectively, are less patient-centred and have less eye contact with their patients compared to GPs without reduced accomplishment. We found no relationship between GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the available time and their psychological evaluations of patients' problems. Conclusion GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the time available for their patients do not obstruct their diagnosis and awareness of patients' psychological problems. On the contrary, GPs with high levels of exhaustion or depersonalisation, and GPs who are dissatisfied with the

  18. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L.; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H. Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data—fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information—than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey. PMID:26060991

  19. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Schober

    Full Text Available As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS, longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded, variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation, and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data-fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information-than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey.

  20. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group,

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of him taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows. Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human...

  1. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of his taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction1) (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows.Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human Re...

  2. Meta-Inquiry: An Approach to Interview Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaslin, Mark L.; Carlson, Nancy Margaret

    2003-12-01

    Developing an effective interview strategy presents unique challenges for the novice and master researcher for if the questions one asks are not crucial, then differences in responses are not crucial either (Creswell, 1998, p. 335). To focus qualitative research in the human ecology of the study, our strategy uses an initial interview protocol and preanalysis process, called meta-inquiry, prior to developing our formal interview protocol. Meta-inquiry of initial interview data, obtained in dialogue with key informants in the researched culture, provides us with an inductive tool to assess, modify, enhance, and focus the formal interview protocol. Thus, preparing for the research journey requires a human ecology-based interview protocol to acquire data from which concepts, categories, properties, and theory can emerge. Key words: Meta-Inquiry, Interview Protocol, and Grounded Theory

  3. Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health leaders such as Jonathan Mann and Daniel Tarantola. We moved back ... We were starting to slow down our moves by then and we ... Profile Interview: Prof. Rob Moodie. “Get up. Do good. Be good. Be.” foundation to use a tax on tobacco to buy out and replace tobacco industry sponsorship in sports and the arts, and.

  4. Leaning in to "muddy" interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    subjectivities, situated identities, emotions, and conversational genres. Based on ethnographic fieldwork at a Danish Vocational Educational Training College, we introduce the concept of “leaning in” to provide an analytical grasp of the “muddy” interactional tension field in an interview situation, in which...

  5. Interview with Mike Parker Pearson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. T. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mike Parker Pearson is the Institute of Archaeology’s newly appointed Professor of British Later Prehistory. In this interview he reflects on his experience at the birth of post-processualism, current problems and opportunities in modern archaeology, and the subject for which he is best known: Stonehenge.

  6. Divergent Thinking and Interview Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Mark; Rawles, Richard; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined divergent thinking (DT) test scores of applicants taking part in a selection procedure for an undergraduate psychology degree (N = 370). Interviewers made six specific (creative intelligence, motivation, work habits, emotional stability, sociability, and social responsibility) and one overall recommendation rating on each…

  7. TECHNOS Interview: Lewis J. Perelman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell Jefferson

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Lewis Perelman, author of "Global Mind" and "School's Out: Hyperlearning, the New Technology, and the End of Education," explores the future of education in the U.S. Argues that the forces changing academia in the direction of obsolescence and ultimate extinction are unrelated to education policy or…

  8. Ralph Mero: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Ralph Mero, Executive Director of Compassion in Dying, Seattle (Washington)-based organization that has brought new voice to controversial issue of physician-assisted rational suicide. Mero explains how his years as minister watching people suffer with cancer or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome led him to work for…

  9. An Interview with Khalil Mahshi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Educational Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In an interview, Khalil Mahshi, director-general of international and public relations for the Palestinian Ministry of Education and Higher Education, talks about the legacy of the first Palestinian intifadah and the current state of Palestinian education. He emphasizes the subjective nature of his observations and the complex role of commenting…

  10. Mathematical people profiles and interviews

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This unique collection contains extensive and in-depth interviews with mathematicians who have shaped the field of mathematics in the twentieth century. Collected by two mathematicians respected in the community for their skill in communicating mathematical topics to a broader audience, the book is also rich with photographs and includes an introduction by Philip J. Davis.

  11. An Interview with Lance Olsen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Segal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With over twenty books to his name, as editor or author, Lance Olsen is a cultural force unto himself. His latest book with Trevor Dodge, Architectures of Possibility (Raw Dog Screaming Press, is a writer's guide against transparent language, and predictable patterned literary convention. In this interview Olsen discusses radical pedagogy and experimental narrative theory and its practice.

  12. An Interview with Roddy Doyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Gülüm Tekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, Roddy Doyle, one of the most popular contemporary writers in Ireland, provides insightful comments on crucial aspects of his writing career. Doyle speaks about the beginning of his literary adventure, the creative process of his work, and his artistic influences, as well as his feeling of pride in being a native Dubliner. Furthermore, he addresses his experience of the Celtic Tiger era in Ireland and the multicultural reality of the country in the late 1990s. Doyle’s detailed discussion of the female characters in his work is one of the most intriguing parts of the interview. He also gives hints about his latest novel The Guts (2013 and talks about the shift in theme, to the middle-age crisis in men, in his recent work: The Bullfighting (2011, Two Pints (2012, and The Guts (2013. His ideas about the filmic adaptations of his work, his favourite writers and his favourite fictional female characters are other inspiring points of the interview. The interview closes with Doyle’s characterization of the Post-Celtic Tiger period in Ireland and his views about the shifting portraits of Irish men and women.

  13. Primary Science Interview: Science Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In this "Primary Science" interview, Lynne Bianchi talks with Emma Vanstone about "Science Sparks," which is a website full of creative, fun, and exciting science activity ideas for children of primary-school age. "Science Sparks" started with the aim of inspiring more parents to do science at home with their…

  14. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practitioners in the domain of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) to generate communicative and meta-communicative .... Adopting a discourse-based approach places this research article in the realm of qualitative research (cf. ..... design language activities for South African business-news interviewer trainees. Adopting ...

  15. Levels Of Formality In Obama's Interview And Sby's Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Karo, Seftyani Fransiska; Tangkas, I Wayan Dirgayasa

    2013-01-01

    This study was intended to describe levels of formality used by Obama and SBY in their interviews. This study was carried out with descriptive research. The data were collected with documentary technique and the instrument used was documentary sheet. The data were analyzed by descriptive comparative. The result of the research show that Obama tends to use Casual level (44,78%), Formal (29,05%), Consultative (26%), and Intimate (0,17%) while SBY tends to use Formal level (49,20%), ...

  16. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  17. A Content Analysis of Medical School Admissions Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Altmaier

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prospective medical school applicants use Internet websites to gain information about medical school interviews as well as to offer their experience in such interviews. This study examined applicants’ reported experiences of interviews and compared them to the purposes of the interview as purported by medical schools. Method. Content analysis of student feedback regarding medical school interviews at 161 medical schools was conducted for entries of over 4600 students applying to medical school who anonymously and voluntarily completed an online questionnaire. Results. Across all medical schools, nearly one half of all cited interview questions addressed non-cognitive characteristics of the applicants. Top ranked medical schools were reported to ask significantly more interpersonal and illegal questions and fewer academic/general knowledge questions than other medical schools. Lower ranked schools did not differ significantly in the types of questions reportedly asked applicants compared to other medical schools. Discussion. Medical school interviews are generally gathering types of information about applicants that admissions personnel identify as important in the admission decision. In addition to measuring interpersonal characteristics, medical school admissions interviews are assessing cognitive abilities and ethical decision-making. Sources on the Internet provide actual medical school interview questions to prospective students. This practice can help them gain an undue advantage in interviewing. Admissions committees and faculty who interview students may want to consider how best to obtain accurate and valid responses from applicants.

  18. Can mock interviewers' personalities influence their personality ratings of applicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Thomas; Macan, Therese

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined individual difference and self-regulatory variables to understand how an interviewer rates a candidate's personality. Participants were undergraduate students at a large midwestern university in the United States who completed measures of individual differences, read an employment interview transcript involving a candidate applying for a customer service job, and rated the candidate's personality. Participants' agreeableness, social skills, and communion striving were positively associated with their ratings of the candidate's helpfulness and obedience. The authors provide a foundation for further research on interviewer effectiveness and the processes underlying the employment interview.

  19. [Interviewing victims of sexual crimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Teresa; Ribeiro, Catarina

    2007-01-01

    The approach to victims of sexual crimes is of special complexity due to the nature of this kind of crime, the impact of victimization and the specificity of judicial investigation procedures. The absence of physical evidence and the secrecy that characterizes the majority of sexual victimization cases frequently lead the victim's story to be used as one of few proof elements. Given the importance of the information supplied by the victim in the criminal inquiry, it is essential to create strategies to optimise the interview process, not only to preserve evidence, but also to prevent a secondary victimization process. This review discusses in a brief manner the extent to which information given by victims can be considered relevant forensic evidence, and then presents the methodological guidelines for interview that should be used in this type of expertise.

  20. Stackwalker: Interviews: 2008-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newby, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Documentation from Simon Yuill's Stackwalker project, a parallel study made from audio interviews relating to crofting communities in the West of Scotland and migrant workers in fishing and food production in the North East of Scotland.The project reflects upon issues of spatial agency (land use,...... in context.This artist's book follows the exhibition, Fields, Factories and Workshops at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, 7 August – 18 September 2010.English language text with Gaelic, Polish, Russian, Latvian and Lithuanian sections......., occupancy, and mobility) and forms of communal organisation that have developed within these communities. These are set against processes of archiving and documentation in terms of historical and legal practices. The book collates the transcribed interviews and provides an introductory essay setting them...

  1. An Interview with Joseph Tabbi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Gonzalez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This interview between Jeff Gonzales and Joseph Tabbi discusses Tabbi’s new book of literary criticism Nobody Grew But the Business: On the Life and Work of William Gaddis (Northwestern UP, 2015. The book effectively and compellingly demonstrates that Gaddis was deeply engaged with the continuing corporate reengineering of postwar American experience not just in 1976’s J R, the Gaddis novel that deals most explicitly with corporations, but throughout his career.

  2. Guerin, Delbert oral history interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Interviewee: Guerin, Delbert; Interviewer: Hall, Peter V; Interviewer: Smith, Leigha; Principal Investigator: Hall, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    This interview is with Delbert Guerin, retired longshoreman (local 500), fisherman, and former chief of the Musqueam First Nation (1973-1982), He was also the lead plaintiff in Guerin v. The Queen, a land rights case decided in favour of the Musqueam in 1984. Topics discussed include: fishing industry; longshoring; job duties; equipment; technology; workplace safety; race; gender; rates of pay; alcohol use; and the evolution of work duties and culture.

  3. Brine, Terry oral history interview

    OpenAIRE

    Interviewee: Brine, Terry; Interviewer: La, Michelle; Interviewer: Garden, Bailey; Principal Investigator: Hall, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    Terry Brine was born in New Westminster and grew up in Burnaby. He studied education at the university and upon graduation joined the successful family business. He was the third manager of this family business after his father and grandfather. The store existed for more than 100 years at its origin location. Terry shares his experience about the success, decline and revitalization of Columbia Street from its heyday as the “Miracle Mile” of the region until today. The interview provides infor...

  4. An Interview with Roy Ellen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejm Benessaiah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I decided to undertake this interview with Professor Ellen, simply because I thought such a distinguished career deserved to be marked as he was retiring. Roy was happy to make time for our interviews, in the form of loosely structured conversation which, like the Arabian Nights, Roy pointed out, could have gone on forever, but I decided to draw the line at three sessions. Perhaps it could, and will go on to form part of a more in-depth biography, as I continued to discover other aspects and adventures of Roy’s interesting life in the course of other contexts, much as one does in the field. Much is known about what ethnobiologists and anthropologists say about another people’s lives; less is known about their own, apart from rare reflections, diaries and memoires. I found Roy’s reflections a source of comfort as I embarked on my own PhD fieldwork, reassuring me as I fumbled around, making my own unique but comparable mistakes among the insights I gleaned. The following is an edited version of the original interview. I hope it will be as enjoyable to the reader as it was to me working on it.

  5. Current Interview Trail Metrics in the Otolaryngology Match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Chang, C W David; Puscas, Liana

    2017-06-01

    Objectives To identify how applicants to otolaryngology residency determine how to apply to, interview with, and rank programs on the interview trail and to determine the extent of the financial burden of the otolaryngology interview trail. Study Design Web-based survey distributed in March and April 2016. Setting Otolaryngology residency applicants throughout the United States. Subjects and Methods Applicants to otolaryngology residency during the 2016 match cycle and current otolaryngology residents were surveyed. Results Median number of applications, interview offers, interviews attended, and programs ranked was not different during the 2016 match and the previous 5 match years. The most important factor affecting the number of applications was the need to apply widely to ensure sufficient interview offers. The most common reason for declining an interview offer was scheduling conflict. Applicants during the 2016 match spent a median of $5400 applying and interviewing for otolaryngology residency. Conclusions Median number of applications, interview offers, interviews attended, and programs ranked has not changed. The most cited reason for applying to many programs was to increase the chances of matching, but this is not statistically likely to increase match success. We advocate for continued attempts to make the otolaryngology match process more transparent for both applicants and resident selection committees, but recognize that applicants are likely to continue to overapply for otolaryngology residency positions.

  6. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Noordman, J; van Dulmen, S; Hiddink, G J

    2014-01-01

    To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were selected. An observational checklist was developed to assess frequency and content. Personalization of advices was scored, as also the guidelines on which PNs based their advices. Content analysis was used to identify different categories of advices. About one quarter of advices concerned weight, over two-thirds nutrition and one-third physical activity. Lose weight, eat less fat and be more physically active in general were the main categories for each type of advice. Despite high clarity of advices, lower scores were found for specificity and personalization. Very few nutrition advices were provided in combination with physical activity advices. Weight advices often related to the patient's complaint. PNs seldom set a concrete weight goal. Although benefits of physical activity were discussed, often no practical advices were provided about how to achieve this. Integrated lifestyle advice was not common: advices about nutrition and physical activity were fragmented throughout the consultation. Obesity prevention needs more emphasis in PNs' educational programs.

  7. Motivational interviewing for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindson-Hawley, Nicola; Thompson, Tom P; Begh, Rachna

    2015-03-02

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a directive patient-centred style of counselling, designed to help people to explore and resolve ambivalence about behaviour change. It was developed as a treatment for alcohol abuse, but may help people to a make a successful attempt to quit smoking. To determine whether or not motivational interviewing (MI) promotes smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register for studies using the term motivat* NEAR2 (interview* OR enhanc* OR session* OR counsel* OR practi* OR behav*) in the title or abstract, or motivation* as a keyword. Date of the most recent search: August 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which motivational interviewing or its variants were offered to tobacco users to assist cessation. We extracted data in duplicate. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically validated rates where available. We counted participants lost to follow-up as continuing smoking or relapsed. We performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel model. We identified 28 studies published between 1997 and 2014, involving over 16,000 participants. MI was conducted in one to six sessions, with the duration of each session ranging from 10 to 60 minutes. Interventions were delivered by primary care physicians, hospital clinicians, nurses or counsellors. Our meta-analysis of MI versus brief advice or usual care yielded a modest but significant increase in quitting (risk ratio (RR) 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 to 1.36; 28 studies; N = 16,803). Subgroup analyses found that MI delivered by primary care physicians resulted in an RR of 3.49 (95% CI 1.53 to 7.94; 2 trials; N = 736). When delivered by counsellors the RR was smaller (1.25; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.63; 22 trials; N = 13,593) but MI still resulted in higher quit rates than brief advice or usual care. When we

  8. New Perspectives From Unstructured Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1980s, Ray Pahl, a sociologist at the University of Kent, and PhD student Claire Wallace conducted interviews examining young people’s experiences of growing up, work, and unemployment on the Isle of Sheppey; these interviews are now deposited at the University of Essex, and this article examines how historians and others might reuse them to interrogate other subjects. The article examines one working-class young woman’s ideas about gender and sexuality in the early 1980s, using the Listening Guide method developed by psychologist Carol Gilligan to probe the individual subjectivity and emotion, as well as the cultural discourses at play in this interview. The interviewee was a young woman who was involved in a culture of casual sex with men “on the ships,” and the article focuses on how she saw the exchanges of money, drink, and gifts between them and herself, and how she avoided seeing her actions as “prostitution.” The analysis shows how in a particular locality in the early 1980s, a particular subculture could allow some young women to sidestep the dominant codes governing young, working-class women’s sexuality and go “on the ships” without seeing this as marking them as “prostitutes”’ or any related category. Thus, the article troubles the ontology of “prostitution” as a category. It also suggests how we can use a single individual’s narrative to offer a broader account of cultures or subcultures, by starting with the individual and examining how one subjectivity navigated and interacted with broader cultural discourses. Finally, this article also offers suggestions about some of the methodological and ethical issues with reusing archived sociological data but argues that it holds rich possibilities.

  9. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  10. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  11. Engaging families through motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adrienne A; Wright, Katherine S

    2014-10-01

    Helping parents change key behaviors may reduce the risk of child maltreatment. However, traditional provider-centered approaches to working with the parents of pediatric patients may increase resistance to behavioral change. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered communication technique that helps address problems of provider-centered approaches. In this article, evidence for use of MI to address several risk factors for child maltreatment is reviewed, including parental substance abuse, partner violence, depression treatment, harsh punishment, and parental management of children's health. Fundamental components of MI that may be incorporated into clinical practice are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The motivational interviewing skill code : Reliability and a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, JM; Schippers, GM; Schaap, CPDR

    The Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC) is a coding system developed to measure adherence to motivational interviewing (MI). MI is an effective clinical style used in different treatment situations. Counsellors practising MI have to follow general principles and avoid certain traps. In the

  13. Confidentiality and Professional Affiliation Effects on Subject Ratings of Interviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David W.; And Others

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of different statements regarding confidentiality (absolute; limited; nondirective) on subject impressions of interviewers. In addition, the professional affiliation of the interviewer was manipulated (psychologist, minister/pastoral counselor, social worker) to assess potential influence of…

  14. An Interview with Adolf Muschg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ricker-Abderhalden

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolf Muschg, a popular writer, teacher and aesthetician, is one of the comparatively few contemporary Swiss writers who has been able to establish himself firmly in Germany. In recent years, he has begun to attract the attention of American critics and Germanists as well. In the interview, Adolf Muschg deals with a wide spectrum of issues. He identifies the authors and works that mean most to him. He traces, for instance, his changing relationship to Goethe, whom he recently rediscovered. In Goethe's works, above all in his scientific studies, Muschg finds issues that are of central importance to the survival of our planet. He detects a kinship between Goethe and the "Greens" of the seventies and looks back critically on the turbulent sixties. He provides an analysis of the current tensions between the USA and Western Europe, while confirming his keen and very personal involvement with the USA. But at the core of the interview are his extensive comments on the creative processes and the perils inherent in writing fiction. There he deals with the complex relationship between literature and therapy, the therapeutic potential of literature for the writer and the reader. By describing the novelist's difficult journey on the narrow path between self-revelation and indiscretion, he also reflects upon the related issue of literary narcissism.

  15. STS-93: Crew Interview - Steve Hawley

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Hawley wanted to be an astronaut, his career path, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) draws attention from the media. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Hawley mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deployed the Chandra Telescope, and the design configuration of Chandra to gather and transfer information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) and Gelation of Sols: Applied Microgravity Research (GOSAMR) experiments, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  16. The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Elizabeth C; Andrews, Samantha J; Stolzenberg, Stacia N; Lyon, Thomas D

    2015-12-13

    Child witnesses are often asked wh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) in forensic interviews. However, little research has examined the ways in which children respond to different wh- prompts, and no previous research has investigated productivity differences among wh- prompts in investigative interviews. This study examined the use and productivity of wh- prompts in 95 transcripts of 4- to 13-year-olds alleging sexual abuse in child investigative interviews. What-how questions about actions elicited the most productive responses during both the rapport building and substantive phases. Future research and practitioner training should consider distinguishing among different wh- prompts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. The Dimensions of the Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1981-01-01

    Develops a conceptual base for analyzing the literature on interviewing for its usefulness to the reference interview. Four holistic dimensions of the reference interview are identified and discussed in relation to interviewer decisions and other factors not directly controlled by the librarian. There are 18 references. (Author/RAA)

  18. Bilingual Supervision: Does It Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Stephen S.; And Others

    The study attempted to determine whether monolingual English-speaking supervisors and bilingual-bicultural supervisors would provide markedly different supervision management to bilingual (English-Spanish) student clinicians in audiology/speech pathology. After viewing each of 10 video-tapes of Spanish language therapy sessions for 2 preschool…

  19. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  20. An Interview with Ralph Clare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Gonzalez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fictions Inc., and this interview, offers detailed readings of a diverse body of texts that, in one way or another, push readers to think about the role of the corporation in 20th and 21st century America. Using a complex set of critical tools—historicizing the rise in the pharmaceutical industry in the 1980s to read White Noise; drawing on Slavoj Žižek and Louis Althusser to explain the model of resistance that appears in Crying of Lot 49; looking at 1980s gentrification policies and government outsourcing while discussing Ghostbusters—Clare generates a series of insights about the fears and the desires embodied in the corporation. What he finds is that older avenues of resistance to consumer capitalism have closed, but the desire to imagine new ones, and maybe create them, remains open.

  1. Interview with Theo van Leeuwen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Moschini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of LEA features an interview with Professor Theo van Leeuwen, where – starting from the fundamental role of the Hallidayan socio-semiotic approach to language in the development of Multimodality – he illustrates the background of his theoretical work as social semiotician and critical discourse analyst. Theo van Leeuwen broadly deals with issues such as the new emerging field of Critical Multimodal Studies, the importance of the socio-cultural perspective in Multimodality and the potential encounter between Multimodality and Cognitivism, with special reference to the concept of “social cognition” and to Metaphor Theory. He concludes his conversation with a reflection on the function of Studies in the Humanities in a specialized and digitally mediated world.

  2. Achievement of First-, Second-, and Third-Grade Students on Multiplication and Division Word Problems in Two Different Solution Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Aileen; Cabral, Sheryl Ann

    This is a project in an emerging line of research investigating children's informed knowledge of mathematics questions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the ability of students who had not received multiplication or division instruction to solve multiplication and division word problems. The study consisted of videotaped interviews with 89…

  3. An Interview with Hermann Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Holmes

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available In an interview with Joan E. Holmes (University of Kansas, Hermann Kant, novelist and current president of the Writers Union of the German Democratic Republic (GDR or East Germany, discusses his own work, literary developments since 1949 in the GDR, and the changing concept of socialist realism. Central to all of these topics is the role of the writer and the function of literature in a socialist system, a question which resulted in a heated controversy during the summer and fall of 1979 in the GDR. The crux of the matter lies in the nature of Marxist theory and is at least as old as the Sickingen debate of 1859, when Marx, Engels and Lassalle discussed the kind of literature that the fledgling socialist movement should encourage in order to promote the building of a future communist society. The question of the role of the author and the function of literature has reappeared since that time in various forms—in the formulation of the concept of socialist realism in the 1930's by Gorki and Soviet Party Secretary Zhadanov, in the formalism debates of the 1950's, in the dictates of the Bitterfelder Way (1960's, and in the liberalizing influence of the proclamations of the Eighth Party Congress in 1971. Since the Ninth Party Congress (May 1976, the controversy has become a critical matter in the cultural policies of the GDR, a country where literature is considered an important political tool. Hermann Kant, in the tradition of the Eighth and Ninth Party Congresses, presents in this interview a broad interpretation of the concept of socialist realism, while at the same time strongly emphasizing the responsibility of the author vis à vis the socialist society. He questions whether too much rapid change can be beneficial for East Germany, and suggests that both tolerance and caution are required.

  4. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 2: survey of North American schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, G H; Spafford, M M; Bohr, J D

    2001-01-01

    veterinary admissions interview is similar to that employed by schools of medicine, optometry, and dentistry, with the exception that veterinary schools are more likely to use panel interviews, to fix the interview weight in selection decisions, and to employ a cold or blind interview (these differences provide an opportunity to increase interview reliability and validity). Interview reliability and validity can be further improved by increasing interviewer training and interview structure, ensuring that the interview's format is consistent with its purpose, and identifying behavioral characteristics that are consistent with successful practice.

  5. Attachment Representations and Early Interactions in Drug Addicted Mothers: A Case Study of Four Women with Distinct Adult Attachment Interview Classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porreca, Alessio; De Palo, Francesca; Simonelli, Alessandra; Capra, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is considered a major risk factor that can influence maternal functioning at multiple levels, leading to less optimal parental qualities and less positive interactive exchanges in mother-child dyads. Moreover, drug abusers often report negative or traumatic attachment representations regarding their own childhood. These representations might affect, to some extent, later relational and developmental outcomes of their children. This study explored whether the development of dyadic interactions in addicted women differed based on attachment status. The longitudinal ongoing of mother-child emotional exchanges was assessed among four mothers with four different attachment statuses (F-autonomous, E-preoccupied, Ds-dismissing, and U-unresolved/with losses). Attachment representations were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview (George et al., 1985), while mother-child interactions were evaluated longitudinally during videotaped play sessions, through the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen, 2008). As expected, the dyad with the autonomous mother showed better interactive functioning during play despite the condition of drug-abuse; the mother proved to be more affectively positive, sensitive, and responsive, while her baby showed a better organization of affects and behaviors. On the other side, insecure mothers seemed to experience more difficulties when interacting with their children showing inconsistency in the ability to perceive and respond to their babies' signals. Finally, children of insecure mothers showed less clear affects and signals. While differences between secure and insecure dyads appeared clear, differences between insecure patterns where less linear, suggesting a possible mediating role played by other factors. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  6. Attachment representations and early interactions in drug addicted mothers: a case study of four women with distinct Adult Attachment Interview classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio ePorreca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is considered a major risk factor that can influence maternal functioning at multiple levels, leading to less optimal parental qualities and less positive interactive exchanges in mother-child dyads. Moreover, drug abusers often report negative or traumatic attachment representations regarding their own childhood. These representations might affect, to some extent, later relational and developmental outcomes of their children.This study explored whether the development of dyadic interactions in addicted women differed based on attachment status. The longitudinal ongoing of mother-child emotional exchanges was assessed among four mothers with four different attachment statuses (F-autonomous, E-preoccupied, Ds-dismissing and U-unresolved/with losses. Attachment representations were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview (George et al., 1985, while mother-child interactions were evaluated longitudinally during videotaped play sessions, through the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen, 2008.As expected, the dyad with the autonomous mother showed better interactive functioning during play despite the condition of drug-abuse; the mother proved to be more affectively positive, sensitive and responsive, while her baby showed a better organization of affects and behaviors. On the other side, insecure mothers seemed to experience more difficulties when interacting with their children showing inconsistency in the ability to perceive and respond to their babies' signals. Finally, children of insecure mothers showed less clear affects and signals. While differences between secure and insecure dyads appeared clear, differences between insecure patterns where less linear, suggesting a possible mediating role played by other factors. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. Video interview with Michael Dell

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Michael Dell, founder and presently Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Office of the DELL computer company visited CERN on Tuesday 26th January 2010. The Bulletin and the Video productions team had the opportunity to meet him. The video interview is transcribed for your convenience.   Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. What motivated you to come and visit CERN? I obviously heard about the great science and research has going on here, and DELL is very pleased to be a partner and providing a lot of the computers to analyse the data and I really wanted to see for myself in person, some of the great science that is going on here. What is your view on fundamental research in IT, and in general? I think if you look at the field of science in the last hundred years, we have been able to solve a lot of problems, but there are still lots of unsolved problems and unsolved mysteries. And it is only through basic fundamental research that we will address these probl...

  8. A Videotaped Self-Modelling and Self-Monitoring Treatment Program to Decrease Off-Task Behaviour in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Catherine; Cole, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The value of a videotaped self-modelling and self-monitoring treatment program was investigated in the present study. The focus was the effect of the treatment program on the off-task classroom behaviour of 3 male children with autism. The participants were aged between 9 and 11 years. Two of the children were described as severely autistic and…

  9. The efficacy of videotape feedback for enhancing the effects of exposure-based treatment for social anxiety disorder: A controlled investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Powers, M.B.; Buxkamper, R.; Telch, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Correcting patients' faulty beliefs concerning social evaluative threats is the hallmark of cognitive-behavioral treatment of social anxiety disorder. The current study examined the efficacy of two videotape feedback procedures as adjuncts to exposure-based treatment. Participants suffering from

  10. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  11. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  12. Influence of gender on outcomes of medication-history interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, D A; Ranelli, P L; Ried, L D

    1996-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of patient and provider gender on the outcomes of medication-history interviewing. In a previous study, 112 pharmacy students conducted medication-history interviews with 2 simulated patients. A secondary analysis was accomplished using complete data from 85 of the original 112 pharmacy students. The other 27 students were eliminated because of missing data. Factor analysis and canonical correlation were used to assess associations between the prior study's set of predictor variables and measures of interview completeness and patient satisfaction with the interview. Female and male pharmacy students appear to use different expressive, interactive, and interrogative skills. Allergy-asking was more complete when female pharmacy students interviewed a male patient. Emotive patient satisfaction was found to be associated more positively with a female student and female patient while teleological patient satisfaction between a male student and male patient was nearly double the result of the female-female dyad. Medication-history interview outcomes appear to differ as a consequence of the use of different sets of skills during same-sex or opposite-sex interviews.

  13. Comprehension and Engagement in Survey Interviews with Virtual Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick eConrad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how an onscreen virtual agent's dialog capability and facial animation affect survey respondents' comprehension and engagement in face-to-face interviews, using questions from US government surveys whose results have far-reaching impact on national policies. In the study, 73 laboratory participants were randomly assigned to respond in one of four interviewing conditions, in which the virtual agent had either high or low dialog capability (implemented through Wizard of Oz and high or low facial animation, based on motion capture from a human interviewer. Respondents, whose faces were visible to the Wizard (and videorecorded during the interviews, answered 12 questions about housing, employment, and purchases on the basis of fictional scenarios designed to allow measurement of comprehension accuracy, defined as the fit between responses and US government definitions. Respondents answered more accurately with the high-dialog-capability agents, requesting clarification more often particularly for ambiguous scenarios; and they generally treated the high-dialog-capability interviewers more socially, looking at the interviewer more and judging high-dialog-capability agents as more personal and less distant. Greater interviewer facial animation did not affect response accuracy, but it led to more displays of engagement—acknowledgements (verbal and visual and smiles—and to the virtual interviewer's being rated as less natural. The pattern of results suggests that a virtual agent’s dialog capability and facial animation differently affect survey respondents' experience of interviews, behavioral displays, and comprehension, and thus the accuracy of their responses. The pattern of results also suggests design considerations for building survey interviewing agents, which may differ depending on the kinds of survey questions (sensitive or not that are asked.

  14. Motivational interviewing: a useful approach to improving cardiovascular health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R; Chair, Sek Y; Chan, Sally W; Astin, Felicity; Davidson, Patricia M; Ski, Chantal F

    2011-05-01

    To review and synthesise, systematically, the research findings regarding motivational interviewing and to inform education, research and practice in relation to cardiovascular health. Motivational interviewing is designed to engage ambivalent or resistant clients in the process of health behaviour change, and it has been widely used in different clinical conditions such as substance abuse, dietary adherence and smoking cessation. Motivational interviewing has also been proposed as a method for improving modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors of patients. Systematic review. Eligible studies published in 1999-2009 were identified from the following databases: CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, Web of Science, Embase and British Nursing Index. A manual search was conducted of bibliographies of the identified studies and relevant journals. Two researchers independently reviewed the studies. Four meta-analyses, one systematic review and three literature reviews of motivational interviewing and five primary studies of motivational interviewing pertaining to cardiovascular health were identified. Despite a dearth of primary studies in cardiovascular health settings, there appears to be strong evidence that motivational interviewing is an effective approach focusing on eliciting the person's intrinsic motivation for change of behaviour. Motivational interviewing is an effective approach to changing behaviour. It offers promise in improving cardiovascular health status. This review indicates that motivational interviewing is a useful method to help nurses improve health behaviour in people with coronary risk factors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 3: strategies for increasing interview validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert E; van Walsum, Kimberly L; Spafford, Marlee M; Edwards, Janine C; Turnwald, Grant H

    2004-01-01

    The veterinary school admission interview is a widely used selection tool, yet concerns persist about its reliability, validity, and cost. Relative to medicine, optometry, and dentistry schools, veterinary schools have been more likely to conduct panel interviews and to fix the interview's weight in selection decisions, strategies that increase interview validity. This article provides strategies for further increasing the veterinary school interview's validity. Interview reliability and validity studies point to key strategies the veterinary school admissions committee can implement before the interview: (1) establishing the interview's purpose(s); (2) conducting a "job" analysis to identify desirable candidate skills, knowledge, and attributes; (3) developing a structured and panel interview where interviewers, if possible, are blind to other admission data; (4) training interviewers; (5) setting a reasonable interview schedule; and (6) determining methods for analyzing applicant data. During the interview, interviewers should proceed through a structured series of steps: (1) open the interview with a specified agenda; (2) probe for information using structured questions and anchored rating scales; (3) close the interview to allow for candidate questions; and (4) evaluate the interview data. After the interview, the admissions committee should (1) analyze the interview data within and across interviewers and (2) analyze the data across all selection tools in order to assign relative weights to the selection tools.

  16. The MLA Interview: The Department's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Dianne F.

    1999-01-01

    Offers advice about interviewing at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention: practice or rehearse issues; allow enthusiasm about teaching to show; model good teaching practices in the interview; and listen thoughtfully and resist the temptation to talk too much. (RS)

  17. Are Employment Interview Skills "That" Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Vickey

    1977-01-01

    Based on interviews with employers of alumni from a vocational-technical school, instructors discuss the importance of an employment interview, stressing composure, preparation, appropriate business-like attire, importance of a resume, and personality and attitude. (TA)

  18. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  19. Interpersonal Stance in Conflict Conversation: Police Interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn

    2013-01-01

    In this work we focus on the dynamics of the conflict that often arises in a police interview between suspects and police officers. Police interviews are a special type of social encounter, primarily because of the authority role of the police interviewer and the often uncooperative stance that the

  20. An Interview with Jose Eustaquio Romao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordao, Clarissa Menezes

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of the European Union (EU) Year of Intercultural Dialogue, 2008, Clarissa Menezes Jordao interviewed Jose Eustaquio Romao, Director of the Paulo Freire Institute in Brazil. Her edited translation of that interview is presented here. In the interview Romao, guided by the legacy of Brazilian educator, Paulo Freire, discusses the…

  1. Impact of Repeated Questioning on Interviewers: Learning From a Forensic Interview Training Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Jacquelynn F; Cheung, Monit

    2016-01-01

    Forensic interviewers have a difficult job with high risk for career burnout and secondary trauma. Few studies have addressed how new forensic interviewers or trainees experience repeated questioning and multiple interviews. This study simulated the process of training new forensic interviewers through the creation of two interview videos in which social work graduate students participated as actors portraying the roles of interviewer and child. These films served as instructional aids preparing graduate social work students for professional child welfare roles while promoting research-based approaches to interviewing children about sexual abuse allegations. Qualitative data from two cohorts of student actors were collected to analyze interviewers' perspectives on repeated questioning and interviews in child sexual abuse cases. Two themes were extracted from the subjects' experiences: "It is emotionally taxing" and "Navigating the interviewer role is unexpectedly complex." Exposure to repeated questions and multiple interviews affected the performance and confidence of the interviewers.

  2. Interviews with employed people with mobility impairments and limitations: environmental supports impacting work acquisition and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lindsey C; Gottlieb, Meghan; Morgan, Kerri A; Gray, David B

    2014-01-01

    Less than 40% of people with disabilities work. Many studies have detailed the barriers to employment but few have examined the work experiences of those who are employed. A description of work conditions valued by a specific segment of employed people with disabilities is provided. Videotaped interviews of 33 successfully employed people with mobility impairments and limitations (PWMIL) were transcribed and analyzed to gather their perspectives on their work social and physical environments. Finding work was facilitated by family, friends and other social networks, vocational services, and prior education. Doing volunteer work, spending time at a paid and unpaid internship, and part-time work experiences were important aspects of job acquisition. Exterior and interior physical features were or had been made accessible. Expensive assistive technologies were paid for by the employee and their health insurance. Almost all personal assistance was provided by family, friends and co-workers. Work satisfaction included having a supportive employer, supportive co-workers, and flexible worksite policies. The interviews of employed PWMIL provide prospective employers and employees information on important social and physical work features that are needed to improve the possibilities for hiring people with disabilities and facilitating their successful careers.

  3. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schober, Michael F; Conrad, Frederick G; Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    ..., administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews...

  4. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    ... affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types...

  5. Profile Interview: Prof. Stephen Gordon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The other half of my upbringing was in Northern Ireland. My father was a CCAP minister at one time but my parents chose to send me to a Catholic school. In Northern Ireland, you ... and Catholics, or two different tribes. So, I learned that working to ... The reason for that was that my first piece of research was surrounding the ...

  6. Evaluating internet interviews with gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Russel; Mewse, Avril J

    2009-04-01

    In this article we describe the use of the Internet to conduct online synchronous interviews on gay men's experiences of Internet sex-seeking and barebacking, using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). We then present the results of a separate IPA of the issues we encountered during the research. The analysis is focused around four superordinate themes: positive experience, technological issues, boundaries, and requests/expectations. We argue that online qualitative research is valuable in its own right, and that the advantages considerably outweigh the difficulties. This is particularly true in accessing individuals who might not participate in other types of research settings to discuss experiences that would otherwise be too difficult to talk about. Several issues that are problematic in more conventional research still apply, albeit in a different guise, but these must be situated in the context of who or what is being researched, and why, and can be largely overcome with more creative methodologies and considered preparation.

  7. Interview with Albert Ziegler about Gifted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Tascilar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Albert Ziegler is the chair of Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg and one of the most productive and cited academicians in gifted education in Europe and also all over the world. Prof. Ziegler has contributed different theories about gifted education and education in general. One of his well-known theories is The Actiotope Model of Giftedness and the 7-Step-Cycle of Self-Regulated Learning. Since last year I had the chance to be with him and his colleagues in Germany, thus I decided to share with you the interview that we had about his theories and his recommendations for Turkey.

  8. Ethnic Minorities' Impression Management in the Interview: Helping or Hindering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derous, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural impression management (IM) has not been considered much, which is remarkable given the fast rate at which the labor market is becoming multicultural. This study investigated whether ethnic minorities and majorities differed in their preference for IM-tactics and how this affected ethnic minorities' interview outcomes. A preliminary study (focus groups/survey) showed that ethnic minorities (i.e., Arab/Moroccans) preferred 'entitlements' whereas majorities (i.e., Flemish/Belgians) preferred 'opinion conformity' as IM-tactics. An experimental follow-up study among 163 ethnic majority raters showed no main effect of IM-tactics on interview ratings. Ethnic minorities' use of IM-tactics only affected interview ratings if rater characteristics were considered. Specifically, interview ratings were higher when ethnic minorities used opinion conformity (i.e., majority-preferred IM-tactic) and lower when minorities used entitlements (i.e., minority-preferred IM-tactic) if recruiters were high in social dominance orientation, and when they felt more experienced/proficient with interviewing. IM-tactics are a human capital factor that might help applicants to increase their job chances on the labor market. It is concluded that ethnic minority applicants' preferences for certain IM-tactics might lead to bias even in structured interview settings, but that this depends on ethnic majority recruiters' interview experience and ingroup/outgroup attitudes. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  9. Ethnic Minorities’ Impression Management in the Interview: Helping or Hindering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derous, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural impression management (IM) has not been considered much, which is remarkable given the fast rate at which the labor market is becoming multicultural. This study investigated whether ethnic minorities and majorities differed in their preference for IM-tactics and how this affected ethnic minorities’ interview outcomes. A preliminary study (focus groups/survey) showed that ethnic minorities (i.e., Arab/Moroccans) preferred ‘entitlements’ whereas majorities (i.e., Flemish/Belgians) preferred ‘opinion conformity’ as IM-tactics. An experimental follow-up study among 163 ethnic majority raters showed no main effect of IM-tactics on interview ratings. Ethnic minorities’ use of IM-tactics only affected interview ratings if rater characteristics were considered. Specifically, interview ratings were higher when ethnic minorities used opinion conformity (i.e., majority-preferred IM-tactic) and lower when minorities used entitlements (i.e., minority-preferred IM-tactic) if recruiters were high in social dominance orientation, and when they felt more experienced/proficient with interviewing. IM-tactics are a human capital factor that might help applicants to increase their job chances on the labor market. It is concluded that ethnic minority applicants’ preferences for certain IM-tactics might lead to bias even in structured interview settings, but that this depends on ethnic majority recruiters’ interview experience and ingroup/outgroup attitudes. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:28203211

  10. Eight Issues to Think About Before Interviewing Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Kuehne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on my personal experience and understanding of conducting research interviews with farmers. It incorporates ethnographic fiction—an approach to writing that is based on first-hand accounts—to examine some of the issues that researchers might think about before interviewing farmers. Research interviews with farmers are unique events because farmers are a sub-cultural group located in a particular landscape, which means that they have quite different experiences, behaviors, and motivations to academic researchers. It is hard to build an understanding of conducting research interviews with farmers other than by doing them. The article focuses on what, for me, were the eight most important issues around interviewing farmers that I had to grapple with. Discussing these issues may add to potential interviewers' understanding of some of the issues with farmer interviews and result in improved interaction and co-operation with them. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1602205

  11. Evaluation of an interviewer as a function of interviewer gaze, reinforcement of subject gaze, and interviewer attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinke, C L; Staneski, R A; Berger, D E

    1975-01-01

    Male subjects were interviewed by female interviewers who gazed constantly, intermittently, or not at all. Experimental subjects were reinforced with green light feedback whenever they gazed at the interviewers and were punished with red light feedback when they averted gaze for more than 6 seconds. Control subjects received noncontingent green and red light feedback. Although gaze of experimental subjects toward the interviewers was increased significantly, their attitudes toward the interviewers remained the same. This was probably because the subjects did not discriminate that their gazing behavior had changed. Subjects gave the most unfavorable reactions to the nongazing interviewers, rating them as least attractive, giving them the shortest answers, and sitting farthest from them during the debriefing session. Subjects did not discriminate between high and low attractive interviewers, except that the latter were rated disproportionately low on attentiveness if they did not gaze. Interviewers with high rates of talking were preferred over interviewers with low rates of talking. It was concluded that interpersonal attraction is related to gaze and physical attractiveness through a number of mediating variables which will have to be isolated more specifically in future research.

  12. Doing it Differently: Engaging Interview Participants with Imaginative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We will discuss how the first author successfully used imaginative variation in this way in her study of the erotic experience of bondage, discipline, dominance and submission, and sadism and masochism (BDSM), before considering the usefulness of this technique when applied to areas of study beyond human sexuality.

  13. SIGNAL (Structured Interview Guide, Navy Apprentice Locator): A Structured Interview Protocol to Improve the Placement of Naval Shipyard Apprentices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    lecturette, also, on such errors as: 4. Primacy / recency --rating candidates seen earlier in interviewing process differ- ently than those seen later, or...placement of apprentices? 5 8. How effective is the "job fair"? 9. Is there anything else we could be doing to better match people to the job? 10. What...additional sites had the effect of confirming the content validity of the dimensions 6 covered by the interview and the appropriateness of the

  14. Exploratory Assessments of Child Abuse: Children's Responses to Interviewer's Questions across Multiple Interview Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tess; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study extends field research on interviews with young children suspected of having been abused by examining multiple assessment interviews designed to be inquisitory and exploratory, rather than formal evidential or forensic interviews. Methods: Sixty-six interviews with 24 children between the ages of 3 and 6 years who were…

  15. Enhancing motivational interviewing training in a family medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Stacey; WinklerPrins, Vincent; Serrano, Adriana; Talisman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among patients in the healthcare system, traditional medical training involves little or no exposure to effective behavior change techniques such as Motivational Interviewing. An online learning community for enhanced training in Motivational Interviewing was developed for 3rd-year medical students. The website included educational materials about Motivational Interviewing as well as problematic health behaviors, a repository of exemplar videos and student videos with feedback, and a discussion board. Student participants were given the opportunity to record an encounter with a patient and to receive feedback on their use of Motivational Interviewing from a faculty member. Student volunteers in the Family Medicine Clerkship at Georgetown University School of Medicine were randomized to enhanced training, which included the online learning community, or training as usual. All student volunteers completed a questionnaire assessing self-efficacy initially and at the end of the clerkship. Students also participated in an Observed Structured Clinical Exam, which was subsequently coded by a blinded rater for behavioral counts of Motivational Interviewing techniques, key steps in Motivational Interviewing, and overall Motivational Interviewing style. Students in the enhanced training arm were rated as having significantly higher scores in Motivational Interviewing style in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam than training as usual students. A significant increase in self-efficacy from pre- to posttest in the overall sample was observed but between-group differences were not significant. Student feedback was particularly positive regarding video recorded practice sessions with patients and individualized feedback. The results of this study as well as student feedback suggest that future work should include patient practice sessions and individualized feedback in developing Motivational Interviewing curricula.

  16. What does the multiple mini interview have to offer over the panel interview?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Pau

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper compares the panel interview (PI performance with the multiple mini interview (MMI performance and indication of behavioural concerns of a sample of medical school applicants. The acceptability of the MMI was also assessed. Materials and methods: All applicants shortlisted for a PI were invited to an MMI. Applicants attended a 30-min PI with two faculty interviewers followed by an MMI consisting of ten 8-min stations. Applicants were assessed on their performance at each MMI station by one faculty. The interviewer also indicated if they perceived the applicant to be a concern. Finally, applicants completed an acceptability questionnaire. Results: From the analysis of 133 (75.1% completed MMI scoresheets, the MMI scores correlated statistically significantly with the PI scores (r=0.438, p=0.001. Both were not statistically associated with sex, age, race, or pre-university academic ability to any significance. Applicants assessed as a concern at two or more stations performed statistically significantly less well at the MMI when compared with those who were assessed as a concern at one station or none at all. However, there was no association with PI performance. Acceptability scores were generally high, and comparison of mean scores for each of the acceptability questionnaire items did not show statistically significant differences between sex and race categories. Conclusions: Although PI and MMI performances are correlated, the MMI may have the added advantage of more objectively generating multiple impressions of the applicant's interpersonal skill, thoughtfulness, and general demeanour. Results of the present study indicated that the MMI is acceptable in a multicultural context.

  17. An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltis, Brooke B; Powell, Martine B; Snow, Pamela C; Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn H

    2010-06-01

    This study compared the effects of open-ended versus specific questions, and various types of open-ended questions, in eliciting story-grammar detail in child abuse interviews. The sample included 34 police interviews with child witnesses aged 5-15 years (M age=9 years, 9 months). The interviewers' questions and their relative sub-types were classified according to definitions reported in the child interview training literature. The children's responses were classified according to the proportion of story grammar and the prevalence of individual story grammar elements as defined by Stein and Glenn (1979). Open-ended questions were more effective at eliciting story grammar than specific questions. This finding was revealed across three age groups, two interview phases and irrespective of how question effectiveness was measured. However, not all types of open-ended questions were equally effective. Open-ended questions that encouraged a broad response, or asked the child to elaborate on a part of their account, elicited more story-grammar detail compared to open-ended questions that requested clarification of concepts or descriptions of the next (or another) activity or detail within a sequence. This study demonstrates that children's ability to provide story-grammar detail is maximised when there is minimal prompting from the interviewer. Given the association between story grammar production and victim credibility, greater guidance is warranted in interviewer training programs in relation to the effects and administration of different types of open-ended questions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  19. Plant Reproduction. Plant Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Plants are vital to all other life on this planet - without them, there would be no food, shelter or oxygen. Luckily, over millions of years plants have developed many different features in order to survive and reproduce. In Plant Reproduction, students will discover that primitive mosses and algae are dependent upon water for their reproduction.…

  20. Chalk, Talk, and Videotape: Utilizing Ken Burns's Television Histories in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the career of Ken Burns, creator of historical documentaries for television and a popular historian. Examines his technique in creating documentaries, such as his use of style and the incorporation of biography. Discusses the differences between professional and popular history. (CMK)

  1. An Oral History Interview with MICHAEL M. CERNEA (interviewer: Judith Freidenberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAEL M. CERNEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The editors and editorial board of Human Organization are pleased to introduce readers to the following oral history interview with Michael M. Cernea, a development social scientist who has militated throughout his academic career and applied work for "putting people first", in the forefront of development projects and policies. Working for a long time for the promotion of anthropological and sociological knowledge, either in the activities of the World Bank or in the policies and programs of governments of both developed and developing countries, Dr. Cernea cleared pathways for applied social science that are sure to benefit people in development settings for many years to come. Undoubtedly many readers already know Dr. Cernea's work well, especially those of us who teach the anthropology of development or work in applied settings and organizations, but this interview embeds his broad body of work into a personal, human, and at times tragic context that opens with brushes with death, Nazi brutality, and exile. It also provides valuable insights for carrying out the work of development anthropologists within large-scale organizations and governments.This interview with Dr. Cernea was conducted by Dr. Judith Freidenberg, of the University of Maryland, on June 30, 2003, for the Society for Applied Anthropology Oral History Project, headquartered at the University of Kentucky Libraries. This Project aims to create, through the vehicle of oral histories, a record of the life, activities and experiences of number of selected scholars-anthropologists who devoted a great part of their scientific work to research, to applied work in different settings, to inducing development, including to hands-on work on crafting public social policies and actual development programs. The present transcript of the interview was reviewed by both participants for editorial purposes. Michael M. Cernea expanded some of his oral responses, for historical accuracy or to add

  2. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  4. Interview at the level of the signifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2012-01-01

    The research strategy interview at the level of the signifier was developed in relation to a qualitative interview project into cross-cultural encounters temporarily and spatially framed by academic organizational settings. The research interest is gender and ethnicity. However, neither happens all...

  5. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  6. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  7. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  8. An Interview Method for Teaching Adolescent Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching adolescent psychology which requires that students interview adolescents on course topics. The reports of these interviews become the basis of classroom discussions which are designed to demonstrate that concepts of adolescence vary as a function of time. (Author/DH)

  9. Interviewing Child Witnesses: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywitz, Karen; Camparo, Lorinda

    1998-01-01

    Reviews suggestions derived from the clinical and experimental literatures for interviewing child witnesses to abuse. Guidelines for questioning children are provided and phases of a forensic interview are outlined in a step-by-step fashion. The suggestions presented highlight a developmental perspective designed to facilitate children's memory…

  10. The Reference Interview: Impact of Environmental Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    This paper develops two models of the reference interview: (1) the Need-Oriented Model, which emphasizes identifying the client's information needs and allows for a broad-ranging diagnostic interview; and (2) the Question-Oriented Model, which is constrained by the client's initial question and focuses on refining that specific question,…

  11. Manual for the Employability Maturity Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Richard; Bolton, Brian

    The Employability Maturity Interview (EMI) is a 10-item structured interview developed to assess readiness for the vocational rehabilitation planning process and the need for additional vocational exploration and employability services. The items deal with occupational choice, self-appraisal of abilities, self-appraisal of personality…

  12. Structured Clinical Interviews and the Inferential Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigh, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews history of psychiatric nosology and the use of interview data as a vehicle for formulating clinical inferences. Focuses on qualities of structured interviews as well as procedures for constructing these indices and methods for establishing their psychometric properties. Reviews practical and theoretical limitations relating to formal…

  13. Involving, Sharing, Analysing—Potential of the Participatory Photo Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Kolb

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the photo interview method used in a participatory inter- and transdisciplinary research setting. The photo interview has proven particularly useful for sustainability and environmental studies in which eliciting community points of view is crucial to the research effort. Based on experiences in several countries, the author describes and analyses the photo interview process and its three phases—involving, sharing and analysing—and explores potential influences on data quality. In the first phase, researchers use the photo interview method to involve community residents from different levels of society in the research process. In the second phase, the photo interview method encourages community residents and scientists to share insights and perspectives and to partner in developing a common understanding of local structures, processes, and possible solutions. In the third phase, the photo interview method allows researchers to analyse visual and textual data as a representation of a local societal context. In decoding images, researchers ground the analysis in subjective perspectives, use residents' visual codes along with other methods to further analyse community data, and explore the wider societal context in which the study is embedded. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0803127

  14. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  15. Training in motivational interviewing in obstetrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina L; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a three day training course in motivational interviewing which is an approach to helping people to change could improve the communication skills of obstetric healthcare professionals in their interaction with obese pregnant women. DESIGN: Intervention study. SETTING......: The Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: Eleven obstetric healthcare professionals working with obese pregnant women underwent a three day course in motivational interviewing techniques and were assessed before- and after training to measure the impact on their overall performance as well as the effect...... on specific behavioral techniques observed during interviews. FINDINGS: With a few exceptions, the participants changed their behavior appropriate to the motivational interviewing technique. The participants made more interventions towards the principles of motivational interviewing (adherent and non...

  16. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  17. Skype interviewing: The new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksana Janghorban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  18. Short Report: Students' perception of different teaching aids in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical teachers have conventionally been using different teaching methods to educate medical students previously dominated by blackboard and slide projectors. More recently audiovisual aids such as videotapes and multimedia have been introduced. Critics of multimedia feel that it is expensive, too time consuming, ...

  19. Analysing the significance of silence in qualitative interviewing: questioning and shifting power relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Tea Torbenfeldt; Fynbo, Lars

    2017-01-01

    In this article we analyse the significance of silence in qualitative interviews with 36 individuals interviewed about high-risk, illegal activities. We describe how silence expresses a dynamic power relationship between interviewer and interviewee. In the analysis, we focus on two different type...

  20. Dynamics of Forensic Interviews with Suspected Abuse Victims Who Do Not Disclose Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkowitz, Irit; Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.; Sternberg, Kathleen J.; Horowitz, Dvora

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was designed to explore structural differences between forensic interviews in which children made allegations and those in which children did not make allegations. Methodology: Fifty forensic interviews of 4- to 13-year-old suspected victims of abuse who did not disclose abuse during the interview were compared with…

  1. Reliability and validity of videotaped functional performance tests in ACL-injured subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Porat, Anette; Holmström, Eva; Roos, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    during five functional tests in subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. METHOD: Twelve ACL-injured men, mean age 40 years, were video filmed before and after 12 weeks of knee-specific training when performing five different functional tests: walking, knee bending, step activity......, crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop. The videos were observed by four physiotherapists, and the knee movement pattern quality, a feature of the loading strategy of the lower extremity, was scored on an 11-point rating scale. To assess the criterion validity, the observational rating was correlated...... validity found indicate that the knee movement pattern quality in ACL-injured subjects can be determined by visual observation of more demanding functional tests such as crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop for distance....

  2. Virtual Team and Trust Relationship: Focus Group Interviews in Multimedia Super Corridor Status Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Norizah Aripin; Hasrina Mustafa; Adnan Hussein

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the trust relationship in virtual teams in Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC) status companies. The study used qualitative method that is phenomenology approach through focus group interviews. In-depth interview were also used with semi-structured and openended questions. The interviews involved six staffs at different position in virtual team (two team leaders, and four team members). The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed according to the thematic ana...

  3. Instructional Quality Features in Videotaped Biology Lessons: Content-Independent Description of Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfner, Tobias; Förtsch, Christian; Boone, William; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2017-09-01

    A number of studies on single instructional quality features have been reported for mathematics and science instruction. For summarizing single instructional quality features, researchers have created a model of three basic dimensions (classroom management, supportive climate, and cognitive activation) of instructional quality mainly through observing mathematics instruction. Considering this model as valid for all subjects and as usable for describing instruction, we used it in this study which aimed to analyze characteristics of instructional quality in biology lessons of high-achieving and low-achieving classes, independently of content. Therefore, we used the data of three different previous video studies of biology instruction conducted in Germany. From each video study, we selected three high-achieving and three low-achieving classes (N = 18 teachers; 35 videos) for our multiple-case study, in which conspicuous characteristics of instructional quality features were qualitatively identified and qualitatively analyzed. The amount of these characteristics was counted in a quantitative way in all the videos. The characteristics we found could be categorized using the model of three basic dimensions of instructional quality despite some subject-specific differences for biology instruction. Our results revealed that many more characteristics were observable in high-achieving classes than in low-achieving classes. Thus, we believe that this model could be used to describe biology instruction independently of the content. We also make the claims about the qualities for biology instruction—working with concentration in a content-structured environment, getting challenged in higher order thinking, and getting praised for performance—that could have positive influence on students' achievement.

  4. Elements of programming interviews the insider's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, Adnan; Prakash, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This is a larger-format version of Elements of Programming Interviews. The language is C++. Specifically, the font size is larger, and the page size is 7"x10" (the regular format uses 6"x9"). The content is identical. Have you ever... Wanted to work at an exciting futuristic company? Struggled with an interview problem that could have been solved in 15 minutes? Wished you could study real-world computing problems? If so, you need to read Elements of Programming Interviews (EPI). EPI is your comprehensive guide to interviewing for software development roles. The core of EPI is a collection of over 250 problems with detailed solutions. The problems are representative of interview questions asked at leading software companies. The problems are illustrated with 200 figures, 300 tested programs, and 150 additional variants. The book begins with a summary of the nontechnical aspects of interviewing, such as strategies for a great interview, common mistakes, perspectives from the other side of the table,...

  5. Self-Reported Current Practices in Child Forensic Interviewing: Training, Tools, and Pre-Interview Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Jillian Rowback; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2017-05-01

    In child sexual abuse investigations, forensic interviewers within the Child Advocacy Center (CAC) model serve as neutral fact-finders for a team of professionals tasked with investigating and intervening in cases of alleged child sexual abuse. Although empirical evidence has led to the development of best-practice techniques and protocols, there is currently no universally adopted protocol in the field. The present research gathered detailed information from a national sample of real-world child forensic interviewers about their training and current practices, with a specific focus on assessing the information interviewers typically review prior to conducting child forensic interviews. Most notably, the survey revealed a lack of uniformity in interviewing protocols adopted and pre-interview preparation practices. Although rare, some interviewers reported using an allegation-blind interviewing approach, highlighting the need for future research on this and other under-studied techniques. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Use of videotape to assess mobility in a controlled randomized crossover trial of physiotherapy in chronic multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Newcombe, R G; Fuller, K J; Jones, A; Price, M

    2003-05-01

    To determine to what degree assessment of mobility based on comparison of videotape recordings before and after courses of physiotherapy in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis (MS) is reliable, correlates with 'live' assessments and indicates benefit. Prospective data collection within a randomized crossover controlled trial of physiotherapy at home, as an outpatient, or 'no therapy' in 40 patients. Hospital outpatients: outpatient and home physiotherapy. Mobility change based on a comparison of short video recordings before and after each treatment period was scored independently by two physiotherapists blinded to therapy type and other measures of outcome. Scores were compared with changes in the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI) and other indices assessed by a physiotherapist in the patient's home. The two video observers agreed substantially on patient outcome. Changes in walking based on video correlated with RMI for home treatment (r = 0.41, p = 0.008) but not for hospital or no treatment periods (r = 0.14 and 0.15): video changes correlated with the 'live' assessor's global change score inconsistently ('no therapy' r = 0.48, p = 0.002, hospital r = 0.30, p = 0.06 and home r = 0.17, p = 0.30 treatment periods). Based on video data alone, improved mobility was evident following home therapy for only one observer but not for the other or the averaged scores of both. There was substantial agreement between two observers deciding on change in mobility based on independent blinded evaluation of short video sequences. However the correlations of these with 'live' assessments were variable. Physiotherapy had a less clear benefit on mobility based on video analysis alone compared with 'live' assessments. The study highlights the need for more objective measures of habitual mobility over longer periods.

  7. Pediatricians' affective communication behavior attenuates parents' stress response during the medical interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmiti, Marco; Hamed, Selei; Lauber-Biason, Anna; Wildhaber, Johannes; Pharisa, Cosette; Klumb, Petra L

    2017-03-01

    To investigate whether the medical interview in the pediatric context generates a stressful response in parents in form of heightened cortisol activity, and whether pediatricians' empathetic communication is able to attenuate this stress response. 68 parents were recruited at pediatric out-patient and in-patient consultations. Salivary samples were collected between 60 and 30min prior to the consultation, shortly before the consultation, 20min as well as 45min after the consultation. 19 pediatricians participated in the study and effectuated the medical visit as usual. We videotaped the consultations and coded pediatricians' affective communication using the RIAS and the Four Habits Coding Scheme. Parents' cortisol increased during the medical visit with a peak at 20min after the medical encounter. Furthermore, multilevel analysis revealed a lesser increase in parents' cortisol response associated with pediatricians' levels in supportive communication behaviors. As indicated by their humoral stress responses, the medical encounter was stressful for the parents. Pediatricians' affective communication modulated this stress response in that more supportive communication was related to smaller cortisol increases. Pediatricians' affective communication behavior during the medical visit can alleviate parents' distress and anxiety, representing a source of social and emotional support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ideas as art. Interview by Dane Cutu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, James G

    2006-10-01

    Three years ago, consultants Laurence Prusak and Thomas H. Davenport asked prominent management thinkers to name their gurus and reported the results in HBR. James G. March appeared on more lists than any other person except Peter Drucker. A professor emeritus in management, sociology, political science, and education at Stanford University, March has taught courses in subjects as diverse as organizational psychology, behavioral economics, leadership, rules for killing people, friendship, computer simulation, and statistics. He is perhaps best known for his pioneering contributions to organization and management theory. March's accomplishments in that field, and in many others, have conferred on him an almost unprecedented reputation as a rigorous scholar and a deep source of wisdom. As University of Chicago professor John Padgett wrote in the journal Contemporary Sociology, "March's influence, unlike that of any of his peers, is not limited to any possible subset of the social science disciplines; it is pervasive." March approaches thought aesthetically; he cares that ideas have "some form of elegance or grace or surprise." His poetic sensibility can be felt in the metaphors he has created over the years--the "garbage can theory" of organizational choice, for instance, and the "hot-stove effect" in learning. In this edited interview with HBR senior editor Diane Coutu, March shares his thinking on aesthetics, leadership, the role of folly, and the irrelevance of relevance when it comes to the pursuit of ideas. He also comments on the fundamental differences between academic and experiential knowledge, underscoring the need for both.

  9. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  10. The Child Attachment Interview: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privizzini, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Attachment theory promoted an impressive body of research on the psychic developmental processes, resulting in studies on both typical and atypical development. Much of the diffusion of the attachment theory in the clinical field was related to the design of reliable instruments to evaluate the organization of attachment in infancy as well as in adulthood. Until recently, the lack of a suitable instrument to assess attachment in middle childhood as well as in adolescence hindered the expansion of research in these developmental phases during which the parent-child relationship takes on a different, albeit still crucial, role. The Child Attachment Interview (CAI), a measure that was recently designed to assess attachment at a representational level in middle childhood and adolescence, filled the measurement gap. The aim of the current review was to summarize previous empirical investigations concerning CAI in order to (a) provide an overview of the state of current research, (b) identify unanswered questions, and (c) propose future research directions. A narrative review was conducted to map the current research findings by searching for the term "Child Attachment Interview" in the Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and PsychINFO databases, followed by a search in Mendeley. Limits were set to exclude dissertations, chapters in books, and qualitative or theoretical papers, while empirical studies were included if they used the CAI and were published in English language, peer-reviewed journals by July, 2016. The review, which ultimately included 39 studies meeting the criteria, showed that the CAI is a reliable instrument to assess attachment organization in clinical and non-clinical samples, thus providing a worthwhile contribution to the investigation of the influence of the parent-child relationship beyond infancy and early childhood. Nevertheless, the review pointed out a number of relevant open issues, the most critical of which concerned the CAI coding and

  11. Comparing appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to phone interviews in qualitative research on reproductive decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Despite an increasing use of qualitative email interviews by nurse researchers, there is little understanding about the appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to other qualitative data collection methods, especially on sensitive topics research. The purpose is to describe our procedures for completing asynchronous, email interviews and to evaluate the appropriateness and equivalency of email interviews to phone interviews in two qualitative research studies that examined reproductive decisions. Content analysis guided the methodological appraisal of appropriateness and equivalency of in-depth, asynchronous email interviews to single phone interviews. Appropriateness was determined by: (a) participants' willingness to engage in email or phone interviews, (b) completing data collection in a timely period, and (c) participants' satisfaction with the interview. Equivalency was evaluated by: (a) completeness of the interview data, and (b) insight obtained from the data. Of the combined sample in the two studies (N=71), 31% of participants chose to participate via an email interview over a phone interview. The time needed to complete the email interviews averaged 27 to 28days and the number of investigator probe-participant response interchanges was 4 to 5cycles on average. In contrast, the phone interviews averaged 59 to 61min in duration. Most participants in both the email and phone interviews reported they were satisfied or very satisfied with their ability to express their true feelings throughout the interview. Regarding equivalence, 100% of the email and phone interviews provided insight into decision processes. Although insightful, two of the email and one phone interview had short answers or, at times, underdeveloped responses. Participants' quotes and behaviors cited within four published articles, a novel evaluation of equivalency, revealed that 20% to 37.5% of the citations about decision processes were from email participants, which is

  12. Interviews with candidates for president transmitted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Gomes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In election years, television interviews with presidential candidates, broadcast live, i.e. without the use of editing, have become an important genre of journalistic representation in Brazilian political campaigns. These interviews are conducted in network studios by well-known Brazilian news anchors. The fact that these interviews are transmitted directly to the electorate in an unedited form is generally offered as a guarantee of a genuine, authentic portrayal of the candidates themselves. The present work proposes that live network candidate interviews, rather than a means of political presentation on television, are actually an arena in which the institution of journalism attempts to use rhetorical and argumentative means to control the candidates’ discourse without relying on the traditional advantages conferred in daily news coverage.

  13. Willem Hendrik Gispen--an interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, P R

    2013-11-05

    This text is based on three long interviews in Utrecht University's Faculty Club, and on almost 40 years of working together in the same city, the same department, the same university. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Reference Interview: Some Intercultural Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the significance of the reference interview and the need for better communication between Black students and White librarians. Sensitivity and understanding of Black behaviors are recommended as ways of building trust between librarians and students. (52 references) (MES)

  15. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  16. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  17. Interview with Science Education Pioneer Bob Yager

    OpenAIRE

    Stiles, John

    2016-01-01

    In a recent interview, Dr. Yager spoke about his participation in the changing field of science education, the challenges that still persist in implementing exemplary science teaching, STEM Education and his views on the current science education standards.

  18. The impact of using peer interviewers in a study of patient empowerment amongst people in cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Clara R; Eskildsen, Nanna B; Thomsen, Thora G

    2017-01-01

    to explore potential differences between interviews conducted by the researcher alone and interviews conducted jointly by the researcher and the peer interviewers. A phone evaluation of the peer interviews was carried out with the research participants, and notes were thematically analysed to understand...

  19. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  20. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  1. Twentyfourth Podcast - Interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Every wednesday the Doctoral School of Human Centred Informatics hosts a small research seminar, where PhD students and senior researchers can share and discuss their ongoing work. Today, we bring an interview from spring 2008. On February 27, Lars Holmgaard Christensen presented his paper "Homo ...... Performans - The Performative Turn". After the seminar, Thomas Ryberg and Anders Albrechtslund made an interview with Lars Holmgaard Christensen which is avaliable as podcast....

  2. Separating Interviewer and Sampling-Point Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Schnell; Frauke Kreuter

    2003-01-01

    "Data used in nationwide face-to-face surveys are almost always collected in multistage cluster samples. The relative homogeneity of the clusters selected in this way can lead to design effects at the sampling stage. Interviewers can further homogenize answers within the small geographic clusters that form the sampling points. The study presented here was designed to distinguish between interviewer effects and sampling-point effects using interpenetrated samples for conducting ...

  3. New Views on Logo and [An Interview with Seymour Papert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papert, Seymour; Reinhold, Fran

    1986-01-01

    Logo creator Seymour Papert discusses ways Logo can be improved to accommodate different learning styles and strengthen word processing and list processing capabilities. In an interview, Papert discusses computers' influences on learning, Logo's underlying concepts, teacher use of Logo, Logo's discovery learning approach, and development of Logo…

  4. Use of the SADS Diagnostic Interview in Evaluating Legal Insanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Richard; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined clinical usefulness of the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) diagnostic interview in evaluations of criminal responsibility. Findings, based on 78 evaluations from a forensic clinic, indicated that SADS successfully differentiated between sane and insane evaluatees. Differences were primarily in severity of symptoms…

  5. A test of the stranger-interviewer norm in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Mariano; Stecklov, Guy; Weinreb, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    We offer the first empirical test of the 'stranger-interviewer norm', according to which interviewers in social, demographic, and health surveys should be strangers-not personally familiar with respondents. We use data from an experimental survey in the Dominican Republic that featured three types of interviewer: from out of town (outsiders); local but unknown to the respondent (local-strangers); and local with a previous relationship to the respondent (insiders). We were able to validate answers to up to 18 questions per respondent, mainly by checking official documents in their possession. Contrary to expectations derived from the stranger-interviewer norm, respondents were more reluctant to show the documents needed for validation when the interviewer was an outsider. Furthermore, and again at odds with the stranger-interviewer norm, we found no difference in accuracy by type of interviewer. Our results have important implications for the selection of survey interviewers in less developed and non-Western settings.

  6. Interview with Datin Goh Suet Lan on Business Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nimehchisalem

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available I had the pleasure of meeting Datin Goh Suet Lan and one of the key members of her team, Mr Murali, in the Faculty of Modern Languages and Communication, Universiti Putra Malaysia with three of my colleagues, Associate Professor Dr Shamala Paramasivam (who initiated this meeting, Dr. Ilyana Binti Jalaluddin, and Dr. Ramiza Binti Darmi. At the end of this meeting, Datin graciously accepted the invitation for an E-mail interview, which is the result of what you are going to read here. The interview will show how it is possible to educate women who are the bread-winners of poverty-stricken families to work more wisely for a better living. In this interview, Datin, who is the president of an NGO called Women of Will (www.womenofwill.org.my, shares the insightful experiences she and her team have reaped in their journey of making a meaningful difference in their community.

  7. ISS Expedition 1 Crew Interviews: Sergei K. Krikalev

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Flight Engineer Sergei K. Krikalev is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Krikalev became a cosmonaut, the events that led to his interest, the transition from being an engineer to being selected as a Russian cosmonaut. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the first Expedition Crew, their scheduled docking with the International Space Station (ISS), making the ISS ready for human inhabitance, and all the specifics that will make his living arrangements difficult. Krikalev mentions his responsibilities during the much-anticipated two-day flight to the ISS, as well as the possibility of his space-walk. Krikalev also discusses the crew's first tasks upon entrance including other scheduled tasks for the first week, docking from cargo ships, and spacecraft delivering equipment or performing Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA). He explains his opinion of the implications of having human beings in space.

  8. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  9. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  10. Influence of medical school applicants' demographic and cognitive characteristics on interviewers' ratings of noncognitive traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D L; Martz, D M; Lancaster, C J; Sade, R M

    1995-06-01

    Interviews are commonly used to measure noncognitive traits of medical school applicants. The present study investigated the influence of knowledge of applicants' cognitive abilities on interviewers' ratings of noncognitive traits. Academic and demographic predictors of interview ratings of applicants' noncognitive traits were examined at the Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine during two years: 1992, when applicants' Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) total scores and undergraduate grade-point averages (GPAs) were available to interviewers; and 1993, when MCAT and GPA data were not available. In 1992, 226 applicants met study criteria (i.e., they received ratings from three interviewers in addition to having MCAT and GPA data on file); in 1993, 245 applicants met the criteria. Step-wise regression analyses were conducted to measure the influences of seven independent variables on applicants' interview ratings. Two-way analyses of variances and t-tests were used to determine the effects of gender of applicants and interviewers. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were used as measures of interviewers' reliability. GPA was the best predictor for both years but accounted for double the amount of variance in interview ratings in 1992 (15.7%) compared with 1993 (7.4%). The reliability coefficients for the interviewers were .496 for 1992 and .473 for 1993. If the goal of the medical school admission interview is to assess noncognitive traits independently from academic skills, the authors recommend that MCAT and GPA data not be available to interviewers during interviews. The authors also found that gender and race influenced interview ratings in accordance with affirmative-action goals. Finally, the authors found that interview scores were only moderately reliable across different interviewers. They discuss ways to increase their reliability.

  11. Assessing the value of structured protocols for forensic interviews of alleged child abuse victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Y; Hershkowitz, I; Lamb, M E; Sternberg, K J; Esplin, P W; Horowitz, D

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a structured interview protocol (NICHD Investigative Interview Protocol) operationalizing universally recommended guidelines for forensic interviews. The NICHD Investigative Protocol was designed to maximize the amount of information obtained using recall memory probes, which are likely to elicit more accurate information than recognition memory probes. Forensic investigators were trained to use the NICHD protocol while conducting feedback-monitored simulation interviews. The utility of the protocol was then evaluated by comparing 55 protocol interviews with 50 prior interviews by the same investigators, matched with respect to characteristics likely to affect the richness of the children's accounts. The comparison was based on an analysis of the investigators' utterance types, distribution, and timing, as well as quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the information produced. As predicted, protocol interviews contained more open-ended prompts overall as well as before the first option-posing utterance than non-protocol interviews did. More details were obtained using open-ended invitations and fewer were obtained using focused questions in protocol interviews than in non-protocol interviews, although the total number of details elicited did not differ significantly. In both conditions, older children provided more details than younger children did. The findings confirmed that implementation of professionally recommended practices affected the behavior of interviewers in both the pre-substantive and substantive phases of their interviews and enhanced the quality (i.e., likely accuracy) of information elicited from alleged victims.

  12. Traces of Traumatizations in Narrative Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Loch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic childhood experiences often lead to the development of dissociation as a defense mechanism, and subsequently to fragmented memories. In narrative interviews this fragmentation is traced in the expressive field of language. In this article a range of case studies are used to illustrate how dissociations, resulting from traumatic experiences in the past as well as the present, may express themselves and how we, as interviewers, can give support to the client in interview situations. Only by understanding the inconsistencies caused by these traumatic experiences, interviewees are able to tell their life histories beyond the collectively effective taboos. By becoming aware of these mechanisms, the researcher can steer clear of reproducing the socially relevant silencing effects, i.e. denial processes, within the context of social scientific research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801544

  13. So you Really Want to Interview Me?: Navigating “Sensitive” Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winsome Chunnu Brayda PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the qualitative interviewing techniques that the authors used to conduct their respective dissertation research in Jamaica and South Carolina. (The research in Jamaica examined the implementation of primary education policies. The research in South Carolina delved into the life history of Benner C. Turner, a controversial college president. Most of the literature about interviewing focuses on asking the right questions; in contrast, this article discusses the challenges of interviewing. In this article, selected interviews are used from both studies to examine the difficulties these researchers encountered when conducting “sensitive” interviews, the risks female researchers face in unfamiliar places, and the challenges of working in international settings (which requires interpersonal skills and cultural competency. While the task of research interviewing is complex, the authors provide ideas that can be used to navigate such moments.

  14. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  15. Interview med børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter.......Interview med børn handler om børneinterview i forbindelse med forskning. Bogen er tænkt som inspiration til og afsæt for metodiske refleksioner i forbindelse med inddragelse af børn som informanter....

  16. Photo-Interviewing to Explore Everyday Occupation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukhave, Elise Bromann; Huniche, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article sheds light on the potential and the limitations of photo-interviewing for the study of human occupation and in so doing, reflects the rapid growth in the use of participatory visual methods in a number of other disciplines. Using a study that explored first person perspecti......Abstract This article sheds light on the potential and the limitations of photo-interviewing for the study of human occupation and in so doing, reflects the rapid growth in the use of participatory visual methods in a number of other disciplines. Using a study that explored first person...

  17. Children's developmental characteristics in the forensic interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Children can be credible witnesses in court procedures given an adequately conducted forensic interview with them. This paper presents the most important features of a child's development (the cognitive and socioemotional development and the development of language and communication and from these features derives the specific guidelines for forensic interviews of children. Due to the frequent belief that children can be led to false witnessing and that they do not differentiate between reality and fantasy the topics of lying and suggestibility are also discussed. At the end some practical suggestions are given with recommendations for trainings of all professionals working with children that are potential witnesses.

  18. Creativity and Marketing: Interview With Marie Taillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Taillard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Dr. Taillard discusses her interest and ongoing research in the areas of marketing, consumer behaviour and creativity. She considers how academic training can be applied to a business context and describes the newly formed Creativity Marketing Centre at ESCP Europe. Exploring the multiple intersections between creativity and marketing represents not only a paradigmatic change for those interested in business and consumer behaviour but also for researchers of creativity who can start envisioning and studying consumption as a creative act. This interview will offer valuable points of reflection for all those interested to know more about this approach.

  19. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 1: literature overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, G H; Spafford, M M; Edwards, J C

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the admission interview used by schools in four health professions (veterinary medicine, allopathic medicine, optometry, and dentistry) portrays a largely similar approach to selection interviews: INTERVIEW USE: At least 80% of schools interview applicants. For schools that offer interviews, at least 40% of candidates are interviewed (a strong academic profile is the number one determinant of receiving an interview offer). The interview is one of the three most important selection tools used by schools. Less than 26% of schools fix the interview's weight in the selection process (fixed weights range from 31% to 35%). INTERVIEW PURPOSE AND CONTENT: The most common purposes of the interview are to (1) gather information, (2) make decisions, (3) verify information provided in other parts of the application, (4) recruit candidates, and/or (5) promote public relations. The most common characteristics and skills interviewers are interested in assessing are motivation for the profession, interpersonal skills, and communication skills. The desire to assess cognitive ability with the interview (>25% of schools) is surprising in view of the use of other selection tools (e.g., GPA). INTERVIEW FORMAT: Medical schools are more likely to offer two interviews per candidate, while optometry schools are more likely to offer one interview per candidate. Individual interviews (one interviewer, one candidate) are the predominant format among medical schools, while panel interviews (more than one interviewer, one candidate) are the most common format among optometry schools. The duration of the interview is 30 to 45 minutes. Interview questions most often address facts and knowledge, hypothetical situations, and the ability to meet program requirements. Most interviews do not meet the criteria for a structured interview, which has demonstrated greater validity and reliability than semi-structured or unstructured interviews. INTERVIEWERS: Interviewers are most likely to

  20. [Differences in subjective health, mental health, and health behavior among 11- to 17-year-olds at secondary schools in Germany : Results of the German health interview and examination survey for children and adolescents: first follow-up (KiGGS Wave 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhauer, Julia; Kuntz, Benjamin; Lampert, Thomas

    2018-02-22

    Social inequalities in health can already be found among children and adolescents to the disadvantage of socially deprived population groups. This paper aims to detect, whether differences in subjective health, mental health and health behavior among young people are due to the secondary school type attended and whether these associations exist independently of the family's socioeconomic position (SEP). The data basis was the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS Wave 1, 2009-2012). Data of 11- to 17-year-old girls and boys (n = 4665) who attend different types of secondary schools in Germany were analyzed. The dependent variables were self-rated health, findings of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for the detection of psychological abnormalities, as well as self-reported information regarding leisure sport, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. Prevalence and odds ratios (ORs) based on logistic regressions are shown. For the majority of the examined indicators, it can be shown that adolescents in lower secondary schools are more likely to report worse self-rated health and mental problems and engage in unhealthy behavior than peers in grammar schools ("Gymnasium"). The differences decrease after controlling for family's SEP but mostly remain statistically significant. Adolescents who don't attend grammar schools are most strongly disadvantaged in terms of inattention/hyperactivity for both gender (OR: 2.29 [1.70-3.08]), smoking among girls (2.91 [1.85-4.57]) and physical inactivity (no leisure sport) among boys (OR: 2.71 [1.85-3.95]). Unequal health opportunities should be viewed in relation to people's living conditions. For adolescents, school constitutes an important setting for learning, experience, and health. The results indicate divergent needs of school-based health promotion and prevention regarding differences among gender and type of school.

  1. Interview Day Environment May Influence Applicant Selection of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the interview day affects applicant interactions with faculty and residents, which can influence the applicant’s rank list decision. We aimed to determine if there was a difference in matched residents between those interviewing on a day on which didactics were held and had increased resident and faculty presence (didactic day versus an interview day with less availability for applicant interactions with residents and faculty (non-didactic day. This was a retrospective study reviewing interview dates of matched residents from 2009-2015. Forty-two (61.8% matched residents interviewed on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence versus 26 (38.2% on a non-didactic interview day with less availability for applicant interactions (p = 0.04. There is an association between interviewing on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence and matching in our program.

  2. An Interview with James T. Webb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    This interview with James T. Webb, clinical psychologist and coauthor of "Guiding the Gifted Child" (1982), focuses on ambivalent messages communicated to gifted/talented children, balancing parental attention among gifted and less gifted siblings, teaching social skills, underachievement, benefits of special programing for emotional development,…

  3. Interview of Jack Goody, 18 May 1991

    OpenAIRE

    Goody, Jack

    2004-01-01

    An interview of about 90 minutes, conducted by Eric Hobsbawm and filmed by Alan Macfarlane Jack Goody describes his education, his time as a prisoner of war in Italy, his later career as a distinguished anthropologist in Cambridge. He draws attention to the influence of thinkers such as Gordon Childe, and his interest in the wide contrasts between Africa and Eur-Asia

  4. Bertrand Russell Speaks: The BBC Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Woodrow

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts from 13 interviews with Bertrand Russell conducted for British television in 1959. The discussion covers the nature and purpose of philosophy, religion, war and pacifism, communism and capitalism, ethics and morality, personal and economic power, happiness, nationalism, individualism, fanaticism, and tolerance. (AM)

  5. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  6. Preventing mismatch answers in standardized survey interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, Yfke P.; Dijkstra, Wil

    Interaction analysis of question–answer sequences from a telephone survey shows that so-called mismatch answers, i.e. answers that do not correspond to the required answering format, are the most frequently occurring problematic verbal behavior. They also are likely to trigger suggestive interviewer

  7. Nonverbal Communication during the Employment Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Helen

    1980-01-01

    Reviews research in several areas of nonverbal communication that relate directly to success or failure during the employment interview. Areas covered are: (1) eyes, (2) hand behavior, (3) smiles, (4) clothing, (5) space/distance, (6) paralanguage, (7) posture, and (8) time. (FL)

  8. Recognizing and Combating Sexist Job Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Laura

    1980-01-01

    This is a self-help guide for women in occupations in which sexist treatment has occurred. The career counselor can help a woman client prepare for a job interview with the sexism-recognition skills outlined. Counselors can work with employers to lower sexist barriers. (Author/BEF)

  9. Vocation Project Interview Questions--Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Leahy, Mary; Fredman, Nick; Moodie, Gavin; Arkoudis, Sophie; Bexley, Emmaline

    2012-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Missing Links: The Fragmented Relation between Tertiary Education and Jobs. It is an added resource for further information. It contains interview questions for: (1) graduates; (2) learning advisors; (3) managers; (4) pathways officers; (5) students; and (6)…

  10. Autisme als contextblindheid : Interview met Peter Vermeulen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanne Diepeveen

    2010-01-01

    Interview met Peter Vermeulen: Peter Vermeulen werkt sinds een aantal jaren bij Autisme Centraal, een kennis- en ondersteuningscentrum omtrent autisme. Daarnaast heeft hij al een 15-tal boeken op zijn naam staan en een werkboek, Ik ben speciaal. Onlangs is er een nieuw boek uitgekomen van Peter

  11. The Reference Interview: An Anecdotal Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    All of us, regardless of experience or achievement, need an occasional reaffirmation of our core knowledge and beliefs. This un-embellished narrative of a real-life reference interview reinforces the importance of persistent but polite attentiveness to the unexpressed needs of library users and, it is hoped, serves as an inspirational reminder not…

  12. Corner Office Interviews: Oxford's Casper Grathwohl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncevic, Mirela

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Casper Grathwohl, VP and publisher of reference at Oxford University Press (OUP), regarding his background of reference publishing, his role in OUP, and his plans of moving on with Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO). Over the past 12 years, Grathwohl, has led a successful transition of the venerable…

  13. Communication Theory's Role in the Reference Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogoff, Stuart

    1983-01-01

    Notes the applicability of communication science theory to the reference process, particularly in areas involving human behavior, and discusses the roles of both verbal and nonverbal communication (body language, paralanguage, proxemics, and environmental factors) in the reference interview. Forty-one references are provided. (EJS)

  14. The Reference Interview in Archival Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbin, Susan L.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews two strands of modern archival writing about reference: one stressing the importance of subject finding aids; the other relying on traditional forms of archival retrieval. Each has emphasized the advantages of new technology but neglected the importance of the reference interview. Raises issues for research and recommends improved…

  15. Interviews with Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Maria; Nasman, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how research practices may simultaneously follow principles of children's citizenship rights to participation and principles of protection and support when children exposed to violence are informants. The article focuses upon organisation of interview processes and interactions between adult researchers and child…

  16. Documenting Art Therapy Clinical Knowledge Using Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Practicing art therapists have vast stores of knowledge and experience, but in most cases, their work is not documented, and their clinical knowledge does not enter the academic discourse. This article proposes a systematic approach to the collection of practice knowledge about art therapy based on conducting interviews with art therapists who…

  17. Recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    A series of 100 recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists has been carried out and some general results are reported here. Twenty countries across the world are represented, mostly European, with a particular emphasis on the United Kingdom. A priority was given to older workers, many of whom were key founders of human genetics in their own countries and areas of work, and over 20 of whom are now no longer living. The interviews also give valuable information on the previous generation of workers, as teachers and mentors of the interviewees, thus extending the coverage of human genetics back to the 1930s or even earlier. A number of prominent themes emerge from the interview series; notably the beginnings of human cytogenetics from the late 1950s, the development of medical genetics research and its clinical applications in the 1960s and 1970s, and more recently the beginnings and rapid growth of human molecular genetics. The interviews provide vivid personal portraits of those involved, and also show the effects of social and political issues, notably those arising from World War 2 and its aftermath, which affected not only the individuals involved but also broader developments in human genetics, such as research related to risks of irradiation. While this series has made a start in the oral history of this important field, extension and further development of the work is urgently needed to give a fuller picture of how human genetics has developed.

  18. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  19. Preventing foetal alcohol syndrome with motivational interviewing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-14

    Oct 14, 2012 ... interviewing (MI) with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) practice, borrowed from health psychological interventions for lifestyle-related chronic health conditions, holds promise for reducing the prevalence of FAS within Western Cape communities. These individual-based approaches have yet to be ...

  20. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  1. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... juvenile (under age 18) and written consent has not been obtained from the inmate's parent or guardian. If the juvenile inmate's parents or guardians are not known or their addresses are not known, the Warden... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may...

  2. Fascinating mathematical people interviews and memoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexanderson, Gerald L.

    2011-01-01

    Fascinating Mathematical People is a collection of informal interviews and memoirs of sixteen prominent members of the mathematical community of the twentieth century, many still active. The candid portraits collected here demonstrate that while these men and women vary widely in terms of their backgrounds, life stories, and worldviews, they all share a deep and abiding sense of wonder about mathematics.

  3. Follow-up interviews after eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beathe; Herbst, Andreas; Johansen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    hundred and twenty-three women (59%) were followed up with a structured telephone interview, 6-24 months (median 11) after their eclamptic fit. Results: At the time of follow-up, 63 women (51%) had at least one persistent symptom; 2 patients had severe neurological sequels (hemiparesis and dysarthria), 11...

  4. Warm water voor alle plantuien (Interview)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    De innovatieve kracht van de biologische sector wordt ook wel omschreven met het begrip kraamkamer. Wat dit zoal inhoudt wordt zichtbaar gemaakt in deze publicatie. Waardevolle innovaties in de biologische landbouw worden geïllustreerd aan de hand van uitkomsten, ervaringen en interviews. Gangbare

  5. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  6. Excerpt of the Interview with Mathew Sands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Excerpt of the Interview with Mathew Sands. Mathew Sands Finn Aaserud. Face to Face Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 881-885. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Analyzing Storytelling in TESOL Interview Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Gabriele; Prior, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographic research interviews have become an accepted and valued method of qualitative inquiry in TESOL and applied linguistics more broadly. In recent discussions surrounding the epistemological treatment of autobiographic stories, TESOL researchers have increasingly called for more attention to the ways in which stories are embedded in…

  8. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  9. LIFE-STYLE SEGMENTATION WITH TAILORED INTERVIEWING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMAKURA, WA; WEDEL, M

    The authors present a tailored interviewing procedure for life-style segmentation. The procedure assumes that a life-style measurement instrument has been designed. A classification of a sample of consumers into life-style segments is obtained using a latent-class model. With these segments, the

  10. Performance Appraisal Interview: A Review of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    found that feedback from patients and co-workers had a greater impact on " nurses’ perceptions of the link between delivering high quality patient care ...Occupational Psycology , 47, 225-230. Fletcher, C. & Williams, R. (1976). The influence of performance feedback in appraisal interviews. Journal of

  11. Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Interviews: Structure and Organization of the Interview Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haislup, Brett D; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Baweja, Rishi; McCarty, Eric C; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a trend toward an increasing subspecialization in orthopaedic surgery, with orthopaedic sports medicine being one of the most competitive subspecialties. Information regarding the application and interview process for sports medicine fellowships is currently lacking. To survey orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship program directors (PDs) to better define the structure of the sports medicine fellowship interview and to highlight important factors that PDs consider in selecting fellows. Cross-sectional study. A complete list of accredited programs was obtained from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) website. An anonymous survey was distributed to fellowship PDs of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships in the United States. The survey included 12 questions about the fellowship interview and selection process. Of the 95 orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship PDs surveyed, 38 (40%) responded. Of these, 16 (42.1%) indicated that they interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year. Eleven of the 38 fellowship programs (28.9%) have only 1 fellow per year at their respective program. Most programs (27/37, 73%) reported that between 0 and 5 faculty members interview applicants, and 29 of the 38 programs (76.3%) arrange for applicants to have ≥4 interviews during their interview day. Large group interviews are conducted at 36 of 38 (94.7%) sports medicine fellowship programs, and most programs (24/38, 63.2%) hold individual interviews that last between 5 and 15 minutes. The most important applicant criterion taken into account by PDs was the quality of the interview, with an average score of 8.68 of 10. The most significant factor taken into account by PDs when deciding how to rank applicants was the quality of the interview. Many orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year

  12. Is web interviewing a good alternative to telephone interviewing? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC Netherlands Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Web interviewing is becoming increasingly popular worldwide, because it has several advantages over telephone interviewing such as lower costs and shorter fieldwork periods. However, there are also concerns about data quality of web surveys. The aim of this study was to compare the International Tobacco Control (ITC Netherlands web and telephone samples on demographic and smoking related variables to assess differences in data quality. Methods Wave 1 of the ITC Netherlands Survey was completed by 1,668 web respondents and 404 telephone respondents of 18 years and older. The two surveys were conducted in parallel among adults who reported smoking at least monthly and had smoked at least 100 cigarettes over their lifetime. Results Both the web and telephone survey had a cooperation rate of 78%. Web respondents with a fixed line telephone were significantly more often married, had a lower educational level, and were older than web respondents without a fixed line telephone. Telephone respondents with internet access were significantly more often married, had a higher educational level, and were younger than telephone respondents without internet. Web respondents were significantly less often married and lower educated than the Dutch population of smokers. Telephone respondents were significantly less often married and higher educated than the Dutch population of smokers. Web respondents used the "don't know" options more often than telephone respondents. Telephone respondents were somewhat more negative about smoking, had less intention to quit smoking, and had more self efficacy for quitting. The known association between educational level and self efficacy was present only in the web survey. Conclusions Differences between the web and telephone sample were present, but the differences were small and not consistently favourable for either web or telephone interviewing. Our study findings suggested sometimes a better data

  13. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  14. Teacher Interviews, Student Interviews, and Classroom Observations in Combinatorics: Four Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddle, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This research consists of teacher interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations, all based around the mathematical content area of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a part of discrete mathematics concerning the ordering and grouping of distinct elements. The data are used in four separate analyses. The first provides evidence that…

  15. Hearing as Touch in a Multilingual Film Interview: The Interviewer's Linguistic Incompetence as Aesthetic Key Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimberger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the author's embodied experience of linguistic incompetence in the context of an interview-based, short, promotional film production about people's personal connections to their spoken languages in Glasgow, Scotland/UK. The article highlights that people's right to their spoken languages during film interviews and the…

  16. The effort and outcomes of the Pediatric Surgery match process: Are we interviewing too many?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadepalli, Samir K; Downard, Cynthia D; Thatch, Keith A; Islam, Saleem; Azarow, Kenneth S; Chen, Mike K; Lillehei, Craig W; Puligandla, Pramod S; Reynolds, Marleta; Waldhausen, John H; Oldham, Keith T; Langham, Max R; Tracy, Thomas F; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2015-11-01

    Increasing numbers of programs participating in the pediatric surgery match has resulted in economic and logistical issues for candidates, General Surgery residencies, and Pediatric Surgery training programs (PSTP). We sought to determine the ideal number of interviews conducted by programs based on resultant rank order lists (ROL) of matched candidates. PSTPs received 4 online surveys regarding interview practices (2011-2012, 2014), and matched candidate ROL (2008-2010, 2012, 2014). Program directors (PD) also provided estimates regarding minimum candidate interview numbers necessary for an effective match (2011-2012, 2014). Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank tests compared ROL and interview numbers conducted. Quartile regression predicted ROL based on the interview numbers. Wilcoxon signed rank-sum tests compared the interview numbers to the minimal interview number using a matched pair. p Values<0.05 were significant. Survey response rates ranged from 85-100%. Median ROL of matched candidates (2-3.5) did not differ between programs (p=0.09) and the lowest matched ROL for any year was 10-12. Interview numbers did not affect the final candidate ROL (p=0.22). While PDs thought the minimum median interview number should be 20, the number actually conducted was significantly higher (p<0.001). These data suggest that PSTPs interview excessive numbers of candidates. Programs and applicants should evaluate mechanisms to reduce interviews to limit costs and effort associated with the match. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary care nurses' performance in motivational interviewing: a quantitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth; Wadensten, Barbro

    2015-07-25

    Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style intended to strengthen motivation to change. It has been shown to be effective in addressing many different lifestyle problems as well as in chronic disease management, and many disease prevention guidelines promote use of motivational interviewing. The aim of the present study was twofold: to assess to what extent the primary care nurses in the study perform motivational interviewing according to the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code and to investigate how the participating primary care nurses rated their own performance in motivational interviewing. The study was based on twelve primary care nurses' audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions with patients (total 32 sessions). After each session, the nurses completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of their own performance in motivational interviewing. The audio-recorded sessions were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code 3.1.1. None of the nurses achieved beginning proficiency in all parts of any motivational interviewing sessions and two nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency in any parts or sessions. Making more complex than simple reflections was the specific verbal behavior/summary score that most nurses achieved. Beginning proficiency/competency in "percent open questions" was the summary score that fewest achieved. Primary care nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency/competency in all aspects of motivational interviewing in their recorded sessions with patients, where lifestyle change was discussed. This indicates a need for improvement and thus additional training, feedback and supervision in clinical practice with motivational interviewing.

  18. The impact of using peer interviewers in a study of patient empowerment amongst people in cancer follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Clara R; Eskildsen, Nanna B; Thomsen, Thora G; Nielsen, Inger D; Johnsen, Anna T

    2017-12-05

    A range of benefits have been reported from engaging peer interviewers in qualitative interviews, but little systematic evaluation exists to assess their impact on both process and outcomes of qualitative interviews in health research. To investigate the impact of involving patient representatives as peer interviewers in a research project on patient empowerment. 18 interviews were carried out as part of the wider study, seven by the academic researcher alone and eleven jointly with a peer interviewer. The interviews were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively to explore potential differences between interviews conducted by the researcher alone and interviews conducted jointly by the researcher and the peer interviewers. A phone evaluation of the peer interviews was carried out with the research participants, and notes were thematically analysed to understand their experiences. Differences were identified between the academic researcher and the peer interviewers in the types of questions they asked and the degree to which personal narrative was used in the interview. Peer interviewers varied significantly in their approach. Research participants were positive about the experience of being interviewed by a peer interviewer. No firm conclusions could be made about impact on outcomes. The uniqueness and complexity of qualitative interviews made it difficult to provide any firm conclusions about the impact of having peer interviewers on the research outcomes, and the benefits identified from the analysis mostly related to the process of the interviews. Benefits from using peer interviewers need to be considered alongside relevant ethical considerations, and available resources for training and support. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. METADISCOURSIVE EXPRESSIONS IN IBORUNA DATABASE’S INTERVIEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange de Carvalho Fortilli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we analyze metadiscoursive expressions as overt manifestations of communicative processing since they stamp in the text enunciative activity establishing speech as object-to-speech (JUBRAN, 2003. Whereas the communicative situation can frame the metadiscourse we take as the object of investigation Iboruna database’s interviews which have characteristics such as prior determination of the types of text to be produced, the definition of the roles of each speaker and interactional asymmetry between them, that means, despite they being in the same situation, their contributions are different. We show that these features what we call interviews for linguistics data collection motivate a series of expressions related to different negotiating about the performance of participants and speech development, as the start or change topics discoursive, conditions for the speech’s continuation, among other.

  20. What happens during annual appraisal interviews? How leader-follower interactions unfold and impact interview outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinecke, Annika L; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Kauffeld, Simone

    2017-07-01

    Despite a wealth of research on antecedents and outcomes of annual appraisal interviews, the ingredients that make for a successful communication process within the interview itself remain unclear. This study takes a communication approach to highlight leader-follower dynamics in annual appraisal interviews. We integrate relational leadership theory and recent findings on leader-follower interactions to argue (a) how supervisors' task- and relation-oriented statements can elicit employee involvement during the interview process and (b) how these communication patterns affect both supervisors' and employees' perceptions of the interview. Moreover, we explore (c) how supervisor behavior is contingent upon employee contributions to the appraisal interview. We audiotaped 48 actual annual appraisal interviews between supervisors and their employees. Adopting a multimethod approach, we used quantitative interaction coding (N = 32,791 behavioral events) as well as qualitative open-axial coding to explore communication patterns among supervisors and their employees. Lag sequential analysis revealed that supervisors' relation-oriented statements triggered active employee contributions and vice versa. These relation-activation patterns were linked to higher interview success ratings by both supervisors and employees. Moreover, our qualitative findings highlight employee disagreement as a crucial form of active employee contributions during appraisal interviews. We distinguish what employees disagreed about, how the disagreement was enacted, and how supervisors responded to it. Overall employee disagreement was negatively related to ratings of supervisor support. We discuss theoretical implications for performance appraisal and leadership theory and derive practical recommendations for promoting employee involvement during appraisal interviews. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Ethnic Minorities’ Impression Management in the Interview: Helping or Hindering?

    OpenAIRE

    Derous, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural impression management (IM) has not been considered much, which is remarkable given the fast rate at which the labor market is becoming multicultural. This study investigated whether ethnic minorities and majorities differed in their preference for IM-tactics and how this affected ethnic minorities’ interview outcomes. A preliminary study (focus groups/survey) showed that ethnic minorities (i.e., Arab/Moroccans) preferred ‘entitlements’ whereas majorities (i.e., Flemish/Belgians...

  2. Interview and translation strategies: coping with multilingual settings and data

    OpenAIRE

    Filep, Béla

    2009-01-01

    Central Eastern Europe, the research area this paper is concerned with, is a region characterized by a high diversity of languages and cultures. It is, at the same time, an area where political, cultural and social conflicts have emerged over time, nowadays especially in border zones, where people of different ethnic, cultural or linguistic background live. In this context, it is important for us researchers to get balanced interview data, and consequently we very often have to conduct interv...

  3. Lost Visions: An Interview with Julia Thomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Calè

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This interview addresses the methodologies and research questions that underpin 'The Illustration Archive'. The archive, created on an AHRC-funded Big Data project, contains over a million searchable book illustrations from a period roughly spanning the eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century, and taken from works of geography, history, philosophy, literature, and science. The Twitter interview, which was supplemented by fuller responses to the questions, offers an insight into how digital archives are created and the problems involved with this creation, from issues of how to make images searchable to the ways in which this resultant searchability impacts on how they are viewed and analysed. The digital archive is a space where forgotten illustrations are made visible, but the terms of this visibility are far from neutral or straightforward.

  4. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang

    OpenAIRE

    Thiesen, Guilherme; de Ara?jo, Telma Martins; Freitas, Maria Perp?tua Mota; da Motta, Alexandre Trindade Sim?es

    2016-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 year...

  5. Stressful First Impressions in Job Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Finnerty, Ailbhe; Muralidhar, Skanda; Nguyen, Laurent Son; Pianesi, Fabio; Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Stress can impact many aspects of our lives, such as the way we interact and work with others, or the first impressions that we make. In the past, stress has most commonly been assessed through selfreported questionnaires; however, advancements in wearable technology have enabled the measurement of physiological symptoms of stress in an unobtrusive manner. Using a dataset of job interviews, we investigate whether first impressions of stress (from annotations) are equivalent to physiological m...

  6. Stressful first impressions in job interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Finnerty, A. N.; Muralidhar, S; Nguyen, L. S.; PIANESI, F.; Gatica-Perez, D.

    2016-01-01

    Stress can impact many aspects of our lives, such as the way we interact and work with others, or the first impressions that we make. In the past, stress has been most commonly assessed through self-reported questionnaires; however, advancements in wearable technology have enabled the measurement of physiological symptoms of stress in an unobtrusive manner. Using a dataset of job interviews, we investigate whether first impressions of stress (from annotations) are equivalent to physiological ...

  7. Healthcare architects' professional autonomy: interview case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duk-Su; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to understand the nature of an architect's professional power. The central questions were: (1) What is the impact of specialized knowledge on the professional autonomy of architects in general? and (2) What are the relationships between task complexity, specialized knowledge, and the professional autonomy of healthcare architects in particular? To answer these questions, this research utilized interviews and focus groups. Focus groups provided in-depth knowledge on a sub-question: How do real-world situations restrict or reinforce the professional autonomy of healthcare architects? The interviews on this sub-question were project-specific to help gain an understanding of the impact that healthcare design complexity and research utilization have on practice and professional autonomy. Two main relationships were discovered from the interviews and focus groups. One was the relationship between the context of healthcare design complexity and the culture of healthcare design practice. The other was the relationship between changing professional attitudes and the consequences of changes in the profession.

  8. Dependent Interviewing and Sub-Optimal Responding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eggs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With proactive dependent interviewing (PDI respondents are reminded of the answer they gave in the previous interview, before being asked about their current status. PDI is used in panel surveys to assist respondent recall and reduce spurious changes in responses over time. PDI may however provide scope for new errors if respondents falsely accept the previous information as still being an accurate description of their current situation. In this paper we use data from the German Labour Market and Social Security panel study, in which an error was made with the preload data for a PDI question about receipt of welfare benefit. The survey data were linked to individual administrative records on receipt of welfare benefit. A large proportion of respondents accepted the false preload. This behaviour seems mainly driven by the difficulty of the response task: respondents with a more complex history of receipt according to the records were more likely to confirm the false preload. Personality also seemed related to the probability of confirming. Predictors of satisficing, indicators of satisficing on other items in the survey, and characteristics of the survey and interviewer were not predictive of confirming the false preload.

  9. District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Wadensten, Barbro; Häggström, Elisabeth; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena

    2014-08-01

    To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use. Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care. A cross-sectional survey study. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011-January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested. According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of 'other' obstacles. Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing. Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Control processes in survey interviews: a cybernetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zouwen, J.; Smit, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - In survey interviews information is transferred to the researchers via a communication process between interviewers and respondents. This process is controlled directly by the interviewers, and indirectly by the researchers who constructed the questionnaire and instructed and supervised

  11. Motivational interview improves treatment entry in homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, R Morgan; Wilbourne, Paula L; Harris, Keith W; Pierson, Heather; Teleki, Jasmine; Burling, Thomas A; Lovett, Steven

    2011-05-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) has successfully been used to facilitate entry and compliance in drug and alcohol treatment programs. Some questions have been raised as to the effectiveness of MI in severely distressed populations. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of MI in a population of homeless, unemployed, and substance dependent veterans who are being wait-listed for entry into a residential treatment program. Seventy-five veterans placed on a wait-list were randomized to receive a single MI or standard (Std) intake interview. Outcomes assessed were entry, and length of stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes assessed included program completion and rates of graduation. Readiness to change and self-efficacy were assessed before and after the interview. Significantly more participants entered the program in the MI group (95%) than in the Std group (71%). Although those in the MI group remained in the program longer, and had higher program completion and graduation rates, these differences were not statistically significant. No significant between-group or within-group differences were found in readiness or self-efficacy. This study demonstrates that a single, easily administered intervention can increase program entry. Also based on the study findings, further research into the question of whether MI can increase program retention, in a severely distressed population, is warranted. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. An interview with Mark G. Hans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Mark G; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    It is a great honor to conduct an interview with Professor Mark G. Hans, after following his outstanding work ahead of the Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center and the Department of Orthodontics at the prestigious Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine (CWRU) in Cleveland, Ohio. Born in Berea, Ohio, Professor Mark Hans attended Yale University in New Haven, CT, and earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry. Upon graduation, Dr. Hans received his DDS and Masters Degree of Science in Dentistry with specialty certification in Orthodontics at Case Western Reserve University. During his education, Dr. Hans’ Master’s Thesis won the Harry Sicher Award for Best Research by an Orthodontic Student and being granted a Presidential Teaching Fellowship. As one of the youngest doctors ever certified by the American Board of Orthodontics, Dr. Hans continues to maintain his board certification. He has worked through academics on a variety of research interests, that includes the demographics of orthodontic practice, digital radiographic data, dental and craniofacial genetics, as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, with selected publications in these fields. One of his noteworthy contributions to the orthodontic literature came along with Dr. Donald Enlow on the pages of “Essentials of Facial Growth”, being reference on the study of craniofacial growth and development. Dr. Mark Hans’s academic career is linked to CWRU, recognized as the renowned birthplace of research on craniofacial growth and development, where the classic Bolton-Brush Growth Study was historically set. Today, Dr. Hans is the Director of The Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center, performing, with great skill and dedication, the handling of the larger longitudinal sample of bone growth study. He is Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics, working in clinical and theoretical activities with students of the Undergraduate Course from the School of

  13. Using student interviews for becoming a reflective geographer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one......'s own students. This paper addresses three issues: implications of doing insider interviews; ethical issues of interviewing students where power relations are at stake and using visual co-constructions as a means of levelling the analytical power of the insider interviewer. We show how student...... interviews have enhanced our reflection-on-action and give recommendations for prospect student interviewers....

  14. Using student interviews for becoming a reflective geographer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine Olesen; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one......’s own students. This paper addresses three issues: implications of doing insider interviews; ethical issues of interviewing students where power relations are at stake and using visual co-constructions as a means of levelling the analytical power of the insider interviewer. We show how student...... interviews have enhanced our reflection-on-action and give recommendations for prospect student interviewers....

  15. Using Motivational Interviewing to reduce threats in conversations about environmental behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Erik Klonek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human behavior contributes to a waste of environmental resources and our society is looking for ways to reduce this problem. However, humans may perceive feedback about their environmental behavior as threatening. According to self-determination theory (SDT, threats decrease intrinsic motivation for behavior change. According to self-affirmation theory (SAT, threats can harm individuals’ self-integrity. Therefore, individuals should show self-defensive biases, e.g., in terms of presenting counter-arguments when presented with environmental behavior change. The current study examines how change recipients respond to threats from change agents in interactions about environmental behavior change. Moreover, we investigate how Motivational Interviewing (MI—an intervention aimed at increasing intrinsic motivation—can reduce threats at both the social and cognitive level. We videotaped 68 dyadic interactions with change agents who either did or did not use MI (control group. We coded agents verbal threats and recipients’ verbal expressions of motivation. Recipients also rated agents’ level of confrontation and empathy (i.e., cognitive reactions. As hypothesized, threats were significantly lower when change agents used MI. Perceived confrontations converged with observable social behavior of change agents in both groups. Moreover, behavioral threats showed a negative association with change recipients’ expressed motivation (i.e., reasons to change. Contrary to our expectations, we found no relation between change agents’ verbal threats and change recipients’ verbally expressed self-defenses (i.e., sustain talk. Our results imply that MI reduces the adverse impact of threats in conversations about environmental behavior change on both the social and cognitive level. We discuss theoretical implications of our study in the context of SAT and SDT and suggest practical implications for environmental change agents in organizations.

  16. Using Motivational Interviewing to reduce threats in conversations about environmental behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonek, Florian E.; Güntner, Amelie V.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Human behavior contributes to a waste of environmental resources and our society is looking for ways to reduce this problem. However, humans may perceive feedback about their environmental behavior as threatening. According to self-determination theory (SDT), threats decrease intrinsic motivation for behavior change. According to self-affirmation theory (SAT), threats can harm individuals’ self-integrity. Therefore, individuals should show self-defensive biases, e.g., in terms of presenting counter-arguments when presented with environmental behavior change. The current study examines how change recipients respond to threats from change agents in interactions about environmental behavior change. Moreover, we investigate how Motivational Interviewing (MI) — an intervention aimed at increasing intrinsic motivation — can reduce threats at both the social and cognitive level. We videotaped 68 dyadic interactions with change agents who either did or did not use MI (control group). We coded agents verbal threats and recipients’ verbal expressions of motivation. Recipients also rated agents’ level of confrontation and empathy (i.e., cognitive reactions). As hypothesized, threats were significantly lower when change agents used MI. Perceived confrontations converged with observable social behavior of change agents in both groups. Moreover, behavioral threats showed a negative association with change recipients’ expressed motivation (i.e., reasons to change). Contrary to our expectations, we found no relation between change agents’ verbal threats and change recipients’ verbally expressed self-defenses (i.e., sustain talk). Our results imply that MI reduces the adverse impact of threats in conversations about environmental behavior change on both the social and cognitive level. We discuss theoretical implications of our study in the context of SAT and SDT and suggest practical implications for environmental change agents in organizations. PMID:26257676

  17. Measuring faking in the employment interview: development and validation of an interview faking behavior scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashina, Julia; Campion, Michael A

    2007-11-01

    An Interview Faking Behavior (IFB) scale is developed and validated in 6 studies (N = 1,346). In Study 1, a taxonomy of faking behavior is delineated. The factor structure of a measure is evaluated and refined (Studies 2 and 3). The convergent and discriminant validity of the measure is examined (Study 4). The IFB scale consists of 4 factors (Slight Image Creation, Extensive Image Creation, Image Protection, and Ingratiation) and 11 subfactors (Embellishing, Tailoring, Fit Enhancing, Constructing, Inventing, Borrowing, Masking, Distancing, Omitting, Conforming, and Interviewer Enhancing). A study of actual interviews shows that scores on the IFB scale are related to getting a 2nd interview or a job offer (Study 5). In Study 6, an experiment is conducted to test the usefulness of the new measure for studying methods of reducing faking using structured interviews. It is found that past behavior questions are more resistant to faking than situational questions, and follow-up questioning increases faking. Finally, over 90% of undergraduate job candidates fake during employment interviews; however, fewer candidates engage in faking that is semantically closer to lying, ranging from 28% to 75%. (c) 2007 APA

  18. Expanding the Reach of the Interview in Audience and Reception Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David; Brites, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the interview method in relation to context, a central notion in audience studies. Through a critique of the traditional conception of the interview method as a question-answer model, the chapter suggests two different articulations of the interview method in the framework...... of a contextual inquiry: the performative and participatory models of interview. These models are presented in their original theoretical, methodological and empirical contexts and then highlighted along four methodological considerations that help position audience research towards the challenges of a contextual...

  19. Applicants' preference for impression management tactic in employment interviews by Transportation Security Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, Joseph N; Lamude, Kevin G

    2009-04-01

    Following past findings on employment interviews, this study hypothesized applicants would have a preference for using self-promoting tactics of impression management over other focuses. Self-reports of impression management tactics were collected from 124 applicants who had interviews for screener positions with the Transportation Security Administration. Contrary to the hypothesis, analysis indicated participants reported they used more ingratiation tactics attempting to praise the interviewer than self-promotion tactics which focused on their own accomplishments. Special qualifications for security jobs which required well-developed perceptual abilities and the controlling structure of the interview context were perhaps responsible for present results differing from prior findings.

  20. A time for growth: an interview with Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer. Interview by Paul Hemp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharer, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Fast growth is a nice problem to have--but a hard one to manage well. In this interview, Kevin Sharer, the CEO of biotech giant Amgen, talks about the special challenges leaders face when their companies are on a roll. Sharer, who was also head of marketing at pre-WorldCom MCI and a division head and a staff assistant to Jack Welch at GE, offers insights drawn from his own experience--and from his own self-proclaimed blunders: "I learned the hard way that you need to become credible and enlist support inside the company before you start trying to be a change agent. If you think you're going to make change happen simply by force of personality or position or intellect, you'd better think again." And change there was: Under Sharer's leadership, Amgen overhauled its management team, altered its culture, and launched a couple of blockbuster products. How do chief executives survive in that kind of dizzying environment? "A CEO must always be switching between different altitudes--tasks of different levels of abstraction and specificity," Sharer says. "You might need to spend time working on a redesign of your organizational structure and then quickly switch to drafting a memo to all employees aimed at reinforcing one of the company's values." Having a supportive and capable top team is also key: "A top management team is the most revealing window into a CEO's style, values, and aspirations.... If you don't have the right top team, you won't have the right tiers below them. [The] A players won't work for B players. Maybe with a company like GE, the reputation of the company is so strong that it can attract top people to work for weaker managers. In a new company like Amgen, that won't happen."

  1. Summarizing knowledge about ethical considerations when conducting Joint Interviews with close relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    the researcher not to jeopardize it doing joint interviews. Ethical considerations conducting joint interviews remain largely undescribed in the literature. Our purpose was to illuminate the literature regarding specific ethical challenges conducting joint interviews with interrelated people in order to avoid...... was analyzed using thematic analysis with an inductive approach. Results In total 17 articles were located. Findings were divided into two main themes: Ethical challenges in conducting joint interviews and Ethical challenges when planning and reporting from joint interviews. Conclusions and implications Joint...... interviewing poses some specific ethical challenges although similarities to other qualitative research methods exist. The main difference occurs on behalf of the relationship. The potential creation of conflicts between participants should be given much consideration because of the possible negative impact...

  2. Summon Post Implementation Interviews Study - Executive Summary

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-04-12

    This executive report summarizes the interview findings on the use of Summon by our community. Summon is the library\\'s new webscale discovery layer that was launched in May 2016. The findings highlighted that Google Scholar remains the popular resource to search for articles. In addition to that, library website (Koral / Summon) is commonly used to search for known items such as book / electronic book titles. The report also includes the author\\'s short and long term recommendations to address the shortcomings of the present situation.

  3. Shop Floor-Level Control of Manufacturing Companies: An Interview Study in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokola Henri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper publishes the results of interviews regarding shop-floor-level control of 18 Finnish manufacturing companies. The interviews had 17 open questions relating to demand characteristics, shop floor-level control issues, production flexibility, inventory control, and potential development areas. In order to get insights from the interviews, this paper analyses the answers from the interviews and categorises them into typical answers. The companies that were interviewed are also categorised as small companies with their own end products, subcontractors, or large companies with their own end products, and the emphasis of the analysis is on how companies differ in their shop floor-level control. The results show that different types of companies have different characteristics. Small companies are characterised by constant workflow, seasonal trends in demand, and the use of forecasts. Subcontractors have great daily variation in their demand and processing times. Large companies tend to focus on inventory issues.

  4. Patterns of Conflict Interaction in Mother-Toddler Dyads: Differences between Depressed and Non-Depressed Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Huang, Keng-Yen; Lima, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We examined the differences in conflict interaction between depressed mothers and their toddler and non-depressed dyads and whether these differences mediated the association of maternal depression with compromised child socioemotional development. Mother/child interaction was videotaped during a teaching task and during a free play task as part…

  5. Young Children's References to Temporal Attributes of Allegedly Experienced Events in the Course of Forensic Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental differences in references to temporal attributes of allegedly experienced events were examined in 250 forensic interviews of 4- to 10-year-old alleged victims of sexual abuse. Children's ages, the specific temporal attributes referenced, and the types of memory tapped by the interviewers' questions significantly affected the quantity…

  6. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 years. He has treated many adult patients focusing on esthetics and periodontal health and has developed many clinical techniques to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment to the benefit of both the patient and practitioner. Dr. Hwang is also interested in the evaluation of facial asymmetry two- and three-dimensionally. As one of the early adopters of cone-beam volume imaging, he has given special emphasis on the management of surgical cases. He is married to Jung-Un Park with whom he has two sons. His favorite hobbies are photography and listening to music. When I was presented to him in a congress, it was a great pleasure meeting someone who I already admired for his singular work. Later on, his humbleness and knowledge made me marvel at him even more. I hope that all readers of Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics also enjoy the teachings from this brilliant Korean orthodontist! Guilherme Thiesen - interview coordinator

  7. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Thiesen, Guilherme; Araújo, Telma Martins de; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota; Motta, Alexandre Trindade Simões da

    2016-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 years. He has treated many adult patients focusing on esthetics and periodontal health and has developed many clinical techniques to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment to the benefit of both the patient and practitioner. Dr. Hwang is also interested in the evaluation of facial asymmetry two- and three-dimensionally. As one of the early adopters of cone-beam volume imaging, he has given special emphasis on the management of surgical cases. He is married to Jung-Un Park with whom he has two sons. His favorite hobbies are photography and listening to music. When I was presented to him in a congress, it was a great pleasure meeting someone who I already admired for his singular work. Later on, his humbleness and knowledge made me marvel at him even more. I hope that all readers of Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics also enjoy the teachings from this brilliant Korean orthodontist! Guilherme Thiesen - interview coordinator.

  8. Interview with Professor Karl-Heinz Mehlan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H G

    1991-09-01

    Professor Karl-Heinz Mehlan, one of the founding fathers of German family planning in the post WWII area, celebrated his 75th birthday of July 18, 1991. The celebration took place in Rostock and Dr. Mehlan was in the best of health. As part of the occasion, Dr. Hans-Georg Neumann conducted an interview with Dr. Mehlan about the beginnings of family planning in what was then the Soviet occupied zone of Germany as well as its further development up to the present day. In the course of the interview Dr. Mehlan discussed the history of abortion in East Germany during the period of recovery immediately after WWII. He related his experiences working as a general practitioner in Calau and the committees he served on that were related to the study and delivery of abortion. During this time there were 80,000 recorded cases. After this he went to Berlin to the Institut fur Sozialmedizin der Chartie to write about the Calau experience. This was the 1st time that the abortion problem was discussed in German in a scientific context. He studied mortality, morbidity, and after effects.

  9. Breathing Silence. An interview with John Palmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Scuderi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The interview focuses on some aspects of the composer’s work with electronics. Palmer, described by the critics as «undoubtedly the most visionary composer of his generation» speaks about the composers and musical works that have had a major impact on him. He also mentions the friendship with John Cage, his numerous travels – with particular emphasis on Japan – and the influence of Eastern culture on his musical mind. The composer discusses the notion of causality explored in Renge-Kyo, the meditative nature of Transient and Inwards, and spirituality as the central theme of both acousmatic works In the Temple and I Am. The electronic medium is also por- trayed as a mirror of an intense and vivid preoccupation for intimacy and perpetual search for timbral qualities that by now characterize most of his music. Another important aspect of Palmer’s work mentioned in the interview is the collaboration with some established performers and its importance for the realization of a musical work.

  10. Breaking bad news: an interview study of paediatric cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Anna-Lena; Dahlgren, Lars; Hägglöf, Bruno; Rydberg, Annika

    2011-06-01

    Technical developments in paediatric cardiology over the last few decades have increased expectations on professionals, demanding of them more emotional competence and communicative ability. The aim of this study was to examine the approach of paediatric cardiologists in informing and communicating with the family of the patient. A qualitative interview method was first tested in a pilot study with two paediatric cardiologists. There were nine subsequent semi-structured interviews that were carried out with paediatric cardiologists. A researcher performed all the interviews, which were taped, transcribed, decoded, and analysed. Among paediatric cardiologists, how to break bad news to the family is an important concern, evident in findings regarding the significance of trust and confidence, the use of different emotional positions, and a common ambition to achieve skills to handle the situation. There is a need for reflection, education, and sharing of experiences. The cardiologists desire further development of teamwork and of skills in medical students and residents for delivering bad news. Doctors are expected to cope with the complexities of diagnoses and decisions, while simultaneously being sensitive to the feelings of the parents, aware of their own emotions, and able to keep it all under control in the context of breaking the bad news to the parents and keeping them informed. These conflicting demands create a need to expand the professional role of the doctor by including more training in emotional competence and communicative ability, beginning in medical school and continuing through consultancy.

  11. Children's performance on ground rules questions: implications for forensic interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jason J; Brubacher, Sonja P; Poole, Debra A

    2015-02-01

    Ground rules, also called interview instructions, are included in investigative interviews with children around the world. These rules aim to manage the expectations of children who are typically unaccustomed to being questioned by adults who are naïve to the children's experiences. Although analog research has examined the efficacy of ground rules instruction, a systematic analysis of children's ability to respond appropriately to each of the rules has not been reported. In the current study, we scored the accuracy of children's (N = 501, 4 to 12 years) responses to 5 ground rules practice questions (e.g., "What is my dog's name?") and 2 questions that asked whether they would follow the rules, and then assigned inaccurate responses to 1 of several error categories. Few children answered every question correctly, but their performance on individual questions was encouraging. As expected, there were marked differences in children's understanding across ground rules questions (especially among the younger children), with "Don't guess" and "Tell the truth" rules being the easiest to comprehend. Together with evidence that ground rules instruction takes little time to deliver (typically 2 to 4 min) and is associated with improved accuracy in previous research, these findings support the use of ground rules in investigative interviews of children 4 years and older.

  12. Parents' expectations regarding their children's eye care: interview results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Aerlyn G; Freedman, Sharon F; Lee, Paul P; Enyedi, Laura B

    2003-11-01

    To determine a relevant set of concerns that parents express as expectations regarding their children's eye care. Qualitative, cross-sectional, pilot study. A total of 48 interviews were conducted with parents of pediatric ophthalmology patients at Duke University Eye Center and the McGovern Davidson Children's Health Center at Duke University to elicit parents' expectations regarding their children's eye care. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded for parent expectations. Content analysis of transcripts from the 48 interviews yielded 35 different expectation areas for eye care, which were further classified into six groups: (1) Communication, (2) Interpersonal Manner, (3) Doctor's Skill, (4) Examination and Testing, (5) Logistics, and (6) Other. The six expectation areas most frequently identified by parents as the single "most important" expectation were the following: (1) Clinical Competence, (2) Interaction with Child, (3) Education/Training, (4) Explanation in Clear Language, (5) Information about Diagnosis, and (6) Personal Connection. Parents of pediatric ophthalmology patients expressed expectation areas in the Communication group more frequently than any other group. However, when asked to identify their single most important expectation area, more than half of parents identified Clinical Competence.

  13. Vamos juntos a la escuela: Consejos para ayudar a los padres a asegurar el exito academico de sus hijos (Let's Go to School Together: Tips To Help Parents Ensure Their Children's Educational Success). [Videotape Kit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Resource Center (ED), Washington, DC.

    Noting research showing that when parents are involved in their children's learning, students achieve more and are less likely to drop out of school, this videotape kit offers Spanish-speaking parents tips to help them become involved in their children's learning, from infancy through adolescence. The kit is intended for use in schools,…

  14. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  15. Look and Do Ancient Greece. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Greek Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource, containing a teacher's manual, reproducible student workbook, and a color teaching poster, is designed to accompany a 21-minute videotape program, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "Greek Architecture," looks at elements of architectural construction as applied to Greek structures, and…

  16. Interviewing When You’re Not Face-To-Face: The Use of Email Interviews in a Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Bowden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As Internet usage becomes more commonplace, researchers are beginning to explore the use of email interviews. Email interviews have a unique set of tools, advantages, and limitations, and are not meant to be blind reproductions of traditional face-to-face interview techniques. Email interviews should be implemented when: 1 researchers can justify email interviews are useful to a research project; 2 there is evidence that the target population will be open to email interviewing as a form of data collection; and 3 the justification of the email interview supports the researchers’ theoretical perspective. The objective of this study was to develop an email interviewing methodology. As with other forms of qualitative interviewing, it is important that the researcher: 1 identifies constraints; 2 adequately prepares for the interview; 3 establishes rapport; 4 asks appropriate questions; 5 actively listens; and 6 ends the email interview appropriately.

  17. Experience-based, body-anchored qualitative research interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    -anchored interviewing, and second, by an interview guide that explores a research participant's personal experience with mindfulness meditation. An excerpt from an interview is discussed to illustrate the advantages of this interview form, namely its value as a methodological instrument for qualitative research...

  18. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  19. Strategic Interviewing to Detect Deception: Cues to Deception across Repeated Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masip, Jaume; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Martínez, Carmen; Herrero, Carmen; Ibabe, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    Previous deception research on repeated interviews found that liars are not less consistent than truth tellers, presumably because liars use a “repeat strategy” to be consistent across interviews. The goal of this study was to design an interview procedure to overcome this strategy. Innocent participants (truth tellers) and guilty participants (liars) had to convince an interviewer that they had performed several innocent activities rather than committing a mock crime. The interview focused on the innocent activities (alibi), contained specific central and peripheral questions, and was repeated after 1 week without forewarning. Cognitive load was increased by asking participants to reply quickly. The liars’ answers in replying to both central and peripheral questions were significantly less accurate, less consistent, and more evasive than the truth tellers’ answers. Logistic regression analyses yielded classification rates ranging from around 70% (with consistency as the predictor variable), 85% (with evasive answers as the predictor variable), to over 90% (with an improved measure of consistency that incorporated evasive answers as the predictor variable, as well as with response accuracy as the predictor variable). These classification rates were higher than the interviewers’ accuracy rate (54%). PMID:27847493

  20. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Linda Godwin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda Godwin is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. She gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), her role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how she will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Godwin ends with her thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  1. Interview with Di Gao PhD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Gao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Di Gao is currently a scientist in the Quality Control department of AstraZeneca. She is responsible for technology transfer, stability programs and supporting regulatory submission. She has a BSc and PhD degree in chemistry and interned with Genentech in 2012. After completing her Ph.D. from University of Michigan in June 2013, she joined the R&D department of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP to support USP monograph modernization and since June 2014 she has been working in her current position at AstraZeneca. Recently, she won a prestigious award from Women in Bio (WIB. WIB is an organization of professionals committed to promoting careers, leadership and entrepreneurship for women in the life sciences. This interview was conducted by Roland J.W. Meesters PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Applied Bioanalysis.

  2. Coding In-depth Semistructured Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, John L.; Quincy, Charles; Osserman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Many social science studies are based on coded in-depth semistructured interview transcripts. But researchers rarely report or discuss coding reliability in this work. Nor is there much literature on the subject for this type of data. This article presents a procedure for developing coding schemes...... for such data. It involves standardizing the units of text on which coders work and then improving the coding scheme’s discriminant capability (i.e., reducing coding errors) to an acceptable point as indicated by measures of either intercoder reliability or intercoder agreement. This approach is especially...... useful for situations where a single knowledgeable coder will code all the transcripts once the coding scheme has been established. This approach can also be used with other types of qualitative data and in other circumstances....

  3. Sonu Shamdasani interviewed by Ann Casement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, Sonu

    2010-02-01

    Sonu Shamdasani interviewed by Ann Casement about Jung's The Red Book: Liber Novus in the course of which they range over issues to do with what drew Shamdasani to Jung; how he came to be involved in editing, translating and publishing Liber Novus; why he is so passionate about it; where it stands in relation to Jung's other work; some of the central figures that appear in the book such as Philemon and Izdubar; what Liber Novus might offer training candidates and succeeding generations of Jungians; how it has changed Shamdasani's own impression of Jung and what he hopes this enormous project will achieve; why Jung did not publish it in his own lifetime and whether he was mistaken in not doing so; and what impact the publication of Liber Novus will have on Jung's reputation worldwide as well as within the Jungian community.

  4. INTERVIEW: Knowledge and Terminology Management at Crisplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Margrethe H.; Toft, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    Margrethe H. Møller interviews Lisbeth Kjeldgaard Almsten (translator/coauthor: Birthe Toft) “If you think that terminology work is simply a matter of buying terminology management software and getting started, you are in for trouble” At Crisplant, we have been doing terminology management...... for the past 20 years. Today, term bases are used not just for terminology-oriented term management. Recording other types of master data needed by all kinds of professionals in the enterprise is equally important. Within the past year, Crisplant has been acquired by the German BEUMER group, which means...... that the terminological resources of the two enterprises are in the process of being integrated. The challenges presented by this process demonstrate the importance of adhering to terminological principles when recording terminology resources, while at the same time reminding us what an essential discipline terminology...

  5. Interview with Brian Tomlinson on Humanising Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nimehchisalem

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brian Tomlinson is a Visiting Professor at The University of Liverpool and a TESOL Professor at Anaheim University. He has worked as a teacher, teacher trainer, curriculum developer, university academic and soccer coach in Indonesia, Japan, Nigeria, Oman, Singapore, Vanuatu, UK and Zambia and has given presentations in over 60 countries. He is the Founder and President of MATSDA and has published many articles and books including Developing Materials for Language Teaching, Openings etc. The interview you are about to read here was recorded after his plenary talk at the 11th Malaysia International Conference on English Language Teaching (MICELT 2016 in Swiss-Garden Beach Resort, Damai Laut, Perak, Malaysia.

  6. Reliability and acceptability of a five-station multiple mini-interview model for residency program recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Diaz Fraga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard interviews are used by most residency programs in the United States for assessment of aptitude of the non-cognitive competencies, but variability of interviewer skill, interviewer bias, interviewer leniency or stringency, and context specificity limit reliability. Aim: To investigate reliability and acceptability of five-station multiple mini-interview (MMI model for resident selection into an internal medicine residency program in the United States. Setting: One independent academic medical center. Participants: Two hundred and thirty-seven applicants and 17 faculty interviewers. Program description: Five, 10-min MMI stations with five different interviewers blinded to the candidate's records and one traditional 20-min interview with the program director. Candidates were rated on two items: interpersonal and communication skills, and overall performance. Program evaluation: Generalizability data showed that the reliability of our process was high (>0.9. The results of anonymous surveys demonstrated that both applicants and interviewers consider the MMI as a fair and more effective tool to evaluate non-cognitive traits, and prefer the MMI to standard interviews. Discussion: The MMI process for residency interviews can generate reliable interview results using only five stations, and it is acceptable and preferred over standard interview modalities by the applicants and faculty members of one US residency program.

  7. Avenues of access to future science teachers: An interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Richard

    2007-12-01

    This research study explored the experiences of individuals who chose careers in secondary science education by examining two cohorts of science education students in a teacher credential program and a group of current secondary science teachers in their first five years of teaching. Issues of how these individuals became interested in science education and the characteristics common among them were examined. This study explored the educational experiences that appeared to contribute to people becoming science teachers. This study also explored the participants' motivation and key turning point moments that appeared to contribute to their choice to pursue a career in science education. The research design used in this study was a two-year, semi-structured interview protocol. Research was conducted at one main university site and within one local unified school district. During the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 academic years, twenty-five secondary science pre-service teacher candidates at a University of California were interviewed, and during the 2005-2006 academic year, twenty-five current practicing science teachers within a Southern California unified school district were also interviewed. Data collection consisted of interviews with the fifty participants typically between 30-45 minutes in length. The EZ-Text software program was employed to aid in the analysis of the transcribed interview data. This study found that much of the previous research on the characteristics of entrants to teaching in general was supported, but that some specific differences exist among science teachers and the general population of teachers. The majority of the participants had exposure to internships or tutoring experiences and indicated that this made them more willing to pursue science teaching as a profession. This study found that high achieving female students constituted the entire female portion of the sample and cited teaching as a friendly avenue for females in science. Teacher

  8. Feasibility and Usability of Tele-interview for Medical Residency Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Lee, Hayoung; Fair, Malika; Maloney, Kaylah; Caggiula, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Every year in the United States, medical students and residency programs dedicate millions of dollars to the residency matching process. On-site interviews for training positions involve tremendous financial investment, and time spent detracts from educational pursuits and clinical responsibilities. Students are usually required to fund their own travel and accommodations, adding additional financial burdens to an already costly medical education. Similarly, residency programs allocate considerable funds to interview-day meals, tours, staffing, and social events. With the rapid onslaught of innovations and advancements in the field of telecommunication, technology has become ubiquitous in the practice of medicine. Internet applications have aided our ability to deliver appropriate, evidence-based care at speeds previously unimagined. Wearable medical tech allows physicians to monitor patients from afar, and telemedicine has emerged as an economical means by which to provide care to all corners of the world. It is against this backdrop that we consider the integration of technology into the residency application process. This article aims to assess the implementation of technology in the form of web-based interviewing as a viable means by which to reduce the costs and productivity losses associated with traditional in-person interview days.

  9. Thinking Globally, Interviewing Locally: Using an Intensive Interview Project to Teach Globalization and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norma J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I connect globalization and qualitative methodological practice, describing a semester-long intensive interview project about the anti-apartheid movement. I provide a detailed overview of the project as well as considerations for those who might want to adapt it for their own courses. Using students' reflections on the projects…

  10. Perspectives on the ‘lens of risk’ interview series: interview with Nick Pidgeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyman, B.; Brown, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article is the first in a series which will appear in 2012 in the special issue series Health Care Through the `Lens of Risk'. It provides a quasi-verbatim transcript of an interview with Nick Pidgeon, one of the main contributors to the social science component of The Royal Society Risk Report

  11. An interview with Senator John D. Rockefeller IV. Interview by Carmella Bocchino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockefeller, J D

    1989-01-01

    Congress is faced with moving forward a pressing health care agenda while the federal deficit demands major budget cuts in Medicare. A pivotal player in this chess game is Senator John D. Rockefeller IV (D-WV). In this interview with Nursing Economic+, Sen. Rockefeller discusses catastrophic health insurance, Medicare, long-term care, and other health care issues.

  12. Telling Stories That Are Needed: An Interview with Christopher Myers. Breakfast Speaker Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomat, Donna Sayers; Lowery, Ruth McKoy; Fain, Jeanne Gilliam

    2016-01-01

    Christopher Myers won acclaim at a young age as a vibrant illustrator of children's picturebooks. In this interview, Myers discusses how he has advocated for diversity in children's literature through themes that weave throughout his writing and illustration, collaborations with other artists, and his participation in the communities of artists,…

  13. How to Interview: Making the First Impression Count. Tape 2: Making an Impact in the Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Placement Council, Bethlehem, PA.

    This booklet describes techniques used to make a positive impact in a job interview. A list of nonverbal behaviors (such as handshake and dress) is given. The job seeker is to use this list to differentiate between positive and negative behaviors. The attitudes, nonverbal behaviors, and verbal responses needed by the effective interviewee are…

  14. An interview with Steven J. Lindauer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    his brilliance ahead of “The Angle Orthodontist”... It didn’t take me long to realize that his virtues by far exceeded the boundaries of the professional domain. Despite his utterly busy schedule, he is still able to dedicate time to his parents, taking them to trips around the world. Interestingly, at every international trip, he always remembers his puppies (Memphis, Baxter and Kingston - in memoriam), taking sightseeing pictures to immediately Photoshop them into. Having done the well deserved introductions to our distinguished interviewee, I would like to offer righteous acknowledgements to the colleagues Jorge Faber, David Turpin, Bhavna Shroff and David Normando, for having accepted the invitation to take part in this interview. I also would like to offer my heartfelt thanks to Dental Press for having entrusted me with the honor to conduct this project. I wish all readers as delightful and rich of an experience when going through this interview as it’s been the scientific path that brought us all here in the first place. No doubts, you stand in face of a life dedicated to Orthodontics. (Andre Wilson Machado, interview coordinator) PMID:28746485

  15. An interview with Steven J. Lindauer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Lindauer

    say at length about his brilliance ahead of “The Angle Orthodontist”... It didn’t take me long to realize that his virtues by far exceeded the boundaries of the professional domain. Despite his utterly busy schedule, he is still able to dedicate time to his parents, taking them to trips around the world. Interestingly, at every international trip, he always remembers his puppies (Memphis, Baxter and Kingston - in memoriam, taking sightseeing pictures to immediately Photoshop them into. Having done the well deserved introductions to our distinguished interviewee, I would like to offer righteous acknowledgements to the colleagues Jorge Faber, David Turpin, Bhavna Shroff and David Normando, for having accepted the invitation to take part in this interview. I also would like to offer my heartfelt thanks to Dental Press for having entrusted me with the honor to conduct this project. I wish all readers as delightful and rich of an experience when going through this interview as it’s been the scientific path that brought us all here in the first place. No doubts, you stand in face of a life dedicated to Orthodontics. (Andre Wilson Machado, interview coordinator

  16. An interview with Steven J. Lindauer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    brilliance ahead of "The Angle Orthodontist"... It didn't take me long to realize that his virtues by far exceeded the boundaries of the professional domain. Despite his utterly busy schedule, he is still able to dedicate time to his parents, taking them to trips around the world. Interestingly, at every international trip, he always remembers his puppies (Memphis, Baxter and Kingston - in memoriam), taking sightseeing pictures to immediately Photoshop them into. Having done the well deserved introductions to our distinguished interviewee, I would like to offer righteous acknowledgements to the colleagues Jorge Faber, David Turpin, Bhavna Shroff and David Normando, for having accepted the invitation to take part in this interview. I also would like to offer my heartfelt thanks to Dental Press for having entrusted me with the honor to conduct this project. I wish all readers as delightful and rich of an experience when going through this interview as it's been the scientific path that brought us all here in the first place. No doubts, you stand in face of a life dedicated to Orthodontics. (Andre Wilson Machado, interview coordinator).

  17. Eloquence Squared: An Interview with Padhraig Nolan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan, Padhraig

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Often, creative people are recognised primarily for the work they do in one discipline, with efforts in other areas overlooked. Some artists are truly multidisciplinary, having the ability to express themselves eloquently through more than one medium. This selection of work from Padhraig Nolan, Dublin-based artist and poet, illustrates two strands of his practice: poetry and painting. As discussed in the accompanying interview, he is an artist working in more than one medium, each of which could be said to communicate with the other. In both painting and poetry, Nolan is inspired by landscape and a sense of place, and he turns his inspirations into remarkable art pieces, whether they be crafted with words or paint. Originally from Enniscorthy in County Wexford, Padhraig Nolan now lives near Dún Laoghaire, where he works as a graphic designer, illustrator and visual artist. He also writes poetry, reviews and songs. His work is regularly published and exhibited in Ireland and internationally. His website is www.padhraignolan.com

  18. Rethinking Democracy: an Interview with Zygmunt Bauman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Ordóñez Roig

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 91 503 UNIVERSIDAD JAUME I 4 1 593 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-TRAD JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Zygmunt Bauman, professor of Sociology at the University of Leeds and, since 1990, emeritus professor, has developed key concepts for the understanding of fundamental issues of today’s world, such as liquid modernity, time, space and disorder, individualism versus community, globalization and consumer’s culture, love and identity, etc. His analyses of the links between modernity, Holocaust, democracy and social politics were the principal subject of the following interview, which was conducted by Vicente Ordóñez and Vicent Sanz on the occasion of Zygmunt Bauman’s recent visit to Spain. 

  19. Ethical Challenges when Interviewing Close Relatives Together – An Integrative Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Interviewing two interrelated persons (or more) simultaneously might pose different ethical considerations than interviewing just one person. Such ethical considerations, however, remain largely undescribed in literature, challenging the researcher who wishes to conduct them....... The purpose of this study is to describe the special ethical perspectives concerning joint interviews with interrelated persons. Method An integrative review was performed. A search was conducted in Pub Med, Cinahl, Philosophers Index and Academic Search from 1980 -2014. Data corpus from the 17 articles...... was analysed using thematic analysis with an inductive approach searching for themes about ethical considerations doing joint interviews. The SPIDER search tool was applied using keywords relatives, ethic, dyadic interview, challenges and qualitative methods created on the basis of relevant pseudonyms, Mesh...

  20. Ethical Challenges when Interviewing Close Relatives Together – An Integrative Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    Background and purpose Interviewing two interrelated persons (or more) simultaneously might pose different ethical considerations than interviewing just one person. Such ethical considerations, however, remain largely undescribed in literature, challenging the researcher who wishes to conduct them....... The purpose of this study is to describe the special ethical perspectives concerning joint interviews with interrelated persons. Method An integrative review was performed. A search was conducted in Pub Med, Cinahl, Philosophers Index and Academic Search from 1980 -2014. Data corpus from the 17 articles...... was analysed using thematic analysis with an inductive approach searching for themes about ethical considerations doing joint interviews. The SPIDER search tool was applied using keywords relatives, ethic, dyadic interview, challenges and qualitative methods created on the basis of relevant pseudonyms, Mesh...

  1. Nurse versus community health worker identification of psychosocial risks in pregnancy through a structured interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godecker, Amy L; Harrison, Patricia A; Sidebottom, Abbey C

    2013-11-01

    A structured psychosocial risk screening interview, the Prenatal Risk Overview, was administered to 733 women in prenatal care. Either a community health worker (CHW) or a registered nurse (RN) conducted the interview based on day of the week. A comparison of identified risk factors found no significant differences between study samples for six of 13 domains. For CHW interviews, significantly more participants were classified as Moderate/ High Risk for Depression, Lack of Telephone Access, Food Insecurity, and Housing Instability, and as High Risk for Lack of Social Support, Lack of Transportation Access, and Housing Instability. For RN interviews, significantly more participants were classified as High Risk for Alcohol Use. Community health workers successfully conducted psychosocial screening and elicited more self-reported risk than RNs, especially lack of basic needs. Comparing the hourly salary/ wage, the cost for CHWs was 56% lower than for RNs. Preliminary findings support use of paraprofessionals for structured screening interviews.

  2. The Decision-Oriented Interview (DOI as a Marketing Instrument for Obtaining Information about Brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Westhoff

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our article is not to report an empirical study but to present a toolkit which can help to collect valid information about brands. The Decision-Oriented Interview, hereafter, DOI presents empirically proven behavior regularities in interviews as a collection of checklists. The DOI has shown its usefulness in different fields of interviewing e.g. as a selection interview, in forensic assessment or a method for oral examinations. The DOI collection of explicit rules for interview design, execution and summary is described as a toolkit for collecting information relevant in marketing. The purchase decisions are presented as a basis for describing brand-differentiating situations. The use of the rules collected in the DOI checklists has clear advantages over the conventional approach in which success depends on the experience of individual project managers.

  3. Belief in the unstructured interview: The persistence of an illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Dana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unstructured interviews are a ubiquitous tool for making screening decisions despite a vast literature suggesting that they have little validity. We sought to establish reasons why people might persist in the illusion that unstructured interviews are valid and what features about them actually lead to poor predictive accuracy. In three studies, we investigated the propensity for ``sensemaking'' - the ability for interviewers to make sense of virtually anything the interviewee says---and ``dilution''---the tendency for available but non-diagnostic information to weaken the predictive value of quality information. In Study 1, participants predicted two fellow students' semester GPAs from valid background information like prior GPA and, for one of them, an unstructured interview. In one condition, the interview was essentially nonsense in that the interviewee was actually answering questions using a random response system. Consistent with sensemaking, participants formed interview impressions just as confidently after getting random responses as they did after real responses. Consistent with dilution, interviews actually led participants to make worse predictions. Study 2 showed that watching a random interview, rather than personally conducting it, did little to mitigate sensemaking. Study 3 showed that participants believe unstructured interviews will help accuracy, so much so that they would rather have random interviews than no interview. People form confident impressions even interviews are defined to be invalid, like our random interview, and these impressions can interfere with the use of valid information. Our simple recommendation for those making screening decisions is not to use them.

  4. Information Architecture Practice: An Interview with Vivian Bliss, Microsoft [and] An Interview with Gayle Curtis, Modem Media [and] An Interview with Seth Gordon, ZEFER [and] An Interview with Steven Ritchey, Sapient [and] an Interview with Lou Rosenfeld, Argus Associates, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines the role of information architects through five interviews with information architects who responded by email to a series of questions. Topics include developing and implementing information systems to enable decision-making; knowledge architecture; Web page design; organizing information; users' information needs; Internet strategies;…

  5. Cambridge Marketing College - interview about e-commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Paa-Kerner, Greta; Cambridge Marketing College

    2015-01-01

    Interview about e-commerce.\\ud \\ud The Cambridge Marketing College interviews Greta Paa-Kerner to learn about the dynamic world of e-commerce. She discusses online retail trends and shopping influencers.

  6. A practical guide to the e-mail interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2007-12-01

    The e-mail interview is a novel technique that has a number of advantages over traditional interviewing, but there are also some disadvantages. In this methodological article, the authors review the issues surrounding the use of the e-mail interview, providing a concrete example of its use, that of interviewing people with alopecia areata regarding psychological issues associated with the disorder. The authors show in the article that the e-mail interview is an effective interview technique but that users must take account of a number of sensitive issues, and there are a number of serious disadvantages that limit its use to specific areas. The e-mail interview cannot be used simply as a cheap alternative to face-to-face interviews in all circumstances.

  7. Newsmaker interview: Geraldine Ferraro. Striving for equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Geraldine Ferraro is a long-standing advocate of women's rights who currently serves as the US ambassador to the UN's Human Rights Commission. She was elected to the US Congress in 1978, after which she served three terms as a representative from the state of New York. Ms. Ferraro led efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment, sponsored the Women's Economic Equity Act, and ran on the Democratic national ticket in 1984 as the first woman vice-presidential candidate. This paper presents the text of her interview with ZPG about women's well-being, current political trends, and population growth. Ms. Ferraro became interested in population issues in the wake of the 1973 Supreme Court decision on Roe vs. Wade. She explains how a 1989 trip to the Philippines made her more aware of the impact of rapid population growth and overpopulation. Ms. Ferraro believes that overpopulation is due to poor health care and high infant and child mortality, the oppression of and discrimination against women, and inadequate social services. Educating both men and women and ensuring the provision of family planning methods are needed to start dealing with such problems. Ms. Ferraro responds to questions on how the health and well-being of women are linked with the need to stabilize population growth, why women in the US have not attained equality with men, the movement of the US away from being a leader on population issues both domestically and internationally, how local communities across the US can influence the direction of population-related policies, and what she hopes will be accomplished at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in September 1995.

  8. The narrative interview in researching offenders in prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Szczepanik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to demonstrate how the narrative interview can be used to collect qualitative data in the prison setting. The article discusses the methodology underpinning this technique and the challenges that arise when the researcher conducts narrative interviews with people in prisons. The challenges concern three aspects of the narrative interview: the personality and role of the researcher, the characteristics of the interviewees, and the prison as the setting for interviews.

  9. Design Matters: The Impact of CAPI on Interview Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nicole; Wilkins, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI) offers many attractive benefits over paper-and-pencil interviewing. There is, however, mixed evidence on the impact of CAPI on interview "length," an important survey outcome in the context of length limits imposed by survey budgets and concerns over respondent burden. In this article,…

  10. Journalistic neutralism and personalisation in the accountability interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    as truth claims in the accountability interview. The case is critical because the specific news interview was framed and marketed as an adversarial interview with a personalised “signature host”. Accordingly, it can be assumed that neutralism can still be a resource for political sources to challenge...

  11. School Nurses' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing for Preventing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Ane Høstgaard; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is a counseling method used to bring about behavior change; its application by school nurses for preventing obesity in children is still new. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses, shows how school nurses adapted motivational interviewing and integrated it into their daily practice along with…

  12. Twenty Minutes to Impress: Keys to a Successful Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougaw, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    An interview is a multifaceted and complex process that begins long before and can end many days after the actual face-to-face interview. The process can be quite intimidating for recent graduates or young teachers with little job search experience. This article offers suggestions that can demystify the interview process and provide an opportunity…

  13. Weekly Community Interviews With High-Risk Participants: Operational Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Lidz, Charles W.; Gardner, William P.; Skeem, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over…

  14. Setting Course: The Case for the Credentialing of Forensic Interviewers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Mike; Vieth, Victor I.; Campos, Hector M.

    2010-01-01

    The article provides a history of efforts to develop a credentialing or certification process for forensic interviewers and reviews the multitiered credentialing process offered by the National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers. The authors argue the benefits of a credentialing process for forensic interviewers and respond to…

  15. An Oral History Annotation Tool for INTER-VIEWs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, H. van den; Sanders, E.P.; Rutten, Robin; Scagliola, S.; Witkamp, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a web-based tool for retrieving and annotating audio fragments of e.g. interviews. Our collection contains 250 interviews with veterans of Dutch conflicts and military missions. The audio files of the interviews were disclosed using ASR technology focussed at keyword retrieval. Resulting

  16. Closing the Reference Interview: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher W.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses reasons why patrons or librarians terminate the reference interview, including the content of the interview, interpersonal dynamics, and institutional or policy factors. Goals and objectives of the person terminating the interview are considered, and guidelines for policy development and performance improvement are offered. (30…

  17. Motivational Interviewing for Smoking Cessation among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Kelly; Carter, Kimberly; Curtin, Lisa; Martz, Denise M.; Gagnon, Sandy G.; Michael, Kurt D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing has shown some success as an intervention for college student cigarette smokers. We tested the efficacy and process of a two session motivational-interviewing-based smoking intervention compared to an assessment/information session. College student participants assigned to the motivational interviewing condition did not…

  18. Assuring Fairness in the Medical School Admission Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Ronald J.; Shores, Jay H.

    1981-01-01

    The reliability and difficulty level of faculty interviewing of applicants to the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are assessed. An index is proposed for classifying interviewers, along with a point system for assuring fairness in assigning interviewers. Tabular data are included. (MSE)

  19. Hospital admission interviews are time-consuming with several interruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghazanfar, Misbah N; Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig; Nielsen, Trine R H

    2012-01-01

    The admission interview is an important procedure to reduce medication errors. Studies indicate that physicians do not spend much time on the interview and that the major obstacles are lack of time and heavy workload. The aim of this study was to measure the time physicians spend on admission...... interviews and to describe factors that affect time consumption....

  20. Teacher Perceptions of Classroom Assessment: A Focus Group Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuankun

    2015-01-01

    This study used a focus group interview to examine teacher perceptions of classroom assessment. The interview took place in a school where the researcher had visited and observed classes taught by the majority of the teachers interviewed for the study. The majority of the interviewees seemed to embrace the notion of assessment for learning.…