WorldWideScience

Sample records for videotape recording students

  1. "Yes! Animation Is Possible with Your Videotape Recorder!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alfreda; Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project in which students are involved in producing an animated videotape recording and discusses the advantages of modern videotape equipment over other film media. An outline of the process covers materials used, storyboard and artwork production, videotaping procedures, and audio dubbing. (CLB)

  2. Radiologic evaluation of the globus symptom using videotape recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Chang, Tae Young; Park, In Yong

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined barium swallow in 213 patients with globus symptom and 79 patients with vague gastric problems without globus symptom. Abnormal findings were more frequently detected on videorecording than on conventional esophagogram. Radiologic findings were transient cricopharyngeal indentation (CPI), residual barium collection and delayed clearing from hypopharynx (RB), laryngeal penetration of barium, barium retention in vallecula and or pyriform sinuses. Among them residual barium in hypopharynx was more frequently detected in patients with globus symptom than in patients without globus symptom. Globus symptom was more frequent in adult women, but age and sex difference did not affect the incidence of the abnormal radiologic findings. Cricopharyngeal indentation was most frequently seen at the level of C5-6 interspace and had a tendency of moving upward gradually during the indentation in about half of the cases. Most of the CPI was seen in early phase of swallowing and was visible within 1 sec. Residual barium collection was mostly seen in C6 or C6-7 level. RB had no cause and effect relationship with CPI, and it was not secondary result of obstructive effect of CPI. The authors think that videotape recording can be a useful method for evaluation of globus symptom. The residual barium collection in hypopharynx can be a significant finding in globus symptom

  3. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  4. Medical Student Assessment of Videotape for Teaching in Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J. R.; McLachlan, M. S. F.

    1976-01-01

    A series of six recordings that describe some aspects of the radiology of the chest, using only radiographs, were viewed by a small group of final year medical students. Their scores for factual questions immediately afterwards were compared with their attitudes to the learning experience; higher scores correlated with positive attitudes. (LBH)

  5. [The scientific videotape with digital processing in surgery. The new opportunities offered surgery for videotape recording and postprocessing with the use of information and digital technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, N

    1999-01-01

    The facility of the tape recording of a surgical operation, by means of simple manageable apparatuses and at low costs, especially in comparison with the former cinematography, makes it possible for all surgeons to record their own operative activity. Therefore at present the demonstration in video of surgical interventions is very common, but very often the video-tapes show surgical events only in straight chronological succession, as for facts of chronicle news. The simplification of the otherwise sophisticated digital technology of informatics elaboration of images makes more convenient and advisable to assemble the more meaningful sequences for a final product of higher scientific value. The digital technology gives at the best its contribution during the phase of post-production of the video-tape, where the surgeon himself can assemble an end product of more value because aimed to a scientific and rational communication. Thanks to such an elaboration the video-tape can aim not simply to become a good documentary, but also to achieve an educational purpose or becomes a truly scientific film. The initial video will be recorded following a specific project, the script, foreseeing and programming what has to be demonstrated of the surgical operation, establishing therefore in advance the most important steps of the intervention. The sequences recorded will then be assembled not necessarily in a chronological succession but integrating the moving images with static pictures, as drawings, schemes, tables, aside the picture-in picture technique, and besides the vocal descriptive comment. The cinema language has accustomed us to a series of passages among the different sequences as fading, cross-over, "flash-back", aiming to stimulate the psychological associative powers and encourage those critical. The video-tape can be opportunely shortened, paying attention to show only the essential phases of the operation for demonstrate only the core of the problem and utilize

  6. Enhancing traditional, televised, and videotaped courses with Web-based technologies: a comparison of student satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, M L; Lindquist, M

    2001-01-01

    Varied distance learning strategies can be used to deliver nursing courses, including interactive television, videotape, and Web-based approaches. (1) To assess student assess student satisfaction with a critical care elective course offered simultaneously via traditional and distance learning formats in which Web-based strategies were added, and (2) to compare satisfaction of students taking the traditional course versus those taking the class via distance technology. Students (n = 113) who took the course during the spring 1998 and 1999 semesters completed a teacher-constructed evaluation at the end of the semester. Mean ratings on the evaluation were positive. Ratings of interaction, communication with instructor, and facilitation of learning were higher from students who took the traditional course. The application of Web-based technologies may be one factor for the overall course satisfaction. However, it is important to continue to evaluate strategies that work best for students taking courses via distance technology.

  7. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  8. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  9. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Khorasani, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2015-04-01

    Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students' ability intaking informed consent from patients. This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students  of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics coursebefore their 'clinical clerkship'training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group(n=28) was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1(n=22) were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issuesthrough the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics ofinformed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anovatest.P-Value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. The mean scores results of A2, A1and B groupwere found to be7.21 , 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8,respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (plecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better.it should be considered that mixed methodsof teaching should be used together for better result.

  10. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  11. Evaluation of two videotape instruction programmes on how to break bad news--for Cantonese-speaking medical students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, C L; Fielding, R; Wong, G; Chung, S F; Nestel, D F

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate a culture-specific videotape on how to 'break bad news' and another videotape produced by a western university, and to determine if the language of presentation influenced the students' perceived abilities to execute basic skills. Third year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong. Longitudinal study with experimental design. Two instructional tapes on breaking bad news; one using Chinese speaking role models and one using English. In both groups, self-efficacy summed scores increased from 26.8 (95% CI = 25.9-27.7) at the pre-test to 29.0 (95% CI = 28.4-29.6). The biggest changes occurred in perceived self-efficacy regarding specific skills. However, students using the Chinese tape rated skills as more useful than those using the English tape. The videotapes were useful in teaching communication skills. Culturally relevant audiovisual materials were more effective.

  12. The Use of Videotape Recordings to Teach Clinical Skills (Evaluation and Remediation) In the Fields of Communicative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeaud, Frances P.

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the benefits derived by speech and language pathology students who used video tape recordings to learn diagnosis of communication disorders, to observe professional therapists and therapy programs, and to improve their own clinical techniques through self-observation. The use of video tapes to teach clinical…

  13. Laboratories and Demonstrations in Child Development with Unedited Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Debra Ann

    1986-01-01

    Multipurpose demonstrations of child development are easy to produce by videotaping children while they interact with parents, siblings, or friends. Unlike commercial films, videotapes without narration allow students to formulate and test their own research questions. This article describes how to use unedited videotapes for laboratories in…

  14. All about Mammals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this videotape, students learn more about the characteristics of common warm-blooded mammals and what makes them different from other animals. Children also find out how humans are more advanced in structure than other mammals, but how they still share the same basic traits. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education…

  15. Adding Feminist Therapy to Videotape Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Jennifer L.; Yoder, Janice D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides directions for presenting a 32-minute series of four videotape segments that highlights the fundamental features of four approaches to psychotherapy, extending its reach to include a feminist perspective. Describes the approaches and included segments. Reports that students' comments demonstrate that the video sequence provided a helpful…

  16. Promoting Student Teachers' Content Related Knowledge in Teaching Systems Thinking: Measuring Effects of an Intervention through Evaluating a Videotaped Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkränzer, Frank; Kramer, Tim; Hörsch, Christian; Schuler, Stephan; Rieß, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of complex, dynamic and animate systems has a special standing in education for sustainable development and biology. Thus one important role of science teacher education is to promote student teachers' Content Related Knowledge (CRK) for teaching systems thinking, consisting of extensive Content Knowledge (CK) and well formed…

  17. Nursing students' self-evaluation using a video recording of foley catheterization: effects on students' competence, communication skills, and learning motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon Sook; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    An opportunity for a student to evaluate his or her own performance enhances self-awareness and promotes self-directed learning. Using three outcome measures of competency of procedure, communication skills, and learning motivation, the effects of self-evaluation using a video recording of the student's Foley catheterization was investigated in this study. The students in the experimental group (n = 20) evaluated their Foley catheterization performance by reviewing the video recordings of their own performance, whereas students in the control group (n = 20) received written evaluation guidelines only. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had better scores on competency (p communication skills (p performance developed by reviewing a videotape appears to increase the competency of clinical skills in nursing students. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Technology Is the Answer, But What Was the Question? Audiotape vs. Videotape for Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Barbara Gerson; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In an evaluation of supplementary learning aids students were assigned to one of four learning conditions: (1) videotape plus worksheet, (2) audiotape plus worksheet, (3) combination of audio- and videotape plus worksheet, and (4) worksheet only. Results reported include test scores and ratings of helpfulness, as well as student preferences and…

  19. Doing Things. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. It contains activities from students' everyday life such as eating, washing, and playing. These daily processes are then…

  20. All about Dinosaurs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs were the rulers of the land 65 million years ago. In this videotape, children learn more about the different kinds of dinosaurs by viewing vivid illustrations and fossil discoveries. Students compare the dinosaurs to their modern kin--snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Students also listen to different theories to try to answer the big…

  1. Library orientation on videotape: production planning and administrative support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, J; Tawyea, E W

    1989-01-01

    New student-faculty-staff orientation is an important public service in a medical library and demands creativity, imagination, teaching skill, coordination, and cooperation on the part of public services staff. The Northwestern University Medical Library (NUML) implemented a video production service in the spring of 1986 and used the new service to produce an orientation videotape for incoming students, new faculty, and medical center staff. Planning is an important function in video production, and the various phases of outlining topics, drafting scripts, matching video sequences, and actual taping of video, voice, and music are described. The NUML orientation videotape demonstrates how reference and audiovisual services merge talent and skills to benefit the library user. Videotape production, however, cannot happen in a vacuum of good intentions and high ideals. This paper also presents the management support and cost analysis needed to make video production services a reality for use by public service departments.

  2. Internet Roadside Cafe #6. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This 30-minute videotape takes an in-depth look at World Wide Web business transactions, potential risks, client privacy and security issues by asking businesses and consumers how they do business on the Internet. Also featured in the program is advice about choosing a secure password, the use of credit cards for Web purchasing and a review of…

  3. Improving Instruction through a Videotape Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batesky, James

    1979-01-01

    Videotape and a videotape library can be used to expand the quality of instruction of a physical education program by allowing greater diversity of material taught and increased use of professionals and experts in various sports. (JMF)

  4. Good Morning, Good Night. A Day on the Farm. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. The videotape provides activities from children's' daily routines, such as eating, playing, and sleeping. It also…

  5. Journey to Planet Earth: The Urban Explosion. The Public Television Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape attempts to show students how the uncontrolled development of the world's major cities has led to a series of problems such as air pollution, water pollution, limited room for waste disposal, housing shortages, and loss of farmland. The videotape profiles four mega-cities: Mexico City, Shanghai, Istanbul, and New York City. Students…

  6. Me & Isaac Newton. [Videotape and] KIDSNET Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This videotape records the stories of 7 scientists, 3 women and 4 men who range in age from 33 to 81. Beginning with their earliest scientific questions and including their most personal ponderings, the scientists reveal their histories and professional obligations to affect the world. Director Michael Apted allows the personal adventures of the…

  7. All about Fish. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    There is a completely new world to discover in the oceans, lakes, and rivers--a world filled with an amazing variety of fish. While all fish live and breathe underwater, each type looks very different and develops its own unique living habits. In this videotape, students learn more about the body structures of fish as well as how they reproduce…

  8. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  9. All about Animal Adaptations. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Animals change to better adapt to their environment. Over long periods of time, nature helps the animals adapt by changing their body shape and color as well as adjusting their methods of getting and eating food, defending themselves, and caring for their young. In this videotape, students learn what changes different animals go through in order…

  10. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  11. All about Food Chains. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Whether animals are herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, each one is part of an eternal food chain that carries on from one generation to the next. In this videotape, students learn more about terms like "predator,""pre-consumer" and "producer," as well as the cycles of food chains and food webs and how they support…

  12. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  13. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  14. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  15. The Law, the Counselor, and Student Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, John D.

    1970-01-01

    Counselor's legal responsibilities in release of information about students involves matters of parental rights to information; defamation, libel, and slander; and privileged communication. Counselor has little to fear provided he performs professionally and ethically. (Author)

  16. Visual Progression Analysis of Student Records Data

    OpenAIRE

    Raji, Mohammad; Duggan, John; DeCotes, Blaise; Huang, Jian; Zanden, Bradley Vander

    2017-01-01

    University curriculum, both on a campus level and on a per-major level, are affected in a complex way by many decisions of many administrators and faculty over time. As universities across the United States share an urgency to significantly improve student success and success retention, there is a pressing need to better understand how the student population is progressing through the curriculum, and how to provide better supporting infrastructure and refine the curriculum for the purpose of ...

  17. Instructional Uses of Videotape: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Harold E.; And Others

    This collection of seven articles for the college teacher of speech relates specific ways that videotape has been used in training teachers and in teaching the fundamentals of speech, advanced public speaking, and discussion. Included are articles by (1) Harold E. Nelson, who explains how videotape is used in college speech classes to aid in…

  18. Recording Students to Bring Poetry Alive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Poems are filled with musicality. Poetry and music are often described using similar terms: meter, cadence, phrase, form, and more. Poetry also has physical qualities recognized ever since the Greeks classified poetic meter in feet. In this article, the author presents a project that works well across the age spectrum: recording expressive poetry…

  19. A Student Right of Privacy: The Developing School Records Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdeb, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Current legal ramifications of the right of privacy in students' school records are examined. It is suggested that resolution of the school record problem must be made with the realization that whatever is imprinted on a youth will affect his future and that of society. (LBH)

  20. Analysis of Participant Reactivity in Dyads Performing a Videotaped Conflict-Management Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk, Yulia Y; Riesch, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    Videotaping is used frequently in nursing research. A threat to the validity of videotaping is participant reactivity, that is, being recorded by a camera may influence the behavior of interest. This paper's purpose is to report how youth ages 10 to 14 years old and their parent viewed participation in a videotaped conflict-management task. Five dyads, who were part of a randomized clinical trial testing an intervention to promote parent-child communication, participated in a structured interview. All parents were mothers. Youth were eighth graders. Three were boys and two were girls. Findings indicated that (a) dyads felt that the videotaped interaction had a progression of feeling unnatural in the beginning to feeling natural toward the end, (b) dyads found it relatively easy to choose a topic of discussion, and (c) dyads felt that the discussions were meaningful. Based on these data, recommendations for researchers to reduce participant reactivity are provided.

  1. Fish. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. There are many types of fish that live in oceans, lakes, and streams. Students learn about fish characteristics and environmental habitats,…

  2. Marine & Other Invertebrates. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Invertebrate animals include a vast array of spineless creatures. In this video, students discover marine lifeforms such as jellyfish,…

  3. Animal Interdependency. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. No organism on Earth can exist independently. Students find out more about animal relationships such as predator/prey relationships and…

  4. Food Chains. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The food chain provides a clear example of how life continues year after year. Students learn how the cycle of energy starts with the sun,…

  5. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kawanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    Describes the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video survey of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. Part of the Third International Mathematics and Science study, this research project is the first study of videotaped records from national probability samples. (SLD)

  6. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  7. Understanding IDEA 1997 and the 1999 Regulations with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    The United States Congress amended the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1997 to reflect changes in the special education field over the previous twenty years. In this 2-hour videotape recording designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman presents her insights about changes in IDEA law and…

  8. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  9. Animal Classification. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They learn what the terms "kingdom", "phylum", and "order" mean, and discover how the 3.5 million-plus organisms found on Earth fit into…

  10. All about Endangered and Extinct Animals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    While there are thousands of different animals in the world, some have been extinct for many years and others are on the verge of extinction. In this videotape, students learn about the natural and man-made factors that lead to the endangerment and extinction of animals. Children find out why it is essential for people to help all forms of…

  11. Endangered & Extinct Animals. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Due to environmental factors and human interference, many of Earth's creatures have ceased to exist or are on the verge of extinction. In…

  12. The Effectiveness of Substance Abuse Prevention Videotapes with Mexican American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Joan M.; Buki, Lydia P.; Horan, John J.; Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Burows, Deborah Dyer

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of three substance-abuse-prevention videotapes derived from contrasting theoretical frameworks was evaluated using 312 rural Mexican-American students in grades seven through eight. The assertion-training video produced higher levels of assertiveness among ninth-graders; the others had no impact. Discusses the importance of…

  13. Reptiles. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The ancestors of reptiles date back to the dinosaurs. After the dinosaurs died out, it was one of the best-adapted species that survived and…

  14. Insects & Other Arthropods. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They also learn that there are more species of insects than any other animal class in the world. Insects are incredible creatures with many…

  15. Presenting Social Issues with Videotape [and] Teaming Up to Take a Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Diana; Jackson, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the use of media in schools. One describes the use of videotapes to present social issues; the second describes the use of an integrated learning system with ninth and tenth grade at-risk students to improve their rate of attendance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (LRW)

  16. Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education.

  17. Teaching Electronic Health Record Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Sandoval, Marie; Hart, Vicki; Drill, Clarissa

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated nurse practitioner students' communication skills when utilizing the electronic health record during history taking. The nurse practitioner students (n = 16) were videotaped utilizing the electronic health record while taking health histories with standardized patients. The students were videotaped during two separate sessions during one semester. Two observers recorded the time spent (1) typing and talking, (2) typing only, and (3) looking at the computer without talking. Total history taking time, computer placement, and communication skills were also recorded. During the formative session, mean history taking time was 11.4 minutes, with 3.5 minutes engaged with the computer (30.6% of visit). During the evaluative session, mean history taking time was 12.4 minutes, with 2.95 minutes engaged with the computer (24% of visit). The percentage of time individuals spent changed over the two visits: typing and talking, -3.1% (P = .3); typing only, +12.8% (P = .038); and looking at the computer, -9.6% (P = .039). This study demonstrated that time spent engaged with the computer during a patient encounter does decrease with student practice and education. Therefore, students benefit from instruction on electronic health record-specific communication skills, and use of a simple mnemonic to reinforce this is suggested.

  18. The Effect of Music in Video Mediated Instruction on Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabi, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study of secondary school students in Nigeria to determine whether use of musical accompaniment on videotape recordings used in instruction of economic geography had any effects on students' learning. Results offer inconclusive differences in effect between video instruction accompanied by music and video instruction without music.…

  19. Student and faculty perceptions of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynor, Lena M; Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K; Elliott, David P

    2013-10-14

    To describe students' and faculty members' perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (pstudents reported being more likely to miss a class that was recorded; however, few students (10%) reported using recordings as a substitute for attending class. The most common concern of faculty members was decreased student attendance (27%). Pharmacy students consider lecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance.

  20. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioli, Frances E; Elliot, Diane L; Palmer, Ryan T; Graichen, Carla C; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna; Galper, Ari B; Tysinger, James W

    2017-01-01

    Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011-2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013-2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students' EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students' EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice.

  1. Legal IEPs: A Common Sense Approach with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    In this 2-hour videotape workshop designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman answers many key questions that have been raised about Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) since the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the 1999 regulations. The videotape reviews the…

  2. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  3. Methods and results of implementing a commercially available videotaped health physics training program in a multi-disciplined DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia, a prime contractor for DOE, is a multi-disciplined research and development laboratory. Its various activities include the operations of two nuclear reactors, several multi-kilocurie gamma irradiation facilities, a transuranic hot cell facility, various and numerous particle accelerators and x-ray generators, and many other areas involving employees working with or around radioactive materials or radiation producing machines. Since March 1979, Sandia has conducted a formalized basic radiation safety training program using a commercially available videotaped training package. The videotapes are generic in nature and are accompanied with hard copy text material, vu-graphs, quizzes, and an instructor's guide. Sandia's overall training program and the methods, results, and problem areas of implementing an off the shelf, commercially available videotaped training program are described. Results are summarized using an instructor/course/student evaluation form

  4. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  5. NEED ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING ESP MATERIALS FOR MEDICAL RECORD STUDENTS IN APIKES CITRA MEDIKA SURAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beta Setiawati

    2016-06-01

    and quantitative methods. The outcomesof this study showed the real necessities of students in learning English to prepare their future at the field of medical record and health information. Findings of the need analysis demonstrate that all four of the language skills were necessary for their academic studies and their target career. There are certain topics related to English for medical record such as medical record staff’ duties, ethical and legal issues in medical record, Hospital statistics, Medical record filling system, Health information system, and so on. Accordingly, this study proposes new ESP materials based on the stakeholders’ needs.It is suggested that textbook or handout of English for Medical Record will be made based on the Need Analysis by ESP designers and ESP lecturers involve actively recognizing the progressive needs of medical record students.

  6. Preparing Payroll Register, Employee Earnings' Records, and Paychecks. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElveen, Peggy C.

    Supporting performance objective 28 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on preparing a payroll register, employee earnings' records, and paychecks are included in this packet, which is one in a series. The student materials include a…

  7. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  8. The Use of Pre-Recorded Lectures on Student Performance in Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgu, Rim Mekonnen; Huynh, Sophia Hoang-Vy; Gopalan, Chaya

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in reliance on pre-recorded lectures (PRL) as a source of learning in place of live-lectures (LL) in higher education today but whether PRL can effectively replace LL remains unknown. We tested how students performed in the exam questions when PRL replaced LL. While PRL+ group included those students who watched the…

  9. Master's degree in nuclear engineering by videotaped courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, a group of northern midwest utilities met with faculty from the nuclear engineering department at the University of Wisconsin (UW) to discuss the possibility of offering graduate courses by videotape for academic credit and earning a master's degree. Four years later, two utility employees from Northern States Power (NSP) and Wisconsin Electric Power Companies (WEPCO) graduated from the University of Wisconsin with master's degrees earned entirely by taking videotape graduate courses at their individual nuclear power plant sites. Within these 4 years, more than a dozen videotaped graduate courses were developed by the faculty of the department in a formalized master's degree program in nuclear engineering and engineering physics. This paper outlines the program's development and its current features

  10. Evaluating Student Self-Assessment through Video-Recorded Patient Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Tammy R; Kearney, Rachel C; Kissell, Denise; Salisbury, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if the use of a video-recorded clinical session affects the accuracy of dental hygiene student self-assessment and dental hygiene instructor feedback. A repeated measures experiment was conducted. The use of the ODU 11/12 explorer was taught to students and participating faculty through video and demonstration. Students then demonstrated activation of the explorer on a student partner using the same technique. While faculty completed the student assessment in real time, the sessions were video recorded. After completing the activation of the explorer, students and faculty completed an assessment of the student's performance using a rubric. A week later, both students and faculty viewed the video of the clinical skill performance and reassessed the student's performance using the same rubric. The student videos were randomly assigned a number, so faculty reassessed the performance without access to the student's identity or the score that was initially given. Twenty-eight students and 4 pre-clinical faculty completed the study. Students' average score was 4.68±1.16 on the first assessment and slightly higher 4.89±1.45 when reviewed by video. Faculty average scores were 5.07±2.13 at the first assessment and 4.79±2.54 on the second assessment with the video. No significant differences were found between the differences in overall scores, there was a significant difference in the scores of the grading criteria compared to the expert assessment scores (p=0.0001). This pilot study shows that calibration and assessment without bias in education is a challenge. Analyzing and incorporating new techniques can result in more exact assessment of student performance and self-assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  11. Image processing system for videotape review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettendroffer, E.

    1988-01-01

    In a nuclear plant, the areas in which fissile materials are stored or handled, have to be monitored continuously. One method of surveillance is to record pictures of TV cameras with determined time intervals on special video recorders. The 'time lapse' recorded tape is played back at normal speed and an inspector checks visually the pictures. This method requires much manpower and an automated method would be useful. The present report describes an automatic reviewing method based on an image processing system; the system detects scene changes in the picture sequence and stores the reduced data set on a separate video tape. The resulting reduction of reviewing time by inspector is important for surveillance data with few movements

  12. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  13. Evidence Regarding Teaching and Assessment of Record-Keeping Skills in Training of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kate J; Bearman, Margaret; Palermo, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the literature on teaching and assessing dental students' record-keeping skills prior to qualification to practice independently as a dentist. A systematic literature review was performed using Ovid MEDLINE and SCOPUS. Keywords used in the search included dental, record, audit, education, and assessment. Electronic search results were screened for publications that targeted undergraduate dental training, related to a record-keeping education intervention, and were published in English and available in full text. Six studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed, and research findings were compared across the included studies. These six articles addressed the techniques used to teach and assess record-keeping skills in a pre-qualification context. The techniques included supervisor audits, peer audits, lectures, tutorials, research assignments, case reports, record-keeping templates, and checklists of required record components. The use of record audit as part of teaching and evaluation dominated these articles; it was used as the assessment method in five of the six studies. All methods of record-keeping training in studies published to date were found effective in improving student record-keeping skills. However, there was insufficient evidence to determine whether certain methods were more effective than others.

  14. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  15. Tips & Techniques: Storytelling with Puppets and Props. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    On this 20-minute videotape, two accomplished storytellers share their expertise on using puppets and props to enhance the art of storytelling. Schroeder Cherry uses several types of puppets to tell his educational story about the Underground Railroad, while Karen Quinn-Wisniewski entertains her audience of young children with classic fables,…

  16. Educators Using Information Technology. GIS Video Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A M Productions Inc., Vancouver (British Columbia).

    This 57-minute videotape covers the "Florida Educators Using Information Technology" session of the "Eco-Informa '96" conference. Two speakers presented examples of environmental educators using information technology. The first speaker, Brenda Maxwell, is the Director and Developer of the Florida Science Institute based at…

  17. Exploiting Academic Records for Predicting Student Drop Out: a case study in Brazilian higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, Allan; Balby, Leandro; Cajueiro, Adalberto

    2017-01-01

    Students’ dropout is a major concern of the Brazilian higher education institutions as it may cause waste of resources and decrease graduation rates. The early detection of students with high probability of dropping out, as well as understanding the underlying causes, are crucial for defining more effective actions toward preventing this problem. In this paper, we cast the dropout detection problem as a classification problem. We use a large sample of academic records of students across 76 co...

  18. A student-centred electronic health record system for clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kristine; Judd, Terry; McColl, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are an increasingly important feature of the national healthcare system [1]. However, little research has investigated the impact this will have on medical students' learning. As part of an innovative technology platform for a new masters level program in medicine, we are developing a student-centred EHR system for clinical education. A prototype was trialed with medical students over several weeks during 2010. This paper reports on the findings of the trial, which had the overall aim of assisting our understanding of how trainee doctors might use an EHR system for learning and communication in a clinical setting. In primary care and hospital settings, EHR systems offer potential benefits to medical students' learning: Longitudinal tracking of clinical progress towards established learning objectives [2]; Capacity to search across a substantial body of records [3]; Integration with online medical databases [3]; Development of expertise in creating, accessing and managing high quality EHRs [4]. While concerns have been raised that EHR systems may alter the interaction between teachers and students [3], and may negatively influence physician-patient communication [6], there is general consensus that the EHR is changing the current practice environment and teaching practice needs to respond. Final year medical students on clinical placement at a large university teaching hospital were recruited for the trial. Following a four-week period of use, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 participants. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data analysed for emerging themes. Study participants were also surveyed about the importance of EHR systems in general, their familiarity with them, and general perceptions of sharing patient records. Medical students in this pilot study identified a number of educational, practical and administrative advantages that the student-centred EHR system offered over their existing ad

  19. Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education. Research In Learning Technology, 20(3). doi:10.3402/rlt.v20i0.17299

  20. 20 CFR 670.960 - What are the procedures for management of student records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the procedures for management of..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative and Management Provisions § 670.960 What are the procedures for management of student records? The Secretary issues...

  1. Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS) [machine-readable data file].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. General Education Div.

    The Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS) machine-readable data file (MRDF) is a collection of education and health data on more than 750,000 migrant children in grades K-12 in the United States (except Hawaii), the District of Columbia, and the outlying territories of Puerto Rico and the Mariana and Marshall Islands. The active file…

  2. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  3. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  4. "But They Won't Come to Lectures..." The Impact of Audio Recorded Lectures on Student Experience and Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    The move to increasingly flexible platforms for student learning and experience through provision of online lecture recordings is often interpreted by educators as students viewing attendance at lectures as optional. The trend toward the use of this technology is often met with resistance from some academic staff who argue that student attendance…

  5. Empirical development of brief smoking prevention videotapes which target African-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, S; Parker, V C; Lopes, C; Crippens, D L; Elder, P; Scholl, D

    1995-07-01

    Two studies are described which provide evaluations for two brief videotapes developed as supplemental materials in the prevention of tobacco use among African-American adolescents. One videotape (the "soap opera") provides a more general audience-oriented presentation of prevention material and it was filmed primarily at a shopping mall, whereas the other videotape (the "rap") provides a "hip-hop generation" presentation, and it was filmed primarily at an outdoor hangout. The first study compared the two videotapes against each other. The second study compared the two videotapes combined in the same presentation, controlling for order of presentation, against a discussion group control. The results of the two studies indicated few differences in receptivity to the two videotapes among primarily African-American and Latino young adolescents. The rap videotape was rated as more accurate in its depiction of the African-American lifestyle, although both videotapes were equally liked. When shown together, the videotapes were not found to be superior in decreasing behavioral intention to smoke compared to a discussion group control. No change in trial of smoking was observed within or across conditions measured over a pre-post summer interval. These data suggest that "culturally sensitive" videotapes have no more of a short-term effect on youth than do other types of brief interventions which involve minority implementers.

  6. The Recording of Student Performance in the Microbiology Laboratory as a Training, Tutorial, and Motivational Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lipson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics, as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  7. The recording of student performance in the microbiology laboratory as a training, tutorial, and motivational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Steven M; Gair, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics), as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  8. The Apprehension and views of the students of music education department about studio recording performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaattin CANBAY

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Being individually staged of music has been a performance process that always requires intensive concentration, attention and long - running work for performers. At the end of this process, generally during their performance, musicians feel apprehensive and excited about some reasons like carrying out work's musical and technical factors properly and sense of being appreciated by audiences. In many surveys, it is known that ,in concerts and their own instrument exams, the apprehension of undergraduate student s of music education department ,who have experienced this process, affects their performances negatively. Thus, the aim of this study is to specify the music education undergraduate students' apprehension level before a studio recording that needs a very special performance according to different variables. Also in this study, students' views about their studio recording experiences are taken. In the study, descriptive research is used and the technical qualitative research is imposed. In the study carried out for two months, working party is designated by the students of Çomu - Faculty of Education, Department of Fine arts education, Department of music education.

  9. Interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlack, M E; Arvidson, J; Snyder-Mackler, L; Danoff, J V; McGarvey, C L

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis (VOGA) assessments. Fifty-four licensed physical therapists with varying amounts of clinical experience served as raters. Three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated an abnormal gait pattern served as subjects for the videotape. The raters analyzed each patient's most severely involved knee during the four subphases of stance for the kinematic variables of knee flexion and genu valgum. Raters were asked to determine whether these variables were inadequate, normal, or excessive. The temporospatial variables analyzed throughout the entire gait cycle were cadence, step length, stride length, stance time, and step width. Generalized kappa coefficients ranged from .11 to .52. Intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1) and (3,1) were slightly higher. Our results indicate that physical therapists' VOGA assessments are only slightly to moderately reliable and that improved interrater reliability of the assessments of physical therapists utilizing this technique is needed. Our data suggest that there is a need for greater standardization of gait-analysis training.

  10. A Survey of First-Year Biology Student Opinions Regarding Live Lectures and Recorded Lectures as Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcock, D. C.; Chua, W. H.; Hekman, M.; Levin, M. T.; Brown, S.

    2017-01-01

    A cohort of first-year biology students was surveyed regarding their opinions and viewing habits for live and recorded lectures. Most respondents (87%) attended live lectures as a rule (attenders), with 66% attending more than two-thirds of the lectures. In contrast, only 52% accessed recordings and only 13% viewed more than two-thirds of the…

  11. How To Dance through Time. Volume V: Victorian Era Couple Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 55-minute VHS videotape is the fifth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It continues the tradition of the romance of the mid-19th century couple dances, focusing on Victorian era couple dances. The videotape offers 35 variations of the renowned 19th century couple dances, including the waltz, the polka, the galop,…

  12. Vicarious Desensitization of Test Anxiety Through Observation of Video-taped Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jay

    1972-01-01

    Procedural variations were compared for a vicarious group treatment of test anxiety involving observation of videotapes depicting systematic desensitization of a model. The theoretical implications of the present study and the feasibility of using videotaped materials to treat test anxiety and other avoidance responses in school settings are…

  13. Begin with Love[R]. The First Three Months: Connecting with Your Child. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIVITAS Initiative, Chicago, IL.

    Hosted by Oprah Winfrey and featuring Dr. Kyle Pruett, this videotape focuses on new parents' relationship with their infant in the first 3 months of life. The 30-minute videotape begins with footage of infants during the newborn period and depicts parents talking about their emotional response to their infant's birth. The video focuses on…

  14. Monitoring Student Immunization, Screening, and Training Records for Clinical Compliance: An Innovative Use of the Institutional Learning Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elting, Julie Kientz

    2017-12-13

    Clinical compliance for nursing students is a complex process mandating them to meet facility employee occupational health requirements for immunization, screening, and training prior to patient contact. Nursing programs monitor clinical compliance with in-house management of student records, either paper or electronic, or by contracting with a vendor specializing in online record tracking. Regardless of method, the nursing program remains fully accountable for student preparation and bears the consequences of errors. This article describes how the institution's own learning management system can be used as an accurate, cost-neutral, user-friendly, and Federal Educational Rights Protection Act-compliant clinical compliance system.

  15. Attitudes and behaviors related to introduction of Electronic Health Record (EHR among Shiraz University students in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Nematollahi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electronic Health Record contains all the information related to the health of citizens, from before birth to death have been consistently over time is electronically stored and will be available without regard to location or time all or part of it to authorized persons. The acceptance of EHR by citizens is important in successful implementation of it. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and behaviors related to the introduction of electronic health records among Shiraz university student. Method:The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive survey. The study population consisted of all Shiraz University students. The data gathering tool was a questionnaire and data were analyzed in SPSS v.16 software, using descriptive statistical tests. Also, the samples, i.e. 384 students, were selected through convenient sampling. Results: The results showed that most of the students kept their medical records at home to show them to a specialist and only 15% of them were familiar with the Electronic Health Records term. The use of Electronic Health Records for Maintenance of drug prescriptions was of the most importance. Conclusion: Among the students who are educated class and the source of change, the university students’ familiarity with Electronic Health Records is too low and most of them were not even familiar with its name and it is very important to implement this system familiarize the users on how to use it sufficiently

  16. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  17. 28 CFR 75.6 - Statement describing location of books and records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Statement describing location of books... of books and records. (a) Any producer of any book, magazine, periodical, film, videotape, digitally... the book, magazine, periodical, film, videotape, digitally- or computer-manipulated image, digital...

  18. The Video Toaster Meets Science + English + At-Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryess, Charlie

    1992-01-01

    Describes an experimental Science-English class for at-risk students which was team taught and used technology--particularly a Video Toaster (a videotape editing machine)--as a motivator. Discusses procedures for turning videotape taken on field trips into three- to five-minute student productions on California's water crisis. (SR)

  19. Look and Do Ancient Greece. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Greek Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource, containing a teacher's manual, reproducible student workbook, and a color teaching poster, is designed to accompany a 21-minute videotape program, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "Greek Architecture," looks at elements of architectural construction as applied to Greek structures, and…

  20. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  1. Science Students' Classroom Discourse: Tasha's Umwelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jenny

    2012-04-01

    Over the past twenty-five years researchers have been concerned with understanding the science student. The need for such research is still grounded in contemporary issues including providing opportunities for all students to develop scientific literacy and the failure of school science to connect with student's lives, interests and personal identities. The research reported here is unusual in its use of discourse analysis in social psychology to contribute to an understanding of the way students make meaning in secondary school science. Data constructed for the study was drawn from videotapes of nine consecutive lessons in a year-seven science classroom in Melbourne, post-lesson video-stimulated interviews with students and the teacher, classroom observation and the students' written work. The classroom videotapes were recorded using four cameras and seven audio tracks by the International Centre for Classroom Research at the University of Melbourne. Student talk within and about their science lessons was analysed from a discursive perspective. Classroom episodes in which students expressed their sense of personal identity and agency, knowledge, attitude or emotion in relation to science were identified for detailed analysis of the function of the discourse used by students, and in particular the way students were positioned by others or positioned themselves. This article presents the discursive Umwelt or life-space of one middle years science student, Tasha. Her case is used here to highlight the complex social process of meaning making in science classrooms and the need to attend to local moral orders of rights and duties in research on student language use, identity and learning in science.

  2. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  3. Record, Replay, Reflect: Videotaped Lessons Accelerate Learning for Teachers and Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim; Bradley, Barbara A.; Hock, Michael; Skrtic, Thomas M.; Knight, David; Brasseur-Hock, Irma; Clark, Jean; Ruggles, Marilyn; Hatton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    New technologies can dramatically change the way people live and work. Jet engines transformed travel. Television revolutionized news and entertainment. Computers and the Internet have transformed just about everything else. And now small video cameras have the potential to transform professional learning. Recognizing the potential of this new…

  4. Discrepancies between perceptions of students and deans regarding the consequences of restricting students' use of electronic medical records on quality of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarte, Ivan; Könings, Karen D

    2017-03-13

    Electronic medical records (EMR) are more used in university hospitals, but the use of EMR by medical students at the workplace is still a challenge, because the conflict of interest between medical accountability for hospitals and quality of medical education programs for students. Therefore, this study investigates the use of EMR from the perspective of medical school deans and students, and determines their perceptions and concerns about consequences of restricted use of EMR by students on quality of education and patient care. We administered a large-scale survey about the existence of EMR, existing policies, students' use for learning, and consequences on patient care to 42 deans and 789 Residency Physician Applicants in a private university in Colombia. Data from 26 deans and 442 former graduated students were compared with independent t tests and chi square tests. Only half of medical schools had learning programs and policies about the use of EMR by students. Deans did not realize that students have less access to EMR than to paper-based MR. Perceptions of non-curricular learning opportunities how to write in (E)MR were significantly different between deans and students. Limiting students use of EMR has negative consequences on medical education, according to both deans and students, while deans worried significantly more about impact on patient care than students. Billing issues and liability aspects were their major concerns. There is a need for a clear policy and educational program on the use of EMR by students. Discrepancies between the planned curriculum by deans and the real clinical learning environment as experienced by students indicate suboptimal learning opportunities for students. Creating powerful workplace-learning experiences and resolving concerns on students use of EMR has to be resolved in a constructive collaboration way between the involved stakeholders, including also EMR designers and hospital administrators. We recommend intense

  5. Evaluating a Serious Gaming Electronic Medication Administration Record System Among Nursing Students: Protocol for a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard; Sinclair, Barbara; McMurray, Josephine; Strudwick, Gillian; Watson, Gavan; Ladak, Hanif; Zwarenstein, Merrick; McBride, Susan; Chan, Ryan; Brennan, Laura

    2018-05-28

    Although electronic medication administration record systems have been implemented in settings where nurses work, nursing students commonly lack robust learning opportunities to practice the skills and workflow of digitalized medication administration during their formative education. As a result, nursing students' performance in administering medication facilitated by technology is often poor. Serious gaming has been recommended as a possible intervention to improve nursing students' performance with electronic medication administration in nursing education. The objectives of this study are to examine whether the use of a gamified electronic medication administration simulator (1) improves nursing students' attention to medication administration safety within simulated practice, (2) increases student self-efficacy and knowledge of the medication administration process, and (3) improves motivational and cognitive processing attributes related to student learning in a technology-enabled environment. This study comprised the development of a gamified electronic medication administration record simulator and its evaluation in 2 phases. Phase 1 consists of a prospective, pragmatic randomized controlled trial with second-year baccalaureate nursing students at a Canadian university. Phase 2 consists of qualitative focus group interviews with a cross-section of nursing student participants. The gamified medication administration simulator has been developed, and data collection is currently under way. If the gamified electronic medication administration simulator is found to be effective, it could be used to support other health professional simulated education and scaled more widely in nursing education programs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03219151; https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03219151 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6yjBROoDt). RR1-10.2196/9601. ©Richard Booth, Barbara Sinclair, Josephine McMurray, Gillian Strudwick, Gavan Watson, Hanif Ladak

  6. Personal health records in the preclinical medical curriculum: modeling student responses in a simple educational environment utilizing Google Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamanlis Dimokratis A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various problems concerning the introduction of personal health records in everyday healthcare practice are reported to be associated with physicians’ unfamiliarity with systematic means of electronically collecting health information about their patients (e.g. electronic health records - EHRs. Such barriers may further prevent the role physicians have in their patient encounters and the influence they can have in accelerating and diffusing personal health records (PHRs to the patient community. One way to address these problems is through medical education on PHRs in the context of EHR activities within the undergraduate medical curriculum and the medical informatics courses in specific. In this paper, the development of an educational PHR activity based on Google Health is reported. Moreover, student responses on PHR’s use and utility are collected and presented. The collected responses are then modelled to relate the satisfaction level of students in such a setting to the estimation about their attitude towards PHRs in the future. Methods The study was conducted by designing an educational scenario about PHRs, which consisted of student instruction on Google Health as a model PHR and followed the guidelines of a protocol that was constructed for this purpose. This scenario was applied to a sample of 338 first-year undergraduate medical students. A questionnaire was distributed to each one of them in order to obtain Likert-like scale data on the sample’s response with respect to the PHR that was used; the data were then further analysed descriptively and in terms of a regression analysis to model hypothesised correlations. Results Students displayed, in general, satisfaction about the core PHR functions they used and they were optimistic about using them in the future, as they evaluated quite high up the level of their utility. The aspect they valued most in the PHR was its main role as a record-keeping tool, while

  7. Does use of an electronic health record with dental diagnostic system terminology promote dental students' critical thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Susan G; Adibi, Shawn S; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G; Wahlquist, Amy E; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H; Walji, Muhammad F; O'Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-06-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students' critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013-17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry.

  8. Nursing Student Experiences Regarding Safe Use of Electronic Health Records: A Pilot Study of the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Karen J; Eden, Lacey; Merrill, Katreena Collette; Hughes, Mckenna

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has linked improper electronic health record configuration and use with adverse patient events. In response to this problem, the US Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology developed the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guides to evaluate electronic health records for optimal use and safety features. During the course of their education, nursing students are exposed to a variety of clinical practice settings and electronic health records. This descriptive study evaluated 108 undergraduate and 51 graduate nursing students' ratings of electronic health record features and safe practices, as well as what they learned from utilizing the computerized provider order entry and clinician communication Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guide checklists. More than 80% of the undergraduate and 70% of the graduate students reported that they experienced user problems with electronic health records in the past. More than 50% of the students felt that electronic health records contribute to adverse patient outcomes. Students reported that many of the features assessed were not fully implemented in their electronic health record. These findings highlight areas where electronic health records can be improved to optimize patient safety. The majority of students reported that utilizing the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guides increased their understanding of electronic health record features.

  9. Medical students volunteering in hospital: a novel method of exploring and recording the patient experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lorraina Hytiris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient experience is increasingly recognised as an important feature of healthcare quality improvement. However, many of the methods implemented for its collection have significant limitations and reliability issues. This article describes how a UK healthcare organisation worked with medical student volunteers to build capacity for the collection of patient feedback in evidence-informed ways, and summarises student reflections on this process. Aims: To improve the quantity and quality of inpatient feedback, and in doing so provide new learning opportunities for medical students. Conclusions: Patient feedback gathered by volunteers is beneficial to the service and to medical student volunteers. As the feedback gathered is ward-specific, opportunities are created for practice improvements to be identified and acted on. It is feasible for medical students to be trained effectively as volunteers in gathering patient care experiences with adequate support mechanisms in place. Implications for practice: •\tHealthcare services should consider the use of personnel independent of the care team for the collection of patient feedback •\tPatient feedback needs to be shared with practitioners in a timely manner •\tMedical schools should consider this type of volunteering as a unique opportunity for medical students to improve understanding of patients’ experiences of healthcare, and of how care can be person-centred

  10. Secrets of Science. Videos 1-13. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Publishing Group, Burbank, CA. Discover Magazine.

    Discoveries in science and technology are being made at such a rapid pace that it is often difficult for many teachers to stay abreast of new and relevant information. To assist teachers in keeping their students well informed of new discoveries in science, Discover Magazine developed a 13-part video series entitled "Secrets of Science." In each…

  11. Senior Project: Mentoring--The Art of Becoming. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE), Tallahassee, FL.

    Mentoring is an integral part of SERVE's Senior Project program. Mentors provide support and guidance to students as they complete the requirements of Senior Project by meeting with them to offer input on their research papers and assistance with the design and implementation of their projects. Approximately 100 schools in SERVE's 6-state region…

  12. POSSIBILITIES OF TEACHERS FOR MONITORING, DETECTING AND RECORDING OF INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS IN EARLY SCHOOL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Koteva-mojsovska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and recording of the individual characteristics of children are very important for the development of quality education. Also the views of the teachers about the differences in the development, the potentials and the affinities of the children in the early school period are especially important. The quality education process in the modern school should be adapted to the individual potentials of the children. The children are individuals with their own integrity and characteristics. (Johnston and Halocha, 2010. They have individual pace and develop individual approaches in the learning process. This individual pace in the development of the children requires the teachers to regularly monitor and record the individual characteristics and differences of the children, monitoring the children’s interests, planning instruction which will adapt to the different learning approaches and the different pace of progress of the students.Setting out from this paradigm, this paper, which is based on a realized research, aims to offer findings about the treatment of the individual characteristics of the early school-age children in our country. According to this, we carried out a research in four primary schools in Skopje, which showed us that the teachers lack the appropriate conditions and possibilities to monitor and record the individual characteristics and the specific differences of the students in the early school period. 

  13. Brief Report: Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder before One Year of Age: A Retrospective Study Based on Home Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Emily; Dawson, Geraldine; Osterling, Julie; Dinno, Nuhad

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study compared videotape footage at 8-10 months of 15 children later known to have autism spectrum disorder and videotapes of 15 same-age children with typical development. The strongest finding was that infants with early onset autism were much less likely to orient when their name was called than typically developing infants.…

  14. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  15. Photocopying and Videotaping for Educational Purposes: The Doctrine of Fair Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Photocopying guidelines of the 1976 amendments to the Copyright Act have been further legitimized by a 1982 settlement involving New York University. Important recent developments concerning videotape copyrights include the 1981 guidelines of the House Judiciary Committee and the 1984 United States Supreme Court case, "Sony Corporation v.…

  16. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  17. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical…

  18. How To Dance through Time. Volume III: The Majesty of Renaissance Dance. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 42-minute VHS videotape is the third in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It highlights the intricacies of an Italian court dance suite, which mirrors the episodic changes of courtship. Nido D'Amore" (The Nest of Love) exposes the technique for all the dance suites of the era, and features The Opening (which…

  19. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Initiative and Social Relations. [with] Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Michelle

    As preschoolers develop the ability to carry out their ideas and play alone and with others, they are developing the foundation for social competence. This booklet and a companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support nine High/Scope key experiences in initiative and social relations: (1) making and expressing choices, plans,…

  20. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Language and Literacy. [with]Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Nancy A.

    During the preschool years, children experience great strides in their ability to use language. This booklet and companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support six High/Scope key experiences in language and literacy: (1) talking with others about personally meaningful experiences; (2) describing objects, events, and relations;…

  1. Microcomputer Applications for Library Instruction: Automation of Test and Assignment Scoring, and Student Record Keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugranes, Maria R.; Snider, Larry C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the development of an automated library instruction records management system using microcomputer technology. Development described includes assessment of need, exploration of options, system design, and operational development. System products are identified and operational results are reported based on actual system performance.…

  2. Recycling Resources. [Student Handbook, Sound Filmstrips, 12-Inch Record, Pollution Simulation Game, Teacher's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. Richard

    A 15- to 20-hour course on materials recycling, teaching junior high school students about environmental problems and solutions, is developed in this set of materials. It attempts to stimulate them to participate in community efforts aimed at improving the environment. Items in the kit include: (1) teacher's manual, with lesson plans enumerating…

  3. A method for creating teaching movie clips using screen recording software: usefulness of teaching movies as self-learning tools for medical students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Su [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    I wanted to describe a method to create teaching movies with using screen recordings, and I wanted to see if self-learning movies are useful for medical students. Teaching movies were created by direct recording of the screen activity and voice narration during the interpretation of educational cases; we used a PACS system and screen recording software for the recording (CamStudio, Rendersoft, U.S.A.). The usefulness of teaching movies for seft-learning of abdominal CT anatomy was evacuated by the medical students. Creating teaching movie clips with using screen recording software was simple and easy. Survey responses were collected from 43 medical students. The contents of teaching movie was adequately understandable (52%) and useful for learning (47%). Only 23% students agreed the these movies helped motivated them to learn. Teaching movies were more useful than still photographs of the teaching image files. The students wanted teaching movies on the cross-sectional CT anatomy of different body regions (82%) and for understanding the radiological interpretation of various diseases (42%). Creating teaching movie by direct screen recording of a radiologist's interpretation process is easy and simple. The teaching video clips reveal a radiologist's interpretation process or the explanation of teaching cases with his/her own voice narration, and it is an effective self-learning tool for medical students and residents.

  4. A method for creating teaching movie clips using screen recording software: usefulness of teaching movies as self-learning tools for medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seong Su

    2007-01-01

    I wanted to describe a method to create teaching movies with using screen recordings, and I wanted to see if self-learning movies are useful for medical students. Teaching movies were created by direct recording of the screen activity and voice narration during the interpretation of educational cases; we used a PACS system and screen recording software for the recording (CamStudio, Rendersoft, U.S.A.). The usefulness of teaching movies for seft-learning of abdominal CT anatomy was evacuated by the medical students. Creating teaching movie clips with using screen recording software was simple and easy. Survey responses were collected from 43 medical students. The contents of teaching movie was adequately understandable (52%) and useful for learning (47%). Only 23% students agreed the these movies helped motivated them to learn. Teaching movies were more useful than still photographs of the teaching image files. The students wanted teaching movies on the cross-sectional CT anatomy of different body regions (82%) and for understanding the radiological interpretation of various diseases (42%). Creating teaching movie by direct screen recording of a radiologist's interpretation process is easy and simple. The teaching video clips reveal a radiologist's interpretation process or the explanation of teaching cases with his/her own voice narration, and it is an effective self-learning tool for medical students and residents

  5. Sistema de Transferencia de Archivos para Estudiantes Migrantes: Un Mejor Entendimiento para Padres. (Migrant Student Record Transfer System: A Better Understanding for Parents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Senaida I.

    When migrant children are enrolled in the Migrant Education Program, they are also enrolled in the Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS), a national system which accumulates educational and health information for each child on a computer located in Little Rock, Arkansas. The system affords teachers the opportunity to review the records,…

  6. Extent of ICT Application in the Management of Administrative and Student Personnel Records in the Public Universities in Enugu State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidobi, Roseline Unoma

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the extent of ICT application in management of administrative and student personnel record in the public universities in Enugu state. The study was a survey research the quantitative data were collected through a 20-item questionnaire title "Extent of ICT Application in Record management"…

  7. An Electronic Medical Record Alert Intervention to Improve HPV Vaccination Among Eligible Male College Students at a University Student Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Warner, Echo L; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Mooney, Ryan; Martel, Laura; Kepka, Deanna

    2018-02-16

    This pilot study aims to improve HPV vaccination for college aged males at a student health center. The first part of the study consisted of a focus group that assessed the barriers and facilitators of HPV vaccination among healthcare providers and clinic staff (N = 16). Providers reported missed opportunities for HPV vaccination. For the second part of the study, providers and staff reviewed medical records of patients ages 18-26 with student health insurance and with HPV vaccine at baseline (12/1/2014 to 7/31/2015) and follow-up (12/1/2015 to 7/31/2016). A computer-automated EMR alert was generated in the medical record of eligible male patients (N = 386). Z-scores were estimated for two-sample proportions to measure change in HPV vaccine rates at baseline and follow-up for males and females. HPV vaccine initiation rates increased among males (baseline: 5.2% follow-up: 25.1%, p HPV vaccine initiation rates among insured college-aged males.

  8. Neurosignal record with a Brain-Computer interface to estimate the level of stress in a student during a class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Angela Moreno Cueva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This work shows an individual study of the capture, recording, and analysis of the level of stress of a university student during a class that involves an evaluation. The stress information was estimated using a commercial and low-cost computer-brain interface. This allows solving the problem of easily obtaining quantitative and not only qualitative measures. Objective: The aim of this article is to analyze the behavior of neural signals to estimate the level of stress in a student to some verbal and nonverbal events generated by a teacher. Methodology: An experimental design of individual character was developed taking as disturbances the level of stress, events such as questions, time limits, and gestures. Results: Some events that caused stress in students produced by the verbal and non-verbal language of the teacher when teaching the class were evidenced. Conclusions: Teachers are encouraged to moderate their body language during assessments by avoiding actions that emulate anxieties or pressures in unnecessary times.

  9. Enhancing Student Empathetic Engagement, History-Taking, and Communication Skills During Electronic Medical Record Use in Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoSasso, Alisa Alfonsi; Lamberton, Courtney E; Sammon, Mary; Berg, Katherine T; Caruso, John W; Cass, Jonathan; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2017-07-01

    To examine whether an intervention on proper use of electronic medical records (EMRs) in patient care could help improve medical students' empathic engagement, and to test the hypothesis that the training would reduce communication hurdles in clinical encounters. Seventy third-year medical students from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University were randomly divided into intervention and control groups during their six-week pediatric clerkship in 2012-2013. The intervention group received a one-hour training session on EMR-specific communication skills, including discussion of EMR use, the SALTED mnemonic and technique (Set-up, Ask, Listen, Type, Exceptions, Documentation), and role-plays. Both groups completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) at the clerkship's start and end. At clerkship's end, faculty and standardized patients (SPs) rated students' empathic engagement in SP encounters, using the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perceptions of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), and their history-taking and communication skills. Faculty mean ratings on the JSPPPE, history-taking skills, and communication skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. SP mean ratings on history-taking skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. Both groups' JSE mean scores increased pretest to posttest, but the changes were not significant. The intervention group's posttest JSE mean score was higher than the control group's, but the difference was not significant. The findings suggest that a simple intervention providing specialized training in EMR-specific communication can improve medical students' empathic engagement in patient care, history-taking skills, and communication skills.

  10. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  11. Student/Pupil Accounting: Standard Terminology and Guide for Managing Student Data in Elementary and Secondary Schools, Community/Junior Colleges, and Adult Education. State Educational Records and Reports Series: Handbook V. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, John F.

    This handbook's fundamental purpose is to provide terms and definitions for the data and information educators use in student services. It identifies concepts used in decisionmaking, provides standardized terms and definitions, classifies the terms, provides guidelines for developing and managing student records, and recommends the development of…

  12. First year midwifery students' experience with self-recorded and assessed video of selected midwifery practice skills at Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Carolyn; Patterson, Jean; Miller, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Studying undergraduate midwifery at a distance has advantages in terms of accessibility and community support but presents challenges for practice based competence assessment. Student -recorded videos provide opportunities for completing the assigned skills, self-reflection, and assessment by a lecturer. This research asked how midwifery students experienced the process of completing the Video Assessment of Midwifery Practice Skills (VAMPS) in 2014 and 2015. The aim of the survey was to identify the benefits and challenges of the VAMPS assessment and to identify opportunities for improvement from the students' perspective. All students who had participated in the VAMPS assessment during 2014 and 2015 were invited to complete an online survey. To maintain confidentiality for the students, the Qualtrics survey was administered and the data downloaded by the Organisational Research Officer. Ethical approval was granted by the organisational ethics committee. Descriptive statistics were generated and students' comments were collated. The VAMPS provided an accessible option for the competence assessment and the opportunity for self-reflection and re-recording to perfect their skill which the students appreciated. The main challenges related to the technical aspects of recording and uploading the assessment. This study highlighted some of the benefits and challenges experienced by the midwifery students and showed that practice skills can be successfully assessed at distance. The additional benefit of accessibility afforded by video assessment is a new and unique finding for undergraduate midwifery education and may resonate with other educators seeking ways to assess similar skill sets with cohorts of students studying at distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What information is provided in transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records from Canadian Medical Schools? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jason A; McInnes, Matthew D F; Esmail, Kaisra

    2014-01-01

    Resident selection committees must rely on information provided by medical schools in order to evaluate candidates. However, this information varies between institutions, limiting its value in comparing individuals and fairly assessing their quality. This study investigates what is included in candidates' documentation, the heterogeneity therein, as well as its objective data. Samples of recent transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records were anonymised prior to evaluation. Data were then extracted by two independent reviewers blinded to the submitting university, assessing for the presence of pre-selected criteria; disagreement was resolved through consensus. The data were subsequently analysed in multiple subgroups. Inter-rater agreement equalled 92%. Inclusion of important criteria varied by school, ranging from 22.2% inclusion to 70.4%; the mean equalled 47.4%. The frequency of specific criteria was highly variable as well. Only 17.7% of schools provided any basis for comparison of academic performance; the majority detailed only status regarding pass or fail, without any further qualification. Considerable heterogeneity exists in the information provided in official medical school documentation, as well as markedly little objective data. Standardization may be necessary in order to facilitate fair comparison of graduates from different institutions. Implementation of objective data may allow more effective intra- and inter-scholastic comparison.

  14. What information is provided in transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records from Canadian Medical Schools? A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Robins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resident selection committees must rely on information provided by medical schools in order to evaluate candidates. However, this information varies between institutions, limiting its value in comparing individuals and fairly assessing their quality. This study investigates what is included in candidates’ documentation, the heterogeneity therein, as well as its objective data. Methods: Samples of recent transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records were anonymised prior to evaluation. Data were then extracted by two independent reviewers blinded to the submitting university, assessing for the presence of pre-selected criteria; disagreement was resolved through consensus. The data were subsequently analysed in multiple subgroups. Results: Inter-rater agreement equalled 92%. Inclusion of important criteria varied by school, ranging from 22.2% inclusion to 70.4%; the mean equalled 47.4%. The frequency of specific criteria was highly variable as well. Only 17.7% of schools provided any basis for comparison of academic performance; the majority detailed only status regarding pass or fail, without any further qualification. Conclusions: Considerable heterogeneity exists in the information provided in official medical school documentation, as well as markedly little objective data. Standardization may be necessary in order to facilitate fair comparison of graduates from different institutions. Implementation of objective data may allow more effective intra- and inter-scholastic comparison.

  15. The Effect of a Learning Environment Using an Electronic Health Record (EHR) on Undergraduate Nursing Students' Behaviorial Intention to Use an EHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a learning environment using an Electronic Health Record (EHR) on undergraduate nursing students' behavioral intention (BI) to use an EHR. BI is defined by Davis (1989) in the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as the degree to which a person has formulated conscious plans to perform or not…

  16. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  17. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  18. A controlled evaluation of an eating disorders primary prevention videotape using the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Twigg, Kylie; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Paxton, Susan J

    2002-11-01

    The aim was to extend findings related to a previously reported eating disorders prevention program by comparing treatment and control groups, adding a follow-up, and examining whether receiver characteristics, personal relevance and need for cognition (NFC), could predict attitude change in early adolescent girls. Grade 7 girls were either shown a brief prevention videotape on dieting and body image (n = 104) or given no intervention (n = 114). All girls completed pre-, post- and 1-month follow-up questionnaires. The intervention group resulted in significantly more positive changes in attitude and knowledge at post-intervention, but only in knowledge at follow-up. There was no strong evidence that pre-intervention characteristics of recipients predicted responses to the videotape intervention when changes were compared to the control group. This prevention videotape appeared to have positive immediate effects, but additional intervention (e.g., booster sessions) may be required for longer-term change. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  20. 77 FR 3455 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records-Migrant Education Bypass Program Student Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records--Migrant Education Bypass Program... (Privacy Act), the Department of Education (Department) publishes this notice of a new system of records... called a ``system of records.'' The Migrant Education Program (MEP) is authorized under Title I, Part C...

  1. Applying the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion to a videotape-based eating disorders primary prevention program for adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Wertheim, Eleanor H

    2004-01-01

    This study applied principles from the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion to the prevention of disordered eating. Early adolescent girls watched either a preventive videotape only (n=114) or video plus post-video activity (verbal discussion, written exercises, or control discussion) (n=187); or had no intervention (n=104). Significantly more body image and knowledge improvements occurred at post video and follow-up in the intervention groups compared to no intervention. There were no outcome differences among intervention groups, or between girls with high or low elaboration likelihood. Further research is needed in integrating the videotape into a broader prevention package.

  2. Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said--Gender, Language, & Communication [and] Deborah Tannen: In Depth. Part 2. [Videotapes and Teaching Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    These curriculum-related materials include two videotapes and a 36-page teaching guide. The first videotape, "Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said," with a running time of 50 minutes discusses: boys and girls, status and connection, directness and indirectness, public talk and private talk, ritual opposition, and conversational style, and a…

  3. Flow observation by rod lens and low-light video (videotape script: January 4, 1977)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The script of a demonstration videotape made to show the possibilities of coupling rod lenses to low-light video systems to observe internal flow conditions is presented. The illustrations accompanying the text were photographed directly from the video screen. Some up-dated comments appear as footnotes to the original script and a description of the multiscan low-light television system developed to measure velocity is included in the epilogue. The combination of rod lens and low-light video system makes it possible to observe dynamic events in hitherto inaccessible volumes. The pressure and temperature capabilities of the rod lens make it applicable to many engineering uses. This system, in conjunction with electronic image enhancement systems, provides a new dimension in engineering analysis

  4. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  5. Reflective teaching of medical communication skills with DiViDU: assessing the level of student reflection on recorded consultations with simulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, R L; Harmsen, A B; Fabriek, M

    2009-02-01

    Acquisition of effective, goal-oriented communication skills requires both practicing skills and reflective thinking. Reflection is a cyclic process of perceiving and analysing communication behaviour in terms of goals and effects and designing improved actions. Based on Korthagen's ALACT reflection model, communication training on history taking was designed. Objectives were to develop rating criteria for assessment of the students' level of reflection and to collect student evaluations of the reflective cycle components in the communication training. All second year medical students recorded a consultation with a simulated patient. In DiViDU, a web-based ICT program, students reviewed the video, identified and marked three key events, attached written reflections and provided peer-feedback. Students' written reflections were rated on four reflection categories. A reflection-level score was based on a frequency count of the number of categories used over three reflections. Students filled out an evaluation questionnaire on components of the communication training. Data were analyzed of 304 (90.6%) students. The four reflection categories Observations, Motives, Effects and Goals of behaviour were used in 7-38%. Most students phrased undirected questions for improvement (93%). The average reflection score was 2.1 (S.D. 2.0). All training components were considered instructive. Acting was preferred most. Reviewing video was considered instructive. Self-reflection was considered more difficult than providing written feedback to the reflections of peers. Reflection on communication behaviour can be systematically implemented and measured in a structured way. Reflection levels were low, probably indicating a limited notion of goal-oriented attributes of communication skills. Early introduction of critical self-reflection facilitates acceptance of an important ability for physicians for continued life-long learning and becoming mindful practitioners.

  6. Development and evaluation of an electronic health record configuration and customization laboratory course for clinical informatics students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Vishnu; Hersh, William R

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for informatics educational programs to develop laboratory courses that facilitate hands-on access to an EHR, and allow students to learn and evaluate functionality and configuration options. This is particularly relevant given the diversity of backgrounds of informatics students. We implemented an EHR laboratory course that allowed students to explore an EHR in both inpatient and outpatient clinical environments. The course focused on specific elements of the EHR including order set development, customization, clinical decision support, ancillary services, and billing and coding functionality. Students were surveyed at the end of the course for their satisfaction with the learning experience. We detailed challenges as well as lessons learned after analyzing student evaluations of this course. Features that promote the successful offering of an online EHR course, include (1) using more than one EHR to allow students to compare functionalities, (2) ensuring appropriate course calibration, (3) countering issues specific to EHR usability, and (4) fostering a fertile environment for rich online conversations are discussed.

  7. Comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques using video camera recordings.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J; Heyworth, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To use video recordings to compare the performance of resuscitation teams in relation to their previous training in cardiac resuscitation. METHODS--Over a 10 month period all cardiopulmonary resuscitations carried out in an accident and emergency (A&E) resuscitation room were videotaped. The following variables were monitored: (1) time to perform three defibrillatory shocks; (2) time to give intravenous adrenaline (centrally or peripherally); (3) the numbers and grade of medical an...

  8. Agreement between veterinary students and anesthesiologists regarding postoperative pain assessment in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Michele; Young, Courtni N; Quandt, Jane E; Hofmeister, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    To determine the levels of agreement among first- and second-year veterinary students and experienced anesthesiologists in assessing postoperative pain in dogs from video-recordings. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-seven veterinary students, five anesthesiologists and 13 canine clinical patients. Prior to their enrolment in a core anesthesia course, veterinary students volunteered to watch 13 90 second videos of dogs. Dogs were hospitalized in an intensive care unit after a variety of surgical procedures. Students were asked to score the level of the dogs' pain using the Dynamic Interactive Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form of the Glasgow Composite-Measure Pain Scale. The same videotapes were scored by five board-certified anesthesiologists. The differences and agreement between the ratings of anesthesiologists and students, and first- and second-year students were determined with Mann-Whitney U-tests and Fleiss' or Cohen's kappa, respectively. Pain scores assigned by students and anesthesiologists differed significantly (p Veterinary students early in their training assigned pain scores to dogs that differed from scores assigned by experienced anesthesiologists. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  9. Electronic Health Record Impacts on Family Medicine Teachers: Survey of Third-Year Medical Student Clerkship Preceptors at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Elizabeth; Oser, Tamara K; Oser, Sean M

    2017-10-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) use in clinical practice has accelerated in recent years. While several aspects of EHR use have been extensively studied, there is little data on EHR impacts on medical student educators, especially those involved in outpatient family medicine. This study evaluated perceived impacts of EHR use on clinician teachers of outpatient family medicine. The study used a mixed methods survey of clinicians who teach third-year medical students during the required family and community medicine outpatient clerkship at a Mid-Atlantic medical school. Among 50 completed surveys, most respondents reported that the EHR had impacted their teaching (70% reported at least one negative effect; 84% reported at least one positive effect). Positive impacts included more easily viewing information, more effectively teaching evidence-based medicine, and teaching about EHR use itself. Negative impacts included less time teaching or interacting with students, and a perception that EHR use impedes development of students' critical thinking and clinical integration skills. Providers who have taught medical students both with and without EHR in place (>P=.024), those over 50 years old (>P=.019), and those with at least 5 years teaching experience (>P=.006) were more likely to report negative impacts. Most preceptors reported that EHR use had both positive and negative impacts on their teaching of medical students, though the negative effects were perceived by respondents as more substantial, consistent with a theme of decreased enthusiasm for teaching due to EHR use. These findings can be used to help inform faculty development and education initiatives.

  10. Do Standardized Tests Penalize Deep-Thinking, Creative, or Conscientious Students?: Some Personality Correlates of Graduate Record Examinations Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald E.; Kaufman, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to explore the relationship of Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test scores to selected personality traits--conscientiousness, rationality, ingenuity, quickness, creativity, and depth. A sample of 342 GRE test takers completed short personality inventory scales for each trait. Analyses…

  11. A videotaped intervention to enhance child control and reduce anxiety of the pain of dental injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Raadal, M; Naidu, S; Yoshida, T; Kvale, G; Milgrom, P

    2003-12-01

    While the psychological literature shows that perceptions of uncontrollability contribute to anxiety and other pathologies, interventions that enhance perceived control have been shown to reduce anxiety. This study attempted to assess a brief videotape to enhance child perceived control in a dental setting. 101 children aged 7-9 years completed warm-up procedures and viewed either: a) the experimental intervention, a 2 minutes video of a dentist explaining what an injection will feel like and proposing hand raising as a signal mechanism; or b) the control condition, a 2 minutes video of Disneyland. Fear of dental injections was assessed on a 10 cm visual analogue scale before and after the intervention. In the experimental group there was a significant fear reduction from pre- to post-intervention, while this was not the case in the control group. Children with higher pre-existing levels of fear benefited more from the intervention than children with lower levels of fear. The results of this pilot study suggest that intervention packages that impact child control have promise in lowering anxiety.

  12. Border Collie Collapse: Owner Survey Results and Veterinary Description of Videotaped Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan; Minor, Katie; Shmon, Cindy L; Shelton, G Diane; Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R

    Completed surveys were obtained from owners of 165 border collies experiencing repeated episodes of abnormal gait or collapse during strenuous exercise. Unremarkable veterinary evaluation and lack of disease progression over time made common systemic, cardiac, and neurologic causes of exercise intolerance unlikely. Survey questions addressed signalment, age of onset, description of episodes, and owner perception of factors associated with collapse. Most dogs were young adults (median 2 yr) when episodes began, and they had experienced from 2 to more than 100 episodes (median 6) prior to their owners completing the survey. Retrieving was the activity most commonly associated with episodes (112/165 dogs, 68%), followed by herding stock (39/165 dogs, 24%). Owners reported that high environmental temperatures (111/165 dogs, 67%) and excitement (67/165 dogs, 41%) increased the likelihood of their dog having an episode during strenuous activity. Veterinary evaluation of videotapes of presumed border collie collapse (BCC) episodes (40 dogs) were used to provide a description of the typical features of BCC episodes. Altered mentation, symmetrical ataxia affecting all four limbs, increased pelvic limb extensor tone and toe scuffing or knuckling, truncal swaying, and falling to the side were common features, suggesting that BCC may be an episodic diffuse central nervous system disorder.

  13. Attitude Change among College Students toward Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Raymond

    1982-01-01

    College students' attitudes toward homosexuality changed after they participated in a program that taught about homosexuality through the use of: (1) a film on the topic of prejudice; (2) a videotape of a homosexual clergyman who discussed sexual variance; (3) two films in which couples engaged in homosexual behavior; and (4) a lecture. Results…

  14. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  15. Understanding the notion of function and articulation of semiotic records that represent between students entering a program Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Prada-Núñez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the understanding of the notion of function and the ability to articulate different semiotic registers for representation by new students in the university in Colombia. Immediate context is taken as the Faculty of Engineering at a public university. Epistemologically the study is based on symbolic interaction by analyzing the meanings that students attributed to this mathematical concept when addressing problem solving. The methodology, therefore, is qualitatively and use of theoretical coding is done. For analysis of the results it has been applied grounded theory with a structured approach. The information generated by this study corresponds to a test that showed students two graphic representations with the intent to identify which of them was a function, besides which should argue their response. Altogether 86 arguments around the concept are analyzed. Data analysis was done through atlas.ti 7.0 software. The system allows a glimpse of emerging categories the following findings: conceptual deficiencies, diversity in conceptual approaches, conceptual referents, semiotic representations, and finally highlight the various conceptual variations.

  16. [Effects of Mental Disorders on the Academic Outcomes of University Students--A Retrospective Study Using Medical Records from a Health Services Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Terumi; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Hori, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Masanori; Hatanaka, Kimitaka; Aiba, Miyuki; Asada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Falling behind in class is a serious problem for university students as it can lead to social problems and increase the risk of suicide. Although it is common for students suffering from mental disorders to fall behind academically, there have been few studies investigating the difficulties these students face in order to graduate from university. Therefore, we investigated factors associated with dropping out of school with the purpose of creating a strategy to improve the academic outcomes of students who regularly seek psychiatric consultation. We investigated undergraduate students who received consultation at Tsukuba University's Health Services Center Psychiatry Department and whose academic outcomes between the 2004 and 2013 academic years were known. Academic outcomes were obtained from Tsukuba University's grade management system by permission of the authority. The students were divided into either a graduate or dropout group depending on their academic outcomes. The medical records for both groups were retrospectively investigated, and factors that were predicted to affect academic outcomes were assessed using statistical methods. The dropout group was younger in grade and had a greater severity of illness at initial consultation. Moreover, this group had a greater number of consultation visits, showed less cooperation with the instructor in charge, had a significantly longer duration of social with drawal and temporary leave of absence from school, and had a significantly greater number of students with grade retention. When a time factor was incorporated in the analysis, the presence of grade retention/temporary leave of absence from school and social withdrawal was significantly correlated with dropping out of school. It was revealed that not only the mental disorder itself, but also psychosocial severity and the maladjusted state that occur secondary to such mental disorder influence academic outcomes. These results indicated that in order to improve

  17. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  18. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  19. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  20. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  1. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  2. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  4. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  5. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  6. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Effects of using mobile device-based academic electronic medical records for clinical practicum by undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mona; Lee, HyeongSuk; Park, Joon Ho

    2018-02-01

    The academic electronic medical record (AEMR) system is applied with the expectation that nursing students will be able to attain competence in healthcare decision-making and nursing informatics competencies. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the advantage of applying mobile devices to clinical practicum. This study aimed to examine the effect of an experiment that introduced a mobile AEMR application for undergraduate nursing students in their practicum. A quasi-experimental design was used. The subjects were 75 third-year nursing students enrolled in clinical practicum and were divided into an experimental (practicum with AEMR) and a control (conventional practicum) group. Nursing informatics competencies, critical thinking disposition, and satisfaction with clinical practicum were measured before and after the clinical practicum for each group. The usability of the AEMR application was also examined for the experimental group after the experiment. After the experiment, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the informatics knowledge domain of nursing informatics competencies in the post-test. The difference in critical thinking between the experimental and control groups was not statistically significant. Regarding satisfaction with the clinical practicum, the experimental group exhibited a significantly higher level of satisfaction in "preparation of a diagnostic test or laboratory test and understanding of the results" and "nursing intervention and documentation" than the control group. Students who participated in the practicum using the AEMR application considered it useful. The AEMR application was an effective educational method for practicing the immediate documentation of students' observations and interventions and was available at the patients' bedsides. To improve critical thinking, it is necessary to apply a variety of approaches when solving clinical problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of peer review on communication skills and learning motivation among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon Sook; Chae, Sun-Mi

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of video-based peer review on communication skills and learning motivation among nursing students. A non-equivalent control with pretest-posttest design was used. The participants were 47 sophomore nursing students taking a fundamentals of nursing course at a nursing college in Korea. Communication with a standardized patient was videotaped for evaluation. The intervention group used peer reviews to evaluate the videotaped performance; a small group of four students watched the videotape of each student and then provided feedback. The control group assessed themselves alone after watching their own videos. Communication skills and learning motivation were measured. The intervention group showed significantly higher communication skills and learning motivation after the intervention than did the control group. The findings suggest that peer review is an effective learning method for nursing students to improve their communication skills and increase their motivation to learn. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Gestalt Therapy: Student Perceptions of Fritz Perls in "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joe; Jacobus, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" ("TAP") videotape series introduces students to three major schools of psychotherapy: client-centered therapy, Gestalt therapy, and rational-emotive therapy. A sample of undergraduate students viewed the "TAP" series. The students were surveyed about their observations of…

  10. Influence of Effective Communication by Surgery Students on Their Oral Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland-Morin, Pamela A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Clinical surgery faculty (n=78) evaluated videotaped simulated surgery student oral examinations. Results showed that regardless of the content of students' responses, evaluators were strongly influenced by how well students communicated. Evaluators preferred a moderate response rate and direct eye contact over a slower response rate and indirect…

  11. Interpersonal Interactions in Instrumental Lessons: Teacher/Student Verbal and Non-Verbal Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined verbal and non-verbal teacher/student interpersonal interactions in higher education instrumental music lessons. Twenty-four lessons were videotaped and teacher/student behaviours were analysed using a researcher-designed instrument. The findings indicate predominance of student and teacher joke among the verbal behaviours with…

  12. Student Teacher Thinking: A Comparative Study of Elementary and Secondary Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzo, Gary L.; Minix, Nancy A.

    1992-01-01

    Using videotaped simulated recall interviews, researchers assessed elementary and secondary student teachers' thoughts and concerns. Both groups considered pupil learning the greatest concern. There were consistent differences in how the groups perceived classroom interactions. Both groups addressed a narrower range of concerns regarding teaching…

  13. Vintage Vinyl Record Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project in which his ninth-grade art students utilized a vinyl record as an unusual medium to create a work that exhibited solid design, great creativity, and strong craftsmanship. Students presented their pieces to the class for critique, explained the process, the media, and their feelings about their…

  14. Administrative Challenge or Ethical Dilemma? Responding Justly when a Student with a Disability Engages in a Violent or Disruptive Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Ritter, Suzanne T.; Wilson, Felicia R.

    2007-01-01

    This case study involves an 8-year-old American Indian student with a disability, who was videotaped assaulting another student as they exited the school bus. Although acts of school violence are common on campuses across the nation, this incident is particularly complex, given the disability status of the student committing this act. This case…

  15. A virtual platform for electronic health record (EHR) education for nursing students: moving from in-house solutions to the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Kuo, Mu-Hsing; Parapini, Eric; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop cost effective ways to bring hands-on education about essential information technologies, such as electronic health record (EHR) systems to nursing students, nursing faculty and practitioners. This is especially the case as worldwide there is an increased deployment of these systems and they are transforming the practice of healthcare. However, due to technical, financial and knowledge limitations, many nursing schools and programs do not have an adequate way to bring such technology into their classes and curricula. In this paper we describe an approach to developing Web-based EHR education that allows students from any Web-accessible location to access and work with real EHR systems remotely over the Internet for learning purposes. In this paper we describe our work in moving this approach to a cloud-based solution to allow access to EHRs for educational purposes from any location with Web access and to do so in a way that is both educationally sound and cost effective.

  16. Time trends in the thesis work by post-graduate students of Community Medicine: A record based descriptive study of 40 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Nagargoje

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thesis work conducted by post-graduate students of Community Medicine is critically appraised by not only their examiners but also by many other public health experts and researchers. Issues related to the repetition of work and quality of thesis work is raised by various authors. Objective: To assess the time trend in the thesis work done by post-graduate students of Community Medicine. Material and methods: This is a record based descriptive observational study conducted in the department of Community Medicine of S. N. Medical College, Agra (Uttar Pradesh. Data from all the 66 theses which were submitted by the Post Graduate students of our department till date was collected and assessed systematically. Result: Most preferred areas of research were MCH/Family Planning (28.79% and Programme/Service evaluation (22.73%. 77.27% of theses were community based, 36.37% were done exclusively in a rural area, 24.24% of theses had children/adolescent as their study subjects and 28.79% were conducted exclusively among females. A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP or Knowledge, attitude, behavior and practice (KABP study was part of many theses but exclusive KAP/KABP study was done only in 12.12% of theses. A purposive or convenience sampling was done in only 18.33% of theses, 86.67% were cross-sectional in design and median sample size was 450 participants per thesis. In comparison to the theses done upto the year 2000, theses thereafter were more often based in an urban area and less often done in an exclusive rural area (p=0.0003 and all KAP/KABP studies were done after the year 2000 (p=0.004. Conclusion: There is no repetition or excessive use of KAP/KABP studies in the theses done by post-graduate students of the department of Community Medicine, S. N. Medical College, Agra

  17. Bring Your Next Film or Videotape in on Time--And within Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampe, Barry

    1980-01-01

    Seventeen steps are presented for the successful production of training films and video tapes. The steps include concept, script preparation, budget, filming and recording, laboratory processing, editing, titles and narration, sound mix, corrections, manufacture of prints, and distribution. (CT)

  18. Self-Monitoring as a Strategy to Increase Student Teachers' Use of Effective Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    Student teachers in classrooms for students with moderate-severe disabilities used self-monitoring to increase their use of effective teaching strategies. In the first study, the participant videotaped daily instructional sessions and collected data on her use of varied praise statements and the number of opportunities to respond in a multiple…

  19. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  20. Changes in Badminton Game Play across Developmental Skill Levels among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Wenhao

    2012-01-01

    The study examined changes in badminton game play across developmental skill levels among high school students in a physical education setting. Videotapes of badminton game play of 80 students (40 boys and 40 girls) in the four developmental skill levels (each skill level had 10 boys and 10 girls) were randomly selected from a database associated…

  1. Student Town Meeting with Vice President Al Gore. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amy N.

    This teacher's guide accompanies a videotape of the same name. Vice President Albert Gore, Jr., discusses current issues with students who question Mr. Gore on such topics as the environment, reinventing government, voter participation, crime, and the United States' role in foreign affairs. Gore tailors his answers to the teenage audience as the…

  2. Accurately Detecting Students' Lies regarding Relational Aggression by Correctional Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhauser, Oliver; Reinhard, Marc-Andre; Marksteiner, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of correctional instructions when detecting lies about relational aggression. Based on models from the field of social psychology, we predict that correctional instruction will lead to a less pronounced lie bias and to more accurate lie detection. Seventy-five teachers received videotapes of students' true denial…

  3. Using Joseph Campbell to Improve Students' Response to Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    Shows how teachers can use the videotapes and writings of Joseph Campbell to help students see patterns in literature and respond personally to it. Presents Campbell's explanation of the monomyth of the hero's journey, and discusses three works in which the pattern is present. (SR)

  4. A phenomenographic case study: Concept maps from the perspectives of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Yilmaz

    The objective of this study was to investigate the experiences of middle school students when concept maps were used as a learning tool. Twenty-nine students' written responses, concept maps and videotapes were analyzed. Out of 29 students, thirteen students were interviewed using a semi-structured and open-ended interview protocol. The students' initial written responses provided us with the students' initial reactions to concept maps. The videotapes captured the students' behavior, and interpersonal interactions. The interviews probed students': (1) knowledge about drawing concept maps, (2) perception of the meaning and usefulness of concept maps, and (3) attitudes towards concept maps. The results indicated that the students viewed concept maps as useful tools in learning science. They believed that concept maps organized and summarized the information, which thereby helped them understand the topic easily. They also believed that concept maps had some cognitive benefits. However, the students viewed concept maps as hard to construct because it was difficult for the students to think of related concepts. The students' initial written responses, interviews and videotapes indicated that the students seemed to see both positive and negative aspects of concept maps. Some students' had more positive and some had more negative attitudes.

  5. "The NASA Sci Files": The Case of the Biological Biosphere. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    The NASA Science Files is a series of instructional programs consisting of broadcast, print, and online elements. Emphasizing standards-based instruction, problem-based learning, and science as inquiry, the series seeks to motivate students in grades 3-5 to become critical thinkers and active problem solvers. Each program supports the national…

  6. All about Motion & Balance. Physical Science for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Walking on a balance beam or riding a bike both require motion and balance. This program will reveal how unbalanced forces create motion, while balanced forces keep things still. Students also learn how concepts like velocity, acceleration, and momentum fit into this puzzle. A unique hands-on activity combined with vivid imagery and graphics…

  7. Teaching French Transformational Grammar by Means of Computer-Generated Video-Tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred; Thomas, Jean Jacques

    This paper describes a pilot program in an integrated media presentation of foreign languages and the production and usage of seven computer-generated video tapes which demonstrate various aspects of French syntax. This instructional set could form the basis for CAI lessons in which the student is presented images identical to those on the video…

  8. All about Flight. Physical Science for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Up, up and away! A hot air balloon, an airplane and even the space shuttle all defy the force of gravity, but they all do it in different ways. Children will learn about the basic concepts that make flight possible. With clear demonstrations and a hands-on project, students will be able to understand more easily the basic concepts behind various…

  9. Forces. Physical Science in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Forces are all around. Without them, there would be no movement. In fact, Sir Isaac Newton theorized that a force called inertia actually works to keep things exactly as they are at any given moment! Students will learn about Newton's laws and about how forces affect many aspects of life. With clear demonstrations and a unique hands-on activity,…

  10. All about Solids, Liquids & Gases. Physical Science for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In All About Solids, Liquids and Gases, young students will be introduced to the three common forms of matter. They'll learn that all things are made up of tiny particles called atoms and that the movement of these particles determines the form that matter takes. In solids, the particles are packed tightly together and move very little. The…

  11. Mealtime behavior among siblings and body mass index of 4-8 year olds: a videotaped observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosli, Rana H; Miller, Alison L; Kaciroti, Niko; Peterson, Karen E; Rosenblum, Katherine; Baylin, Ana; Lumeng, Julie C

    2015-07-15

    Being a last-born child and having a sister have been associated with higher body mass index (BMI). Encouragement to eat that overrides children's self-regulation has been reported to increase the risk of obesogenic eating behaviors. This study sought to test the hypothesis that encouragement to eat during mealtime from older siblings and sisters mediates associations of being last-born or having a sister with higher BMI. Children aged 4-8 years (n = 75) were videotaped while eating a routine evening meal at home with one sibling present. Encouragement to eat (defined as direct prompts to eat or general positive statements about food) delivered to the index child (IC) from the sibling was coded from the videotape. Path analysis was used to examine associations between IC's birth order, sibling's sex, encouragement counts, and IC's measured BMI z-score (BMIz). Being the younger sibling in the sibling dyad was associated with the IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling (β: 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.59, 1.26, p eat from the sibling (β: 0.18, 95 % CI: -0.09, 0.47, p = 0.20). The IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling was associated with lower IC BMIz (β: -0.06, 95 % CI: -0.12, 0.00, p = 0.05). Children were more likely to receive encouragements to eat from older siblings than younger siblings. Being the recipient of encouragements to eat from a sibling was associated with lower, not higher, child BMIz, which may reflect sibling modeling of maternal behavior. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine whether encouragements to eat from siblings lead to increase in BMI over time. Encouragements from siblings may be a novel intervention target for obesity prevention.

  12. How do lay people assess the quality of physicians' communicative responses to patients' emotional cues and concerns? An international multicentre study based on videotaped medical consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzi, M.A.; Bensing, J.; Rimondini, M.; Fletcher, I.; Vliet, L. van; Zimmermann, C.; Deveugele, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish which kind of physician communicative responses to patient cues and concerns are appreciated by lay people. Methods: A balanced sample (259 people) was recruited in public places to participate in a full day observation of four videotaped standardized medical consultations.

  13. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  14. The Periodic Table. Physical Science in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Kids know that when they are lost, they look at a map to find their way. It's no different in the world of science, as they'll learn in The Periodic Table--a fun and engaging look at the road map of the elements. Young students will learn about key information included on the table, including atomic number, atomic mass and chemical symbol. They'll…

  15. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best…

  16. Effectiveness of student learning during experimental work in primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Logar, Ana; Peklaj, Cirila; Ferk Savec, Vesna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research was to optimize the effectiveness of student learning based on experimental work in chemistry classes in Slovenian primary schools. To obtain evidence about how experimental work is implemented during regular chemistry classes, experimental work was videotaped during 19 units of chemistry lessons at 12 Slovenian primary schools from the pool of randomly selected schools. Altogether 332 eight-grade students were involved in the investigation, with an average...

  17. Physical risk factors identification based on body sensor network combined to videotaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignais, Nicolas; Bernard, Fabien; Touvenot, Gérard; Sagot, Jean-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an ergonomic analysis of a material handling task by combining a subtask video analysis and a RULA computation, implemented continuously through a motion capture system combining inertial sensors and electrogoniometers. Five workers participated to the experiment. Seven inertial measurement units, placed on the worker's upper body (pelvis, thorax, head, arms, forearms), were implemented through a biomechanical model of the upper body to continuously provide trunk, neck, shoulder and elbow joint angles. Wrist joint angles were derived from electrogoniometers synchronized with the inertial measurement system. Worker's activity was simultaneously recorded using video. During post-processing, joint angles were used as inputs to a computationally implemented ergonomic evaluation based on the RULA method. Consequently a RULA score was calculated at each time step to characterize the risk of exposure of the upper body (right and left sides). Local risk scores were also computed to identify the anatomical origin of the exposure. Moreover, the video-recorded work activity was time-studied in order to classify and quantify all subtasks involved into the task. Results showed that mean RULA scores were at high risk for all participants (6 and 6.2 for right and left sides respectively). A temporal analysis demonstrated that workers spent most part of the work time at a RULA score of 7 (right: 49.19 ± 35.27%; left: 55.5 ± 29.69%). Mean local scores revealed that most exposed joints during the task were elbows, lower arms, wrists and hands. Elbows and lower arms were indeed at a high level of risk during the total time of a work cycle (100% for right and left sides). Wrist and hands were also exposed to a risky level for much of the period of work (right: 82.13 ± 7.46%; left: 77.85 ± 12.46%). Concerning the subtask analysis, subtasks called 'snow thrower', 'opening the vacuum sealer', 'cleaning' and 'storing' have been identified as

  18. Phenological Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phenology is the scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The few records...

  19. The Effect on Learning, Communication, and Assessment when Student-Created Youtubes of Microteaching Were Used in an Online Teacher-Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study within an online teacher-education course required pre-service teachers to develop self-videotaped microteaching lessons which were posted in a private YouTube. Analysis of the students' YouTube lessons, course postings, and peer interactions found that students learned the technology requirements quickly, were able to develop…

  20. Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits – analysis of video-taped general practice visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dulmen Sandra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general practitioner (GP can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals. Methods For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001. Results The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes. In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84, but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%, most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17% the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all. Conclusion In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

  1. Instructional Quality Features in Videotaped Biology Lessons: Content-Independent Description of Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfner, Tobias; Förtsch, Christian; Boone, William; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2017-09-01

    A number of studies on single instructional quality features have been reported for mathematics and science instruction. For summarizing single instructional quality features, researchers have created a model of three basic dimensions (classroom management, supportive climate, and cognitive activation) of instructional quality mainly through observing mathematics instruction. Considering this model as valid for all subjects and as usable for describing instruction, we used it in this study which aimed to analyze characteristics of instructional quality in biology lessons of high-achieving and low-achieving classes, independently of content. Therefore, we used the data of three different previous video studies of biology instruction conducted in Germany. From each video study, we selected three high-achieving and three low-achieving classes (N = 18 teachers; 35 videos) for our multiple-case study, in which conspicuous characteristics of instructional quality features were qualitatively identified and qualitatively analyzed. The amount of these characteristics was counted in a quantitative way in all the videos. The characteristics we found could be categorized using the model of three basic dimensions of instructional quality despite some subject-specific differences for biology instruction. Our results revealed that many more characteristics were observable in high-achieving classes than in low-achieving classes. Thus, we believe that this model could be used to describe biology instruction independently of the content. We also make the claims about the qualities for biology instruction—working with concentration in a content-structured environment, getting challenged in higher order thinking, and getting praised for performance—that could have positive influence on students' achievement.

  2. Identifying Student Difficulties with Entropy, Heat Engines, and the Carnot Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor I.; Christensen, Warren M.; Mountcastle, Donald B.; Thompson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on several specific student difficulties regarding the second law of thermodynamics in the context of heat engines within upper-division undergraduate thermal physics courses. Data come from ungraded written surveys, graded homework assignments, and videotaped classroom observations of tutorial activities. Written data show that students…

  3. Describing the Cognitive Level of Professor Discourse and Student Cognition in College of Agriculture Class Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, John C.; Whittington, M. Susie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the cognitive level of professor discourse and student cognition during selected college of agriculture class sessions. Twenty-one undergraduate class sessions were videotaped in 12 professors' courses. Results were interpreted to show that professors' discourse was mostly (62%) at the knowledge and…

  4. Recorded Music and Graphic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterer, Irv

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of art as an element of music-recording packaging. Describes a project in which students design a jacket for either cassette or CD using a combination of computerized and traditional rendering techniques. Reports that students have been inspired to look into careers in graphic design. (DSK)

  5. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  6. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Records via probability theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ahsanullah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A lot of statisticians, actuarial mathematicians, reliability engineers, meteorologists, hydrologists, economists. Business and sport analysts deal with records which play important roles in various fields of statistics and its application. This book enables a reader to check his/her level of understanding of the theory of record values. We give basic formulae which are more important in the theory and present a lot of examples which illustrate the theoretical statements. For a beginner in record statistics, as well as for graduate students the study of our book needs the basic knowledge of the subject. A more advanced reader can use our book to polish his/her knowledge. An upgraded list of bibliography which will help a reader to enrich his/her theoretical knowledge and widen the experience of dealing with ordered observations, is also given in the book.

  8. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. L. Gresik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  9. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  10. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, Maria A; Rimondini, Michela; Deveugele, Myriam; Zimmermann, Christa; Moretti, Francesca; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Deledda, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Ian; Bensing, Jozien

    2015-10-01

    The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes 'good communication' by evoking their reactions to variations in physician communication. Lay people from four different countries watched the same videotaped standardized medical encounters and discussed their preferences in gender-specific focus groups who were balanced in age groups. Two hundred and fifty-nine lay people (64 NL, 72 IT, 75 UK and 48 BE) distributed over 35 focus groups of 6-8 persons each. Comments on doctors' behaviours were classified by the GULiVer framework in terms of contents and preferences. Participants prevalently discussed 'task-oriented expressions' (39%: competency, self-confident, providing solutions), 'affective oriented/emotional expressions' (25%: empathy, listening, reassuring) and 'process-oriented expressions' (23%: flexibility, summarizing, verifying). 'Showing an affective attitude' was most appreciated (positive percentage within category: 93%, particularly facilitations and inviting attitude), followed by 'providing solution' (85%). Among disfavoured behaviour, repetitions (88%), 'writing and reading' (54%) and asking permission (42%) were found. Although an affective attitude is appreciated by nearly everybody, people may vary widely in their communication needs and preferences: what is 'good communication' for one person may be disliked or even a source of irritation for another. A physician should be flexible and capable of adapting the consultation to the different needs of different patients. This challenges the idea of general communication guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary S; Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student's actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees' observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  12. The Shadow of Hate: A History of Intolerance in America. Student Text ("Us and Them") and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Jim; Roberson, Houston

    "The Shadow of Hate" resource kit provides a videotape program (40 minutes), 20 copies of a 128-page student text ("Us and Them"), and a 32-page teacher's guide. This document consists of single copies of the two printed components of this kit. The resource traces the history of racial, religious, and social intolerance in the…

  13. Secure surveillance videotapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnik, W.M.; Kadner, S.P.; Olsen, R.; Chitumbo, K.; Pepper, S.

    1995-01-01

    With assistance from the US Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), Aquila Technologies Group developed the Tamper-Resistant Analog Media (TRAM-1000) system to provide standard VHS surveillance video tapes with an enhanced tamper-indicating capability. This project represents further implementation of the partnership approach in facilities including light water reactors with MOX facilities. These facilities use Uniplex Digiquad system video tapes. The partnership approach ensures that one organization can exchange the tapes in a machine without the presence of the other, without losing continuity of information. The TRAM-1000 system development project was accomplished in two stages. In the first stage of the project, the original system delivered to the IAEA, consists of three parts: (1) the tamper detection unit, (2) a specially augmented VHS video tape, and (3) an HP-95 reader. The tamper detection unit houses a VACOSS active fiber-optic seal and an electronic identification tag (E-TAG) reader. In the second stage of the project, the original TRAM-1000 was modified to its current design based on agency input. After delivery of the original TRAM-1000 system to the IAEA, it was reviewed by inspectors. The inspectors felt that the initial system's tape storage/transport method could be simplified. Rather than threading the fiber through the tape spindles, the inspectors suggested that the tape be placed in a bag capable of being sealed. Also, a more flexible fiber-optic cable was recommended. As a result of these suggestions, Aquila developed a tamper-proof bag specifically for holding a surveillance video tape and sealable with a VACOSS fiber optical seal

  14. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  15. Bug City: Bees [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  16. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  17. Vinyl Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartmanski, Dominik; Woodward, Ian

    2018-01-01

    . This relational process means that both the material affordances and entanglements of vinyl allow us to feel, handle, experience, project, and share its iconicity. The materially mediated meanings of vinyl enabled it to retain currency in independent and collector’s markets and thus resist the planned......In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via...

  18. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club November  Selections Just in time for the holiday season, we have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then Nov 2011. New films include the all 5 episodes of Fast and Furious, many of the most famous films starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and those of Louis de Funes and some more recent films such as The Lincoln Lawyer and, according to some critics, Woody Allen’s best film for years – Midnight in Paris. For the younger generation there is Cars 2 and Kung Fu Panda 2. New CDs include the latest releases by Adele, Coldplay and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. We have also added the new Duets II CD featuring Tony Bennett singing with some of today’s pop stars including Lady Gaga, Amy Winehouse and Willy Nelson. The Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday ...

  19. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club June Selections We have put a significant number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club and select the «Discs of the Month» button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then June 2011. New films include the latest Action, Suspense and Science Fiction film hits, general drama movies including the Oscar-winning The King’s Speech, comedies including both chapter of Bridget Jones’s Diary, seven films for children and a musical. Other highlights include the latest Harry Potter release and some movies from the past you may have missed including the first in the Terminator series. New CDs include the latest releases by Michel Sardou, Mylene Farmer, Jennifer Lopez, Zucchero and Britney Spears. There is also a hits collection from NRJ. Don’t forget that the Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday lunchtimes from 12h30 to 13h00 in Restaurant 2, Building 504. (C...

  20. Record club

    CERN Document Server

    Record club

    2010-01-01

      Bonjour a tous, Voici les 24 nouveaux DVD de Juillet disponibles depuis quelques jours, sans oublier les 5 CD Pop musique. Découvrez la saga du terroriste Carlos, la vie de Gainsbourg et les aventures de Lucky Luke; angoissez avec Paranormal Activity et évadez vous sur Pandora dans la peau d’Avatar. Toutes les nouveautés sont à découvrir directement au club. Pour en connaître la liste complète ainsi que le reste de la collection du Record Club, nous vous invitons sur notre site web: http://cern.ch/crc. Toutes les dernières nouveautés sont dans la rubrique « Discs of the Month ». Rappel : le club est ouvert les Lundis, Mercredis, Vendredis de 12h30 à 13h00 au restaurant n°2, bâtiment 504. A bientôt chers Record Clubbers.  

  1. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club Nouveautés été 2011 Le club de location de CDs et de DVDs vient d’ajouter un grand nombre de disques pour l’été 2011. Parmi eux, Le Discours d’un Roi, oscar 2011 du meilleur film et Harry Potter les reliques de la mort (1re partie). Ce n’est pas moins de 48 DVDs et 10 CDs nouveaux qui vous sont proposés à la location. Il y en a pour tous les genres. Alors n’hésitez pas à consulter notre site http://cern.ch/record.club, voir Disc Catalogue, Discs of the month pour avoir la liste complète. Le club est ouvert tous les Lundi, Mercredi, Vendredi de 12h30 à 13h dans le bâtiment du restaurent N°2 (Cf. URL: http://www.cern.ch/map/building?bno=504) A très bientôt.  

  2. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Ferenchick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT, to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student

  3. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bakker Dinny H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners' (GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for providing mental health care. We investigated if GPs who feel burnt out or dissatisfied with the time available for their patients, are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose their distress, and have shorter consultations, in order to gain time and energy. This may result in less psychological evaluations of patients' complaints. Methods We used 1890 videotaped consultations from a nationally representative sample of 126 Dutch GPs to analyse GPs' communication and the duration of their consultations. Burnout was subdivided into emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced accomplishment. Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate which subgroups of GPs differed significantly. Results GPs with feelings of exhaustion or dissatisfaction with the available time have longer consultations compared to GPs without these feelings. Exhausted GPs, and GPs with feelings of depersonalisation, talk more about psychological or social topics in their consultations. GPs with feelings of reduced accomplishment are an exception: they communicate less affectively, are less patient-centred and have less eye contact with their patients compared to GPs without reduced accomplishment. We found no relationship between GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the available time and their psychological evaluations of patients' problems. Conclusion GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the time available for their patients do not obstruct their diagnosis and awareness of patients' psychological problems. On the contrary, GPs with high levels of exhaustion or depersonalisation, and GPs who are dissatisfied with the

  4. Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students.

    OpenAIRE

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. METHODS: Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or...

  5. RECORD CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2010-01-01

    DVD James Bond – Series Complete To all Record Club Members, to start the new year, we have taken advantage of a special offer to add copies of all the James Bond movies to date, from the very first - Dr. No - to the latest - Quantum of Solace. No matter which of the successive 007s you prefer (Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan or Daniel Craig), they are all there. Or perhaps you have a favourite Bond Girl, or even perhaps a favourite villain. Take your pick. You can find the full selection listed on the club web site http://cern.ch/crc; use the panel on the left of the page “Discs of the Month” and select Jan 2010. We remind you that we are open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 13:00 in Restaurant 2 (Bldg 504).

  6. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When quenched rapidly beyond their glass transition, colloidal suspensions fall out of equilibrium. The pace of their dynamics then slows down with the system age, i.e., with the time elapsed after the quench. This breaking of time translational invariance is associated with dynamical observables...... which depend on two time-arguments. The phenomenology is shared by a broad class of aging systems and calls for an equally broad theoretical description. The key idea is that, independent of microscopic details, aging systems progress through rare intermittent structural relaxations that are de......-facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  7. Record breakers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In the sixties, CERN’s Fellows were but a handful of about 50 young experimentalists present on site to complete their training. Today, their number has increased to a record-breaking 500. They come from many different fields and are spread across CERN’s different activity areas.   “Diversifying the Fellowship programme has been the key theme in recent years,” comments James Purvis, Head of the Recruitment, Programmes and Monitoring group in the HR Department. “In particular, the 2005 five-yearly review introduced the notion of ‘senior’ and ‘junior’ Fellowships, broadening the target audience to include those with Bachelor-level qualifications.” Diversification made CERN’s Fellowship programme attractive to a wider audience but the number of Fellows on site could not have increased so much without the support of EU-funded projects, which were instrumental in the growth of the programme. ...

  8. Comparison of spectrographic records of two syllables pronounced from scripts in hiragana and romaji by students with different familiarity with English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ototake, Harumi; Yamada, Jun

    2005-10-01

    The same syllables /mu/ and /ra/ written in Japanese hiragana and romaji given on a standard speeded naming task elicited phonetically or acoustically different responses in a syllabic hiragana condition and a romaji condition. The participants were two groups of Japanese college students (ns = 15 and 16) with different familiarity with English as a second language. The results suggested that the phonetic reality of syllables represented in these scripts can differ, depending on the interaction between the kind of script and speakers' orthographic familiarity.

  9. Record Club

    CERN Document Server

    Record Club

    2012-01-01

      March  Selections By the time this appears, we will have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left panel of the web page and then Mar 2012. New films include recent releases such as Johnny English 2, Bad Teacher, Cowboys vs Aliens, and Super 8. We are also starting to acquire some of the classic films we missed when we initiated the DVD section of the club, such as appeared in a recent Best 100 Films published by a leading UK magazine; this month we have added Spielberg’s Jaws and Scorsese’s Goodfellas. If you have your own ideas on what we are missing, let us know. For children we have no less than 8 Tin-Tin DVDs. And if you like fast moving pop music, try the Beyonce concert DVD. New CDs include the latest releases from Paul McCartney, Rihanna and Amy Winehouse. There is a best of Mylene Farmer, a compilation from the NRJ 201...

  10. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  11. Appropriating Scientific Vocabulary in Chemistry Laboratories: A Multiple Case Study of Four Community College Students with Diverse Ethno-Linguistic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cink, Ruth B.; Song, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    This multiple case study investigated how college students with diverse ethno-linguistic backgrounds used chemistry vocabulary as a way to look at their discursive identities and cultural border crossings during first semester general chemistry laboratories. The data were collected in two major forms: video-taped laboratory observations and…

  12. Teaching Information Skills: Recording Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach students in primary and intermediate grades to record and organize information. Highlights include developing a research question; collaborative planning between teachers and library media specialists; consistency of data entry; and an example of a unit on animal migration based on an appropriate Web site. (LRW)

  13. Learning science through talk: A case study of middle school students engaged in collaborative group investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicola, Debra Ann

    Reformers call for change in how science is taught in schools by shifting the focus towards conceptual understanding for all students. Constructivist learning is being promoted through the dissemination of National and State Science Standards that recommend group learning practices in science classrooms. This study examined the science learning and interactions, using case study methodology, of one collaborative group of 4 students in an urban middle school. Data on science talk and social interaction were collected over 9 weeks through 12 science problem solving sessions. To determine student learning through peer interaction, varied group structures were implemented, and students reflected on the group learning experience. Data included: field notes, cognitive and reflective journals, audiotapes and videotapes of student talk, and audiotapes of group interviews. Journal data were analyzed quantitatively and all other data was transcribed into The Ethnograph database for qualitative analysis. The data record was organized into social and cognitive domains and coded with respect to interaction patterns to show how group members experienced the social construction of science concepts. The most significant finding was that all students learned as a result of 12 talk sessions as evidenced by pre- and post-conceptual change scores. Interactions that promoted learning involved students connecting their thoughts, rephrasing, and challenging ideas. The role structure was only used by students about 15% of the time, but it started the talk with a science focus, created awareness of scientific methods, and created an awareness of equitable member participation. Students offered more spontaneous, explanatory talk when the role structure was relaxed, but did not engage in as much scientific writing. They said the role structure was important for helping them know what to do in the talk but they no longer needed it after a time. Gender bias, status, and early adolescent

  14. Analyzing the Cooking Behavior of Sophomore Female Students : In relation to the ability for preparation of cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Imakawa, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the Dandori-ryoku (the ability for preparation in cooking) by analyzing the practical cooking behavior of sophomore female students. Ten sophomore female students were participated in the experiment to cook three kinds of food (cooking rice, making miso soup and fried vegetables). The behavior of the participants during cooking were videotaped and analyzed in detail later especially in relation to Dandori-ryoku. Such behaviors as “starting from cooking ric...

  15. Records Management Directive

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Records Management Directive provides guidelines for the management of OPM records, and identifies the records management...

  16. Using Video-Taped Examples of Stand-Up Comedy Routines To Teach Principles of Public Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Paul J., III

    This paper investigates the use of stand-up comedy routines to demonstrate principles of public speaking to college students in communication classes. The paper examines particular elements of the public speaking process, which include the structural elements of speeches: (1) introductions; (2) the body of the speech, including organization,…

  17. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States. A Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kwanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    This report presents the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video study of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. This exploratory research project is part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). The study included 231 eighth-grade mathematics…

  18. Learning about Folklife: The U.S. Virgin Islands and Senegal. A Guide for Teachers and Students = Apprenons A Propos Des Traditions Culturelles: Les Iles Vierges Des Etats Unis Et Le Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies.

    Developed as part of an educational kit that includes a four-part videotape, maps, photographs, and audio tapes, this guide gives teacher preparation information, objectives, teaching strategies, and student activities for each of 3 lessons in 4 units: Unit 1, "Introduction to Folklife," presents a definition in lesson 1, "What is…

  19. Payroll Records, Business Education: 7734.31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitz, Rochelle

    This brief pamphlet offers a course description to acquaint students with different types of payroll records, and provides experience in the preparation of time cards, the use of charts to figure taxes, making deductions, and completing records to government requirements. Enrollment guidelines; objectives; course content; procedures; learning…

  20. 76 FR 24001 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ...'' student, as defined in DoD Joint Travel Regulation, Volume 2, Appendix A (JTR V. 2, App. A). Access is... student records of their ``dependent'' student, as defined in DoD Joint Travel Regulation, Volume 2....'' Categories of individuals covered by the system: Delete entry and replace with ``Current and former students...

  1. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  2. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  3. Quality assurance records and records' system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.; Martinek, J.

    1980-01-01

    For nuclear power plants extensive proof of quality is required which has to be documented reliably by quality records. With respect to the paper volume it is the most comprehensive 'curriculum vitae' of the technique. Traditional methods of information and recording are unsatisfactory for meeting regulatory requirements for maintaining the QA-aspects of status reporting, completeness, traceability and retrieval. Therefore KWU has established a record (documentation) subsystem within the overall component qualification system. Examples of the general documentation requirements, the procedure and handling in accordance with this subsystem for mechanical equipment are to be described examplarily. Topics are: - National and international requirements - Definition of QA records - Modular and product orientated KWU-record subsystem - Criteria for developing records - Record control, distribution, collection, storage - New documentation techniques (microfilm, data processing) - Education and training of personnel. (orig./RW)

  4. Presidential Electronic Records Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — PERL (Presidential Electronic Records Library) used to ingest and provide internal access to the Presidential electronic Records of the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton...

  5. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  6. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  7. Effectiveness of Student Learning during Experimental Work in Primary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Ana; Peklaj, Cirila; Ferk Savec, Vesna

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the research was to optimize the effectiveness of student learning based on experimental work in chemistry classes in Slovenian primary schools. To obtain evidence about how experimental work is implemented during regular chemistry classes, experimental work was videotaped during 19 units of chemistry lessons at 12 Slovenian primary schools from the pool of randomly selected schools. Altogether 332 eight-grade students were involved in the investigation, with an average age of 14.2 years. Students were videotaped during chemistry lessons, and their worksheets were collected afterward. The 12 chemistry teachers, who conducted lessons in these schools, were interviewed before the lessons; their teaching plans were also collected. The collected data was analyzed using qualitative methods. The results indicate that many teachers in Slovenian primary schools are not fully aware of the potential of experimental work integrated into chemistry lessons for the development of students' experimental competence. Further research of the value of different kinds of training to support teachers for the use of experimental work in chemistry teaching is needed.

  8. Students' beliefs, attitudes, and conceptual change in a traditional and a constructivistic high school physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, April Dean

    In this study, the relationships between student beliefs about the nature of science, student attitudes, and conceptual change about the nature of forces were investigated within a traditional and within a constructivistic high school physics classroom. Students in both classrooms were honors students taking a first year high school physics course and were primarily white and middle to upper SES. Students in the traditional classroom were all high ability juniors, and physics instruction was integrated with pre-calculus. Students in the constructivistic classroom were a mixture of juniors and seniors. Due to the interrelated nature of these factors and the complexity of their interactions, a naturalistic inquiry design was chosen. The data sources included videotape of 7-9 weeks of instruction; analysis of the videotapes using the Secondary Teacher Analysis Matrix (Gallagher & Parker, 1995); field notes; pretest/posttest assessment with the Force Concept Inventory (Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhammer, 1992); student responses from the Views on Science-Technology-Society questionnaire (Aikenhead & Ryan, 1992), the Questionnaire for the Assessment of a Science Course (Chiappetta, 1995), and the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (Taylor, Fraser, & White, 1994); student interviews; and teacher interviews. In the traditional classroom, (a) students did not think that physics was relevant to everyday experiences; (b) high conceptual change students were more likely to have an angular world view (Cobern, 1993) and have views more similar to the teacher's about the nature of science; and (c) high conceptual change students were able to develop an internally consistent understanding of the content; however, that content appeared to be isolated knowledge in some students. In the constructivistic classroom, (a) students saw physics as relevant and useful; (b) there was no difference in world view or agreement with the teacher's views on the nature of science between high

  9. Is video review of patient encounters an effective tool for medical student learning? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammoud MM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Maya M Hammoud1, Helen K Morgan1, Mary E Edwards2, Jennifer A Lyon2, Casey White31Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Health Sciences Center Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Faculty Affairs and Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USAPurpose: To determine if video review of student performance during patient encounters is an effective tool for medical student learning.Methods: Multiple bibliographic databases that include medical, general health care, education, psychology, and behavioral science literature were searched for the following terms: medical students, medical education, undergraduate medical education, education, self-assessment, self-evaluation, self-appraisal, feedback, videotape, video recording, televised, and DVD. The authors examined all abstracts resulting from this search and reviewed the full text of the relevant articles as well as additional articles identified in the reference lists of the relevant articles. Studies were classified by year of student (preclinical or clinical and study design (controlled or non-controlled.Results: A total of 67 articles met the final search criteria and were fully reviewed. Most studies were non-controlled and performed in the clinical years. Although the studies were quite variable in quality, design, and outcomes, in general video recording of performance and subsequent review by students with expert feedback had positive outcomes in improving feedback and ultimate performance. Video review with self-assessment alone was not found to be generally effective, but when linked with expert feedback it was superior to traditional feedback alone.Conclusion: There are many methods for integrating effective use of video-captured performance into a program of learning. We recommend combining student self-assessment with feedback

  10. Maximum Acceleration Recording Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Coarsely digitized maximum levels recorded in blown fuses. Circuit feeds power to accelerometer and makes nonvolatile record of maximum level to which output of accelerometer rises during measurement interval. In comparison with inertia-type single-preset-trip-point mechanical maximum-acceleration-recording devices, circuit weighs less, occupies less space, and records accelerations within narrower bands of uncertainty. In comparison with prior electronic data-acquisition systems designed for same purpose, circuit simpler, less bulky, consumes less power, costs and analysis of data recorded in magnetic or electronic memory devices. Circuit used, for example, to record accelerations to which commodities subjected during transportation on trucks.

  11. Using Peer Feedback to Improve Students' Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Tammy Q.; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

    2016-02-01

    This article examines a 7th grade teacher's pedagogical practices to support her students to provide peer feedback to one another using technology during scientific inquiry. This research is part of a larger study in which teachers in California and Washington and their classes engaged in inquiry projects using a Web-based system called Web of Inquiry. Videotapes of classroom lessons and artifacts such as student work were collected as part of the corpus of data. In the case examined, Ms. E supports her students to collectively define "meaningful feedback," thereby improving the quality of feedback that was provided in the future. This is especially timely, given the attention in Next Generation Science Standards to cross-cutting concepts and practices that require students discuss and debate ideas with each other in order to improve their understanding and their written inquiry reports (NGSS, 2013).

  12. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hear medical people call these EHRs — short for electronic health records . Electronic records make it easier for all your doctors ... doctor's office is trying to protect a patient's privacy or safety. For example, they may say no ...

  13. Climate Record Books

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climate Record Books contain daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual averages, extremes, or occurrences. Most data are sequential by period of record 1871-1910,...

  14. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  15. Iraq Radiosonde Launch Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Iraqi upper air records loaned to NCDC from the Air Force 14th Weather Squadron. Scanned notebooks containing upper air radiosonde launch records and data. Launches...

  16. Record Statistics and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibani, Paolo; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2009-01-01

    with independent random increments. The term record dynamics covers the rather new idea that records may, in special situations, have measurable dynamical consequences. The approach applies to the aging dynamics of glasses and other systems with multiple metastable states. The basic idea is that record sizes...... fluctuations of e. g. the energy are able to push the system past some sort of ‘edge of stability’, inducing irreversible configurational changes, whose statistics then closely follows the statistics of record fluctuations....

  17. Interpreting land records

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    Base retracement on solid research and historically accurate interpretation Interpreting Land Records is the industry's most complete guide to researching and understanding the historical records germane to land surveying. Coverage includes boundary retracement and the primary considerations during new boundary establishment, as well as an introduction to historical records and guidance on effective research and interpretation. This new edition includes a new chapter titled "Researching Land Records," and advice on overcoming common research problems and insight into alternative resources wh

  18. Managing electronic records

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Julie

    2005-01-01

    For records management courses, this book covers the theory and practice of managing electronic records as business and information assets. It focuses on the strategies, systems and procedures necessary to ensure that electronic records are appropriately created, captured, organized and retained over time to meet business and legal requirements.

  19. Medical Students Learning Communication Skills in a Second Language: Empathy and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Muhammad J; Major, Stella; Mirza, Deen M; Prinsloo, Engela A M; Osman, Ossama; Amiri, Leena; McLean, Michelle

    2013-02-01

    Communications skills (CS) training for medical interviewing is increasingly being conducted in English at medical schools worldwide. In this study, we sought to identify whether Arabic-speaking medical students experienced difficulty with the different components of the CS training that were conducted in English. Individual third-year preclinical medical students (N = 45) were videotaped while interviewing simulated patients. Each student assessed his/her performance on a 13-item (5-point scale) assessment form, which was also completed by the tutor and other students in the group. Of the 13 components of their CS training, tutors awarded the lowest marks for students' abilities to express empathy, ask about patients' feelings, use transition statements, ask about functional impact, and elicit patients' expectations (P students learning CS in a second language.

  20. Refugees in Today's Europe. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Lynette

    There are approximately 18 million refugees as well as many millions more who have been uprooted from their homes. This 25-minute video is primarily for 14-18 year olds. It is designed to suit the needs of teachers of history, geography, sociology, integrated humanities, English, and modern studies, but it may also be used in adult education…

  1. Bug City: Aquatic Insects [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  2. Bug City: Flies & Mosquitoes [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon, including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic…

  3. Bug City: Ladybugs & Fireflies [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon, including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic…

  4. Improving the quality of endodontic record keeping through clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E; Shekaran, L; Muthukrishnan, A

    2017-03-10

    Introduction Record keeping is an essential part of day-to-day practice and plays an important role in treatment, audit and dento-legal procedures. Creating effective endodontic records is challenging due to the scope of information required for comprehensive notes. Two audits were performed to assess the standards of endodontic record keeping by dentists in a restorative dentistry department and students on an endodontic MSc course.Methods Fifty sets of departmental records and 10 sets of student records were retrospectively evaluated against the European Society of Endodontology 2006 guidelines. Results of the first cycle of both audits were presented to departmental staff and MSc students, alongside an educational session. Additionally, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms were developed. Both audits were repeated using the same number of records, thus completing both audit cycles.Results The most commonly absent records included consent, anaesthetic details, rubber dam method, working length reference point, irrigation details and obturation technique. Almost all areas of record keeping improved following the second audit cycle, with some areas reaching 100% compliance when record keeping forms were used. Statistically significant improvements were seen in 24 of the 29 areas in the departmental audit and 14 of the 29 areas in the MSc audit (P = 0.05).Conclusions Significant improvements in endodontic record keeping can be achieved through the provision of education, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms.

  5. Modern recording techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, David Miles

    2013-01-01

    As the most popular and authoritative guide to recording Modern Recording Techniques provides everything you need to master the tools and day to day practice of music recording and production. From room acoustics and running a session to mic placement and designing a studio Modern Recording Techniques will give you a really good grounding in the theory and industry practice. Expanded to include the latest digital audio technology the 7th edition now includes sections on podcasting, new surround sound formats and HD and audio.If you are just starting out or looking for a step up

  6. Disturbance recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Mayya, A.; Vaidya, U.W.; Premraj, M.K.; Patil, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    A computerized system for disturbance monitoring, recording and display has been developed for use in nuclear power plants and is versatile enough to be used where ever a large number of parameters need to be recorded, e.g. conventional power plants, chemical industry etc. The Disturbance Recording System (DRS) has been designed to continuously monitor a process plant and record crucial parameters. The DRS provides a centralized facility to monitor and continuously record 64 process parameters scanned every 1 sec for 5 days. The system also provides facility for storage of 64 parameters scanned every 200 msec during 2 minutes prior to and 3 minutes after a disturbance. In addition the system can initiate, on demand, the recording of 8 parameters at a fast rate of every 5 msec for a period of 5 sec. and thus act as a visicorder. All this data is recorded in non-volatile memory and can be displayed, printed/plotted and used for subsequent analysis. Since data can be stored densely on floppy disks, the volume of space required for archival storage is also low. As a disturbance recorder, the DRS allows the operator to view the state of the plant prior to occurrence of the disturbance and helps in identifying the root cause. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  7. Privacy and Library Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Stacey L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the history of privacy as it relates to library records. It commences with a discussion of how the concept of privacy first originated through case law and follows the concept of privacy as it has affected library records through current day and the "USA PATRIOT Act."

  8. Visual patient records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luu, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient information is often complex and fragmented; visualization can help to obtain and communicate insights. To move from paper medical records to interactive and visual patient records is a big challenge. This project aims to move towards this ultimate goal by providing an interactive prototype

  9. Record Keeping Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    These guidelines are designed to educate psychologists and provide a framework for making decisions regarding professional record keeping. State and federal laws, as well as the American Psychological Association's "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct," generally require maintenance of appropriate records of psychological…

  10. Usage Record Format Recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsen, J.K.; Muller-Pfeerkorn, R

    2013-01-01

    For resources to be shared, sites must be able to exchange basic accounting and usage data in a common format. This document describes a common format which enables the exchange of basic accounting and usage data from different resources. This record format is intended to facilitate the sharing of usage information, particularly in the area of the accounting of jobs, computing, memory, storage and cloud usage but with a structure that allows an easy extension to other resources. This document describes the Usage Record components both in natural language form and annotated XML. This document does not address how these records should be used, nor does it attempt to dictate the format in which the accounting records are stored. Instead, it denes a common exchange format. Furthermore, nothing is said regarding the communication mechanisms employed to exchange the records, i.e. transport layer, framing, authentication, integrity, etc.

  11. Laser color recording unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E.

    1984-05-01

    A color recording unit was designed for output and control of digitized picture data within computer controlled reproduction and picture processing systems. In order to get a color proof picture of high quality similar to a color print, together with reduced time and material consumption, a photographic color film material was exposed pixelwise by modulated laser beams of three wavelengths for red, green and blue light. Components of different manufacturers for lasers, acousto-optic modulators and polygon mirrors were tested, also different recording methods as (continuous tone mode or screened mode and with a drum or flatbed recording principle). Besides the application for the graphic arts - the proof recorder CPR 403 with continuous tone color recording with a drum scanner - such a color hardcopy peripheral unit with large picture formats and high resolution can be used in medicine, communication, and satellite picture processing.

  12. Critical thinking skills in nursing students: comparison of simulation-based performance with metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fero, Laura J; O'Donnell, John M; Zullo, Thomas G; Dabbs, Annette DeVito; Kitutu, Julius; Samosky, Joseph T; Hoffman, Leslie A

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of an examination of the relationship between metrics of critical thinking skills and performance in simulated clinical scenarios. Paper and pencil assessments are commonly used to assess critical thinking but may not reflect simulated performance. In 2007, a convenience sample of 36 nursing students participated in measurement of critical thinking skills and simulation-based performance using videotaped vignettes, high-fidelity human simulation, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and California Critical Thinking Skills Test. Simulation-based performance was rated as 'meeting' or 'not meeting' overall expectations. Test scores were categorized as strong, average, or weak. Most (75.0%) students did not meet overall performance expectations using videotaped vignettes or high-fidelity human simulation; most difficulty related to problem recognition and reporting findings to the physician. There was no difference between overall performance based on method of assessment (P = 0.277). More students met subcategory expectations for initiating nursing interventions (P ≤ 0.001) using high-fidelity human simulation. The relationship between videotaped vignette performance and critical thinking disposition or skills scores was not statistically significant, except for problem recognition and overall critical thinking skills scores (Cramer's V = 0.444, P = 0.029). There was a statistically significant relationship between overall high-fidelity human simulation performance and overall critical thinking disposition scores (Cramer's V = 0.413, P = 0.047). Students' performance reflected difficulty meeting expectations in simulated clinical scenarios. High-fidelity human simulation performance appeared to approximate scores on metrics of critical thinking best. Further research is needed to determine if simulation-based performance correlates with critical thinking skills in the clinical setting. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced

  13. Informal science participation positively affects the communication and pedagogical skills of university physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah

    2013-04-01

    Many undergraduate and graduate physics students choose to participate in an informal science program at the University of Colorado Boulder (Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC)). They coach elementary and middle school students in inquiry-based physics activities during weekly, afterschool sessions. Observations from the afterschool sessions, field notes from the students, and pre/post surveys are collected. University students are also pre/post- videotaped explaining a textbook passage on a physics concept to an imagined audience for the Communications in Everyday Language assessment (CELA). We present findings from these data that indicate informal experiences improve the communication and pedagogical skills of the university student as well as positively influence their self-efficacy as scientific communicators and teachers.

  14. ‘n Videogebaseerde tutor onderrig- en ondersteuningsprogram vir eerstejaar verpleegkunde studente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. du Rand

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available A video-based method of instruction was introduced to develop students academically as well as to implement parallel medium instruction. An action research approach was followed Lectures were video-taped beforehand and worked through with the students by a tutor in scheduled Afrikaans or English periods. Simultaneously a live class situation was handled by the lecturer in the other language. Over and above these methods additional video-based support sessions were conducted by tutors for high risk students. A survey indicated that 85% of students were satisfied with this method of instruction. The perceptions of high risk students to VSI were positive and they passed the examinations. Video lectures need to be carefully planned in order to be acceptable as one of a number of possible instruction methods at a multi-cultural university.

  15. Learning to think like a nurse: the development of clinical judgment in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jane; Stamp, Kelly

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the clinical judgment and reasoning skills of nursing students in high-fidelity simulation. Two levels of students (N = 104), novices and those who are slightly more advanced, participated in individual videotaped simulations. Afterward, interviews were conducted to explore what the student was thinking and feeling during simulation. Five themes emerged from the interviews: thinking like a nurse, assessment, looking for answers, communication, and magical or reflective thinking. There was a clear distinction in the reasoning skills of the novice students compared with students with more clinical experience. Tanner's model of clinical judgment in nursing is used to understand the findings of the study. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Should Lecture Recordings Be Mandated in Dental Schools? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Lecture Recordings Should Be Mandatory in U.S. Dental Schools and Viewpoint 2: Lecture Recordings Should Not Be Mandatory in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandona, Andrea Ferreira; Kinney, Janet; Seong, WookJin; Kumar, Vandana; Bendayan, Alexander; Hewlett, Edmond

    2016-12-01

    Transcription or recording of lectures has been in use for many years, and with the availability of high-fidelity recording, the practice is now ubiquitous in higher education. Since technology has permeated education and today's tech-savvy students have expectations for on-demand learning, dental schools are motivated to record lectures, albeit with positive and negative implications. This Point/Counterpoint article addresses the question of whether lecture recording should be mandatory in U.S. dental schools. Viewpoint 1 supports the statement that lecture recording should be mandatory. Proponents of this viewpoint argue that the benefits-notably, student satisfaction and potential for improvement in student performance-outweigh concerns. Viewpoint 2 takes the opposite position, arguing that lecture recording decreases students' classroom attendance and adversely affects the morale of educators. Additional arguments against mandatory lecture recordings involve the expense of incorporating technology that requires ongoing support.

  17. Electronic health records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    that a centralised European health record system will become a reality even before 2020. However, the concept of a centralised supranational central server raises concern about storing electronic medical records in a central location. The privacy threat posed by a supranational network is a key concern. Cross......-border and Interoperable electronic health record systems make confidential data more easily and rapidly accessible to a wider audience and increase the risk that personal data concerning health could be accidentally exposed or easily distributed to unauthorised parties by enabling greater access to a compilation...... of the personal data concerning health, from different sources, and throughout a lifetime....

  18. Effect of magnification loupes on dental hygiene student posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, J Peggy; Millar, A Michele; Burke, Jillian M; Maillet, Michelle A; Maillet, Wayne A; Neish, Nancy R

    2008-01-01

    The chair-side work posture of dental hygienists has long been a concern because of health-related problems potentially caused or exacerbated by poor posture. The purpose of this study was to investigate if using magnification loupes improved dental hygiene students' posture during provision of treatment. The treatment chosen was hand-scaling, and the effect of the timing of introduction of the loupes to students was also examined. Thirty-five novice dental hygiene students took part in the study. Each student was assessed providing dental hygiene care with and without loupes, thus controlling for innate differences in natural posture. Students were randomized into two groups. Group one used loupes in the first session and did not use them for the second session. Group two reversed this sequence. At the end of each session, all students were videotaped while performing scaling procedures. Their posture was assessed using an adapted version of Branson et al.'s Posture Assessment Instrument (PAI). Four raters assessed students at three time periods for nine posture components on the PAI. A paired t-test compared scores with and without loupes for each student. Scores showed a significant improvement in posture when using loupes (ppostural benefit is realized by requiring students to master the use of magnification loupes as early as possible within the curriculum.

  19. Deploying Electronic Health Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOFTLINKS DIGITAL

    [11] Verisign Whitepaper (2005) Managing Application Security in Business ... health record (EHR) and Information Technology and the subsequent impact of ... advancements, said that IT must play a ... and history of medical status and other.

  20. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  1. Lagos Notes and Records

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Lagos Notes and Records is an annual, interdisciplinary journal of the humanities. ... Insuring the Nation: Europeans and the Emergence of Modern Insurance Business in Colonial Nigeria ...

  2. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    independent web service connected to database of medical records or Worldwide. Interoperability ... allows wireless monitoring and tracking of patients and first responders using sensor nodes .... All these network security threats arise mainly ...

  3. Records Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Records Management Database is tool created in Microsoft Access specifically for USAID use. It contains metadata in order to access and retrieve the information...

  4. Environmental Review Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD’s Environmental Review Records page houses environmental reviews made publicly available through the HUD Environmental Review Online System (HEROS). This...

  5. Vaccination Records for Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunization Information System (IIS). An IIS is a computer system your doctor or public health clinic may use ... preventable diseases. Immunization Records for Adoption and Foster Care You should ask your adoption coordinator for your ...

  6. A cognitive framework for analyzing and describing introductory students' use and understanding of mathematics in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuminaro, Jonathan

    Many introductory, algebra-based physics students perform poorly on mathematical problem solving tasks in physics. There are at least two possible, distinct reasons for this poor performance: (1) students simply lack the mathematical skills needed to solve problems in physics, or (2) students do not know how to apply the mathematical skills they have to particular problem situations in physics. While many students do lack the requisite mathematical skills, a major finding from this work is that the majority of students possess the requisite mathematical skills, yet fail to use or interpret them in the context of physics. In this thesis I propose a theoretical framework to analyze and describe students' mathematical thinking in physics. In particular, I attempt to answer two questions. What are the cognitive tools involved in formal mathematical thinking in physics? And, why do students make the kinds of mistakes they do when using mathematics in physics? According to the proposed theoretical framework there are three major theoretical constructs: mathematical resources, which are the knowledge elements that are activated in mathematical thinking and problem solving; epistemic games, which are patterns of activities that use particular kinds of knowledge to create new knowledge or solve a problem; and frames, which are structures of expectations that determine how individuals interpret situations or events. The empirical basis for this study comes from videotaped sessions of college students solving homework problems. The students are enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course. The videotapes were transcribed and analyzed using the aforementioned theoretical framework. Two important results from this work are: (1) the construction of a theoretical framework that offers researchers a vocabulary (ontological classification of cognitive structures) and grammar (relationship between the cognitive structures) for understanding the nature and origin of

  7. Microcomputer sunshine recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benincasa, F.; Fasano, G.; Materassi, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Campbell-Stokes recorder is the most frequently used sunshine recorder. However, it cannot be used for automatic data acquisitions and the threshold level is not well defined. This paper describes an instrument in which the threshold for minimum sunshine is strictly established. The instrument not only gives the parameter but three other analogical signals: direct, diffuse and global radiation. All of this as been done with only two silicon cells [it

  8. The intelligent data recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Mamoru; Hidekuma, Sigeru.

    1985-01-01

    The intelligent data recorder has been developed to data acquisition for a microwave interferometer. The 'RS-232C' which is the standard interface is used for data transmission to the host computer. Then, it's easy to connect with any computer which has general purpose serial port. In this report, the charcteristics of the intelligent data recorder and the way of developing the software are described. (author)

  9. Probabilistic record linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Adrian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Blom, Ashley W; Steele, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    Studies involving the use of probabilistic record linkage are becoming increasingly common. However, the methods underpinning probabilistic record linkage are not widely taught or understood, and therefore these studies can appear to be a 'black box' research tool. In this article, we aim to describe the process of probabilistic record linkage through a simple exemplar. We first introduce the concept of deterministic linkage and contrast this with probabilistic linkage. We illustrate each step of the process using a simple exemplar and describe the data structure required to perform a probabilistic linkage. We describe the process of calculating and interpreting matched weights and how to convert matched weights into posterior probabilities of a match using Bayes theorem. We conclude this article with a brief discussion of some of the computational demands of record linkage, how you might assess the quality of your linkage algorithm, and how epidemiologists can maximize the value of their record-linked research using robust record linkage methods. © The Author 2015; Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  10. Digital recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Iyer, A.; Vaidya, U.W.

    1987-01-01

    A large number of critical process parameters in nuclear power plants have hitherto been monitored using electromechanical chart recorders. The reducing costs of electronics systems have led to a trend towards modernizing power plant control rooms by computerizing all the panel instrumentation. As a first step, it has been decided to develop a digital recording system to record the values of 48 process parameters. The system as developed and described in this report is more than a replacement for recorders; it offers substantial advantages in terms of lower overall system cost, excellent time resolution, accurate data and absolute synchronization for correlated signals. The system provides high speed recording of 48 process parameters, maintains historical records and permits retrieval and display of archival information on a colour monitor, a plotter and a printer. It is implemented using a front end data acquisition unit connected on a serial link to a PC-XT computer with 20 MB Winchester. The system offers an extremely user friendly man machine interaction, based on a hierarchical paged menu driven scheme. Softwre development for this system has been carried out using the C language. (author). 9 figs

  11. Engaging Students in Online Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egendal, Jeppe Michael

    This study investegates how the educational design of online study activities affects students’ social and academic engagement in connection to their study? The study uses a hermenutical approach, using recordings of online sessions of student collaborations and interviews with students as methods...... for understanding student engagement...

  12. Sound and recording applications and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rumsey, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Providing vital reading for audio students and trainee engineers, this guide is ideal for anyone who wants a solid grounding in both theory and industry practices in audio, sound and recording. There are many books on the market covering ""how to work it"" when it comes to audio equipment-but Sound and Recording isn't one of them. Instead, you'll gain an understanding of ""how it works"" with this approachable guide to audio systems.New to this edition:Digital audio section revised substantially to include the latest developments in audio networking (e.g. RAVENNA, AES X-192, AVB), high-resolut

  13. 75 FR 20346 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Federal Student Aid, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of an altered system of records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), 5 United States Code (U.S.C.) 552a, the Chief Operating...

  14. 76 FR 46767 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ...: The Department of the Army proposes to add a system of records to its inventory of record systems... provides a student management system that integrates Web-enabled courseware to support online certification... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army [Docket ID USA-2011-0019] Privacy Act of 1974; System...

  15. 75 FR 48655 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... recertification, the file may include proficiency data in one or more skill areas. Electronic records may contain... educational, training, and conferencing entities for participant enrollment, tracking, evaluation, and payment... on electronic storage media. RETRIEVABILITY: Records may be retrieved by name, student identification...

  16. 77 FR 31606 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students, Department... Secretary of the Office of English Language Acquisition deletes the following system of records: System...

  17. Critical thinking skills in nursing students: comparison of simulation-based performance with metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fero, Laura J.; O’Donnell, John M.; Zullo, Thomas G.; Dabbs, Annette DeVito; Kitutu, Julius; Samosky, Joseph T.; Hoffman, Leslie A.

    2018-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an examination of the relationship between metrics of critical thinking skills and performance in simulated clinical scenarios. Background Paper and pencil assessments are commonly used to assess critical thinking but may not reflect simulated performance. Methods In 2007, a convenience sample of 36 nursing students participated in measurement of critical thinking skills and simulation-based performance using videotaped vignettes, high-fidelity human simulation, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and California Critical Thinking Skills Test. Simulation- based performance was rated as ‘meeting’ or ‘not meeting’ overall expectations. Test scores were categorized as strong, average, or weak. Results Most (75·0%) students did not meet overall performance expectations using videotaped vignettes or high-fidelity human simulation; most difficulty related to problem recognition and reporting findings to the physician. There was no difference between overall performance based on method of assessment (P = 0·277). More students met subcategory expectations for initiating nursing interventions (P ≤ 0·001) using high-fidelity human simulation. The relationship between video-taped vignette performance and critical thinking disposition or skills scores was not statistically significant, except for problem recognition and overall critical thinking skills scores (Cramer’s V = 0·444, P = 0·029). There was a statistically significant relationship between overall high-fidelity human simulation performance and overall critical thinking disposition scores (Cramer’s V = 0·413, P = 0·047). Conclusion Students’ performance reflected difficulty meeting expectations in simulated clinical scenarios. High-fidelity human simulation performance appeared to approximate scores on metrics of critical thinking best. Further research is needed to determine if simulation-based performance correlates with critical thinking skills

  18. Keeping electronic records secure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, David

    2013-10-01

    Are electronic engineering maintenance records relating to the hospital estate or a medical device as important as electronic patient records? Computer maintenance management systems (CMMS) are increasingly being used to manage all-round maintenance activities. However, the accuracy of the data held on them, and a level of security that prevents tampering with records, or other unauthorised changes to them to 'cover' poor practice, are both essential, so that, should an individual be injured or killed on hospital grounds, and a law suit follow, the estates team can be confident that it has accurate data to prove it has fulfilled its duty of care. Here David Easton MSc CEng FIHEEM MIET, director of Zener Engineering Services, and chair of IHEEM's Medical Devices Advisory Group, discusses the issues around maintenance databases, and the security and integrity of maintenance data.

  19. Documentation: Records and Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with documentation to include the beginning of documentation, the requirements of Good Manufacturing Practice reports and records, and the steps that can be taken to minimize Good Manufacturing Practice documentation problems. It is important to remember that documentation for 503a compounding involves the Formulation Record, Compounding Record, Standard Operating Procedures, Safety Data Sheets, etc. For 503b outsourcing facilities, compliance with Current Good Manufacturing Practices is required, so this article is applicable to them. For 503a pharmacies, one can see the development and modification of Good Manufacturing Practice and even observe changes as they are occurring in 503a documentation requirements and anticipate that changes will probably continue to occur. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  20. Elementary student teachers' science content representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembal-Saul, Carla; Krajcik, Joseph; Blumenfeld, Phyllis

    2002-08-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which three prospective teachers who had early opportunities to teach science would approach representing science content within the context of their student teaching experiences. The study is framed in the literature on pedagogical content knowledge and learning to teach. A situated perspective on cognition is applied to better understand the influence of context and the role of the cooperating teacher. The three participants were enrolled in an experimental teacher preparation program designed to enhance the teaching of science at the elementary level. Qualitative case study design guided the collection, organization, and analysis of data. Multiple forms of data associated with student teachers' content representations were collected, including audiotaped planning and reflection interviews, written lesson plans and reflections, and videotaped teaching experiences. Broad analysis categories were developed and refined around the subconstructs of content representation (i.e., knowledge of instructional strategies that promote learning and knowledge of students and their requirements for meaningful science learning). Findings suggest that when prospective teachers are provided with opportunities to apply and reflect substantively on their developing considerations for supporting children's science learning, they are able to maintain a subject matter emphasis. However, in the absence of such opportunities, student teachers abandon their subject matter emphasis, even when they have had extensive background and experiences addressing subject-specific considerations for teaching and learning.

  1. Thermal transfer recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Fukushima, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Shinozuka, M.; Seikohsha, K. K. Suwa

    1988-08-01

    The recording media consist of more than or one coloring layer and a layer containing a flame retardant to ensure noncombustibility and good thermal transfer. Thus, a PET film was coated on a side with a compound containing Vylon 290 (polyester resin), AFR-1021 (decabromodiphenyl oxide) 8 and Polysafe 60 (Sb oxide), and coated on the other side with a compound containing carnauba wax, HNP-9 (paraffin wax), EV-410 (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer), and Cu phthalocyanine to give a thermal transfer recording medium which showed good noncombustibility and antiblocking properties, and provided high quality images.

  2. Optical recording medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriech, A.; Bivol, V.; Tridukh, G.; Tsiuleanu, D.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates of the micro- and optoelectronics, computer engineering ,in particular, to tjhe optical information media and may be used in hilography. Summary of the invention consists in that the optical image recording medium, containing a dielectric substrates, onto one surface of which there are placed in series a transparent electricity conducting layer, a photo sensitive recording layer of chalcogenic glass and a thin film electrode of aluminium, is provided with an optically transparent protective layer, applied into the thin film electrode. The result of the invention consists in excluding the dependence of chemical processes course into the medium upon environmental conditions

  3. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowker, Geof

    2006-01-01

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  4. Can "YouTube" help students in learning surface anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2012-07-01

    In a problem-based learning curriculum, most medical students research the Internet for information for their "learning issues." Internet sites such as "YouTube" have become a useful resource for information. This study aimed at assessing YouTube videos covering surface anatomy. A search of YouTube was conducted from November 8 to 30, 2010 using research terms "surface anatomy," "anatomy body painting," "living anatomy," "bone landmarks," and "dermatomes" for surface anatomy-related videos. Only relevant video clips in the English language were identified and related URL recorded. For each videotape the following information were collected: title, authors, duration, number of viewers, posted comments, and total number of days on YouTube. The data were statistically analyzed and videos were grouped into educationally useful and non-useful videos on the basis of major and minor criteria covering technical, content, authority, and pedagogy parameters. A total of 235 YouTube videos were screened and 57 were found to have relevant information to surface anatomy. Analysis revealed that 15 (27%) of the videos provided useful information on surface anatomy. These videos scored (mean ± SD, 14.0 ± 0.7) and mainly covered surface anatomy of the shoulder, knee, muscles of the back, leg, and ankle, carotid artery, dermatomes, and anatomical positions. The other 42 (73%) videos were not useful educationally, scoring (mean ± SD, 7.4 ± 1.8). The total viewers of all videos were 1,058,634. Useful videos were viewed by 497,925 (47% of total viewers). The total viewership per day was 750 for useful videos and 652 for non-useful videos. No video clips covering surface anatomy of the head and neck, blood vessels and nerves of upper and lower limbs, chest and abdominal organs/structures were found. Currently, YouTube is an inadequate source of information for learning surface anatomy. More work is needed from medical schools and educators to add useful videos on You

  5. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Interprofessional Competencies to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Patrick L; Scherer, Yvonne Krall; Hatton, Michael; Antonson, Donald; Austin-Ketch, Tammy; Campbell-Heider, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a novel interprofessional standardized patient exercise (ISPE) with oral-systemic and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) components. Dental students and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students at one U.S. university participated in the simulation, which was primarily designed to test their teamwork skills. In spring 2014, DNP students worked in the dental clinics with dental students under the supervision of nursing and dental faculty members. To test the teamwork outcomes for both groups of students, a standardized patient (SP) scenario was designed to include multiple chronic medical diagnoses and an oral-systemic component. The exercise was filmed for later review. Outcomes measures included SP and student self-evaluations and faculty evaluation of student documentation. The primary outcome of interest from a dental standpoint was faculty evaluation of IPCP competencies derived from the Core Competencies of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and were deemed to be observable by faculty when viewing the videotaped scenario. Eight teams of students participated with an SP trained in the scenario. Each team consisted of a DNP student, a fourth-year dental student, and a second-year dental student. All eligible students in the DNP class (n=20) and eight students from each dental class (approximately 110 each) participated. The results showed that the teams scored highest on the role/responsibilities subscale, indicating students were respectful of each other's roles and expertise and effectively engaged each other to develop strategies to meet the patient's needs. Scores on the three other subscales (values/ethics, interprofessional communication, and teams/teamwork) were also high. These findings appeared to support IPCP as a method to foster knowledge and respect for other roles and responsibilities, improve appreciation of teamwork, and encourage better communication among health

  6. WIPP Project Records Management Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Records Management Handbook provides the WIPP Project Records Management personnel with a tool to use to fulfill the requirements of the WIPP Records Program and direct their actions in the important area of records management. The handbook describes the various project areas involved in records management, and how they function. The handbook provides the requirements for Record Coordinators and Master Record Center (MRC) personnel to follow in the normal course of file management, records scheduling, records turnover, records disposition, and records retrieval. More importantly, the handbook provides a single reference which encompasses the procedures set fourth in DOE Order 1324.2A, ''Records Disposition'' ASME NQA-1, ''Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities'' and DOE-AL 5700.6B, ''General Operations Quality Assurance.'' These documents dictate how an efficient system of records management will be achieved on the WIPP Project

  7. Student comprehension of mathematics through astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search, Robert

    The purpose of this study is to examine how knowledge of astronomy can enhance college-level learning situations involving mathematics. The fundamental symbiosis between mathematics and astronomy was established early in the 17th century when Johannes Kepler deduced the 3 basic laws of planetary motion. This mutually harmonious relationship between these sciences has been reinforced repeatedly in history. In the early 20th century, for example, astronomer Arthur Eddington used photographic evidence from a 1919 solar eclipse to verify Einstein's mathematical theory of relativity. This study was conducted in 5 undergraduate mathematics classes over the course of 2 years. An introductory course in ordinary differential equations, taught in Spring Semester 2013, involved 4 students. A similar course in Spring Semester 2014 involved 6 students, a Summer Semester 2014 Calculus II course involved 2 students, and a Summer 2015 Astronomy course involved 8 students. The students were asked to use Kepler's astronomical evidence to deduce mathematical laws normally encountered on an undergraduate level. They were also asked to examine the elementary mathematical aspects involved in a theoretical trajectory to the planet Neptune. The summer astronomy class was asked to draw mathematical conclusions about large numbers from the recent discoveries concerning the dwarf planet Pluto. The evidence consists primarily of videotaped PowerPoint presentations conducted by the students in both differential equations classes, along with interviews and tests given in all the classes. All presentations were transcribed and examined to determine the effect of astronomy as a generator of student understanding of mathematics. An analysis of the data indicated two findings: definite student interest in a subject previously unknown to most of them and a desire to make the mathematical connection to celestial phenomena.

  8. Electronic health record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission wants to boost the digital economy by enabling all Europeans to have access to online medical records anywhere in Europe by 2020. With the newly enacted Directive 2011/24/EU on Patients’ Rights in cross border healthcare due for implementation by 2013, it is inevitable tha...

  9. Cine recording ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Camera system provides accurate photographic recording during acceleration of centrifuge and permits immediate observation of dynamic changes in retinal circulation by a closed-circuit television loop. System consists of main camera, remote control unit, and strobe power supply unit, and is used for fluorescein studies and dynamometry sequences.

  10. Records on the water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regula, E.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the electric power generation in hydro-power plants in the Slovak Republic during 2002 is reviewed. Year 2002 was rich on precipitation and the Hydro Power Plants (plants of the Slovenske elektrarne, a.s.) has reached record in generation of electric power when altogether the Water Power Plants produced 5,168.5 GWh. (author)

  11. A Miniature Recording Cardiotachometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul J; Vroomen, Louis J.; Hendriksen, Nils Thedin

    1981-01-01

    The design of a miniature, recording cardiotachometer is described. It is simple and can store digital data. Bench and field tests, using a hand-held display, are presented. Construction and principles of operation are discussed. Applications, with performing athlete subjects, are outlined....

  12. Students' performance on the Ghanaian junior high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    Mathematics education is considered as the basic right that all students have to .... Descriptive Statistics on the Total Score of Students. ( ). Minimum. Score .... where Ghanaian students' worst performances were recorded in applying. Also, the ...

  13. Qualities of dental chart recording and coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantravekin, Yosananda; Tasananutree, Munchulika; Santaphongse, Supitcha; Aittiwarapoj, Anchisa

    2013-01-01

    Chart recording and coding are the important processes in the healthcare informatics system, but there were only a few reports in the dentistry field. The objectives of this study are to study the qualities of dental chart recording and coding, as well as the achievement of lecture/workshop on this topic. The study was performed by auditing the patient's charts at the TU Dental Student Clinic from July 2011-August 2012. The chart recording mean scores ranged from 51.0-55.7%, whereas the errors in the coding process were presented in the coder part more than the doctor part. The lecture/workshop could improve the scores only in some topics.

  14. Records Center Program Billing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — RCPBS supports the Records center programs (RCP) in producing invoices for the storage (NARS-5) and servicing of National Archives and Records Administration’s...

  15. Recording thoughts while memorizing music: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania eLisboa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicians generally believe that memory differs from one person to the next. As a result, memorizing strategies that could be useful to almost everyone are not widely taught. We describe how an 18-year old piano student (Grade 7, ABRSM, learned to memorize by recording her thoughts, a technique inspired by studies of how experienced soloists memorize. The student, who had previously ignored suggestions that she play from memory, decided to learn to memorize, selecting Schumann’s Der Dichter Spricht for this purpose. Rather than explicitly teaching the student how to memorize, the teacher taught her to record her thoughts while playing by marking them on copies of the score, adapting an approach used previously in research with experienced performers. Over a 6½ week period, the student recorded her thoughts during practice (5 times and while performing from memory for the teacher (3 times. The student also video-recorded three weeks of practice, three performances, and the reconstruction of the piece from memory after a 9½-weeks break. The thoughts that the student reported were prepared during practice, stable over time, and functioned as memory retrieval cues during reconstruction. This suggests that the student memorized in the same way as the more experienced musicians who have been studied previously and that teaching student musicians to record their thoughts may be an effective way to help them memorize. The speed and durability of her memorization surprised the student, inspiring her to perform in public and to use the same technique for new pieces.

  16. Recording thoughts while memorizing music: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Tania; Chaffin, Roger; Demos, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Musicians generally believe that memory differs from one person to the next. As a result, memorizing strategies that could be useful to almost everyone are not widely taught. We describe how an 18-years old piano student (Grade 7, ABRSM), learned to memorize by recording her thoughts, a technique inspired by studies of how experienced soloists memorize. The student, who had previously ignored suggestions that she play from memory, decided to learn to memorize, selecting Schumann’s “Der Dichter Spricht” for this purpose. Rather than explicitly teaching the student how to memorize, the teacher taught her to record her thoughts while playing by marking them on copies of the score, adapting an approach used previously in research with experienced performers. Over a 6½ week period, the student recorded her thoughts during practice (five times) and while performing from memory for the teacher (three times). The student also video-recorded 3 weeks of practice, three performances, and the reconstruction of the piece from memory after a 9½-weeks break. The thoughts that the student reported were prepared during practice, stable over time, and functioned as memory retrieval cues during reconstruction. This suggests that the student memorized in the same way as the more experienced musicians who have been studied previously and that teaching student musicians to record their thoughts may be an effective way to help them memorize. The speed and durability of her memorization surprised the student, inspiring her to perform in public and to use the same technique for new pieces. PMID:25667574

  17. Optimization by record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, Daniele; Sibani, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Large dynamical changes in thermalizing glassy systems are triggered by trajectories crossing record sized barriers, a behavior revealing the presence of a hierarchical structure in configuration space. The observation is here turned into a novel local search optimization algorithm dubbed record...... dynamics optimization,or RDO. RDO uses the Metropolis rule to accept or reject candidate solutions depending on the value of a parameter akin to the temperature and minimizes the cost function of the problem at hand through cycles where its ‘temperature’ is raised and subsequently decreased in order......), is applied to the same problem as a benchmark. RDO and PT turn out to produce solutions of similar quality for similar numerical effort, but RDO is simpler to program and additionally yields geometrical information on the system’s configuration space which is of interest in many applications. In particular...

  18. [Automated anesthesia record systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, W; Mönk, S; Eberle, B

    1997-07-01

    The introduction of electronic anaesthesia documentation systems was attempted as early as in 1979, although their efficient application has become reality only in the past few years. The advantages of the electronic protocol are apparent: Continuous high quality documentation, comparability of data due to the availability of a data bank, reduction in the workload of the anaesthetist and availability of additional data. Disadvantages of the electronic protocol have also been discussed in the literature. By going through the process of entering data on the course of the anaesthetic procedure on the protocol sheet, the information is mentally absorbed and evaluated by the anaesthetist. This information may, however, be lost when the data are recorded fully automatically-without active involvement on the part of the anaesthetist. Recent publications state that by using intelligent alarms and/or integrated displays manual record keeping is no longer necessary for anaesthesia vigilance. The technical design of automated anaesthesia records depends on an integration of network technology into the hospital. It will be appropriate to connect the systems to the internet, but safety requirements have to be followed strictly. Concerning the database, client server architecture as well as language standards like SQL should be used. Object oriented databases will be available in the near future. Another future goal of automated anaesthesia record systems will be using knowledge based technologies within these systems. Drug interactions, disease related anaesthetic techniques and other information sources can be integrated. At this time, almost none of the commercially available systems has matured to a point where their purchase can be recommended without reservation. There is still a lack of standards for the subsequent exchange of data and a solution to a number of ergonomic problems still remains to be found. Nevertheless, electronic anaesthesia protocols will be required in

  19. The good field trip: How elementary students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds learn science, art, and technology at a museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sandra Toro

    The Good Field Trip is a study that uses an ethnographic approach to answer the question of what learning looks like during a field trip to a museum. The study uses the Contextual Model of Learning (Falk & Dierking, 2000) to investigate elementary students' personal, physical, and sociocultural contexts of learning as well as how time affects students' thoughts and feelings about the experience. The author accompanied a group of eight students on a three and a half day camp-like experience to a museum that promotes environmental stewardship and the integration of art, science, and technology use and learning. The author videotaped the students' conversations and experiences and interviewed students before, during, and after the trip. Analyses of the videotapes were supplemented with student documents, including comic books, journal notes, and reflective essays about the trip. Findings include that not all experiences are marked as science, art, and technology; technology use does not occur; art is presented in a more formalized manner than science, which is composed of observation and the acquisition of knowledge about plants and animals; and conversations and activities resemble traditional modes of learning in school settings.

  20. New operator's console recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    This article described a software module that automatically records images being shown on multiple HMI or SCADA operator's displays. Videos used for monitoring activities at industrial plants can be combined with the operator console videos and data from a process historian. This enables engineers, analysts or investigators to see what is occurring in the plant, what the operator is seeing on the HMI screen, and all relevant real-time data from an event. In the case of a leak at a pumping station, investigators could watch plant video taken at a remote site showing fuel oil creeping across the floor, real-time data being acquired from pumps, valves and the receiving tank while the leak is occurring. The video shows the operator's HMI screen as well as the alarm screen that signifies the leak detection. The Longwatch Operator's Console Recorder and Video Historian are used together to acquire data about actual plant plant management because they show everything that happens during an event. The Console Recorder automatically retrieves and replays operator displays by clicking on a time-based alarm or system message. Play back of video feed is a valuable tool for training and analysis purposes, and can help mitigate insurance and regulatory issues by eliminating uncertainty and conjecture. 1 fig.

  1. Radiation exposure records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiter, H.P.

    1975-12-01

    Management of individual radiation exposure records begins at employment with the accumulation of data pertinent to the individual and any previous occupational radiation exposure. Appropriate radiation monitorinng badges or devices are issued and accountability established. A computer master file is initiated to include the individual's name, payroll number, social security number, birth date, assigned department, and location. From this base, a radiation exposure history is accumulated to include external ionizing radiation exposure to skin and whole body, contributing neutron exposure, contributing tritium exposure, and extremity exposure. It is used also to schedule bioassay sampling and in-vivo counts and to provide other pertinent information. The file is used as a basis for providing periodic reports to management and monthly exposure summaries to departmental line supervision to assist in planning work so that individual annual exposures are kept as low as practical. Radiation exposure records management also includes documentation of radiation surveys performed by the health physicist to establish working rates and the individual estimating and recording his estimated exposure on a day-to-day basis. Exposure information is also available to contribute to Energy Research and Development Administration statistics and to the National Transuranium Registry

  2. A seismic recording device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, R; Kind, A G; Thompson, S R

    1983-06-08

    A method and a device for noting the moment of an explosion on a seismic recording is proposed, in which the moment of the explosion is recorded as a result of a break in an electrical circuit under the effects of the explosive charge used to excite the seismic waves. The electrical circuit being broken is connected to the same energy source as the electric detonator which initiates the explosion, which is attached to a high frequency, alternating current source, where the circuit being broken is either the primary or the secondary winding of a transformer, through which the electric detonator is switched in to the source. The moment the circuit is broken is determined from the ceasation of current in the circuit or by the sharp rise in voltage in the broken sector. The method makes it possible to more precisely fix the moment of the break than the existing methods. When insulated copper wires are used the recording of the time occurs 100 microseconds after the explosion.

  3. Automated touch screen device for recording complex rodent behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, O.S.; Dripps, I.J.; Ramani, S.; Chang, C.; Han, J.L.; Rice, KC; Jutkiewicz, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Monitoring mouse behavior is a critical step in the development of modern pharmacotherapies. New Method Here we describe the application of a novel method that utilizes a touch display computer (tablet) and software to detect, record, and report fine motor behaviors. A consumer-grade tablet device is placed in the bottom of a specially made acrylic cage allowing the animal to walk on the device (MouseTrapp). We describe its application in open field (for general locomotor studies) which measures step lengths and velocity. The device can perform light-dark (anxiety) tests by illuminating half of the screen and keeping the other half darkened. A divider is built into the lid of the device allowing the animal free access to either side. Results Treating mice with amphetamine and the delta opioid peptide receptor agonist SNC80 stimulated locomotor activity on the device. Amphetamine increased step velocity but not step length during its peak effect (40–70 min after treatment), thus indicating detection of subtle amphetamine-induced effects. Animals showed a preference (74% of time spent) for the darkened half compared to the illuminated side. Comparison with Existing Method Animals were videotaped within the chamber to compare quadrant crosses to detected motion on the device. The slope, duration and magnitude of quadrant crosses tightly correlated with overall locomotor activity as detected by Mousetrapp. Conclusions We suggest that modern touch display devices such as MouseTrapp will be an important step toward automation of behavioral analyses for characterizing phenotypes and drug effects. PMID:24952323

  4. Accurate blood pressure recording: is it difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, A; Singh, R; D'cruz, S; Lehl, S S; Sachdev, A

    2005-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurement is a routine procedure but errors are frequently committed during BP recording. AIMS AND SETTINGS: The aim of the study was to look at the prevalent practices in the institute regarding BP recording. The study was conducted in the Medicine Department at Government Medical College, Chandigarh, a teaching institute for MBBS students. A prospective, observational study was performed amongst the 80 doctors in a tertiary care hospital. All of them were observed by a single observer during the act of BP recording. The observer was well versed with the guidelines issued by British Hypertension Society (BHS) and the deviations from the standard set of guidelines issued by BHS were noted. The errors were defined as deviations from these guidelines. The results were recorded as percentage of doctors committing these errors. In our study, 90% used mercury type sphygmomanometer. Zero error of the apparatus, hand dominance was not noted by any one. Every one used the standard BP cuff for recording BP. 70% of them did not let the patient rest before recording BP. 80% did not remove the clothing from the arm. None of them recorded BP in both arms. In out patient setting, 80% recorded blood pressure in sitting position and 14% in supine position. In all the patients where BP was recorded in sitting position BP apparatus was below the level of heart and 20% did not have their arm supported. 60% did not use palpatory method for noticing systolic BP and 70% did not raise pressure 30-40 mm Hg above the systolic level before checking the BP by auscultation. 80% lowered the BP at a rate of more than 2 mm/s and 60% rounded off the BP to nearest 5-10 mm Hg. 70% recorded BP only once and 90% of the rest re inflated the cuff without completely deflating and allowing rest before a second reading was obtained. The practice of recording BP in our hospital varies from the standard guidelines issued by the BHS.

  5. Mapping student online actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Jensen, Pia; Udby, Linda

    The Virtual Neutrons for Teaching project (vnt.nmi3.org) has converted traditional text book material into a wiki-style online text book that contains the same text and equations as the traditionally styled text book but has added features due to the online nature. Two of these features...... their problem solving strategy. In this study, we use web analytics software to track student online behavior by recording what particular objects on particular web-pages students click on and when each click occurs. For each recorded session, we create networks based on student clicks: A directed link between...... two nodes, 1 and 2, is drawn, if the object represented by node 2 is clicked right af the object represented by node 1. Preliminary analysis of these networks show two general types of behavior: In one type, there is little interaction with the online contents. The student navigates to the page...

  6. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    Effective January 1, 1982, NRC will institute records retention and disposal practices in accordance with the approved Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule (CRDS). CRDS is comprised of NRC Schedules (NRCS) 1 to 4 which apply to the agency's program or substantive records and General Records Schedules (GRS) 1 to 22 which apply to housekeeping or facilitative records. The schedules are assembled functionally/organizationally to facilitate their use. Preceding the records descriptions and disposition instructions for both NRCS and GRS, there are brief statements on the organizational units which accumulate the records in each functional area, and other information regarding the schedules' applicability

  7. Photopolymer holographic recording material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. R.; O'Neill, F. T.; Sheridan, J. T.

    Photopolymers are promising materials for use in holography. They have many advantages, such as ease of preparation, and are capable of efficiencies of up to 100%. A disadvantage of these materials is their inability to record high spatial frequency gratings when compared to other materials such as dichromated gelatin and silver halide photographic emulsion. Until recently, the drop off at high spatial frequencies of the material response was not predicted by any of the diffusion based models available. It has recently been proposed that this effect is due to polymer chains growing away from their initiation point and causing a smeared profile to be recorded. This is termed a non-local material response. Simple analytic expressions have been derived using this model and fits to experimental data have allowed values to be estimated for material parameters such as the diffusion coefficient of monomer, the ratio of polymerisation rate to diffusion rate and the distance that the polymer chains spread during holographic recording. The model predicts that the spatial frequency response might be improved by decreasing the mean polymer chain lengths and/or by increasing the mobility of the molecules used in the material. The experimental work carried out to investigate these predictions is reported here. This work involved (a) the changing of the molecular weights of chemical components within the material (dyes and binders) and (b) the addition of a chemical retarder in order to shorten the polymer chains, thereby decreasing the extent of the non-local effect. Although no significant improvement in spatial frequency response was observed the model appears to offer an improved understanding of the operation of the material.

  8. Quality assurance records system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the IAEA Code of Practice on Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No.50-C-QA), which requires that for each nuclear power plant a system for the generation, identification, collection, indexing, filing, storing, maintenance and disposition of quality assurance records shall be established and executed in accordance with written procedures and instructions. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide assistance in the establishment and operation of such a system. An orderly established and maintained records system is considered to be part of the means of providing a basis for an appropriate level of confidence that the activities which affect the quality of a nuclear power plant have been performed in accordance with the specific requirements and that the required quality has been achieved and is maintained

  9. Record prices [crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2006-01-01

    Crude oil prices climbed to new record levels on fears of a future loss of supplies from Iran as Washington stepped up its efforts to persuade Tehran to abandon its programme to produce nuclear fuel. IPE's December Brent contract set a new record for the exchange by trading at $75.80/bbl on 21st April. On the same day October WTI reached an all-time high of $77.30/bbl on Nymex. US product prices gained as refiners struggled to produce sufficient middle distillate. Alarmed by the rising retail price of gasoline, the US Senate debated a reduction in the already low US tax rate on motor spirit. The House of Representatives passed a measure to prohibit overcharging for petrol, diesel and heating oil, but Democrats rejected a Republican proposal to speed-up the process for approving new refineries. President George W Bush announced a temporary easing of new gasoline and diesel specifications (see 'Focus', March 2006) to allow more fuel to be produced. He also agreed to delay the repayment of some 2.1 mn bbl of crude oil lent to companies after last year's hurricanes from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. California announced an inquiry into alleged overcharging for fuel by oil companies operating in the state. (author)

  10. Teacher Narratives and Student Engagement: Testing Narrative Engagement Theory in Drug Prevention Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Krieger, Janice L.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Shin, YoungJu; Graham, John

    2015-01-01

    Testing narrative engagement theory, this study examines student engagement and teachers’ spontaneous narratives told in a narrative-based drug prevention curriculum. The study describes the extent to which teachers share their own narratives in a narrative-based curriculum, identifies dominant narrative elements, forms and functions, and assesses the relationships among teacher narratives, overall lesson narrative quality, and student engagement. One hundred videotaped lessons of the keepin’ it REAL drug prevention curriculum were coded and the results supported the claim that increased narrative quality of a prevention lesson would be associated with increased student engagement. The quality of narrativity, however, varied widely. Implications of these results for narrative-based prevention interventions and narrative pedagogy are discussed. PMID:26690668

  11. Effects of biology teachers' professional knowledge and cognitive activation on students' achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förtsch, Christian; Werner, Sonja; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of teachers' biology-specific dimensions of professional knowledge - pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and content knowledge (CK) - and cognitively activating biology instruction, as a feature of instructional quality, on students' learning. The sample comprised 39 German secondary school teachers whose lessons on the topic neurobiology were videotaped twice. Teachers' instruction was coded with regard to cognitive activation using a rating manual. Multilevel path analysis results showed a positive significant effect of cognitive activation on students' learning and an indirect effect of teachers' PCK on students' learning mediated through cognitive activation. These findings highlight the importance of PCK in preservice biology teachers' education. Items of the rating manual may be used to provide exemplars of concrete teaching situations during university seminars for preservice teacher education or professional development initiatives for in-service teachers.

  12. The opportunities and challenges of guided inquiry science for students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marianne

    Research in science education has been conducted with various goals for instruction. Four outcomes identified include: immediate and delayed recall, literal comprehension, science skills and processes, and conceptual understanding. The promise of developing important thinking skills exists for all students if science instruction is designed to teach students the products of science and the principled process of inquiry. Guided inquiry science seeks to develop conceptual understanding through the pursuit of meaningful questions using scientific problem solving to conduct investigations that are thoughtfully generated and evaluated. Using a social constructivist perspective, this study examines the learning experiences of four students, identified by their teachers as learning disabled or underachieving. Four case studies are presented of the students' participation in a guided inquiry investigation of the behavior of light. Measures of conceptual understanding included pre- and post-instruction assessments, interviews, journal writing, videotapes, and fieldnotes. All four students demonstrated improved conceptual understanding of light. Five patterns of relationships influenced the development of the students' thinking. First, differences in the culture of the two classrooms altered the learning environment, Second, the nature of teacher interaction with the target students affected conceptual understanding. Third, interactions with peers modified the learning experiences for the identified students. Fourth, the conceptual and procedural complexity of the tasks increased the tendency for the students to lose focus. Finally, the literacy requirements of the work were challenging for these students.

  13. The patients' active role in managing a personal electronic health record: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudendistel, Ines; Winkler, Eva; Kamradt, Martina; Brophy, Sarah; Längst, Gerda; Eckrich, Felicitas; Heinze, Oliver; Bergh, Bjoern; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-09-01

    The complexity of illness and cross-sectoral health care pose challenges for patients with colorectal cancer and their families. Within a patient-centered care paradigm, it is vital to give patients the opportunity to play an active role. Prospective users' attitudes regarding the patients' role in the context of a patient-controlled electronic health record (PEPA) were explored. A qualitative study across regional health care settings and health professions was conducted. Overall, 10 focus groups were performed collecting views of 3 user groups: patients with colorectal cancer (n = 12) and representatives from patient support groups (n = 2), physicians (n = 17), and other health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 16). Data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The patients' responsibility as a gatekeeper and access manager was at the center of the focus group discussions, although HCPs addressed aspects that would limit patients taking an active role (e.g., illness related issues). Despite expressed concerns, PEPAs possibility to enhance personal responsibility was seen in all user groups. Giving patients an active role in managing a personal electronic health record is an innovative patient-centered approach, although existing restraints have to be recognized. To enhance user adoption and advance PEPAs potential, key user needs have to be addressed.

  14. Automating occupational protection records systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Martin, J.B.

    1991-10-01

    Occupational protection records have traditionally been generated by field and laboratory personnel, assembled into files in the safety office, and eventually stored in a warehouse or other facility. Until recently, these records have been primarily paper copies, often handwritten. Sometimes, the paper is microfilmed for storage. However, electronic records are beginning to replace these traditional methods. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for making the transition to automated record keeping and retrieval using modern computer equipment. This paper describes the types of records most readily converted to electronic record keeping and a methodology for implementing an automated record system. The process of conversion is based on a requirements analysis to assess program needs and a high level of user involvement during the development. The importance of indexing the hard copy records for easy retrieval is also discussed. The concept of linkage between related records and its importance relative to reporting, research, and litigation will be addressed. 2 figs

  15. Personal health records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kensing, Finn

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses the complex interplay between patients, healthcare professionals, and technology in relation to the treatment of chronic patients. It reflects on an ongoing interdisciplinary action research project striving to design and implement IT support for communication and collaboration...... in the distributed heterogeneous network of chronic patients and the healthcare professionals that take care of them. An interactive personal health record (PHR) has been designed as part of the project. As such it is part of a trend to find ways to include patients in their own care process. This has been motivated...... by expected health benefits for the patients as well as promises to lead to reduced costs for a burdened healthcare system....

  16. Steganalysis of recorded speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Micah K.; Lyu, Siwei; Farid, Hany

    2005-03-01

    Digital audio provides a suitable cover for high-throughput steganography. At 16 bits per sample and sampled at a rate of 44,100 Hz, digital audio has the bit-rate to support large messages. In addition, audio is often transient and unpredictable, facilitating the hiding of messages. Using an approach similar to our universal image steganalysis, we show that hidden messages alter the underlying statistics of audio signals. Our statistical model begins by building a linear basis that captures certain statistical properties of audio signals. A low-dimensional statistical feature vector is extracted from this basis representation and used by a non-linear support vector machine for classification. We show the efficacy of this approach on LSB embedding and Hide4PGP. While no explicit assumptions about the content of the audio are made, our technique has been developed and tested on high-quality recorded speech.

  17. Recording Village Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cromwell, Jennifer Adele

    and economic changes happening at both the community and country-wide levels during the early years of Islamic rule in Egypt. Additionally, they offer a fascinating picture of the scribe’s role within this world, illuminating both the practical aspects of his work and the social and professional connections......Recording Village Life presents a close study of over 140 Coptic texts written between 724–756 CE by a single scribe, Aristophanes son of Johannes, of the village Djeme in western Thebes. These texts, which focus primarily on taxation and property concerns, yield a wealth of knowledge about social...... of late antique studies, papyrology, philology, early Islamic history, social and economic history, and Egyptology....

  18. Design and Evaluation of the Electronic Class Record for LPU-Laguna International School

    OpenAIRE

    RHOWEL M. DELLOSA

    2014-01-01

    - This study aimed to design, develop, deploy and evaluate an electronic class record (e-class record). Microsoft Excel is used to develop the electronic class record and several Microsoft Excel arithmetic operands and functions like VLOOKUP, IF, AVERAGE, COUNTIF are used. A worksheet template was developed to accept name of teacher, course code, course title, section, schedule, room, student number, student name, grade level, gender, date of each classes, base grade, test items a...

  19. AE Recorder Characteristics and Development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curtis, Shane Keawe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McGrogan, David Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Anomalous Environment Recorder (AE Recorder) provides a robust data recording capability for multiple high-shock applications including earth penetrators. The AE Recorder, packaged as a 2.4" di ameter cylinder 3" tall, acquires 12 accelerometer, 2 auxiliary, and 6 discrete signal channels at 250k samples / second. Recording depth is 213 seconds plus 75ms of pre-trigger data. The mechanical, electrical, and firmware are described as well as support electro nics designed for the first use of the recorder.

  20. The need for academic electronic health record systems in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joohyun; Cho, Insook

    2017-07-01

    The nursing profession has been slow to incorporate information technology into formal nurse education and practice. The aim of this study was to identify the use of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education and to determine student and faculty perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. A quantitative research design with supportive qualitative research was used to gather information on nursing students' perceptions and nursing faculty's perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. Eighty-three participants (21 nursing faculty and 62 students), from 5 nursing schools, participated in the study. A purposive sample of 9 nursing faculty was recruited from one university in the Midwestern United States to provide qualitative data for the study. The researcher-designed surveys (completed by faculty and students) were used for quantitative data collection. Qualitative data was taken from interviews, which were transcribed verbatim for analysis. Students and faculty agreed that academic electronic health record systems could be useful for teaching students to think critically about nursing documentation. Quantitative and qualitative findings revealed that academic electronic health record systems regarding nursing documentation could help prepare students for the future of health information technology. Meaningful adoption of academic electronic health record systems will help in building the undergraduate nursing students' competence in nursing documentation with electronic health record systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Design and Evaluation of the Electronic Class Record for LPU-Laguna International School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RHOWEL M. DELLOSA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available - This study aimed to design, develop, deploy and evaluate an electronic class record (e-class record. Microsoft Excel is used to develop the electronic class record and several Microsoft Excel arithmetic operands and functions like VLOOKUP, IF, AVERAGE, COUNTIF are used. A worksheet template was developed to accept name of teacher, course code, course title, section, schedule, room, student number, student name, grade level, gender, date of each classes, base grade, test items attendance, and performance of the students. These serve as the input of the e-class record. The e-class record automatically computes the grades of the students following the standard grading system. Developmental process and prototyping method were utilized to develop the e-class record. Testing, deployment and evaluation have been initiated to observe its acceptability. It is found out that the e-class record can generate the quarterly and final grade of the students, total number of absences and tardiness of the students, grade sheet with corresponding level of evaluation of each student in the class and summary of the total number of students for each of the level of proficiency. It is recommended that further study may be initiated to utilize the output of this study as an input of an online application such as online grade viewer. Security of previous submitted grades from being changed by the teacher accidentally or intentionally must be also taken into consideration. A report card may be also included in the system.

  2. 34 CFR 99.12 - What limitations exist on the right to inspect and review records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What limitations exist on the right to inspect and... EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY What Are the Rights of Inspection and Review of Education Records? § 99.12 What limitations exist on the right to inspect and review records? (a) If the education records of a student...

  3. Early Days of Recorder Teaching in South Australian Schools: A Personal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcott, Jane

    2016-01-01

    As a primary school student in the 1960s I learnt the recorder. This paper explores how the recorder became a staple of Australian primary school music programs. At that time recorders were comparatively recently revived Renaissance musical instruments that were adopted by music educators as a way for children and their teachers to engage in…

  4. The Use of Recorded Lectures in Education and the Impact on Lecture Attendance and Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embedded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam performance is not clear. The purpose of the current study is to address the use of recorded…

  5. The use of recorded lectures in education and the impact on lecture attendance and exam performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; Van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embed- ded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam perfor- mance is not clear. The purpose of the

  6. EEG in the classroom: Synchronised neural recordings during video presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Kamronn, Simon Due; Dmochowski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    We performed simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) from multiple students in a classroom, and measured the inter-subject correlation (ISC) of activity evoked by a common video stimulus. The neural reliability, as quantified by ISC, has been linked to engagement and attentional......-evoked neural responses, known to be modulated by attention, can be tracked for groups of students with synchronized EEG acquisition. This is a step towards real-time inference of engagement in the classroom....

  7. Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weighing rain gauge charts record the amount of precipitation that falls at a given location. The vast majority of the Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts...

  8. High school students presenting science: An interactional sociolinguistic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Robert

    Presenting science is an authentic activity of practicing scientists. Thus, effective communication of science is an important skill to nurture in high school students who are learning science. This study examines strategies employed by high school students as they make science presentations; it assesses students' conceptual understandings of particular science topics through their presentations and investigates gender differences. Data are derived from science presentation given by eight high school students, three females and five males who attended a summer science program. Data sources included videotaped presentations, ethnographic fieldnotes, interviews with presenters and members of the audience, and presenter notes and overheads. Presentations were transcribed and submitted to discourse analysis from an interactional sociolinguistic perspective. This article focuses on the methodology employed and how it helps inform the above research questions. The author argues that use of this methodology leads to findings that inform important social-communicative issues in the learning of science. Practical advice for teaching students to present science, implications for use of presentations to assess conceptual learning, and indications of some possible gender differences are discussed.Received: 14 April 1993; Revised: 15 February 1994;

  9. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Title 44 United States Code, ''Public Printing and Documents,'' regulations cited in the General Services Administration's (GSA) ''Federal Information Resources Management Regulations'' (FIRMR), Part 201-9, ''Creation, Maintenance, and Use of Records,'' and regulation issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter XII, Subchapter B, ''Records Management,'' require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA's General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 2, contains ''NRC's Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,'' and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 2 totally reorganizes the records schedules from a functional arrangement to an arrangement by the host office. A subject index and a conversion table have also been developed for the NRC schedules to allow staff to identify the new schedule numbers easily and to improve their ability to locate applicable schedules

  10. TANZANTA'S 2002 RECORDS AND ARCHIVES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management, rational allocation of resources and provision of adequate and effective ... records management environment in which records can be timely accessed to .... most critical in terms of impact and influence in the development of records and ..... and educative role of the Court of Appeal as the highest judicial organ ...

  11. Paleofloods records in Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Kumar, A.; Chaudhary, S.; Meena, N.; Sundriyal, Y. P.; Rawat, S.; Rana, N.; Perumal, R. J.; Bisht, P.; Sharma, D.; Agnihotri, R.; Bagri, D. S.; Juyal, N.; Wasson, R. J.; Ziegler, A. D.

    2017-05-01

    We use paleoflood deposits to reconstruct a record of past floods for the Alaknanda-Mandakini Rivers (Garhwal Himalaya), the Indus River (Ladakh, NW Himalaya) and the Brahmaputra River (NE Himalaya). The deposits are characterized by sand-silt couplets, massive sand beds, and from debris flow sediment. The chronology of paleoflood deposits, established by Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C AMS dating techniques, indicates the following: (i) The Alaknanda-Mandakini Rivers experienced large floods during the wet and warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA); (ii) the Indus River experienced at least 14 large floods during the Holocene climatic optimum, when flood discharges were likely an order of magnitude higher than those of modern floods; and (iii) the Brahmaputra River experienced a megaflood between 8 and 6 ka. Magnetic susceptibility of flood sediments indicates that 10 out of 14 floods on the Indus River originated in the catchments draining the Ladakh Batholith, indicating the potential role of glacial lake outbursts (GLOFs) and/or landslide lake outbursts (LLOFs) in compounding flood magnitudes. Pollen recovered from debris flow deposits located in the headwaters of the Mandakini River showed the presence of warmth-loving trees and marshy taxa, thereby corroborating the finding that floods occurred during relatively warm periods. Collectively, our new data indicate that floods in the Himalaya largely occur during warm and wet climatic phases. Further, the evidence supports the notion that the Indian Summer Monsoon front may have penetrated into the Ladakh area during the Holocene climatic optimum.

  12. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study. Each teacher was videotaped for 1 lesson on the topic blood and circulatory system. Before and after the lessons, the students completed tests and questionnaires. Chi-square analysis was conducted to compare the boys' and girls' participation rates of answering teachers' questions in the lessons. The findings revealed that in the urban classrooms the boys had a significantly higher rate of participation than did the girls, and hence also a higher situational interest. However, no such gender inequity was found among the rural students. The study also revealed that urban students answered more complicated questions compared with the rural students in general. The findings of this study suggest that the teachers should try to balance boys' and girls' participation and involve more students in answering questions in their lessons. The study also raises questions about long-term effects of students' participation in answering teachers' questions on their outcomes-knowledge achievement, situational interest and SET.

  13. Assessment of cognitive factors that impact on student knowledge of genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerow, Tracy Nelson

    1999-12-01

    Attaining an understanding of basic principles of inheritance and their implications is crucial for all people as society is confronted with a variety of ethical, sociological and ecological questions generated by the rapid growth of genetic knowledge. College level students are burdened by terminology, have difficulty making associations among related ideas, and often possess misconceptions or fragmented ideas about how traits are inherited. Subject comprehension is evaluated mostly with objective testing techniques that don't show how well students truly understand concepts. This research was done to determine how prior subject knowledge in biology and general cognitive ability affected community college students' understanding of several genetic principles both before and after completing a one-semester college biology course. Understanding of genetic principles was determined with a videotape assessment that evaluated student written explanations of experimental events. The evaluations were then used to place students into three categories: descriptive, transitional, and relational type learners. A subset of students was interviewed to better determine how thoroughly genetic concepts depicted in the videotape program were understood. Prior subject matter knowledge and cognitive level were discovered to be moderately correlated with ability to explain genetic phenomena. Most students in this study were categorized as either descriptive or transitional learners. Descriptive type students gave less detailed explanations, employed less successful problem solving methods, had more misconceptions and used feedback less effectively than did transitional type learners. The study results show that science teachers need to be aware of the heterogeneity existing in their students' background knowledge and cognitive skills. It demonstrated that a large contingency of students, descriptive learners, lack a framework of knowledge upon which to build new concepts or change

  14. The use of virtual patients to teach medical students history taking and communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Amy; Hernandez, Jonathan; Johnsen, Kyle; Dickerson, Robert; Raij, Andrew; Harrison, Cyrus; DiPietro, Meredith; Allen, Bryan; Ferdig, Richard; Foti, Sebastian; Jackson, Jonathan; Shin, Min; Cendan, Juan; Watson, Robert; Duerson, Margaret; Lok, Benjamin; Cohen, Marc; Wagner, Peggy; Lind, D Scott

    2006-06-01

    At most institutions, medical students learn communication skills through the use of standardized patients (SPs), but SPs are time and resource expensive. Virtual patients (VPs) may offer several advantages over SPs, but little data exist regarding the use of VPs in teaching communication skills. Therefore, we report our initial efforts to create an interactive virtual clinical scenario of a patient with acute abdominal pain to teach medical students history-taking and communication skills. In the virtual scenario, a life-sized VP is projected on the wall of an examination room. Before the virtual encounter, the student reviews patient information on a handheld tablet personal computer, and they are directed to take a history and develop a differential diagnosis. The virtual system includes 2 networked personal computers (PCs), 1 data projector, 2 USB2 Web cameras to track the user's head and hand movement, a tablet PC, and a microphone. The VP is programmed with specific answers and gestures in response to questions asked by students. The VP responses to student questions were developed by reviewing videotapes of students' performances with real SPs. After obtaining informed consent, 20 students underwent voice recognition training followed by a videotaped VP encounter. Immediately after the virtual scenario, students completed a technology and SP questionnaire (Maastricht Simulated Patient Assessment). All participants had prior experience with real SPs. Initially, the VP correctly recognized approximately 60% of the student's questions, and improving the script depth and variability of the VP responses enhanced most incorrect voice recognition. Student comments were favorable particularly related to feedback provided by the virtual instructor. The overall student rating of the virtual experience was 6.47 +/- 1.63 (1 = lowest, 10 = highest) for version 1.0 and 7.22 +/- 1.76 for version 2.0 (4 months later) reflecting enhanced voice recognition and other

  15. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Effective January 1, 1982, NRC will institute records retention and disposal practives in accordance with the approved Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule (CRDS). CRDS is comprised of NRC Schedules (NRCS) 1 to 4 which apply to the agency's program or substantive records and General Records Schedules (GRS) 1 to 24 which apply to housekeeping or facilitative records. NRCS-I applies to records common to all or most NRC offices; NRCS-II applies to program records as found in the various offices of the Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, and the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Panel; NRCS-III applies to records accumulated by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; and NRCS-IV applies to records accumulated in the various NRC offices under the Executive Director for Operations. The schedules are assembled functionally/organizationally to facilitate their use. Preceding the records descriptions and disposition instructions for both NRCS and GRS, there are brief statements on the organizational units which accumulate the records in each functional area, and other information regarding the schedules' applicability

  16. Development of Farm Records Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Abubakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Farm records are mostly manually kept on paper notebooks and folders where similar records are organized in one folder or spread sheet. These records are usually kept for many years therefore they becomes bulky and less organized. Consequently, it becomes difficult to search, update and tedious and time consuming to manage these records. This study was carried-out to overcome these problems associated with manual farm records keeping by developing user-friendly, easily accessible, reliable and secured software. The software was limited records keeping in crop production, livestock production, poultry production, employees, income and expenditure. The system was implemented using Java Server Faces (JSF for designing Graphical User Interface (GUI, Enterprises Java Beans (EJB for logic tier and MySQL database for storing farm records.

  17. Digital SLIFER Recorder, Model A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breding, D.R.; Fogel, D.; Loukota, J.J.; Worthen, G.S.; Watterberg, J.P.

    1977-11-01

    The Digital SLIFER Recorder (DSR) is an instrument that records a time-varying frequency signal in the range from 700 kHz to 1500 kHz with an amplitude greater than 200 mV. This signal is referenced to an input fiducial marker, and recording is initiated by an increase in the frequency of the signal. The primary purpose of this instrument is to record data from the SLIFER system. The DSR records 512 samples after the record trigger signal, with a sample interval of 50 μs (for a total recording time of 25.55 ms). The measurement essentially uses a 20-cycle period-averaging counter technique

  18. RECORDED-ROLE PLAY IN EFL CLASSROOM: A WAY OF MAXIMIZING STUDENTS‟ POTENTIAL IN SPEAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krismiyati Krismiyati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English for non English Department students will be quite a challenge as the students have various background and interest. Handling those students in a big number in a class that requires them to speak is another impending challenge. This is an action research on role-play in English classroom for Information Technology students. This study tries to see whether recorded-role play could maximize students‘ potential in speaking. This study involved 30 students taking English course in Information Technology Faculty. The students were given a situation in which they had to act the role play. They drafted the role -play before they recorded it. The result shows that students felt less tense in acting the role. They also got more time to practice their pronunciation before recording. It even gave students who felt reluctant and shy in the class to actively participate. In addition, students could play around with the supporting background sound to show their creativity. Surprisingly, most students do their best to show their effort in their speaking as the end-product would be played in the classroom, even the most quiet students performed really well. Finally, this recorded-role play proved to be an effective way to maximize students‘ potential in speaking.

  19. Student Performance in Undergraduate Economics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Kevin J.; Ohland, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Using undergraduate student records from six large public universities from 1990 to 2003, the authors analyze the characteristics and performance of students by major in two economics courses: Principles of Microeconomics and Intermediate Microeconomics. This article documents important differences across students by major in the principles course…

  20. Rourke Baby Record 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riverin, Bruno; Li, Patricia; Rourke, Leslie; Leduc, Denis; Rourke, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2011 edition of the Rourke Baby Record (RBR) by reviewing current best evidence on health supervision of infants and children from birth to 5 years of age. Quality of evidence The quality of evidence was rated with the former (until 2006) Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care classification system and GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation) approach. Main message New evidence has been incorporated into the 2014 RBR recommendations related to growth monitoring, nutrition, education and advice, development, physical examination, and immunization. Growth is monitored with the World Health Organization growth charts that were revised in 2014. Infants’ introduction to solid foods should be based on infant readiness and include iron-containing food products. Delaying introduction to common food allergens is not currently recommended to prevent food allergies. At 12 months of age, use of an open cup instead of a sippy cup should be promoted. The education and advice section counsels on injuries from unstable furniture and on the use of rear-facing car seats until age 2, and also includes information on healthy sleep habits, prevention of child maltreatment, family healthy active living and sedentary behaviour, and oral health. The education and advice section has also added a new environmental health category to account for the effects of environmental hazards on child health. The RBR uses broad developmental surveillance to recognize children who might be at risk of developmental delays. Verifying tongue mobility and patency of the anus is included in the physical examination during the first well-baby visit. The 2014 RBR also provides updates regarding the measles-mumps-rubella, live attenuated influenza, and human papillomavirus vaccines. Conclusion The 2014 RBR is the most recent update of a longstanding evidence-based, practical knowledge translation tool with related Web-based resources

  1. 76 FR 20718 - Records Schedules; Availability and Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...: You may request a copy of any records schedule identified in this notice by contacting the Life Cycle... request. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurence Brewer, Director, Life Cycle Management Division (NWML..., rosters, test scores, student awards, and disciplinary documents. 11. Department of Housing and Urban...

  2. Digital Recording Technology in the Writing Classroom: Sampling as Citing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    For the last few years, the author has been implementing a pedagogy that infuses musical composition--specifically the recording of electronic music--into his first-year composition courses. The author and his students have been quite surprised by the theoretical and practical connections that exist between the production of popular electronic…

  3. Capsule Units for Guitar, Autoharp, Recorder. Elementary General Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Debbie

    An intermediate-level general music unit provides introductory lessons for the autoharp, guitar, and recorder. In the autoharp unit, chording is approached by first using a one-chord song and proceeding to three-chord songs. The guitar unit introduces chord symbols and tablatures and helps students gain familiarity with the parts of the…

  4. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  5. 75 FR 136 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... THE SYSTEM: STORAGE: Paper records and on electronic storage media. RETRIEVABILITY: Name and/or Social... Institute of Technology Management and Information System (AFITMIS) (February 21, 2008, 73 FR 9548). CHANGES: * * * * * SYSTEM NAME: Delete entry and replace with ``Air Force Institute of Technology Student Information System...

  6. Aligning the Effective Use of Student Data with Student Privacy and Security Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, Steve; Coleman, Art; Palmer, Scott; Lipper, Kate; Neiditz, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This legal and policy guidance provides a summary framework for state policymakers as they work to use longitudinal data to improve student achievement while also protecting the privacy and security of individual student records. Summarizing relevant federal privacy and security laws, with a focus on the Family Educational Records and Privacy Act…

  7. Superfund TIO videos: Set A. Settlement tools and practices, win-win negotiations, closeout, records management, authorities and liabilities. Part 5. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into 5 sections. Section 1 provides an overview of settlement activities including conducting an information exchange, issuing general notice letters, initiating special notice procedures, receiving good faith offers (GFO), negotiating and settlements, and pursuing enforcement actions. Section 2 covers the types of negotiations that commonly involve OSCs and RPMs. The characteristics of a negotiating style that satisfy all the parties as well as methods for preparing and conducting this type of negotiation are outlined. Section 3 deals with post-removal site control arrangements and other closeout requirements for a removal site, such as completing necessary paperwork. The remedial project closeout procedures also are covered, including the remedial closeout report, operation and maintenance (O ampersand M) arrangements, transfer of site responsibility, and deletion from the National Priorities List (NPL). Section 4 discusses the purpose, procedures, roles and responsibilities associated with records management under Superfund. Section 5 outlines the response authority provided by CERCLA to OCSs and RPMs

  8. The Impact of Critical Thinking on Clinical Judgment During Simulation With Senior Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzell, Mary; Anderson, Mindi

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the impact of critical thinking (CT) on clinical judgment (CJ) during a pediatric Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE) with 160 pre-licensure nursing students. Educators are called to transform teaching strategies to develop CJ but confusion exists over definitions. A descriptive correlational design was used to examine demographics and Tower of Hanoi (TOH) and Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT) scores. CJ was measured by scores on the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) from videotaped OSCEs. Participants were: 86 percent female, 42 percent Caucasian, median 23 years, with 49 percent having health care experience. Students averaged seven moves over minimum on the TOH. Average scores were: HSRT 25/38 and LCJR 31/44. Statistically significant predictors of CJ were gender, ethnicity, HSRT deduction, and analysis; 11 CT variables accounted for 17 percent of LCJR scores. Educators need to utilize/develop innovative teaching strategies addressing CJ predictors.

  9. The idea of the record

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the idea of the sports record and its relation to our ideas of excellence, achievement and progress. It begins by recovering and reviewing the work of Richard Mandell, whose definition of the record emphasizes three central ideas: statistic, athletic and recognition. It then considers the work of Henning Eichberg, Allen Guttmann and Mandell, from the 1970s onwards, on the genesis of the modern sports record, explaining and developing their ideas via a distinction between d...

  10. Environmental recordkeeping: The administrative record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, B.S.

    1991-08-01

    This document provides information on an environmental records management system. It includes information on environmental recordkeeping; environmental regulations with emphasis on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); and the administrative record including a case study of the Hanford Site's administrative record system. This paper will focus on the following objectives: (1) Identify resources that can be used as reference tools; (2) understand the reasons for developing and maintaining an administrative record; and, (3) evaluate an existing system and identify means of complying with the regulations. 15 refs., 2 figs

  11. The foundations of magnetic recording

    CERN Document Server

    Mallinson, John C

    1993-01-01

    This expanded and updated new edition provides a comprehensive overview of the science and technology of magnetic recording. In the six years since the publication of the first edition, the magnetic recording and storage industry has burgeoned with the introduction of a host of new ideas and technologies. His book contains a discussion of almost every technologically important aspect of recording.* Continas complete coverage of the current technology of magnetic recording and storage* Written in a non-mathematical but scientifically accurate style* Permits intelligent evaluat

  12. Environmental recordkeeping: The administrative record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprouse, B.S.

    1991-08-01

    This document provides information on an environmental records management system. It includes information on environmental recordkeeping; environmental regulations with emphasis on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); and the administrative record including a case study of the Hanford Site's administrative record system. This paper will focus on the following objectives: (1) Identify resources that can be used as reference tools; (2) understand the reasons for developing and maintaining an administrative record; and, (3) evaluate an existing system and identify means of complying with the regulations. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  13. A Novel Web-Based Student Academic Records Information System

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... Department of Computer Science, University of Port Harcourt,. Port Harcourt ... for the implementation is a client/server technology, with MYSQL as the server technology and Visual .... adopted in this project is the incremental.

  14. Fostering Students' Conceptual Knowledge in Biology in the Context of German National Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förtsch, Christian; Dorfner, Tobias; Baumgartner, Julia; Werner, Sonja; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2018-04-01

    The German National Education Standards (NES) for biology were introduced in 2005. The content part of the NES emphasizes fostering conceptual knowledge. However, there are hardly any indications of what such an instructional implementation could look like. We introduce a theoretical framework of an instructional approach to foster students' conceptual knowledge as demanded in the NES (Fostering Conceptual Knowledge) including instructional practices derived from research on single core ideas, general psychological theories, and biology-specific features of instructional quality. First, we aimed to develop a rating manual, which is based on this theoretical framework. Second, we wanted to describe current German biology instruction according to this approach and to quantitatively analyze its effectiveness. And third, we aimed to provide qualitative examples of this approach to triangulate our findings. In a first step, we developed a theoretically devised rating manual to measure Fostering Conceptual Knowledge in videotaped lessons. Data for quantitative analysis included 81 videotaped biology lessons of 28 biology teachers from different German secondary schools. Six hundred forty students completed a questionnaire on their situational interest after each lesson and an achievement test. Results from multilevel modeling showed significant positive effects of Fostering Conceptual Knowledge on students' achievement and situational interest. For qualitative analysis, we contrasted instruction of four teachers, two with high and two with low student achievement and situational interest using the qualitative method of thematic analysis. Qualitative analysis revealed five main characteristics describing Fostering Conceptual Knowledge. Therefore, implementing Fostering Conceptual Knowledge in biology instruction seems promising. Examples of how to implement Fostering Conceptual Knowledge in instruction are shown and discussed.

  15. Student and faculty member perspectives on lecture capture in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Jon-Paul; Pearson, Marion L; Albon, Simon P

    2014-05-15

    To examine faculty members' and students' use and perceptions of lecture recordings in a previously implemented lecture-capture initiative. Patterns of using lecture recordings were determined from software analytics, and surveys were conducted to determine awareness and usage, effect on attendance and other behaviors, and learning impact. Most students and faculty members were aware of and appreciated the recordings. Students' patterns of use changed as the novelty wore off. Students felt that the recordings enhanced their learning, improved their in-class engagement, and had little effect on their attendance. Faculty members saw little difference in students' grades or in-class engagement but noted increased absenteeism. Students made appropriate use of recordings to support their learning, but faculty members generally did not make active educational use of the recordings. Further investigation is needed to understand the effects of lecture recordings on attendance. Professional development activities for both students and faculty members would help maximize the learning benefits of the recordings.

  16. Recording of electrohysterogram laplacian potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberola-Rubio, J; Garcia-Casado, J; Ye-Lin, Y; Prats-Boluda, G; Perales, A

    2011-01-01

    Preterm birth is the main cause of the neonatal morbidity. Noninvasive recording of uterine myoelectrical activity (electrohysterogram, EHG) could be an alternative to the monitoring of uterine dynamics which are currently based on tocodynamometers (TOCO). The analysis of uterine electromyogram characteristics could help the early diagnosis of preterm birth. Laplacian recordings of other bioelectrical signals have proved to enhance spatial selectivity and to reduce interferences in comparison to monopolar and bipolar surface recordings. The main objective of this paper is to check the feasibility of the noninvasive recording of uterine myoelectrical activity by means of laplacian techniques. Four bipolar EHG signals, discrete laplacian obtained from five monopolar electrodes and the signals picked up by two active concentric-ringed-electrodes were recorded on 5 women with spontaneous or induced labor. Intrauterine pressure (IUP) and TOCO were also simultaneously recorded. To evaluate the uterine contraction detectability of the different noninvasive methods in comparison to IUP the contractions consistency index (CCI) was calculated. Results show that TOCO is less consistent (83%) than most EHG bipolar recording channels (91%, 83%, 87%, and 76%) to detect the uterine contractions identified in IUP. Moreover laplacian EHG signals picked up by ringed-electrodes proved to be as consistent (91%) as the best bipolar recordings in addition to significantly reduce ECG interference.

  17. The science of sound recording

    CERN Document Server

    Kadis, Jay

    2012-01-01

    The Science of Sound Recording will provide you with more than just an introduction to sound and recording, it will allow you to dive right into some of the technical areas that often appear overwhelming to anyone without an electrical engineering or physics background.  The Science of Sound Recording helps you build a basic foundation of scientific principles, explaining how recording really works. Packed with valuable must know information, illustrations and examples of 'worked through' equations this book introduces the theory behind sound recording practices in a logical and prac

  18. Acceleration recorder and playback module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention is directed to methods and apparatus relating to an accelerometer electrical signal recorder and playback module. The recorder module may be manufactured in lightweight configuration and includes analog memory components to store data. Signal conditioning circuitry is incorporated into the module so that signals may be connected directly from the accelerometer to the recorder module. A battery pack may be included for powering both the module and the accelerometer. Timing circuitry is included to control the time duration within which data is recorded or played back so as to avoid overloading the analog memory components. Multiple accelerometer signal recordings may be taken simultaneously without analog to digital circuits, multiplexing circuitry or software to compensate for the effects of multiplexing the signals.

  19. Beyond School Records: The Value of Cognitive and Affective Engagement in Predicting Dropout and On-Time Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Matthew D.; Reschly, Amy L.; Appleton, James J.

    2018-01-01

    Early warning systems use school record data--such as attendance rate, behavior records, and course performance--to identify students at risk of dropping out. These are useful predictors of graduation-related outcomes, in large part because they indicate a student's level of engagement with school. However, these data do not indicate how invested…

  20. More than Winning: When Students become Teachers of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    This essay is an account of student civic engagement in action. It stresses the vital role of environments in which students learn to be civic actors. The student experiences recorded in this account point toward a form of campus politics that places students in a role of coworker and cocreator, where they must negotiate differences and…

  1. Predictors of Graduation among College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingry O'Neill, Laura N.; Markward, Martha J.; French, Joshua P.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study determined which set of student characteristics and disability-related services explained graduation success among college students with disabilities. The archived records of 1,289 unidentified students with disabilities in three public universities were examined ex-post-facto to collect demographic data on the students, the…

  2. Medical students, clinical preventive services, and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carole W; Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Margaret

    2002-11-01

    Improving access to preventive care requires addressing patient, provider, and systems barriers. Patients often lack knowledge or are skeptical about the importance of prevention. Physicians feel that they have too little time, are not trained to deliver preventive services, and are concerned about the effectiveness of prevention. We have implemented an educational module in the required family practice clerkship (1) to enhance medical student learning about common clinical preventive services and (2) to teach students how to inform and involve patients in shared decision making about those services. Students are asked to examine available evidence-based information for preventive screening services. They are encouraged to look at the recommendations of various organizations and use such resources as reports from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to determine recommendations they want to be knowledgeable about in talking with their patients. For learning shared decision making, students are trained to use a model adapted from Braddock and colleagues(1) to discuss specific screening services and to engage patients in the process of making informed decisions about what is best for their own health. The shared decision making is presented and modeled by faculty, discussed in small groups, and students practice using Web-based cases and simulations. The students are evaluated using formative and summative performance-based assessments as they interact with simulated patients about (1) screening for high blood cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities, (2) screening for colorectal cancer, (3) screening for prostate cancer, and (4) screening for breast cancer. The final student evaluation is a ten-minute, videotaped discussion with a simulated patient about screening for colorectal cancer that is graded against a checklist that focuses primarily on the elements of shared decision making. Our medical students appear quite willing to accept shared decision making as

  3. The Barbados Sea Level Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, R. G.; Mortlock, R. A.; Abdul, N. A.; Wright, J. D.; Cao, L.; Mey, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Additional offshore drill cores, nearly 100 new radiometric dates, and more than 1000 kilometers of Multibeam mapping greatly enhance the Barbados Sea Level record. Extensive Multibeam mapping around the entire island covers approximately 2650 km2 of the sea bottom and now integrates the offshore reef topography and Barbados Sea Level Record with the unparalleled onshore core collection, digital elevation maps, and Pleistocene sea level record spanning the past one million years. The reef crest coral, Acropora palmata, remains the stalwart indicator of sea level for many reasons that are validated by our redundant sea level records and redundant dating via Th/U and Pa/U analyses. Microanalysis and densitometry studies better explain why Acropora palmata is so well preserved in the Pleistocene reef records and therefore why it is the species of choice for sea level reconstructions and radiometric dating. New drill cores into reefs that formed during Marine Isotope Stage 3 lead us to a model of diagenesis that allows us to better prospect for unaltered coral samples in older reefs that may be suitable for Th/U dating. Equally important, our diagenesis model reinforces our rigorous sample quality criteria in a more quantitative manner. The Barbados Sea Level record has a sampling resolution of better than 100 years throughout much of the last deglaciation showing unprecedented detail in redundant drill cores. The Melt Water Pulses (MWP1A and MWP1B) are well resolved and the intervening interval that includes the Younger Dryas reveals sea level changes in new detail that are consistent with the terrestrial records of ice margins (see Abdul et al., this section). More than 100 paired Th/U and radiocarbon ages place the Barbados Sea Level Record unambiguously on the radiocarbon time scale for direct comparisons with the terrestrial records of ice margin changes.

  4. Electronic health records for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Trenor

    2010-01-01

    The straight scoop on choosing and implementing an electronic health records (EHR) system Doctors, nurses, and hospital and clinic administrators are interested in learning the best ways to implement and use an electronic health records system so that they can be shared across different health care settings via a network-connected information system. This helpful, plain-English guide provides need-to-know information on how to choose the right system, assure patients of the security of their records, and implement an EHR in such a way that it causes minimal disruption to the daily demands of a

  5. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an…

  6. 75 FR 4308 - Personnel Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... the Chief Information Officer, Records Management, Room 7439, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, DC 20415... systems and business practices, both internal and external to government systems, which use the SSN as a...

  7. Problems in Recording the Electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, John G.

    The unwanted signals that arise in electrocardiography are discussed. A technical background of electrocardiography is given, along with teaching techniques that educate students of medical instrumentation to solve the problems caused by these signals. (MJH)

  8. Medical Archive Recording System (MARS)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Tajvidi

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, one of the most efficient, and reliable integrated tools for CD/DVD production workflow, called Medical Archive Recording System (MARS) by ETIAM Company, France, which is a leader in multimedia connectivity for healthcare in Europe, is going to be introduced. "nThis tool is used to record all patient studies, route the studies to printers and PACS automatically, print key images and associated reports and log all study production for automated post processing/archiving. Its...

  9. Measuring student engagement among elementary students: pilot of the Student Engagement Instrument--Elementary Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chandra P; Reschly, Amy L; Lovelace, Matthew D; Appleton, James J; Thompson, Dianne

    2012-06-01

    Early school withdrawal, commonly referred to as dropout, is associated with a plethora of negative outcomes for students, schools, and society. Student engagement, however, presents as a promising theoretical model and cornerstone of school completion interventions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the Student Engagement Instrument-Elementary Version (SEI-E). The psychometric properties of this measure were assessed based on the responses of an ethnically diverse sample of 1,943 students from an urban locale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the 4-factor model of student engagement provided the best fit for the current data, which is divergent from previous SEI studies suggesting 5- and 6-factor models. Discussion and implications of these findings are presented in the context of student engagement and dropout prevention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. An electronic record system in nursing education: evaluation and utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel González-Chordá

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is to analyze the results of the utilization and evaluation of the LORETO Record System (LRS, providing improvement areas in the teaching-learning process and technology, in second year nursing students. A descriptive, prospective, cross sectional study using inferential statics has been carried out on all electronic records reported by 55 nursing students during clinical internships (April 1º-June 26º, 2013. Electronic record average rated 7.22 points (s=0.6; CV=0.083, with differences based on the clinical practice units (p<0,05. Three items assessed did not exceed the quality threshold set at 0.7 (p<0.05. Record Rate exceeds the quality threshold set at 80% for the overall sample, with differences based on the practice units.  Only two clinical practice units rated above the minimum threshold (p <0.05. Record of care provision every 3 days did not reach the estimated quality threshold (p <0.05. There is a dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative results of LRS. Improvement areas in theoretical education have been identified. The LRS seems an appropriate learning and assessment tool, although the development of a new APP version and the application of principles of gamification should be explored.

  11. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

  12. Juggling with Language Learning Theories. [Videotape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Learning to juggle has become popular among corporate training programs because it shows participants how to appreciate mistakes and use "Intelligent Fast Failure" (learning quickly by daring to make a lot of simple mistakes at the beginning of a process). Big business also likes the way juggling can get executives "out of the…

  13. Bug City: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Friends [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon, including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic…

  14. Bug City: Spiders and Scorpions [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  15. Bug City: Butterflies and Moths [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  16. Bug City: House and Backyard Insects [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  17. Computer-aided training exam creation and personnel records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, R.K.; Louche, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    A problem has existed in nuclear power plant training departments about how to choose questions for examinations without instructor bias, how to permanently store this exam so that it can be reconstructed, how to statistically analyze class, instructor, and student performance, and how to keep accurate, easily accessible records of all training. The design of the software package discussed in the paper is such that a complete record of classes, quizzes, exams, instructors, and analysis is available for each trainee. The need for classes is automatically available from the computer with randomly created exams available on request

  18. Using Student-Produced Video to Validate Head-to-Toe Assessment Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpora, Christina; Prion, Susan

    2018-03-01

    This study explored third-semester baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the value of using student-produced video as an approach for learning head-to-toe assessment, an essential clinical nursing skill taught in the classroom. A cognitive apprenticeship model guided the study. The researchers developed a 34-item survey. A convenience sample of 72 students enrolled in an applied assessment and nursing fundamentals course at a university in the western United States provided the data. Most students reported a videotaping process that worked, supportive faculty, valuable faculty review of their work, confidence, a sense of performance independence, the ability to identify normal assessment findings, and few barriers to learning. The results suggested that a student-produced video approach to learning head-to-toe assessment was effective. Further, the study demonstrated how to leverage available instructional technology to provide meaningful, personalized instruction and feedback to students about an essential nursing skill. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):154-158.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making.

  20. Medical students' communication skills in clinical education: Results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Cadja; Roschlaub, Silke; Harendza, Sigrid; Keim, Rebecca; Scherer, Martin

    2017-10-01

    To assess students' communication skills during clinical medical education and at graduation. We conducted an observational cohort study from 2007 to 2011 with 26 voluntary undergraduate medical students at Hamburg University based on video-taped consultations in year four and at graduation. 176 consultations were analyzed quantitatively with validated and non-validated context-independent communication observation instruments (interrater reliability ≥0.8). Based on observational protocols each consultation was also documented in free-text comments, salient topics were extracted afterwards. 26 students, seven males, were enrolled in the survey. On average, graduates scored higher in differential-diagnostic questioning and time management but showed deficiencies in taking systematic and complete symptom-oriented histories, in communication techniques, in structuring consultations and in gathering the patients' perspectives. Patient-centeredness and empathy were rather low at graduation. Individual deficiencies could barely be eliminated. Medical students were able to enhance their clinical reasoning skills and their time management. Still, various communication deficiencies in final year students became evident regarding appropriate history taking, communication skills, empathy and patient-centeredness. The necessity of developing a longitudinal communication curriculum with enhanced communication trainings and assessments became evident. A curriculum should ensure that students' communication competencies are firmly achieved at graduation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Teaching medical students to express empathy by exploring patient emotions and experiences in standardized medical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moral, Roger; Pérula de Torres, Luis; Monge, Diana; García Leonardo, Cristina; Caballero, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    To increase medical students' ability to detect contextual and emotional cues and to respond empathetically to patients. a training course in communication skills and patient-centered care with different teaching activities (didactic, reflective and interactive: workshops and encounters with simulated patients) was delivered to third-year medical students just before their clerkships. The program was evaluated by an external observer (OE) and simulated patients (SP) in 2 or 3 videotaped encounters. Students improved significantly from baseline to 3rd interview in all communicative skills and domains explored both in OE (32.4%) and SP (38.3%) measurement. At the end of the course students detected significantly more clues and made more empathetic expressions. The course seems to improve the ability of students to explore the illness experience, showing more empathy in a more genuine way. This was carried out in consultations lasting 10min. The program is effective and feasible to be applied as a regular formative activity. Further research is needed to assess whether this training program is applicable to students in more advanced educational levels and if it has any additional outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Automatic System for Producing and Distributing Lecture Recordings and Livestreams Using Opencast Matterhorn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonach, Rafael; Ebner, Martin; Grigoriadis, Ypatios

    2015-01-01

    Lectures of courses at universities are increasingly being recorded and offered through various distribution channels to support students' learning activities. This research work aims to create an automatic system for producing and distributing high quality lecture recordings. Opencast Matterhorn is an open source platform for automated video…

  3. Improving English Reading Comprehension Ability through Survey, Questions, Read, Record, Recite, Review Strategy (SQ4R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusniyah, Nurul Lailatul; Lustyantie, Ninuk

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of the survey, questions, read, record, recite, review (SQ4R) strategy of the reading comprehension ability students of 2nd semester. The research study was used action research method. The sampling was taken by 34 students. The validity of data used credibility, transferability, dependability, and…

  4. 1993 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This document consists of viewgraphs from the presentations at the conference. Topics included are: DOE records management overview, NIRMA and ARMA resources, NARA records management training, potential quality assurance records, filing systems, organizing and indexing technical records, DOE-HQ initiatives, IRM reviews, status of epidemiologic inventory, disposition of records and personal papers, inactive records storage, establishing administrative records, managing records at Hanford, electronic mail -- legal and records issues, NARA-GAO reports status, consultive selling, automated indexing, decentralized approach to scheduling at a DOE office, developing specific records management programs, storage and retrieval at Savannah River Plant, an optical disk case study, and special interest group reports.

  5. The Role of Self-Monitoring in Assessing Individual Students' Quantity and Quality of Comments in Large-Class Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, B. A.; Wright, J. M.; Coles, J. T.; McCleary, L. N.; Williams, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a reliable and valid self-monitoring procedure for student use in recording and rating the quality of their individual comments in large college classes. Students used daily record cards immediately to record and rate each comment they made each day. However, a limit was set on the amount of credit students could claim for…

  6. Construction contract revenue recording comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Bohušová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Publicly traded companies prepare their consolidated accounts in conformity with the international accounting standards (IAS/IFRS in accordance with the Regulation No. 1606/2002. This is obliged for all publicly traded joint-stock companies in the Czech Republic. Other companies prepare financial statements in accordance with national accounting standards. There are Accounting Act No. 563/1991 of Coll. and Regulation No. 500/2002 of Coll., Czech Accounting Standards in the Czech Republic. Both systems are based on different principles so there are many differences. The Czech Accounting System (CAS is based on the rules while IAS/IFRS are based on principles (Kovanicová, 2005. These differences are mainly caused by the different philosophy. CAS prefers the fiscal policy to the economic substance while IAS/IFRS prefere the economic substance. One of the most significant dif­fe­ren­ces is in the field of revenue recording. There are two standards concerning the revenues recording (IAS 18 − Revenue, IAS 11 – Construction Contracts in IAS/IFRS. CAS 019 – Expenses and Revenue are dealing with the revenue recording in the Czech Republic. The paper is aimed at the comparison of the methodical approaches for revenue recording used by IAS/IFRS and by CAS. The most important differences are caused by the different approach to the long term contracts (construction contracts, software development contracts revenues recording.

  7. Comparing records with related chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Albert, Paul; Kearney, Rebecca; Staff, Richard A.

    2016-04-01

    In order to integrate ice, terrestrial and marine records, it is necessary to deal with records on different timescales. These timescales can be grouped into those that use a common fundamental chronometer (such as Uranium-Thorium dating or Radiocarbon) and can also be related to one another where we have chronological tie points such as tephra horizons. More generally we can, through a number of different methodologies, derive relationships between different timescales. A good example of this is the use of cosmogenic isotope production, specifically 10Be and 14C to relate the calibrated radiocarbon timescale to that of the Greenland ice cores. The relationships between different timescales can be mathematically expressed in terms of time-transfer functions. This formalism allows any related record to be considered against any linked timescale with an appropriate associated uncertainty. The prototype INTIMATE chronological database allows records to be viewed and compared in this way and this is now being further developed, both to include a wider range of records and also to provide better connectivity to other databases and chronological tools. These developments will also include new ways to use tephra tie-points to constrain the relationship between timescales directly, without needing to remodel each associated timescale. The database as it stands allows data for particular timeframes to be recalled and plotted against any timescale, or exported in spreadsheet format. New functionality will be added to allow users to work with their own data in a private space and then to publish it when it has been through the peer-review publication process. In order to make the data easier to use for other further analysis and plotting, and with data from other sources, the database will also act as a server to deliver data in a JSON format. The aim of this work is to make the comparison of integrated data much easier for researchers and to ensure that good practice in

  8. Beaming teaching application: recording techniques for spatial xylophone sound rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Olesen, Søren Krarup

    2012-01-01

    BEAMING is a telepresence research project aiming at providing a multimodal interaction between two or more participants located at distant locations. One of the BEAMING applications allows a distant teacher to give a xylophone playing lecture to the students. Therefore, rendering of the xylophon...... to spatial improvements mainly in terms of the Apparent Source Width (ASW). Rendered examples are subjectively evaluated in listening tests by comparing them with binaural recording....

  9. Student Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Edward

    This report discusses student violence within the framework of causes, issues, and false and true solutions. The author decries the abdication of responsibilities by both college administrators, who have permitted students to "do their thing," and leftwing students, who crusade thoughtlessly against educational institutions. Some true solutions…

  10. STUDENT PLACEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students express lack of interest in the field they are placed, it ... be highly motivated to learn than students placed in a department ... the following research questions. Research Questions. •. Did the criteria used by Mekelle. University for placement of students into different departments affect the academic performance of ...

  11. Perceptions of undergraduate dental students at Makerere College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The creating, maintenance and storage of patients' medical records is an important competence for the professional training of a dental student. Objective. Owing to the unsatisfactory state of dental records at the students' clinic, the objective of this study was to obtain information from undergraduate dental ...

  12. 76 FR 27898 - Registration and Recordation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... to reflect a reorganization that has moved the Recordation function from the Visual Arts and... function from the Visual Arts and Recordation Division of the Registration and Recordation Program to the... Visual Arts Division of the Registration and Recordation Program, has been renamed the Recordation...

  13. 27 CFR 24.317 - Sugar record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sugar record. 24.317... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.317 Sugar record. A proprietor who receives, stores, or uses sugar shall maintain a record of receipt and use. The record will show the date of...

  14. 25 CFR 15.504 - Who may inspect records and records management practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who may inspect records and records management practices... Records § 15.504 Who may inspect records and records management practices? (a) You may inspect the probate... Secretary and the Archivist of the United States may inspect records and records management practices and...

  15. Learners' independent records of vocabulary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Philip; Leeke, Philip

    1999-01-01

    Handbooks recommend a variety of quite complicated procedures for learning and remembering vocabulary, but most learners only engage in very simple procedures. The aim of this project was to establish a basis for identifying optimal vocabulary recording procedures by finding out what learners...

  16. DNR Land Records Search Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    - ENGINEERING PLAT FILE 311 - AK STATE LAND SUR 312 - UNORGANIZED BOROUGH 313 - RECORD OF SURVEY 314 - EASEMENT - ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE 513 - PARK USE PERMIT 521 - SUBDIVISION SALE COMP 522 - AGRICULTURAL SALE COMP 523 - ODDLOT UPLAND 539 - OTHER SALE NON-COMP 541 - SUBDIVISION LEASE COMP 542 - AGRICULTURAL LEASE COMP 543 - ODDLOT

  17. Dental Electronic Health Record Evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chleborád, K.; Zvára Jr., Karel; Dostálová, T.; Zvára, Karel; Ivančáková, R.; Zvárová, Jana; Smidl, L.; Trmal, J.; Psutka, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 50-50 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : dentistry * medical documentation * electronic health record Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  18. Video Recordings in Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    Reports on development and operation of public library collection of video recordings, describes results of user survey conducted over 6-month period, and offers brief guidelines. Potential users, censorship and copyright, organization of collection, fees, damage and loss, funding, purchasing and promotion, formats, processing and cataloging,…

  19. Self-Reflection of Video-Recorded High-Fidelity Simulations and Development of Clinical Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Michelle E

    2016-09-01

    Nurse educators are increasingly using high-fidelity simulators to improve prelicensure nursing students' ability to develop clinical judgment. Traditionally, oral debriefing sessions have immediately followed the simulation scenarios as a method for students to connect theory to practice and therefore develop clinical judgment. Recently, video recording of the simulation scenarios is being incorporated. This qualitative, interpretive description study was conducted to identify whether self-reflection on video-recorded high-fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios helped prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. Tanner's clinical judgment model was the framework for this study. Four themes emerged from this study: Confidence, Communication, Decision Making, and Change in Clinical Practice. This study indicated that self-reflection of video-recorded HFS scenarios is beneficial for prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(9):522-527.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Various Portraits of Finnish Open University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Arto; Nori, Hanna; Alho-Malmelin, Marika

    2007-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the background and goals of students at the Finnish open university in the beginning of the twenty-first century. The material consists of statistics based on the student records of the Finnish open university in 2000 (n = 9080) and of the stories, educational autobiographies written by the adult learners (n =…

  1. Improving Student Performance through Parent Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steventon, Candace E.

    A personalized parenting program was implemented to address poor academic performance and low self-esteem of high school students. Student records, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, the Behavior Evaluation Scale, and teacher surveys were employed to identify and measure academic and/or self-perception growth. Parents participated in an 8-week…

  2. Student employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Marita; Gerth, Maria; Weiss, Felix

    2018-01-01

    , according to social origins, in student employment from first-year students through graduating students. We show that inequality in job quality exists and is partly attributable to the need for students from lower social origins to work to finance their studies. We hypothesise that initial inequalities......In this article, we examine social origin differences in employment patterns across different stages of higher education and compare these differences between vocational and academic fields of study. Using data from a large-scale German student survey, we study the development of inequality...

  3. Digital recording as a teaching and learning method in the skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Ingebjørg; Gulbrandsen, Lise; Slettebø, Åshild; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2017-09-01

    To obtain information on how nursing students react to, think about and learn from digital recording as a learning and teaching method over time. Based on the teaching and learning philosophy of the university college, we used digital recording as a tool in our daily sessions in skills laboratory. However, most of the studies referred to in the background review had a duration of from only a few hours to a number of days. We found it valuable to design a study with a duration of two academic semesters. A descriptive and interpretative design was used. First-year bachelor-level students at the department of nursing participated in the study. Data collection was carried out by employing an 'online questionnaire'. The students answered five written, open-ended questions after each of three practical skill sessions. Kvale and Brinkmann's three levels of understanding were employed in the analysis. The students reported that digital recording affected factors such as feeling safe, secure and confident and that video recording was essential in learning and training practical skills. The use of cameras proved to be useful, as an expressive tool for peer learning because video recording enhances self-assessment, reflection, sensing, psychomotor performance and discovery learning. Digital recording enhances the student's awareness when acquiring new knowledge because it activates cognitive and emotional learning. The connection between tutoring, feedback and technology was clear. The digital recorder gives students direct and immediate feedback on their performance from the various practical procedures, and may aid in the transition from theory to practice. Students experienced more self-confidence and a feeling of safety in their performances. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 77 FR 43821 - Records Governing Off-the-Record Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ...-515-000 7-9-12 Michael Mojica \\2\\. 3. CP08-6-000 7-11-12 David J. Devine. 4. CP11-161-000 7-13-12...\\ Email record. \\6\\ Hons. Robert P. Casey, Jr. and Tom Marino. Dated: July 20, 2012. Nathaniel J. Davis... \\5\\. 3. P-2458-000 6-27-12 Hon. Michael H. Michaud. 4. CP11-161-000 6-27-12 Hon. Tom Marino. 5. P...

  5. Nurturing virtues of the medical profession: does it enhance medical students' empathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweller, Marcelo; Ribeiro, Diego Lima; Celeri, Eloisa Valer; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio

    2017-07-11

    To examine if the empathy levels of first-year medical students are amenable to didactic interventions idealized to promote values inherent to medical professional identity. This is a pretest-posttest study designed to assess the empathy levels of first-year medical students (n=166) comprising two consecutive classes of a Brazilian medical school, performed before and after a didactic intervention. Students attended a course based on values and virtues related to medical professional identity once a week over four months. Every didactic approach (interviews with patients and physicians, supervised visits to the hospital, and discussion of videotaped simulated consultations) was based on "real-world" situations and designed to promote awareness of the process of socialization. Students filled out the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) on the first and last days of this course, and the pretest-posttest analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The mean pretest JSPE score was 117.9 (minimum 92, maximum 135) and increased to 121.3 after the intervention (minimum 101, maximum 137). The difference was significant (z=-5.2, pEmpathy is a fundamental tool used to achieve a successful physician-patient relationship, and it seems to permeate other virtues of a good physician. This study's results suggest that medical students' empathy may be amenable to early curricular interventions designed to promote a positive development of their professional identity, even when empathy is not central in discussion.

  6. Evaluation of Fourth-Year Veterinary Students' Client Communication Skills: Recommendations for Scaffolded Instruction and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Brenda J; Kedrowicz, April A

    Effective client communication is important for success in veterinary practice. The purpose of this project was to describe one approach to communication training and explore fourth-year veterinary students' communication skills through an evaluation of their interactions with clients during a general practice rotation. Two raters coded 20 random videotaped interactions simultaneously to assess students' communication, including their ability to initiate the session, incorporate open-ended questions, listen reflectively, express empathy, incorporate appropriate nonverbal communication, and attend to organization and sequencing. We provide baseline data that will guide future instruction in client communication. Results showed that students' communication skills require development. Half of the students sampled excelled at open-ended inquiry (n=10), and 40% (n=8) excelled at nonverbal communication. Students needed improvement on greeting clients by name and introducing themselves and their role (n=15), reflective listening (n=18), empathy (n=17), and organization and sequencing (n=18). These findings suggest that more focused instruction and practice is necessary in maintaining an organized structure, reflective listening, and empathy to create a relationship-centered approach to care.

  7. Creating student awareness to improve cultural competence: creating the critical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Venita W; Sharp, Penny C; Crandall, Sonia J

    2002-09-01

    Teaching medical students to recognize the need for cultural competence and accept their shortcomings in this area is a challenge. A simulated patient scenario was developed to address this challenge. The objective of the simulation is to enhance students' readiness to learn by moving them from 'unconscious incompetence' to 'conscious incompetence'. The patient scenario presents a Cherokee Indian woman with a complaint of abnormal menstrual bleeding who is resistant to gynaecologic care from male providers. A faculty member facilitates a small-group videotape review of student interviews. As students discuss their encounters, they realize they 'misdiagnose' and mishandle the interview. They are confronted by their inability to recognize cultural cues and the impact they may have on health outcomes and begin to question whether cultural beliefs are affecting the care of other patients. This simulation creates an eye-opening situation that must be handled carefully. This activity is an effective method to create awareness in students who feel they 'know all this stuff.'

  8. A clinical assessment tool used for physiotherapy students--is it reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lucy K; Stiller, Kathy; Hardy, Frances

    2008-01-01

    Educational institutions providing professional programs such as physiotherapy must provide high-quality student assessment procedures. To ensure that assessment is consistent, assessment tools should have an acceptable level of reliability. There is a paucity of research evaluating the reliability of clinical assessment tools used for physiotherapy students. This study evaluated the inter- and intrarater reliability of an assessment tool used for physiotherapy students during a clinical placement. Five clinical educators and one academic participated in the study. Each rater independently marked 22 student written assessments that had been completed by students after viewing a videotaped patient physiotherapy assessment. The raters repeated the marking process 7 weeks later, with the assessments provided in a randomised order. The interrater reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient) for the total scores was 0.32, representing a poor level of reliability. A high level of intrarater reliability (percentage agreement) was found for the clinical educators, with a difference in section scores of one mark or less on 93.4% of occasions. Further research should be undertaken to reevaluate the reliability of this clinical assessment tool following training. The reliability of clinical assessment tools used in other areas of physiotherapy education should be formally measured rather than assumed.

  9. Tracing students' attention through the Neurosky MindWave headset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringtved, Ulla Lunde; Larsen, Torben; Toftegaard, Lars Landberg

    This poster explores how students` attention levels can be traced through recordings of their electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The EEG signals are recorded through the Neurosky MindWave headset during lectures in the classroom. We configured and aggregated the recordings searching for simila......This poster explores how students` attention levels can be traced through recordings of their electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The EEG signals are recorded through the Neurosky MindWave headset during lectures in the classroom. We configured and aggregated the recordings searching...... for similarity in the signals throughout the group of students to create a dashboard and use them as pedagogical neurofeedback to increase the students` capabilities in controlling their attention and concentration in learning situations. Furthermore, learning analytics methods are deployed to create a prototype...

  10. The strategic use of lecture recordings to facilitate an active and self-directed learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topale, Luminica

    2016-08-12

    New learning technologies have the capacity to dramatically impact how students go about learning and to facilitate an active, self-directed learning approach. In U. S. medical education, students encounter a large volume of content, which must be mastered at an accelerated pace. The added pressure to excel on the USMLE Step 1 licensing exam and competition for residency placements, require that students adopt an informed approach to the use of learning technologies so as to enhance rather than to detract from the learning process. The primary aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of how students were using recorded lectures in their learning and how their study habits have been influenced by the technology. Survey research was undertaken using a convenience sample. Students were asked to voluntarily participate in an electronic survey comprised of 27 closed ended, multiple choice questions, and one open ended item. The survey was designed to explore students' perceptions of how recorded lectures affected their choices regarding class participation and impacted their learning and to gain an understanding of how recorded lectures facilitated a strategic, active learning process. Findings revealed that recorded lectures had little influence on students' choices to participate, and that the perceived benefits of integrating recorded lectures into study practices were related to their facilitation of and impact on efficient, active, and self-directed learning. This study was a useful investigation into how the availability of lecture capture technology influenced medical students' study behaviors and how students were making valuable use of the technology as an active learning tool.

  11. Student-to-Student Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Ane Katrine

    2017-01-01

    Chinese international students have become an increasingly visible presence around the globe, and interest in these students has consequently increased among universities, researchers, and policy-makers, who often see international students as a source of increased soft power. This article...... questions the idea of Chinese international students as a soft-power tool. This is done through a critical discussion of the concept of soft power and the rather limited research on educational diplomacy, demonstrating that the analytical vagueness of the concept of soft power leads to an oversimplified...... understanding of the linkage between international students and soft power. In order to provide a more nuanced understanding of this linkage, the article examines the actual overseas experience of Chinese international students and argues that the linkage between international students and soft power is highly...

  12. The Cadmio XML healthcare record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Francesco; Ferri, Fernando; Ricci, Fabrizio L; Sottile, Pier Angelo

    2002-01-01

    The management of clinical data is a complex task. Patient related information reported in patient folders is a set of heterogeneous and structured data accessed by different users having different goals (in local or geographical networks). XML language provides a mechanism for describing, manipulating, and visualising structured data in web-based applications. XML ensures that the structured data is managed in a uniform and transparent manner independently from the applications and their providers guaranteeing some interoperability. Extracting data from the healthcare record and structuring them according to XML makes the data available through browsers. The MIC/MIE model (Medical Information Category/Medical Information Elements), which allows the definition and management of healthcare records and used in CADMIO, a HISA based project, is described in this paper, using XML for allowing the data to be visualised through web browsers.

  13. Reservoirs talk to pressure recorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamenter, C B

    1968-02-01

    Keeping pace with increased demand for efficiency in secondary recovery schemes is the widening use of downhole tools charged with supplying data before and during the operation of the projects. One of the most important of these is the pressure recorder. This highly sensitive instrument, housed in a tough, slim steel case and lowered by drill pipe or cable, accurately measures the pressure of its downhole environment. This information is instantly available at the surface whenever a pressure reading is required. Typical applications of surface recorders often contribute are: (1) production practices such as checking surface and subsurface equipment, and special lifting problems; (2) well conditions including regular productivity indices, data observations and for interference studies; (3) secondary recovery projects, in both producing and injection wells; and (4) reservoir conditions where oil-water contacts and damaged zones need close attention.

  14. Patient records and clinical overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Groth

    the possibilities to mark up pages in personal ways and add personal notes to it. On the other hand, the EPR provides quick and easy access to lot of information and once information is entered in the EPR they stay in place. Information in the EPR is often updated due to real time entry, which avoid...... that information has to travel physically between different departments or different hospitals. Another advantage in the creation of clinical overview, when using an EPR, is that the record is never lost. If you have access to a computer, you have access to the record. Besides this, the search function...... at hospitals, these results indicate that you need to think besides the presentation of information. If the physicians are supposed to create an overview, information should be presented in ways that enables them to interpret and make sense of this information. At the same time, to support the creation...

  15. Extinction and the fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, ,. J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The author examines evidence of mass extinctions in the fossil record and searches for reasons for such large extinctions. Five major mass extinctions eliminated at least 40 percent of animal genera in the oceans and from 65 to 95 percent of ocean species. Questions include the occurrence of gradual or catastrophic extinctions, causes, environment, the capacity of a perturbation to cause extinctions each time it happens, and the possibility and identification of complex events leading to a mass extinction.

  16. Assessing Middle School and College Students' Conceptions About Wind, Fog, and Tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, E.; Monteverdi, J. P.; Garcia, O.; Tanner, K. D.

    2008-12-01

    Meteorological content is presented in K-12 educational standards and in university general education courses, yet little research has been done to explore how students conceptualize weather phenomena. This investigation probes the understanding of students at three cognitive levels-6th grade earth science students, university non-meteorology majors, and meteorology major students-of three meteorological phenomena-wind, fog, and tornadoes. All students were enrolled in schools in San Francisco, CA. The meteorological content chosen for this project-wind, fog, and tornadoes-was deliberate. Wind is a fundamental process on our planet, and has the potential to cause great damage. Students have direct experience with wind on a daily basis. Fog is a dominant feature of San Francisco climatology, and a familiar phenomenon to students living in our region. Tornadoes are associated with devastating winds and represent a destructive weather phenomenon that students only experience indirectly through movies representations and other media outlets. The phases consisted of (a) a fifteen-question survey, (b) written essay assessments, and (c) videotaped interviews. Phase I, a weather survey, was given to the entire population (65 middle school students, 50 university non-meteorology majors, and 10 university meteorology majors) and consisted of 10-15 challenge statements. Challenge statements assert a common misconception or truism and ask the students to rank their level of agreement on a 4-point Likert scale (strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree). Phase II presented the students a subset of statements and questions, and they were given 5 minutes to explain why they chose their response. To quantify the resulting qualitative data, the written essay assessments were scored using a developed conceptual rubric by multiple observers, using inter-observer reliability to measure agreement in scoring. The results from this phase helped to structure the interview

  17. First ATLAS Events Recorded Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Teuscher, R

    As reported in the CERN Bulletin, Issue No.30-31, 25 July 2005 The ATLAS barrel Tile calorimeter has recorded its first events underground using a cosmic ray trigger, as part of the detector commissioning programme. This is not a simulation! A cosmic ray muon recorded by the barrel Tile calorimeter of ATLAS on 21 June 2005 at 18:30. The calorimeter has three layers and a pointing geometry. The light trapezoids represent the energy deposited in the tiles of the calorimeter depicted as a thick disk. On the evening of June 21, the ATLAS detector, now being installed in the underground experimental hall UX15, reached an important psychological milestone: the barrel Tile calorimeter recorded the first cosmic ray events in the underground cavern. An estimated million cosmic muons enter the ATLAS cavern every 3 minutes, and the ATLAS team decided to make good use of some of them for the commissioning of the detector. Although only 8 of the 128 calorimeter slices ('superdrawers') were included in the trigg...

  18. Ladder beam and camera video recording system for evaluating forelimb and hindlimb deficits after sensorimotor cortex injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soblosky, J S; Colgin, L L; Chorney-Lane, D; Davidson, J F; Carey, M E

    1997-12-30

    Hindlimb and forelimb deficits in rats caused by sensorimotor cortex lesions are frequently tested by using the narrow flat beam (hindlimb), the narrow pegged beam (hindlimb and forelimb) or the grid-walking (forelimb) tests. Although these are excellent tests, the narrow flat beam generates non-parametric data so that using more powerful parametric statistical analyses are prohibited. All these tests can be difficult to score if the rat is moving rapidly. Foot misplacements, especially on the grid-walking test, are indicative of an ongoing deficit, but have not been reliably and accurately described and quantified previously. In this paper we present an easy to construct and use horizontal ladder-beam with a camera system on rails which can be used to evaluate both hindlimb and forelimb deficits in a single test. By slow motion videotape playback we were able to quantify and demonstrate foot misplacements which go beyond the recovery period usually seen using more conventional measures (i.e. footslips and footfaults). This convenient system provides a rapid and reliable method for recording and evaluating rat performance on any type of beam and may be useful for measuring sensorimotor recovery following brain injury.

  19. Student Reading Practices in Print and Electronic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foasberg, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a diary-based qualitative study on college students' reading habits with regard to print and electronic media. Students used a form to record information about their reading practices for twelve days, including length of reading event, location, format used, and the purpose of reading. Students tended to use print for academic…

  20. Counseling Centers Lack Resources to Help Troubled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2008-01-01

    The fatal shootings at Northern Illinois University this month were shocking yet familiar. For the second time in 10 months, a student with a record of mental-health problems went on a killing spree at a large public university. Ever since a disturbed student fatally shot 32 students and professors at Virginia Tech last April, college…

  1. Language Aspects of Engineering Students' View of Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Andersson, Staffan; Elmgren, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Entropy is a central concept in thermodynamics, but has been found to be challenging to students due to its abstract nature and the fact that it is not part of students' everyday language. Interviews with three pairs of engineering students (N = 6) were conducted and video recorded regarding their interpretation and use of the entropy concept, one…

  2. High School Student Modeling in the Engineering Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan; Huffman, Tanner; Thayer, Hilde

    2014-01-01

    A diverse group of 20 high school students from four states in the US were individually provided with an engineering design challenge. Students chosen were in capstone engineering courses and had taken multiple engineering courses. As students considered the problem and developed a solution, observational data were recorded and artifacts…

  3. Affective Responses of Students Who Witness Classroom Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Burger, Amanda; Blosser, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    For this study, 82 general psychology students (51 females, 31 males) witnessed a peer cheating while completing a test. Following the incident, we tape recorded semi-structured interviews with each student who saw the cheating event for later analysis. Using qualitative coding and methodology, themes emerged regarding students' emotional…

  4. The Goat Portage: Students' Stories and Learning from Canoe Trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Bert

    This study explores how high school students learn from their experiences in an extracurricular adventure program and illustrates how students' narrative inquiries relate to experiential learning. Twelve canoe trips were studied by participant observation methods. Data were collected from recorded interviews with students and staff, field notes,…

  5. The Use of Lecture Capture and Student Performance in Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgu, Rim Mekonnen; Huynh, Sophia; Gopalan, Chaya

    2016-01-01

    Lecture capture technology is fairly new and has gained interest among higher institutions, faculty and students alike. Live-lecture (LL) is captured in real-time and this recording, LC, is made available for students to access for later use, whether it be for review purpose or to replace a missed class. Student performance was compared between…

  6. Studies in perpendicular magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcu, Bogdan F.

    This dissertation uses both micromagnetic simulation and analytical methods to analyze several aspects of a perpendicular recording system. To increase the head field amplitude, the recording layer is grown on top of a soft magnetic layer (keeper). There is concern about the ability of the keeper to conduct the magnetic flux from the head at high data rates. We compute numerically the magnetization motion of the soft underlayer during the reversal process. Generation of non-linear spin waves characterizes the magnetization dynamics in the keeper, the spins are oscillating with a frequency higher than that of the reversal current. However, the recording field applied to the data layer follows the time dependence of the input wave form. The written transition shape is determined by the competition between the head field gradient and the demagnetizing field gradient. An analytical slope model that takes into consideration the angular orientation of the applied field is used to estimate the transition parameter; agreement is shown with the micromagnetic results. On the playback side, the reciprocity principle is applied to calculate the read out signal from a single magnetic transition in the perpendicular medium. The pulse shape is close to an error-function, going through zero when the sensor is above the transition center and decaying from the peak to an asymptotic value when the transition center is far away. Analytical closed forms for both the slope in the origin and the asymptotic value show the dependence on the recording geometry parameters. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio is calculated assuming that the noise is dominated by the medium jitter. To keep the SNR at a readable level while increasing the areal density, the average magnetic grain diameter must decrease; consequently grain size fluctuations will affect the thermal decay. We performed Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements and observed differences in the grain size distribution between various types

  7. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or production run of medicated feed to which it pertains. The Master Record File or card shall... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the complete...

  8. Record reach : ExxonMobil extends its own world record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.

    2008-06-15

    Extended reach drilling (ERD) records are now regularly being broken by ExxonMobil Corporation's Sakhalin project on Russia's east coast. In 2008, an oil well on the coast established a new record by achieving a measured depth of 11,680 meters. The well was punched out by a Texas-based drilling company using the world's largest land-based drilling rig. The use of ERD has reduced the capital and operating costs of the project in addition to reducing its environmental impacts. ERD has been used to drill onshore beneath the seafloor and has eliminated the need for additional offshore structure and pipelines. The horizontal reach of the wells has improved productivity while also avoiding disturbing whale migrations in the region. The rig features a 1.5 million pound load capacity, 3000 horsepower draw-works. The top-drive drilling systems were used to transmit real time data to external locations for further evaluation. Oil and gas is also produced from a gravity-based offshore platform. It was concluded that longer wellbore are now being developed by the corporation in order to drill under the Beaufort Sea. 2 figs.

  9. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  10. Noninvasive recording of electrocardiogram in conscious rat: A new device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Srivastava, Pooja; Gupta, Ankit; Bajpai, Manish

    2017-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is an important tool for the study of cardiac electrophysiology both in human beings and experimental animals. Existing methods of ECG recording in small animals like rat have several limitations and ECG recordings of the anesthetized rat lack validity for heart rate (HR) variability analysis. The aim of the present study was to validate the ECG data from new device with ECG of anesthetized rat. The ECG was recorded on student's physiograph (BioDevice, Ambala) and suitable coupler and electrodes in six animals first by the newly developed device in conscious state and second in anesthetized state (stabilized technique). The data obtained were analyzed using unpaired t -test showed no significant difference ( P < 0.05) in QTc, QRS, and HR recorded by new device and established device in rats. No previous study describes a similar ECG recording in conscious state of rats. Thus, the present method may be a most physiological and inexpensive alternative to other methods. In this study, the animals were not restrained; they were just secured and represent a potential strength of the study.

  11. 12 CFR 1732.7 - Record hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS RECORD RETENTION Record Retention Program § 1732.7 Record hold. (a) Definition. For... Enterprise or OFHEO that the Enterprise is to retain records relating to a particular issue in connection...

  12. Record Values of a Pareto Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanullah, M.

    The record values of the Pareto distribution, labelled Pareto (II) (alpha, beta, nu), are reviewed. The best linear unbiased estimates of the parameters in terms of the record values are provided. The prediction of the sth record value based on the first m (s>m) record values are obtained. A classical Pareto distribution provides reasonably…

  13. 27 CFR 24.320 - Chemical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical record. 24.320... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.320 Chemical record. A proprietor who uses chemicals, preservatives, or other such materials shall maintain a record of the purchase, receipt and...

  14. 21 CFR 1271.270 - Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... particular HCT/P involved. (b) Records management system. You must establish and maintain a records management system relating to core CGTP requirements. Under this system, records pertaining to a particular... procedures, and equipment logs) must also be maintained and organized under the records management system. If...

  15. 21 CFR 225.110 - Distribution records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records and Reports § 225.110 Distribution records. (a) Distribution records permit the manufacturer to relate complaints to specific batches and/or... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution records. 225.110 Section 225.110 Food...

  16. 21 CFR 226.110 - Distribution records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES Records and Reports § 226.110 Distribution records. Complete records shall be maintained for each shipment of Type A medicated article(s) in... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution records. 226.110 Section 226.110 Food...

  17. 21 CFR 211.196 - Distribution records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports § 211.196 Distribution records. Distribution records shall contain the name and strength of the product and description... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution records. 211.196 Section 211.196 Food...

  18. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  19. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  20. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system. 8 refs

  1. The impact of expert- and peer feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students - a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Felix; Schmalz, Gerhard; Haak, Rainer; Rockenbauch, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of peer- and expert feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students. All students of the first clinical treatment course (n=46) were randomly assigned into two groups. For three times a medical-dental interview/consultation of each student with a real patient was videotaped. After every consultation the videos were assessed either by a person experienced in communication (expert group) or by a fellow student (peer group), giving the students feedback regarding their chairside performed communication skills. Before and after the feedback-interventions all students conducted an interview with simulated patients, which was rated using a validated global rating and analyzed statistically. Global ratings mean scores after feedback-intervention were significantly improved (p0.05). During this study students improved their communication skills in dentist-patient interactions. The communication experience of the feedback provider seems not to have any impact on the communication skills in undergraduate dental students. The clinical courses in dentistry offer the opportunity to implement peer-feedback interventions in real treatment situation as part of communication training to longitudinally improve communication skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sedimentary record of erg migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.

    1986-06-01

    The sedimentary record of erg (eolian sand sea) migration consists of an idealized threefold division of sand-sea facies sequences. The basal division, here termed the fore-erg, is composed of a hierarchy of eolian sand bodies contained within sediments of the flanking depositional environment. These sand bodies consist of eolian strata deposited by small dune complexes, zibars, and sand sheets. The fore-erg represents the downwind, leading edge of the erg and records the onset of eolian sedimentation. Basin subsidence coupled with erg migration places the medial division, termed the central erg, over the fore-erg strata. The central erg, represented by a thick accumulation of large-scale, cross-stratified sandstone, is the product of large draa complexes. Eolian influence on regional sedimentation patterns is greatest in the central erg, and most of the sand transported and deposited in the erg is contained within this region. Reduction in sand supply and continued erg migration will cover the central-erg deposits with a veneer of back-erg deposits. This upper division of the erg facies sequence resembles closely the fore-erg region. Similar types of eolian strata are present and organized in sand bodies encased in sediments of the upwind flanking depositional environment(s). Back-erg deposits may be thin due to limited eolian influence on sedimentation or incomplete erg migration, or they may be completely absent because of great susceptibility to postdepositional erosion. Tectonic, climatic, and eustatic influences on sand-sea deposition will produce distinctive variations or modifications of the idealized erg facies sequence. The resulting variants in the sedimentary record of erg migration are illustrated with ancient examples from western North America, Europe, southern Africa, and South America.

  3. Students developing resources for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Michael; Evans, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula. Students quickly adapt to using multimedia learning resources, but these need to be well designed, learner-centred and interactive for students to become significantly engaged. One way to ensure that students become committed users and that resources become distinct elements of the learning cycle is to involve students in resource design and production. Such an approach enables resources to accommodate student needs and preferences, but also provides opportunities for them to develop their own teaching and training skills. The aim of the medical student research project was to design and produce an electronic resource that was focused on a particular anatomical region. The views of other medical students were used to decide what features were suitable for inclusion and the resulting package contained basic principles and clinical relevance, and used a variety of approaches such as images of cadaveric material, living anatomy movies and quizzes. The completed package was assessed using a survey matrix and found to compare well with commercially available products. Given the ever-diversifying arena of multimedia instruction and the ability of students to be fully conversant with technology, this project demonstrates that students are ideal participants and creators of multimedia resources. It is hoped that such an approach will help to further develop the skill base of students, but will also provide an avenue of developing packages that are student user friendly, and that are focused towards particular curricula requirements. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  4. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    soluble aerosols can be analysed for concentration changes only, insoluble aeolian dust can reveal additional information on its atmospheric residence time via changes in the mean grain sizes. Volumes of particulate matter in ice cores are most reliably determined with Coulter counters, but since...... a Coulter counter performs measurements on discrete samples, it cannot be connected to a CFA system. Attenuation sensors, on the other hand, can be integrated into a CFA set-up, but are known to yield poor dust size records. The dilemma between high quality sizing and high depth resolution was found...

  5. Record current in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    On 19 December, just before CERN's end-of-year break, Sector 4-5, which had been cooled to 1.9 K, beat the LHC current record for 2007. The current was raised to 8500 amperes in the main magnets. The current of the dipole circuit was repeatedly ramped up and quenches were provoked. The magnets were maintained at 4.5 K over the holiday period so that they could be quickly brought back down to the nominal temperature after the shutdown. The testing of the sector has now resumed.

  6. Paleogene Seawater Osmium Isotope Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolewicz, Z.; Thomas, D. J.; Marcantonio, F.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoceanographic reconstructions of the Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic require enhanced geographic coverage, particularly in the Pacific, in order to better constrain meridional variations in environmental conditions. The challenge with the existing inventory of Pacific deep-sea cores is that they consist almost exclusively of pelagic clay with little existing age control. Pelagic clay sequences are useful for reconstructions of dust accumulation and water mass composition, but accurate correlation of these records to other sites requires improved age control. Recent work indicates that seawater Os isotope analyses provide useful age control for red clay sequences. The residence time of Os in seawater is relatively long compared to oceanic mixing, therefore the global seawater 187Os/188Os composition is practically homogeneous. A growing body of Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic data has constrained the evolution of the seawater Os isotopic composition and this curve is now a viable stratigraphic tool, employed in dating layers of Fe-Mn crusts (e.g., Klemm et al., 2005). Ravizza (2007) also demonstrated that the seawater Os isotopic composition can be extracted reliably from pelagic red clay sediments by analyzing the leached oxide minerals. The drawback to using seawater Os isotope stratigraphy to date Paleogene age sediments is that the compilation of existing data has some significant temporal gaps, notably between ~38 and 55 Ma. To improve the temporal resolution of the seawater Os isotope curve, we present new data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 in the equatorial Pacific. Site 865 has excellent biostratigraphic age control over the interval ~38-55Ma. Preliminary data indicate an increase in the seawater composition from 0.427 at 53.4 Ma to 0.499 by 43 Ma, consistent with the apparent trend in the few existing data points. We also analyzed the Os isotopic composition recorded by oxide minerals at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1370

  7. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  8. Undocumented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the plight of undocumented immigrant students in the United States. Fights have been waged in various state legislatures over the past few years concerning whether undocumented immigrant students should be able to benefit from in-state tuition rates at public colleges and universities. But a story in The Wall Street Journal…

  9. Identifying and addressing specific student difficulties in advanced thermal physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    As part of an ongoing multi-university research study on student understanding of concepts in thermal physics at the upper division, I identified several student difficulties with topics related to heat engines (especially the Carnot cycle), as well as difficulties related to the Boltzmann factor. In an effort to address these difficulties, I developed two guided-inquiry worksheet activities (a.k.a. tutorials) for use in advanced undergraduate thermal physics courses. Both tutorials seek to improve student understanding of the utility and physical background of a particular mathematical expression. One tutorial focuses on a derivation of Carnot's theorem regarding the limit on thermodynamic efficiency, starting from the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The other tutorial helps students gain an appreciation for the origin of the Boltzmann factor and when it is applicable; focusing on the physical justification of its mathematical derivation, with emphasis on the connections between probability, multiplicity, entropy, and energy. Student understanding of the use and physical implications of Carnot's theorem and the Boltzmann factor was assessed using written surveys both before and after tutorial instruction within the advanced thermal physics courses at the University of Maine and at other institutions. Classroom tutorial sessions at the University of Maine were videotaped to allow in-depth scrutiny of student successes and failures following tutorial prompts. I also interviewed students on various topics related to the Boltzmann factor to gain a more complete picture of their understanding and inform tutorial revisions. Results from several implementations of my tutorials at the University of Maine indicate that students did not have a robust understanding of these physical principles after lectures alone, and that they gain a better understanding of relevant topics after tutorial instruction; Fisher's exact tests yield statistically significant improvement at the

  10. Undergraduate students' goals for chemistry laboratory coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKorver, Brittland K.

    Chemistry laboratory coursework has the potential to offer many benefits to students, yet few of these learning goals are realized in practice. Therefore, this study seeks to characterize undergraduate students' learning goals for their chemistry laboratory coursework. Data were collected by recording video of students completing laboratory experiments and conducting interviews with the students about their experiences that were analyzed utilizing the frameworks of Human Constructivism and Self-Regulated Learning. A cross-sectional sampling of students allowed comparisons to be made among students with varying levels of chemistry experience and interest in chemistry. The student goals identified by this study were compared to previously described laboratory learning goals of the faculty who instruct these courses in an effort to identify potential avenues to improve laboratory learning.

  11. Evaluation of a communication skills training course for medical students using peer role-play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuob, Nasra Naeim; Qadi, Mahdi Ali; El Deek, Basem Salama; Boker, Abdulaziz Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of using peer role-playing in learning the communication skills as a step in the development of the communication skills training course delivered to pre-clinical medical students. This study was conducted at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between September 2014 and February 2015 and comprised medical students. Mixed methods design was used to evaluate the developed communication skills training course. Tests were conducted before and after the communication skills training course to assess the students' self-reported communication. After the course, the students completed a satisfaction survey. Focus groups were conducted to assess the behavioural and organisational changes induced by the course. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis.. Of the293 respondents, 246(84%) were satisfied with the course. Overall, 169(58%) subjects chose the lectures as the most helpful methods for learning the communication skills while 124(42%) considered practical sessions as the most helpful method. Besides, 237(81%) respondents reported that the role-play was beneficial for their learning, while 219(75%) perceived the video-taped role-play as an appropriate method for assessing the communication skills. Peer role-play was found to be a feasible and well-perceived alternative method in facilitating the acquisition of communication skills..

  12. Persistence of deaf students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics undergraduate programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchut, Amber E.

    Diversifying the student population and workforce under science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a necessity if innovations and creativity are to expand. There has not been a lot of literature regarding Deaf students in STEM especially regarding understanding how they persist in STEM undergraduate programs to successfully become STEM Bachelor of Science degree recipients. This study addresses the literature gap by investigating six students' experiences as they navigate their STEM undergraduate programs. The investigation uses narrative inquiry methodology and grounded theory method through the lens of Critical Race Theory and Critical Deaf Theory. Using videotaped interviews and observations, their experiences are highlighted using narratives portraying them as individuals surviving in a society that tends to perceive being deaf as a deficit that needs to be treated or cured. The data analysis also resulted in a conceptual model providing a description of how they persist. The crucial aspect of the conceptual model is the participants learned how to manage being deaf in a hearing-dominated society so they can reach their aspirations. The essential blocks for the persistence and managing their identities as deaf undergraduate STEMs include working harder, relying on familial support, and affirming themselves. Through the narratives and conceptual model of the six Deaf STEM undergraduates, the goal is to contribute to literature to promote a better understanding of the persistence of Deaf students, members of a marginalized group, as they pursue their dreams.

  13. Student Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conduit, Jodie; Karpen, Ingo; Farrelly, Francis

    2017-01-01

    system (the university), the narrow service system (the course), and the individual dyadic level of engagement (the student-lecturer interaction). These findings could be further considered and empirically tested in other engagement contexts (e.g. employee engagement, customer engagement).......Universities are seeking to actively and strategically manage student engagement through providing opportunities for students to interact and engage with the institution on a range of levels and in different ways. However, this increasingly complex and multi-layered nature of student engagement...... within a tertiary education environment is not well understood. Through qualitative focus groups and a series of interviews with undergraduate and postgraduate students, this study explores and articulates the cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social dimensions of engagement that depict the nature...

  14. Smartphone attachment for stethoscope recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    With the ubiquity of smartphones and the rising technology of 3D printing, novel devices can be developed that leverage the "computer in your pocket" and rapid prototyping technologies toward scientific, medical, engineering, and creative purposes. This paper describes such a device: a simple 3D-printed extension for Apple's iPhone that allows the sound from an off-the-shelf acoustic stethoscope to be recorded using the phone's built-in microphone. The attachment's digital 3D files can be easily shared, modified for similar phones and devices capable of recording audio, and in combination with 3D printing technology allow for fabrication of a durable device without need for an entire factory of expensive and specialized machining tools. It is hoped that by releasing this device as an open source set of printable files that can be downloaded and reproduced cheaply, others can make use of these developments where access to cost-prohibitive, specialized medical instruments are not available. Coupled with specialized smartphone software ("apps"), more sophisticated and automated diagnostics may also be possible on-site.

  15. Medical students can learn the basic application, analytic, evaluative, and psychomotor skills of critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, P L; Jacob, H; Thomas, E A; Harwell, M; Willenkin, R L; Pinsky, M R

    2000-02-01

    To determine whether fourth-year medical students can learn the basic analytic, evaluative, and psychomotor skills needed to initially manage a critically ill patient. Student learning was evaluated using a performance examination, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Students were randomly assigned to one of two clinical scenarios before the elective. After the elective, students completed the other scenario, using a crossover design. Five surgical intensive care units in a tertiary care university teaching hospital. Forty fourth-year medical students enrolled in the critical care medicine (CCM) elective. All students evaluated a live "simulated critically ill" patient, requested physiologic data from a nurse, ordered laboratory tests, received data in real time, and intervened as they deemed appropriate. Student performance of specific behavioral objectives was evaluated at five stations. They were expected to a) assess airway, breathing, and circulation in appropriate sequence; b) prepare a manikin for intubation, obtain an acceptable airway on the manikin, demonstrate bag-mouth ventilation, and perform acceptable laryngoscopy and intubation; c) provide appropriate mechanical ventilator settings; d) manage hypotension; and e) request and interpret pulmonary artery data and initiate appropriate therapy. OSCEs were videotaped and reviewed by two faculty members masked to time of examination. A checklist of key behaviors was used to evaluate performance. The primary outcome measure was the difference in examination score before and after the rotation. Secondary outcomes included the difference in scores at each rotation. The mean preelective score was 57.0%+/-8.3% compared with 85.9%+/-7.4% (ppsychomotor skills necessary to initially manage critically ill patients. After an appropriate 1-month CCM elective, students' thinking and application skills required to initially manage critically ill patients improved markedly, as demonstrated by an OSCE

  16. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital signals are being discovered in pre-Pleistocene sediments. Due to their hierarchical nature these cycle patterns are complex, and the imprecision of geochronology generally makes the assignment of stratigraphic cycles to specific orbital cycles uncertain, but in sequences such as the limnic Newark Group under study by Olsen and pelagic Cretaceous sequence worked on by our Italo-American group the relative frequencies yield a definitive match to the Milankovitch hierarchy. Due to the multiple ways in which climate impinges on depositional systems, the orbital signals are recorded in a multiplicity of parameters, and affect different sedimentary facies in different ways. In platform carbonates, for example, the chief effect is via sea-level variations (possibly tied to fluctuating ice volume), resulting in cycles of emergence and submergence. In limnic systems it finds its most dramatic expression in alternations of lake and playa conditions. Biogenic pelagic oozes such as chalks and the limestones derived from them display variations in the carbonate supplied by planktonic organisms such as coccolithophores and foraminifera, and also record variations in the aeration of bottom waters. Whereas early studies of stratigraphic cyclicity relied mainly on bedding variations visible in the field, present studies are supplementing these with instrumental scans of geochemical, paleontological, and geophysical parameters which yield quantitative curves amenable to time-series analysis; such analysis is, however, limited by problems of distorted time-scales. My own work has been largely concentrated on pelagic systems. In these, the sensitivity of pelagic organisms to climatic-oceanic changes, combined with the sensitivity of botton life to changes in oxygen availability (commonly much more restricted in the Past than now) has left cyclic patterns related to orbital forcing. These systems are further attractive because (1) they tend to offer depositional continuity

  17. Taking note of the perceived value and impact of medical student chart documentation on education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Erica; Sainte, Michelle; Fallar, Robert

    2010-09-01

    To determine the extent of restrictions to medical student documentation in patients' records and the opinions of medical education leaders about such restrictions' impact on medical student education and patient care. Education deans (n = 126) of medical schools in the United States and Canada were surveyed to determine policies regarding placement of medical student notes in the patient record, the value of medical students' documentation in the medical record, and the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) for patient notes. The instrument was a 23-item anonymous Web survey. Seventy-nine deans responded. Over 90% believed student notes belong in medical records, but only 42% had a policy regarding this. Ninety-three percent indicated that without student notes, student education would be negatively affected. Fewer (56%) indicated that patient care would be negatively affected. Most thought limiting students' notes would negatively affect several other issues: feeling a part of the team (96%), preparation for internship (95%), and students' sense of involvement (94%). Half (52%) reported that fourth-year students could place notes in paper charts at "all" affiliated hospitals, and 6% reported that fourth-year students could do so at "no" hospitals. Although students' ability to enter notes in patients' records is believed to be important for student education, only about half of all hospitals allow all students' notes in the EMR. Policies regarding placement of student notes should be implemented to ensure students' competency in note writing and their value as members of the patient care team.

  18. Adaptive and Defensive Strategies in Post-Traumatic Play of Young Children Exposed to Violent Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazan, Saralea; Cohen, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three children, aged four to eight years, who had been exposed to violent attacks, were videotaped in individual 40-minute play sessions. These play narratives were recorded by a student researcher trained in narrative analysis and play therapy. She then sorted these play vignettes into three patterns of post-traumatic play, defined in the…

  19. Looking at the Complexity of Two Young Children's Understanding of Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Jennifer S.; Pirie, Susan E. B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study that investigated two third-grade students' understanding of number. The children were videotaped while they worked to record everything they knew about the number, 72. Their artifacts and conversations were then analyzed using the Pirie-Kieren dynamical theory for the growth of mathematical understanding as…

  20. Videos as Literature in EFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, William A.

    Despite the lengthy English language training experienced by most Japanese students, their communicative use of English is not well developed. Videotape recordings of dramas (movies, television programs, and plays) offer a means and an interesting context for developing linguistic knowledge into usable language skills. A good movie provides a…

  1. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that sediment deposition in the North Sea and on the Norwegian Shelf varied significantly during the Cenozoic as a consequence of varying erosion rate mainly in Western Scandinavia, in Scotland and in the Alps. Recent results have demonstrated that a causal relationship exists...... of variations in erosion rates. Here we present the rationale behind the project, the data available and some preliminary results. The dense seismic and well coverage in the area makes it possible to estimate the rate of deposition of matrix mass. Assuming that sediment storage is not important, this provides...... models. The matrix mass deposition history will be compared with the paleoclimate record (e.g. oxygen isotope curves) to see if the previously observed correlation in the eastern North Sea can be extended to other ages and locations.  ...

  2. Collaborative Affordances of Medical Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Houben, Steven

    2017-01-01

    by Sellen and Harper (2003) on the affordances of physical paper. Sellen and Harper describe how the physical properties of paper affords easy reading, navigation, mark-up, and writing, but focuses, we argue, mainly on individual use of paper and digital technology. As an extension to this, Collaborative...... Affordances; being portable across patient wards and the entire hospital, by providing collocated access, by providing a shared overview of medical data, and by giving clinicians ways to maintain mutual awareness. We then discuss how the concept of Collaborative Affordances can be used in the design of new...... technology by providing a design study of a ‘Hybrid Patient Record’ (HyPR), which is designed to seamlessly blend and integrate paper-based with electronic patient records....

  3. Home recording for musicians for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Invaluable advice that will be music to your ears! Are you thinking of getting started in home recording? Do you want to know the latest home recording technologies? Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies will get you recording music at home in no time. It shows you how to set up a home studio, record and edit your music, master it, and even distribute your songs. With this guide, you?ll learn how to compare studio-in-a-box, computer-based, and stand-alone recording systems and choose what you need. You?ll gain the skills to manage your sound, take full advantage of MIDI, m

  4. 78 FR 43258 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8384] Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records... system of records, Human Resources Records, State- 31, pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of... State proposes that the current system will retain the name ``Human Resources Records'' (previously...

  5. Paying for College: Trends in Student Financial Aid at Independent Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Julianne Still; Toppe, Christopher M.

    Sources of funds for students at private colleges are assessed, along with major changes in student financial aid during 1979-1984, based on the Student Aid Recipient Data Bank of the National Institute of Independent Colleges and Universities. A random sample of actual student financial aid records was examined in order to show how aid is…

  6. Hidden Losses: How Demographics Can Encourage Incorrect Assumptions about ESL High School Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Kelleen; Derwing, Tracey M.

    2008-01-01

    Data from ESL students' records in Vancouver are examined in the light of the BC Ministry of Education's claim that ESL high school students are more successful than students whose first language is English. We argue that the academic achievement of well-to-do students whose parents are skilled workers or entrepreneurs may mask the completion…

  7. How Much Hope Is Enough? Levels of Hope and Students' Psychological and School Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Susana C.; Lopez, Shane J.; Fontaine, Anne Marie; Coimbra, Susana; Mitchell, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of students who report extremely high levels of hope. A sample of 682 students (ages 11-17) completed measures of hope, school engagement, life satisfaction, self-worth, and mental health. Academic achievement was obtained from students' school records. Based on their hope scores, students were divided…

  8. One year of ICTP diploma courses on-line using the automated EyA recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canessa, Enrique; Fonda, Carlo; Zennaro, Marco

    2009-03-01

    The 12-month pre-Ph.D ICTP Diploma Courses in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics, High Energy Physics, Mathematics, Earth System Physics and Basics Physics have been recorded using the automated, low cost recording system called EyA developed in-house. We discuss the technical details on how these recordings were implemented, together with some web usage statistics and students feedback. As yet, no similar endeavor has been made to put on-line a complete high-level Diploma Programme, due to the high costs involved when using alternative recording solutions. These recordings are freely available on the website www.ictp.tv. (author)

  9. Reliability of Alberta Infant Motor Scale Using Recorded Video Observations Among the Preterm Infants in India: A Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kirthika S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of motor function is a vital characteristic of infant development. Alberta Infant Motor scale (AIMS is considered to be one of the tool available for screening the developmental delays, but this scale was formulated by using western samples. Every country has its own ethnic and cultural background and various differences are observed in the culture and ethnicity. Therefore, there is a need to obtain reliability for the use of AIMS in south Indian population. Purpose: To find the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS on pre-term infants using the recorded video observations in Indian population. Method: 30 preterm infants in three age groups, 0-3 months (10 infants, 4-7 months (10 infants, 8-18 months (10 infants were recruited for this reliability study. The AIMS was administered to the preterm infants and the performance was videotaped. The performance was then rescored by the same therapist, immediately from the video and on another two consecutive months to estimate intra-rater reliability using ICC (3,1, two-way mixed effects model. For reporting inter-rater reliability, AIMS was scored by three different raters, using ICC (2,k two-way random effects model and by two other therapists to examine the inter and intra-rater reliability. Results: The two-way mixed effects model for intra-rater reliability of AIMS, ICC (3,1 = 0.99 and for reporting inter-rater reliability of AIMS by two-way random effects model, ICC (2,k = 0.96. Conclusion: AIMS has excellent intra and inter-rater reliability using recorded video observations among the preterm infants in India

  10. Student-Led Conferences: Students Taking Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauss, Sherri A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the many challenges that face middle grade students, parents, and teachers is the student's lack of ownership of their academic achievements. Student-led conferences are a unique way to engage the student and the parent in the academic progress. Parents and teachers discuss the student's attitude toward the work, the student's work ethic in…

  11. Technology and Career Preparation: Using Virtual Interview Recordings (VIRs) in an Apparel, Design, and Textiles (ADT) Professional Seminar Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eike, Rachel J.; Rowell, Amy; Mihuta, Tiffani

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify key virtual-recorded interview (VIR) skills that are essential to Apparel, Design, and Textile (ADT) student performance. The virtual, computer-recording interview platform, InterviewStream, was used as the data collection instrument in this qualitative, exploratory case study. Virtual interviews have been…

  12. Clinical audit teaching in record-keeping for dental undergraduates at International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jun A; Chew, Jamie K Y; Ravindranath, Sneha; Pau, Allan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of clinical audit training on record-keeping behavior of dental students and students' perceptions of the clinical audit training. The training was delivered to Year 4 and Year 5 undergraduates at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It included a practical audit exercise on patient records. The results were presented by the undergraduates, and guidelines were framed from the recommendations proposed. Following this, an audit of Year 4 and Year 5 students' patient records before and after the audit training was carried out. A total of 100 records were audited against a predetermined set of criteria by two examiners. An email survey of the students was also conducted to explore their views of the audit training. Results showed statistically significant improvements in record-keeping following audit training. Responses to the email survey were analyzed qualitatively. Respondents reported that the audit training helped them to identify deficiencies in their record-keeping practice, increased their knowledge in record-keeping, and improved their record-keeping skills. Improvements in clinical audit teaching were also proposed.

  13. NCDC Southeast Federal Records Center Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — East Point, Georgia is the former location of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Southeast regional Federal Records Center (FRC). The southeast...

  14. National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator is an online system that provides the name, office symbol, location, room, telephone number, and...

  15. An audit of anaesthetic record keeping

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    tive assessment and the intra-operative data is usually con- ... An audit of anaesthetic records was performed to determine the rate of completion and adequacy of such records. ... medicolegal practice, where the risks of legal action being.

  16. 30 CFR 75.339 - Seals records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... serve the purpose for which it is built. (3) Gas sampling records 75.336(e)(2) 1 year. (4) Record of... Services, or from the authorized representative of miners, mine operators shall promptly provide access to...

  17. The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... special conference on the cutting-edge topic of electronic health records (EHR) on May 20-21, 2009, on the ...

  18. World War II Weather Record Transmittances

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World War II Weather Record Transmittances are a record of the weather and meteorological data observed during World War II and transferred to the archive. It...

  19. DoD Records Management Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnason, C

    1997-01-01

    ... title 36, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter XII, 'National Archives and Records Administration,' Subchapter B, 'Records Management,' under the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (ASD(C3I...

  20. 32 CFR 806.10 - Records management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records management. 806.10 Section 806.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.10 Records management. Keep records that were fully released for...