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Sample records for videos efl students

  1. Effect of YouTube Videos and Pictures on EFL Students' Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styati, Erlik Widiyani

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at investigating the effect of YouTube videos and pictures as the authentic materials on Indonesian EFL students' writing performance. The experimental research is conducted by using quasi-experimental design. This research employed two groups: an experimental and control group. This is to see which group is effective to be used…

  2. Motivating EFL Students: E-Learning Enjoyment as a Predictor of Vocabulary Learning through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined e-learning enjoyment to see if it could predict high school students' vocabulary learning through a digital video game. Furthermore, the difference between those who played and those who watched the game was assessed. Participants of the study were male, high school, EFL students (N = 136, age 12-18) randomly assigned to…

  3. The Effect of Digital Video Games on EFL Students' Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the effect of a commercial digital video game on high school students' language learning motivation. Participants were 241 male students randomly assigned to one of the following three treatments: Readers, who intensively read the game's story; Players, who played the digital video game; and Watchers, who watched two classmates…

  4. Readers, Players, and Watchers: EFL Students' Vocabulary Acquisition through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated vocabulary acquisition through a commercial digital video game compared to a traditional pencil-and-paper treatment. Chosen through cluster sampling, 241 male high school students (age 12-18) participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to one of the following groups. The first group, called Readers,…

  5. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-01-01

    This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead...

  6. Humorous Videos and Idiom Achievement: Some Pedagogical Considerations for EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neissari, Malihe; Ashraf, Hamid; Ghorbani, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Employing a quasi-experimental design, this study examined the efficacy of humorous idiom video clips on the achievement of Iranian undergraduate students studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Forty humorous video clips from the English Idiom Series called "The Teacher" from the BBC website were used to teach 120 idioms to 61…

  7. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead of classic forms of instruction. The video game used served to approach EFL by means of language exploratory activities designed according to the context present in the video game and the course linguistic objectives. This study was conducted on the grounds that computer technology offers the possibility of enhancing EFL instruction by means of simulating and augmenting the target language context. The researcher’s belief is that video games offer a learning environment closely related to students’ experiences and preferences. Results from this study suggest that students were more entertained and attentive and demonstrated more engagement and disposition towards their English classes. Students also learned about matters related to the target language and culture, and were not only circumscribed to linguistic ones. Similarly, results from this study shed some light on the importance of offering access to technology to students before they advance to higher education that support video-gaming practices in the classroom.

  8. Humorous Videos and Idiom Achievement: Some Pedagogical Considerations for EFL Learners

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    Malihe Neissari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Employing a quasi-experimental design, this study examined the efficacy of humorous idiom video clips on the achievement of Iranian undergraduate students studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL. Forty humorous video clips from the English Idiom Series called “The Teacher” from the BBC website were used to teach 120 idioms to 61 undergraduate students at the University of Bojnord (UB. A 40-item idiom pretest was given to the experimental group (EG and the control group (CG while an independent-samples t-test was used to compare the means of these two groups based on posttest scores. A 15-item attitudinal questionnaire captured participants’ attitudes toward learning English idioms through video clips. The results indicate that there was a significant difference between the EG and CG mean scores: humorous video clips do facilitate EFL learners’ idioms achievement and learners exhibit a positive attitude toward their application in the classroom.

  9. An Automatic Caption Filtering and Partial Hiding Approach to Improving the English Listening Comprehension of EFL Students

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    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Fostering the listening comprehension of English as Foreign Language (EFL) learners has been recognized as an important and challenging issue. Videos have been used as one of the English listening learning resources; however, without effective learning supports, EFL students are likely to encounter difficulties in comprehending the video content,…

  10. Examining the Effectiveness of Digital Video Recordings on Oral Performance of EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktürk, Nazlinur

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the results of an action-based study conducted in an EFL class to examine whether digital video recordings would contribute to the enhancement of EFL learners' oral fluency skills. It also investigates the learners' perceptions of the use of digital video recordings in a speaking class. 10 Turkish EFL learners participated in…

  11. Cognitive Learning Styles of EFL Students

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    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to study cognitive learning styles of EFL students, compare language learning styles among students categorized by their background, and investigate the relationship between English background knowledge and language learning styles. The samples were 210 undergraduate students enrolled in Fundamental English course at Bangkok…

  12. The Effect of Video Games on Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Sedigheh; Rasti Behbahani, Amin

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effect of video games as a new tool for Iranian EFL (English as a foreign language) vocabulary learning. To conduct the study, 40 intermediate EFL learners, both male and female, were chosen through a TOEFL proficiency test. The participants were divided into two groups (10 males and 10 females in each): a control group and…

  13. Using Mobile Devices and the Adobe Connect Web Conferencing Tool in the Assessment of EFL Student Teacher Performance

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    Bolona Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Ortiz, Margarita Elizabeth; Allen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a project to use mobile devices and video conferencing technology in the assessment of student English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher performance on teaching practice in Ecuador. With the increasing availability of mobile devices with video recording facilities, it has become easier for trainers to capture teacher…

  14. Using Videos of Students in the Classroom to Enhance Learner Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachob, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Although the technology of digital videos is available, many classroom EFL teachers are unsure of what they can do with videos. This paper will present some reasons why teachers should consider using videos of student performance based on ideas of motivation and learner autonomy. Three activities are presented with checklists and protocols that…

  15. Reasons for College Students to Plagiarize in EFL Writing: Students' Motivation to Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Darwish, Salwa; Sadeqi, Abdul Azeez

    2016-01-01

    EFL students acquire their writing skill through practice and hard work. However, there seems to be a lot of reasons why EFL students should find the task of composing an essay so difficult that leads them to plagiarize. For that, the present paper tries to find out the real motivation for EFL students to plagiarize in writing. This research was…

  16. Citation Behaviors Observed in Japanese EFL Students' Argumentative Writing

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    Kamimura, Taeko

    2014-01-01

    Effective use of outside source texts is one of the key components of successful academic writing. This study aims at clarifying Japanese university EFL students' citation behaviors in producing argumentative writing. Twenty-six Japanese university EFL students wrote an argumentative essay. Their essays were analyzed quantitatively by six…

  17. Effect of Instructional vs. Authentic Video Materials on Introvert and Extrovert Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isazadeh, Parya; Makui, Selma Mohammad Zadeh; Ansarian, Loghman

    2016-01-01

    The study delved into the effect of instructional video materials vs. authentic video materials on vocabulary learning of extrovert and introvert Iranian EFL learners. To this end, Nelson proficiency test was administered to one hundred eighty (n = 180) language learners. Considering 1 standard deviation above and below the mean score, one hundred…

  18. Effect of Instructional vs. Authentic Video Materials on Introvert and Extrovert Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Isazadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The study delved into the effect of instructional video materials vs. authentic video materials on vocabulary learning of extrovert and introvert Iranian EFL learners. To this end, Nelson proficiency test was administered to one hundred eighty (n=180 language learners. Considering 1 standard deviation above and below the mean score, one hundred twenty three (n=123 language learners were selected for the study. These participants were distributed into 4 experimental groups (with 25 learners and a control group (with 23 learners. Researcher-made vocabulary pretest and posttest which were designed using the vocabularies from the movies were also administered to the participants. The findings of the study after three weeks of treatment revealed that both authentic video materials and instructional video materials can have positive effect on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL leaners. This effect, however, is not different among extrovert learners. It was also revealed that introvert EFL learners benefit more from authentic video materials. The findings of the study could be used by material developers or language teachers who may wish to use video materials in their classes. Keywords: Authentic video materials, Instructional video materials, Vocabulary learning, Introversion, Extroversion

  19. Effective methods of teaching biblical idioms to EFL students

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova, A.

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problems of teaching biblical idioms to EFL students. The necessity of using these phenomena in methodical aspect is conditioned by their linguistic and cultural characteristics.

  20. The Use of Video Feedback in Teaching Process-Approach EFL Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkul, Sertaç; Ortaçtepe, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the use of video feedback as an alternative to feedback with correction codes at an institution where the latter was commonly used for teaching process-approach English as a foreign language (EFL) writing. Over a 5-week period, the control and the experimental groups were provided with feedback based on…

  1. EFL Academic writing. What should Dutch business communication students learn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Frank van; Hendriks, B.C.; Planken, B.C.; Barasa, S.N.; Groot, E.B. de; Nederstigt, U.

    2016-01-01

    Many Dutch university students are expected to read and write academic research papers in English. In this article, we discuss a number of areas of EFL academic writing that are relevant for first-year Dutch business communication students. These students need to become familiar with quantitative

  2. Indonesian EFL Students' Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermilinda Abas, Imelda; Aziz, Noor Hashima Abd

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students' perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of…

  3. Is Peer Review Training Effective in Iranian EFL Students' Revision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Hadiseh; Abasi, Maasumeh; Soori, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of peer review training on the Iranian EFL students' subsequent revision in an advanced writing class in Larestan Islamic Azad University. After 12 weeks class demonstration, teacher-reviewer conferences with 20 male and female students, the students' first drafts, revisions, and reviewers' comments were…

  4. Wiki and Digital Video Use in Strategic Interaction-Based Experiential EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaan, Jonathan; Johnson, Neil H.; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kondo, Takako

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the use of a free and access-controlled wiki as the learning management system for a four-week teaching module designed to improve the oral communication skills of Japanese university EFL students. Students engaged in repeated experiential learning cycles of planning, doing, observing, and evaluating their performance of a role…

  5. The Effects of Portfolio Assessment on Writing of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezakatgoo, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the effect of portfolio assessment on final examination scores of EFL students' writing skill. To determine the impact of portfolio-based writing assessment 40 university students who enrolled in composition course were initially selected and divided randomly into two experimental and control…

  6. The Effects of Audiobooks on EFL Students' Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Galip; Simsek, Harun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of audiobooks on listening comprehension skills of EFL Students, and their attitudes towards using audiobooks in a foreign language classroom. The participants are 66 first-year students of a state university in Turkey. The research follows a pre- post-test control group research design using quantitative and…

  7. Impromptu Speech Gamification for ESL/EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardelli, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Any introductory undergraduate public-speaking course, in particular in ESL/EFL contexts. Objectives: This single-class activity is intended to (1) build students' ability to communicate orally "off the cuff;" (2) foster students' understanding of the major organizational formats used in organizing speeches; and (3) increase…

  8. Writing II for 2nd Year EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Writing is a very important skill that should be mastered properly by university students, especially pre-service language teachers (e.g. EFL student teachers). In order to present their ideas efficiently in the context of their academic study, they have to be trained well on how to write meaningful pieces (e.g. essays, academic reports,…

  9. Scaffolding EFL Students' Writing through the Writing Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Avan Kamal Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This research reports a study conducted at Koya University/English Language Department, and it aims at presenting the effect of scaffolding on EFL students' writing ability through the writing process. In this study, the students have taken the role of writers, so they need to follow the same steps that writers apply during their writing process.…

  10. An Analysis of Comprehension Performance of Sudanese EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mahgoub Dafalla

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the Sudanese EFL students' comprehension performance and measures the differences in their performance according to gender. After one semester of participation in extensive reading, 300 secondary school students from 15 schools in the state of Khartoum are randomly selected for the study. A comprehension test followed by a…

  11. Using a Facebook Closed Group to Improve EFL Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodliyah, Rojab Siti

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how social media, in this case Facebook, can be incorporated in ELT through e-dialogue journal writing shared in a Facebook closed group. Fifteen EFL students participated in this case study. They were second, third, and fourth year students of English Education Department of a university in Bandung, who voluntarily joined…

  12. The Relationship between EFL Students' Emotional Intelligence and Writing Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, KaiQi; Yu, WeiHua; Ji, ZhongMin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was threefold: (1) to further examine the possibility of using literature-based activities to raise EFL students' emotional intelligence (hereafter EI) and (2) to see whether there is any relationship between students' EI and writing achievement, in addition (3) to shed light on the implementation of such activities into the…

  13. Managing Student Participation: Teacher Strategies in a Virtual EFL Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Airong

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to explore teacher strategies for managing student participation in a complex Multi-user Virtual Environment. Data include transcribed recordings from a task-based EFL course in Second Life. Conversational Analysis is adopted to analyze the teacher's verbal language output in the transcript, and a student questionnaire is used to…

  14. CONGRATULATION STRATEGIES OF JORDANIAN EFL POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

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    Yasser Al-Shboul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates congratulation strategies used by Jordanian EFL postgraduate students. It also investigates the types of positive politeness strategies in the congratulation speech act. Data were collected using an adopted version of discourse completion test (DCT by Dastjerdi and Nasri (2013. Data were encoded and analyzed based on the taxonomy of congratulation strategy proposed by Elwood (2004. Furthermore, data were analyzed based on a modified version of positive politeness strategies proposed by Brown and Levinson (1987. Findings revealed that the most frequently used strategies of congratulation were illocutionary force indicating devise (IFID, offer of good wishes, and expression of happiness. Regarding the positive politeness strategies, findings revealed that the most frequently used strategies by the participants were giving gift to listener, exaggeration, and ingroup identity marker. The study concludes with a discussion of important directions for future research such as including more participants with different social background. The results are expected to be useful information in cross-cultural comparison studies and other related areas.

  15. Video Recording as a Stimulus for Reflection in Pre-Service EFL Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    More than three decades ago, when the author was a student teacher in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, her evaluations came from either a mentor or a university supervisor. Feedback about her teaching was filtered through the lens of their perceptions and experiences, leaving little space for her own reflection. While this type of…

  16. Metacognitive Listening Strategies Used by Saudi EFL Medical Students

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    Alhaison, Eid

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the metacognitive listening strategies among Saudi EFL medical students. The participants were 104 males and females, randomly selected to fill in the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ), developed and validated Vandergrift Goh, Mareschal, and Tafaghodtari (2006). The results revealed that…

  17. Female Arab EFL Students Learning Autonomously beyond the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocatepe, Mehtap

    2017-01-01

    Benson's (2011a; 2011b) identification of out-of-class learning as constituted by contexts, resources, levels of formality and more and less intentional pedagogic outcomes was used as a framework to investigate a group of tertiary level female Emirati EFL students' autonomous out-of-class learning experiences. Data collected via a survey, learner…

  18. Raising EFL Students' Awareness of English Intonation Functioning

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    Mitrofanova, Yelena

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the importance of EFL (English as a foreign language) students' awareness of English extended pitch sequences realised within complex utterances and text sub-topics. Considering these higher levels of intonation functioning alongside with the tone group turned out to be crucial for adequate intonation production by Russian…

  19. The acquisition of English ergative verbs by Turkish EFL students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullayeva, Ophelia

    1993-01-01

    Ankara : Faculty of Humanities and Letters and Institute of Economics and Social Sciences, Bilkent Univ., 1993. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1993. Includes bibliographical refences. The purpose of the study was to investigate the acquisition of English ergative verbs by Turkish EFL students. In contrast with transitive and intransitive verbs, these verbs can form both grammatically correct passive and intransitive ergative constructions. Generative grammar pre...

  20. Students' Attitudes toward Extensive Reading in the Japanese EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies state the benefits of extensive reading (ER) for language learning, this practice is not common in language classrooms. Because few studies have investigated the status of ER in second language classrooms, this study looks at past and current ER practice among Japanese students of English as a foreign language (EFL) and their…

  1. Social Network Sites Effectiveness from EFL Students' Viewpoints

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    Alnujaidi, Sulaiman

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between EFL students' experience, attitudes, perceptions, and expectations toward the effectiveness of Social Network Sites (SNS), namely, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Flickr, Classmates, Academica, MySpace, English baby, and Google+, in English language learning. A survey of 103 participants from…

  2. Perceptions of EFL College Students toward Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingling

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand the perceptions of EFL college students toward collaborative learning (CL). This qualitative research design used narrative approach since the study emphasized on each participant's learning experiences with CL strategy. The data collection instruments for this research were consisted by interview…

  3. Film Circles: Scaffolding Speaking for EFL Students

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    Stephens, Crissa

    2012-01-01

    Pre-service teachers around the world face a unique challenge: bridging the gap between traditional teaching focused on grammar translation and receptive skills, and communicative teaching aimed at well-rounded communication skills. Many new EFL teachers learned English in a traditional context that emphasized memorization and grammar, but after…

  4. EFL College Students' Attitudes towards Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Fatimah A.; Aldashti, Abdulmohsen A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, cell phones have received much attention in the context of EFL/ESL learning. Mobile learning, in general, and distant learning, in particular, in educational contexts has been approached by educationalist all over the world (Hwang & Chang, 2011). Presently, countries pay ample attention to mobile learning in education. Despite the…

  5. The Importance of Incorporating Student Presentations in EFL Listening Courses

    OpenAIRE

    河内, 智子

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the significance of incorporating “mini-presentations” in EFL(English as a Foreign Language) listening courses. Public speaking seems to be a skill on which Japanese students have generally received little training, possibly due to the lack of emphasis on the ability in the current Japanese school curriculum. However, developing Japanese students’ adeptness to express one’s ideas publicly in English is becoming increasingly important not only for students to survive...

  6. A STUDY ON THE READING SKILLS OF EFL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

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    Flora Debora Floris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The present study attempts to investigate kinds of reading skills that EFL (English as a Foreign Language University students have difficulty with. For this purpose, two reading tests which covered seventeen kinds of reading skills were developed and administered to ten students of batch 2003 studying at an English Department of a private university in Surabaya, Indonesia. The analysis showed that each reading skill had different level of difficulty for the respondents..

  7. Perceptions of efl instructors and turkish efl students as prospective teachers about learner autonomy and the comparison of their perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Sofracı, Gülsün

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of EFL instructors and Turkish EFL students as prospective teachers about learner autonomy. The study also aimed to find answers to the question whether the instructors’ perceptions differed from the ones of prospective English teachers’ by comparing and contrasting the results of the questionnaires. In order to reach those aims, first of all a questionnaire study was designed and administered to a total of 123 participating instru...

  8. A Survey of the English Reading Habits of EFL Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftanti, Erna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read…

  9. A Study of Students' Attitude toward Teachers' Affective Factors in EFL Classrooms

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    Ranjbar, Nahid Amini; Narafshan, Mehry Haddad

    2016-01-01

    In any teaching-learning situation, teacher plays a significant role in the classroom. This study aimed at investigating the students' attitude toward teachers' affective factors in EFL classrooms. In this study, the students' population was 300 pre-intermediate (based on the institutes' placement test) female EFL students (10 to 25 years old) in…

  10. The Effectiveness of Adopting E-Readers to Facilitate EFL Students' Process-Based Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    English as Foreign Language (EFL) students face additional difficulties for academic writing largely due to their level of language competency. An appropriate structural process of writing can help students develop their academic writing skills. This study explored the use of the e-readers to facilitate EFL students' process-based academic…

  11. The Effect of Video-Based Tasks in Listening Comprehension of Iranian Pre-Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Abdullah; Behtash, Esmail Zare; Nezhad Arani, Saieed Moslemi

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at finding the effect of video-based tasks in improving the listening comprehension ability of Iranian pre-intermediate EFL (English Foreign Language) learners. After determining the level of learners, an experimental and control group, each of 20 participants, were nominated to contribute to the study. From the time the pre-test…

  12. Video Chat vs. Face-to-Face Recasts, Learners' Interpretations and L2 Development: A Case of Persian EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassaei, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two modes of corrective feedback, namely, face-to-face recasts and computer-mediated recasts during video-conferencing on Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' second language (L2) development. Moreover, the accuracy of the learners' interpretations of recasts in the two modalities was…

  13. The Effect of Online Dictionaries Usage on EFL Undergraduate Students' Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananuraksakul, Noparat

    2015-01-01

    Due to EFL undergraduate students' ineffective learning strategies, which mirror lack of autonomy, this paper is a pilot study into how use of Cambridge Dictionaries Online can affect undergraduate students' autonomy or self-reliance in a Thai EFL context. The link was selectively integrated in a writing classroom as a tool to improve their…

  14. The Flipped Classroom Model to Develop Egyptian EFL Students' Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Samah Zakareya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of the flipped classroom model on Egyptian EFL students' listening comprehension. A one-group pre-posttest design was adopted. Thirty-four 3rd-year EFL students at the Faculty of Education, Suez University, were pretested on listening comprehension before the experiment and then posttested after…

  15. Application of Gender Difference and Topic Preference to Promote Students' Motivation for Online EFL Learning

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    Chen, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to apply the analysis of gender difference and topic preference to enhance and motivate online EFL learning shown by Taiwanese students enrolled in Freshman English Aural Training courses for English majors in a university in central Taiwan. Online learning for EFL students has been a worldwide trend. Hundreds of…

  16. Innovative Resources Based on ICTs and Authentic Materials to Improve EFL Students' Communicative Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Otero, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Our global society and our current communication needs have put a strain on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching, since common resources such as textbooks may fail to adapt to the needs and interests of our students. The present action research study aims at identifying EFL students' communicative needs and developing their oral skills…

  17. Languaging and Writing Skill: The Effect of Collaborative Writing on EFL Students' Writing Performance

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    Khatib, Mohammad; Meihami, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of using collaborative techniques and activities on EFL students' writing performance. A total of 35 low-intermediate EFL students ranging from 15 to 18 years-of-age participated in this investigation. These participants were assigned into two groups: An experimental group (N = 17) in which…

  18. Attitudes of Jordanian Students towards Using Group Work in EFL Classrooms

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    Ababneh, Sana'

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses itself to the outcomes of a field study which was carried out to identify Jordanian EFL students' attitudes towards using group work in EFL classrooms. The study sample consisted of 179 students enrolled in English 101, an elementary language skills course taught at Al- Huson University College, Al -Balqa' Applied University,…

  19. EXPLORING THE TERTIARY EFL STUDENTS' ACADEMIC WRITING COMPETENCIES

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    Aunurrahman Aunurrahman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For tertiary English as a Foreign Language (EFL students, academic writing is not an easy task. It requires knowledge of the academic writing genres with their particular linguistic features. Moreover, academic writing demands good critical thinking. This research aims to explore the students' academic writing competencies that also focus on critical thinking. The research involved thirty-six first-year tertiary EFL students from a regular class of a private university in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The source for data collection was the students’ texts. Three texts were selected and the students were categorized into low, medium, and high levels of writing achievement. The text analysis utilized functional grammar rooted in systemic functional linguistics (Emilia, 2014. The analysis shows that the students, regardless of their levels of writing achievement, have little control over the schematic structure and linguistic features of an argumentative writing. The text analysis also shows that the students’ texts have some limitations as regards their critical thinking capacity. Still, a few examples of academic language were detected in the texts. The findings suggest that the lecturer should incorporate explicit teaching and cooperative learning activities to alleviate the students' difficulties and develop their academic writing and critical thinking capacity.

  20. Study on Writing Anxiety among Iranian EFL Students

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    Naghmeh Jebreil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed at investigating the level of writing anxiety of the Iranian EFL students with different proficiency levels. To do so, 45 students (elementary, intermediate, and advanced learners studying in Azad University of Ilam, Iran were selected based on random sampling. Second, Language Writing Anxiety Inventory SLWAI (Cheng, 2004 was used to measure anxiety.  Both descriptive and inferential statistics including One-way ANOVA were run to analyze the data. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS. The results of the study indicated that the selected Iranian EFL students majoring in English language teaching experienced a high level of anxiety. In addition, students with elementary level were found to suffer higher level of English writing anxiety than the students with intermediate and advanced levels. Finally, based on the findings, cognitive anxiety was the most common type of anxiety, followed by somatic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. The results also highlighted the fact that foreign and second language teachers should be cautious of the dangers of  anxiety  and try  to  make  the  atmosphere  of  class  as  stress-free  as possible  in  order  to  improve  students’ performance.

  1. Preparing EFL Student Teachers with New Technologies in the Korean Context

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    Jeong, Kyeong-Ouk

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates a Korean English as a foreign language (EFL) student teacher education programme which is intended to develop prospective teachers' digital literacy and to help them understand innovative pedagogy of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) in Korean EFL context. This paper presents ideas of effective curriculum…

  2. High School Students' Attitudes and Experiences in EFL Classrooms Equipped with Interactive Whiteboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Turgay; Okatan, Semih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ninth grade EFL students' experiences and attitudes towards classrooms equipped with interactive whiteboards (IWB). The data were collected with a questionnaire about attitudes towards IWB use in EFL classes, and observations from three different classrooms in three different high schools. The study…

  3. Teacher Electronic Portfolio and Its Relation to EFL Student Teacher Performance and Attitude

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    Alshawi, Areej T.; Alshumaimeri, Yousif A.

    2017-01-01

    E-portfolio is a promising approach to develop teachers into reflective practitioners who show that they can adapt to new technologies, new criteria, and new environments. The current research explored the quality of EFL student teachers' e-portfolios and their attitudes towards using them. The research was conducted on 30 EFL female student…

  4. Language Learning Autonomy among Jordanian EFL University Students

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    Misarah Zreagat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Autonomy in language learning has gained prominence due to the preference for learner-centred styles. An implementation of autonomy in learning should be preceded by an investigation of learners’ readiness for autonomous learning, taking into account the cultural differences of different communities. This article reports findings about the perceived learning autonomy among EFL university students in Yarmouk University in Jordan. 154 students taking English proficiency based courses and five lecturers teaching these courses took part in the research. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to conduct the research. A 43-item questionnaire adapted from Chan, Spratt & Humphreys (2002 was used to collect the quantitative data while semi-structured interviews were conducted with the students and their lecturers. The findings revealed that teaching of English is still highly teacher-centred in Jordanian university classrooms. In relation to the autonomy construct, the results show that although Jordanian EFL university students feel that they are, somehow responsible for autonomous learning, they do not possess the ability to act autonomously nor do they embark on engaging in any autonomous activities. The implications of this study suggest that policy makers in Jordan need to pay more attention to the process of teaching English in Jordanian universities.

  5. Language Learning Strategies of EFL College Students

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    Dewi Furwana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were (1 to investigate the most dominant language learning strategies (LLS used by sixth semester students of English Department of Tarbiyah Faculty at UIN Alauddin Makassar and (2 to find out the differences of using LLS between high achieving students and low achieving students. The result of the quantitative data through questionnaire showed that (1 metacognitive strategies was the most dominant LLS used, and (2 the high achieving students used metacognitive strategies with the highest preference and low achieving students used compensation strategies with the highest preference. The result of the qualitative data through think aloud showed that (1 the most dominant LLS employed by students were listening music, utilizing time for practicing and self-evaluating, (2 the most dominant LLS used by high achieving students were utilizing time for practicing, practicing English together and self-evaluating, whereas the most dominant LLS used by low achieving students were listening music, asking friend and selecting topic. The data were collected through documentation used to classify high achieving students and low achieving students based on their grade point average. It is concluded that the most dominant language learning strategies employed by students was metacognitive strategies. High achieving students employed different strategy than low achieving students. High achieving students used learning strategies more frequently than low achieving students.

  6. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

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    Erna Iftanti

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading ha...

  7. The Impact of Silent and Freeze-Frame Viewing Techniques of Video Materials on the Intermediate EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension

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    Sara Shahani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern technologies has been widely prevalent among language learners, and video, in particular, as a valuable learning tool provides learners with comprehensible input. The present study investigated the effect of silent and freeze-frame viewing techniques of video materials on the intermediate English as a foreign language (EFL learners’ listening comprehension. To this end, 45 intermediate EFL learners participated in this quasi-experimental study. The results of one-way ANOVA revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the experimental groups (using two types of viewing techniques and the control group. While the difference between the two experimental groups was not statistically significant, the experimental groups outperformed the control group significantly.

  8. The Impact of Videos Presenting Speakers’ Gestures and Facial Clues on Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension

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    Somayeh Karbalaie Safarali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research sought to explore the effectiveness of using videos presenting speakers’ gestures and facial clues on Iranian EFL learners’ listening comprehension proficiency. It was carried out at Ayandeh English Institute among 60 advanced female learners with the age range of 17-30 through a quasi-experimental research design. The researcher administered a TOEFL test to determine the homogeneity of the participants regarding both their general English language proficiency level and listening comprehension ability. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups. After coming up with the conclusion that the two groups were homogeneous,  during 10 sessions of treatment, they received two different listening comprehension techniques, i.e. audio-visual group watching the video was equipped with the speaker’s gestures and facial clues, while the audio-only group could just listen to speaker’s voice and no additional clue was presented. Meanwhile, the participants were supposed to answer the questions related to each video. At the end of the treatment, both groups participated in the listening comprehension test of the Longman TOEFL test as the post-test. A t-test was used to compare the mean scores of the two groups, the result of which showed that the learners’ mean score in the audio-visual group was significantly higher than the learners’ mean score in the audio-only group. In conclusion, the result of this study suggests that foreign language pedagogy, especially for adult English learners, would benefit from applying videos presenting speakers’ gestures and facial clues.

  9. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

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    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  10. TEACHERS QUESTIONING STRATEGIES TO ELICIT STUDENTS VERBAL RESPONSES IN EFL CLASSES AT A SECONDARY SCHOOL

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    Sri Wuli Fitriati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study aimed at exploring and examining English language teachers skills in questioning to enhance students verbal repsonses in EFL (English as a Foreign language classes. This was a qualitative case study, employing discourse analysis, conducted in one junior high school in a town in Central Java Province, Indonesia. The research participants were two Indonesian teachers of English language. They taught Year Eight students in the academic year of 2015/2016. The data were collected from audio-video recordings, transcripts of the lessons, classroom observations notes, and teachers interviews. The transcriptions were analysed by using Wus taxonomy of questioning strategies (1993 as it gave a detailed categorization of teachers questions to stimulate students verbal responses. The findings showed that the teachers used mostly four questioning strategies. The first teacher often applied decomposition strategy where the initial question was elaborated into some questions, while the second teacher tended to use repetition strategy. This study has shown that teachers questioning skills is crucial to successfully make students engaged in the classroom interaction, enhance students verbal responses, and lead to the comprehension of the lesson. Therefore, it is suggested that teachers should be more aware of their questioning skills to assist students achieve better proficiency in the English language.

  11. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

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    Galvis, Héctor Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context…

  12. Teacher Electronic Portfolio and its Relation to EFL Student Teacher Performance and Attitude

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    Areej T Alshawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available E-portfolio is a promising approach to develop teachers into reflective practitioners who show that they can adapt to new technologies, new criteria, and new environments. The current research explored the quality of EFL student teachers’ e-portfolios and their attitudes towards using them. The research was conducted on 30 EFL female student teachers at Princess Noura bint Abdulrahman University, Saudi Arabia. The participants were engaging in practical training at schools and reflecting their skills and experiences in their e-portfolios. This research posed further questions about the relationships between the quality of EFL student teachers’ e-portfolios, their attitudes towards using them and their teaching performance. In order to explore the possible answers, the participants’ teaching performance were observed, their e-portfolios were evaluated by a rubric, and a 24-item questionnaire was administered to them. The results proved high proficiency level of the EFL student teachers’ e-portfolios and positive attitudes towards using e-portfolios among EFL student teachers. Furthermore, the results denoted a statistically significant positive relationship between the quality of EFL student teachers’ e-portfolio and their teaching performance. The results of this study may encourage policy makers to integrate the idea of e-portfolio and reflection as an effective component in teacher education and development.

  13. Laying the Foundations for Video-Game Based Language Instruction for the Teaching of EFL

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    Héctor Alejandro Galvis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces video-game based language instruction as a teaching approach catering to the different socio-economic and learning needs of English as a Foreign Language students. First, this paper reviews statistical data revealing the low participation of Colombian students in English as a second language programs abroad (U.S. context especially. This paper also provides solid reasons why the use of video games in education and foreign language education is justified. Additionally, this paper reviews second language acquisition theoretical foundations that provide the rationale for adapting video-game based language instruction in light of important second language acquisition constructs such as culture and identity, among others. Finally, this document provides options for further research to construct and test the efficacy of video-game based language instruction while simultaneously leaving it open for collaborative contributions.

  14. The Attitudes of Students from ESL and EFL Countries to English

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    Muhamad Hasbi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the attitudes of English students from English as a Second Language (ESL and English as a Foreign Language (EFL country in English and Foreign Languages University (EFL University, Hyderabad to English. This is a descriptive-quantitative research with a survey method. The attitudes researched include those to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The data was taken through questionnaire consisting of 20 questions. The findings of this study showed that the English students in EFL University have neutral-to-positive attitudes to Listening, positive attitudes to Speaking, positive attitudes to Reading, and poor attitudes to Writing. In addition, the English students from ESL country have better attitudes to Reading (positive and Writing (neutral and those from EFL country have better attitudes to Speaking (neutral-to-positive and Listening (neutral-to-positive.

  15. The Attitudes of Students From ESL And EFL Countries To English

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    Muhammad Hasbi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the attitudes of English students from English as a Second Language (ESL and English as a Foreign Language (EFL country in English and Foreign Languages University (EFL University, Hyderabad to English. This is a descriptive-quantitative research with a survey method. The attitudes researched include those to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The data was taken through questionnaire consisting of 20 questions. The findings of this study showed that the English students in EFL University have neutral-to-positive attitudes to Listening, positive attitudes to Speaking, positive attitudes to Reading, and poor attitudes to Writing. In addition, the English students from ESL country have better attitudes to Reading (positive and Writing (neutral and those from EFL country have better attitudes to Speaking (neutral-to-positive and Listening (neutral-to-positive.

  16. Writing and Related Problems for EFL Students

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    Hassan Edalat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available ESL students who write in English may present written material in a rhetorical and organizational mode that reflects the pattern which is valued in their native culture and rhetoric. Considering the violation of English code of writing in the writings of Iranian students, we will notice one common characteristic: They are reluctant (or ignorant of to write a unified paragraph. Their writing consists of one whole page or two. They do not divide their writing into separate paragraphs. The knowledge of the writer on any subject begins and ends as much as the time or space for writing allows with no paragraph separation. The length of sentences is extraordinary, and the position of modifiers does not seem natural according to the code of English sentence pattern. This means that elements transferred from L1 rhetoric result in a production which does not match the English language style and rhetoric, despite the fact that some students lack grammatical competence. As a result, this type of writing is labeled unacceptable, vague or erroneous by English language standards. The focus of this study is to use English major students' writings to identify the elements which violate English language pattern of writing. The sources of errors responsible for non-English language rhetoric will be classified after a short theoretical review in the literature and finally suggestions for the elimination of errors will be presented.

  17. The Development of an Instructional Design Model on Facebook Based Collaborative Learning to Enhance EFL Students' Writing Skills

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    Linh, Nguyen Duy; Suppasetseree, Suksan

    2016-01-01

    Writing is one of the essential skills that EFL students, specifically in Thailand, need to achieve while their learning English during tertiary education. However, Thai EFL students have few chances to practice writing skills while learning. This study was conducted to develop an instructional design model for assisting students in learning…

  18. Enhancing EFL Learners’ Speaking Skill Through Effective Communicative Activities and Strategies The Case of First Year EFL students

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    Kaddour, Khaoula Imane

    2016-01-01

    Speaking English is doubtless essential nowadays since it is globally recognized language in almost all fields. Thus, if we want EFL learners to be fluent and good at speaking we first should encourage them to practice with an eye towards improvement. Second, we must elevate the student's awarness and introduce them to the great importance that speaking skill has in developing their language. The purpose of this work was, then, to explore the effectiveness of using speaking communicative acti...

  19. Attitudes of Jordanian Students Towards Using Group Work in EFL Classrooms

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    Sana' Ababneh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses itself to the outcomes of a field study which was carried out to identify Jordanian EFL students' attitudes towards using group work in EFL classrooms. The study sample consisted of 179 students enrolled in English 101, an elementary language skills course taught at Al- Huson University College, Al -Balqa' Applied University, Jordan. A questionnaire was used to investigate the subjects' attitudes. The findings show that approximately two-thirds of the participants are either very extrovert or somewhat extrovert, i.e. they have positive attitudes towards participating in group work in EFL classes. In contrast, only a third are either somewhat introvert or very introvert, i.e., they do not like to take part in group work in EFL classes. Moreover, the data show that neither the subjects' gender nor their secondary school stream (vocational, scientific, or literary has any significant effect on their preferences.

  20. The Student-Bloggers’ Voices on the Contribution of EFL Writing Through Blogging

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    Silvana Devinta Sari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Blogging is an effective way to help students write better as it positively enhances the students’ EFL writing skills. The following study is an attempt to evaluate student-bloggers’ opinions on blogging activity as it gives valuable contributions to student’s EFL writing skill. The research aimed at investigating student-bloggers’ attitudes towards the application of class blog in an informal learning situation. A descriptive case study was conducted to get more information on blogging contributions to student-bloggers’ EFL writing both for the process and the product of writing. The subjects were the student-bloggers of a language course whose blogging activity was intense. The data gathering was employed by probing interview and observation. Additionally, the thorough and meticulous analysis on the product of the writing was performed and scored using a rubric. Findings gathered from the interview depict the benefits and positive contributions of blogging to student-bloggers’ EFL writing. Blogging was certainly seen as a fun writing activity by the student-bloggers. It resulted from the fact that contrary to school learning, while blogging the students experienced autonomous learning, getting direct feedback from readers, and most importantly a complete freedom in writing. Some of blogging contributions for EFL writing are multi-literacy, direct feedback from readers, motivation, autonomous learning, critical thinking and language awareness, networking, freedom to write, and self confidence.

  1. Movie Effects on EFL Learners at Iraqi School in Kuala Lumpur

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    Yaseen, Bilal Huri; Shakir, Hani

    2015-01-01

    Previously, one of the vital tasks of English learning is to find new methods and resources to make the EFL students more stimulating and productive. Recently, the usage of movies (in DVD format) in courses became popular or supplementary resources to learn English among EFL learners. Many researchers stated that authentic video is an advantage…

  2. Students Age at which EFL is Introduced in Schools and Educational Outcomes

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    Chuzaimah Dahlan Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To see the relationship between the age at which EFL is introduced in some Indonesian public schools and student outcomes a survey involving 229 students both from elementary and junior high schools in Palembang is conducted. These students are given the test comprising vocabulary, reading comprehension, and grammar. It is hypothesized that those who start learning English earlier have better achievement. Factors such as school and home environments are also considered in the analysis. Stepwise regression analysis is applied to identify which variable contributes to students outcomes. The results show that there is no correlation between age alone and the students EFL achievement. However, significant influence is found when teacher education level and teacher ELT experience are added to the prediction model predicting EFL achievement from age.

  3. The Impact of Teacher Corrective Feedback on EFL Student Writers' Grammatical Improvement

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    Sermsook, Kanyakorn; Liamnimitr, Jiraporn; Pochakorn, Rattaneekorn

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to provide information about teacher corrective feedback that would be helpful for EFL students' writing improvement. It focuses on feedback provided to correct grammatical errors made by student writers as the author finds that this type of errors can obstruct the effectiveness of students' pieces of writing and may result in…

  4. Effects of Using Mobile Devices on English Listening Diversity and Speaking for EFL Elementary Students

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    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min; Shadiev, Rustam; Wu, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study designed learning activities supported by a mobile learning system for students to develop listening and speaking skills in English as a foreign language (EFL). How students perceive learning activities and a mobile learning system were examined in this study. Additionally, how different practices relate to students' language…

  5. The Impact of Reading for Pleasure on Georgian University EFL Students' Reading Comprehension (IBSU Case)

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    Goctu, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Reading is one of the most significant skills, particularly for EFL students. Many students today do not have the reading skills needed to do effective work in their courses. This paper explores reading for pleasure, its importance and impact on reading comprehension. Pleasure reading helps students to communicate, listen and, most importantly, to…

  6. Student Satisfaction with EFL Speaking Classes: Relating Speaking Self-Efficacy and Skills Achievement

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    Asakereh, Ahmad; Dehghannezhad, Maliheh

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between student satisfaction with speaking classes, speaking skills self-efficacy beliefs, and speaking skills achievement. To this end, one hundred Iranian EFL undergraduate students filled out two questionnaires; a research-made and pilot-tested questionnaire for student satisfaction with speaking…

  7. A Model of Reading Teaching for University EFL Students: Need Analysis and Model Design

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    Hamra, Arifuddin; Syatriana, Eny

    2012-01-01

    This study designed a model of teaching reading for university EFL students based on the English curriculum at the Faculty of Languages and Literature and the concept of the team-based learning in order to improve the reading comprehension of the students. What kind of teaching model can help students to improve their reading comprehension? The…

  8. Strategies Used by Jordanian EFL University Graduate Students in Translating Idioms into Arabic

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    Smadi, Oqlah; Alrishan, Amal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the strategies utilized by Jordanian EFL University graduate students in translating idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at the University of Jordan and Yarmouk University who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students was 90 who participated in a…

  9. Difficulties EFL Jordanian University Students Encounter in Translating English Idioms into Arabic

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    Alrishan, Amal; Smadi, Oqlah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the difficulties that Jordanian EFL University students encounter in translating English idioms into Arabic. The participants of the study were all M.A translation students at Yarmouk University and the University of Jordan who were selected purposefully. The total number of the students who participated in the…

  10. EFL Teachers' Perception of University Students' Motivation and ESP Learning Achievement

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    Dja'far, Veri Hardinansyah; Cahyono, Bambang Yudi; Bashtomi, Yazid

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed at examining Indonesian EFL Teachers' perception of students' motivation and English for Specific Purposes (ESP) learning achievement. It also explored the strategies applied by teachers based on their perception of students' motivation and ESP learning achievement. This research involved 204 students who took English for…

  11. Self-, Peer-, and Teacher-Assessment: An Investigation into Iranian EFL Students' Attitudes

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    Abolfazli Khonbi, Zainab; Sadeghi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Student-directed teaching and assessment techniques are gradually dominating educational systems almost all over the world. This study investigated a cohort of male and female Iranian EFL students' attitudes toward self-, peer-, and teacher-assessment experiences. Sixty three students at Urmia University and Tabriz Islamic Azad University, in the…

  12. Lexical Diversity and the Use of Academic and Lower Frequency Words in the Academic Writing of EFL Students

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    Akbari, Neda

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on lexical diversity and the use of academic and lower frequency words in essays written by EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students enrolled in Years 1 and 2 at the undergraduate university level. The purpose of this study is to find out the extent to which EFL students become more proficient in their use of academic and…

  13. The Effect of Using the Story-Mapping Technique on Developing Tenth Grade Students' Short Story Writing Skills in EFL

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    Ibnian, Salem Saleh Khalaf

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effect of using the story-mapping technique on developing tenth grade students' short story writing skills in EFL. The study attempted to answer the following questions: (1) What are the short story writing skills needed for tenth grade students in EFL?; and (2) What is the effect of the using the…

  14. A Learning Style-Based Grouping Collaborative Learning Approach to Improve EFL Students' Performance in English Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Huang, Chi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Learning English is an important and challenging task for English as Foreign Language (EFL) students. Educators had indicated that, without proper learning support, most EFL students might feel frustrated while learning English, which could significantly affect their learning performance. In the past research, learning usually utilized grouping,…

  15. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

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    Erna Iftanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading habits as suggested by their eagerness to regularly spend time reading various types of English texts and their high motivation to read English for pleasure. The EFL students read English for some purposes, i.e. for school assignments, for pleasure, and for knowledge and English skills improvement. Their positive belief about reading does not motivate them to read English for pleasure; rather, it is school assignments that appear to be their biggest motivation.

  16. An Analysis of Errors in Written English Sentences: A Case Study of Thai EFL Students

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    Sermsook, Kanyakorn; Liamnimit, Jiraporn; Pochakorn, Rattaneekorn

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to examine the language errors in a writing of English major students in a Thai university and to explore the sources of the errors. This study focused mainly on sentences because the researcher found that errors in Thai EFL students' sentence construction may lead to miscommunication. 104 pieces of writing…

  17. A Correlation Study between EFL Strategic Listening and Listening Comprehension Skills among Secondary School Students

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    Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the correlation between EFL students strategic listening and their listening comprehension skills. Eighty secondary school students participated in this study. Participants' strategic listening was measured by a Strategic Listening Interview (SLI), a Strategic Listening Questionnaire (SLQ) and a…

  18. E-Portfolio as a Corrective Platform towards EFL Students' Overall/Componential Writing Performance

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    Saeedi, Zari; Meihami, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at accentuating and exploring the effect of using electronic portfolio (EP) platform in providing corrective feedback (CF) on EFL students' overall and micro-componential writing performance. Moreover, by conducting a semi-structured interview, the study seeks to obtain students' attitudes towards the use of EP in three aspects,…

  19. The Effect of iPad Assisted Language Learning on Developing EFL Students' Autonomous Language Learning

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    Albadry, Haifa

    2015-01-01

    This paper will present the experience of using iPads with a group of 21 students in a Saudi university over a period of one semester. The purpose of this ongoing study is to explore how students learn to collaborate and interact in English by participating in a teacher-designed English as a Foreign Language (EFL) course. The course aimed at…

  20. Using a Multimedia-Based Program for Developing Student Teachers' EFL Speaking Fluency Skills

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    Diyyab, Eman Aly; Abdel-Haq, Eman Muhamad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdel-Sadeq

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of using a multimedia-based program for developing EFL speaking fluency skills among second year, English section student teachers. The sample of the present study consisted of thirty students at Sadat Faculty of Education, Minufiya University, Egypt. The study sample was…

  1. Exploring Writing Anxiety and Self-Efficacy among EFL Graduate Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates research writing anxiety and self-efficacy beliefs among English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) graduate students in engineering-related fields. The relationship between the two writing affective constructs was examined and students' perspectives on research writing anxiety were also explored. A total of 218 survey responses…

  2. EFL Students' Preferences toward the Lecturer's Corrective Feedback in Business Letters Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanu, La Ode

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the students' preferences toward the lecturer's corrective feedback in the business letter writing and their reasons why they preferred particular corrective feedback types. A case study was used by involving 15 EFL students who enrolled in the Business Correspondence Course. The questionnaire and interview were…

  3. CORI: Explicit Reading Instruction to Enhance Informational Text Comprehension and Reading Engagement for Thai EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkrachang, Salila; Chinwonno, Apasara

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the effect of explicit reading instruction as an approach to Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI) framework on EFL students' informational text comprehension and engagement. The explicit reading instruction was implemented with 39 first-year Thai undergraduate students over a 10-week period. It was found that the…

  4. EFL Students' Attitudes towards Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadikhah, Shirin; Aliyan, Zahra; Talebi, Seyed Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate EFL university students' attitude towards self-regulated learning strategies in writing academic papers. A further aim of the study was to compare the attitudes of two groups of university students (third and fourth years) in the employment of self-regulated learning strategies to find out whether…

  5. The Usefulness of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) Eyespeak Software in Improving Iraqi EFL Students' Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidgi, Lina Fathi Sidig; Shaari, Ahmad Jelani

    2017-01-01

    The present study focuses on determining whether automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology is reliable for improving English pronunciation to Iraqi EFL students. Non-native learners of English are generally concerned about improving their pronunciation skills, and Iraqi students face difficulties in pronouncing English sounds that are not…

  6. An Exploratory Study of ICT Use in English Language Learning among EFL University Students

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    Tri, Dang Hoang; Nguyen, Nhung Hong Thi

    2014-01-01

    There has been a large volume of published studies describing the attitudes of teachers and students towards ICT usage to study English; nevertheless, limited research has been conducted to examine the use of ICT in terms of frequency of use, purposes, perceptions, and expectations among EFL students. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to…

  7. Using the Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy plus to Develop University EFL Students' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodary, Manal Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of using the Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy Plus (VSSPlus) on developing university EFL students' vocabulary learning. It adopted the quasi experimental design which included two groups design. The participants were first level students at Languages and Translation Department, Arar…

  8. Effect of Foreign Language Anxiety on Gender and Academic Achievement among Yemeni University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Norizan Abdul; Yassin, Amr Abdullatif; Maasum, Tengku Nor Rizan Bt Tengku Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the gender differences in terms of anxiety among Yemeni university EFL learners. It also aimed to investigate the correlation between the level of anxiety and the academic achievement of the students. The participants of this study were 155 students chosen from the population through stratified random sampling. The…

  9. Collaborative Blended Learning Writing Environment: Effects on EFL Students' Writing Apprehension and Writing Performance

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    Challob, Ala'a Ismael; Bakar, Nadzrah Abu; Latif, Hafizah

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of collaborative blended learning writing environment on students' writing apprehension and writing performance as perceived by a selected group of EFL students enrolled in one of the international schools in Malaysia. Qualitative case study method was employed using semi-structured interview, learning diaries and…

  10. Modeling the development of L1 and EFL writing proficiency of secondary school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.; van Gelderen, A.; Stoel, R.D.; Hulstijn, J.; de Glopper, K.

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates the development of writing proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL), in contrast to the development of first language (L1) writing proficiency in Dutch L1, in a sample of almost 400 secondary school students in the Netherlands. Students performed

  11. Modeling the Development of L1 and EFL Writing Proficiency of Secondary School Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, Rob; van Gelderen, Amos; Stoel, Reinoud D.; Hulstijn, Jan; de Glopper, Cornelis

    This longitudinal study investigates the development of writing proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL), in contrast to the development of first language (L1) writing proficiency in Dutch L1, in a sample of almost 400 secondary school students in the Netherlands. Students performed

  12. Examining the Effectiveness of Pre-Reading Strategies on Saudi EFL College Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rasheed, Hana S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Reading comprehension is a key issue in learning English as a foreign language, and it is critical that teachers utilize pre-reading strategies in reading classes in order to help students enhance their comprehension. The present study investigates the effectiveness of two pre-reading strategies on EFL students' performance in reading…

  13. Perceptions of Turkish EFL Students on Online Language Learning Platforms and Blended Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istifci, Ilknur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of EFL students studying English at the School of Foreign Languages, Anadolu University (AUSFL) on blended language learning and online learning platforms. The participants of the study consisted of 167 students whose English language proficiency level was B2 according to the Common European…

  14. Understanding by Design (UbD) in EFL Teaching: Teachers' Professional Development and Students' Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, Nihal; Altun, Sertel

    2017-01-01

    Concepts such as teachers' professional development and students' achievement act as the driving force for the development of each in a causal relationship in EFL teaching, as in many other disciplines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the change Understanding by Design (UbD) made on teachers' professional development and students'…

  15. Edmodo Use to Develop Saudi EFL Students' Self-Directed Learning

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    Khodary, Manal Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the effect of Edmodo use on developing Saudi English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students' Self-Directed Learning (SDL). It employed a quasi-experimental design that included a one group design. The participants (n = 45) were all fifth level students at Languages and Translation Department, Arar Faculty of Education…

  16. The Reading Response E-Journal: An Alternative Way to Engage Low-Achieving EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The reading response journal has been valued as an effective tool for involving students in authentic reading and writing activities. As the internet has become an essential medium in today's English classroom, it is advisable to integrate both the web and the journal when approaching our EFL students. In order to motivate and engage my…

  17. Using Non-Finites in English Academic Writing by Chinese EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingjun

    2014-01-01

    Frequent use of non-finites is an important feature of English academic writing (Chafe & Danielewicz, 1987), but teachers and students in the Chinese environment are not aware of it. To investigate the problems that can be found in academic writings by Chinese students is significant in two aspects: academic writing by Chinese EFL students…

  18. First-Year College Students' Experiences in the EFL Flipped Classroom: A Case Study in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zamzami

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the first year college students' learning and experiences in an EFL flipped classroom at the State Islamic University of Ar-Raniry in Indonesia. 27 students who enrolled in English 2 course participated as samples of this study. The data were collected from diverse sources including questionnaire surveys, focus…

  19. Exploring How Digital Media Technology Can Foster Saudi EFL Students' English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawil, Abdulmohsin

    2016-01-01

    Digital media technology has become an integral part of daily life for almost all young students, and for the majority of Saudi EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students. Digital media technology may not be limited to one or two kinds; it has various types such as software and programs, devices, application, websites, social media tools, etc.…

  20. Student Evaluation of Online Pharmaceutical Compounding Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy students’ views on the effectiveness of an expansion of the compounding laboratory website at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Methods. Originally, there were 39 videos and three animations available. In 2011, an additional 59 videos and two animations were added. Concurrently, all of the interactive questions were updated to fully integrate with the expanded video library. Students were surveyed about the expanded video library regarding accessibility, functionality, and usefulness, and how using the library impacted their learning of compounding. Surveys were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Means and SDs were calculated for the rating scale questions; independent t tests and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to find differences between professional classes and campuses. Analytical results were evaluated with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), z test, and a homogeneity of variance (Levene’s) test. Results. The response rate to the survey was 85%. Compounding videos were used by 386/391 students. Thirty-four percent of students used the videos an average of 30 minutes or less per week; 56% used the videos 1–2 hours per week. Approximately 80% of students were satisfied with the functionality and accessibility of the videos. All students, regardless of professional year or campus affiliation, put their confidence/competence at about 70% of the rating scale. Conclusions. As no standardized compounding curriculum was found in US schools of pharmacy and students reported being satisfied with the website, it could be an accessible, functional, and useful resource for pharmaceutical compounding in schools of pharmacy. PMID:27073283

  1. The Effect of Emotionality and Openness to Experience on Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Iranian EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Ranjbaran Oskouei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship between vocabulary learning strategies and learner variables of Iranian learners of English as a foreign Language (EFL with special reference to their personality types to examine what implications these associations have for teaching EFL. It tried to find any possible relation between vocabulary learning strategies use of Iranian EFL students and two personality types, namely emotionality and openness to experience. For so doing, a representative sample of the EFL students was chosen, which comprised 120 second year EFL students from Islamic Azad university of Tabriz.  The data were collected using two questionnaires - Schmitt’s vocabulary learning strategy questionnaire and HEXACO personality assessment questionnaire;only two dimensions of emotionality and openness to experience were investigated in this research. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the associations between the learner variables and use of vocabulary learning strategies. The findings showed differences in strategy use indicating that these strategy choices are correlated with their personality type. It was found that there is a positive relation between emotionality and cognitive strategies, and also between emotionality and metacognitive strategies. The results also showed that there is a positive relation between openness to experience and memory, and social strategies.

  2. The Impact of Task-Based Instruction on Reading Comprehension Ability among the Iranian EFL students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Rezaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the effect of task-based instruction in improving the reading comprehension ability among the Iranian EFL students. To conduct this study, a sample of 80 Iranian EFL students in Islamic Azad University, Larestan, Iran served as the participants of the study. After the administration of an Oxford Placement Test as the pre-test, the students were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. During the treatment, the students in the experimental group received some reading comprehension tasks, and the students in the control group received a placebo. At the end of the treatment, the students in both groups were administered a post-test. The result of this study revealed that the students in experimental group outperformed the students in the control group. In other words, task-based instruction was effective in increasing the reading comprehension ability.

  3. The Impact of Text Genre on Iranian Intermediate EFL Students' Writing Errors: An Error Analysis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqimipour, Kourosh; Shahrokhi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at analyzing writing errors caused by the interference of the Persian language, regarded as the first language (L1), in three writing genres, namely narration, description, and comparison/contrast by Iranian EFL students. 65 English paragraphs written by the participants, who were at the intermediate level based on their…

  4. Investigation of Writing Strategies, Writing Apprehension, and Writing Achievement among Saudi EFL-Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    The tenet of this study is to investigate the use of writing strategies in reducing writing apprehension and uncovering its effect on EFL students' writing achievement. It also attempts to explore associations between foreign language apprehension, writing achievement and writing strategies. The primary aims of the study were to explore the…

  5. Comparing L1 and L2 Organizational Patterns in the Argumentative Writing of Japanese EFL Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    Compared Japanese first language (L1) and English second language (L2) organizational patterns in the argumentative writing of Japanese English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) student writers. Made within-subject comparisons of L1 and L2 compositions in terms of organizational patterns, organizational scores, and overall quality. (Author/VWL)

  6. Metacognitive Awareness of EFL Student Writers in a Chinese ELT Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhoulin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into metacognitive awareness of Chinese English as a foreign language (EFL) student writers, under a threefold metacognition framework--person, task, and strategy variables, and within the broader domain of cognitive writing theories. Data were collected in a Chinese tertiary English language teaching (ELT)…

  7. Measuring Japanese EFL Student Perceptions of Internet-Based Tests with the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has made it possible for teachers to administer online assessments with affordability and ease. However, little is known about Japanese English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students' attitudes of internet-based tests (IBTs). Therefore, this study aimed to measure the perceptions of IBTs among Japanese English language learners with the…

  8. Racial Epithets and Other Labels: Their Social Meaning and EFL Students' Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, Pavlou

    A study assessed the awareness of English-as-a-Foreign- Language (EFL) learners concerning a set of English lexical items referring to racial or ethnic heritage, and examined how this awareness might predict the learner's linguistic behavior. Subjects were 40 university students of varying linguistic background enrolled in beginning and advanced…

  9. A Cross-Cultural Study of Taiwanese and Kuwaiti EFL Students' Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-hua; Alrabah, Sulaiman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate the findings of a survey of learning styles and multiple intelligences that was distributed among two different cultural groups of Freshman-level EFL students in Taiwan and Kuwait in order to confirm its consistency for developing teaching techniques appropriate for each group's general profiles. Data…

  10. EFL College Students' Perceptions of the Difficulties in Oral Presentation as a Form of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Abdul-Kareem, Muneera M.; Taqi, Hanan A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral presentation skills are considered one of the most important proficiencies needed for higher education and future careers. Thus, the present study is interested in eliciting English as a Foreign Language (EFL) college students' perceptions of the difficulties they face in oral presentation as a form of assessment. Participants were 500 female…

  11. Critical Literacy Practices in EFL Reading Classroom--An Experimental Study towards Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    English as a world language is more than a way to exchange information but a means to solidify certain social hierarchy and represent certain social interests. English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers should instruct critical awareness to empower students to transform social injustice and fulfill responsibilities as global citizens. This…

  12. Article Errors in the English Writing of Saudi EFL Preparatory Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaisoni, Eid; Gaudel, Daya Ram; Al-Zuoud, Khalid M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at providing a comprehensive account of the types of errors produced by Saudi EFL students enrolled in the preparatory year programe in their use of articles, based on the Surface Structure Taxonomies (SST) of errors. The study describes the types, frequency and sources of the definite and indefinite article errors in writing…

  13. Effectiveness of Read-Aloud Instruction on Motivation and Learning Strategy among Japanese College EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozuka, Katsumasa; Shibata, Setsue; Mizusawa, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    Poor English performance among Japanese college EFL students has often been explained by grammar-translation and lecture-memorization instruction. This study investigated the effectiveness of a recently designed teaching method, namely, "The read-aloud instruction package," which consists of four major activities: Slash/chunked reading…

  14. Exploring the Multimodality of EFL Textbooks for Chinese College Students: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiqin; Qu, Dianning

    2014-01-01

    To explore the multimodality of two representative EFL textbook series for Chinese college students, their visual and verbal semiotic modes were compared. The target textbooks are "Experiencing English" and "New Century College English". Through multimodal discourse analysis, the study aims to shed some light on how to develop…

  15. Effects of Situated Mobile Learning Approach on Learning Motivation and Performance of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chester S. J.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Su, Addison Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a 5-step vocabulary learning (FSVL) strategy and a mobile learning tool in a situational English vocabulary learning environment and assessed their effects on the learning motivation and performance of English as a foreign language (EFL) students in a situational English vocabulary learning environment. Overall, 80 EFL…

  16. Developing an Instrument for Assessing Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as Perceived by EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have been keen to develop instruments for the assessment of teachers' self-perceived technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK); however, few studies have been conducted to validate such assessment tools through students' perspectives in the context of English as a foreign language (EFL). The purpose of this study was thus to…

  17. Advanced ESL Students' Prior EFL Education and Their Perceptions of Oral Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    The author in this study examines how advanced-level adult English as a Second Language (ESL) students' previous English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom experiences influence their perceptions of their teachers' oral corrective feedback (CF). It uses in-depth qualitative data to characterize the participants' prior English learning, and to…

  18. Levels of Code Switching on EFL Student's Daily Language; Study of Language Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at describing the levels of code switching on EFL students' daily conversation. The topic is chosen due to the facts that code switching phenomenon are commonly found in daily speech of Indonesian community such as in teenager talks, television serial dialogues and mass media. Therefore, qualitative data were collected by using…

  19. EFL Students' Perceptions of a Blended Learning Environment: Advantages, Limitations and Suggestions for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zumor, Abdul Wahed Q.; Al Refaai, Ismail K.; Eddin, Eyhab A. Bader; Al-Rahman, Farouq H. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    This study explores King Khalid University English as Foreign Language (EFL) students' views regarding the advantages and limitations of merging the features of face-to-face language instruction and online language learning via the Blackboard learning management system in a new pedagogical approach called Blended Learning. The study also examines…

  20. An EFL Flipped Learning Course Design: Utilizing Students' Mobile Online Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yasushige; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko; Smith, Craig; Kondo, Mutsumi; Tsubota, Yasushi; Dantsuji, Masatake

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project in a university English as Foreign Language (EFL) program in Japan which explored ways to sustain active participation in e-learning tasks. The tasks were intended to improve students' scores on the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC), a test used by businesses to make hiring decisions.…

  1. Motivational Orientations and Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Turkish Students towards EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Sabriye; Erol, Ismail Kaan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: There has been a concern as to what motivates people to learn a foreign language among researchers. Another concern in EFL context is that students may not benefit from learning opportunities due to low self-efficacy and low motivation to learn a foreign language. The main goal of this study is to explore the motivational orientations of…

  2. An Investigation of Strategies for Student Motivation in the Chinese EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ruth M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers employ various strategies aimed at enhancing student motivation, yet there is scant empirical evidence to support their effectiveness. Based on an investigation of 30 EFL classroom observations involving 10 teachers and more than 900 learners (including 90 learners at different levels of English proficiency who completed questionnaires),…

  3. Developing Research Paper Writing Programs for EFL/ESL Undergraduate Students Using Process Genre Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyen, Kim Thanh; Bin Osman, Shuki; Dan, Thai Cong; Ahmad, Nor Shafrin Binti

    2016-01-01

    Research Paper Writing (RPW) plays a key role in completing all research work. Poor writing could lead to the postponement of publications. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a program of (RPW) to improve RPW ability for EFL/ESL writers, especially for undergraduate students in Higher Education (HE) institutions, which has caught less attention…

  4. Identifying Students' Learning Style Preferences Regarding Some Variables in the EFL Classroom: The Case of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cevdet; Genc, Salih Zeki

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the identification of students' learning style preferences has gained importance in educational research. This study aimed at identifying the individual perceptions of the learner style preferences of Turkish EFL learners. Using learning style preference categories and a 28-item language learning preference questionnaire…

  5. Do Peer Reviews Help Improve Student Writing Abilities in an EFL High School Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have reported the benefits of peer reviews in English as a second language (ESL) and English as a foreign language (EFL) writing classrooms. However, there has been little empirical research on whether such peer reviews improve students' writing abilities. The current study investigated the effects of peer review on the development…

  6. Students' Perceptions of Using a Novel as Main Material in the EFL Reading Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-hsin

    2012-01-01

    The study looked into the possibility of using a novel as main material in a college EFL reading course. It focused on evaluating the effectiveness of novel-teaching based on students' subjective perceptions. For this purpose, two classes of non-English majors read and received instruction on an unabridged novel for one semester. A pair of…

  7. Student's Video Production as Formative Assessment

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    Gama, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Learning assessments are subject of discussions that envolve theoretical and practical approaches. To measure learning in physics by high school students, either qualitatively or quantitatively, is a process in which it should be possible to identify not only the concepts and contents students failed to achieve but also the reasons of the failure. We propose that students' video production offers a very effective formative assessment to teachers: as a formative assessment, it produces information that allows the understanding of where and when the learning process succeeded or failed, of identifying, as a subject or as a group, the defficiencies or misunderstandings related to the theme under analysis and their interpretation by students, and it provides also a different kind of assessment, related to some other life skills, like the ability to carry a project to its conclusion and to work cooperatively. In this paper, we describe the use of videos produced by high school students as an assessment resource. T...

  8. Technology-Assisted Sheltered Instruction: Instructional Streaming Video in an EFL Multi-Purpose Computer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Hsuan; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been widely adopted for decades. However, existing CBI models cannot always be effectively put into practice, especially for learners of lower English proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. This study examined an animation design course adopting CBI to promote reading abilities of English…

  9. Student-Produced Video: Two Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Nathaniel; Foss, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the idea of using video production to engage second language learners in learner-centered, project-based learning activities to motivate them to learn and participate through writing, directing, acting in, and editing a movie. The authors describe two projects. In the first project, four pairs of students each created a…

  10. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  11. Iranian EFL Students' Emotional Intelligence and Autonomy in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify EFL learners' conceptions of autonomy and whether their autonomy was correlated with their emotional intelligence. The research was carried out with the participation of 110 learners at Distance Education University in Urmia, Iran. Questionnaires were emailed to the participants. Results of statistical analyses…

  12. The Impact of Using Youtube in EFL Classroom on Enhancing EFL Students' Content Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwehaibi, Huda Omar

    2015-01-01

    Information technology has opened up prospects for rich and innovative approaches to tackle educational issues and provide solutions to the increasing demands for learning resources. YouTube, a video-sharing website that allows users to upload, view, and share video clips, offers access to new and dynamic opportunities for effective and…

  13. Student-Produced Videos for Exam Review in Mathematics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsizer, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Videos have been used in classrooms for decades, but student-produced video has recently become a viable, economical option to enhance learning. Students were asked to create videos to be used for their exam review in two different undergraduate mathematics courses: Differential Equation and Complex Analysis. Students were then surveyed about…

  14. Using Blogs to Promote Student Interaction and Learning in EFL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izela Habul Sabanovic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the application of a class blog in an EFL (English as a foreign language teaching context in order to promote student interaction and learning. A weblog, or blog, is an interactive homepage easy to set up and manage, which permits publishing online. Although it was not initially provided for pedagogical purposes, a blog has a great potential to be used as a tool in EFL classes, especially to motivate students to engage in online exchanges, thereby expanding their language study and learning community beyond the walls of a physical classroom. This small scale action research explores the usefulness of incorporating a blog project into an EFL class as it provides an effective means of facilitating greater learner interaction and reflection on language skills development. A class blog was envisaged as an out-of-class project aimed at motivating students to practice language skills and communicate with others via this new computer-based learning platform outside the classroom. The participants for this study were the third and fourth year students (n= 52 of the Pedagogical Faculty in Sarajevo attending an EFL elective course. The research mainly focused on the students' attitudes and perceptions of using a class blog to support their English language learning and foster student interaction in an online learning community. The project lasted for two semesters and data were collected from students through a questionnaire at the end of the term. The results of the questionnaire reveal that students had an overall positive attitude towards using a class blog as an appropriate medium for practicing both their language and social skills.

  15. Why and How EFL Students Learn Vocabulary in Parliamentary Debate Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice M. Aclan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vocabulary, the backbone of any language including English, is foundational for listening, speaking, reading and writing. These four macro-skills are necessary not only in gaining knowledge as English is the language to access major information sources particularly the World Wide Web but also in the demanding globalized workplace. Vocabulary is seen to be learned better when it is contextualized thus language teachers should design communicative activities such as debate. However, debate, being more known as a competitive rather than a classroom activity worldwide, has not been explored yet for its potential to develop vocabulary among EFL/ESL students although it has been identified for its power in developing communication skills in general as well as critical thinking and other soft skills. Thus, this qualitative study was conducted to explore why and how EFL students learn vocabulary in classroom debate. The data were gathered through end-of-course evaluation and focus group interview with seven participants from the Middle East, African and ASEAN countries. The findings show that students learned vocabulary due to debate’s interactive nature requiring contextualized and meaningful language use from preparation to actual debate. EFL students described how they learned vocabulary through debate which has implications for SLA and language teaching.   Keywords: Noticing hypothesis, Comprehensible input, Incomprehensible input, Vocabulary building strategies

  16. The Use of Authentic Materials in Teaching Grammar for EFL Students (Teachers’ Perspective

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    Sri Agriyanti Mestari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to analyze the use of authentic material in teaching grammar for EFL students. Kilickaya (2004 define authentic materials as exposure to real language and use in its own community. Peacock (1997 has another definition of authentic materials which is”the materials that have been produced to fulfill some social purposes in the language community”. Authentic materials are assume as the important tools for teachers in class in order to make his/her teaching effective in transmitting the necessary knowledge to all students. This presentation will discuss the effects of using authentic material in teaching grammar from teachers’ perspective and offer how authentic material can be used in grammar EFL class.   DOI: https;//doi.org/10.24071/llt.2016.190207

  17. Extraversion-introversion and the oral performance of Koya University EFL students

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    Aziz, Rebin A

    2010-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Bilkent University, 2010. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2010. Includes bibliographical references leaves 75-77. This study explores the relationship between the extraversion-introversion personality type tendencies of Iraqi college students and their oral proficiency in English as a Foreign Language (EFL). In this regard, the present study aims to reinvestigate the correlation between extraversion-...

  18. New Software to Help EFL Students Self-Correct Their Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of web-based software at a university in Spain to help students of EFL self-correct their free-form writing. The software makes use of an eighty-million-word corpus of English known to be correct as a normative corpus for error correction purposes. It was discovered that bigrams (two-word combinations of words)…

  19. The effect of three types of feedback on the journal writing of EFL Japanese students

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    デュペンサラー, ピーター; Peter, DUPPENTHALER; Tezukayama Gakuin University

    2004-01-01

    The one-year experimental study reported in this article investigated which of three types of feedback had the most beneficial effect on EFL students' English-language journal writing. The three types of feedback were: meaning-focused feedback, positive comments, and error-focused feedback. The major finding was that meaning-focused feedback was more effective than either positive comments or error-focused feedback in facilitating overall improvement in journal entries.

  20. Learner anxiety and EFL learning: A study of tertiary students' and teachers' perceptions in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Chieh-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Taiwanese university students’ and teachers’ perceptions of foreign language anxiety in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom. The main aims were: (a) to identify the situations, sources, effects of, and coping tactics for the anxiety of Taiwanese tertiary students and (b) to examine tertiary English teachers’ perceptions of their students’ anxiety and how they deal with it. An anxiety scale, the ELCAS, was first administered to English major and non-Englis...

  1. Medical Students' Perceptions of Video-Linked Lectures and Video-Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, RuoLan; Mattick, Karen; Dunne, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Video-linked lectures allow healthcare students across multiple sites, and between university and hospital bases, to come together for the purposes of shared teaching. Recording and streaming video-linked lectures allows students to view them at a later date and provides an additional resource to support student learning. As part of a UK Higher…

  2. The Effects of Extensive Reading via E-Books on Tertiary Level EFL Students' Reading Attitude, Reading Comprehension, and Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Neng; Chen, Shu-Chu; Chen, Shu-Hui Eileen; Wey, Shyh-Chyi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of extensive reading of e-books on tertiary level EFL students' English reading attitude, reading comprehension and vocabulary. Eighty-nine participants were assigned in two groups, with 46 students in the experimental group and the other 43 students in the control group. In addition to a traditional curriculum…

  3. Effective Educational Videos: Principles and Guidelines for Maximizing Student Learning from Video Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational videos have become an important part of higher education, providing an important content-delivery tool in many flipped, blended, and online classes. Effective use of video as an educational tool is enhanced when instructors consider three elements: how to manage cognitive load of the video; how to maximize student engagement with the…

  4. The Effectiveness of Using an Explicit Language Learning Strategy-Based Instruction in Developing Secondary School Students' EFL Listening Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of using explicit language learning strategy-based instruction in developing secondary school students' EFL listening comprehension skills. It was hypothesized that using explicit strategy-based instruction would develop students' EFL listening comprehension skill and its sub-skills. The…

  5. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CONTENT-BASED APPROACH IN IMPROVING ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS OF EFL STUDENTS

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    Dwi Fita Heriyawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the benefits of the implementation of Content-Based Approach (CBA in academic writing of EFL settings. Therefore, the approach was implemented in writing class in which 35 students participated as the respondents of the study. They were treated with CBA and their essays were then analyzed to examine the effects of the implementation of the approach on their writing products. Besides, this study investigated further the grammatical errors made by the students as reflected on their essays. The findings of this study proved that CBA is beneficial to improve students’ writing skills even though the students still produced grammatical errors.

  6. High school students' perceptions of EFL teacher control orientations and their English academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiany, Gholam Reza; Shayestefar, Parvaneh

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND. Theories distinguish between student-initiated and teacher-initiated regulation of students' learning activities, or between strong, shared, or loose teacher control during the completion of learning tasks. Empirical validations for such distinctions are scarce, however. AIM. The present study aimed at (a) investigating students' perceptions of control behaviours exhibited by their English teachers; and (b) exploring the contribution of different types of teacher control behaviours to students' cognitive outcomes (English Achievement). SAMPLE. The sample comprised 732 English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students studying in three major fields of high school (Mathematics, Natural Science, and Humanities). The participants (16-17 years of age) were selected from third-grade classes of 27 EFL teachers working in 25 high schools of 6 main different geographical regions in the Isfahan province, Iran. METHOD. To obtain a comprehensive picture of different control types exhibited by Iranian EFL teachers, the control subscales of the two existing questionnaires, i.e., the Questionnaire on Instructional Behaviours (QIB), adapted by Den Brok et al. (2004) and the Questionnaire on Lesson Activities (QLA) used by Den Brok (2001) were merged to form the Questionnaire of Teacher Control (QTC). The development of this Persian instrument involved several steps: translation and back translation by the researchers, one expert translator, and two EFL teachers; piloting; and a final administration of the questionnaire to the student sample. With respect to the second aim of the study, data regarding students' performances on the Standardized National English Achievement Tests were gathered from local educational offices and schools. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Statistical analyses supported acceptable reliability and validity of the instrument. A main factor structure with three types of teacher control (strong/high, shared/mid, and loose/low) was found to underlie students

  7. Streaming Video to Enhance Students' Reflection in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Wildschut, Liesbeth; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation case study that describes the experiences of 15 students and 2 teachers using a video-based learning environment, DiViDU, to facilitate students' daily reflection activities in a composition course and a ballet course. To support dance students' reflection processes streaming video was applied as follows: video…

  8. Students' Age at which EFL is Introduced in Schools and Educational Outcomes

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    Chuzaimah Dahlan Diem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tries to see the relationship between the age at which EFL is introduced in public schools and educational processes and outcomes. A survey involving 229 students from elementary and junior high schools in Palembang is conducted. The population consists of those who have never taken extra non-formal English courses. These students are given the same English tests comprising mostly vocabulary and reading comprehension followed by a small portion of grammar. It is hypothesized that those who start learning English earlier have better achievement. Curriculum, intensity of instruction, teacher education level, years of ELT experience are considered in the analysis, in addition to class size, students' SES and gender. Stepwise regression analysis is applied to identify which variable contributes to students' outcomes. The results show there is no correlation between age alone and the students' EFL achievement. However, negative significant correlation is found between the students' achievement and teacher education level and also between the students' achievement and SES. Finally, some implications of research for theory, policy, and practice are suggested.

  9. The effects of teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' EFL performance: a randomized-group design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro; Núñez, José C; Vallejo, Guillermo; Cunha, Jennifer; Nunes, Tânia; Suárez, Natalia; Fuentes, Sonia; Moreira, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the effects of five types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework completion; answering questions about homework; checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) used in class by 26 teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) using a randomized-group design. Once a week, for 6 weeks, the EFL teachers used a particular type of homework follow-up practice they had previously been assigned to. At the end of the 6 weeks students completed an EFL exam as an outcome measure. The results showed that three types of homework follow-up practices (i.e., checking homework orally; checking homework on the board; and collecting and grading homework) had a positive impact on students' performance, thus highlighting the role of EFL teachers in the homework process. The effect of EFL teachers' homework follow-up practices on students' performance was affected by students' prior knowledge, but not by the number of homework follow-up sessions.

  10. Geoscience Videos and Their Role in Supporting Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggen, Jennifer; McDonnell, David

    2017-01-01

    A series of short (5 to 7 minutes long) geoscience videos were created to support student learning in a flipped class setting for an introductory geology class at North Carolina State University. Videos were made using a stylus, tablet, microphone, and video editing software. Essentially, we narrate a slide, sketch a diagram, or explain a figure…

  11. The Effect of Task-Based Language Teaching on Motivation and Grammatical Achievement of EFL Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    NamazianDost, Islam; Bohloulzadeh, Ghassem; Pazhakh, Abdolreza

    2017-01-01

    This research sought to investigate the effect of the effect of task-based language teaching on motivation and grammatical achievement of EFL junior high school students of Ahvaz. To fulfill the objectives of the study a Homogeneity test (Oxford Quick Placement Test) was administered among 100 students at the junior high school and finally 80…

  12. The Effects of Using Technology and the Internet on Some Iranian EFL Students' Perceptions of Their Communication Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Nabi A.; Eskandari, Zahra; Rahimi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of implementing a CALL framework on the students' perceptions of their communication classroom environments. The What Is Happening In This Class? (WIHIC) questionnaire was distributed twice among 34 (F=14 and M=20) Iranian EFL students, the first time after a ten-session-long regular no-tech communication…

  13. Student Engagement in Long-Term Collaborative EFL Storytelling Activities: An Analysis of Learners with English Proficiency Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Yin; Liu, Chen-Chung; Wang, Yu; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Hung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    English proficiency difference among students is a challenging pedagogical issue in EFL classrooms worldwide. Collaborative digital storytelling has been adopted in language learning settings to increase motivation and engagement, especially for young learners. However, it remains unknown whether students of different proficiency levels can…

  14. EFL Students' Vocabulary Learning in NS-NNS E-Mail Interactions: Do They Learn New Words by Imitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated Japanese students' EFL vocabulary development through e-mail interactions with a native English speaker (NS), with primary focus on students' imitation of new words. According to sociocultural theory, learners can internalize new linguistic knowledge by imitating an expert's expressions to create his/her own…

  15. A Comparative Study of EFL Teachers' and Intermediate High School Students' Perceptions of Written Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodaie, Mina; Farrokhi, Farahman; Zoghi, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    This study was an attempt to compare EFL teachers' and intermediate high school students' perceptions of written corrective feedback on grammatical errors and also to specify their reasons for choosing comprehensive or selective feedback and some feedback strategies over some others. To collect the required data, the student version of…

  16. EFL Student and Faculty Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Online Testing in the Medium of Blackboard: Promises and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fageeh, Abdulaziz I.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored EFL students and faculty's perceptions of and attitudes towards the use of online assessment and practice. A descriptive method was used, employing quantitative data collection and analyses from a sample of 400 students of different age categories and educational levels and another sample of 25 teachers in the English…

  17. Competitive Team-Based Learning versus Group Investigation with Reference to the Language Proficiency of Iranian EFL Intermediate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a report on an experimental study which intended to look into the possible effects of Competitive Team-Based Learning (CTBL) vis-à-vis Group Investigation (GI) method of Cooperative Learning (CL) on the language proficiency of Iranian EFL intermediate students. Seventy homogeneous Iranian intermediate students were selected out of a…

  18. Politeness Accommodation in E-Mail Requests among Iranian Postgraduate Students of EFL

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    Muhammed Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer-mediated communication (CMC offers us a chance to understand how social relationships are built and maintained in an environment in which interlocutors not only lack the paralinguistic features that are vital to face-to- face conversation, but are participating in a medium which has had little time to develop rules of conduct. The present study was an attempt to determine politeness accommodation in e-mail messages among Iranian postgraduate students of EFL. One hundred EFL learners, aged 22-26, participated in this study. Four different message types were constructed and sent to the participants, i.e. messages with verbal politeness markers; messages with structural politeness elements (e. g., salutation and closing remarks; messages with both verbal and structural politeness indicators; finally messages with neither verbal nor structural politeness indicators. Further, the messages varied in their degree of politeness; however, their content was the same. Results showed that the participants accommodated significantly to verbal politeness indicators in the body of a message, and to structural politeness indicators of greeting/salutation. When such indicators were included in messages, the participants responded with significantly more polite messages (greeting and body than when the indicators were absent. The results boost our understanding of CMC with reference to politeness markers, and how they are used by Iranian EFL learners.

  19. Teaching Word Stress to Turkish EFL (English as a Foreign Language) Learners through Internet-Based Video Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hismanoglu, Murat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elicit problem causing word stress patterns for Turkish EFL (English as a foreign language) learners and investigate whether Internet-based pronunciation lesson is superior to traditional pronunciation lesson in terms of enhancing Turkish EFL learners' accurate production of stressed syllables in English words. A…

  20. Effects of Using Instructional Video Games on Teaching English Vocabulary to Iranian Pre-Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether there is any benefit in using IVGs among the Iranian pre-intermediate EFL learners or not. Therefore, 60 EFL learners from Padideh Derakhshan Institute in Sahinshahr, Isfahan, Iran were chosen as the sample. First, a test of novelty was administered at the early stage to ensure the novelty of to-be-instructed…

  1. The Impact of Metamemory on the EFL Students` Achievement at Taif University

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    Nasrah Mahmoud Ismaiel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current research is to scrutinize the relationship between metamemory and EFL learners` achievement. The participants were 250 first year university students who were chosen from a large sample of the preparatory year Science and Humanities streams at Taif University, Taif, Saudi Arabia. The objective of the research is twofold: (a to assess whether metamemory can predict English language skills achievement (listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and (b to assess if there exist notable discrepancies between male and female students and the different academic streams (the science stream and the humanities stream on the metamemory factors. Students` metamemory was measured by the Metamemory questionnaire (SMSQ of Tonkovic and Vranic (2011. The results of this study show that metamemory is a good predictor of the EFL students` language learning skills achievement. It also indicates that there are differences between male and female students on the metamemory factors in favor of females. Furthermore, the findings reaffirm that there are differences between the academic streams, in favor of the science stream.

  2. Using Online Video to Support Student Learning and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Pamela; Shea, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Online videos are used increasingly in higher education teaching as part of the explosion of Web 2.0 tools that are now available. YouTube is one popular example of a video-sharing resource that both faculty and students can use effectively, both inside and outside of the classroom, to engage students in their learning, energize classroom…

  3. Improving Web-Based Student Learning Through Online Video Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott; Redman, S.

    2010-01-01

    Students in online courses continue to lag their peers in comparable face-to-face (F2F) courses (Ury 2004, Slater & Jones 2004). A meta-study of web-based vs. classroom instruction by Sitzmann et al (2006) discovered that the degree of learner control positively influences the effectiveness of instruction: students do better when they are in control of their own learning. In particular, web-based courses are more effective when they incorporate a larger variety of instructional methods. To address this need, we developed a series of online videos to demonstrate various astronomical concepts and provided them to students enrolled in an online introductory astronomy course at Penn State University. We found that the online students performed worse than the F2F students on questions unrelated to the videos (t = -2.84), but that the online students who watched the videos performed better than the F2F students on related examination questions (t = 2.11). We also found that the online students who watched the videos performed significantly better than those who did not (t = 3.43). While the videos in general proved helpful, some videos were more helpful than others. We will discuss our thoughts on why this might be, and future plans to improve upon this study. These videos are freely available on iTunesU, YouTube, and Google Video.

  4. Impact of Using Instructional Video Games as an on EFL Learners' Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Maryam; Salehi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of Instructional Video Games (IVGs) on the vocabulary retention of Iranian language learners. To do so, 32 male and 43 female, between the ages thirteen to thirty one years old, in Padideh Derakhshan Institute, Sahinshahr, Isfahan, Iran were selected as a whole population. First, the World English…

  5. Learning approaches of Indonesian EFL Gen Z students in a Flipped Learning context

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    Made Hery Santosa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The 21st-century learning has eventually transformed today’s classroom. With more digital natives in the class, both educators and students face a changing classroom that should accommodate different learning paces, styles and needs. This study aimed at helping students in becoming English as Foreign Language (EFL competent in-service teachers. Using Flipped Learning, the study utilizes four FLIP pillars into EFL learning, namely Flexible environment, Learning culture, Intentional content, Professional educators. The study employed three instruments, namely survey, tests, and interview. The result of tests showed a promising students’ progress from low to high achievement. The survey showed that students tended to perform deep approaches to learning while findings from the interview provided more interesting phenomena underlying students’ motives in their learning approaches, involving dynamic power distance relationship between lecturer and students. Heavier task loads and learning model familiarity have been highlighted. Effective socialization of the model using technology and sustainability of use of the model are suggested.

  6. Student use of flipped classroom videos in a therapeutics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanwala, Asad E; Erstad, Brian L; Murphy, John E

    To evaluate the extent of student use of flipped classroom videos. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a college of pharmacy therapeutics course in the Unites States. In one section of the course (four sessions) all content was provided in the form of lecture videos that students had to watch prior to class. Class time was spent discussing patient cases. For half of the sessions, there was an electronic quiz due prior to class. The outcome measure was video view time in minutes. Adequate video view time was defined as viewing ≥75% of total video duration. Video view time was compared with or without quizzes using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There were 100 students in the class and all were included in the study. Overall, 74 students had adequate video view time prior to session 1, which decreased to 53 students for session 2, 53 students for session 3, and 36 students for session 4. Median video view time was greater when a quiz was required [80 minutes (IQR: 38-114) versus 69 minutes (IQR: 3-105), p flipped classroom is low and decreases with time. Preparation is higher when there is a quiz required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interweaving Autonomous Learning and Peer-tutoring in Coaching EFL Student-Teachers

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    Aleida Ariza Ariza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we share the findings on the exploration of undergraduate efl (English as a Foreign Language student-teachers' professional preparation and autonomous practices. Participants were tutees who attended tutorial sessions with peers in higher semesters. In this context, tutoring was based on a model we designed. As the model was implemented, they collected information by means of multiple qualitative research instruments. Results indicate that tutees' learning process was strongly influenced by their personality and attitudes. Similarly, tutees expanded their views in regard to the English language, its learning, and their communicative competence. Finally, we pinpoint some considerations for others interested in adopting this pedagogical strategy.

  8. Is Portfolio Assessment Effective in Improving Iranian EFL Students' Writing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepasdar, Mansoreh; Esmaeeli, Hadiseh; Sherafat, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the effect of portfolio assessment on the improvement of the Iranian students' writing. Additionally, students' attitudes towards using portfolio were investigated. Participants of the study were 46 pre-intermediate Iranian male and female university students who were chosen from a larger group of 70 students. They were…

  9. Listening: The Ignored Skill in EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulum, Ömer Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Listening is clearly the weakest skill of EFL students who encounter different kinds of listening problems. It is the most underestimated skill in EFL context, though. This study seeks to examine the listening problems faced by a group of first year university students whose English proficiency level is elementary. 50 EFL students from three…

  10. EFL College Students' Perceptions of Classroom English Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Abdul-Kareem, Muneera M.; Taqi, Hanan A.

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their classroom English tests play a crucial role in affecting their performance. Hence, the present study is interested in soliciting college students' perceptions of their classroom English tests to find out the reasons behind test difficulties. Participants were 585 female college students chosen randomly from all grade…

  11. Veterinary students' usage and perception of video teaching resources

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    Jones Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to use a student-centred approach to develop an online video learning resource (called 'Moo Tube' at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, UK and also to provide guidance for other academics in the School wishing to develop a similar resource in the future. Methods A focus group in the format of the nominal group technique was used to garner the opinions of 12 undergraduate students (3 from year-1, 4 from year-2 and 5 from year-3. Students generated lists of items in response to key questions, these responses were thematically analysed to generate key themes which were compared between the different year groups. The number of visits to 'Moo Tube' before and after an objective structured practical examination (OSPE was also analysed to provide data on video usage. Results Students highlighted a number of strengths of video resources which can be grouped into four overarching themes: (1 teaching enhancement, (2 accessibility, (3 technical quality and (4 video content. Of these themes, students rated teaching enhancement and accessibility most highly. Video usage was seen to significantly increase (P Conclusions The students had a positive perception of video usage in higher education. Video usage increases prior to practical examinations. Image quality was a greater concern with year-3 students than with either year-1 or 2 students but all groups highlighted the following as important issues: i good sound quality, ii accessibility, including location of videos within electronic libraries, and iii video content. Based on the findings from this study, guidelines are suggested for those developing undergraduate veterinary videos. We believe that many aspects of our list will have resonance in other areas of medicine education and higher education.

  12. Veterinary students' usage and perception of video teaching resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshier, Amanda L; Foster, Neil; Jones, Michael A

    2011-01-10

    The purpose of our study was to use a student-centred approach to develop an online video learning resource (called 'Moo Tube') at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, UK and also to provide guidance for other academics in the School wishing to develop a similar resource in the future. A focus group in the format of the nominal group technique was used to garner the opinions of 12 undergraduate students (3 from year-1, 4 from year-2 and 5 from year-3). Students generated lists of items in response to key questions, these responses were thematically analysed to generate key themes which were compared between the different year groups. The number of visits to 'Moo Tube' before and after an objective structured practical examination (OSPE) was also analysed to provide data on video usage. Students highlighted a number of strengths of video resources which can be grouped into four overarching themes: (1) teaching enhancement, (2) accessibility, (3) technical quality and (4) video content. Of these themes, students rated teaching enhancement and accessibility most highly. Video usage was seen to significantly increase (P students had a positive perception of video usage in higher education. Video usage increases prior to practical examinations. Image quality was a greater concern with year-3 students than with either year-1 or 2 students but all groups highlighted the following as important issues: i) good sound quality, ii) accessibility, including location of videos within electronic libraries, and iii) video content. Based on the findings from this study, guidelines are suggested for those developing undergraduate veterinary videos. We believe that many aspects of our list will have resonance in other areas of medicine education and higher education.

  13. Comparison of Iranian Monolingual and Bilingual EFL Students' Listening Comprehension in Terms of Watching English Movie with Latinized Persian Subtitles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamchi, Roghayeh; Kumar, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The main concern of the present study was to compare Iranian monolingual and bilingual EFL students' listening comprehension in terms of Latinized Persian subtitling of English movie to see whether there was a significant difference between monolinguals and bilinguals on immediate linguistic comprehension of the movie. Latinized Persian subtitling…

  14. A Linguistic Analysis on Errors Committed by Jordanian EFL Undergraduate Students: A Case of News Headlines in Jordanian Newspapers

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    Al Karazoun, Ghada Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated some linguistic errors committed by Jordanian EFL undergraduate students when translating news headlines in Jordanian newspapers from Arabic to English and vice versa. The data of the study was collected through a test composed of (30) English news headlines and (30) Arabic ones covering various areas of news occurring in a…

  15. Making It "Authentic": Egyptian EFL Student Teachers' Awareness and Use of Online Authentic Language Materials and Their Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafez, Hanan A.; Abdallah, Mahmoud M. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a research study that sought investigating Assiut University College of Education (AUCOE) EFL student teachers' awareness and use of online authentic materials on the basis of their actual language leaning needs, and how this relates to their language learning motivation. To accomplish this, a mixed-method research methodology…

  16. The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Peer Feedback Training on Chinese EFL College Students' Writing Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahong; Yu, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    English writing, an indispensable skill in English learning, plays an important role in improving learners' language proficiency. With the wide spread and use of wired or wireless internet, EFL students can easily help and be helped with English writing. Therefore, the application of internet-based peer feedback training on writing to foreign or…

  17. Letting the Cat out of the Bag: EFL College Students' Attitudes towards Learning English Idioms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Houti, Shorouq K.; Aldaihani, Sultan M.

    2018-01-01

    Learning idioms is an uphill battle for many language learners. Thus, this quantitative study aims to shed light on English as Foreign Language (EFL) college students' attitudes towards idiom learning. Specifically, the study is interested in revealing their attitudes towards (1) the importance of idiom learning, (2) the difficulties of idiom…

  18. A Constructivist Approach to Game-Based Language Learning: Student Perceptions in a Beginner-Level EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, James; deHaan, Jonathan William

    2018-01-01

    This article provides information on an action research project in a low-level EFL setting in Japan. The project aims were to (1) foster spoken communication skills and (2) help students engage with their own learning. The project investigated the applicability of board games as a mediating tool for authentic communication as part of a wider TBLT…

  19. The Perception of EFL High School Students in Using of Computer Technology in the Process of Learning: Merits and Demerits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadpanah, Siros; Alavi, Mansooreh

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of computer technology have led to a renewed interest in the process of learning. In order to investigate EFL learners' perception of technology use, a mixed method design was used to explore students' attitude. Quantitative data was collected through questionnaires and qualitative data using open-ended questions.…

  20. Apps and EFL: A Case Study on the Use of Smartphone Apps to Learn English by Four Japanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindog, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This study explores, describes and analyzes the utilization of smartphone apps by four Japanese university students to support learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Findings indicate that intermediate language learners use apps to access content and communicate on SNS and are not keen on studying discrete language parts. Participants…

  1. Using the MoodleReader as an Extensive Reading Tool and Its Effect on Iranian EFL Students' Incidental Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Sepideh; Keyvanshekouh, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    The present study focused on using the MoodleReader to promote extensive reading (ER) in an Iranian EFL context, emphasizing its effect on students' incidental vocabulary acquisition. Thirty eight Shiraz University sophomores were assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group used the MoodleReader for their ER program, while…

  2. Creating a Communicative Language Teaching Environment for Improving Students' Communicative Competence at EFL/EAP University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad U.

    2015-01-01

    The present research focuses on teachers' perceptions and practices regarding Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) and its impact on communicative competency of the students. A questionnaire was used to collect the quantitative data from teachers. The results show that the EFL teachers are aware of the CLT characteristics, its implementation and…

  3. The Effect of Mind Mapping on EFL Students' Idea Development in Argumentative Writing across Gender Differences and Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, Ary Setya Budhi; Latief, Mohammad Adnan; Sulistyo, Gunadi Harry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of mind mapping as a strategy in generating ideas before writing on the EFL students' idea development in argumentative writing as perceived from their gender differences and learning styles. By conducting an experimental investigation at university level in Indonesia, two existing TOEFL classes…

  4. A Group of Indonesian Adult EFL Students' Mastery of Tenses and Aspects: Investigating the Internal and External Factors of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin; Salikin, Hairus

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed, firstly, to assess a group of Indonesian adult EFL students' mastery of tenses and aspects as part of their mastery of English grammar and, secondly, to identify if their experience of going through the instructional processes, their perceptions of and habits in studying English grammar shaped their mastery of tenses and aspects.…

  5. Effects of Explicit Instruction in Cognitive and Metacognitive Reading Strategies on Iranian EFL Students' Reading Performance and Strategy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaie, Reza; Zhang, Lawrence Jun

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of explicit teaching of reading strategies on English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) students' reading performance in Iran. The study employed a questionnaire adapted from Chamot and O'Malley's (1994) cognitive and metacognitive strategies framework. To test the effects of explicit teaching of cognitive and…

  6. Teacher Motivational Practice, Student Motivation, and Possible L2 Selves: An Examination in the Iranian EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Mostafa; Abdollahzadeh, Esmaeel

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to provide observational evidence on the relationship between teachers' use of motivational strategies and students' motivated behavior in the English as a foreign language (EFL) context of Iran. To this end, 741 male learners of English from 26 secondary school classes taught by 17 teachers participated in the study. The…

  7. EFL Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Look at NESTs and Non-NESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Turgay; Tanriöver, Ahmet Serkan; Sahan, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs) have been employed in various English language teaching (ELT) positions and departments at private and state universities in Turkey, particularly over the last three decades. However, undergraduate EFL students' attitudes toward NESTs and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (Non-NESTs) remain seriously…

  8. A Study on the Oral Disfluencies Developmental Traits of EFL Students--A Report Based on Canonical Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Du, Wanyi

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces 9 non-English major EFL students and collects their oral productions in 4 successive oral exams in 2 years. The canonical correlation analysis approach of SPSS is adopted to study the disfluencies developmental traits under the influence of language acquisition development. We find that as language acquisition develops, the total…

  9. EFL Chinese Students and High Stakes Expository Writing: A Theme Analysis

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    Qian Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The expository essay in English is a key gatekeeping milestone as students seek to move from one level of schooling to the next (Schleppegrell, 2004. Using Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL, this study analyzes a Chinese college student's expository essay written on a nationwide English examination in China. Two aspects of theme in the textual metafunction will be examined: theme markedness and theme progression (Eggins, 1994; Halliday, 1994. These components are further explored through a parallel analysis of an expository essay written by a North American freshman. This comparative theme analysis highlights areas in pedagogy that should be attended to if EFL students are to get more sophisticated control over important features of expository writing.

  10. A Project-Based Language Learning Model for Improving the Willingness to Communicate of EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Farouck

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and inadequate motivation due to misapplication of some language teaching methodologies and learning materials have been shown to affect the Willingness to Communicate of students in EFL programs. This study used a Project-Based Language Learning to improve learning motivation and content relevance. Students were grouped into pairs to conduct fieldwork activities on their chosen topics and learned the English language that was suitable for describing their activities and outcomes. They interacted with content and peers through Web 2.0 environments. In the classroom, they engaged in communicative tasks in a jigsaw format and presented their projects where their peers used an online rubric and forum to give feedback. They also participated in a speech contest with peers outside their class or from another university in order to broaden their confidence. Findings from this study show that students were able to develop the language and evaluation skills for presentation. Additionally, they indicated a reduction in communication anxiety.

  11. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Students` Academic Achievements in General EFL Classes

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    Sepideh Berenji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional Intelligence, the ability to be aware of, understand, and express oneself, the ability to be aware of, understand, and relate to others, the ability to deal with strong emotions, and the ability to adapt to change and solve problems of a social or personal nature, can be considered an important factor in learning a language as it enhances the verbal fluency which is the ultimate goal in FLL. The present study intended to consider the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic performance in Osku-Iran Islamic Azad University`s EFL classes. For this purpose, 110 undergraduate EFL sophomore and junior students participated in this study. First, in the middle of the term they were required to complete Bar-On (1997 Emotional Intelligence Inventory and their EI scores were computed based on the guidelines Bar-On (1997 provided. At the end of the term the academic course final exam was administered to the students to achieve their academic mean score which was computed out of 20. After that the degree of correlation between EI and academic mean score was found. It became evident that there is no meaningful relationship between total EI score and academic mean score but there is a meaningful and positive relationship between some sub-scales of emotional intelligence and academic mean score. Therefore, material developers and syllabus designers are required to take emotional factors into account when they want to design syllabuses or make materials ready for teaching.

  12. Effective Educational Videos: Principles and Guidelines for Maximizing Student Learning from Video Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, Cynthia J

    Educational videos have become an important part of higher education, providing an important content-delivery tool in many flipped, blended, and online classes. Effective use of video as an educational tool is enhanced when instructors consider three elements: how to manage cognitive load of the video; how to maximize student engagement with the video; and how to promote active learning from the video. This essay reviews literature relevant to each of these principles and suggests practical ways instructors can use these principles when using video as an educational tool. © 2016 C. J. Brame. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Implementing Controlled Composition to Improve Vocabulary Mastery of EFL Students

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    Juriah Juriah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study was to know how (1 Controlled composition teaching techniques implemented by the English teacher at SDN 027 Samarinda to improve vocabulary mastery, and (2 Controlled composition teaching techniques improves vocabulary mastery of the sixth grade students of SDN 027 Samarinda. This research used a Classroom Action Research (CAR as the research design. The subject of the research is the sixth grade students in the 2013/2014 academic year that consists of 43 students. The instruments employed in this study were observation checklist, field note, and vocabulary test. The result of the research showed that in cycle 1 the students’ achievement did not fulfill the minimal criteria of success. However the result of the cycle 1 was better than the preliminary study. The criteria of success did not fulfill in cycle one, some enhancement of the implementation of Controlled Composition were made in cycle two in the form of: Instruct the students bring dictionary, give more examples English sentences, guide the students find the mining of words in the dictionary and write a paragraph, more motivate the students and preparing a media/ picture .Meanwhile the students ’achievement in cycle two showed that fulfilled the criteria of success. Based on the findings and discussion, the conclusions : Firstly, Controlled composition was implemented well by the teacher of SDN 027 Samarinda. Controlled composition was implemented and gave impacts in: (a increasing the students’ vocabulary mastery significantly, (b making the students able to spell the vocabularies, (c making the students understand the meaning English words, and (d making the students able to pronounce English words quite good. Secondly, Controlled composition improved the students’ vocabulary mastery; it was only 20.9% of the students who achieved the English passing grade in the preliminary study, but then 81.39% of the students achieved the English passing grade in

  14. Students of Different Subjects Have Different Levels of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation to Learn English: Two Different Groups of EFL Students in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kieran; Fujita, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Here is documented investigation to assess the motivational drivers of a group of Japanese, first-year, dental-university students taking part in compulsory EFL classes and to compare those motivational drivers with an investigation into the motivational drivers of a group of Japanese IT students. There was a clear difference between extrinsic and…

  15. The Role of Semantic Mapping Strategy Training on Students' EFL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the role of semantic mapping in cultivating the vocabulary competence of grade 8 students of Arsi Negelle Number 1 Elementary School. The sample of the study consisted of 112 students enrolled in two sections, which were randomly selected from five sections and assigned to both treatment and ...

  16. Impact of Smartphone Based Activities on EFL Students' Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhandi, Pir Suhail Ahmed; Bajnaid, Ayman; Elyas, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Teachers all over the world strive to keep their students engaged, and research has shown that task engagement can be elevated by utilising technology to complete classroom activities. Reasons suggested for this is that technology's alignment with students' interests, as well as the stimulatingly transformative effect that technology can have on…

  17. Goal Setting for Learning English Language of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated goal setting for learning English language of Bangkok University students. A set of questionnaires for the assessment of goal settings and problems of learning English was administered to 370 second-year students. The study revealed that the goal setting was at a moderate level. There were statistically significant…

  18. EFL Students Use of Technology in the Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özad, Bahire Efe; Kutoglu, Ülfet

    2004-01-01

    English for Mass Communication is a course offered by the Faculty of Communication and Media Studies to the students studying at the Departments of Journalism, Radio, Television and Film, and Public Relations and Advertising in their sophomore year. Students taking this course are required to make a presentation at the end of the semester. In…

  19. Short Videos to Enhance Student Learning in Microbiological Laboratory Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann

    This poster describes the use of short videos demonstrating basic microbiological techniques in a second semester course in Biological Chemistry at the Technical University of Denmark. Videos were a useful complement to the laboratory compendium, allowing students to focus on conceptual...

  20. Video Segment Comprehension Strategies: Male and Female University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu-Fang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate video comprehension strategies used by male and female university students. The researcher designed a video comprehension strategy questionnaire including cognitive, compensation, and memory categories. Totally, 168 Taiwanese university participants completed the questionnaire. The quantitative results…

  1. Evaluation of Professional Self-esteem among EFL Teachers and Students at Mevlana University

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    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-esteem is generally defined as a global self-evaluation. It indicates the extent to which an individual believes the self to be capable, significant, successful and worthy (Rosse et al., 1991; Leary and McDonald, 2003. The study generally aims at measuring and correlating professional self-esteem perceptions of ELT professors (N = 6 and prospective EFL teachers (N = 79 at Mevlana University for diagnosing the pedagogical problems. Four professional self-esteem scales, each including 16 items, were developed to measure the participants’ self-esteem perceptions in the five areas of (a satisfaction, (b knowledge development, (c practice, (d adaptation, and (e communication. The average internal consistency reliability of the four scales was r = 0.86. The findings revealed that there were statistically significant differences between the socio-demographic variables of Gender and Student-class and Student Self-report Self-esteem and between the socio-demographic variable of Student-class and Teacher Student-report Self-esteem. Moreover, they demonstrated slight positive correlation between Teacher Self-report Self-esteem and Teacher Student-report Self-esteem and moderate negative correlation between Student Self-report Self-esteem and Student Teacher-report Self-esteem. Finally, the regression findings showed that Student Self-report Self-esteem was better predicted by the Practice dimension, while Student Teacher-report Self-esteem by the development dimension.

  2. The Impact Of Using Computer Software On Vocabulary Learning Of Iranian EFL University Students

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    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, using computer is common in all fields. Education is not an exception. In fact, this approach of technology has been using increasingly in language classrooms. We have witnessed there are more and more language teachers are using computers in their classrooms. This research study investigates the impact of using computer   on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL university students. To this end, a sample of 40 university students in Islamic Azad University, Larestan branch were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. Prior the treatment and to catch the initial deferences between the participants, all the students sat for a pre-test that was an Oxford Placement Test. Then the students were received the treatment for 10 weeks. The students in the experimental group were taught by computer software for vocabulary learning while the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning. After the treatment, all the students sat for a post-test. The statistical analysis through running Independent-Sample T-tests revealed thatthe students in the experimental group who used the computer software for vocabulary learning performed better than the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning.

  3. BLENDED LEARNING: STUDENT PERCEPTION OF FACE-TO-FACE AND ONLINE EFL LESSONS

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    Brenda M. Wright

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-increasing development of technology, online teaching is more readily accepted as a viable component in teaching and learning, and blended learning, the combining of online and face-to-face learning, is becoming commonplace in many higher education institutions. Blended learning is, particularly in developing countries, in its early stages and not without its challenges. Asynchronous online lessons are currently still more prevalent in many areas of South-East Asia, perhaps due to potential difficulty in obtaining strong Internet connections, which may deter educators from synchronous options. Technological media have the potential to broaden the scope of resources available in teaching and to enhance the language learning experience. Although research to date shows some focus on blended learning, literature on distance online teaching seems more prevalent. This study exposed 112 Malaysian undergraduate EFL students' responses to an online lesson as part of an English grammar course, and investigates common student perceptions of the online lesson as compared with face-to-face lessons. Questionnaires using qualitative (Likert scale questions and quantitative (open-ended questions approaches provided data for content analysis to determine common student perceptions, with particular reference to motivation and interest. In general, more students associated in-class lessons with higher motivation and more interest, due to better understanding, valued classroom interaction with the lecturer and peers, and input from the lecturer. Students preferring the online lesson cited speed and convenience of study and flexibility of time and place of study as reasons for their choice. Skilful implementation of online lessons can enhance a language course but should not undermine the value of face-to-face instruction with EFL teachers.

  4. Make your point! debate for ESL/EFL students

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    Lubetsky, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    This valuable workbook and downloadable audio can turn any ESL student into an accomplished debater!Make Your Point! opens the world of formal debate to the English learner. Debate fundamentals are taught form the first chapter in a student-centered format suitable for large and small classes alike.Each of the ten chapters offers a ""language focus"" and a ""debatable focus."" As students learn new debate skills, they also build important language skills. All task chains integrate speaking, listening, reading and writing activities. Most activities are intended for pairs and small groups.

  5. Measuring EFL Students` Vocabulary Size: Why and How

    OpenAIRE

    Kurniawan, Iwan

    2016-01-01

    Students` vocabulary size plays very important role toward their success in learning new language. To succeed in language learning 2,000 word families is often mentioned. Having this number, a reader can understand nine from ten words in many written text. Right now, researchers propose number at least 3000 word families and mastering minimum 3000 word families will support students` success in academic reading at university level. To pass tests such as Cambridge First Certificate, TOEFL or ...

  6. EFL student teachers’ learning in a peer-tutoring research study group

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    John Jairo Viafara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to become peer-tutors in a B.A program in Modern Languages, a group of EFL (English as a Foreign Language student teachers attended a study and research group in a university. Throughout their participation, prospective teachers collaborated and reflected by means of tasks completion and dialogue to learn the theory and practice of tutoring and research. Additionally, participants provided survey, journal and interview data to contribute with the exploration of how their group membership shaped them academically and personally. Results suggested that student teachers increased their knowledge of English due to their use of real-life group dynamics, among others. Furthermore, they updated and expanded their competencies to monitor pedagogical situations, design strategies and solve problems.

  7. The Effects of Portfolio Use in Teaching Report Writing: EFL Students' Perspective

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    Hussein Taha Assaggaf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio has widely been used in various areas including second language writing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the views of students in using portfolio in teaching technical report-writing. The participants are computer science students enrolled in a report writing course at a university in Yemen. For data collection, the study used three techniques; namely, group discussions, written reflections and a short questionnaire. The findings showed participants' positive views towards the use of portfolio in teaching writing in general and report writing in particular. The main views concerning the use of portfolio in teaching writing in general are: improving writing learning, making writing more fun and monitoring one's writing. The main findings regarding report writing were improving areas such as elements of writing, getting better feedback and report writing elements. The study concluded with a number of recommendations pertaining to both the practice of portfolio in EFL writing settings, as well as the future research.

  8. Using interactive graphical and technological strategies for EFL reading comprehension: A case study involving engineering students

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    Julia Valeska Barraza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study engaged a group of engineering students in the use of interactive graphical and technological strategies called IGOs (interactive, graphic organisers software in order to improve their level of EFL reading comprehension. The learners were asked to use three different types of IGOs, causes and effects, a sequence of events and pros and cons. Data was gathered through an opinion’s survey with the intention of collecting and evaluating the students’ perceptions on the use of the IGOs software. Findings revealed that most of the learners answered positively. Students also expressed they wanted more opportunities to use this software; because they not only could improve their scores but also, they enjoyed the experience they had using the new strategies software.

  9. Divergent Language Choices and Maintenance of Intersubjectivity: The Case of Danish EFL Young Learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa; Sert, Olcay

    Using CA of 2 hours of video-recordings, this study illustrates the interactional resources employed by Danish young EFL learners and their teacher in maintaining intersubjectivity and pedagogical foci. The results reveal two sequential formats that help to ensure student understanding, as well...

  10. Receptive Vocabulary Measures for EFL Costa Rican High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Garcia, Damaris

    2017-01-01

    The study offers a glimpse of the current situation of foreign language education in the Costa Rican context from the perspective of vocabulary knowledge, particularly passive vocabulary size. Students from two institutions participated: one school implements Content Based Teaching while the other follows traditional, Foreign Language Teaching…

  11. Learning Styles and Preferences of Jordanian EFL Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparative investigation into the learning styles of successful and unsuccessful language learners. Subjects of the study were seventeen graduate university students at Yarmouk University, Jordan. They were categorized as "successful" or "unsuccessful" learners, on the basis of their final…

  12. Developing a Model of Teaching Reading Comprehension for EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamra, Arifuddin; Syatriana, Eny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a model of teaching reading comprehension based on the objectives of teaching reading at the senior high school and the teachers' understanding of the school curriculum and to describe the implementation of the model. The subject consisted of 24 teachers, 167 students of five SMAs (senior high schools) in South…

  13. DEVELOPING WRITING ABILITIES OF EFL STUDENTS THROUGH BLOGGING

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    Orachorn KITCHAKARN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to a rapid development and expansion of technology and, as a result, Web 2.0 technologies are providing both teachers and learners with new solutions to the limitations of traditional method in the field of language teaching and learning. The research compared students’ writing ability before and after they were taught through blog, a new medium or tool for written communication and interaction in many different languages around the world. The research design is a kind of one group pretest posttest. Participants were 35 first-year students. They were divided into eight groups. Four or five students in each group created a blog, www.blogger.com, and they worked together for twelve weeks to produce six pieces of writing assignments. Each member in the group worked through providing comments, editing and revising on the blog until the group got a final writing and submitted that to the teacher for grading. The instruments used in this study were: Ø two writing tests Ø a questionnaire surveying students’ attitude toward learning through blogs, and Ø postings on blogs to reflect their learning experiences. The results revealed that after the students worked together on weblogs, their English writing mean score of the posttest was higher than that of the pretest, and they had positive attitudes towards using weblogs in learning. Regarding cooperative learning experiences through using weblogs, most students thought that it was interesting, a new experience to work with their friends on the weblogs.

  14. Multilingualism in an EFL Practicum: Increasing Student Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, María Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Research in second language teacher education has demonstrated that novice teachers have difficulty in using their pedagogical knowledge, which partly results from a heavy focus on theory offered in teacher training programs (e.g., Bartels, 2005, 2009; Tarone & Allwright, 2005). In order to better equip student teachers with the knowledge…

  15. Asian EFL University Students' Preference toward Teaching Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Aaron David

    2015-01-01

    Designing and presenting lessons is the center of the teaching process. Every day teachers must make decisions about the instructional process. A teacher's approach can have an enormous impact on the effectiveness of his or her teaching. Understanding students' preferences toward teaching approaches and teaching styles can create opportunities for…

  16. Implementing Controlled Composition to Improve Vocabulary Mastery of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juriah

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study was to know how (1) Controlled composition teaching techniques implemented by the English teacher at SDN 027 Samarinda to improve vocabulary mastery, and (2) Controlled composition teaching techniques improves vocabulary mastery of the sixth grade students of SDN 027 Samarinda. This research used a Classroom Action…

  17. Student Choice and Reading in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguelles Alvarez, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the role of both the teacher and the student when choosing materials for the course, more specifically, with the selection of books for extensive reading. Although carried out in a first year tertiary education level, the results of this small scale study could be a good starting point for reflection in previous secondary and…

  18. The Flipped Classroom Impact in Grammar Class on EFL Saudi Secondary School Students' Performances and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Sarah S.; Alshumaimeri, Yousif A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the flipped classroom strategy in teaching English grammar to examine its impact on secondary school students' performances, perceptions, and attitudes toward learning English independently. The researcher implemented the flipped classroom strategy by selecting videos based on the students' textbook and uploading…

  19. EXPLORING WRITER IDENTITY IN MEXICAN EFL STUDENTS' ACADEMIC WRITING

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    Ruth Roux Rodríguez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore writer identity in Mexican undergraduate students of Applied Linguistics writing in English. We focused on the participants' use of first person pronouns and the ways in which they conceptualized their identity as authors of their essays. We employed a combination of text analysis and discourse-based interview methodologies. Findings indicate that participants that made ample use of first person pronouns employed them to present personal experiences rather than to project a strong authorial self. By contrast, those who made little use of first person pronouns seemed to project stronger authorial selves by employing a broader range of stylistic choices. The use of first person pronouns is not essential in the development of strong authorial selves. Higher education should provide better opportunities and resources for students to learn how to project a strong authorial presence in the academic texts they write in English.

  20. Anxiety in Spanish EFL students in different university degree programmes

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    Patricia Arnaiz-Castro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have studied the effects of anxiety on foreign language learning since the 1970's, and despite significant advances in approaches to language teaching, the literature continues to report the existence of language apprehension in the classroom and its debilitating effect on the learning process. However, very few studies have been developed in a socio-cultural context comparable to ours, namely, a Spanish university in which English is learnt. This study set out to examine and compare the feelings of anxiety experienced by university students enrolled in six different degree programs. A total of 200 students participated in this study. The data were collected using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS (Horwitz, Horwitz and Cope, 1986. The analyses reveal, firstly, that all the students suffered from average anxiety levels; secondly, that only in one of the aspects is the anxiety level of participants with English as a main subject (i.e. chosen lower than that of participants for whom English is a non-elective degree requirement; and in the third place, that the relationship between anxiety and the mark obtained by participants is stronger in the case of those who have English as a degree requirement. The implications of these results for a better understanding of anxiety and foreign language learning are discussed.

  1. The Effect of Communicative Activities on EFL Learners’ Motivation: A Case of Students in the Amazon Region of Ecuador

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    César Ochoa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to shed light on the relationship between communicative activities and their impact on students’ motivation to learn English as a Foreign Language (EFL. A total of 180 senior high school learners (86 male and 94 female and 8 EFL teachers in a town of the Amazon region of Ecuador completed a questionnaire. A sample of these students and all of the teachers participated in a face-to-face interview. Both instruments were applied to obtain data concerned with use of communicative activities in the classroom and their relation with motivation. The data gathered was analyzed using a mixed-method approach, which comprised quantitative and qualitative methods. The results showed that students and teachers believe that communicative activities are motivating. Furthermore, students feel highly motivated when participating in interactive activities because these enhance their fluency, pronunciation and performance in the use of English in a realistic and enjoyable way.

  2. LOOKING INTO THE EFL STUDENTS TYPE OF FEEDBACKS ON PEER CORRECTION ACTIVITY

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    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the types of feedbacks made by EFL students in a writing class. A number of 25 students essays were collected and analysed. The results revealed that a number of 61 responding feedbacks were found in the types of support, sharing knowledge, negotiation, appreciation and criticism. Meanwhile, 142 correcting feedbacks were found in the types of coded, uncoded, a combination of coded and uncoded and direct answer. The type most used in responding feedback was support, which indicates that it is an important pursuit in these students learning to drive each other into improving their writing skills with confidence. Whilst the least used was criticism, and this indicates that it was not considerably favoured to be given in the peer correction feedbacks since they restrain encouragement and cause social anxiety. The type most used in correcting feedbacks was a combination of coded and uncoded. This signifies that to provide both mark and symbol on an error can avoid confusion between the student corrector and the student writer. The least used was direct answer, which signified that it was only done by students who had high English proficiency and confidence to provide the correct answer directly on the errors.

  3. Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Buus, Lillian; Thorsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Classes The bachelor programme in biomedical laboratory technology at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on......-site or to attend classes from home via live video-stream. Our previous studies revealed that interaction and dialog between attendants were reduced in the live-streamed sessions compared to on-site teaching, and that the main reasons were technological issues and the teacher’s choice of teaching methods. One......-site and live video-streamed teaching. The results document a continuous progress in technological transparency, as the live video-streamed classes increasingly support the student’s flexibility in ways of attending and interacting in classes. Interaction is facilitated through teacher driven support, resulting...

  4. Exploring University Students' Engagement with Online Video Lectures in a Blended Introductory Mechanics Course

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    Lin, Shih-Yin; Seaton, Daniel T; Douglas, Scott S; Greco, Edwin F; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    The advent of MOOCs has stimulated interest in using online videos to deliver content in university courses. We examined student engagement with 78 online videos that we created and were incorporated into a one-semester blended introductory mechanics course at the Georgia Institute of Technology. We found that students were more engaged with videos that supported laboratory activities than with videos that presented lecture content. In particular, the percentage of students accessing laboratory videos was consistently greater than 80 percent throughout the semester while the percentage of students accessing lecture videos dropped to less than 40 percent by the end of the term. Moreover, students were more likely to access the entirety of a laboratory video than a lecture video. Our results suggest that students may access videos based on perceived value: students appear to consider the laboratory videos as essential for successfully completing the laboratories while students appear to consider the lecture vid...

  5. Harnessing Students' Interest in Physics with Their Own Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like, Christopher

    2011-04-01

    Many physics teachers assign projects where students are asked to measure real-world motion. One purpose of this student-centered activity is to cultivate the relevance of physics in their lives. Typical project topics may include measuring the speed of a student's fastball and calculating how much reaction time batters are given. Another student may find the trajectory of her dive off the blocks at the pool and its effect on race time. Leaving the experimental design to the student's imagination allows for a variety of proposals ranging from stopwatches to highly technical video analysis. The past few years have shown an increase in students' eagerness to tackle the physics behind the motion of virtual characters and phenomena in their own video games. This paper puts forth a method of analyzing the physics behind bringing the games students are playing for enjoyment into the physics classroom.

  6. Student Views on Learning Environments Enriched by Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosterelioglu, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    This study intended to identify student views regarding the enrichment of instructional process via video clips based on the goals of the class. The study was conducted in Educational Psychology classes at Amasya University Faculty of Education during the 2012-2013 academic year. The study was implemented on students in the Classroom Teaching and…

  7. Using Video Effectively in Diverse Classes: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Anthony; Budde-Sung, Amanda E. K.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an exploratory study into the perceptions of a culturally and linguistically diverse cohort of management students (n = 236) about the use of video as a teaching and learning tool. The results show that while students are generally favorable toward audiovisual materials, the choice of content, how the medium…

  8. The Video Toaster Meets Science + English + At-Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryess, Charlie

    1992-01-01

    Describes an experimental Science-English class for at-risk students which was team taught and used technology--particularly a Video Toaster (a videotape editing machine)--as a motivator. Discusses procedures for turning videotape taken on field trips into three- to five-minute student productions on California's water crisis. (SR)

  9. Students Designing Video Games about Immunology: Insights for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Neda; Sheridan, Kimberly; Williams, Asia; Clark, Kevin; Stegman, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Exposing American K-12 students to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content is a national initiative. Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration targets students from underserved communities and uses their interest in video games as a way to introduce science, technology, engineering, and math topics. This article describes a…

  10. Developing and Evaluating SynctoLearn, a Fully Automatic Video and Transcript Synchronization Tool for EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao-Jan Howard

    2011-01-01

    Authentic videos are always motivational for foreign language learners. According to the findings of many empirical studies, subtitled L2 videos are particularly useful for foreign language learning. Although there are many authentic English videos available on the Internet, most of these videos do not have subtitles. If subtitles can be added to…

  11. Video Creation: A Tool for Engaging Students to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Students today process information very differently than those of previous generations. They are used to getting their news from 140-character tweets, being entertained by You-Tube videos, and Googling everything. Thus, traditional passive methods of content delivery do not work well for many of these millennials. All students, regardless of career goals, need to become scientifically literate to be able to function in a world where scientific issues are of increasing importance. Those who have had experience applying scientific reasoning to real-world problems in the classroom will be better equipped to make informed decisions in the future. The problem to be solved is how to present scientific content in a manner that fosters student learning in today's world. This presentation will describe how the appeal of technology and social communication via creation of documentary-style videos has been used to engage students to learn scientific concepts in a university non-science major course focused on energy and the environment. These video projects place control of the learning experience into the hands of the learner and provide an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills. Students discover how to locate scientifically reliable information by limiting searches to respected sources and synthesize the information through collaborative content creation to generate a "story". Video projects have a number of advantages over research paper writing. They allow students to develop collaboration skills and be creative in how they deliver the scientific content. Research projects are more effective when the audience is larger than just a teacher. Although our videos are used as peer-teaching tools in the classroom, they also are shown to a larger audience in a public forum to increase the challenge. Video will be the professional communication tool of the future. This presentation will cover the components of the video production process and instructional lessons

  12. Teaching professionalism to first year medical students using video clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Allison Haley; Thomas, Aliki; Fuks, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Medical schools are confronted with the challenge of teaching professionalism during medical training. The aim of this study was to examine medical students' perceptions of using video clips as a beneficial teaching tool to learn professionalism and other aspects of physicianship. As part of the longitudinal Physician Apprenticeship course at McGill University, first year medical students viewed video clips from the television series ER. The study used qualitative description and thematic analysis to interpret responses to questionnaires, which explored the educational merits of this exercise. Completed questionnaires were submitted by 112 students from 21 small groups. A major theme concerned the students' perceptions of the utility of video clips as a teaching tool, and consisted of comments organized into 10 categories: "authenticity and believability", "thought provoking", "skills and approaches", "setting", "medium", "level of training", "mentorship", "experiential learning", "effectiveness" and "relevance to practice". Another major theme reflected the qualities of physicianship portrayed in video clips, and included seven categories: "patient-centeredness", "communication", "physician-patient relationship", "professionalism", "ethical behavior", "interprofessional practice" and "mentorship". This study demonstrated that students perceived the value of using video clips from a television series as a means of teaching professionalism and other aspects of physicianship.

  13. The effectiveness of audio books on the reading comprehension of selected texts by university EFL students at different proficiency levels

    OpenAIRE

    Türker, Sami

    2010-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Bilkent University, 2010. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2010. Includes bibliographical references leaves 79-83. This study mainly investigated the effectiveness of audio books on the reading comprehension of selected texts by university EFL students. This study also aimed to find out whether a difference in students‘ reading comprehension as a result of exposure to audio books emerges based on thei...

  14. EXPLORING EFL LEARNERS’ DIFFICULTIES IN THE PRODUCTIVE SKILLS: THE CASE OF FIRST-YEAR LMD STUDENTS AT TLEMCEN UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    SAF, Salima; OUAHHOUD, Zahira Board

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to shed the light on the linguistic and the psychological reasons behind first-year EFL learners’ weaknesses and difficulties in producing the English language at the Department of English in Tlemcen University. This leads to ask the following research questions:  What are the linguistic factors which cause students difficulties ?  What are the psychological variables that influence the students’ speaking skill ? Two hypotheses were ...

  15. Translating Legal Collocations in Contract Agreements by Iraqi EFL Students-Translators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntaha A. Abdulwahid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal translation of contract agreements is a challenge to translators as it involves combining the literary translation with the technical terminological precision. In translating legal contract agreements, a legal translator must utilize the lexical or syntactic precision and, more importantly, the pragmatic awareness of the context. This will guarantee an overall communicative process and avoid inconsistency in legal translation. However, the inability of the translator to meet these two functions in translating the contract item not only affects the contractors’ comprehension of the contract item but also affects the parties’ contractual obligations. In light of this, the purpose of this study was to find out how legal collocations used in contract agreements are translated from Arabic into English by student-translators in terms of (1 purely technical, (2 semi-technical, and (3 everyday vocabulary collocations. For the data collection, a multiple-choice collocation test was used to be answered by 35 EFL Iraqi undergraduate translator-students to decide on the aspects of weaknesses and strengths of their translation, thus decide on the aspects of correction. The findings showed that these students had serious problems in translating legal collocations as they lack the linguistic knowledge and pragmatic awareness needed to achieve the legal meaning and effect. They were also unable to make a difference among the three categories of legal collocations, purely technical, semi-technical, and everyday vocabulary collocations. These students should be exposed to more legal translation practices to obtain the required experience needed for their future career.

  16. Digital Video as a Personalized Learning Assignment: A Qualitative Study of Student Authored Video Using the ICSDR Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurie O.; Cox, Thomas D.

    2018-01-01

    Students within this study followed the ICSDR (Identify, Conceptualize/Connect, Storyboard, Develop, Review/Reflect/Revise) development model to create digital video, as a personalized and active learning assignment. The participants, graduate students in education, indicated that following the ICSDR framework for student-authored video guided…

  17. The Role of Reading Skills on Reading Comprehension Ability of Turkish EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading is a part of our daily lives. It is performed both for pleasure and information. Reading skills are important for the individuals since they foster comprehension in reading. If the students do not have knowledge of reading skills, they cannot be expected to be successful readers. Thus, they cannot achieve the level of comprehension required to pass exams in their own departments. For this reason, reading skills should be taught in universities for the students to be able to cope with comprehension problems. This case study aims to find out whether or not reading skills has a role on the reading comprehension ability of Turkish EFL students. This study is both a qualitative and a quantitative study which lasted for a duration of 14 weeks. Two groups were selected (experimental and control among prep classes at Kahramanmaraş Sütçü Imam University. Both groups were administered a pre-test and questionnaire at the beginning of the study to find out if they were aware of reading skills. In addition, 10 students were chosen randomly for interview. During the study, reading skills were infused into the curriculum through designing lesson plans in accordance with the language content and topics for level C students, as determined by the Common European Language Framework. The lessons required the students to use reading skills before, during, and post reading. At the end of the study, the same questionnaire was re-administered. The students were given the post-test and then interviewed. The quantitative data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. The obtained data revealed that the students enhanced their comprehension ability provided that they were taught to use reading skills.

  18. An Investigation of the Relationship between College Chinese EFL Students' Autonomous Learning Capacity and Motivation in Using Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Minran

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between college EFL students' autonomous learning capacity and motivation in using web-based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in China. This study included three questionnaires: the student background questionnaire, the questionnaire on student autonomous learning capacity, and…

  19. The Effectiveness of a Programme-Based Vocabulary Learning Strategies for Developing English Vocabulary for EFL Female Students at Taif University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, Nasrah Mahmoud; Al Asmari, AbdulRahman Awadh

    2017-01-01

    The study of vocabulary can be considered a chief issue which the second language students encounter within the learning of another language especially, for non-English major students. This study aims at assessing the influence of a suggested program for enhancing EFL students` vocabulary and vocabulary learning strategies use. The sample of this…

  20. Investigating Students' Use and Adoption of "With-Video Assignments": Lessons Learnt for Video-Based Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Ilias O.; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mikalef, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The use of video-based open educational resources is widespread, and includes multiple approaches to implementation. In this paper, the term "with-video assignments" is introduced to portray video learning resources enhanced with assignments. The goal of this study is to examine the factors that influence students' intention to adopt…

  1. Case study: student perceptions of video streaming nursing class sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall Parilo, Denise M; Parsh, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Due to space constraints, students in their pediatric and obstetrical nursing courses received lecture in two formats: live lecture and video-streamed lecture. Live lecture is the traditional classroom format of live, in-person lecture without recording archives, whereas video streaming is live (synchronous) online lecture, also recorded for digital archive (asynchronous viewing). At the end of the semester, students (N = 53) responded to a survey about what they liked about both methods of instruction. Results reveal strengths of both methods and suggest ways to make both methods more effective. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. To Speak Like a TED Speaker--A Case Study of TED Motivated English Public Speaking Study in EFL Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxia; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Dongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to investigate the effectiveness of a new course pattern--TED-motivated English Public Speaking Course in EFL teaching in China. This class framework adopts TED videos as the learning materials to stimulate students to be a better speaker. Meanwhile, it aims to examine to what extent the five aspects of language skills are…

  3. Improving Student Performance in a Management Science Course with Supplemental Tutorial Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Janice K.; Cahn, E. Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe the implementation and assessment of supplementary online video tutorials in a management science course. The videos were a mix of existing videos curated from the web and new videos created by the instructors of the course. Students were encouraged to use the resources with grade incentives. Students who used more of these…

  4. The Difference between the Effectiveness of Authentic and Pedagogical Films in Learning Vocabulary among Iranian EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Soltani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to investigate the effectiveness of authentic and pedagogical films with English and Persian subtitles in learning vocabulary. Moreover, the role of these two types of subtitles and the films with no subtitles were investigated. To conduct the study, 30 Iranian EFL students were selected based on the results of an Oxford Placement Test and were assigned in two experimental groups as authentic and pedagogical groups. The students were given twelve sessions as treatment. Then, the researcher administered a post-test at the end of the treatment period. The post-test was a multiple-choice test with 25 items. To answer the research questions statistical analysis was performed. The results of t-test showed that the students in authentic group had a better performance than the students in the pedagogical group in vocabulary learning. Regarding the findings of One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tuckey test, revealed that the students who received films with English subtitles had a better performance in comparison to groups of students who watched films with Farsi subtitles or those watched films with no subtitles. Keywords: Subtitles, pedagogical, authentic, films, EFL students, vocabulary learning

  5. Reflections from teachers and students on speaking anxiety in an EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkakoson Songyut

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on part of the research project in which instructor perspectives on the role of anxiety in an EFL speaking classroom and anxiety-coping strategies students employ when speaking English have been investigated. The existence of students’ speaking anxiety was revealed via a teacher interview. A total of 88 students from the intact classes also responded to an interview form for an analysis of anxiety-coping strategies they utilised when speaking English in class. The qualitative data from both instruments was analysed using the content analysis. The findings of the teacher interview data put forward that students of this study have experienced speaking-in-class anxiety. This anxiety may influence their grades, to some extent. Three factors that may hinder students’ development of oral skills emerge, including their lack of self-confidence, having poor English background and having neither intrinsic nor extrinsic motivation to use English. Using the target language as the medium of communication in class is viewed by the teachers as a must in theory, but flexibility is allowed in practice. Moreover, the results of the student interview data show a wide range of strategies employed to deal with anxiety (ie social, affective, meta-cognitive, compensatory, cognitive and memory-related strategies. Social strategies are the most frequently-used techniques. Suggestions for improvement in the overall oral English (ie vocabulary focus, audiovisual focus, self-practice, social focus, auditory focus, meta-cognitive focus, compensatory focus and affective focus have also been given by the student participants. An increased repertoire of vocabulary is viewed as the most effective tool for such improvement.

  6. Article Errors in the English Writing of Saudi EFL Preparatory Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid Alhaisoni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at providing a comprehensive account of the types of errors produced by Saudi EFL students enrolled in the preparatory year programe in their use of articles, based on the Surface Structure Taxonomies (SST of errors. The study describes the types, frequency and sources of the definite and indefinite article errors in writing compositions. Data were collected from written samples of 150 students. They were given one-and-a-half hours to write on one of four different descriptive topics. Analysis of  inter-lingual and intra-lingual sources of article errors revealed that the frequency of eliminating both the indefinite articles and the definite article was higher than the frequency of inserting and substituting one article with the other. The study also shows that errors of using ‘a’ were more common than errors of using ‘an’ and ‘the’ in the writing texts.  This result also indicates that L1 interference strongly influences the process of second language acquisition of the articles, having a negative effect on the learning process Pedagogical practices including comparison of article use in learners’ both language systems may improve learners’ ability to use the articles correctly in writing and the other language skills.

  7. Developing Handheld Video Intervention for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Elizabeth M.; Yakubova, Gulnoza

    2016-01-01

    Video-based intervention (VBI) has strong evidence supporting efficiency in teaching social, communication, functional, behavior, play, and self-help skills and emerging evidence for teaching academic skills to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). VBI allows opportunities to electronically provide personalized, consistent, and prerecorded…

  8. Teaching Bioethics via the Production of Student-Generated Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Christopher J. R.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that science is not conducted in a vacuum and that advances in the biosciences have ethical and social implications for the wider community. An exercise is described in which undergraduate students work in teams to produce short videos about the science and ethical dimensions of current developments in biomedicine.…

  9. Case Study: Student-Produced Videos for the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes a way of building a library of student-produced videos to use in the flipped classroom.

  10. Video Game Playing and Academic Performance in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen R.; Stermer, Steven Paul; Burgess, Melinda C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The relations between media consumption, especially TV viewing, and school performance have been extensively examined. However, even though video game playing may have replaced TV viewing as the most frequent form of media usage, relatively little research has examined its relations to school performance, especially in older students. We surveyed…

  11. Student-Built Underwater Video and Data Capturing Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, F.

    2016-12-01

    Students from Stockbridge High School Robotics Team invention is a low cost underwater video and data capturing device. This system is capable of shooting time-lapse photography and/or video for up to 3 days of video at a time. It can be used in remote locations without having to change batteries or adding additional external hard drives for data storage. The video capturing device has a unique base and mounting system which houses a pi drive and a programmable raspberry pi with a camera module. This system is powered by two 12 volt batteries, which makes it easier for users to recharge after use. Our data capturing device has the same unique base and mounting system as the underwater camera. The data capturing device consists of an Arduino and SD card shield that is capable of collecting continuous temperature and pH readings underwater. This data will then be logged onto the SD card for easy access and recording. The low cost underwater video and data capturing device can reach depths up to 100 meters while recording 36 hours of video on 1 terabyte of storage. It also features night vision infrared light capabilities. The cost to build our invention is $500. The goal of this was to provide a device that can easily be accessed by marine biologists, teachers, researchers and citizen scientists to capture photographic and water quality data in marine environments over extended periods of time.

  12. A case study of a Hungarian EFL teacher’s assessment practices with her young learners

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella Hild

    2017-01-01

    The case study aims to provide insights into how a Hungarian EFL teacher used tests, assessed her young learners and gave feedback to them in the classroom. This qualitative, exploratory study was a follow-up to a large-scale project. In this single-case study, data were collected from an EFL teacher and five of her seventh graders on what tasks she used to assess them and how. The participants were interviewed. For the purpose of triangulation, the students were also audio- and video-recorde...

  13. A Study of a Multimedia Web Annotation System and Its Effect on the EFL Writing and Speaking Performance of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shadiev, Rustam; Huang, Szu-Min

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve students' English as Foreign Language (EFL) writing and speaking performance with appropriate learning activity design supported by Virtual Pen ("VPen"), a multimedia web annotation system. Students' perceptions toward using "VPen" and learning activities, attitude toward using "VPen," actual "VPen" usage and…

  14. The Effect of Expansion of Vision Span on Reading Speed: A Case Study of EFL Major Students at King Khalid University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana'an, Basim Hamdan Ibrahim; Rab, Salahud Din Abdul; Siddiqui, Ahlullah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to demonstrate how and to what extent the expansion of vision span could be a decisive factor in enhancing the reading speed of EFL major students in the English Department at King Khalid University while maintaining their previous level of comprehension. The reading speed of students in the English Department at KKU…

  15. EFL Learners’ Critical Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Four College Students in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ko, Mei-yun; Wang, Tzu-Fu

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored four English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) learners’ critical literacy practices by analyzing their reflective essays on a gender-related article and their perceptions of critical literacy...

  16. Idea Sharing: Do Students Learn Better through a More Entertaining Way? The Case of Taiwan EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin Min; Wu, Chita

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at sharing with the readers two ways of English vocabulary learning based upon a small-scale study conducted in Taiwan. The participants of this study were one hundred and three university students randomly chosen from universities in Taiwan. They received questionnaires and vocabulary teaching videos through e-mail or Facebook.…

  17. Metamorphological awareness and EFL students' memory, retention, and retrieval of English adjectival lexicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lawrence Jun

    2002-12-01

    Research has shown that foreign or second language learners' metalinguistic awareness has important effects on their acquisition of the target language. Important among a multitude of the concerns are problems these learners encounter when they have to process the morphological features of individual words, particularly in the acquisition of literacy skills. Nevertheless, for students who learn English as a foreign or second language for academic purposes, one of the biggest challenges in their advanced study is how they can effectively remember, retain, and retrieve the colossal number of newly learnt English vocabulary, including adjectival lexicons, to enhance their academic success. Results from the present report on the effects of metamorphological awareness of 65 adult Chinese EFL learners' memory, retention, and retrieval of adjectival lexicons show that, although the subjects in the two groups did not differ significantly in their performance on a pretest designed to check their lexical knowledge and no sex difference was observed, statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in both conditions (immediate and delayed retrievals) on a posttest. The experimental group and women predominantly performed better in the memory-retention-retrieval tasks assigned to them. Implications for educational research and practices are also discussed.

  18. GENDER IN EFL CLASSROOM: TRANSITIVITY ANALYSIS IN ENGLISH TEXTBOOK FOR INDONESIAN STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Emilia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the topic of gender in EFL classroom, particularly in Indonesian context. Owing to the framework proposed by Sunderland (1992, the paper focuses on the discussion of gender in classroom materials, i.e. English textbooks. Selected reading passages were analyzed within the framework of Transitivity system of functional grammar (Halliday & Mathiessen, 2004; Haliday & Mathiessen, 2014. The Processes in the texts (e.g. travel, walk, and climb reveal that males were perpetually constructed as ‘adventurous’, ‘risk taker’, ‘active’, ‘independent’, and ‘capable’. Meanwhile, the Processes also indicate that the females were shaped as more ‘passive', ’expressive’, ‘nurturing’, and ‘unassertive’ than their male counterparts (Blackstone, 2003; Evans & Davies, 2000. The findings suggest that the gender roles were presented in an asymmetrical manner. The paper provides recommendation in terms of how both teachers and students can develop gender awareness in the classroom practices through the use of the textbooks.

  19. Grammatical Errors in English Essays Written by Thai EFL Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirilak Khumphee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted according to three research objectives: 1 to investigate common types of grammatical errors based on their frequency of occurrence in English essay writing of Thai EFL undergraduate students, 2 to examine the effects of L1 interference on discovered grammatical errors, in particular, to find out whether there were any of the errors influenced by the students’ mother tongue (Thai language, and 3 to provide some essential pedagogical implications for second language learning and teaching. The subjects of this study were 83 second-year students majoring in English at Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University, and they were drawn by using purposive sampling method. The study procedures consisted of 2 steps: 1 the students were asked to write an English essay, and 2 the researcher of this study analyzed the students’ essays by employing the study analysis framework which was adapted from Na-ngam’s (2005 error taxonomy and Richards’ (1971 error categories. The findings indicated that ; 1 there were 26 types of grammatical errors, with the total number of 4,909 errors, occurred in the students’ written work, and the five most common types of all were punctuation, nouns, prepositions, verbs, and articles respectively ; and 2 there were 1,560 out of 4,909 errors, which were categorized into 14 types, caused by the students’ L1 interference, Thai language. The five most frequent numbers of these types of errors fell into the use of plural form of nouns, omission of punctuation, wrong structures of complex sentences, omission of some parts of a sentence, and fragments respectively.

  20. The Comparison of Typed and Handwritten Essays of Iranian EFL Students in terms of Length, Spelling, and Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Sarbakhshian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to compare typed and handwritten essays of Iranian EFL students in terms of length, spelling, and grammar. To administer the study, the researchers utilized Alice Touch Typing Tutor software to select 15 upper intermediate students with higher ability to write two essays: one typed and the other handwritten. The students were both males and females between the ages of 22 to 35. The analyses of the students’ scores in the three mentioned criteria through three paired samples t-tests indicate that typed essays are significantly better than handwritten ones in terms of length of texts and grammatical mistakes, but not significantly different in spelling mistakes. Positive effects of typing can provide a logical reason for students, especially TOEFL applicants, to spend more time on acquiring typing skill and also for teachers to encourage their students with higher typing ability to choose typed format in their essays.

  1. PhD students at Science & Technology exploring student learning in a collaborative video-circle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Hougaard, Rikke F.

    to facilitate students' exploratory talk in small class teaching, lab exercises etc. A potential third module organized as a video-circle with collaborative analysis of the TAs teaching based on observation and video has therefore been tested. The TAs reflections and their enactments in own teaching have been...... examined using video, audio and questionnaires. The TAs reported a high level of outcomes and referred to the importance of the video as evidence supporting the discussions. The importance of the collaboration between peers and staff (educational developers) was emphasized: highlighting the benefit...

  2. Medical students¿ assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundWe introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching...

  3. Bioscience Students' First Year Perspectives through Video Diaries: Home, Family and Student Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Green, Paul; Cashmore, Annette

    2012-01-01

    The first year experiences of students are viewed as important in contributing to retention, overall academic success and student satisfaction. As such there is an increased focus on students' experiences of their first weeks at university. In this paper we describe some findings from a video-diary project through which bioscience students…

  4. Digital video, learning styles, and student understanding of kinematics graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Teresa Lee

    1997-12-01

    Student ability to analyze and interpret motion graphs following laboratory instruction that utilized interactive digital video as well as traditional instructional techniques was investigated. Research presented suggested that digital video tools serve to motivate students and may be an effective mechanism to enhance student understanding of motion concepts. Two laboratory exercises involving motion concepts were developed for this study. Students were divided into two instructional groups. The treatment group used digital video techniques and the control group used traditional techniques to perform the laboratory exercises. Student understanding of motion concepts were assessed, in part, using the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Other assessment measures included student responses to a set of written graphical analysis questions and two post-lab activities. Possible relationships between individual learning style preferences and student understanding of motion concepts were also addressed. Learning style preferences were assessed using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey prior to the instructional treatments. Students were asked to comment in writing about their learning styles before and after they were given the learning style assessment. Student comments revealed that the results they received from Productivity Environmental Preference Survey accurately reflected their learning styles. Results presented in this study showed that no significant relationship exists between students' learning style preferences and their ability to interpret motion graphs as measured by scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. In addition, the results showed no significant difference between instructional treatment and mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Analysis of writing activities revealed that students in the treatment group responded more effectively than students in the control group to graphical interpretation

  5. Impact of multimodality in reading comprehension of narrative texts in English as a foreign language (EFL in undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vera Millalén

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to compare the effect that monomodal and multimodal tests have on the reading comprehension level of English-written narrative texts that EFL learners achieve at a private Chilean university. For this purpose, a quasi-experiment was performed, using a monomodal reading comprehension test and another multimodal one, with intact groups. The experimental group took the multimodal format test, while the control group took the monomodal format test. The interest of this research focused on the need to integrate multimodal texts in L2 reading comprehension. The results endorse the hypothesis that students reach higher comprehension levels in multimodal reading comprehension tests.

  6. The effect of written corrective feedback on grammatical accuracy of EFL students: An improvement over previous unfocused designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin Khanlarzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of written corrective feedback (WCF in the improvement of language learners' grammatical accuracy has been a topic of interest in SLA studies for the past couple of decades. The present study reports the findings of a three-month study investigating the effect of direct unfocused WCF on the grammatical accuracy of elementary students in an EFL context. The researchers selected two intact classes totaling 33 students, and assigned each to a direct feedback group (n = 16 and a control group (n = 17. The students produced eight pieces of writing (a pretest, three writing tasks along with their revisions, and a posttest from which their grammatical accuracy was obtained. The results indicated that while the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in the revision of the three writing tasks, no significant difference was found when the two groups produced a new piece of writing after a one-month interval. The study concludes that accuracy improvement caused by unfocused WCF during the revision process does not extend to EFL learners' future writing when no feedback is available, at least at the elementary level.

  7. On the Relation of Locus of Control, Social and Cultural Capital and Oral Proficiency Achievement of EFL Students:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ashraf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two areas of difficulty that almost all students might face while learning a second language are speaking and listening skills.  Individuals’ perceptions about the underlying main causes of their lives’ events which is called Locus of Control (LOC, has a great role in their activities as well as the interactions between individuals and socio-cultural environments. This study aims at investigating the relationship between social cultural capital, LOC and oral proficiency (listening and speaking of Iranian EFL learners.  It also aims at examining the relationship between social cultural capital and LOC (internal and external. To meet this end, Social Cultural Capital Questionnaire (Pishghadam, Noghani & Zabihi, 2011 and the Persian version of  LOC questionnaire (Ghonsooly & Elahi, 2010 were administered to a sample of 100 upper intermediate EFL students from some language institutes in Mashhad, Iran. Both male (N=46 and female (N=54 students filled in two questionnaires. The participants’ Grand Point Averages (GPA of their FL Listening and Speaking exams also served as an index of their oral proficiency achievement. The results of the statistical analyses revealed a positive correlation between social cultural capital, LOC, and students’ oral proficiency. The findings also demonstrated a significant relationship between social cultural capital and LOC.

  8. Students Perceptions about the Use of Video Games in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgonjon, Jeroen; Valcke, Martin; Soetaert, Ronald; Schellens, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Video games are often regarded as promising teaching and learning tools for the 21st century. One of the main arguments is that video games are appealing to contemporary students. However, there are indications that video game acceptance cannot be taken for granted. In this study, a path model to examine and predict student acceptance of video…

  9. The Effectiveness of a Suggested Program Based on Combining the Direct and the Indirect Strategies on Developing the EFL Al-Azhr Secondary School Students' Strategic Competence Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshirbini Abdel-fattah Al-Ashrii, Ismail Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of using a suggested program based on integrating the direct and indirect approaches on developing Strategic Competence skills of EFL secondary school students. The study adopted the experimental design. One group was an experimental group (using the suggested program) and another group worked as the…

  10. Students' Responses to the Use of Songs in the EFL Classroom at a Public School in Bogotá: A Critical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Nilsen; Chapetón, Claudia Marcela

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an action research stydy aiming at fostering interest, participation, and self-expression in an EFL classroom at a public school in Usme, in the southeast of Bogotá. The study focuses on students' responses to the use of songs with social content within a framework of literacy as a situated social practice and…

  11. EFL Oral Communication Teaching Practices: A Close Look at University Teachers and A2 Students' Perspectives in Thailand and a Critical Eye from Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David Allen; Sinwongsuwat, Kemtong; Radic-Bojanic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to reexamine current EFL oral communication teaching practices from the perspectives of teachers and A2 students at two universities, namely Prince of Songkla University (PSU), Thailand and University of Novi Sad (UNS), Serbia. The main objectives were: (1) to analyze current practices from the perspectives of teachers and…

  12. Interweaving Autonomous Learning and Peer-tutoring in Coaching EFL Student-Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza Ariza Aleida

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we share the findings on the exploration of undergraduate efl (English as a Foreign Language student-teachers’ professional preparation and autonomous practices. Participants were tutees who attended tutorial sessions with peers in higher semesters. In this context, tutoring was based on a model we designed. As the model was implemented, they collected information by means of multiple qualitative research instruments. Results indicate that tutees’ learning process was strongly influenced by their personality and attitudes. Similarly, tutees expanded their views in regard to the English language, its learning, and their communicative competence. Finally, we pinpoint some considerations for others interested in adopting this pedagogical strategy. Key words: Peer tutoring, university tutoring, autonomous learning, independent work En este artículo compartimos hallazgos relacionados con la preparación profesional y las prácticas autónomas de estudiantes de inglés en un programa de licenciatura. Los participantes tutorados asistían a sesiones tutoriales con compañeros en semestres superiores. En este contexto, la tutoría se basó en un modelo que diseñamos. Durante la implementación del modelo se recogió información a través de múltiples instrumentos cualitativos de investigación. Los resultados revelan que el proceso de aprendizaje de los tutorados se vio fuertemente influenciado por su personalidad y sus actitudes. Asimismo, los tutorados ampliaron sus puntos de vista sobre la lengua inglesa, su aprendizaje y su competencia comunicativa. Finalmente, señalamos algunas consideraciones para los interesados en adoptar esta estrategia pedagógica Palabras clave: Tutoría entre compañeros, tutoría a nivel universitario, aprendizaje autónomo, trabajo independiente

  13. An Investigation of Vocabulary Learning Strategies by Iranian EFL Students in Different Proficiency Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Jafari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find out the various strategies used in learning vocabularies among Iranian EFL learners in three different proficiency levels (beginner, intermediate and advanced in Zanjan province. The vocabulary learning strategies which have been used in this research include determination, social, memory, cognitive, and meta-cognitive which follow Schmitt’s taxonomy. 110 students were randomly selected from two language institutes in Zanjan. Schmitt’s (1997 Vocabulary Learning Strategies’ questionnaire was administered to the learners with three proficiency levels. Then, descriptive statistics and Anova were utilized to analyze the data. Descriptive statistics revealed that the participants of the study regardless of their proficiency levels were generally medium strategy users who used all these strategies moderately except for the determination strategies that were used in high level. In addition, basic learners used all different types of strategies more frequently than intermediate and advanced learners. By comparing two other proficiency levels, advanced learners used determination strategies and meta-cognitive strategies more frequently than intermediate learners, while social, memory and cognitive strategies were used more frequently by Intermediates. In order to perceive if the results were statistically significant, Anova for between group mean differences was conducted. It revealed the fact that there is no significant difference among learners with different proficiency levels in application of determination and meta-cognitive strategies while the learners with lower proficiency level used social, memory and cognitive strategies more frequently, that is, these three strategies were used more frequently by basic, intermediate and advanced learners respectively.

  14. Competitive Team-Based Learning versus Group Investigation with Reference to the Language Proficiency of Iranian EFL Intermediate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Hassan Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a report on an experimental study which intended to look into the possible effects of Competitive Team-Based Learning (CTBL vis-à-vis Group Investigation (GI method of Cooperative Learning (CL on the language proficiency of Iranian EFL intermediate students. Seventy homogeneous Iranian intermediate students were selected out of a total population of 110 to serve the present study. The results of the study indicated the advantage of CTBL over GI in terms of its effect on improving the target group’s language proficiency. The results of the study were in contrast to the reports of researchers like Ab-Raza (2007, an Israeli language specialist, who have argued that students in Islamic countries “do not value diversity of ideas, beliefs, and perspectives” (p. 5 and so cannot be taught through modern methods like those of CL.

  15. Promoting Communicative Skills and Cultural Understanding among Saudi EFL Students Joining Summer English Programs at US Universities: A Web-Based Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ali Nasr Al-wossabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As English is one of the most spoken languages in the globally  interconnected  world of today, many Saudi universities are enrolling their EFL students in summer intensive English programs at US universities. The main purpose is to enhance their EFL students' oral competencies. This new policy is, in fact, the result of the failure of CLT practices in local universities (Liao, 2004; Nunan, 2003, large EFL classes and students' low proficiency (Yu, 2001; Li, 1998 and EFL teachers' preference for using traditional methods rather than communicative ones (Chowdhry, 2010; Littlewood, 2007. However, Saudi students, upon arrival to the US, encounter challenging communicative situations. The present study, therefore, advocates the implementation of four-week language software program in Jazan university prior to the later four-week language program in US universities. The aim is to prepare EFL Saudi students for the communicative and academic situations and cultural norm they would be encountering and experiencing in the USA. The project includes two modalities; online learning and in class learning. The online learning entails a language software content-based program with emphasis on listening, vocabulary, writing, grammar and reading skills.  The in-class learning includes only speaking activities that are paralleled and compatible to the online thematic content. Thus, the main focus of the present paper will primarily be directed to providing a detailed description of the online language software and the different elements involved in constituting it. Keywords: language software components, integrated skills, communicative competencies, intensive language programs, cultural and sociolinguistic norms

  16. EFL Writers' Perceptions of Portfolio Keeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2010-01-01

    Although portfolios in writing in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learning are alternative tools, the portfolio process mainly concerns the decisions of language teachers rather than students' perceptions of portfolios. The present study aims to descriptively measure the perceptions of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students towards…

  17. WHAT IS SAID AND WHAT IS DONE: EFL Student Writers’ Perceptions of Peer Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onuma LAKARNCHUA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The demand of responsibilities among teachers has evolved not only in classroom management but also to the extent of promoting communication and interpersonal skills. Social media is integrated in schools and higher learning institutions for communication and reflection of learning which enhance teachers’ performance in leadership quality and effective teaching. This study was designed in a qualitative approach mainly to explore the extent of interest and enjoyment students experienced during an intensive ICT course. Blog was used as a medium for reflection during the class where students posted their creations of videos, posters and other ICT materials. The three needs investigated were namely autonomy, competence, and relatedness support. The researcher further examined on students’ awareness of the usefulness of the ICT skill they learned and how much they can use the blog for teaching and learning. Based on the Basic Psychological Needs Theory framework (BPNT, this study has adopted the direct observation, journal entry, and interviews as a triangulation approach.

  18. Efficacy of Task-Induced Involvement in Incidental Lexical Development of Iranian Senior EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourakbari, Ali A.; Biria, Reza

    2015-01-01

    One of the most significant current discussions in L2 classroom research has been related to the necessity of vocabulary in language learning.Undoubtedly, EFL learners with high levels of lexical knowledge perform better in writing and oral tasks. Accordingly, the present study sought to investigate the efficacy of Task-induced Involvement in…

  19. The Use of EFL Reading Strategies among High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kate Tzu-Ching; Chen, Sabina Chia-Li

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional English l language classroom, reading is the skill that receives the most emphasis (Susser & Rob, 1990). Learners should use reading strategies to plan how to read and to enhance their reading comprehension (Poole, 2010). The purpose of this study was to explore the use of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading…

  20. International Orientation as Predictor of EFL Learning Strategy Use in Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platsidou, Maria; Kantaridou, Zoe; Papadopoulou, Iris

    2017-01-01

    L2 acquisition is a complicated process in which many parameters intertwine. Reported strategy use in L2 learning has been extensively researched in relation to factors that are likely to determine it, such as positive attitudes towards English as a foreign language (EFL) learning. In this paper, we investigated another potential determinant of…

  1. Online Corpus Tools in Scholarly Writing: A Case of EFL Postgraduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamjani, Sedigheh Shakib; Razavi, Ommehoney Fazel; Hussin, Habsah

    2017-01-01

    Some studies have reported the positive outcome of using concordancers and dictionaries in (ESL) context. This study aims to examine how an EFL writer consulted with concordancers and dictionaries along with Google and Google Scholar when engaging in academic writing at university level. The researcher investigated a non-English-major postgraduate…

  2. An NLP-Based Programme for Developing EFL Student-Teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... using motivational language. Based on these findings, it was recommended that direct and explicit teaching of motivational language by using influential hypnotic language patterns should be integrated into EFL pre-service teacher training curricula. Keywords: Motivational language, Neuro-linguistic Programming, Milton ...

  3. How EFL Students Can Use Google to Correct Their "Untreatable" Written Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiller, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an experiment in which a group of 17 French post-secondary EFL learners used Google to self-correct several "untreatable" written errors. Whether or not error correction leads to improved writing has been much debated, some researchers dismissing it is as useless and others arguing that error feedback…

  4. Reading Motivation in Two Languages: An Examination of EFL College Students in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Ja

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify underlying factors that motivate language learners to read in a foreign language (L2) context. It also examined the relationships between L1 and L2 reading motivation and any differences in reading motivation based on the learners' academic majors and L2 reading proficiency. 259 Korean EFL college students…

  5. Effects of a Multimodal Approach on ESL/EFL University Students' Attitudes towards Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyn, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Poetry is a specific genre of literature that has been long argued as being too difficult for ESL/EFL learners. However, poetry is considered a valuable and authentic material for teaching language learners and teaching poetry in the language classroom can lead to a meaningful language learning experience. This study examined the implementation of…

  6. Everybody Loves Cinderella; A Study on Boosting Students' Motivation in an Indonesian EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna, Fauziatul

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is by large a fundamental aspect in learning foreign languages which plays significant role in determining the outcome of the learning process. For more than a decade now, EFL in Indonesia have been in the stagnant period when various efforts could not result as expected. One of the problems is that those efforts often do not deal with…

  7. Applying Sight Translation as a Means to Enhance Reading Ability of Iranian EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatollahi, Moslem

    2016-01-01

    Sight translation is the oral translation of a written text and is a mixture of translation and interpreting. Sight translation is a widely-used activity in translation training programs. Yet, this mode of translation has rarely been applied as a reading instruction technique in Iranian EFL instruction context in spite of the growing interest in…

  8. Exploring physics students' engagement with online instructional videos in an introductory mechanics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Aiken, John M.; Seaton, Daniel T.; Douglas, Scott S.; Greco, Edwin F.; Thoms, Brian D.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of new educational technologies has stimulated interest in using online videos to deliver content in university courses. We examined student engagement with 78 online videos that we created and were incorporated into a one-semester flipped introductory mechanics course at the Georgia Institute of Technology. We found that students were more engaged with videos that supported laboratory activities than with videos that presented lecture content. In particular, the percentage of students accessing laboratory videos was consistently greater than 80% throughout the semester. On the other hand, the percentage of students accessing lecture videos dropped to less than 40% by the end of the term. Moreover, the fraction of students accessing the entirety of a video decreases when videos become longer in length, and this trend is more prominent for the lecture videos than the laboratory videos. The results suggest that students may access videos based on perceived value: students appear to consider the laboratory videos as essential for successfully completing the laboratories while they appear to consider the lecture videos as something more akin to supplemental material. In this study, we also found that there was little correlation between student engagement with the videos and their incoming background. There was also little correlation found between student engagement with the videos and their performance in the course. An examination of the in-video content suggests that students engaged more with concrete information that is explicitly required for assignment completion (e.g., actions required to complete laboratory work, or formulas or mathematical expressions needed to solve particular problems) and less with content that is considered more conceptual in nature. It was also found that students' in-video accesses usually increased toward the embedded interaction points. However, students did not necessarily access the follow-up discussion of these

  9. Gross anatomy videos: student satisfaction, usage, and effect on student performance in a condensed curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Daniel B

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy educators are being tasked with delivering the same quantity and quality of material in the face of fewer classroom and laboratory hours. As a result they have turned to computer-aided instruction (CAI) to supplement and augment curriculum delivery. Research on the satisfaction and use of anatomy videos, a form of CAI, on examination performance continues to grow. The purpose of this study was to describe the usage and effect on examination scores of a series of locally produced anatomy videos after an 11% curriculum reduction. First-year medical students (n = 40) were given access to the videos and the prior year's students (n = 40) were used as historical controls. There was no significant difference in demographics between the two groups. The survey response rate was 85% (n = 34) in the experimental group. The students found the videos to be highly satisfying (median = 5 on a five-point Likert scale, interquartile range = 1) and used them on average 1.55 times/week (SD ± 0.77). Availability of the videos did have a statistically significant effect (4% improvement) on the final laboratory examination (p = 0.039). This suggests that the videos were a well-received form of CAI that may be useful in bridging the gap created by a reduction in gross anatomy course contact hours. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Critical Pedagogy Principles in Teaching EFL Reading

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    Slamet Wahyudi Yulianto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to reveal how the use of critical pedagogy principles in teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL reading facilitates students to think critically. Additionally, it investigates and elaborates the benefits and challenges of using critical pedagogy principles in teaching EFL reading. The three critical pedagogy principles used in this study were dialogic education, democratic classroom, and reading the world and the word. Critical thinking skills and dispositions expected to be performed by the participants were analysis and evaluation skills, open-mindedness, and making reasoned decision. This is a case study design which was conducted in the form of teaching program. The teaching program which consisted of eight meetings was given to 59 EFL sophomores in the Reading in Professional Context class at a private teacher education in Bandung. Data in the form of classroom talks and activities and students‟ responses as well as their critical thinking skills self-assessment were collected by using video recordings, observation notes, interview guideline, students‟ learning journals, and questionnaires. It is revealed that the teaching program has facilitated students to think critically by providing four categories of activity. They are (1 offering problematic topics and reading materials that are linked to the students‟ lives, (2 encouraging students to read between the lines, (3 distributing classroom power, and (4 creating space for students‟ voices to be heard. Meanwhile, there are two benefits of the teaching program, namely (1 language development and (2 new knowledge as well as experience acquisition. However, there are three major challenges in conducting the teaching program that are (1 the lack of classroom-friendly authentic controversial reading materials, (2 the passive culture, and (3 the unpredictable classroom.

  11. The Uniqueness of EFL Teachers: Perceptions of Japanese Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Building on the work of Borg (2006), this article reports on a study of Japanese English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' perceptions of some of the unique characteristics of EFL teachers that distinguish them from teachers of other subjects. The data were collected by means of a questionnaire to which 163 college-level EFL students in Japan…

  12. Crosscultural Comparison of Writing Standards: American ESL and Japanese EFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Linton, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Compared the evaluative criteria that American English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors and Japanese English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) instructors applied in rating compositions written by adult Japanese EFL students. Results found that Japanese EFL teachers focused on accuracy while American ESL teachers focused on intersentential…

  13. Classroom Management Problems and Coping Strategies of Turkish Student EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Merç

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classroom management (CM is one of the most cited problems of pre-service teachers. This study aims to have a closer look at the issue within a qualitative research design by eliciting problems, coping strategies, and the sources of those coping strategies related to CM during teaching practicum. The participants of the study were 12 student EFL teachers (eight female and four male completing their teaching practicum at Anadolu University, Faculty of Education, English Language Teacher Training Program. The participants were asked to keep diaries related to their CM problems throughout the 12-week teaching practicum. Semi-structured interviews conducted with each teacher candidate and field notes taken by the researchers were also used as the research data. The analyses of the data indicated that student teachers’ CM problems were mainly because of the pupils in the classroom. Student teachers themselves, teaching point and materials, and the cooperating teachers were also the sources of the CM problems. Various coping strategies were also elicited to deal with the problems mentioned. The methodology lessons they took, their cooperating teachers, and their previous teachers were cited by the student teachers as the sources of the coping strategies they employed. The findings are discussed along with the current literature on CM, and certain implications and suggestions are provided for a better teaching practice.Keywords: Classroom management, pre-service teachers, EFL teacher education, foreign language teaching İngilizce Öğretmen Adaylarının Sınıf Yönetimi ile İlgili Karşılaştıkları Sorunlar ve Bu Sorunlarla Başa Çıkma Yöntemleri Öz Sınıf yönetimi öğretmen adaylarının öğretmenlik deneyimleri boyunca en sık karşılaştığı sorunlardan biridir. Bu çalışma nitel bir araştırma ile bu sorunları, çözüm yollarını ve bu çözüm yollarının kaynaklarını belirlemeyi amaçlamaktadır. Ara

  14. TEFL/TESOL for Students with Special Needs: For EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud M. S.

    2015-01-01

    "Special education" has become a prominent field that needs some attention in pre-service teacher education programmes offered by educational and teacher training institutions (e.g. Egyptian colleges of education at university). Like normal students, students with special educational needs (e.g. physical and mental disabilities, learning…

  15. In Search of Teaching Quality of EFL Student Teachers through Teaching Practicum: Lessons from a Teacher Education Program

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    Siti Nurul Azkiyah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to investigate the teaching quality of student teachers when they conducted their teaching practicum. Teaching quality is conceptualised based on eight classroom factors (orientation, structuring, modelling, application, questioning, building classroom as a learning environment, assessment, and time management of the dynamic model, which have previously been found to affect student outcomes. The study used a mixed-methods design: a survey on students’ perceptions of the teaching quality of their teacher (student teachers and classroom observation. The study was conducted in Tangerang Selatan, Indonesia, involving English as a Foreign Language (EFL student teachers in the English Education Program, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Indonesia and 199 students of three different schools. The findings revealed that the student teachers did not yet practice the classroom factors of the dynamic model. Some recommendations include incorporating the classroom factors of the dynamic model in the curriculum or syllabus related to pedagogical skills to better prepare teachers in the future. It is also beneficial to study the possibility of sending student teachers to school earlier not only for the teaching practicum but also for other relevant purposes.

  16. Video Modeling and Observational Learning to Teach Gaming Access to Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Amy D.; Gast, David L.; Knight, Victoria F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both video modeling and observational learning to teach age-appropriate recreation and leisure skills (i.e., accessing video games) to students with autism spectrum disorder. Effects of video modeling were evaluated via a multiple probe design across participants and criteria for mastery were based on…

  17. Effects of Video Streaming Technology on Public Speaking Students' Communication Apprehension and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupagne, Michel; Stacks, Don W.; Giroux, Valerie Manno

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether video streaming can reduce trait and state communication apprehension, as well as improve communication competence, in public speaking classes. Video streaming technology has been touted as the next generation of video feedback for public speaking students because it is not limited by time or space and allows Internet…

  18. DanceChemistry: Helping Students Visualize Chemistry Concepts through Dance Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Gidget C.; Edwards, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    A visual aid teaching tool, the DanceChemistry video series, has been developed to teach fundamental chemistry concepts through dance. These educational videos portray chemical interactions at the molecular level using dancers to represent chemical species. Students reported that the DanceChemistry videos helped them visualize chemistry ideas in a…

  19. Making It Work: Creating a Student-Friendly Repository of Instructional Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, Michelle; Segno, Jamie; Schofield, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This case study investigates how a team of librarians at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) worked together to assess and optimize their library's current instructional videos in order to create a mobile-first video hosting platform, known as LibraryLearn. Instructional library videos serve as invaluable resources for students who are not present…

  20. Using Progressive Video Prompting to Teach Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability to Shoot a Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Burk, Bradley; Burk, Bradley; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of a modified video prompting procedure, namely progressive video prompting, to increase technique accuracy of shooting a basketball in the school gymnasium of three 11th-grade students with moderate intellectual disability. The intervention involved participants viewing video clips of an adult model who…

  1. Self-perceived Listening Comprehension Strategies Used by Iranian EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nowrouzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are available on L2 learners’ strategy use; however, there is no study investigating the Iranian tertiary level EFL learners’ listening strategy use. The present paper reports the findings of a cross-sectional study that explored a group of Iranian EFL learners’ (n = 100 use of listening comprehension strategies. The instrument that was used for collecting the data was called the Listening Strategy Use Questionnaire (LSUQ by Nowrouzi, Tam, Nimehchisalem, and Zareian (2014. The instrument divides listening strategies into cognitive, metacognitive, and socio-affective categories. Based on the results, on average the respondents reported low levels of self-perceived use of cognitive, metacognitive, and socio-affective strategies. The results indicate a serious need to focus more on the students’ listening comprehension skills in general and their listening strategies in particular.

  2. High or low context culture in the EFL classroom?

    OpenAIRE

    Melih KARAKUZU; Pelin İRGİN

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and high-low context culture situations are important for both EFL/ESL teachers and their students. In the EFL context, tertiary level students in Turkey are taught by both native and non-native English speakers, which might be challenging for foreign language students as it causes potential communication breakdowns in the classroom. By regarding cultural values, there is a need to examine how EFL tertiary level students successfully negotiate thes...

  3. Learning About Energy Resources Through Student Created Video Documentaries in the University Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2010-12-01

    Students enrolled in an undergraduate non-science majors’ Energy Perspectives course created 10-15 minute video documentaries on topics related to Energy Resources and the Environment. Video project topics included wave, biodiesel, clean coal, hydro, solar and “off-the-grid” energy technologies. No student had any prior experience with creating video projects. Students had Liberal Arts academic backgrounds that included Anthropology, Theater Arts, International Studies, English and Early Childhood Education. Students were required to: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write a narrative, 4) construct a project storyboard, 5) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 6) record the narrative, and 7) construct the video documentary. This study describes the instructional approach of using student created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors’ science course. Two knowledge survey instruments were used for assessment purposes. Each instrument was administered Pre-, Mid- and Post course. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries. Results showed students acquired enhanced technology skills especially with regard to research techniques, writing skills and video editing. The second survey assessed students’ content knowledge acquired from each documentary. Results indicated students’ increased their content knowledge of energy resource topics. Students reported very favorable evaluations concerning their experience with creating “Ken Burns” video project documentaries.

  4. Can student-produced video transform university teaching?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    maps. Video 2 was produced in groups during the field course. Video two replaced a larger written assignment. Video 3 was produced in groups during the field course. The videos was an experimental field exercise, and the production was guided by a “dogma concept“, meaning that everything should be done...

  5. The Effect of Task-Based Language Teaching on Motivation and Grammatical Achievement of EFL Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam NamazianDost

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research sought to investigate the effect of the effect of task-based language teaching on motivation and grammatical achievement of EFL junior high school students of Ahvaz. To fulfill the objectives of the study a Homogeneity test (Oxford Quick Placement Test was administered among 100 students at the junior high school and finally 80 participants were selected. Then, they were divided into two sub­groups, namely control and experimental groups. Before starting the treatment, a validated teacher-made grammar test in terms of the materials supposed to be covered in both groups was administered to them as the pre-test. Moreover, a motivation questionnaire were given to both groups at the beginning and at the end of study. Then the experimental group received the treatment, which was teaching and learning grammar through using task-based language teaching and the control group received traditional teaching which is teaching grammar through instruction on examples and drills proposed by the teacher. After 12 sessions of treatment, the two groups were administered the same teacher-made grammar test as posttest. Data were analyzed by Paired and Independent Samples t-­test. The findings showed that the experimental group significantly performed better than the control group. Generally, the experimental groups outperformed the control groups. Furthermore, the results of motivation questionnaire show that there was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups' motivation in the post-test of questionnaire which implies that the experimental group's motivation increased significantly. The results suggest that task-based language teaching can be used in English classes to develop grammar ability among Iranian EFL learners.

  6. The Effect of Music Videos on College Students' Perceptions of Rape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Melinda C. R.; Burpo, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    This paper examined the effect of sexualized portrayals of female artists in music videos on college students' perceptions of date rape. 132 college students were randomly assigned to view a music video that contained either high or low levels of sexuality and sexual objectification and were then asked to rate the guilt of the male in a scenario…

  7. Effects of a Brief Video Intervention on White University Students' Racial Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soble, Jason R.; Spanierman, Lisa B.; Liao, Hsin-Ya

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of a brief video intervention on the racial attitudes of White university students. One hundred thirty-eight self-identified White students were randomly assigned to either an experimental condition in which they viewed a video documenting the pervasiveness of institutional racism and White privilege in the…

  8. Methods & Techniques: Techniques for Increasing Student Learning from Educational Videos: Notes Versus Guiding Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Timothy J.; Bodle, James H.; McDonough, Tracy A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of several techniques for enhancing student learning from educational videos. Introductory psychology students (N = 113) watched a video about intelligence and testing while taking notes, not taking notes, writing answers to guiding questions, or thinking about guiding questions without writing answers. Afterward,…

  9. Effects of Commercial Web Videos on Students' Attitude toward Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yaming; Ting, Yu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study values the broad range of web videos produced by businesses to introduce new technologies while also promoting their products. When the promoted technology is related to the topic taught in a school course, it may be beneficial for students to watch such videos. However, most students view the web as a source for entertainment, and may…

  10. The Application of Podcasting as an Instructional Tool to Improve Turkish EFL Learners' Speaking Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoglu, Harika; Koçoglu, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate: (a) the effect of podcasts in EFL students' oral performance, (b) the effect of podcasts in EFL students' speaking anxiety, (c) the relationship between speaking anxiety and oral performance, and (d) EFL students' perceptions of using podcasts. This study was conducted in a high school in Istanbul,…

  11. The Use of ICTs to Enhance EFL Learners’ Oral Language Proficiency: The Case of First-Year LMD Students at Tlemcen University

    OpenAIRE

    FEKIH, Ahlem

    2015-01-01

    The main value of this research study is to emphasize the tremendous and important role of ICTs in enhancing EFL learners’ speaking skill. In addition, it tries to help them express their ideas and communicate in the target language. But, first year students find that learning oral production characterize a very difficult task for them. So through using ICTs, the value of oral production courses will be improved. This investigation was carried out at Abou Bekr Belkaid –Tlemcen ...

  12. Reflections on the development of an EFL reading programme for middle school students of varied levels of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barfield Randall

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This personal-experience article attempts to share with the reader an EFL reading and grammar programme that was designed in 2002 for a group of 12 to 14-year olds (6th and 7th graders whose English levels varied from almost nil to semiconversational. Multi-levels of English in any given group present a considerable challenge to either the EFL or ESL teacher, needless to say. More than one of these students exhibited evidence of a learning disability, not only in L2 but in L1 as well. For instance, transposition of letters (b instead of d and vice versa in both languages, poor spelling in L1 and L2, and in L2, writing on the level of a second or third- grade native speaker. A considerable number of these students had been forced to leave other, larger schools for academic and/or disciplinary reasons. So, this teacher swallowed then rolled up his sleeves to go to work (in fear of what the year would bring?. In other words, the teacher accepted the challenge. Key words: English-Teaching High School-Programs, Reading-Teaching-Programs, Books and Reading for Children-Teaching High School-Programs Este artículo de experiencia personal tiene como objetivo dar a conocer al lector un programa de EFL sobre lectura y gramática que fue diseñado en 2002 para un grupo de niños entre los 12 y 14 años de edad (grados 6 y 7, los cuales tenían niveles de inglés que variaban entre cero conocimiento del idioma y semi-conversacional. Los multi-niveles en inglés en cualquier grupo presentan un desafío considerable para el profesor de EFL o ESL. Adicionalmente, más de un estudiante demostró tener problemas de aprendizaje no sólo en L2 sino en L1. Por ejemplo, la transposición de letras (b en vez de d o viceversa en ambos idiomas, pobre ortografía en L1 y L2 y en L2 la escritura en un nivel igual al de un estudiante nativo que cursa segundo o tercero de primaria. Un número considerable de estudiantes han sido obligados a abandonar otros colegios

  13. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    the intervention, this share was 75% (218/289) (p = 0.06). Furthermore, internal as well as external examiners found video cases valuable, but the use of videos did not change the average examination grade. CONCLUSION: A video case supplement to teaching in clinical paediatrics was considered to be of value...... in paediatrics in seven centres. A video case library showing children with common clinical conditions was established, and a short video was added to the oral examination. We evaluated students' and internal and external examiners' perceptions by questionnaires. RESULTS: A total of 81% of the students reported...... for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. FUNDING: The University of Copenhagen funded the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION...

  14. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    in paediatrics in seven centres. A video case library showing children with common clinical conditions was established, and a short video was added to the oral examination. We evaluated students' and internal and external examiners' perceptions by questionnaires. RESULTS: A total of 81% of the students reported...... for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. FUNDING: The University of Copenhagen funded the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION...... the intervention, this share was 75% (218/289) (p = 0.06). Furthermore, internal as well as external examiners found video cases valuable, but the use of videos did not change the average examination grade. CONCLUSION: A video case supplement to teaching in clinical paediatrics was considered to be of value...

  15. The Effects of Instructional Design on Student Engagement with Video Lectures at Cyber Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Costley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The number of students enrolled in online courses that use video lectures is on the rise. However, research shows that the number of students watching video lectures is low, and the number watching videos to completion is even lower. Background: This paper seeks to understand this problem by looking for correlations between instructional design and student engagement with video lectures. Methodology: Students at a cyber-university in South Korea (n=1801 were surveyed on their perception of the instructional design used in the courses they took and their engagement with online video lectures. Contribution: This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by demonstrating positive correlations between instructional design, watching, and finishing video lectures. Findings: While most other research has found low levels of online lecture viewership, this paper found significantly higher numbers watching and finishing videos. Other major findings of the paper are that five key elements of instructional design for online learning environments (designing methods, setting the curriculum, establishing time parameters, establishing netiquette, and utilizing the medium effectively all correlated positively with students watching and finishing video lectures. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: Based on findings in this paper, it is recommended that practitioners consider taking actions when designing their instruction for online courses. These include batching their video lectures together by topic, devoting greater resources to helping students utilize the medium, and communicate time parameters in a way that encourages students to view video lectures in a timely manner. Recommendation for Researchers: As the watching of video lectures in this study was mandatory for learners, an interesting area of further research would be to examine whether that decision led to higher numbers of students watching them. Future Research: It is important for

  16. Cooperative Learning Groups in an EFL Grammar Classes: A Learners’ Boost Outcomes The Case of Second Year EFL Students at Tlemcen University

    OpenAIRE

    KEZOUI, Nouria

    2015-01-01

    English is spoken nowadays around the globe and has wider dispersion that any other language; it becomes really hard to thrive in this world without knowing this language. For this reason, its teaching is viewed as one of the rapid processes in this increasingly changing world. In fact, EFL learners are daily confronted with manifold complicating factors along their learning process ranging between the feeling of contentment and motivation in some situations involving speaking ...

  17. What EFL Student Teachers Think about Their Professional Preparation: Evaluation of an English Language Teacher Education Programme in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Agudo, Juan de Dios

    2017-01-01

    Given the importance of programme evaluation in the EFL teacher education, this research paper of exploratory-interpretive nature mainly focuses on both strengths and weaknesses identified through the analysis and/or critical evaluation of an EFL teacher education programme carried out in Spain. Both quantitative and qualitative research…

  18. Relationship between Motivation for Learning EFL and Intrinsic Motivation for Learning in General among Japanese Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Junko Matsuzaki

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated children's motivation for learning English as a foreign language (EFL) and intrinsic motivation for learning in general. The participants were 268 third-sixth graders in a public school in Japan. Data were collected using two questionnaires, one measuring motivation for learning EFL and the other investigating intrinsic…

  19. Does Replacing Live Demonstration With Instructional Videos Improve Student Satisfaction and Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Examination Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Ryan; Gustowski, Sharon M; Kominski, Carol; Li, Feiming

    2016-11-01

    Instructional videos for osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) are a potentially valuable resource for novice learners. To evaluate student experiences and the effectiveness of instructional videos in lieu of live faculty demonstration in a second-year osteopathic manipulative medicine course. Faculty created and produced written instructions and videos for selected Still and facilitated positional release techniques. These materials incorporated curricular design principles and psychomotor skills development strategies. During a second-year OMT skills laboratory session, students used the videos as the primary source for technique demonstration and instruction. Table trainers monitored and assisted students per their request or if errors were observed. Students completed surveys regarding their previous experiences in the OMT skills laboratory sessions (presession survey) and the video-based instructional one (postsession survey). One month after the survey, students were also asked to complete a postexamination survey. Student scores on the skills competency examination were compared with scores from the previous year. Of the 230 students, 162 (70%), 135 (59%), and 86 (37%) responded to the presession, postsession, and postexamination surveys, respectively. The majority of students indicated that the OMT videos helped them feel more prepared (98%) and more confident for their examination (78%), were a valuable addition to learning (97%), and would help increase confidence in using osteopathic manipulative medicine on patients (84%). Two-thirds of students indicated that the videos were superior to faculty demonstration from the stage. Compared with students from the previous year, no statistically significant improvement was noted on the total clinical competency examination scores. The faculty-created videos for teaching OMT techniques did not improve scores on the clinical competency examination but had subjective benefits as part of the OMT laboratory

  20. Using Student Learning and Development Outcomes to Evaluate a First-Year Undergraduate Group Video Project

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Johnson, Brady

    2012-01-01

    Students in an interdisciplinary undergraduate introductory course were required to complete a group video project focused on nutrition and healthy eating. A mixed-methods approach to data collection involved observing and rating video footage of group work sessions and individual and focus group interviews. These data were analyzed and used to evaluate the effectiveness of the assignment in light of two student learning outcomes and two student development outcomes at the University of Minne...

  1. video supported performance feedback to nursing students after simulated practice events.

    OpenAIRE

    Monger, Eloise; Weal, Mark J.; Gobbi, Mary; Michaelides, Danius; Shepherd, Matthew; Wilson, Matthew; Barnard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Within the field of health care education, simulation is used increasingly to provide students with opportunities to develop their clinical skills (Alnier, 2006), often occurring in specially designed facilities with audio-video capture of student performance. The video capture enables analysis and assessment of student performance and or competence, the analysis of events (DiGiacomo et al, 1997), processes (Ram et al, 1999), and Objective Clinical Examinations (Humphris and Kaney, 2000 ; Viv...

  2. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    /138) of the students reported confidence at a score of 5-7 on a seven-point Likert scale. This increased to 64% (186/289) (p Likert scale) and after...... in paediatrics in seven centres. A video case library showing children with common clinical conditions was established, and a short video was added to the oral examination. We evaluated students' and internal and external examiners' perceptions by questionnaires. RESULTS: A total of 81% of the students reported...

  3. VIDEO BLOGGING AND ENGLISH PRESENTATION PERFORMANCE: A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Hung, Shao-Ting; Danny Huang, Heng-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the utility of video blogs in improving EFL students' performance in giving oral presentations and, further, examined the students' perceptions toward video blogging. Thirty-six English-major juniors participated in a semester-long video blog project for which they uploaded their 3-min. virtual presentation clips over 18 weeks. Their virtual presentation clips were rated by three raters using a scale for speaking performance that contained 14 presentation skills. Data sources included presentation clips, reflections, and interviews. The results indicated that the students' overall presentation performance improved significantly. In particular, among the 14 presentation skills projection, intonation, posture, introduction, conclusion, and purpose saw the most substantial improvement. Finally, the qualitative data revealed that learners perceived that the video blog project facilitated learning but increased anxiety.

  4. Enhancing Astronomy Studies by Using IUCAA Video Lectures in the Student Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, N.; Bawdekar, N.

    2015-04-01

    IUCAA is one of the premier astronomy and astrophysics research institutions in India. Research at IUCAA spans a wide range of fields. Lectures delivered by eminent faculty as well as senior professors visiting IUCAA are recorded to benefit students pursuing research in astronomy and astrophysics. The recordings of lectures delivered by IUCAA faculty at other institutions are also available at the library. In order to facilitate access to these lectures by the students, both on-campus and off-campus, an effort to upload these videos to the Network Assisted Server (NAS) was taken up by the IUCAA library staff. The IUCAA library initiated this activity in the year 2010. Video production tools such as Open-EyA are used for creating classroom and blackboard lecture videos in real time. These video files are processed and stored on the server and can also be accessed online. The paper showcases the usefulness of these videos among the student community. Statistics show that the majority of IUCAA students accessing the NAS are viewing the lectures and students can view the video lectures at their convenience. Resources such as these are easy to create and can be used to enhance students' understanding of the subject. It has been observed that students all around the globe extensively use the uploaded video lectures.

  5. Video Game Addiction among High School Students in Hordaland; Prevalence and Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Bjordal, Sunniva Alsvik; Skumsnes, Toril; Ørland, Anette

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of video game addiction among high school students (N = 531) in Hordaland county, Norway. Video game addiction measured by the Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents was estimated both by a monothetic and a polythetic format. The prevalence was found to be 2.5% and 12.5%, respectively. Regression analyses were conducted where video game addiction comprised the dependent variable. Demographic variables, depression, anxiety, lone...

  6. Is Video Podcast Supplementation as a Learning Aid Beneficial to Dental Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalludi, Shivananda; Punja, Dhiren; Rao, Raghavendra; Dhar, Murali

    2015-12-01

    Podcasting has recently emerged as an important information technology tool for health professionals. Podcasts can be viewed online or downloaded to a user computer or a handheld multimedia device like a portable MP3 player, smart phone and tablet device. The principal advantage of the podcast is that the presentation of information need not be linked with any particular time or location. Since students are familiar with newer technology tools and may be using it on a regular basis, video podcast could serve as a convenient tool for students to help remember both conceptual and factual information. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitude of first year dental students towards video podcast supplementation and to assess the efficacy of video podcast as a teaching aid in comparison to text book reading. First year dental students were recruited for this study. A didactic lecture class was conducted for the students (n=100). The students were then randomly divided into two groups. Students present in group A (n=46) underwent a video podcast session followed by a multiple choice question test. This was followed by student feedback to assess the usefulness of video podcast. Students belonging to group B (n=54) had a study session for 20 minutes followed by the MCQ test. Students then underwent the video podcast session followed by feedback to assess the utility of video podcast. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to compare the difference in the median MCQ score between the two groups. The findings revealed a significant gain in the median MCQ score in the intervention group (group A) when compared to control group (Group B). In the feedback form, 89% of students agreed that the video podcast might be useful as it would enable them to view slides and hear the lectures repeatedly. Students who underwent the video podcast session performed significantly better in the MCQ test compared to students who underwent text book reading alone. This demonstrates an

  7. Adversity and redemption: Learning and teaching in the language learning histories of two EFL student-teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Tashma Baum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the multifaceted, dynamic and situated identity of the language learner stands at the center of much current SLA research. One of the main ways in which it is investigated is through the examination of autobiographical language learning histories. In an effort to better understand some of the processes which lead to a motivated, confident and successful language learner and user, this article analyzes the language learning histories of two EFL student-teachers, notable for their commitment to the learning and teaching of English. A close analysis of their narratives, focusing on thematic, stylistic and performative aspects, reveals what narrative psychologist McAdams (2006 has called “redemptive” patterns, that is, narrative structures in which hardship leads to inner growth and difficulties become “springboards” (Pals, 2006 to success. The two narrators also display a similar flexibility in their evolving self-positioning in response to the difficulties they narrate, and for both, attachment to the imagined community of Anglophone popular culture is an essential component in this process. Together, the learning experiences delineated in the accounts support the call for student-focused pedagogy, which puts emphasis on creating a positive emotional atmosphere, on the one hand, and providing rich intercultural knowledge, on the other.

  8. A Journey into the Future: Using Sci-Fi Stories with EFL Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anson

    2001-01-01

    Discusses using science fiction stories in the English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) classroom. Presents experiences in a science fiction course with some successful methods in eliciting EFL students' discussion. Concludes that using both film and text versions of science fiction stories can be useful devices in helping EFL students participate…

  9. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Won; Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2014-03-21

    Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources.

  10. Effects of Comprehension and Production-Based Tasks on Learning Morphosyntax by University EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Gardaoui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of an experimental study investigating the differential effects of two grammar-teaching options on learning tense and grammatical aspect. The treatment conditions were implemented with young adult Algerian EFL learners in two first-semester classes at the university level.The first group was given comprehension practice only. The second group was given both comprehension and production practice.Descriptive statistics indicated that the second group outperformed the first group. However, the statistical analysis (Anova revealed that the instructional effect did not amount to statistically significant learning gains. Pedagogically, the results of the study seem to support the use of output practice as well as input-based practice in the classroom. It is necessary to carry out research on other aspects of language in other similar contexts in order to know which activities of comprehension or production are most effective.

  11. Student perceptions of a video-based blended learning approach for improving pediatric physical examination skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ronny; Seitz, Anke; Bosse, Hans Martin; Lutz, Thomas; Huwendiek, Sören

    2016-11-01

    Physical examination skills are crucial for a medical doctor. The physical examination of children differs significantly from that of adults. Students often have only limited contact with pediatric patients to practice these skills. In order to improve the acquisition of pediatric physical examination skills during bedside teaching, we have developed a combined video-based training concept, subsequently evaluating its use and perception. Fifteen videos were compiled, demonstrating defined physical examination sequences in children of different ages. Students were encouraged to use these videos as preparation for bedside teaching during their pediatric clerkship. After bedside teaching, acceptance of this approach was evaluated using a 10-item survey, asking for the frequency of video use and the benefits to learning, self-confidence, and preparation of bedside teaching as well as the concluding OSCE. N=175 out of 299 students returned survey forms (58.5%). Students most frequently used videos, either illustrating complete examination sequences or corresponding focus examinations frequently assessed in the OSCE. Students perceived the videos as a helpful method of conveying the practical process and preparation for bedside teaching as well as the OSCE, and altogether considered them a worthwhile learning experience. Self-confidence at bedside teaching was enhanced by preparation with the videos. The demonstration of a defined standardized procedural sequence, explanatory comments, and demonstration of infrequent procedures and findings were perceived as particularly supportive. Long video segments, poor alignment with other curricular learning activities, and technical problems were perceived as less helpful. Students prefer an optional individual use of the videos, with easy technical access, thoughtful combination with the bedside teaching, and consecutive standardized practice of demonstrated procedures. Preparation with instructional videos combined with bedside

  12. Incorporating Video Modeling into a School-Based Intervention for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kaitlyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Video modeling is an intervention strategy that has been shown to be effective in improving the social and communication skills of students with autism spectrum disorders, or ASDs. The purpose of this tutorial is to outline empirically supported, step-by-step instructions for the use of video modeling by school-based speech-language…

  13. Using Student Learning and Development Outcomes to Evaluate a First-Year Undergraduate Group Video Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Johnson, Brady

    2012-01-01

    Students in an interdisciplinary undergraduate introductory course were required to complete a group video project focused on nutrition and healthy eating. A mixed-methods approach to data collection involved observing and rating video footage of group work sessions and individual and focus group interviews. These data were analyzed and used to…

  14. Questioning, Promoting and Evaluating the Use of Streaming Video To Support Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Uses case studies to describe how streaming video is currently used to support student learning in post-compulsory education in the United Kingdom. Describes the current role of streaming video and identifies processes that could extend the application of streaming in education. Identifies elements of a research agenda that could further develop…

  15. Enhancing the Assessment Experience: Improving Student Perceptions, Engagement and Understanding Using Online Video Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John; Turner, Will

    2016-01-01

    Individualised video screencasts with accompanying narration were used to provide assessment feedback to a large number (n = 299) of first-year Bachelor of Education students at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia. An anonymous online survey revealed that nearly three times as many respondents (61%) preferred video feedback to written…

  16. Relationships between Computer and Video Game Play and Creativity among Upper Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlen, Karla R.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored relationships between time spent playing video games in a typical week and general creativity, as measured by a common assessment. One hundred eighteen students in 4th and 5th grades answered questions about their video game play and completed the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Torrance, Orlow, & Safter, 1990). While…

  17. Storytelling in EFL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Bala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is one of the oldest ways of education and oral tradition that is continuously being used to transfer the previous nation‘s cultures, tradition and customs. It constructs a bridge between the new and the old. Storytelling in EFL classes usually provides a meaningful context, interesting atmosphere and is used as a tool to highly motivate students. Although it seems to be mostly based on speaking, it is used to promote other skills such as writing, reading, and listening. Storytelling is mainly regarded to be grounded on imitation and repetition; nevertheless many creative activities can be implemented in the classroom since this method directs learners to use their imaginations. This study discusses the importance of storytelling as a teaching method, and it outlines the advantages of storytelling in EFL classes.

  18. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper; Jensen, Maria Anna Bruunsgaard; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøll; Nygaard, Ulrikka; Poulsen, Anja; Sørensen, Jette Led; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-04-01

    Use of video cases in clinical education is rarely used systematically. Medical students (n = 127) reported by questionnaire whether they had or had not seen a bedside case of each of 22 specific clinical conditions during their five-week clinical course in paediatrics in seven centres. A video case library showing children with common clinical conditions was established, and a short video was added to the oral examination. We evaluated students' and internal and external examiners' perceptions by questionnaires. A total of 81% of the students reported having seen a child with asthma in the daily clinic. In contrast, respiratory syncytial virus infection was only seen by 20%. Students' self-reported confidence in the assessment of paediatric patients increased after the video case library was made available: Before the intervention, 41% (57/138) of the students reported confidence at a score of 5-7 on a seven-point Likert scale. This increased to 64% (186/289) (p students judged the impact of video cases to be high (score 5-7 on a seven-point Likert scale) and after the intervention, this share was 75% (218/289) (p = 0.06). Furthermore, internal as well as external examiners found video cases valuable, but the use of videos did not change the average examination grade. A video case supplement to teaching in clinical paediatrics was considered to be of value for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. The University of Copenhagen funded the study. not relevant.

  19. The Effects of Using Microsoft Power Point on EFL Learners' Attitude and Anxiety: Case Study of Two Master Students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghalem, Boualem

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using ICT tools such as Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL students' attitude and anxiety. The participants in this study were 40 Master 2 students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes Algeria. In order to find out the effects of Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL…

  20. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Use of video cases in clinical education is rarely used systematically. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical students (n = 127) reported by questionnaire whether they had or had not seen a bedside case of each of 22 specific clinical conditions during their five-week clinical course...... in paediatrics in seven centres. A video case library showing children with common clinical conditions was established, and a short video was added to the oral examination. We evaluated students' and internal and external examiners' perceptions by questionnaires. RESULTS: A total of 81% of the students reported...... for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. FUNDING: The University of Copenhagen funded the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION...

  1. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks...

  2. Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Buus, Lillian; Thorsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    -site and live video-streamed teaching. The results document a continuous progress in technological transparency, as the live video-streamed classes increasingly support the student’s flexibility in ways of attending and interacting in classes. Interaction is facilitated through teacher driven support, resulting...

  3. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered…

  4. Construction of a Digital Video Library: A Socio-Technical Pilot Study on College Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Choi, Gilok

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates socio-technical aspects of digital video libraries based on college students' learning experiences and perspectives. Forty-one students in biology classes were studied through a survey and individual interviews. Findings are presented by the students' knowledge of computer technology, experiences with AV materials, and…

  5. How Much Does Student Engagement with Videos and Forums in a MOOC Affect Their Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafini, Fernanda Cesar; Chae, Chungil; Park, Eunsung; Jablokow, Kathryn Weed

    2017-01-01

    Engagement in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is based on students who self-organize their participation according to their own goals and interests. Visual materials such as videos and discussion forums are basic ways of engaging students in MOOCs. Student achievement in MOOCs is typically measured using assessments distributed throughout the…

  6. Lens on Climate Change: Making Climate Meaningful through Student-Produced Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Anne U.; Oonk, David J.; Smith, Lesley; Boykoff, Maxwell T.; Osnes, Beth; Sullivan, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Learning about climate change is tangible when it addresses impacts that can be observed close to home. In this program, sixty-four diverse middle and high school students produced videos about locally relevant climate change topics. Graduate and undergraduate students provided mentorship. The program engaged students in research and learning…

  7. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video…

  8. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered conceptually, the notion of virtual experience is not limited to those experiences generated by computer aided technology, as with a video game or computer simulation. The notion of virtuality can apply to many real world experiences as well. It is proposed that the medium of the learning experience, be it video game or classroom, is not an important distinction to consider; instead, we should seek to determine what kinds of meaningful experiences apply for both classrooms and video games.

  9. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. FUNDING: The University of Copenhagen funded the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION......INTRODUCTION: Use of video cases in clinical education is rarely used systematically. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical students (n = 127) reported by questionnaire whether they had or had not seen a bedside case of each of 22 specific clinical conditions during their five-week clinical course...... the intervention, this share was 75% (218/289) (p = 0.06). Furthermore, internal as well as external examiners found video cases valuable, but the use of videos did not change the average examination grade. CONCLUSION: A video case supplement to teaching in clinical paediatrics was considered to be of value...

  10. Functions of Teacher and Student Code-Switching in an EFL Classroom and Pedagogical Focus: Observations and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rathert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Code-switching (CS, the alternation between two or more languages within a stretch of language, is accepted as a valuable strategy of bilinguals in making linguistic choices for communicative purposes. Following different perspectives, CS can be understood either as an attempt to communicate meanings at the macro level (such as identity, solidarity etc., or to convey intended meaning to the listener within the boundaries of conversational interaction at the micro level. Accepted as a strategy of speakers in bilingual communities, CS in foreign language learning settings is still a contentious matter. However, its potential has been emphasized in recent studies. This small-scale study examines teacher and student CS occurrences in an EFL lesson at a Turkish state university. CS occurrences were transcribed and sample extracts were analyzed through conversational analysis. The results show that teachers and learners apply CS to generate access to language or as a tool in classroom management. This study also reveals that CS can be a learner strategy to avoid L2 when lesson content is of little relevance to learners. In such cases CS cannot fulfil its potential as a means in discourse strategy, and language learning is unlikely to be facilitated.

  11. Teachers' Treatment of Different Types of Student Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Dogan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how two experienced instructors of EFL (English as a Foreign Language) literature treated questions posed by students during classroom discussions. Data came from two semester-long college-level classes in Turkey. Video recordings of the classes in one semester, field notes taken during the observations, and interviews with…

  12. Personality Types and Language Learning in an EFL Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrell, Patricia L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied the relationships between the personality types of a group of English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) students in Indonesia and various measures of their academic performance in a course with EFL language measures. Students were almost evenly divided between extroverts and introverts with a distribution of types similar to those of…

  13. EFL Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Pedagogical Success and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this research was threefold. Firstly, EFL teachers' in the study were tested about their self-efficacy belief levels internally and about their pedagogical success externally by their students. Secondly, student participants' perceptions of the characteristics of successful EFL teachers with respect to gender were ...

  14. On Adopting a Cognitive Orientation in EFL Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2007-01-01

    The present paper underscores the importance of the cognitive orientation of EFL students in their success in writing courses. A few suggestions are made as to how EFL teachers can put their students on the right cognitive path in their writings.

  15. The Relationship between Multiple Intelligences and L2 Reading Skill among Iranian EFL University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Khooei Oskooei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between multiple intelligences (MI and foreign language (L2 reading skill among Iranian EFL sophomores. Multiple intelligences and L2 reading measurements of participants – 29 males and 69 females who were selected from four intact classes – were obtained through McKenzie’s (1999 Multiple Intelligences Inventory and reading part of a Preliminary English Test PET, respectively, and then Pearson’s correlation analysis was run to determine the degree of the relationship between each component of multiple intelligences and L2 reading skill. Afterwards, through a multiple regression analysis those components of multiple intelligences which acted as the predictors of L2 reading skill were identified and the power of each predictor was calculated. The results of the correlation analyses revealed that linguistic-verbal, logical-mathematical, spatial, and interpersonal intelligences were significantly correlated with reading skill. In addition, the results showed that linguistic-verbal, interpersonal, and logical-mathematical intelligences were the best predictors of L2 reading skill scores of the participants. The results of the study can help coursebook designers, educational planners, foreign language institutes, teachers, learners and their parents to provide and use different methods of teaching and learning.

  16. Using focus groups to develop a nutrition education video for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D C; Rienzo, B A; Frazee, C

    1997-11-01

    Focus group interviews were used to develop a nutrition education video and a teacher's guide for use in Florida high schools. Authors conducted a pilot and four focus group interviews with ninth grade students in five geographically distinct regions of Florida. Most students agreed that a video with scenarios or success stories would work well. Teens expressed interest in 10 topics: eating disorders; consequences of unhealthy eating; preparing quick, healthy meals; what constitutes a balanced diet; nutrition and fitness; weight control; food and the environment; the food guide pyramid; nutrition facts and fallacies; and food labels. Students suggested no more than three or four topics should be covered in the video, and the video cast should consist mainly of teen-agers with different body sizes, who were average, attractive, and from different ethnic backgrounds. Music was recommended only for transitions between scenes, as background, or during the credits.

  17. The effectiveness of streaming video on medical student learning: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Patrick D; Jackson, Matt; Robinson, Leah

    2009-08-19

    Information technology helps meet today's medical students' needs by providing multiple curriculum delivery methods. Video streaming is an e-learning technology that uses the Internet to deliver curriculum while giving the student control of the content's delivery. There have been few studies conducted on the effectiveness of streaming video in medical schools. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted using three groups of students (n = 1736) to determine if the availability of streaming video in Years 1-2 of the basic science curriculum affected overall Step 1 scores for first-time test-takers. The results demonstrated a positive effect on program outcomes as streaming video became more readily available to students. Based on these findings, streaming video technology seems to be a viable tool to complement in-class delivery methods, to accommodate the needs of medical students, and to provide options for meeting the challenges of delivering the undergraduate medical curriculum. Further studies need to be conducted to continue validating the effectiveness of streaming video technology.

  18. Medical students' assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Greisen, Gorm Ole

    2014-11-13

    We introduced video-based teaching in pediatrics. We evaluated the impact of a pediatric video program on student performance in assessing pediatric patients presented as video cases. The program consisted of a library of pediatric videos, and inclusion of these in the teaching and examination for pediatric medicine. Medical students on a pediatric clerkship at the University of Copenhagen assessed eight short pediatric video cases during autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Two independent observers evaluated a subset of records in a pilot study. A blind evaluation was made of the written records of 37 students before, and 58 students after, the introduction of the program using a Rubric score with four domains. The intraobserver interclass correlation coefficient was 0.94 and the interobserver interclass correlation was 0.71(n=25). The students' mean total Rubric score in spring 2012 (7.0) was significantly higher (ppediatric patients presented as video cases after the introduction of the program. The impact on real-life situations remains to be established.

  19. Phys FilmMakers: teaching science students how to make YouTube-style videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Rebecca L.; Kuhai, Alvina; Turlej, Laurence Z. J.; Rivlin, Tom; McKemmish, Laura K.

    2018-01-01

    Phys FilmMakers (PFM) is a new type of course in which a science expert and science communicator partner teach physics students how to make YouTube-style videos on cutting-edge scientific research within the university department. Here, we describe this new course, outline its key components and provide recommendations for others considering implementing a similar FilmMakers-style course using feedback from course tutors and students. We discuss successful and less successful teaching techniques as well as use our experience to identify areas that science students in particular often have difficulties: finding an interesting ‘hook’ for the video, imagining creative B-roll and making a succinct video by removing extraneous (though usually correct and often interesting) material. The course has two major components: workshop sessions in which students learn the key elements of film-making and independent video production where PFM students partner with senior PhD or post-doc researchers to produce a video on their research. This partnership with the department means that the videos produced serve not only as interesting ‘edutainment’ to encourage teenagers and young adults into Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths subjects, but also provide valuable outreach for the academic department.

  20. The Students Experiences With Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Ørngreen, Rikke; Buus, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The Bachelor's Degree Programme of Biomedical Laboratory Science at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on-site or to attend classes from home via live video-stream. Our...... method inspired from mobile probes (Ørngreen & Jørgensen, n.d.). The research results document a continuous progress in technological transparency, as the live video-streamed classes increasingly support the student’s flexibility in ways of attending and interacting in classes. The analysis shows...... transparency in the live video-streamed teaching sessions during a 5-year period of continuous development of technological and pedagogical solutions for live-streamed teaching. Data describing student’s experiences were gathered in a longitudinal study of four sessions from 2012 to 2017 using a qualitative...

  1. Exploration and Remote Instrumentation by Students (ERIS): Video Documentation in Undergraduate Ocean Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, M.

    2016-12-01

    Success in the future ability to conduct global ocean research relies on our strategies to teach and train the next generation of ocean scientists. The mission of the Exploration and Remote Instrumentation by Students (ERIS) program at the University of Washington is to enhance undergraduate learning in the design and build process of advanced technologies. The ERIS program introduces the science of applied technology in oceanography through a series of courses that link the design, build, and maintenance of a student implemented underwater cabled observatory. We present a suggested template for a production method of how-to videos focused on capturing and communicating the design and build experience in ocean technology makerspaces. The application of this production method of videos produced by students, for students, creates structured learning opportunities and becomes an archive of online resources for future ocean technologists. Furthermore, video documentation enables students to link their participation in active learning experiences with skills in ocean science, technology and communication.

  2. Combining simulation, instructor-produced videos, and online discussions to stimulate critical thinking in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhde, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Combining the use of several different types of technology enables an instructor to develop teaching methods to address a specific problem area that students encounter and can greatly affect student learning. This article discusses a program that was developed that utilized SimMan, instructor-produced videos, and online discussion to stimulate critical thinking in beginning-level nursing students. The goal was to make the student aware of the importance of an initial thorough assessment of a client. This is especially difficult since new students are focused on learning the skills and have not had enough clinical experience to appreciate the importance of assessment. The first two videos show a nurse who makes a very incomplete assessment of the client and misses important observations. This leads to the patient (SimMan) going into respiratory distress. The third video demonstrates a complete assessment. The students viewed and discussed the first two videos online. After the third video, students posted their own reflections of this activity including what they learned and how this would change their behavior. The outcome showed an increased awareness of the importance of assessment. Instructors observed a change in behavior, which included early assessment of the client.

  3. Developing Reading and Summary Writing Abilities of EFL Undergraduate Students through Transactional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadee, Saovapa

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated how transactional strategies could improve undergraduate students' reading and writing abilities. A quasi-experimental study was performed with two groups of students. Students in the control group were taught by the traditional method, while students in the experimental group were taught by transactional strategies. The…

  4. The Use of EFL Authentic Materials: A Gender-Line University Teachers' Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Al Asmari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempted to explore the role of authentic materials (henceforth AM in the interaction of the Saudi EFL university classrooms with an emphasis placed on gender-based analysis of EFL university teachers' classroom practices. Moreover, it introduces the concepts of what define AM, and presents various perceptions of researchers, teachers on their usefulness. To examine this phenomenon, Saudi EFL teachers’ perceptions about the use of authentic materials were investigated to improve English language skills at Saudi EFL university classrooms. After employing a structured questionnaire, the results indicated that Saudi EFL university teachers authenticated the significance of AM for improving language skills of Saudi EFL university students. Also, the results reflected that Saudi EFL teachers showed their preferences for the use of balanced AM and English for Academic Purposes (EAP textbooks. The findings elicited the meaningful implications for the use of AM especially for the Saudi EFL university students.

  5. Developing students' listening metacognitive strategies using online videotext self-dictation-generation learning activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ching; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The study is based on the use of a flexible learning framework to help students improve information processes underlying strategy instruction in EFL listening. By exploiting the online videotext self-dictation-generation (video-SDG) learning activity implemented on the YouTube caption manager platform, the learning cycle was emphasized to promote metacognitive listening development. Two theories were used to guide the online video-SDG learning activity: a student question-generation meth...

  6. The Use of English Songs with Social Content as a Situated Literacy Practice: Factors that Influence Student Participation in the EFL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen Palacios Mena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This action research study examines the factors that influence student participation when songs with social content are utilised in the EFL classroom. The study proposes the use of English songs as a situated social practice under the perspective of critical pedagogy. The study was done in the 11th English class of a public high school located in the south of Bogota, Colombia. Data was collected through field observations, semistructured interviews, questionnaires and artefacts made by the students. The results indicate that factors relate to the songs and the students themselves. The study suggests that providing different opportunities for students to explore different dimensions of literacy that go beyond the linguistic aspects of a foreign language can encourage meaningful participation and interest in learning English as a Foreign Language.

  7. The Use of English Songs with Social Content as a Situated Literacy Practice: Factors that Influence Student Participation in the EFL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen Palacios Mena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This action research study examines the factors that influence student participation when songs with social content are utilised in the EFL classroom. The study proposes the use of English songs as a situated social practice under the perspective of critical pedagogy. The study was done in the 11th English class of a public high school located in the south of Bogota, Colombia. Data was collected through field observations, semistructured interviews, questionnaires and artefacts made by the students. The results indicate that factors relate to the songs and the students themselves. The study suggests that providing different opportunities for students to explore different dimensions of literacy that go beyond the linguistic aspects of a foreign language can encourage meaningful participation and interest in learning English as a Foreign Language.

  8. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2012-10-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video game-playing behaviors outside of school and their perceptions about the use of science video games during school. Thirty-four teachers and 876 sixth- through ninth-grade students from 14 states participated in the study. All student groups reported that they would prefer to learn science from a video game rather than from traditional text, laboratory-based, or Internet environments. Chi-square analyses indicated a significant association between reading ability level, disability status, and key areas of interest including students' use of video games outside of school, their perceptions of their scientific abilities, and whether they would pursue a career in the sciences. Implications of these findings and areas for future research are identified.

  9. The Effect of Flipped Model of Instruction on EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension: Learners' Attitudes in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mehrnoosh; Hamzavi, Raouf

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of flipped model of instruction on EFL learners' reading comprehension ability. Moreover, this study aimed at identifying EFL students' attitudes toward flipped model of instruction. To this end, 60 EFL learners studying at an accredited private language institute in Isfahan were first…

  10. Exploring gender differences in the EFL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Constanza Durán

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe a case study which explores teacher and students` conceptions about gender in an EFL setting and the way they are manifested in their discourse patterns. This exploratory case study was carried out with a group of eleventh grade students and an English teacher at Liceo de la Universidad Católica high school in Bogotá Colombia. The data collected included direct observation of classroom interaction, audio and video recording of the teacher and students` interactions and interviews on the teacher’s and students` discourse. The analysis of the data revealed that in fact there are imbalances in relation to boys` and girls` participation during interaction, made manifest by verbal and nonverbal attitudes. There is also sound evidence of girls’ low self esteem in response to the lack of value and respect granted to their opinions by their male peers. Stereotypes are part of teachers’ and students’ conceptions regarding gender and thus they are maintained to a great extent. The teacher’s attitude in the classroom with respect to boys and girls also appeared to show inequality that favoured boys. The girls showed evidence of awareness of the teacher’s conscious or unconscious indifference towards them, which seemed to affect their autonomy and confidence as English language learners.

  11. Using student learning and development outcomes to evaluate a first-year undergraduate group video project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Johnson, Brady

    2012-01-01

    Students in an interdisciplinary undergraduate introductory course were required to complete a group video project focused on nutrition and healthy eating. A mixed-methods approach to data collection involved observing and rating video footage of group work sessions and individual and focus group interviews. These data were analyzed and used to evaluate the effectiveness of the assignment in light of two student learning outcomes and two student development outcomes at the University of Minnesota. Positive results support the continued inclusion of the project within the course, and recommend the assignment to other programs as a viable means of promoting both content learning and affective behavioral objectives.

  12. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students....... Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. CONCLUSION: The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact...

  13. The Use of Concept Maps in Creating a Short Video with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocsál, Ákos; Tóth, Renáta

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental project in which media students created a short video. The students in groups of 4 or 5 used concept maps for collected their ideas about organizing the project. The analysis of the concept maps revealed that two groups were product-oriented, one group was workflow-oriented, and two groups used…

  14. Using Web-Based Video as an Assessment Tool for Student Performance in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredricks, Susan; Dudkin, Elizabeth; Kistler, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the potential for using video responses to specific questions as part of the assessment process in an organic chemistry class. These exercises have been used with a postbaccalaureate cohort of 40 students, learning in an online environment, over a period of four years. A second cohort of 25 second-year students taking the…

  15. Introducing Statistical Research to Undergraduate Mathematical Statistics Students Using the Guitar Hero Video Game Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramler, Ivan P.; Chapman, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a semester-long project, based on the popular video game series Guitar Hero, designed to introduce upper-level undergraduate statistics students to statistical research. Some of the goals of this project are to help students develop statistical thinking that allows them to approach and answer open-ended research…

  16. Leveling Up: Video Games, Development and the Narrated Everyday Experiences of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Vanessa L.

    2016-01-01

    Video games have become an integral part of the day to day lives of many people across gender, race, and age in the United States. They have become particularly important in the college student population, with nearly two thirds of all college students playing on a regular basis (Lee, 2003). While much of the scholarly research in this area…

  17. Effects of Expanded and Standard Captions on Deaf College Students' Comprehension of Educational Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Michael S.; Stevenson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-two college students who were deaf viewed one instructional video with standard captions and a second with expanded captions, in which key terms were expanded in the form of vocabulary definitions, labeled illustrations, or concept maps. The students performed better on a posttest after viewing either type of caption than on a pretest;…

  18. An Intensive Presentations Course in English for Aeronautical Engineering Students Using Cyclic Video Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatzl, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the design and evaluation of an intensive presentations course for aeronautical engineering students based on cyclic video recordings. The target group of this course in English for specific purposes (ESP) were undergraduate final-year students who needed to improve their presentation and foreign language skills to prepare…

  19. Video Review in Self-Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Lucio R.; Das, Rolee Pathak

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a student self-assessment activity of a video-recorded counseling session and evaluate its impact on student self-perceptions of specific communication skills. This activity was incorporated into a core-communications course within the third professional year of a Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Student…

  20. Improving Secondary School Students' Achievement and Retention in Biology through Video-Based Multimedia Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Yaki, Akawo Angwal; Gana, Eli S.; Ughovwa, Queen Eguono

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of video-based multimedia instruction on secondary school students' achievement and retention in biology. In Nigeria, 120 students (60 boys and 60 girls) were randomly selected from four secondary schools assigned either into one of three experimental groups: Animation + Narration; Animation + On-screen Text;…

  1. Development of Students' Conceptual Thinking by Means of Video Analysis and Interactive Simulations at Technical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockicko, Peter; Krišták, Luboš; Nemec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Video analysis, using the program Tracker (Open Source Physics), in the educational process introduces a new creative method of teaching physics and makes natural sciences more interesting for students. This way of exploring the laws of nature can amaze students because this illustrative and interactive educational software inspires them to think…

  2. Perceptions of Students Who Take Synchronous Courses through Video Conferencing about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan; Cebi, Ayca; Turgut, Yigit Emrah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how students who are taking synchronous distance education classes via video conferencing perceive distance learning courses. A qualitative research approach was used for the study. Scale sampling was also used. The study's subjects consisted of a total of nine students comprised of 2nd and 4th grade…

  3. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  4. Developing Community and Building Knowledge Online Using a Virtual Reality Environment and Student-Created Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.

    2018-01-01

    Within an online science teacher education course, an important although secondary goal was to prepare students for a high-stakes licensure portfolio at some time after course completion. Thus, various communication technologies including synchronous virtual reality meetings and asynchronous student self-created video commentaries were interwoven…

  5. Energizing Project-Based Inquiry: Middle-Grade Students Read, Write, and Create Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Hiller A.; Hervey, Lisa G.; Morris, Gwynn; Stelpflug, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In light of emerging technologies prompting new avenues for teaching and learning, students are positioned to "create" to learn, with video production being an important process for literacy development. There is a growing need for innovative instructional practices in reading and writing that are aligned with student interests and the activities…

  6. An Exploratory Study on the Reasons and Preferences of Six Malaysian Students on the Video Games Played

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Eow Yee; Baki, Roselan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons why six Malaysian students from upper secondary school are playing video games, types of games and the features preferred. A qualitative method was being used in the study. Purposive sampling was conducted in selecting the students. The findings indicated that students played video games for a…

  7. The influence of learning strategies and self-efficacy on students' motivation in university EFL settings

    OpenAIRE

    岡崎, 万紀子; Okazaki, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    The answers from two groups of students' questionnaires including open-ended questions, are closely examined to investigate the influence of students' sense of efficacy and development of learning strategies on their motivation to learn English.

  8. INDONESIAN EFL STUDENTS' ANXIETY IN SPEECH PRODUCTION: POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christina Lhaksmita Anandari

    2015-01-01

    .... The results also demonstrate that self-reflections helped the students deal with foreign language anxiety because they helped the students identify their strengths and weaknesses, conduct problem solving, and increase confidence.

  9. Causes and Effects of Online Video Game Playing Among Junior-Senior High School Students in Malang East Java

    OpenAIRE

    Eskasasnanda, I Dewa Putu

    2017-01-01

    Science and technology development causes a lot of changes in any fields including the form of popular games among the Junior and Senior High School students in Indonesia. The traditional games that are famous formerly have been replaced by the modern games like online video game. This article discusses the cause and effect of the online video game playing on the Junior and Senior High Schools students in Malang. This study reveal that students play video games online due to peers pressure; a...

  10. Contrasting Views of Business Students' Writing Needs in an EFL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Nahla Nola; Bahous, Rima

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of business student and faculty views at the Lebanese American University as to the students' language proficiency levels, writing in particular, and what the specific writing needs are in order for students to be effective in their course work. The role of the English and business faculty is also investigated.…

  11. Turkish Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward the Use of Interactive Whiteboards in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews-Aydinli, Julie; Elaziz, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes of students and teachers toward the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in a foreign language teaching and learning context. The study also investigated possible factors affecting teachers' and students' attitudes toward IWB technology. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to 458 students and…

  12. Socio-Political Influences on EFL Motivation and Attitudes: Comparative Surveys of Korean High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates Korean high school students' English learning motivation and attitudes. In this regard, the results of a 2002 study were compared with those of a 2006 study. Questionnaire data were obtained from a total of 1,037 high school students in a major city in South Korea, and the data were compared with those on the students'…

  13. The Effectiveness of a Program Based on the Combination of Relevance and Confidence Motivational Strategies in Developing EFL Argumentative Writing Skills and Overcoming Writing Apprehension among Students Teachers at Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Helwa, Hasnaa Sabry Abdel-Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of a program based on the combination of relevance and confidence motivational strategies in developing EFL argumentative writing skills and overcoming writing apprehension among students teachers at Faculty of Education. The design of the research is a mixed research methodology. It…

  14. The programming language EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    EFL is a comprehensive language designed to make it easy to write portable, understandable programs. It provides a rich set of data types and structures, a convenient operator set, and good control flow forms. The lexical form is easy to type and to read. Whenever possible, EFL uses the same forms that Ratfor does; in this sense EFL may be viewed as a superset of Ratfor. EFL is a well-defined language; this distinguishes it from most FORTRAN preprocessors which only add simple flow of control constructs to FORTRAN. The EFL compiler generates (possibly tailored) Standard FORTRAN as its output. EFL should catch and diagnose all syntax errors.

  15. Transana Qualitative Video and Audio Analysis Software as a Tool for Teaching Intellectual Assessment Skills to Graduate Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, S. Craig

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on the author's experience using qualitative video and audio analysis, most notably through use of the Transana qualitative video and audio analysis software program, as an alternative method for teaching IQ administration skills to students in a graduate psychology program. Qualitative video and audio analysis may be useful for…

  16. Video capture on student-owned mobile devices to facilitate psychomotor skills acquisition: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Glori; Bergmann, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Objective : We evaluated the feasibility of using mobile device technology to allow students to record their own psychomotor skills so that these recordings can be used for self-reflection and formative evaluation. Methods : Students were given the choice of using DVD recorders, zip drive video capture equipment, or their personal mobile phone, device, or digital camera to record specific psychomotor skills. During the last week of the term, they were asked to complete a 9-question survey regarding their recording experience, including details of mobile phone ownership, technology preferences, technical difficulties, and satisfaction with the recording experience and video critique process. Results : Of those completing the survey, 83% currently owned a mobile phone with video capability. Of the mobile phone owners 62% reported having email capability on their phone and that they could transfer their video recording successfully to their computer, making it available for upload to the learning management system. Viewing the video recording of the psychomotor skill was valuable to 88% of respondents. Conclusions : Our results suggest that mobile phones are a viable technology to use for the video capture and critique of psychomotor skills, as most students own this technology and their satisfaction with this method is high.

  17. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  18. Helping the Visually Impaired Student with Electronic Video Visual Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visualtek, Inc., Santa Monica, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Video visual aids are Closed Circuit TV systems (CCTV's) which magnify print and enlarge it electronically upon a screen so partially sighted persons with some residual vision can read and write normal size print. These devices are in use around the world in homes, schools, industries and libraries,…

  19. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale for Cypriot Senior High School EFL Students: The Rasch Measurement Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayiotis Panayides

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS for Cypriot senior high school EFL students, through Rasch measurement. In doing so, the researchers clarified two discrepancies found in the literature: first the factor structure of the scale and second whether test anxiety is a component of FLCA. The Greek version of the FLCAS was administered to a sample of 304 senior high school EFL students. Results showed that after removing five items which fitted the Rasch Rating Scale model poorly, the remaining 28 items formed a unidimensional scale, one component of which is test anxiety. The degree of reliability was high. Semantic analysis of the items revealed that one of the reasons was the inclusion of many parallel items. The Rasch person-item map showed that a second reason was the narrow coverage of the construct by the items. Finally the 5-point Likert scale was shown to be marginally optimal. Suggestions are proposed for future research into the refinement of the scale.

  20. International EFL/ESL Master Students' Adaptation Strategies for Academic Writing Practices at Tertiary Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manjet Kaur Mehar Singh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present research provides insights into the different forms of adaptation strategies employed by international graduate students to overcome the challenges faced in the academic writing...

  1. The Use of Short, Animated, Patient-Centered Springboard Videos to Underscore the Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Medical Student Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Maya; Chen, Sharon F; Amieva, Manuel; Deitz, Jennifer; Jang, Heeju; Porwal, Aarti; Prober, Charles

    2017-07-01

    Medical students often struggle to appreciate the clinical relevance of material taught in the preclinical years. The authors believe videos could be effectively used to interweave a patient's illness script with foundational basic science concepts. In collaboration with four other U.S. medical schools, educators at the Stanford University School of Medicine created 36 short, animated, patient-centered springboard videos (third-person, narrated accounts of authentic patient cases conveying foundational pathophysiology) in 2014. The videos were used to introduce students to 36 content modules, created as part of a microbiology, immunology, and infectious diseases curriculum. The videos were created with input from faculty content experts and in some cases medical students, and were piloted using a flipped classroom pedagogical approach in January 2015-June 2016. Student feedback from course evaluations and focus groups was analyzed using a mixed-methods approach. On the course evaluations, the majority of students rated the patient-centered videos positively, and the majority of comments on the videos were positive, highlighting both enhanced engagement and enhanced learning and retention. Comments from focus groups mirrored the course evaluation comments and highlighted different usage patterns for the videos. The authors will continue to gather and analyze data from schools using the videos as part of their core preclinical curriculum, and will produce similar videos for use in other areas of undergraduate medical education. These videos could support students' review of content taught previously and be repurposed for use in continuing and graduate medical education, as well as patient education.

  2. The Effect of Teacher Error Feedback on the Accuracy of EFL Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-chun

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of teacher error feedback on students' ability to write accurately. Three male first-year Physics graduate students at a university in Taiwan participated in this study. They were asked to write a 100-word passage about the greatest invention in human history. Within days of the teacher's grammatical feedback,…

  3. Implementing Reflective Portfolios for Promoting Autonomous Learning among EFL College Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-Fen

    2010-01-01

    This article depicts challenges for students and teachers involved in developing a reflective portfolio to promote autonomous learning in Taiwan. One hundred and one students in a Taiwan university completed their individual portfolio projects. A pre-course questionnaire, post-course self-evaluation, and the instructor's field notes were the data…

  4. Automatic Scaffolding and Measurement of Concept Mapping for EFL Students to Write Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    An incorrect concept map may obstruct a student's comprehension when writing summaries if they are unable to grasp key concepts when reading texts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of automatic scaffolding and measurement of three-layer concept maps on improving university students' writing summaries. The automatic…

  5. An Exploratory Study of the Language-Learning Style Preferences of Iranian EFL High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Afsaneh Effatdokht; Dehgahi, Meysam; Hashemi, Hanie

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the learning style preferences of 40 Iranian students at Marefat Iranian high school in Kuala Lumpur of which, 20 are females and 20 are males. To this end, this study used structured interview to elicit in-depth information from the students. The results of the study showed that learning style preferences of Iranian students…

  6. On Students' De-Motivation, Gender, Major, and Educational Level in Iranian EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Hemmatizad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated de-motivation among Iranian secondary high school and university students with respect to gender, major, and level of education and explored students' experiences in overcoming de-motivation. Data were gathered from 485 participants who comprised 215 male and 270 female. A 35 Likert type item de-motivation…

  7. Learner to Teacher: EFL Student Teachers' Perceptions on Internet-Assisted Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ming-Mu

    2008-01-01

    To meet the challenges of fast-paced globalization and a more demanding high-tech environment of the future, it is imperative to train students for equipping with relevant abilities and competencies, especially in online literacy and communication skills, and assist them to build correct technology attitude and belief. Student teachers'…

  8. A Look at EFL Technical Students' Use of Learning Strategies in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-Wei; Huang, Bih-Shia; Shih, Ming-Piao; Tsai, Chih-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    253 freshmen taking Freshman English from a university of technology in the central Taiwan participated in this study. The purposes of this research were to explore what learning strategy was used more frequently by college students and to investigate the variance of using learning strategies among students of different English proficiency levels.…

  9. Developing Detailed Rubrics for Assessing Critique Writing: Impact on EFL University Students' Performance and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Rula; Balaa, Luma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop specific rubrics for assessing critiques in English 202, an English as a foreign language course at the Lebanese American University to explore the effectiveness of these rubrics on students' writing and to investigate students' attitudes and reactions to the use of these rubrics. After development of the…

  10. Peer/Teacher-Assessment Using Criteria in the EFL Classroom for Developing Students' L2 Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the difference between peer- and teacher-assessment and to identify and explore the components in given criteria that students find easy or difficult when writing essays. One hundred and four essays and a survey were collected from 26 students at a Korean university in Seoul. The essays were analyzed to…

  11. Thematization in EFL Students' Composition Writing and Its Relation to Academic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilifar, Alireza

    2010-01-01

    This study made frequency and functional analysis of thematization in English students' compositions in Shahid Chamran University. Ninety students were selected and divided into three groups, followed by a homogeneity test (Fowler and Coe, 1976). An educated native speaker was also used as a criterion measure. Then, they were asked to narrate…

  12. Engaging EFL Students in E-Books Using Reader-Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Chia

    2015-01-01

    E-book reading is generally considered suboptimal because people engaging in e-book reading tend to browse through digital texts. As a result, studies concerning students' e-book preference in academic contexts have shown that students less prefer using e-books than hardcopy books when engaging in academic reading which is considered intensive…

  13. Teacher Feedback to Student Oral Presentations in EFL Classrooms: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Teo, Timothy; Yu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    Whilst much research has been conducted on teacher feedback in various teaching and learning contexts, little is known about how teachers give feedback on student oral presentations to enhance students' oral communicative skills in second-language (L2) education. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews, this case study investigated the…

  14. High School Students' Use of Digital Tools for Learning English Vocabulary in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocnean, Diana

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Romanian high school students' use of digital tools for learning vocabulary in English. Although students have a wide range of technological affordances at their disposal, little is known about how they make use of them or the extent to which they are aware of how to use them in their vocabulary learning. The study features…

  15. The Impact of Native Language Use on Second Language Vocabulary Learning by Saudi EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saleem

    2016-01-01

    This paper strives to explore the impact of Native Language use on Foreign Language vocabulary learning on the basis of empirical and available data. The study is carried out with special reference to the English Language Programme students in Buraydah Community College, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia. The Native Language of these students is…

  16. How Public High School Students Assume Cooperative Roles to Develop Their EFL Speaking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Espinel, Julie Natalie; Fonseca Canaría, Diana Carolina

    2010-01-01

    This study describes an investigation we carried out in order to identify how the specific roles that 7th grade public school students assumed when they worked cooperatively were related to their development of speaking skills in English. Data were gathered through interviews, field notes, students' reflections and audio recordings. The findings…

  17. Indonesian EFL Students' Anxiety in Speech Production: Possible Causes and Remedy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandari, Christina Lhaksmita

    2015-01-01

    This research examined what causes speech-production-related foreign-language anxiety among Indonesian students majoring in English Language Education. Furthermore, it also looks into whether and how self-reflective activities are able to help these students reduce their anxiety. The data were gathered from a qualitative research conducted on a…

  18. University Students' Perceptions of an Activity-Based EFL Drama Course at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jennifer; Aguiar, Bryan; Seong, Myeong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate university students' perceptions of drama activities in terms of providing suggestions for constructing an effective drama class. A total of ten students who participated in Interactive English, an elective English course during the second semester of 2013 at a Korean university, took part in this study. The…

  19. Development and evaluation of online video teaching resources to enhance student knowledge of livestock handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupiec, C; Pope, S; Taylor, R; Carroll, D; Ward, M H; Celi, P

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of online audiovisual materials to support the acquisition of animal handling skills by students of veterinary and animal science. A series of video clips (Livestock Handling modules) demonstrating livestock handling procedures was created and delivered online to students enrolled in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney. The effectiveness of these modules for supporting student learning was evaluated via an online survey. The survey also sought feedback on how students could be better prepared for handling livestock. The survey indicated that students found the videos a useful part of their learning experience, particularly by familiarising them with correct handling procedures and emphasising the importance of safety when handling livestock. Students also highlighted that online delivery supported flexible learning. Suggested improvements of the Livestock Handling modules centred around broadening the content of the videos and improving the user-friendliness of online access. Student feedback regarding how the Faculty could better prepare them for livestock handling was dominated by requests for more opportunities to practise animal handling using live animals. The Livestock Handling audiovisual tool is a valuable supplementary resource for developing students' proficiency in safe and effective handling of livestock. However, the results also clearly reveal a perception by students that more hands-on experience is required for acquisition of animal handling skills. These findings will inform future development of the Faculty's animal handling program. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. INDONESIAN EFL STUDENTS' ANXIETY IN SPEECH PRODUCTION: POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Laksmita Anandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examined what causes speech-production-related foreign-language anxiety among Indonesian students majoring in English Language Education. Furthermore, it also looks into whether and how self reflective activities are able to help these students reduce their anxiety. The data were gathered from a qualitative research conducted on a group of Indonesian students taking a Public Speaking course at Sanata Dharma University. The subjects were given two types of questionnaires to explore the possible causes of their anxiety and their reflection on the process of learning the public speaking skills. The research results show three causes of foreign language anxiety: fear, shyness, and discomfort. The results also demonstrate that self-reflections helped the students deal with foreign language anxiety because they helped the students identify their strengths and weaknesses, conduct problem solving, and increase confidence.

  1. Developing Students' Listening Metacognitive Strategies Using Online Videotext Self-Dictation-Generation Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    The study is based on the use of a flexible learning framework to help students improve information processes underlying strategy instruction in EFL listening. By exploiting the online videotext self-dictation-generation (video-SDG) learning activity implemented on the YouTube caption manager platform, the learning cycle was emphasized to promote…

  2. Analysis of EFL Students' Ability in Reading Vocabulary of Synonyms and Antonyms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vina Fathira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an important thing for academic level. Every student must have many vocabularies to encourage her/his reading skill. The aim of this research is to analyze the students' understanding of reading vocabularies of synonyms and antonyms in the higher education level. Synonyms and antonyms are two important things should be mastered to get better reading comprehension. The method used in this research was quantitative with survey design. The population same as the sample of this research was from fifth semester students of STIBA Persada Bunda Pekanbaru. The procedures of the research were divided into 3 parts. First, students were asked to choose the best choice in the multiple choice for synonyms and anton, number and the wrong number, and grouped the wrong number into difficulties level. Last, the researcher analyzed the students' ability in reading vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms and concluded the result of students' ability in reading vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms in elementary, intermediate, and advanced level. The result of this research showed that the students' ability in reading vocabulary of synonyms and antonyms was categorized into "excellent" level with mean score 85. From the three difficulties level of question, the findings of this research were explained every level of question. In synonyms, the mean score of students' ability were 89, 85, and 84 for elementary, intermediate, and advanced level of question. Whereas, in antonyms, the mean score of students' ability were 97, 85, and 69 for elementary, intermediate, and advanced level of question.Keywords: students' ability, reading vocabulary, synonyms and antonyms

  3. Comparative exploration of learning styles and teaching techniques between Thai and Vietnamese EFL students and instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supalak Nakhornsri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning styles have been a particular focus of a number of researchers over the past decades. Findings from various studies researching into how students learn highlight significant relationships between learners’ styles of learning and their language learning processes and achievement. This research focuses on a comparative analysis of the preferences of English learning styles and teaching techniques perceived by students from Thailand and Vietnam, and the teaching styles and techniques practiced by their instructors. The purposes were 1 to investigate the learning styles and teaching techniques students from both countries preferred, 2 to investigate the compatibility of the teaching styles and techniques practiced by instructors and those preferred by the students, 3 to specify the learning styles and teaching techniques students with high level of English proficiency preferred, and 4 to investigate the similarities of Thai and Vietnamese students’ preferences for learning styles and teaching techniques. The sample consisted of two main groups: 1 undergraduate students from King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB, Thailand and Thai Nguyen University (TNU, Vietnam and 2 English instructors from both institutions. The instruments employed comprised the Students’ Preferred English Learning Style and Teaching Technique Questionnaire and the Teachers’ Practiced English Teaching Style and Technique Questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using arithmetic means and standard deviation. The findings can contribute to the curriculum development and assist teachers to teach outside their comfort level to match the students’ preferred learning styles. In addition, the findings could better promote the courses provided for students. By understanding the learning style make-up of the students enrolled in the courses, faculty can adjust their modes of content delivery to match student preferences and maximize

  4. Evaluation of Two Popular EFL Coursebooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Jafarigohar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates two EFL coursebooks commonly taught in Iran, namely Topnotch and Total English. Thirty three teachers with minimum one year experience of teaching the two books evaluated them using a checklist of the evaluation of EFL coursebooks. Analysis of the obtained data by t-test showed that the difference between the two coursebooks was statistically significant in some criteria. Teachers were more satisfied with Topnotch than Total English in the criteria such as language components, tasks, activities, exercises, and critical discourse analysis features. On the other hand, they were more satisfied with Total English than the other coursebook in a criterion considered as general considerations. The difference between the two coursebooks was not significant in some criteria including structures, skills, and teacher’s manual. Findings of the study can be beneficial for the authors of the two coursebooks, EFL teachers, curriculum and material developers, administrators of language institutes, and also students interested in learning EFL.

  5. Pragmatic competence in English at the VG1 level: To what extent are Norwegian EFL students able to adapt to contextual demands when making requests in English?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Brubæk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article presents an investigation of Norwegian students of English as a foreign language (EFL and their pragmatic competence in English. The importance of developing such a competence receives a strong focus in the English subject curriculum. However, very few studies have been conducted in the field of pragmatics in Norway, and even fewer Norwegian studies have focused on students’ pragmatic competence in a second language. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether Norwegian EFL students would be familiar with and show awareness of English politeness norms and pragmatic conventions when having to communicate in English. Would they be able to adapt their language, choice of strategy and level of formality to the contextual demands when making requests in the second language (L2? Forty students answered a simplified version of a discourse completion test (DCT consisting of four different situations in which the students had to make requests. The results, which were analysed by means of Brown and Levinson’s theory of face threatening acts, indicated that most of the students were at one of the beginning stages of English pragmatic development. Their language use was characterized by first language (L1 transfer and overuse of familiar and informal expressions. When faced with more formal and demanding situations, they fell short and clearly lacked the knowledge and competence that would allow them to communicate successfully. It can be argued that these findings might indicate a lack of focus in Norwegian schools when it comes to developing students’ pragmatic competence. If this is true, an important part of the subject curriculum is being neglected.

  6. Frequent Errors in Chinese EFL Learners' Topic-Based Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huifang

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated a large number of errors found in the topic-based writings of Chinese EFL learners, especially provided an analysis on frequent errors, to find useful pedagogical implications for English grammar teaching and writing instruction in Chinese EFL setting. Students' topic-based writings were examined by the author. The findings…

  7. Practices and Challenges of EFL Teachers in Monitoring Learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practices and Challenges of EFL Teachers in Monitoring Learners' Group Performances and Administrating Feedback with Reference to High Schools in Nekemte, ... The result of the study showed that EFL teachers do not pay significant attention for their students' understanding responsibilities participating in group work.

  8. Leading for Learning: Reflective Management in EFL Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker, Suleyman Davut

    2006-01-01

    Around the world there are many schools where native speakers of other languages study English as a foreign language (EFL). In this article, I introduce a school-based reflective management model (SBRM) for such EFL schools. The model centers on creating a learning community where all changes involve reflective learning and growth for students,…

  9. Factors Causing Demotivation in EFL Teaching Process: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2012-01-01

    Studies have mainly focused on strategies to motivate teachers or the student-teacher motivation relationships rather than teacher demotivation in the English as a foreign language (EFL) teaching process, whereas no data have been found on the factors that cause teacher demotivation in the Turkish EFL teaching contexts at the elementary education…

  10. The Formeaning Response Approach: Poetry in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellem, Harlan

    2009-01-01

    In English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms, where acquisition of English is the ultimate goal, one of the main tasks for the teacher is to provide students with language input and activities that best aid them in their learning process. As different researchers have reported, including poetry-based activities in the EFL classroom is…

  11. Action Research Practices of English as Foreign Language (EFL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study intended to assess EFL teachers' actual practice of action research and the concomitant change to themselves and to their practices. Analysis of the data collected from EFL teachers and students at Jimma and Hawassa Universities using questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion (FGD) guide has shown that ...

  12. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Iranian Upper-Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Mohammad; Hassanzadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei, Saeed

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the preferred vocabulary learning strategies of Iranian upper-intermediate EFL learners. In order to identify the aforementioned group in terms of language proficiency, a TOEFL test was administered to a population of 146 undergraduate EFL students at the university of Vali-e-Asr in Rafsanjan, Iran. Those scoring above 480 were…

  13. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  14. Effects of a Computer-Assisted Concept Mapping Learning Strategy on EFL College Students' English Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Lin; Chen, Chiu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on EFL college learners' English reading comprehension. The research questions were: (1) what was the influence of the computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on different learners' English reading comprehension? (2) did…

  15. The Effect of Explicit Metapragmatic Instruction on Request Speech Act Awareness of Intermediate EFL Students at Institute Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masouleh, Fatemeh Abdollahizadeh; Arjmandi, Masoumeh; Vahdany, Fereydoon

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with the application of the pragmatics research to EFL teaching. The need for language learners to utilize a form of speech acts such as request which involves a series of strategies was significance of the study. Although defining different speech acts has been established since 1960s, recently there has been a shift towards…

  16. Reading Subtitles and Taking Enotes While Learning Scientific Materials in a Multimedia Environment: Cognitive Load Perspectives on EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John J. H.; Lee, Yuan-Husan; Wang, Dai-Yi; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of providing subtitles and taking enotes on cognitive load and performance. A total of 73 English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) undergraduates learned brain anatomy and cognitive functions through multimedia programs. We used a 2 (subtitle/no) x 2 (taking enotes/no) factorial design to test the following:…

  17. The Correlation and Contribution of Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge to Reading Success of EFL Bangladeshi Tertiary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Shabdin, Ahmad Affendi

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of the present research work are to investigate which aspects of depth of vocabulary knowledge have strong and significant correlation with academic reading comprehension and examine to what extent different dimensions of depth of vocabulary knowledge have predicted to academic reading success in an EFL context. A total sample of 175…

  18. The Effect of Dialogue Journal Writing on EFL Students' Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gholami Mehrdad

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the role writing plays in learning a foreign language, many students do not show much interest in taking an active part in writing classes (Myint, 1997. Thus different activities have been proposed to motivate students to write one of which is dialogue journal writing, and the present work tries to investigate the possible effect(s of such activity on writing ability of a group of English students at Islamic Azad University- Hamedan branch. To do this, 50 students obtaining 1 and 2 on the TWE scale on the structure section of a TOEFL test were selected and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. After some introductory sessions, the students were asked to write paragraphs on a weekly schedule and hand them in to be corrected. In the experimental group the students were, furthermore, asked to keep journals and hand them in. After 4 months, the students in both groups took part in a writing exam in which they had to write two paragraphs on the topics given. The comparison of the means at p

  19. Medical students review of formative OSCE scores, checklists, and videos improves with student-faculty debriefing meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W; Ceccolini, Gabbriel; Feinn, Richard; Rockfeld, Jennifer; Rosenberg, Ilene; Thomas, Listy; Cassese, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Performance feedback is considered essential to clinical skills development. Formative objective structured clinical exams (F-OSCEs) often include immediate feedback by standardized patients. Students can also be provided access to performance metrics including scores, checklists, and video recordings after the F-OSCE to supplement this feedback. How often students choose to review this data and how review impacts future performance has not been documented. We suspect student review of F-OSCE performance data is variable. We hypothesize that students who review this data have better performance on subsequent F-OSCEs compared to those who do not. We also suspect that frequency of data review can be improved with faculty involvement in the form of student-faculty debriefing meetings. Simulation recording software tracks and time stamps student review of performance data. We investigated a cohort of first- and second-year medical students from the 2015-16 academic year. Basic descriptive statistics were used to characterize frequency of data review and a linear mixed-model analysis was used to determine relationships between data review and future F-OSCE performance. Students reviewed scores (64%), checklists (42%), and videos (28%) in decreasing frequency. Frequency of review of all metric and modalities improved when student-faculty debriefing meetings were conducted (pstudents, checklist review was associated with an improved performance on subsequent F-OSCEs (p = 0.038) by 1.07 percentage points on a scale of 0-100. Among 86 second year students, no review modality was associated with improved performance on subsequent F-OSCEs. Medical students review F-OSCE checklists and video recordings less than 50% of the time when not prompted. Student-faculty debriefing meetings increased student data reviews. First-year student's review of checklists on F-OSCEs was associated with increases in performance on subsequent F-OSCEs, however this outcome was not observed among

  20. Harnessing Students' Interest in Physics with Their Own Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Many physics teachers assign projects where students are asked to measure real-world motion. One purpose of this student-centered activity is to cultivate the relevance of physics in their lives. Typical project topics may include measuring the speed of a student's fastball and calculating how much reaction time batters are given. Another student…

  1. Peer Assessment of Student-Produced Mechanics Lab Report Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings…

  2. EFL Speaking Anxiety among Senior High School Students and Policy Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amirul Mukminin; Masbirorotni Masbirorotni; Noprival Noprival; Sutarno Sutarno; Nelly Arif; Maimunah Maimunah

    2015-01-01

    ...’ English language speaking anxiety at senior high schools in Jambi, Indonesia. The purpose of this paper was to report some of findings from the qualitative interview data on the sources of senior high school students...

  3. Thesis/Dissertation Writing for EFL Students: An ESP Course Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rebecca T.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an intensive English for Specific Purposes (ESP) thesis-writing course. The course focuses on total discourse learning needs and uses an interactive model of needs analysis to target the learning needs of students. (Author/CB)

  4. The Role of Reading Skills on Reading Comprehension Ability of Turkish EFL Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Reading is a part of our daily lives. It is performed both for pleasure and information. Reading skills are important for the individuals since they foster comprehension in reading. If the students do not have knowledge of reading skills, they cannot be expected to be successful readers. Thus, they cannot achieve the level of comprehension required to pass exams in their own departments. For this reason, reading skills should be taught in universities for the students to be able to cope with ...

  5. The Effects of Portfolio Use in Teaching Report Writing: EFL Students' Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Taha Assaggaf; Yousef Salem Bamahra

    2016-01-01

    Portfolio has widely been used in various areas including second language writing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the views of students in using portfolio in teaching technical report-writing. The participants are computer science students enrolled in a report writing course at a university in Yemen. For data collection, the study used three techniques; namely, group discussions, written reflections and a short questionnaire. The findings showed participants' positive views towar...

  6. The Impact of Teacher Questioning on Creating Interaction in EFL: A Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Mona Yousef; Al-Bargi, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effect of questions on fostering interaction in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms. It also seeks to determine the characteristics of questions that promote increased classroom interaction. Data were collected through video recordings of EFL classrooms which were analyzed using Discourse Analysis techniques.…

  7. THE EFFECT OF TEACHER ERROR FEEDBACK ON THE ACCURACY OF EFL STUDENT WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-chun Pan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of teacher error feedback on students' ability to write accurately. Three male first-year Physics graduate students at a university in Taiwan participated in this study. They were asked to write a 100-word passage about the greatest invention in human history. Within days of the teacher’s grammatical feedback, the students were required to revise their work again based on the teacher's suggested revisions. In addition, oral conferencing was conducted in order to help the students obtain a better comprehension of certain grammar points. Four weeks after the oral conferencing, the students were asked, without prior notice, to revise their original passages again. The findings reveal that the students made progress in the revised versions of their passages, but the success was not repeated in their later test versions. In other words, no positive relationship between teacher error feedback and students’ improvement in linguistic accuracy over time was observed. This suggests that teacher error feedback alone may not facilitate the learning of linguistic information. A combination of sufficient exposure to English in reading and writing, plus opportunities to practice the language, for example, may lead to better grammar.

  8. Video Games, Internet and Social Networks: A Study among French School students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dany, Lionel; Moreau, Laure; Guillet, Clémentine; Franchina, Carmelo

    2016-11-25

    Aim : Screen-based media use is gradually becoming a public health issue, especially among young people.Method : A local descriptive observational study was conducted in 11 colleges of the Bouches-du-Rhône department. All middle high school students were asked to fill in a questionnaire comprising questions about their demographic characteristics, their screen-based media use (Internet, video games, social networks), any problematic use (video games and social networks), self-esteem and quality of life.Results : A total of 950 college students (mean age : 12.96 years) participated in the research. The results show a high level and a very diverse screen-based media use. Boys more frequently played video games and girls go more frequently used social networks. The levels of problematic use were relatively low for all middle high school students. The level of problematic video game use was significantly higher in boys, and the level of problematic social network use was higher in girls.Conclusion : Differences in the use of video games or social networks raise the general issue of gender differences in society. This study indicates the need for more specific preventive interventions for screen-based media use. The addictive “nature” of certain practices needs to be studied in more detail.

  9. Including Students' Diverse Perspectives on Classroom Interactions into Video-Based Professional Development for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Anna-Marietha; Prediger, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Video is often used in professional development courses to sensitize mathematics teachers to students' thinking and issues of classroom interaction. This article presents an approach that incorporates students' perspectives on mathematics classroom interactions into video-based professional development in order to enhance teachers' reflection on…

  10. Students' Perceptions of the Value of Using Videos as a Pre-Class Learning Experience in the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Taotao; Logan, Joanne; Waugh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom is an instructional model in which students viewed the learning content before class through instructor-provided video lectures or other pre-class learning materials, and in-class time is used for student-centered active learning. Video is widely utilized as a typical pre-class learning material in the flipped classroom. This…

  11. Constraints experienced by EFL literature students: A case study from an Algerian university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl S le Roux

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the perceptions and experiences of second language reading and comprehension of Arabic-speaking university students in TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language literature classes. In reflecting students’ observations and experiences in a variety of classroom activities, the study attempts to uncover the constraints and challenges students experience and to suggest ways in which these difficulties could be overcome. The findings of the study reveal that lecturers have a significant role to play in helping students overcome barriers to understanding and interpreting literature. Recommendations for improving comprehension and enjoyment in L2 literature studies include the teaching and modelling of appropriate reading strategies that improve critical and analytical thinking skills; teaching and learning within a collaborative learning environment which fosters the development and exploration of ideas; and improving students’ background knowledge relevant to the text being studied.

  12. APPLYING MATERIALS OF AN EFL WRITING COURSEWARE FOR 8TH GRADE STUDENTS OF JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumbuh Prabowo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To fulfill the demand of the advance of Information Technology, this present study involved multimedia for writing courseware. This study examined teacher’s and students’ responses to the use of interactive multimedia. The participants of this were one immersion class of 8th grade students and an English teacher of a junior high school in Purwokerto, Central Java. These students were selected purposively. There were two instruments used in this study: questionnaire and observational sheet. It can be concluded that regarding to the teacher’s and students’ responses to the use of interactive multimedia, it is found out that both teacher and the students responded positively. They were interested in the courseware because this multimedia was different from those used in class.

  13. How Public High School Students Assume Cooperative Roles to Develop Their EFL Speaking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Natalie Parra Espinel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an investigation we carried out in order to identify how the specific roles that 7th grade public school students assumed when they worked cooperatively were related to their development of speaking skills in English. Data were gathered through interviews, field notes, students’ reflections and audio recordings. The findings revealed that students who were involved in cooperative activities chose and assumed roles taking into account preferences, skills and personality traits. In the same manner, when learners worked together, their roles were affected by each other and they put into practice some social strategies with the purpose of supporting their embryonic speaking development.

  14. Rhetorical Moves in Problem Statement Section of Iranian EFL Postgraduate Students' Theses

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Nimehchisalem; Zahra Tarvirdizadeh; Sara Sayed Paidary; Nur Izyan Syamimi Binti Mat Hussin

    2016-01-01

    The Problem Statement (PS) section of a thesis, usually a subsection of the first chapter, is supposed to justify the objectives of the study. Postgraduate students are often ignorant of the rhetorical moves that they are expected to make in their PS. This descriptive study aimed to explore the rhetorical moves of the PS in Iranian master’s (MA) degree theses. The study focused on 30 PSs written by MA Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) students. The samples were analyzed based on S...

  15. Why Do Students Plagiarize? Efl Undergraduates’ Views on the Reasons Behind Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doró Katalin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheating and plagiarism spread like pandemics in many educational contexts and are difficulty to detect, fight and also to understand. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate what first-year students of English at a large Hungarian university believe to be the main reasons for plagiarism. Twenty-five students were asked to express their views in a free opinion essay. Perceived reasons were categorized into twelve main groups based on the literature and the reasons for plagiarism provided by faculty members at the same university. The most often mentioned reasons included saving time and effort and unintentional plagiarism.

  16. A Comparison of Chinese and Colombian University EFL Students Regarding Learner Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Paola Buendía Arias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to gain deeper understanding of learner autonomy in English as a Foreign Language students from different cultures through the identification and analysis of similarities and differences between Chinese and Colombian students from two public universities: Tianjin Foreign Studies University in China and Universidad Surcolombiana in Colombia. Data were gathered using questionnaires and interviews for comparative research. The participants’ responses were analyzed using quantitative methods such as independent samples t-test and qualitative methods such as data codification and triangulation were also used. The results indicate a significant difference between the two groups of learners regarding their autonomy. Complementarily, their autonomy-enhancement difficulties were diagnosed.

  17. Impact of current video game playing on robotic simulation skills among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öge, Tufan; Borahay, Mostafa A; Achjian, Tamar; Kılıç, Sami Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of current and prior video game playing on initial robotic simulation skill acquisition. This cross-sectional descriptive study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-1) was conducted at a medical university training center. The study subjects were medical students who currently played video games (Group I) and those who had not played video games in the last 2 years (Group II). The robotic skills of both groups were assessed using simulation. Twenty-two students enrolled in this study; however, only 21 completed it. The median age of the participants was 23 (22-24) years and 24 (23-26) years in Groups I and II, respectively. Among the participants, 15 (71.4%) were male and 6 (28.5%) were female, and 90.4% of the students started playing video games in primary school. When the 2 groups were compared according to the completion time of each exercise, Group I finished more quickly than Group II in the Peg Board-1 exercise (p>0.05), whereas Group II had better results in 3 exercises including Pick and Place, Ring and Rail, and Thread the Rings-1. However, none of the differences were found to be statistically significant (p>.05), and according to the overall scores based on the time to complete exercises, economy of motion, instrument collision, use of excessive instrument force, instruments out of view, and master workspace range, the scores were not statistically different between Groups I and II (p>.05). According to the basic robotic simulation exercise results, there was no difference between medical students who used to play video games and those who still played video games. Studies evaluating baseline visuospatial skills with larger sample sizes are needed.

  18. A Comparison of Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Iranian EFL University Students: Repeating versus Cooperating with Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Maki; Foo, Thomas Chow Voon

    2014-01-01

    Vocabulary learning and assessment are considered as the key basis for the training of English as a foreign language. However, it is time-consuming, uncertain and repetitious for the teachers to assess the proficiency of the students' vocabulary storage. This paper reports the results of a study which aimed to investigate the effect of Repeating…

  19. A Survey of Kurdish Students' Sound Segment & Syllabic Pattern Errors in the Course of Learning EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to finding adequate answers to the following queries: (A) what are the segmental and syllabic pattern errors made by Kurdish students in their pronunciation? (B) Can the problematic areas in pronunciation be predicted by a systematic comparison of the sound systems of both native and target languages? (C) Can there be any…

  20. Two Portfolio Systems: EFL Students' Perceptions of Writing Ability, Text Improvement, and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ricky

    2013-01-01

    Research into portfolio assessment ("PA") typically describes teachers' development and implementation of different portfolio models in their respective teaching contexts, however, not much attention is paid to student perceptions of the portfolio approach or its impact on the learning of writing. To this end, this study aims to…

  1. EFL Students' Perceptions of Social Issues in Famous Works of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista Urrego, Lizmendy Zuhey; Parra Toro, Ingrid Judith

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative, descriptive, and interpretative research intervention case study of English as a foreign language students' construction of perceptions on social issues found in famous works of art. Participants in this study engaged in the practice of critical thinking as a strategy to appreciate art that expresses social…

  2. The Effects of Blended Learning on the Intrinsic Motivation of Thai EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucaromana, Usaporn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the results of blended learning with face-to-face learning among university students studying English as a foreign language. The participants were separated by gender, and the following variables, intrinsic motivation for learning English, attitudes towards English as a subject, and satisfaction with the…

  3. Thai EFL Students' Writing Errors in Different Text Types: The Interference of the First Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapunyawong, Somchai; Usaha, Siriluck

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing writing errors caused by the interference of the Thai language, regarded as the first language (L1), in three writing genres, namely narration, description, and comparison/contrast. 120 English paragraphs written by 40 second year English major students were analyzed by using Error Analysis (EA).The results revealed…

  4. Associations between Chinese EFL Graduate Students' Beliefs and Language Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mailing; Tian, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    This study, using Horwitz's Beliefs about Language Learning Inventory and Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning, investigated learners' beliefs about language learning and their choice of strategy categories among 546 graduate students in China. The correlation between learners' beliefs and their strategy categories use was examined.…

  5. Exploring Self-Regulation in Language Learning: A Study of Japanese High School EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Atsuko; Nakata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Self-regulated learning explores learners' complex intrinsic factors, including their learning strategies and motivation to learn. It offers learners the opportunity to become autonomous--a situation that is essential for ensuring that Japanese students acquire English proficiency. This study aims to explore the factors involved in self-regulated…

  6. Transforming EFL Classroom Practices and Promoting Students' Empowerment: Collaborative Learning from a Dialogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras León, Janeth Juliana; Chapetón Castro, Claudia Marcela

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of implementing collaborative learning from a social and dialogical perspective on seventh graders' interaction in an English as a foreign language classroom at a public school in Bogotá, Colombia. Thirty students participated in this action research where field notes, questionnaires, semi-structured interviews,…

  7. Understanding EFL Students' Development of Self-Regulated Learning in a Process-Oriented Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ricky

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a study which investigated how explicit strategy instruction may shape student use of metacognitive knowledge and in what ways this knowledge promotes self-regulation in the learning of writing. From a class of a 2-year associate degree programme in Hong Kong, which experienced a 15-week process-oriented writing course…

  8. Assertive Classroom Management Strategies and Students' Performance: The Case of EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Mohammad; Bozorgmanesh, Bafrin

    2015-01-01

    Ample research findings support the effective role that classroom management strategies play in enhancing students' learning. Drawing upon Iranian high school teachers' classroom management strategies, this article is intended to examine the extent to which these teachers follow assertive classroom management strategies and if these strategies…

  9. Web-Based Essay Critiquing System and EFL Students' Writing: A Quantitative and Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cynthia; Wong, Kelvin C. K.; Cheung, William K.; Lee, Fion S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The paper first describes a web-based essay critiquing system developed by the authors using latent semantic analysis (LSA), an automatic text analysis technique, to provide students with immediate feedback on content and organisation for revision whenever there is an internet connection. It reports on its effectiveness in enhancing adult EFL…

  10. Chinese University EFL Undergraduate Students' Perceptions towards EGAP Reading and Writing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Chen, Jianhua; Liu, Meihua

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined how undergraduate students from a prestigious Chinese university perceived the teaching and learning of English for general academic purposes (EGAP) reading and writing courses. Analyses of 951 questionnaires revealed that most participants generally (strongly) believed that learning general academic English was closely…

  11. Research Trends of EFL Students in English Education Program: A 2005-2015 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftanti, Erna; Shofiya, Arina

    2017-01-01

    One of the purposes of English Education Program of State Islamic Institute of Tulungagung, Indonesia, is to lead the graduates to do research on linguistics and language teaching and to write a thesis accordingly. However, the preliminary study shows that there is some repeatedly research on the same topics, because the students commonly spend…

  12. EFL Student-Teachers' Identity Construction: A Case Study in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dánisa; Ayala, Maximiliano

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the process of professional identity construction of two English as a foreign language student-teachers from a sociocultural theoretical lens. A qualitative case study was conducted through personal narratives, semi-structured interviews, and a focus group. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory…

  13. Reading for the Purpose of Responding to Literature: EFL Students' Perceptions of E-Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Chia

    2016-01-01

    As electronic books continue to attract attention as a pedagogical tool in language classrooms, the impact that e-books are expected to have on higher education cannot be ignored. Despite the pervasiveness of e-book reading studies in higher education, most studies show that students' reactions to e-books are often negative. However, the effects…

  14. International EFL/ESL Master Students' Adaptation Strategies for Academic Writing Practices at Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2017-01-01

    The present research provides insights into the different forms of adaptation strategies employed by international graduate students to overcome the challenges faced in the academic writing practices and gain access to their disciplinary communities of practice at Master's level. Qualitative data was collected through semi-structured in-depth…

  15. Effect of Group Work on EFL Students' Attitudes and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqi, Hanan A.; Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of group work in classroom activities is a method used for motivating learning and increasing the idea of pleasure through learning. The current study investigates the advantages of group work in exams in the English department, in the College of Basic Education. 40 students in two classes of "The Introduction of Phonetics and…

  16. The Use of Electronic Dictionaries for Pronunciation Practice by University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metruk, Rastislav

    2017-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore how Slovak learners of English use electronic dictionaries with regard to pronunciation practice and improvement. A total of 24 Slovak university students (subjects) completed a questionnaire which contained pronunciation-related questions in connection with the use of electronic dictionaries. The questions primarily…

  17. The Use of Video Modeling via a Video iPod and a System of Least Prompts to Improve Transitional Behaviors for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David; Fahrenkrog, Cynthia; Ayres, Kevin M.; Smith, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of video modeling delivered via a handheld device (video iPod) and the use of the system of least prompts to assist elementary-age students with transitioning between locations and activities within the school. Four students with autism learned to manipulate a handheld device to watch video models. An ABAB…

  18. Use of Short Animal-Themed Videos to Enhance Veterinary Students' Mood, Attention, and Understanding of Pharmacology Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R; Hellyer, Pete; Clapp, Tod R; Suchman, Erica; McLean, Jennifer; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2017-09-29

    Professional DVM training is inherently stressful and challenging for students. This study evaluated a simple intervention-short breaks during a veterinary pharmacology lecture course in the form of funny/cute animal videos (Mood Induction Procedures, or MIP)-to assess for potential impact on students' mood, interest in material, and perceived understanding of material. Ten YouTube video clips showing cats or dogs were selected to influence students' affective states. The videos were shown in a required pharmacology class offered during the fall semester of the second year of the DVM program at a large, land-grant institution in the Western US. The student cohort consisted of 133 students (20 males, 113 females). Twenty days of the course were randomly chosen for the study and ranged from weeks 2 to 13 of the semester. Sessions in which the videos were played were alternated with sessions in which no video was played, for a total of 10 video days and 10 control days. There were significant differences in all three post-class assessment measures between the experimental (video) days and the control days. Results suggest that showing short cute animal videos in the middle of class positively affected students' mood, interest in material, and self-reported understanding of material. While the results of this study are limited to one student cohort at one institution, the ease of implementation of the technique and relatively low stakes support incorporation of the MIP technique across a variety of basic and clinical science courses.

  19. Energy Expenditure during Physically Interactive Video Game Playing in Male College Students with Different Playing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Katie; Lillie, Tia; Taylor, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Researchers have yet to explore the effect of physically interactive video game playing on energy expenditure, despite its potential for meeting current minimal daily activity and energy expenditure recommendations. Participants and Methods: Nineteen male college students-12 experienced "Dance Dance Revolution" (DDR) players and 7…

  20. A Comparison of Students' Performances Using Audio Only and Video Media Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Norazean; Muhammad, Ahmad Mazli; Ganapathy, Nurul Nadiah Dewi Faizul; Khairuddin, Zulaikha; Othman, Salwa

    2017-01-01

    Listening is a very crucial skill to be learnt in second language classroom because it is essential for the development of spoken language proficiency (Hamouda, 2013). The aim of this study is to investigate the significant differences in terms of students' performance when using traditional (audio-only) method and video media method. The data of…