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Sample records for video-rate confocal scanning

  1. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  2. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  3. Toward endoscopes with no distal optics: video-rate scanning microscopy through a fiber bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bouwmans, Géraud; Monneret, Serge; Rigneault, Hervé

    2013-03-01

    We report a step toward scanning endomicroscopy without distal optics. The focusing of the beam at the distal end of a fiber bundle is achieved by imposing a parabolic phase profile across the exit face with the aid of a spatial light modulator. We achieve video-rate images by galvanometric scanning of the phase tilt at the proximal end. The approach is made possible by the bundle, designed to have very low coupling between cores.

  4. Synchronous-digitization for video rate polarization modulated beam scanning second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Muir, Ryan D.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Fast beam-scanning non-linear optical microscopy, coupled with fast (8 MHz) polarization modulation and analytical modeling have enabled simultaneous nonlinear optical Stokes ellipsometry (NOSE) and linear Stokes ellipsometry imaging at video rate (15 Hz). NOSE enables recovery of the complex-valued Jones tensor that describes the polarization-dependent observables, in contrast to polarimetry, in which the polarization stated of the exciting beam is recorded. Each data acquisition consists of 30 images (10 for each detector, with three detectors operating in parallel), each of which corresponds to polarization-dependent results. Processing of this image set by linear fitting contracts down each set of 10 images to a set of 5 parameters for each detector in second harmonic generation (SHG) and three parameters for the transmittance of the fundamental laser beam. Using these parameters, it is possible to recover the Jones tensor elements of the sample at video rate. Video rate imaging is enabled by performing synchronous digitization (SD), in which a PCIe digital oscilloscope card is synchronized to the laser (the laser is the master clock.) Fast polarization modulation was achieved by modulating an electro-optic modulator synchronously with the laser and digitizer, with a simple sine-wave at 1/10th the period of the laser, producing a repeating pattern of 10 polarization states. This approach was validated using Z-cut quartz, and NOSE microscopy was performed for micro-crystals of naproxen.

  5. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  6. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  7. Video-rate confocal microscopy for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Hohng, Sungchul

    2012-10-17

    There is no confocal microscope optimized for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging. By combining the swiftness of the line-scanning method and the high sensitivity of wide-field detection, we have developed a, to our knowledge, novel confocal fluorescence microscope with a good optical-sectioning capability (1.0 μm), fast frame rates (fluorescence detection efficiency. Full compatibility of the microscope with conventional cell-imaging techniques allowed us to do single-molecule imaging with a great ease at arbitrary depths of live cells. With the new microscope, we monitored diffusion motion of fluorescently labeled cAMP receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum at both the basal and apical surfaces and obtained superresolution fluorescence images of microtubules of COS-7 cells at depths in the range 0-85 μm from the surface of a coverglass. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia M R; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Brandt, Rick A J; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H C; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required.

  9. Application of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy in Biology and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Volkov; N. V. Frigo; L. F. Znamenskaya; O. R. Katunina

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy are up-to-date highend study methods. Confocal microscopy is used in cell biology and medicine. By using confocal microscopy, it is possible to study bioplasts and localization of protein molecules and other compounds relative to cell or tissue structures, and to monitor dynamic cell processes. Confocal microscopes enable layer-by-layer scanning of test items to create demonstrable 3D models. As...

  10. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  11. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.; Breedijk, R.; Hoebe, R.; Stallinga, S.; Manders, E.

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  12. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  13. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  14. Sub-Airy Confocal Adaptive Optics Scanning Ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sredar, Nripun; Fagbemi, Oladipo E; Dubra, Alfredo

    2018-04-01

    To demonstrate the viability of improving transverse image resolution in reflectance scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy using sub-Airy disk confocal detection. The foveal cone mosaic was imaged in five human subjects free of known eye disease using two custom adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopes (AOSLOs) in reflectance with 7.75 and 4.30 mm pupil diameters. Confocal pinholes of 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 Airy disk diameters (ADDs) were used in a retinal conjugate plane before the light detector. Average cone photoreceptor intensity profile width and power spectrum were calculated for the resulting images. Detected energy using a model eye was recorded for each pinhole size. The cone photoreceptor mosaic is better resolved with decreasing confocal pinhole size, with the high spatial frequency content of the images enhanced in both the large- and small-pupil AOSLOs. The average cone intensity profile width was reduced by ∼15% with the use of a 0.5 ADD pinhole when compared to a 1.0 ADD, with an accompanying reduction in signal greater than a factor of four. The use of sub-Airy disk confocal pinhole detection without increasing retinal light exposure results in a substantial improvement in image resolution at the cost of larger than predicted signal reduction. Improvement in transverse resolution using sub-Airy disk confocal detection is a practical and low-cost approach that is applicable to all point- and line-scanning ophthalmoscopes, including optical coherence tomographers.

  15. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological

  16. How the confocal laser scanning microscope entered biological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, W B; White, J G

    2003-09-01

    A history of the early development of the confocal laser scanning microscope in the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge is presented. The rapid uptake of this technology is explained by the wide use of fluorescence in the 80s. The key innovations were the scanning of the light beam over the specimen rather than vice-versa and a high magnification at the level of the detector, allowing the use of a macroscopic iris. These were followed by an achromatic all-reflective relay system, a non-confocal transmission detector and novel software for control and basic image processing. This design was commercialized successfully and has been produced and developed over 17 years, surviving challenges from alternative technologies, including solid-state scanning systems. Lessons are pointed out from the unusual nature of the original funding and research environment. Attention is drawn to the slow adoption of the instrument in diagnostic medicine, despite promising applications.

  17. Configurations of the Re-scan Confocal Microscope (RCM) for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, G. M. R.; Desclos, E.; Breedijk, R. M. P.; Dolz-Edo, L.; Smits, G. J.; Bielefeld, P.; Picavet, L.; Fitzsimons, C. P.; Hoebe, R.; Manders, E. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The new high-sensitive and high-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), is based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan detection unit. The re-scan unit includes a pair of re-scanning mirrors that project the emission light onto a camera in a scanning manner. The

  18. Configurations of the Re-scan Confocal Microscope (RCM) for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.M.R.; Desclos, E.; Breedijk, R.M.P.; Dolz-Edo, L.; Smits, G.J.; Nahidiazar, L.; Bielefeld, P.; Picavet, L.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Hoebe, R.; Manders, E.M.M.

    The new high-sensitive and high-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), is based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan detection unit. The re-scan unit includes a pair of re-scanning mirrors that project the emission light onto a camera in a scanning manner. The

  19. Integrated Confocal and Scanning Probe Microscopy for Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Haupt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM continues to be developed, not only in design, but also in application. The new focus of using AFM is changing from pure material to biomedical studies. More frequently, it is being used in combination with other optical imaging methods, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and fluorescent imaging, to provide a more comprehensive understanding of biological systems. To date, AFM has been used increasingly as a precise micromanipulator, probing and altering the mechanobiological characteristics of living cells and tissues, in order to examine specific, receptor-ligand interactions, material properties, and cell behavior. In this review, we discuss the development of this new hybrid AFM, current research, and potential applications in diagnosis and the detection of disease.

  20. Signal and noise modeling in confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E; Aach, Til

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has revolutionized imaging of subcellular structures in biomedical research by enabling the acquisition of 3D time-series of fluorescently-tagged proteins in living cells, hence forming the basis for an automated quantification of their morphological and dynamic characteristics. Due to the inherently weak fluorescence, CLSM images exhibit a low SNR. We present a novel model for the transfer of signal and noise in CLSM that is both theoretically sound as well as corroborated by a rigorous analysis of the pixel intensity statistics via measurement of the 3D noise power spectra, signal-dependence and distribution. Our model provides a better fit to the data than previously proposed models. Further, it forms the basis for (i) the simulation of the CLSM imaging process indispensable for the quantitative evaluation of CLSM image analysis algorithms, (ii) the application of Poisson denoising algorithms and (iii) the reconstruction of the fluorescence signal.

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  3. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. ► The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. ► In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. ► Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  4. A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope for retinal vessel oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompado, Arthur

    Measurement of a person's blood oxygen saturation has long been recognized as a useful metric for the characterizing ailments ranging from chronic respiratory disorders to acute, potentially life threatening, traumas. The ubiquity of oxygen saturation monitors in the medical field, including portable pulse oximeters and laboratory based CO-oximeters, is a testament to the importance of this technique. The work presented here documents the design, fabrication and development of a unique type of oxygen saturation monitor, a confocal scanning retinal vessel oximeter, with the potential to expand the usefulness of the present devices. A large part of the knowledge base required to construct the instrument comes from the consideration of light scattering by red blood cells in a blood vessel. Therefore, a substantial portion of this work is devoted to the process of light scattering by whole human blood and its effects on the development of a more accurate oximeter. This light scattering effect has been both measured and modeled stochastically to determine its contribution to the measured oximeter signal. It is shown that, although well accepted in the published literature, the model only correlates marginally to the measurements due to inherent limitations imposed by the model assumptions. Nonetheless, enough material has been learned about the scattering to allow development of a mathematical model for the interaction of light with blood in a vessel, and this knowledge has been applied to the data reduction of the present oximeter. This data reduction technique has been tested in a controlled experiment employing a model eye with a blood filled mock retinal vessel. It will be shown that the presently developed technique exhibited strong correlation between the known blood oxygen saturation and that calculated by the new system.

  5. Confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes for high speed measurements and better imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wanhee; Lee, SeungWoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-02-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) needs a scanning mechanism because only one point information of specimen can be obtained. Therefore the speed of the confocal scanning microscopy is limited by the speed of the scanning tool. To overcome this limitation from scanning tool we propose another scanning mechanism. We make three optical probes in the specimen under confocal condition of each point. Three optical probes are moved by beam scanning mechanism with shared resonant scanning mirror (RM) and galvanometer driven mirror (GM). As each optical probe scan allocated region of the specimen, information from three points is obtained simultaneously and image acquisition time is reduced. Therefore confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is expected to have three times faster speed of the image acquisition than conventional one. And as another use, multiple optical probes to which different light wavelength is applied can scan whole same region respectively. It helps to obtain better contrast image in case of specimens having different optical characteristics for specific light wavelength. In conclusion confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is useful technique for views of image acquisition speed and image quality.

  6. Dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy: fluorescence axial imaging without axial scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Kim, Young-Duk; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2013-07-29

    We propose a new method for high-speed, three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence imaging, which we refer to as dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy (DDCFM). In contrast to conventional beam-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, where the focal spot must be scanned either optically or mechanically over a sample volume to reconstruct a 3-D image, DDCFM can obtain the depth of a fluorescent emitter without depth scanning. DDCFM comprises two photodetectors, each with a pinhole of different size, in the confocal detection system. Axial information on fluorescent emitters can be measured by the axial response curve through the ratio of intensity signals. DDCFM can rapidly acquire a 3-D fluorescent image from a single two-dimensional scan with less phototoxicity and photobleaching than confocal fluorescence microscopy because no mechanical depth scans are needed. We demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method by phantom studies.

  7. Transient gels in colloid-polymer mixtures studied with fluorescence confocal scanning laser microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, N.A.M.; Asnaghi, D.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    1999-01-01

    We study the structure and the time evolution of transient gels formed in colloid-polymer mixtures, by means of uorescence Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM). This technique is used in conjunction with novel colloidal silica particles containing a uorescent core. The confocal micrographs

  8. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  9. Optical depth sectioning in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission and scanning confocal electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behan, G; Nellist, P D

    2008-01-01

    The use of spherical aberration correctors in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has the effect of reducing the depth of field of the microscope, making three-dimensional imaging of a specimen possible by optical sectioning. Depth resolution can be improved further by placing aberration correctors and lenses pre and post specimen to achieve an imaging mode known as scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). We present the calculated incoherent point spread functions (PSF) and optical transfer functions (OTF) of a STEM and SCEM. The OTF for a STEM is shown to have a missing cone region which results in severe blurring along the optic axis, which can be especially severe for extended objects. We also present strategies for reconstruction of experimental data, such as three-dimensional deconvolution of the point spread function.

  10. Visualization of carbon nanotubes dispersion in composite by using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ilčíková, M.; Danko, M.; Doroshenko, M.; Best, A.; Mrlík, M.; Csomorová, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Chorvát Jr., D.; Koynov, K.; Mosnáček, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, June (2016), s. 187-197 ISSN 0014-3057 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : confocal laser scanning microscopy * composites * carbon nanotubes dispersion Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.531, year: 2016

  11. The Enhancement of 3D Scans Depth Resolution Obtained by Confocal Scanning of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martisek, Dalibor; Prochazkova, Jana

    2017-12-01

    The 3D reconstruction of simple structured materials using a confocal microscope is widely used in many different areas including civil engineering. Nonetheless, scans of porous materials such as concrete or cement paste are highly problematic. The well-known problem of these scans is low depth resolution in comparison to the horizontal and vertical resolution. The degradation of the image depth resolution is caused by systematic errors and especially by different random events. Our method is focused on the elimination of such random events, mainly the additive noise. We use an averaging method based on the Lindeberg-Lévy theorem that improves the final depth resolution to a level comparable with horizontal and vertical resolution. Moreover, using the least square method, we also precisely determine the limit value of a depth resolution. Therefore, we can continuously evaluate the difference between current resolution and the optimal one. This substantially simplifies the scanning process because the operator can easily determine the required number of scans.

  12. The Enhancement of 3D Scans Depth Resolution Obtained by Confocal Scanning of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martisek Dalibor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction of simple structured materials using a confocal microscope is widely used in many different areas including civil engineering. Nonetheless, scans of porous materials such as concrete or cement paste are highly problematic. The well-known problem of these scans is low depth resolution in comparison to the horizontal and vertical resolution. The degradation of the image depth resolution is caused by systematic errors and especially by different random events. Our method is focused on the elimination of such random events, mainly the additive noise. We use an averaging method based on the Lindeberg-Lévy theorem that improves the final depth resolution to a level comparable with horizontal and vertical resolution. Moreover, using the least square method, we also precisely determine the limit value of a depth resolution. Therefore, we can continuously evaluate the difference between current resolution and the optimal one. This substantially simplifies the scanning process because the operator can easily determine the required number of scans.

  13. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  14. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  15. Enhancement of fluorescence confocal scanning microscopy lateral resolution by use of structured illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoong; Gweon, DaeGab; Lee, Jun-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an optical imaging technique used to reconstruct three-dimensional images without physical sectioning. As with other optical microscopes, the lateral resolution of the confocal microscope cannot surpass the diffraction limit. This paper presents a novel imaging system, structured illumination confocal scanning microscopy (SICSM), that uses structured illumination to improve the lateral resolution of the confocal microscope. The SICSM can easily be implemented by introducing a structured illumination generating optics to conventional line-scanning fluorescence confocal microscopy. In this paper, we report our analysis of the lateral and axial resolutions of the SICSM by use of mathematical imaging theory. Numerical simulation results show that the lateral resolution of the SICSM is 1.43-fold better than that of the confocal microscope. In the axial direction, however, the resolution of the SICSM is ∼15% poorer than that of the confocal microscope. This deterioration arises because of a decrease in the axial cut-off frequency caused by the process of generating structured illumination. We propose the use of imaging conditions under which a compromise between the axial and lateral resolutions is chosen. Finally, we show simulated images of diversely shaped test objects to demonstrate the lateral and axial resolution performance of the SICSM

  16. Mechanisms of biliary stent clogging: confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, A M; van Marle, J; Groen, A K; Bruno, M J

    2005-08-01

    Endoscopic insertion of plastic biliary endoprostheses is a well-established treatment for obstructive jaundice. The major limitation of this technique is late stent occlusion. In order to compare events involved in biliary stent clogging and identify the distribution of bacteria in unblocked stents, confocal laser scanning (CLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out on two different stent materials - polyethylene (PE) and hydrophilic polymer-coated polyurethane (HCPC). Ten consecutive patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures were included in the study. Two 10-Fr stents 9 cm in length, one made of PE and the other of HCPC, were inserted. The stents were electively exchanged after 3 months and examined using CLS and SEM. No differences were seen between the two types of stent. The inner stent surface was covered with a uniform amorphous layer. On top of this layer, a biofilm of living and dead bacteria was found, which in most cases was unstructured. The lumen was filled with free-floating colonies of bacteria and crystals, surrounded by mobile laminar structures of mucus. An open network of large dietary fibers was seen in all of the stents. The same clogging events occurred in both PE and HCPC stents. The most remarkable observation was the identification of networks of large dietary fibers, resulting from duodenal reflux, acting as a filter. The build-up of this intraluminal framework of dietary fibers appears to be a major factor contributing to the multifactorial process of stent clogging.

  17. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  18. Laser scanning confocal microscope with programmable amplitude, phase, and polarization of the illumination beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, B R; Neil, M A A

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a laser scanning confocal microscope with programmable beam forming optics. The amplitude, phase, and polarization of the laser beam used in the microscope can be controlled in real time with the help of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator, acting as a computer generated hologram, in conjunction with a polarizing beam splitter and two right angled prisms assembly. Two scan mirrors, comprising an on-axis fast moving scan mirror for line scanning and an off-axis slow moving scan mirror for frame scanning, configured in a way to minimize the movement of the scanned beam over the pupil plane of the microscope objective, form the XY scan unit. The confocal system, that incorporates the programmable beam forming unit and the scan unit, has been implemented to image in both reflected and fluorescence light from the specimen. Efficiency of the system to programmably generate custom defined vector beams has been demonstrated by generating a bottle structured focal volume, which in fact is the overlap of two cross polarized beams, that can simultaneously improve both the lateral and axial resolutions if used as the de-excitation beam in a stimulated emission depletion confocal microscope.

  19. Superresolution upgrade for confocal spinning disk systems using image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbaner, Sebastian; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Confocal Spinning Disk Systems are widely used for 3D cell imaging because they offer the advantage of optical sectioning at high framerates and are easy to use. However, as in confocal microscopy, the imaging resolution is diffraction limited, which can be theoretically improved by a factor of 2 using the principle of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM) [1]. ISM with a Confocal Spinning Disk setup (CSDISM) has been shown to improve contrast as well as lateral resolution (FWHM) from 201 +/- 20 nm to 130 +/- 10 nm at 488 nm excitation. A minimum total acquisition time of one second per ISM image makes this method highly suitable for 3D live cell imaging [2]. Here, we present a multicolor implementation of CSDISM for the popular Micro-Manager Open Source Microscopy platform. Since changes in the optical path are not necessary, this will allow any researcher to easily upgrade their standard Confocal Spinning Disk system at remarkable low cost ( 5000 USD) with an ISM superresolution option. [1]. Müller, C.B. and Enderlein, J. Image Scanning Microscopy. Physical Review Letters 104, (2010). [2]. Schulz, O. et al. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110, 21000-5 (2013).

  20. Application of the laser scanning confocal microscope in fluorescent film sensor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Wei-Min; Zhao, Wen-Wen; Dai, Qing; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2010-10-01

    Confocal microscopy offers several advantages over conventional optical microscopy; we show an experimental investigation laser scanning confocal microscope as a tool to be used in cubic boron nitride (cBN) film-based fluorescent sensor research. Cubic boron nitride cBN film sensors are modified with dansyl chloride and rhodamine B isothiocyanate respectively. Fluorescent modification quality on the cubic boron nitride film is clearly express and the sensor ability to Hg2+ cations and pH are investigated in detail. We evidence the rhodamine B isothiocyanate modified quality on cBN surface is much better than that of dansyl chloride. And laser scanning confocal microscope has potential application lighttight fundus film fluorescent sensor research.

  1. Musculature of Notholca acuminata (Rotifera : Ploima : Brachionidae) revealed by confocal scanning laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.V.; Funch, P.; Hooge, M.

    2003-01-01

    The body-wall and visceral musculature of Notholca acuminata was visualized using phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The body-wall musculature includes dorsal, lateral, and ventral pairs of longitudinally oriented body retractor muscles, two pairs of head...

  2. Confocal soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy: setup, alignment procedure and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Späth, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Fink, Rainer H.

    2015-01-01

    A conventional STXM setup has been upgraded with a second micro zone plate and aligned to confocal geometry. Two confocal geometries (in-line and off-axis) have been evaluated and a discussion on prospects and limitations is presented. Zone-plate-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is a well established technique for high-contrast imaging of sufficiently transparent specimens (e.g. ultrathin biological tissues, polymer materials, archaeometric specimens or magnetic thin films) with spatial resolutions in the regime of 20 nm and high spectroscopic or chemical sensitivity. However, due to the relatively large depth of focus of zone plates, the resolution of STXM along the optical axis so far stays unambiguously behind for thicker X-ray transparent specimens. This challenge can be addressed by the implementation of a second zone plate in the detection pathway of the beam, resulting in a confocal arrangement. Within this paper a first proof-of-principle study for a confocal STXM (cSTXM) and an elaborate alignment procedure in transmission and fluorescence geometry are presented. Based on first confocal soft X-ray micrographs of well known specimens, the advantage and limitation of cSTXM as well as further development potentials for future applications are discussed

  3. Confocal soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy: setup, alignment procedure and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Späth, Andreas [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Raabe, Jörg [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Fink, Rainer H., E-mail: rainer.fink@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Egerlandstraße 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A conventional STXM setup has been upgraded with a second micro zone plate and aligned to confocal geometry. Two confocal geometries (in-line and off-axis) have been evaluated and a discussion on prospects and limitations is presented. Zone-plate-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is a well established technique for high-contrast imaging of sufficiently transparent specimens (e.g. ultrathin biological tissues, polymer materials, archaeometric specimens or magnetic thin films) with spatial resolutions in the regime of 20 nm and high spectroscopic or chemical sensitivity. However, due to the relatively large depth of focus of zone plates, the resolution of STXM along the optical axis so far stays unambiguously behind for thicker X-ray transparent specimens. This challenge can be addressed by the implementation of a second zone plate in the detection pathway of the beam, resulting in a confocal arrangement. Within this paper a first proof-of-principle study for a confocal STXM (cSTXM) and an elaborate alignment procedure in transmission and fluorescence geometry are presented. Based on first confocal soft X-ray micrographs of well known specimens, the advantage and limitation of cSTXM as well as further development potentials for future applications are discussed.

  4. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied

  5. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apedo, K.L., E-mail: apedo@unistra.fr [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Munzer, C.; He, H. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Montgomery, P. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Serres, N. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Fond, C. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Feugeas, F. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  6. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  7. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u......, inoculation of the flow cells, running of the system, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis, and disassembly and cleaning of the system....

  8. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 o C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton

  9. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-04-10

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of porous media using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S M; Crawshaw, J P; Boek, E S

    2017-02-01

    In the last decade, imaging techniques capable of reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) pore-scale model have played a pivotal role in the study of fluid flow through complex porous media. In this study, we present advances in the application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to image, reconstruct and characterize complex porous geological materials with hydrocarbon reservoir and CO 2 storage potential. CLSM has a unique capability of producing 3-D thin optical sections of a material, with a wide field of view and submicron resolution in the lateral and axial planes. However, CLSM is limited in the depth (z-dimension) that can be imaged in porous materials. In this study, we introduce a 'grind and slice' technique to overcome this limitation. We discuss the practical and technical aspects of the confocal imaging technique with application to complex rock samples including Mt. Gambier and Ketton carbonates. We then describe the complete workflow of image processing to filtering and segmenting the raw 3-D confocal volumetric data into pores and grains. Finally, we use the resulting 3-D pore-scale binarized confocal data obtained to quantitatively determine petrophysical pore-scale properties such as total porosity, macro- and microporosity and single-phase permeability using lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations, validated by experiments. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Investigation of phosphatidylcholine enhancing FITC-insulin across buccal mucosa by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weiqun; Su, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Gao, Qiuhua; Xu, Huibi

    2002-04-01

    The aim was to characterize the transport of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran and insulin with different resoluble compounds for peptides and proteins through buccal mucosa. The penetration rate of insulin molecules through porcine buccal mucosa (a nonkeratinized epithelium, comparable to human buccal mucosa) was investigated by measuring transbuccal fluxes and by analyzing the distribution of the fluorescent probe in the rabbit buccal mucosa epithelium, using confocal laser scanning microscopy for visualizing permeation pathways. The confocal images of the distribution pattern of FITC-dextran and FITC-insulin showed that the paracellular route is the major pathway of FITC-dextran through buccal mucosa epithelium, the intra-cellular route is the major pathway of FITC-insulin through buccal mucosa epithelium. The permeation rate can be increased by co-administration of soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC).

  12. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  13. Confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate nanoparticles’ human skin penetration in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zou,1,2,* Anna Celli,2,3,* Hanjiang Zhu,2,* Akram Elmahdy,2 Yachao Cao,2 Xiaoying Hui,2 Howard Maibach2 1Skin & Cosmetic Research Department, Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3San Francisco Veterans Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: With rapid development of nanotechnology, there is increasing interest in nanoparticle (NP application and its safety and efficacy on human skin. In this study, we utilized confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate NP skin penetration.Methods: Three different-sized polystyrene NPs marked with red fluorescence were applied to human skin, and Calcium Green 5N was used as a counterstain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and ethanol were used as alternative vehicles for NPs. Tape stripping was utilized as a barrier-damaged skin model. Skin biopsies dosed with NPs were incubated at 4°C or 37°C for 24 hours and imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results: NPs were localized in the stratum corneum (SC and hair follicles without penetrating the epidermis/dermis. Barrier alteration with tape stripping and change in incubation temperature did not induce deeper penetration. DMSO enhanced NP SC penetration but ethanol did not.Conclusion: Except with DMSO vehicle, these hydrolyzed polystyrene NPs did not penetrate intact or barrier-damaged human “viable” epidermis. For further clinical relevance, in vivo human skin studies and more sensitive analytic chemical methodology are suggested. Keywords: nanoparticles, skin penetration, stratum corneum, confocal laser scanning microscopy, tape stripping

  14. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo for diagnosing melanocytic skin neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo (CLSM for diagnosing melanocytic skin neoplasms and its value for early diagnostics of melanoma. CLSM is an innovation noninvasive visual examination method for real-time multiple and painless examinations of the patient’s skin without injuring the skin integument. The method ensures early diagnostics of skin melanomas with high sensitivity and specificity, which makes it possible to use CLSM for screening melanocytic skin neoplasms for the sake of the early onset of treatment to save patient life and health.

  15. Ti-6Al-4V electron beam weld qualification using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjara, P.; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Processing conditions for manufacturing Ti-6Al-4V components by welding using an electron beam source are known to influence the transformation microstructure in the narrow fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld region. This work examined the effect of multiple-sequence welding on the characteristics of the transformed beta microstructure, using laser scanning confocal microscopy to resolve the Widmanstaetten alpha-beta structure in the fusion zone. The evolution in the alpha interlamellar spacing and plate thickness with processing was then related to microhardness measurements in the weld region

  16. Dark-field scanning confocal microscope for vertical particle tracks in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhov, A.Ya.; Batusov, Yu.A.; Soroko, L.M.; Tereshchenko, S.V.; Tereshchenko, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The principle of the DArk-FIeld Scanning CONfocal (DAFISCON) microscope for selective observation of the vertical particle tracks in nuclear emulsion is described. The construction of the DAFISCON microscope, built on the basis of the 2D measurement microscope, is described. The results of the experimental testing of the DAFISCON microscope, accomplished at high density of the vertical particle tracks, are presented. The 2D plot and the 1D plot of the CCD dark-field image are given. The spatial resolution of our microscope can be increased by using the objective with higher aperture

  17. Embryological study of Herminium monorchis (Orchidaceae) using confocal scanning laser microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrikson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The embryology of Herminium monorchis (Orchidaceae) was studied using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), a new technique for embryological studies. This technique may contribute new information to plant embryology. Herminium monorchis has a monosporic embryo sac development. The mature embryo sac is 8-nucleate. Two integuments, both 2-layered, are formed, but only the inner takes part in formation of the micropyle. Double fertilization takes place. The primary endosperm nucleus does not divide, but remains alive at least at the 3-celled stage of embryo development. The three antipodals do not show any sign of degeneration at this stage. (author)

  18. Iris ultrastructure in patients with synechiae as revealed by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy : In vivo iris ultrastructure in patients with Synechiae by Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cheng, Hongbo; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Chun; Tang, Song; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-04-26

    Iris plays important roles in ocular physiology and disease pathogenesis. Currently it is technically challenging to noninvasively examine the human iris ultrastructure in vivo. The purpose of the current study is to reveal human iris ultrastructure in patients with synechiae by using noninvasive in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The ultrastructure of iris in thirty one patients, each with synechiae but transparent cornea, was examined by in vivo LSCM. Five characteristic iris ultrastructures was revealed in patients with synechiae by in vivo LSCM, which include: 1. tree trunk-like structure; 2. tree branch/bush-like structure; 3. Fruit-like structure; 4. Epithelioid-like structure; 5. deep structure. Pigment granules can be observed as a loose structure on the top of the arborization structure. In iris-associated diseases with Tyndall's Phenomenon and keratic precipitates, the pigment particles are more likely to fall off from the arborization structure. The ultrastructure of iris in patients with synechiae has been visualized using in vivo LSCM. Five iris ultrastructures can be clearly observed, with some of the structures maybe disease-associated. The fall-off of the pigment particles may cause the Tyndall's Phenomenon positive. In vivo LSCM provides a non-invasive approach to observe the human iris ultrastructure under certain eye disease conditions, which sets up a foundation to visualize certain iris-associated diseases in the future.

  19. Characterization of particle deformation during compression measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H X; Heinämäki, J; Yliruusi, J

    1999-09-20

    Direct compression of riboflavin sodium phosphate tablets was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The technique is non-invasive and generates three-dimensional (3D) images. Tablets of 1% riboflavin sodium phosphate with two grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were individually compressed at compression forces of 1.0 and 26.8 kN. The behaviour and deformation of drug particles on the upper and lower surfaces of the tablets were studied under compression forces. Even at the lower compression force, distinct recrystallized areas in the riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were observed in both Avicel PH-101 and Avicel PH-102 tablets. At the higher compression force, the recrystallization of riboflavin sodium phosphate was more extensive on the upper surface of the Avicel PH-102 tablet than the Avicel PH-101 tablet. The plastic deformation properties of both MCC grades reduced the fragmentation of riboflavin sodium phosphate particles. When compressed with MCC, riboflavin sodium phosphate behaved as a plastic material. The riboflavin sodium phosphate particles were more tightly bound on the upper surface of the tablet than on the lower surface, and this could also be clearly distinguished by CLSM. Drug deformation could not be visualized by other techniques. Confocal laser scanning microscopy provides valuable information on the internal mechanisms of direct compression of tablets.

  20. Automatic segmentation of cell nuclei from confocal laser scanning microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelemen, A.; Reist, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    A newly developed experimental method combines the possibility of irradiating more than a thousand cells simultaneous with an efficient colony-forming ability and with the capability of localizing a particle track through a cell nucleus together with the assessment of the energy transfer by digital superposition of the image containing the track with that of the cells. To assess the amount of energy deposition by particles traversing the cell nucleus the intersection lengths of the particle tracks have to be known. Intersection lengths can be obtained by determining the 3D surface contours of the irradiated cell nuclei. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using specific DNA fluorescent dye offers a possible way for the determination of the 3D shape of individual nuclei. Unfortunately, such experiments cannot be performed on living cells. One solution to this problem can be provided by building a statistical model of the shape of the nuclei of the exposed cells. In order to build such a statistical model, a large number of cell nuclei have to be identified and segmented from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. The present paper describes a method to perform this 3D segmentation in an automatic manner in order to create a solid basis for the statistical model. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate nanoparticles' human skin penetration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying; Celli, Anna; Zhu, Hanjiang; Elmahdy, Akram; Cao, Yachao; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2017-01-01

    With rapid development of nanotechnology, there is increasing interest in nanoparticle (NP) application and its safety and efficacy on human skin. In this study, we utilized confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate NP skin penetration. Three different-sized polystyrene NPs marked with red fluorescence were applied to human skin, and Calcium Green 5N was used as a counterstain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol were used as alternative vehicles for NPs. Tape stripping was utilized as a barrier-damaged skin model. Skin biopsies dosed with NPs were incubated at 4°C or 37°C for 24 hours and imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy. NPs were localized in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles without penetrating the epidermis/dermis. Barrier alteration with tape stripping and change in incubation temperature did not induce deeper penetration. DMSO enhanced NP SC penetration but ethanol did not. Except with DMSO vehicle, these hydrolyzed polystyrene NPs did not penetrate intact or barrier-damaged human "viable" epidermis. For further clinical relevance, in vivo human skin studies and more sensitive analytic chemical methodology are suggested.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate nanoparticles’ human skin penetration in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmahdy, Akram; Cao, Yachao; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Objective With rapid development of nanotechnology, there is increasing interest in nanoparticle (NP) application and its safety and efficacy on human skin. In this study, we utilized confocal laser scanning microscopy to estimate NP skin penetration. Methods Three different-sized polystyrene NPs marked with red fluorescence were applied to human skin, and Calcium Green 5N was used as a counterstain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol were used as alternative vehicles for NPs. Tape stripping was utilized as a barrier-damaged skin model. Skin biopsies dosed with NPs were incubated at 4°C or 37°C for 24 hours and imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results NPs were localized in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles without penetrating the epidermis/dermis. Barrier alteration with tape stripping and change in incubation temperature did not induce deeper penetration. DMSO enhanced NP SC penetration but ethanol did not. Conclusion Except with DMSO vehicle, these hydrolyzed polystyrene NPs did not penetrate intact or barrier-damaged human “viable” epidermis. For further clinical relevance, in vivo human skin studies and more sensitive analytic chemical methodology are suggested. PMID:29184403

  3. QUANTIFICATION OF BIOFILMS IN MULTI-SPECTRAL DIGITAL1 VOLUMES FROM CONFOCAL LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Populations of bacteria in sludge flocs and biofilm marked by fluorescence marked with fluorescent probes are digitised with a confocal laser scanning microscope. These data are used to analyse the microbial community structure, to obtain information on the localisation of specific bacterial groups and to examine gene expression. This information is urgently required for an in-depth understanding of the function and, more generally, the microbial ecology of biofilms. Methods derived from quantitative image analysis are applied to digitised data from confocal laser scanning microscopes to obtain quantitative descriptions of volumetric, topological (and topographical properties of different compartments of the components under research. In addition to free-moving flocs, also biofilms attached to a substratum in an experimental environment are analysed. Growth form as well as interaction of components are quantitatively described. Classical measurements of volume and intensity (shape, distribution and distance dependent interaction measurements using methods from mathematical morphology are performed. Mainly image (volume processing methods are outlined. Segmented volumes are globally and individually (in terms of 3Dconnected components measured and used for distance mapping transform as well as for estimation of geodesic distances from the substrate. All transformations are applied on the 3D data set. Resulting distance distributions are quantified and related to information on the identity and activity of the probe-identified bacteria.

  4. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented...... to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis...... scanning microscopy images can be used to provide information on the protein microstructure in yogurt products. For large numbers of microscopy images, subjective evaluation becomes a difficult or even impossible approach, if the images should be incorporated in any form of statistical analysis alongside...

  5. Analysis of polymer grafted inside the porous hydrogel using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate onto the pore surface of polyacrylamide macroporous gel was implemented in DMSO-aqueous solution using diperiodatocuprate(III complexes as an initiator. The grafting densities up to 410% were achieved. The graft polymerization was confirmed by gravimetrical methods and FTIR. The graft polymerization of polymer inside the pores of the macroporous gel resulted in increased flow resistance through the gel matrix. The distribution of grafted polymer on the gel pore surface material was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. CLSM is an alternative method for studying morphology of gel surface with grafted polymer having the advantages over the SEM allowing to investigate the distribution of grafted polymer inside the hydrogel in a native hydrated state. The microscopic techniques demonstrated uneven distribution of the grafted polymer inside the gel pores as a result of initiating the graft polymerization by insoluble initiator deposited on the pore surface.

  6. Spectral imaging technique for retinal perfusion detection using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Sharp, Peter F.

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate retinal perfusion in the human eye, a dual-wavelength confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) was developed that provides spectral imaging of the fundus using a combination of red (670 nm) and near-infrared (810 nm) wavelengths. The image of the ocular fundus was analyzed to find out if quantitative measurements of the reflectivity of tissue permit assessment of the oxygen perfusion of tissue. We explored problems that affect the reproducibility of patient measurements such as non-uniformity errors on the image. For the first time, an image processing technique was designed and used to minimize the errors of oxygen saturation measurements by illumination correction in retina wide field by increasing SNR. Retinal images were taken from healthy and diabetic retinopathy eyes using the cSLO with a confocal aperture of 100 μm. The ratio image (RI) of red/IR, as oxygen saturation (SO2) index, was calculated for normal eyes. The image correction technique improved the reproducibility of the measurements. Average RI intensity variation of healthy retina tissue was determined within a range of about 5.5%. The capability of the new technique to discriminate oxygenation levels of retinal artery and vein was successfully demonstrated and showed good promise in the diagnosis of the perfused retina.

  7. Investigation of the petrophysical properties of a porous sandstone sample using confocal scanning laser microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petford, N. [Kingston Univ., Centre for Earth and Environmental Science Research, Kingston (United Kingdom); Davidson, G. [University Coll., Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Miller, J.A. [Cambridge Univ., Dept. of Earth Sciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2001-05-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is used to produce images of the two- and three-dimensional distribution and geometry of pore space in a reservoir sandstone and measure the 2D distribution of pore throat radii. Non-destructive serial sectioning of the rock using laser light at 100% illumination, combined with image thresholding and histogram equalization techniques allow the pore volume structure of the uppermost 100 {mu}m of the sample to be reconstructed. Negative imaging of the pore volume gave superior depth and feature resolution compared to positive (reflection) imaging. Artefacts encountered in applying classical Medial Axial Transforms to CSLM images include branch networks dominated by coordination numbers of 3. Skeletonization using Euclidean distance maps gives increased accuracy in the description of the pore network. Measured pore throat size distribution in the rock is strongly exponential and described by the expression y 219e{sup -0.25x} where y is the number of pore throats. (Author)

  8. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy detection of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts and chromoplasts of tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Lucio; Amenós, Montse; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are unique among eukaryotic cells because of the presence of plastids, including chloroplasts and chromoplasts. Chloroplasts are found in green tissues and harbor the photosynthetic machinery (including chlorophyll molecules), while chromoplasts are present in non-photosynthetic tissues and accumulate large amounts of carotenoids. During tomato fruit development, chloroplasts are converted into chromoplasts that accumulate high levels of lycopene, a linear carotenoid responsible for the characteristic red color of ripe fruit. Here, we describe a simple and fast method to detect both types of fully differentiated plastids (chloroplasts and chromoplasts), as well as intermediate stages, in fresh tomato fruits. The method is based on the differential autofluorescence of chlorophylls and carotenoids (lycopene) detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  10. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Pieper, Christoph; Clever, Michaela; Pfaff, Janine; Ruhlandt, Aike; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Wouters, Fred S; Großhans, Jörg; Bunt, Gertrude; Enderlein, Jörg

    2013-12-24

    We demonstrate how a conventional confocal spinning-disk (CSD) microscope can be converted into a doubly resolving image scanning microscopy (ISM) system without changing any part of its optical or mechanical elements. Making use of the intrinsic properties of a CSD microscope, we illuminate stroboscopically, generating an array of excitation foci that are moved across the sample by varying the phase between stroboscopic excitation and rotation of the spinning disk. ISM then generates an image with nearly doubled resolution. Using conventional fluorophores, we have imaged single nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane and aggregates of GFP-conjugated Tau protein in three dimensions. Multicolor ISM was shown on cytoskeletal-associated structural proteins and on 3D four-color images including MitoTracker and Hoechst staining. The simple adaptation of conventional CSD equipment allows superresolution investigations of a broad variety of cell biological questions.

  11. Optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in retinal nerve fiber layer measurements of glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanihagh, Farsad; Kremmer, Stephan; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    To determine the correlations and strength of association between different imaging systems in analyzing the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of glaucoma patients: optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO). 114 eyes of patients with moderate open angle glaucoma underwent spectral domain OCT (Topcon SD-OCT 2000 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT), SLP (GDx VCC and GDx Pro) and CSLO (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT 3). Correlation coefficients were calculated between the structural parameters yielded by these examinations. The quantitative relationship between the measured RNFL thickness globally and for the four regions (superior, inferior, nasal, temporal) were evaluated with different regression models for all used imaging systems. The strongest correlation of RNFL measurements was found between devices using the same technology like GDx VCC and GDx Pro as well as Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT. In glaucoma patients, the strongest associations (R²) were found between RNFL measurements of the two optical coherence tomography devices Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT (R² = 0.513) and between GDx VCC and GDx Pro (R² = 0.451). The results of the OCTs and GDX Pro also had a strong quantitative relationship (Topcon OCT R² = 0.339 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.347). GDx VCC and the OCTs showed a mild to moderate association (Topcon OCT R² = 0.207 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.258). The confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT 3) had the lowest association to all other devices (Topcon OCT R² = 0.254, Cirrus OCT R² = 0.158, GDx Pro R² = 0.086 and GDx VCC R² = 0.1). The measurements of the RNFL in glaucoma patients reveal a high correlation of OCT and GDx devices because OCTs can measure all major retinal layers and SLP can detect nerve fibers allowing a comparison between the results of this devices. However, CSLO by means of HRT topography can only measure height values of the retinal surface but it cannot distinguish

  12. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  13. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Ilčíková, Markéta; Mičušík, Matej; Kasák, Peter; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Omastová, Mária; Krupa, Igor; Pavlova, Ewa; Chorvát Jr, Dušan

    2013-01-01

    The photo-actuation behavior of nanocomposites based on ethylene–vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and styrene–isoprene–styrene (SIS) block copolymer filled with well-dispersed and modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is discussed in this paper. The nanocomposites were prepared by casting from solution. To improve the dispersion of the MWCNTs in EVA, the MWCNT surface was modified with a non-covalent surfactant, cholesteryl 1-pyrenecarboxylate (PyChol). To prepare SIS nanocomposites, the MWCNT surface was covalently modified with polystyrene chains. The good dispersion of the filler was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Special, custom-made punch/die molds were used to create a Braille element (BE)-like shape, which under shear forces induces a uniaxial orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrix. The uniaxial orientation of MWCNTs is an essential precondition to ensure the photo-actuating behavior of MWCNTs in polymeric matrices. The orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrices was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite BEs were illuminated from the bottom by a red light-emitting diode (LED), and the photo-actuation was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). When the BEs were exposed to light, a temporary increase in the height of the element was detected. This process was observed to be reversible: after switching off the light, the BEs returned to their original shape and height. (paper)

  14. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  15. The binding of cellulase variants to dislocations: a semi-quantitative analysis based on CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi J.; Weisskopf, Carmen; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    or slip planes. Here we study whether cellulases bind to dislocations to a higher extent than to the surrounding cell wall. The binding of fluorescently labelled cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases to filter paper fibers was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and a ratiometric method...

  16. The simplicity of males: Dwarf males of four species of Osedax (Siboglinidae; Annelida) investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2010-01-01

    . Here, we present the first investigation of the entire muscle and nervous system in dwarf males of Osedax frankpressi, O. roseus, O. rubiplumus, and O. spiral analyzed by multistaining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Sperm shape and spermiogenesis, the sperm duct and internal and external...

  17. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy to probe the milk fat globule membrane and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallier, Sophie; Gragson, Derek; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Everett, David

    2010-04-14

    The bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is an important, biologically relevant membrane due to its functional and health properties. Its composition has been thoroughly studied, but its structure, especially the lateral organization of its components, still remains unclear. We have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the surface structure of the MFGM in globules with different degrees of processing using two types of fluorescently labeled phospholipid probes and a protein dye. Using this technique, we have observed heterogeneities in the distribution of MFGM lipids and proteins relating to the processing and size of the globules. The effect of pretreating the milk (centrifugation, pasteurization-homogenization and churning) was studied by double-staining the surface of the milk fat globules, followed by observation using CLSM, and by determining the phospholipid profile of raw milk, raw cream, processed milk and buttermilk powder. Our findings agree with other techniques by showing that the composition of the MFGM changes with processing through the loss of phospholipids and the adsorption of caseins and whey proteins onto the surface.

  18. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytte, Jacob L; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F; Andersen, Ulf; Møller, Flemming; Dahl, Anders B; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-06-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented dairy products. When studying such networks, hundreds of images can be obtained, and here image analysis methods are essential for using the images in statistical analysis. Previously, methods including gray level co-occurrence matrix analysis and fractal analysis have been used with success. However, a range of other image texture characterization methods exists. These methods describe an image by a frequency distribution of predefined image features (denoted textons). Our contribution is an investigation of the choice of image analysis methods by performing a comparative study of 7 major approaches to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis, and cluster analysis. Our investigation suggests that the texton-based descriptors provide a fuller description of the images compared to gray-level co-occurrence matrix descriptors and fractal analysis, while still being as applicable and in some cases as easy to tune. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Apoplastic pH in corn root gravitropism: a laser scanning confocal microscopy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.P.; Slattery, J.; Leopold, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to measure the pH of the apoplast in situ is of special interest as a test of the cell wall acidification theory. Optical sectioning of living seedlings of corn roots using the laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) permits us to make pH measurements in living tissue. The pH of the apoplast of corn roots was measured by this method after infiltration with CI-NERF, a pH-sensitive dye, along with Texas Red Dextran 3000, a pH-insensitive dye, as an internal standard. In the elongation zone of corn roots, the mean apoplastic pH was 4.9. Upon gravitropic stimulation, the pH on the convex side of actively bending roots was 4.5. The lowering of the apoplastic pH by 0.4 units appears to be sufficient to account for the increased growth on that side. This technique provides site-specific evidence for the acid growth theory of cell elongation. The LSCM permits measurements of the pH of living tissues, and has a sensitivity of approximately 0.2 pH units. (author)

  20. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  1. Scanning confocal slit photon counter measurements of post-PRK haze in two-year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, John; Gaines, David; Perez, Mary A.; Waller, Steve G.; Ivan, Douglas J.; Baldwin, J. Bruce; LoRusso, Frank; Tutt, Ronald C.; Thompson, B.; Perez, Jose; Tredici, Thomas; Johnson, Dan A.

    2001-06-01

    In our study, a group of 80 United States Air Force, non- flying personnel will undergo photorefractive corneal surgery for moderate levels of myopia (< 6 diopters) and 20 will serve as controls. As of this report, approximately 56 have had the treatment. Of these, only about 59% of the treated eyes showed even a trace (.5) level of clinically assessed haze at any time. We report on the use of a recently developed instrument designed for the objective measurement of these low levels of haze in treated corneas. The sensitivity of the instrument is derived from the use of a scanning confocal slit photon counter. The use of a physical standard for calibration secures accuracy and reproducibility over an extensive period of time. Our haze measurements in this study revealed a very low level increase from baseline values for these patients. The typical increase over baseline was of the same magnitude as the variability in the observations, although the inherent variability in the measurements was approximately 0.25 times the value of the patient's haze variability.

  2. Post-PRK corneal scatter measurements with a scanning confocal slit photon counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, John; Gaines, David; Perez, Mary A.; Waller, Steve G.; Ivan, Douglas J.; Baldwin, J. Bruce; LoRusso, Frank; Tutt, Ronald C.; Perez, Jose; Tredici, Thomas; Johnson, Dan A.

    2000-06-01

    Increased corneal light scatter or 'haze' has been associated with excimer laser photorefractive surgery of the cornea. The increased scatter can affect visual performance; however, topical steroid treatment post surgery substantially reduces the post PRK scatter. For the treatment and monitoring of the scattering characteristics of the cornea, various methods have been developed to objectively measure the magnitude of the scatter. These methods generally can measure scatter associated with clinically observable levels of haze. For patients with moderate to low PRK corrections receiving steroid treatment, measurement becomes fairly difficult as the haze clinical rating is non observable. The goal of this development was to realize an objective, non-invasive physical measurement that could produce a significant reading for any level including the background present in a normal cornea. As back-scatter is the only readily accessible observable, the instrument is based on this measurement. To achieve this end required the use of a confocal method to bias out the background light that would normally confound conventional methods. A number of subjects with nominal refractive errors in an Air Force study have undergone PRK surgery. A measurable increase in corneal scatter has been observed in these subjects whereas clinical ratings of the haze were noted as level zero. Other favorable aspects of this back-scatter based instrument include an optical capability to perform what is equivalent to an optical A-scan of the anterior chamber. Lens scatter can also be measured.

  3. A statistical pixel intensity model for segmentation of confocal laser scanning microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapez, Alexandre; Rosa, Agostinho

    2010-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the life sciences for the characterization of cell processes because it allows the recording of the distribution of fluorescence-tagged macromolecules on a section of the living cell. It is in fact the cornerstone of many molecular transport and interaction quantification techniques where the identification of regions of interest through image segmentation is usually a required step. In many situations, because of the complexity of the recorded cellular structures or because of the amounts of data involved, image segmentation either is too difficult or inefficient to be done by hand and automated segmentation procedures have to be considered. Given the nature of CLSM images, statistical segmentation methodologies appear as natural candidates. In this work we propose a model to be used for statistical unsupervised CLSM image segmentation. The model is derived from the CLSM image formation mechanics and its performance is compared to the existing alternatives. Results show that it provides a much better description of the data on classes characterized by their mean intensity, making it suitable not only for segmentation methodologies with known number of classes but also for use with schemes aiming at the estimation of the number of classes through the application of cluster selection criteria.

  4. Application of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemelle, A; Veksler, B; Piletsky, S A; Meglinski, I [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Kozhevnikov, I S; Akchurin, G G, E-mail: a.lemelle.s06@cranfield.ac.uk [Physics Faculty, Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a modern high-resolution optical technique providing detailed image of tissue structure with high (down to microns) spatial resolution. Aiming at a concurrent improvement of imaging depth and image quality the CLSM requires the use of contrast agents. Commonly employed fluorescent contrast agents, such as fluorescent dyes and proteins, suffer from toxicity, photo-bleaching and overlapping with the tissues autofluorescence. Gold nanoparticles are potentially highly attractive to be applied as a contrast agent since they are not subject to photo-bleaching and can target biochemical cells markers associated with the specific diseases. In current report we consider the applicability of gold nano-spheres as a contrast agent to enhance quality of CLSM images of skin tissues in vitro versus the application of optical clearing agent, such as glycerol. The enhancement of CLSM image contrast was observed with an application of gold nano-spheres diffused within the skin tissues. We show that optical clearing agents such as a glycerol provide better CLSM image contrast than gold nano-spheres.

  5. Application of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemelle, A; Veksler, B; Piletsky, S A; Meglinski, I; Kozhevnikov, I S; Akchurin, G G

    2009-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a modern high-resolution optical technique providing detailed image of tissue structure with high (down to microns) spatial resolution. Aiming at a concurrent improvement of imaging depth and image quality the CLSM requires the use of contrast agents. Commonly employed fluorescent contrast agents, such as fluorescent dyes and proteins, suffer from toxicity, photo-bleaching and overlapping with the tissues autofluorescence. Gold nanoparticles are potentially highly attractive to be applied as a contrast agent since they are not subject to photo-bleaching and can target biochemical cells markers associated with the specific diseases. In current report we consider the applicability of gold nano-spheres as a contrast agent to enhance quality of CLSM images of skin tissues in vitro versus the application of optical clearing agent, such as glycerol. The enhancement of CLSM image contrast was observed with an application of gold nano-spheres diffused within the skin tissues. We show that optical clearing agents such as a glycerol provide better CLSM image contrast than gold nano-spheres

  6. Application of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelle, A.; Veksler, B.; Kozhevnikov, I. S.; Akchurin, G. G.; Piletsky, S. A.; Meglinski, I.

    2009-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a modern high-resolution optical technique providing detailed image of tissue structure with high (down to microns) spatial resolution. Aiming at a concurrent improvement of imaging depth and image quality the CLSM requires the use of contrast agents. Commonly employed fluorescent contrast agents, such as fluorescent dyes and proteins, suffer from toxicity, photo-bleaching and overlapping with the tissues autofluorescence. Gold nanoparticles are potentially highly attractive to be applied as a contrast agent since they are not subject to photo-bleaching and can target biochemical cells markers associated with the specific diseases. In current report we consider the applicability of gold nano-spheres as a contrast agent to enhance quality of CLSM images of skin tissues in vitro versus the application of optical clearing agent, such as glycerol. The enhancement of CLSM image contrast was observed with an application of gold nano-spheres diffused within the skin tissues. We show that optical clearing agents such as a glycerol provide better CLSM image contrast than gold nano-spheres.

  7. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of capillaries in normal and psoriatic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archid, Rami; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Ulrich, Martina; Stockfleth, Eggert; Philipp, Sandra; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-10-01

    An important and most likely active role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been attributed to changes in cutaneous blood vessels. The purpose of this study was to use confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate dermal capillaries in psoriatic and normal skin. The structures of the capillary loops in 5 healthy participants were compared with those in affected skin of 13 psoriasis patients. The diameters of the capillaries and papillae were measured for each group with CLSM. All investigated psoriasis patients showed elongated, widened, and tortuous microvessels in the papillary dermis, whereas all healthy controls showed a single capillary loop in each dermal papilla. The capillaries of the papillary loop and the dermal papilla were significantly enlarged in the psoriatic skin lesions (diameters 24.39±2.34 and 146.46±28.52 μm, respectively) in comparison to healthy skin (diameters 9.53±1.8 and 69.48±17.16 μm, respectively) (P<0.001). CLSM appears to represent a promising noninvasive technique for evaluating dermal capillaries in patients with psoriasis. The diameter of the vessels could be seen as a well-quantifiable indicator for the state of psoriatic skin. CLSM could be useful for therapeutic monitoring to delay possible recurrences.

  8. In vivo assessment of the structure of skin microcirculation by reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugata, Keiichi; Osanai, Osamu; Kawada, Hiromitsu

    2012-02-01

    One of the major roles of the skin microcirculation is to supply oxygen and nutrition to the surrounding tissue. Regardless of the close relationship between the microcirculation and the surrounding tissue, there are few non-invasive methods that can evaluate both the microcirculation and its surrounding tissue at the same site. We visualized microcapillary plexus structures in human skin using in vivo reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), Vivascope 3000® (Lucid Inc., USA) and Image J software (National Institutes of Health, USA) for video image processing. CLSM is a non-invasive technique that can visualize the internal structure of the skin at the cellular level. In addition to internal morphological information such as the extracellular matrix, our method reveals capillary structures up to the depth of the subpapillary plexus at the same site without the need for additional optical systems. Video images at specific depths of the inner forearm skin were recorded. By creating frame-to-frame difference images from the video images using off-line video image processing, we obtained images that emphasize the brightness depending on changes of intensity coming from the movement of blood cells. Merging images from different depths of the skin elucidates the 3-dimensional fine line-structure of the microcirculation. Overall our results show the feasibility of a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging technique to characterize the skin microcirculation and the surrounding tissue.

  9. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye's optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss.

  10. Combining confocal laser scanning microscopy with serial section reconstruction in the study of adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuzzati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current advances in imaging techniques have extended the possibility of visualizing small structures within large volumes of both fixed and live specimens without sectioning. These techniques have contributed valuable information to study neuronal plasticity in the adult brain. However, technical limits still hamper the use of these approaches to investigate neurogenic regions located far from the ventricular surface such as parenchymal neurogenic niches, or the scattered neuroblasts induced by brain lesions. Here, we present a method to combine confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and serial section reconstruction in order to reconstruct large volumes of brain tissue at cellular resolution. In this method a series of thick sections are imaged with CLSM and the resulting stacks of images are registered and 3D reconstructed. This approach is based on existing freeware software and can be performed on ordinary laboratory personal computers (PC. By using this technique we have investigated the morphology and spatial organization of a group of doublecortin (DCX+ neuroblasts located in the lateral striatum of the late post-natal guinea pig. The 3D study unravelled a complex network of long and poorly ramified cell processes, often fascicled and mostly oriented along the internal capsule fibre bundles. These data support CLSM serial section reconstruction as a reliable alternative to the whole mount approaches to analyze cyto-architectural features of adult germinative niches.

  11. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  12. Central serous chorioretinopathy fundus autofluorescence comparison with two different confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Tae; Yun, Cheol Min; Kim, Jee Taek; Yang, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Oh, Jaeryung; Huh, Kuhl

    2015-12-01

    To compare the lesion characteristics of two different types of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) autofluorescence (AF) images in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). The study included 63 eyes of 61 patients; 63 pairs of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images were compared before CSC resolution in 63 eyes, FAF images of 31 eyes were also compared after CSC resolution. The lesion characteristics (brightness and composite pattern) were compared between Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2 (HRA2; Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) and Optomap Tx (Optomap; Optos, Scotland) FAF images. The lesion composite pattern was categorized as diffuse or granular. Diffuse AF was defined as homogenously increased or decreased AF, and granular AF was defined as dot-like, coarse changes in AF. The mean disease duration and subretinal fluid (SRF) height in the spectral domain optical coherence tomography were compared according to the FAF image characteristics. Lesion brightness before CSC resolution was hypo-AF in 48 eyes (76.2 %), hyper-AF in three (4.8 %), and mixed-AF in 12 (19.0 %) in HRA2 FAF images. In comparison, nine (14.3 %) images were hypo-AF, 44 (69.8 %) were hyper-AF, and 10 (15.9 %) were mixed-AF in Optomap FAF images (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in lesion composite pattern between the two FAF image wavelengths. Patients with lesions that were hyper-AF in Optomap FAF and hypo-AF in HRA2 FAF had a shorter disease duration and greater SRF height (1 month, 281 um) than those who were hyper-AF in both Optomap and HRA2 images (26 months, 153 um; P = 0.004, 0.001). The two types of FAF images of CSC showed different lesion brightness before and after CSC resolution but demonstrated similar lesion composite patterns.

  13. Performance of confocal scanning laser tomograph Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) for assessing glaucomatous progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowd, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Weinreb, Robert N; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Alencar, Luciana M; O'Leary, Neil; Sample, Pamela A; Zangwill, Linda M

    2009-02-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope's Topographic Change Analysis (TCA; Heidelberg Retina Tomograph [HRT]; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) parameters for discriminating between progressing glaucomatous and stable healthy eyes. The 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 specificity cutoffs for various (n=70) TCA parameters were developed by using 1000 permuted topographic series derived from HRT images of 18 healthy eyes from Moorfields Eye Hospital, imaged at least four times. The cutoffs were then applied to topographic series from 36 eyes with known glaucomatous progression (by optic disc stereophotograph assessment and/or standard automated perimetry guided progression analysis, [GPA]) and 21 healthy eyes from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS), all imaged at least four times, to determine TCA sensitivity and specificity. Cutoffs also were applied to 210 DIGS patients' eyes imaged at least four times with no evidence of progression (nonprogressed) by stereophotography or GPA. The TCA parameter providing the best sensitivity/specificity tradeoff using the 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 cutoffs was the largest clustered superpixel area within the optic disc margin (CAREA(disc) mm(2)). Sensitivities/specificities for classifying progressing (by stereophotography and/or GPA) and healthy eyes were 0.778/0.809, 0.639/0.857, and 0.611/1.00, respectively. In nonprogressing eyes, specificities were 0.464, 0.570, and 0.647 (i.e., lower than in the healthy eyes). In addition, TCA parameter measurements of nonprogressing eyes were similar to those of progressing eyes. TCA parameters can discriminate between progressing and longitudinally observed healthy eyes. Low specificity in apparently nonprogressing patients' eyes suggests early progression detection using TCA.

  14. Cutting efficiency of apical preparation using ultrasonic tips with microprojections: confocal laser scanning microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Won Kwak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the cutting efficiency of a newly developed microprojection tip and a diamond-coated tip under two different engine powers. Materials and Methods The apical 3-mm of each root was resected, and root-end preparation was performed with upward and downward pressure using one of the ultrasonic tips, KIS-1D (Obtura Spartan or JT-5B (B&L Biotech Ltd.. The ultrasonic engine was set to power-1 or -4. Forty teeth were randomly divided into four groups: K1 (KIS-1D / Power-1, J1 (JT-5B / Power-1, K4 (KIS-1D / Power-4, and J4 (JT-5B / Power-4. The total time required for root-end preparation was recorded. All teeth were resected and the apical parts were evaluated for the number and length of cracks using a confocal scanning micrscope. The size of the root-end cavity and the width of the remaining dentin were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Mann-Whitney test. Results There was no significant difference in the time required between the instrument groups, but the power-4 groups showed reduced preparation time for both instrument groups (p < 0.05. The K4 and J4 groups with a power-4 showed a significantly higher crack formation and a longer crack irrespective of the instruments. There was no significant difference in the remaining dentin thickness or any of the parameters after preparation. Conclusions Ultrasonic tips with microprojections would be an option to substitute for the conventional ultrasonic tips with a diamond coating with the same clinical efficiency.

  15. Cutting efficiency of apical preparation using ultrasonic tips with microprojections: confocal laser scanning microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sang-Won; Moon, Young-Mi; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Lee, WooCheol; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cutting efficiency of a newly developed microprojection tip and a diamond-coated tip under two different engine powers. The apical 3-mm of each root was resected, and root-end preparation was performed with upward and downward pressure using one of the ultrasonic tips, KIS-1D (Obtura Spartan) or JT-5B (B&L Biotech Ltd.). The ultrasonic engine was set to power-1 or -4. Forty teeth were randomly divided into four groups: K1 (KIS-1D / Power-1), J1 (JT-5B / Power-1), K4 (KIS-1D / Power-4), and J4 (JT-5B / Power-4). The total time required for root-end preparation was recorded. All teeth were resected and the apical parts were evaluated for the number and length of cracks using a confocal scanning micrscope. The size of the root-end cavity and the width of the remaining dentin were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Mann-Whitney test. There was no significant difference in the time required between the instrument groups, but the power-4 groups showed reduced preparation time for both instrument groups (p < 0.05). The K4 and J4 groups with a power-4 showed a significantly higher crack formation and a longer crack irrespective of the instruments. There was no significant difference in the remaining dentin thickness or any of the parameters after preparation. Ultrasonic tips with microprojections would be an option to substitute for the conventional ultrasonic tips with a diamond coating with the same clinical efficiency.

  16. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  18. Real time detection of antibody-antigen interaction using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong-Yan; Yang Li-Quan; Ning Ting-Yin; Liu Wei-Min; Sun Jia-Yu; Wang Peng-Fei; Meng Lan; Nie Jia-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance (LSCI-SPR) instrument integrated with a wavelength-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor and a laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is built to detect the bonding process of human IgG and fluorescent-labeled affinity purified antibodies in real time. The shifts of resonant wavelength at different reaction time stages are obtained by SPR, corresponding well with the changes of the fluorescence intensity collected by using LSCM. The instrument shows the merits of the combination and complementation of the SPR and LSCM, with such advantages as quantificational analysis, high spatial resolution and real time monitor, which are of great importance for practical applications in biosensor and life science. (general)

  19. Studies of porphyrin-containing specimens using an optical spectrometer connected to a confocal scanning laser microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, O; Rokahr, I; Andersson-Engels, S; Carlsson, K

    1994-12-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for use with a confocal scanning laser microscope. With this unit, spectral information from a single point or a user-defined region within the microscope specimen can be recorded. A glass prism is used to disperse the spectral components of the recorded light over a linear CCD photodiode array with 256 elements. A regulated cooling unit keeps the detector at 277 K, thereby allowing integration times of up to 60 s. The spectral resolving power, lambda/delta lambda, ranges from 350 at lambda = 400 nm to 100 at lambda = 700 nm. Since the entrance aperture of the spectrometer has the same size as the detector pinhole used during normal confocal scanning, the three-dimensional spatial resolution is equivalent to that of normal confocal scanning. Light from the specimen is deflected to the spectrometer by a solenoid controlled mirror, allowing fast and easy switching between normal confocal scanning and spectrometer readings. With this equipment, studies of rodent liver specimens containing porphyrins have been made. The subcellular localization is of interest for the mechanisms of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours. Spectroscopic detection is necessary to distinguish the porphyrin signal from other fluorescent components in the specimen. Two different substances were administered to the tissue, Photofrin, a haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and delta-amino levulinic acid (ALA), a precursor to protoporphyrin IX and haem in the haem cycle. Both are substances under clinical trials for PDT of malignant tumours. Following administration of these compounds to the tissue, the potent photosensitizer and fluorescent compound Photofrin, or protoporphyrin IX, respectively, is accumulated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A portable confocal hyperspectral microscope without any scan or tube lens and its application in fluorescence and Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Cai, Fuhong; Dong, Yongjiang; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Sun, Xianhe; Zhang, Hequn; He, Sailing

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a portable confocal hyperspectral microscope is developed. In traditional confocal laser scanning microscopes, scan lens and tube lens are utilized to achieve a conjugate relationship between the galvanometer and the back focal plane of the objective, in order to achieve a better resolution. However, these lenses make it difficult to scale down the volume of the system. In our portable confocal hyperspectral microscope (PCHM), the objective is placed directly next to the galvomirror. Thus, scan lens and tube lens are not included in our system and the size of this system is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the resolution is also acceptable in many biomedical and food-safety applications. Through reducing the optical length of the system, the signal detection efficiency is enhanced. This is conducive to realizing both the fluorescence and Raman hyperspectral imaging. With a multimode fiber as a pinhole, an improved image contrast is also achieved. Fluorescent spectral images for HeLa cells/fingers and Raman spectral images of kumquat pericarp are present. The spectral resolution and spatial resolutions are about 0.4 nm and 2.19 μm, respectively. These results demonstrate that this portable hyperspectral microscope can be used in in-vivo fluorescence imaging and in situ Raman spectral imaging.

  1. Simultaneous Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Combined with High-Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Castro Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate technical aspects and the clinical relevance of a simultaneous confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and a high-speed, high-resolution, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT device for retinal imaging. The principle of confocal scanning laser imaging provides a high resolution of retinal and choroidal vasculature with low light exposure. Enhanced contrast, details, and image sharpness are generated using confocality. The real-time SDOCT provides a new level of accuracy for assessment of the angiographic and morphological correlation. The combined system allows for simultaneous recordings of topographic and tomographic images with accurate correlation between them. Also it can provide simultaneous multimodal imaging of retinal pathologies, such as fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies, infrared and blue reflectance (red-free images, fundus autofluorescence images, and OCT scans (Spectralis HRA + OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany. The combination of various macular diagnostic tools can lead to a better understanding and improved knowledge of macular diseases.

  2. 3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrich, J.T.

    1999-02-10

    We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

  3. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  4. The neuromuscular system of Pycnophyes kielensis (Kinorhyncha: Allomalorhagida) investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Kinorhynchs are ecdysozoan animals with a phylogenetic position close to priapulids and loriciferans. To understand the nature of segmentation within Kinorhyncha and to infer a probable ancestry of segmentation within the last common ancestor of Ecdysozoa, the musculature and the nervous system of the allomalorhagid kinorhynch Pycnophyes kielensis were investigated by use of immunohistochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstruction software. The kinorhynch body plan comprises 11 trunk segments. Trunk musculature consists of paired ventral and dorsal longitudinal muscles in segments 1-10 as well as dorsoventral muscles in segments 1-11. Dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscles insert on apodemes of the cuticle inside the animal within each segment. Strands of longitudinal musculature extend over segment borders in segments 1-6. In segments 7-10, the trunk musculature is confined to the segments. Musculature of the digestive system comprises a strong pharyngeal bulb with attached mouth cone muscles as well as pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors. The musculature of the digestive system shows no sign of segmentation. Judged by the size of the pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors, the pharyngeal bulb, as well as the introvert, is moved passively by internal pressure caused by concerted action of the dorsoventral muscles. The nervous system comprises a neuropil ring anterior to the pharyngeal bulb. Associated with the neuropil ring are flask-shaped serotonergic somata extending anteriorly and posteriorly. A ventral nerve cord is connected to the neuropil ring and runs toward the anterior until an attachment point in segment 1, and from there toward the posterior with one ganglion in segment 6. Segmentation within Kinorhyncha likely evolved from an unsegmented ancestor. This conclusion is supported by continuous trunk musculature in the anterior segments 1-6, continuous pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors throughout the anterior

  5. The neuromuscular system of Pycnophyes kielensis (Kinorhyncha: Allomalorhagida investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Altenburger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinorhynchs are ecdysozoan animals with a phylogenetic position close to priapulids and loriciferans. To understand the nature of segmentation within Kinorhyncha and to infer a probable ancestry of segmentation within the last common ancestor of Ecdysozoa, the musculature and the nervous system of the allomalorhagid kinorhynch Pycnophyes kielensis were investigated by use of immunohistochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstruction software. Results The kinorhynch body plan comprises 11 trunk segments. Trunk musculature consists of paired ventral and dorsal longitudinal muscles in segments 1–10 as well as dorsoventral muscles in segments 1–11. Dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscles insert on apodemes of the cuticle inside the animal within each segment. Strands of longitudinal musculature extend over segment borders in segments 1–6. In segments 7–10, the trunk musculature is confined to the segments. Musculature of the digestive system comprises a strong pharyngeal bulb with attached mouth cone muscles as well as pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors. The musculature of the digestive system shows no sign of segmentation. Judged by the size of the pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors, the pharyngeal bulb, as well as the introvert, is moved passively by internal pressure caused by concerted action of the dorsoventral muscles. The nervous system comprises a neuropil ring anterior to the pharyngeal bulb. Associated with the neuropil ring are flask-shaped serotonergic somata extending anteriorly and posteriorly. A ventral nerve cord is connected to the neuropil ring and runs toward the anterior until an attachment point in segment 1, and from there toward the posterior with one ganglion in segment 6. Conclusions Segmentation within Kinorhyncha likely evolved from an unsegmented ancestor. This conclusion is supported by continuous trunk musculature in the anterior segments 1–6, continuous

  6. Degeneration process of fungiform taste buds after severing the human chorda tympani nerve--observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Kato, Yuji; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norihiko

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the degeneration process of fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Prospective study. University hospital. Seven consecutive patients whose CTN was severed during tympanoplasty for middle ear cholesteatoma. Diagnostic. Preoperative and postoperative gustatory functions were assessed by electrogustometry (EGM). An average of 10 fungiform papillae (FP) in the midlateral region of the tongue were periodically observed, and the number of taste buds was counted using a confocal laser microscope. Among them, 2 to 3 reference FPs were selected based on the typical form of the FP or characteristic arrangements of taste pores. Observation was performed before surgery, 1 or 2 days after surgery, 2 or 3 times a week until 2 weeks after surgery, once a week between 2 and 4 weeks, and every 2 to 4 weeks thereafter until all taste buds had disappeared. EGM thresholds showed no response within 1 month after surgery in all patients. The initial change in the degeneration process was the disappearance of taste pores. The surface of taste buds became covered with epithelium. Finally, taste buds themselves atrofied and disappeared. The time course of degeneration differed depending upon individuals, each FP, and each taste bud. By employing the generalized linear mixed model under the Poisson distribution, it was calculated that all taste buds would disappear at around 50 days after surgery. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was useful for clarifying the degeneration process of fungiform taste buds.

  7. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Penetration and binding of monoclonal antibody in human osteosarcoma multicell spheroids. Comparison of confocal laser scanning microscopy and autoadiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelstuen, M.H.; Rasch-Halvorsen, K.; Brekken, C.; Bruland, Oe.; Davies, C. de L.

    1996-01-01

    Penetration and binding of monoclonal antibody (MAb) in multicell osteosarcoma spheroids have been studied by autoradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Optical sectioning of the 3-dimensional spheroids was performed by CLSM. Owing to attenuation of fluorescence intensity, FITC-labelled MAb could not be detected at depths greater than 60 μm within the spheroids. The antibody uptake seen in autoradiographs and CLSM images 60 μm within the spheroids were essentially identical. MAb had reached all parts of the spheroids within 6 h. Quantitative measurements of the fluorescence intensity of FITC-labelled MAb seen in confocal images and measurements of MAb bound per cell using flow cytometry, showed that maximum uptake was reached after 6 h. The possibility to perform both quantatitive and qualitative measurements makes CLSM a promising method for studying antibody uptake in thick tissue samples. (orig.)

  9. Observation of regenerated fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Kato, Yuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norihiko

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate whether regenerated fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve can be detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Retrospective study. University hospital. Six patients with a normal gustatory function (Group 1), 9 patients with taste function recovery after severing the CTN (Group 2), and 5 patients without taste function recovery (Group 3) were included. In Groups 2 and 3, canal wall up (closed) tympanoplasty or canal wall down with canal reconstruction tympanoplasty was performed in all patients. Diagnostic. The severed nerves were readapted or approximated on the temporalis muscle fascia used to reconstruct the eardrum during surgery. Preoperative and postoperative gustatory functions were assessed using electrogustometry. Twelve to 260 months after severing the CTN, the surface of the midlateral region of the tongue was observed with a confocal laser microscope. EGM thresholds showed no response 1 month after surgery in all patients of Groups 2 and 3. In Group 2, EGM thresholds showed recovery 1 to 2 years after surgery and before confocal microscopy (-1.3 ± 6.5 dB). There was a significant difference between Group 1 (-5.7 ± 2.0 dB; p taste buds were observed in each FP, and 55 (79.7%) of 69 FP contained at least 1 taste bud. The mean number of taste bud per papilla was 3.7 ± 3.6. In patients with a recovered taste function (Group 2), 0 to 8 taste buds were observed in each FP. In this group, 54 (56.2%) of 94 FP contained at least 1 taste bud. The mean number of taste bud per papilla was 2.0 ± 2.2 (p taste bud was observed. Regenerated fungiform taste bud could be observed in vivo using confocal laser scanning microscopy, indicating that regenerated taste bud can be detected without biopsy.

  10. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  11. Miniature in vivo MEMS-based line-scanned dual-axis confocal microscope for point-of-care pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, C.; Glaser, A.K.; Leigh, S. Y.; Chen, Y.; Wei, L.; Pillai, P. C. S.; Rosenberg, M. C.; Abeytunge, S.; Peterson, G.; Glazowski, C.; Sanai, N.; Mandella, M. J.; Rajadhyaksha, M.; Liu, J. T. C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for miniature optical-sectioning microscopes to enable in vivo interrogation of tissues as a real-time and noninvasive alternative to gold-standard histopathology. Such devices could have a transformative impact for the early detection of cancer as well as for guiding tumor-resection procedures. Miniature confocal microscopes have been developed by various researchers and corporations to enable optical sectioning of highly scattering tissues, all of which have necessitated various trade-offs in size, speed, depth selectivity, field of view, resolution, image contrast, and sensitivity. In this study, a miniature line-scanned (LS) dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscope, with a 12-mm diameter distal tip, has been developed for clinical point-of-care pathology. The dual-axis architecture has demonstrated an advantage over the conventional single-axis confocal configuration for reducing background noise from out-of-focus and multiply scattered light. The use of line scanning enables fast frame rates (16 frames/sec is demonstrated here, but faster rates are possible), which mitigates motion artifacts of a hand-held device during clinical use. We have developed a method to actively align the illumination and collection beams in a DAC microscope through the use of a pair of rotatable alignment mirrors. Incorporation of a custom objective lens, with a small form factor for in vivo clinical use, enables our device to achieve an optical-sectioning thickness and lateral resolution of 2.0 and 1.1 microns respectively. Validation measurements with reflective targets, as well as in vivo and ex vivo images of tissues, demonstrate the clinical potential of this high-speed optical-sectioning microscopy device. PMID:26977337

  12. Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects of Gas-Metal-Oxide Mass Transfer in High-Temperature Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Stephano P. T.; Pistorius, P. Chris; Webler, Bryan A.

    2018-05-01

    During high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscopy (HT-CSLM) of liquid steel samples, thermal Marangoni flow and rapid mass transfer between the sample and its surroundings occur due to the relatively small sample size (diameter around 5 mm) and large temperature gradients. The resulting evaporation and steel-slag reactions tend to change the chemical composition in the metal. Such mass transfer effects can change observed nonmetallic inclusions. This work quantifies oxide-metal-gas mass transfer of solutes during HT-CSLM experiments using computational simulations and experimental data for (1) dissolution of MgO inclusions in the presence and absence of slag and (2) Ca, Mg-silicate inclusion changes upon exposure of a Si-Mn-killed steel to an oxidizing gas atmosphere.

  13. Noise analysis of a white-light supercontinuum light source for multiple wavelength confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Gail [Centre for Biophotonics, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-07

    Intensity correlations of a Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and a white-light supercontinuum were performed to quantify the typical signal amplitude fluctuations and hence ascertain the comparative output stability of the white-light supercontinuum source for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intensity correlations across a two-pixel sample (n = 1000) of up to 98%, 95% and 94% were measured for the Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and white-light supercontinuum source, respectively. The white-light supercontinuum noise level is therefore acceptable for CLSM, with the added advantage of wider wavelength flexibility over traditional CLSM excitation sources. The relatively low-noise white-light supercontinuum was then used to perform multiple wavelength sequential CLSM of guinea pig detrusor to confirm the reliability of the system and to demonstrate system flexibility.

  14. Superresolution size determination in fluorescence microscopy: A comparison between spatially modulated illumination and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoeri, Udo; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Cremer, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Recently developed far field light optical methods are a powerful tool to analyze biological nanostructures and their dynamics, in particular including the interior of three-dimensionally conserved cells. In this article, the recently described method of spatially modulated illumination (SMI) microscopy has been further extended to the online determination of the extension of small, subwavelength sized, fluorescent objects (nanosizing). Using fluorescence excitation with 488 nm, the determination of fluorescent labeled object diameters down to 40 nm corresponding to about 1/12th of the wavelength used for one-photon excitation could be shown. The results of the SMI nanosizing procedure for a detailed, systematic variation of the object diameter are presented together with a fast algorithm for online size evaluation. In addition, we show a direct comparison of the diameter of 'colocalization volumes' between SMI nanosizing and conventional confocal laser scanning microscopy

  15. Demons registration for in vivo and deformable laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Wei Ming; Lin, Feng; Seah, Hock Soon

    2017-09-01

    A critical effect found in noninvasive in vivo endomicroscopic imaging modalities is image distortions due to sporadic movement exhibited by living organisms. In three-dimensional confocal imaging, this effect results in a dataset that is tilted across deeper slices. Apart from that, the sequential flow of the imaging-processing pipeline restricts real-time adjustments due to the unavailability of information obtainable only from subsequent stages. To solve these problems, we propose an approach to render Demons-registered datasets as they are being captured, focusing on the coupling between registration and visualization. To improve the acquisition process, we also propose a real-time visual analytics tool, which complements the imaging pipeline and the Demons registration pipeline with useful visual indicators to provide real-time feedback for immediate adjustments. We highlight the problem of deformation within the visualization pipeline for object-ordered and image-ordered rendering. Visualizations of critical information including registration forces and partial renderings of the captured data are also presented in the analytics system. We demonstrate the advantages of the algorithmic design through experimental results with both synthetically deformed datasets and actual in vivo, time-lapse tissue datasets expressing natural deformations. Remarkably, this algorithm design is for embedded implementation in intelligent biomedical imaging instrumentation with customizable circuitry.

  16. Multimodal backside imaging of a microcontroller using confocal laser scanning and optical-beam-induced current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Göring, Lena; Schellenberg, Falk; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Microscopy imaging with a single technology is usually restricted to a single contrast mechanism. Multimodal imaging is a promising technique to improve the structural information that could be obtained about a device under test (DUT). Due to the different contrast mechanisms of laser scanning microscopy (LSM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical beam induced current microscopy (OBICM), a combination could improve the detection of structures in integrated circuits (ICs) and helps to reveal their layout. While OBIC imaging is sensitive to the changes between differently doped areas and to semiconductor-metal transitions, CLSM imaging is mostly sensitive to changes in absorption and reflection. In this work we present the implementation of OBIC imaging into a CLSM. We show first results using industry standard Atmel microcontrollers (MCUs) with a feature size of about 250nm as DUTs. Analyzing these types of microcontrollers helps to improve in the field of side-channel attacks to find hardware Trojans, possible spots for laser fault attacks and for reverse engineering. For the experimental results the DUT is placed on a custom circuit board that allows us to measure the current while imaging it in our in-house built stage scanning microscope using a near infrared (NIR) laser diode as light source. The DUT is thinned and polished, allowing backside imaging through the Si-substrate. We demonstrate the possibilities using this optical setup by evaluating OBIC, LSM and CLSM images above and below the threshold of the laser source.

  17.   In situ identification of streptococci and other bacteria in initial dental biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Kilian, Mogens; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been employed as a method for studying intact natural biofilm. When combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) it is possible to analyze spatial relationships and changes of specific members of microbial populations over time. The aim...

  18. Activity and three-dimensional distribution of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in a multispecies biofilm assessed by quantitative in situ hybridization and scanning confocal laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Pedersen, Anne Rathmann; Poulsen, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    As a representative member of the toluene-degrading population in a biofilter for waste gas treatment, Pseudomonas putida was investigated with a 16S rRNA targeting probe, The three-dimensional distribution of P. putida was visualized in the biofilm matrix by scanning confocal laser microscopy...

  19. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkai, Rahul S; Hegde, Mithra N; Halkai, Kiran R

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration.

  20. Electron microscopy of intermediate filaments: teaming up with atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Richter, Karsten; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) were originally discovered and defined by electron microscopy in myoblasts. In the following it was demonstrated and confirmed that they constitute, in addition to microtubules and microfilaments, a third independent, general filament system in the cytoplasm of most metazoan cells. In contrast to the other two systems, IFs are present in cells in two principally distinct cytoskeletal forms: (i) extended and free-running filament arrays in the cytoplasm that are integrated into the cytoskeleton by associated proteins of the plakin type; and (ii) a membrane- and chromatin-bound thin 'lamina' of a more or less regular network of interconnected filaments made from nuclear IF proteins, the lamins, which differ in several important structural aspects from cytoplasmic IF proteins. In man, more than 65 genes code for distinct IF proteins that are expressed during embryogenesis in various routes of differentiation in a tightly controlled manner. IF proteins exhibit rather limited sequence identity implying that the different types of IFs have distinct biochemical properties. Hence, to characterize the structural properties of the various IFs, in vitro assembly regimes have been developed in combination with different visualization methods such as transmission electron microscopy of fixed and negatively stained samples as well as methods that do not use staining such as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryoelectron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy. Moreover, with the generation of both IF-type specific antibodies and chimeras of fluorescent proteins and IF proteins, it has become possible to investigate the subcellular organization of IFs by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopic methods. The combination of these powerful methods should help to further develop our understanding of nuclear architecture, in particular how nuclear subcompartments are organized and in which way lamins are involved.

  1. In-situ observation of recrystallization in an AlMgScZr alloy using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taendl, J.; Nambu, S.; Orthacker, A.; Kothleitner, G.; Inoue, J.; Koseki, T.; Poletti, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a novel in-situ approach to study the recrystallization behavior of age hardening alloys. We use confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at 400 °C to investigate the static recrystallization of an AlMg4Sc0.4Zr0.12 alloy in-situ. The results are combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. It was found that CLSM is a powerful tool to visualize both the local initiation and temporal sequence of recrystallization. After fast nucleation and initial growth, the grain growth rate decreases and the grain boundary migration stops after some minutes due to Zener pinning from Al 3 (Sc,Zr) precipitates produced during the heat treatment. EBSD and TEM analyses confirm both the boundary movements and the particle-boundary interactions. - Highlights: • First time that CLSM is used to study recrystallization in-situ. • The start and end of recrystallization can be directly observed. • The procedure is easy to apply and requires only simple data interpretation. • In-situ observations on the surface correlate to modifications inside the bulk. • In-situ observations correlate to EBSD and EFTEM analyses.

  2. Porosity of natural stone and use of confocal laser scanning microscopy on calcitic marble aged in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mladenovič

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Porosity is one of the key characteristics of natural stone, which influences ondurability as well as functionality of stone as building material. Further, deterioration processes themselves are also characterized by change of porosity. Different direct and indirect techniques can be used for porosity determination. In the following paper overview of these methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, is given. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is indirect (microscopic technique. Despite its numerous advantages, among which 3D visualizationof pore structure is of major importance, this technique is less known in the area of building materials. An example how CLSM can be applied for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of porosity of calcitic polygonal granoblastic marble is given in this paper. Studied marble has been, despite of its poor durability, often used as building material, especially in the case of claddings. It is shown that thermal hydric factors of deterioration can influence porosity significantly,especially formation of intergranular cracks.This kind of deterioration can be successfully evaluated with use of CLSM method, if samples are suitable prepared and if suitable image analysis tools are developed.

  3. In-situ observation of recrystallization in an AlMgScZr alloy using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taendl, J., E-mail: johannes.taendl@tugraz.atl [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Nambu, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Orthacker, A.; Kothleitner, G. [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Graz Center for Electron Microscopy, Graz (Austria); Inoue, J.; Koseki, T. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Poletti, C. [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    In this work we present a novel in-situ approach to study the recrystallization behavior of age hardening alloys. We use confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at 400 °C to investigate the static recrystallization of an AlMg4Sc0.4Zr0.12 alloy in-situ. The results are combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. It was found that CLSM is a powerful tool to visualize both the local initiation and temporal sequence of recrystallization. After fast nucleation and initial growth, the grain growth rate decreases and the grain boundary migration stops after some minutes due to Zener pinning from Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) precipitates produced during the heat treatment. EBSD and TEM analyses confirm both the boundary movements and the particle-boundary interactions. - Highlights: • First time that CLSM is used to study recrystallization in-situ. • The start and end of recrystallization can be directly observed. • The procedure is easy to apply and requires only simple data interpretation. • In-situ observations on the surface correlate to modifications inside the bulk. • In-situ observations correlate to EBSD and EFTEM analyses.

  4. Quantifying migration and polarization of murine mesenchymal stem cells on different bone substitutes by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, J C; Chang, E; Kelantan, M; Jazayeri, L; Deisinger, U; Detsch, R; Reichert, T E; Gurtner, G C

    2010-12-01

    Cell migration is preceded by cell polarization. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the geometry of different bone substitutes on cell morphology and chemical responses in vitro. Cell polarization and migration were monitored temporally by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to follow green fluorescent protein (GFP)±mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on anorganic cancellous bovine bone (Bio-Oss(®)), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (chronOS(®)) and highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics (Friedrich-Baur-Research-Institute for Biomaterials, Germany). Differentiation GFP±MSCs was observed using pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic biomarkers. At the third day of culture polarized vs. non-polarized cellular sub-populations were clearly established. Biomaterials that showed more than 40% of polarized cells at the 3rd day of culture, subsequently showed an enhanced cell migration compared to biomaterials, where non-polarized cells predominated (ppolarization predominated at the 7th day of culture (p=0.001). This model opens an interesting approach to understand osteoconductivity at a cellular level. MSCs are promising in bone tissue engineering considering the strong angiogenic effect before differentiation occurs. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-Temperature Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Studies of Ferrite Formation in Inclusion-Engineered Steels: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Hedström, Peter; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Jönsson, Pär G.; Nakajima, Keiji

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of oxide metallurgy and inclusion engineering can be utilized to improve the properties of low-alloy steels. These concepts aim at controlling the formation of intragranular ferrite (IGF), often a desirable microstructure providing good mechanical properties without the need for expensive alloying elements. IGF formation is stimulated to occur at non-metallic inclusions and form an arrangement of fine, interlocking ferrite grains. A method that has contributed significantly to investigations in this field lately is high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy (HT-CLSM). HT-CLSM is suited for in situ studies of inclusion behavior in liquid steel and phase transformations in solid-state steel, where in particular, displacive phase transformations can be studied, since they provide sufficient topographic contrast. The purpose of the present report is to provide a brief review of the state of the art of HT-CLSM and its application for in situ observations of ferrite formation in inclusion-engineered steels. The scientific literature in this field is surveyed and supplemented by new work to reveal the capability of HT-CLSM as well as to discuss the effect of factors such as cooling rate and parent grain size on IGF formation and growth kinetics. The report concludes with an outlook on the opportunities and challenges of HT-CLSM for applications in oxide metallurgy.

  6. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  7. Mycelial pellet intrastructure visualization and viability prediction in a culture of Streptomyces fradiae using confocal scanning laser microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.; Tamura, S.; Koike, Y.; Toriya, M.; Okabe, M.

    1997-01-01

    The intrastructure of mycelial pellets of Streptomyces fradiae, which produces tylosin, was visualized following labeling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide (PI) using confocal scanning laser microscopy. A PI-labeled inactive core was present inside the mycelial pellet in both fermentor and air-lift reactor cultures. The thickness of the active mycelial layer on the pellet surface was calculated from a density sliced image to be 60 and 68 μm respectively, in the fermentor and in air-lift reactor cultures. Using image analysis, the active mycelial concentration of pellets in the fermentor culture was predicted to be 2.1 times higher than that in the air-lift reactor culture. The tylosin production rate in the fermentor reached 0.78 g/l/d, which was 2.5-fold that in the air-lift reactor culture. These results indicate that the higher tylosin production rate in the fermentor culture was due to the higher active mycelial concentration in the fermentor compared to that in the air-lift reactor. (author)

  8. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs.

  9. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; Pfiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  10. Scanner component and head development for confocal microscopy using moving mirror technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, Gregory C.

    1993-12-01

    One of the challenges in designing a confocal microscope is choosing the scan system configuration. The selection is based largely on the microscope application and involves a few distinct schemes. One scheme, moving mirror using galvanometer and resonant scanners, has been shown to offer an excellent solution exhibited by the large number of commercial systems which utilize them. Perceived shortcomings, such as slow image acquisition, are being dispelled due to the advent of large angle, high frequency resonant scanners. These newer devices offer near video rate performance at good scan efficiency.

  11. Effect of the menstrual cycle on the optic nerve head in diabetes: analysis by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Munire Erman; Yucel, Iclal; Erdem, Uzeyir; Taskin, Omur; Ozel, Alper; Akar, Yusuf

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and compare menstrual-cycle-dependent topographic changes in the optic nerve head of normally menstruating women with different grades of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We studied the right eyes of 123 normally menstruating women (36 with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy [NPDR], 42 with mild NPDR and 45 healthy subjects). All subjects underwent a complete ocular examination at baseline. At 4 hormonally distinct phases of the menstrual cycle (early follicular, late follicular, mid-luteal and late luteal), we analysed the topography of the optic nerve head, using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope, and measured the serum levels of estradiol, progesterone and luteinizing hormone. We excluded from analysis the data for 8 patients with severe NPDR, 10 patients with mild NPDR and 15 control subjects who were lost to follow-up examinations during the menstrual cycle. The mean age and optic disc area did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. The duration of diabetes was significantly longer in the patients with severe NPDR than in those with mild NPDR (p cup-shape measure, linear cup/disc ratio, cup/disc area ratio and cup area in the late luteal phase compared with the other phases of the menstrual cycle (p menstrual cycle. Severe NPDR is associated with significant topographic changes in the rim and cup of the optic nerve head during the menstrual cycle. This must be considered in the evaluation of women with both diabetes and glaucoma. The normal fluctuations in serum sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle of diabetic women seem to affect the optic nerve head more when the disease is advanced.

  12. Image-guided intraocular injection using multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in rodent ophthalmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrones, Benjamin D.; Benavides, Oscar R.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Intraocular injections are routinely performed for delivery of anti-VEGF and anti-inflammatory therapies in humans. While these injections are also performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the injection location and volume are not well-controlled and reproducible. We overcome limitations of conventional injections methods by developing a multimodality, long working distance, non-contact optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) system for retinal imaging before and after injections. Our OCT+cSLO system combines a custom-built spectraldomain OCT engine (875+/-85 nm) with 125 kHz line-rate with a modified commercial cSLO with a maximum frame-rate of 30 fps (512 x 512 pix.). The system was designed for an overlapping OCT+cSLO field-of-view of 1.1 mm with a 7.76 mm working distance to the pupil. cSLO excitation light sources and filters were optimized for simultaneous GFP and tdTomato imaging. Lateral resolution was 3.02 µm for OCT and 2.74 μm for cSLO. Intravitreal injections of 5%, 10%, and 20% intralipid with Alex Fluor 488 were manually injected intraocularly in C57BL/6 mice. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. OCT enables quantitative analysis of injection location and volumes whereas complementary cSLO improves specificity for identifying fluorescently labeled injected compounds and transgenic cells. The long working distance of our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections and may be applied for imaging of ophthalmic surgical dynamics and real-time image-guided injections.

  13. Effects of two desensitizing dentifrices on dentinal tubule occlusion with citric acid challenge: Confocal laser scanning microscopy study

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    Sneha Anil Rajguru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin hypersensitivity results when patent tubules are exposed to pain-inducing external stimuli. Aim: This study aims to compare the effects of two desensitizing dentifrices containing NovaMin and arginine on dentinal tubule occlusion with and without citric acid challenge in vitro using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Materials and Methods: Forty dentin discs were randomly divided into Groups I and II containing twenty specimens each, treated with NovaMin and arginine-containing dentifrices, respectively. Groups I and II were divided into subgroups A and B where IA and IIA underwent CLSM analysis to determine the percentage of tubule occlusion while IB and IIB underwent 0.3% citric acid challenge and CLSM analysis. A novel grading system was devised to categorize tubule occlusion. Results: In Group II, the percentage of occluded tubules was highest for IIA (72.25% ± 10.57% and least for IIB (42.55% ± 8.65% having statistical significance (P < 0.0005. In Group I, the difference between IA (49.9% ± 12.96% and IB (43.15% ± 12.43% was statistically insignificant (P = 0.249. On the comparison between IB and IIB statistically indifferent result was obtained (P = 0.901, whereas the difference between IA and IIA was statistically significant (P < 0.001. The results of grading system were for IA 50% of samples belonged to Grade 2, for IIA 60% - Grade 3, and for IB 70% and for IIB 90% - Grade 2. Conclusion: Dentinal tubule occlusion with arginine-containing dentifrice was significantly higher than NovaMin. However, it could not resist citric acid challenge as effectively as NovaMin. The effects of NovaMin were more sustainable as compared to arginine-containing dentifrice, thus proving to be a better desensitizing agent.

  14. Multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in a zebrafish model of retinal vascular occlusion and remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyue; Spitz, Kathleen; Bozic, Ivan; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) result in severe vision-loss and are two of the leading causes of blindness. The structural, metabolic, and vascular changes underlying retinal neovascularization are unknown and, thus, there is an unmet need to identify mechanisms of pathogenesis and novel anti-angiogenic therapies. Zebrafish is a robust ophthalmological model because its retina has comparable structure to the human retina and its fecundity and life-cycle enable development of mutant phenotypes of human pathologies. Here, we perform multimodal imaging with OCT and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) to identify changes in retinal structure and function in a zebrafish model of vascular leakage. Transgenic zebrafish with EGFP tagged plasma protein were imaged longitudinally at six time points over two weeks to visualize vascular perfusion changes from diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) treatment. Complementary contrast from OCT-A perfusion maps and cSLO imaging of plasma protein EGFP shows vascular occlusions posttreatment. cSLO images confirm presence of vessels despite loss of OCT-A signal. Plasma protein EGFP contrast also shows significant changes in vessel structure as compared to baseline images. OCT structural volumes show empty vessel cross-sections confirming non-perfusion. In addition, we present algorithms for automated biometric identification of OCT datasets using OCT-A vascular patterns in the presence of significant vascular perfusion changes. These results establish a framework for large-scale in vivo assays to identify novel anti-angiogenic compounds and understand the mechanisms ofneovascularization associated with retinal ocular pathologies.

  15. Tumor-specific antivascular effect of TZT-1027 (Soblidotin) elucidated by magnetic resonance imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Tsugitaka; Watanabe, Junichi; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Ogawa, Kenji; Yasumura, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    TZT-1027 (soblidotin), an antimicrotubule agent, has previously been evaluated in terms of its antivascular effects. In this study, Evans blue perfusion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were utilized to further elucidate the antivascular effect of TZT-1027 in female nude mice and rats bearing human breast tumor MX-1, as well as in female Sprague-Dawley rats that developed breast tumors induced by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Therapeutic doses of TZT-1027 caused nearly complete regression of implanted MX-1 tumors in nude mice and rats as well as DMBA-induced tumors in rats. The perfusion in MX-1 tumor implanted in nude mice was drastically reduced within 30 min after TZT-1027 administration and was completely inhibited after 6 h or more, although not reduced in normal tissue of kidney. The study using MRI demonstrated that rich blood flow within tumors was remarkably reduced 1-3 h after TZT-1027 administration both in nude rats bearing MX-1 tumors and in rats with DMBA-induced tumors. Furthermore, the study with CLSM in nude mice bearing MX-1 tumors revealed a disruption of tumor microvessels at 1 h and a destruction of tumor microvessel network at 3 h after TZT-1027 administration. In contrast, these types of vascular disorders were not observed in heart and kidney. These results suggest that TZT-1027 specifically damages tumor vasculatures, leading to extensive tumor necrosis within tolerable dose range, and confirms earlier observations that TZT-1027 exerts a considerable antivascular effect in addition to an excellent cytotoxic effect. (author)

  16. Potential of confocal laser scanning microscopy for non-invasive diagnostics of malignant epithelial skin tumors in the course of dermatoheliosis progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Snarskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of malignant epithelial skin neoplasms including actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma, which are characterized by the most complicated course and numerous clinical and morphological options, involve dermatoheliosis progression. The risk of actinic keratosis transformation into basal cell carcinoma varies from 0.1% to 20% and up to 80% in cases of multiple AK lesion foci. A non-invasive method known as reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy is the most promising one for the purposes of early diagnostics of signs pointing at epithelial skin neoplasm development and makes it possible to monitor the tumor in progress in vivo to diagnose the presence of a pool of squamous cells on a timely basis. The confocal laser scanning microscopy method provides high-contrast images of for any horizontal-oriented morphologic structures in the epidermis and upper dermis with a resolution comparable to those characteristic of traditional optical microscopy of skin tissue samples. According to our data obtained as a result of studying dynamic changes and morphologic structures in actinic keratosis foci (50 cases using the confocal laser scanning microscopy method, we discovered a number of morphologic features, and their further analysis will distinguish the signs of progressing carcinogenesis in case of dermatoheliosis.

  17. In vitro studies of Rickettsia-host cell interactions: Confocal laser scanning microscopy of Rickettsia helvetica-infected eukaryotic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Stephanie; Kern, Tanja; Aistleitner, Karin; Dilcher, Meik; Dobler, Gerhard; Essbauer, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Rickettsia (R.) helvetica is the most prevalent rickettsia found in Ixodes ricinus ticks in Germany. Several studies reported antibodies against R. helvetica up to 12.5% in humans investigated, however, fulminant clinical cases are rare indicating a rather low pathogenicity compared to other rickettsiae. We investigated growth characteristics of R. helvetica isolate AS819 in two different eukaryotic cell lines with focus on ultra-structural changes of host cells during infection determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Further investigations included partially sequencing of rickA, sca4 and sca2 genes, which have been reported to encode proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread and virulence in some rickettsiae. R. helvetica grew constantly but slowly in both cell lines used. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the dissemination of R. helvetica AS819 in both cell lines was rather mediated by cell break-down and bacterial release than cell-to-cell spread. The cytoskeleton of both investigated eukaryotic cell lines was not altered. R. helvetica possesses rickA, but its expression is not sufficient to promote actin-based motility as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Hypothetical Sca2 and Sca4 proteins were deduced from nucleotide gene sequences but the predicted amino acid sequences were disrupted or truncated compared to other rickettsiae most likely resulting in non-functional proteins. Taken together, these results might give a first hint to the underlying causes of the reduced virulence and pathogenicity of R. helvetica.

  18. Evaluation of baseline structural factors for predicting glaucomatous visual-field progression using optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehi, M; Bhardwaj, N; Chung, Y S; Greenfield, D S

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether baseline optic nerve head (ONH) topography and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) are predictive of glaucomatous visual-field progression in glaucoma suspect (GS) and glaucomatous eyes, and to calculate the level of risk associated with each of these parameters. Participants with ≥28 months of follow-up were recruited from the longitudinal Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study. All eyes underwent standard automated perimetry (SAP), confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO), time-domain optical coherence tomography (TDOCT), and scanning laser polarimetry using enhanced corneal compensation (SLPECC) every 6 months. Visual-field progression was assessed using pointwise linear-regression analysis of SAP sensitivity values (progressor) and defined as significant sensitivity loss of >1 dB/year at ≥2 adjacent test locations in the same hemifield at P<0.01. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) were calculated to determine the predictive ability of baseline ONH and RNFL parameters for SAP progression using univariate and multivariate models. Seventy-three eyes of 73 patients (43 GS and 30 glaucoma, mean age 63.2±9.5 years) were enrolled (mean follow-up 51.5±11.3 months). Four of 43 GS (9.3%) and 6 of 30 (20%) glaucomatous eyes demonstrated progression. Mean time to progression was 50.8±11.4 months. Using multivariate models, abnormal CSLO temporal-inferior Moorfields classification (HR=3.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-6.80, P=0.04), SLPECC inferior RNFLT (per -1 μm, HR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.02-2.2, P=0.02), and TDOCT inferior RNFLT (per -1 μm, HR=1.11, 95% CI: 1.04-1.2, P=0.001) had significant HRs for SAP progression. Abnormal baseline ONH topography and reduced inferior RNFL are predictive of SAP progression in GS and glaucomatous eyes.

  19. Development of useful recombinant promoter and its expression analysis in different plant cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Designing functionally efficient recombinant promoters having reduced sequence homology and enhanced promoter activity will be an important step toward successful stacking or pyramiding of genes in a plant cell for developing transgenic plants expressing desired traits(s. Also basic knowledge regarding plant cell specific expression of a transgene under control of a promoter is crucial to assess the promoter's efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have constructed a set of 10 recombinant promoters incorporating different up-stream activation sequences (UAS of Mirabilis mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript (MS8, -306 to +27 and TATA containing core domains of Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS3, -271 to +31. Efficacies of recombinant promoters coupled to GUS and GFP reporter genes were tested in tobacco protoplasts. Among these, a 369-bp long hybrid sub-genomic transcript promoter (MSgt-FSgt showed the highest activity in both transient and transgenic systems. In a transient system, MSgt-FSgt was 10.31, 2.86 and 2.18 times more active compared to the CaMV35S, MS8 and FS3 promoters, respectively. In transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum, var. Samsun NN and Arabidopsis plants, the MSgt-FSgt hybrid promoter showed 14.22 and 7.16 times stronger activity compared to CaMV35S promoter respectively. The correlation between GUS activity and uidA-mRNA levels in transgenic tobacco plants were identified by qRT-PCR. Both CaMV35S and MSgt-FSgt promoters caused gene silencing but the degree of silencing are less in the case of the MSgt-FSgt promoter compared to CaMV35S. Quantification of GUS activity in individual plant cells driven by the MSgt-FSgt and the CaMV35S promoter were estimated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and compared. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We propose strong recombinant promoter MSgt-FSgt, developed in this study, could be very useful for high-level constitutive expression of transgenes in

  20. Membrane Separated Flow Cell for Parallelized Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy to Characterize Electro-Active Microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stöckl, Markus; Schlegel, Christin; Sydow, Anne; Holtmann, Dirk; Ulber, Roland; Mangold, Klaus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a membrane separated electrochemical flow cell. • Simultaneous combination of EIS and CLSM. • Monitoring of bacterial cell attachment to anode of MFC. • Cell attachment of Shewanella oneidensis is shown. - Abstract: Understanding the attachment of electro-active bacteria to electrode surfaces and their subsequent biofilm formation is one of the major challenges for the establishment of bacterial bioelectrochemial systems (BES). For a constant observation of biofilm growth, providing information on different stages of biofilm formation, continuous monitoring methods are required. In this paper a combination of two powerful analytical methods, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), for biofilm monitoring is presented. A custom-built flow cell with a transparent indium tin oxide working electrode (WE) was constructed allowing monitoring of cell attachment to a working electrode simultaneously by EIS and CLSM. Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and EIS of an iron (II)/iron (III) redox couple indicate that the flow cell is suitable for electrochemical experiments. An engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (ATCC700550) producing eGFP was used as electro-active model organism to demonstrate the practical application of the flow cell as BES to monitor cell attachment simultaneously with EIS and CLSM. Applying the flow cell as MFC (transparent working electrode poised as anode) produced a typical current curve for such a system. From the equivalent circuit used to interpret EIS data the charge transfer resistance R CT is sensitive to attachment of microorganisms. Fitted R CT was increased initially after cell inoculation and then lowered constantly with progressing experimental time. In parallel taken CLSM images show that bacteria already adhered to the WE 5 min after inoculation. A mono- respectively bilayer of electro-active cells was observed after 17 h on the WE surface. With the presented

  1. Distribution of biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads using confocal laser scanning microscopy and high-speed cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Maan, Abid Aslam; Khan, Muhammad Kashif Iqbal; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-04-02

    The main focus of our research was to study the distribution of inkjet printed biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads of different brands. We produced microarrays of fluorophore-labeled IgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on FAST, Unisart, and Oncyte-Avid slides and compared the spot morphology of the inkjet printed biomolecules. The distribution of these biomolecules within the spot embedded in the nitrocellulose membrane was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy in the "Z" stack mode. By applying a "concentric ring" format, the distribution profile of the fluorescence intensity in each horizontal slice was measured and represented in a graphical color-coded way. Furthermore, a one-step diagnostic antibody assay was performed with a primary antibody, double-labeled amplicons, and fluorophore-labeled streptavidin in order to study the functionality and distribution of the immune complex in the nitrocellulose membrane slides. Under the conditions applied, the spot morphology and distribution of the primary labeled biomolecules was nonhomogenous and doughnut-like on the FAST and Unisart nitrocellulose slides, whereas a better spot morphology with more homogeneously distributed biomolecules was observed on the Oncyte-Avid slide. Similar morphologies and distribution patterns were observed when the diagnostic one-step nucleic acid microarray immunoassay was performed on these nitrocellulose slides. We also investigated possible reasons for the differences in the observed spot morphology by monitoring the dynamic behavior of a liquid droplet on and in these nitrocellulose slides. Using high speed cameras, we analyzed the wettability and fluid flow dynamics of a droplet on the various nitrocellulose substrates. The spreading of the liquid droplet was comparable for the FAST and Unisart slides but different, i.e., slower, for the Oncyte-Avid slide. The results of the spreading of the droplet and the penetration behavior of the liquid in the

  2. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  3. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  4. In-vivo diagnosis and non-inasive monitoring of Imiquimod 5% cream for non-melanoma skin cancer using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietterle, S; Lademann, J; Röwert-Huber, H-J; Stockfleth, E; Astner, S; Antoniou, C; Sterry, W

    2008-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cutaneous malignancy with increasing incidence rates worldwide. A number of established treatments are available, including surgical excision. The emergence of new non-invasive treatment modalities has prompted the development of non-invasive optical devices for therapeutic monitoring and evaluating treatment efficacy. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (CFLSM) for non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of basal cell carcinoma treated with Imiquimod (Aldara®) as topical immune-response modifier. Eight participants with a diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were enrolled in this investigation. Sequential evaluation during treatment with Imiquimod showed progressive normalization of the confocal histomorphologic parameters in correlation with normal skin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was able to identify characteristic features of BCC and allowed the visualization of therapeutic effects over time. Thus our results indicate the clinical applicability of CFLSM imaging to evaluate treatment efficacy in vivo and non-invasively

  5. The effect of compression on clinical diagnosis of glaucoma based on non-analyzed confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effect of compression of ophthalmic images on diagnostic reading is essential for effective tele-ophthalmology applications. It was therefore with great anticipation that I read the article “The Effect of Compression on Clinical Diagnosis of Glaucoma Based on Non-analyzed Confocal

  6. Relationship between gustatory function and average number of taste buds per fungiform papilla measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Sano, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between the gustatory function and average number of taste buds per fungiform papilla (FP) in humans. Systemically healthy volunteers (n = 211), pre-operative patients with chronic otitis media (n = 79), and postoperative patients, with or without a chorda tympani nerve (CTN) severed during middle ear surgery (n = 63), were included. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was employed to observe fungiform taste buds because it allows many FP to be observed non-invasively in a short period of time. Taste buds in an average of 10 FP in the midlateral region of the tongue were counted. In total, 3,849 FP were observed in 353 subjects. The gustatory function was measured by electrogustometry (EGM). An inverse relationship was found between the gustatory function and average number of fungiform taste buds per papilla. The healthy volunteers showed a lower EGM threshold (better gustatory function) and had more taste buds than did the patients with otitis media, and the patients with otitis media showed a lower EGM threshold and had more taste buds than did postoperative patients, reflecting the severity of damage to the CTN. It was concluded that the confocal laser scanning microscope is a very useful tool for using to observe a large number of taste buds non-invasively. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  7. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  8. Real-Time Demonstration of Split Skin Graft Inosculation and Integra Dermal Matrix Neovascularization Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, John; Amjadi, Mahyar; Dearman, Bronwyn; Mackie, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: During the first 48 hours after placement, an autograft “drinks” nutrients and dissolved oxygen from fluid exuding from the underlying recipient bed (“plasmatic imbibition”). The theory of inosculation (that skin grafts subsequently obtain nourishment via blood vessel “anastomosis” between new vessels invading from the wound bed and existing graft vessels) was hotly debated from the late 19th to mid-20th century. This study aimed to noninvasively observe blood flow in split skin grafts and Integra™ dermal regeneration matrix to provide further proof of inosculation and to contrast the structure of vascularization in both materials, reflecting mechanism. Methods: Observations were made both clinically and using confocal microscopy on normal skin, split skin graft, and Integra™. The VivaScope™ allows noninvasive, real-time, in vivo images of tissue to be obtained. Results: Observations of blood flow and tissue architecture in autologous skin graft and Integra™ suggest that 2 very different processes are occurring in the establishment of circulation in each case. Inosculation provides rapid circulatory return to skin grafts whereas slower neovascularization creates an unusual initial Integra™ circulation. Conclusions: The advent of confocal laser microscopy like the VivaScope 1500™, together with “virtual” journals such as ePlasty, enables us to provide exciting images and distribute them widely to a “reading” audience. The development of the early Integra™ vasculature by neovascularization results in a large-vessel, high-volume, rapid flow circulation contrasting markedly from the inosculatory process in skin grafts and the capillary circulation in normal skin and merits further (planned) investigation. PMID:19787028

  9. Video-rate optical flow corrected intraoperative functional fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Maximilian; Glatz, Juergen; Ermolayev, Vladimir; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    Intraoperative fluorescence molecular imaging based on targeted fluorescence agents is an emerging approach to improve surgical and endoscopic imaging and guidance. Short exposure times per frame and implementation at video rates are necessary to provide continuous feedback to the physician and

  10. In-situ Crystallization of Highly Volatile Commercial Mold Flux Using an Isolated Observation System in the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ryu, Jae Wook; Sohn, Il

    2014-08-01

    The in situ crystallization behavior of highly volatile commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels was investigated using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) equipped with an optimized isolated observation system. The highly volatile compounds of the mold flux were suppressed during heating allowing direct observation in the CLSM. Cooling rates of 25, 50, 100, 400, and 800 K/min were incorporated and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of 4 different commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels were developed. Identification of the crystalline phase was conducted with XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. A cuspidine crystalline was observed in all samples at various cooling rates. With higher basicity, CaF2, and NaF, the crystallization of the fluxes was enhanced according to the CCT diagram. As the slag structure becomes depolymerized, the diffusion rate of the cathodic ions seems to increase.

  11. Chlorophyll and its degradation products in the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae: observations using epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2013-10-01

    Chlorophyll and chlorophyll degradation products were observed in the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A clear red fluorescence (EFM) and a fluorescence induced by a laser wavelength of 650 nm (CLSM) were observed. In the lateral caeca, in the ventriculus and in the excretory organ, a bright light blue fluorescence was observed in close association with chlorophyll by using EFM. The same material can be localized with CLSM by using a laser with a wavelength of 488 nm. By comparison with synthetic guanine, this bright fluorescence is supposed to be guanine. The presence of guanine fluorescence in the mite pellets confirms this hypothesis. A possible mechanism for guanine formation is discussed.

  12. Ultrasonically synthesized organic liquid-filled chitosan microcapsules: part 2: characterization using AFM (atomic force microscopy) and combined AFM-confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Ye, Qianyu; Zhou, Meifang; Dagastine, Raymond; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2018-04-25

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is used to measure the stiffness and Young's modulus of individual microcapsules that have a chitosan cross-linked shell encapsulating tetradecane. The oil filled microcapsules were prepared using a one pot synthesis via ultrasonic emulsification of tetradecane and crosslinking of the chitosan shell in aqueous solutions of acetic acid. The concentration of acetic acid in aqueous solutions of chitosan was varied from 0.2% to 25% v/v. The effect of acetic acid concentration and size of the individual microcapsules on the strength was probed. The deformations and forces required to rupture the microcapsules were also measured. Three dimensional deformations of microcapsules under large applied loads were obtained by the combination of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The stiffness, and hence the modulus, of the microcapsules was found to decrease with an increase in size with the average stiffness ranging from 82 to 111 mN m-1 and average Young's modulus ranging from 0.4 to 6.5 MPa. The forces required to rupture the microcapsules varied from 150 to 250 nN with deformations of the microcapsules up to 62 to 110% relative to their radius, respectively. Three dimensional images obtained using laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that the microcapsules retained their structure and shape after being subjected to large deformations and subsequent removal of the loads. Based on the above observations, the oil filled chitosan crosslinked microcapsules are an ideal choice for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries as they would be able to withstand the process conditions encountered.

  13. Confocal Adaptive Optics Imaging of Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Bundles: Implications for Glaucomatous Damage Seen on Circumpapillary OCT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald C; Chen, Monica F; Lee, Dongwon; Epstein, Benjamin; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Chui, Toco Y P

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of glaucomatous damage as seen on circumpapillary disc scans obtained with frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT), fdOCT scans were compared to images of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber (RNF) bundles obtained with an adaptive optics-scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). The AO-SLO images and fdOCT scans were obtained on 6 eyes of 6 patients with deep arcuate defects (5 points ≤-15 db) on 10-2 visual fields. The AO-SLO images were montaged and aligned with the fdOCT images to compare the RNF bundles seen with AO-SLO to the RNF layer thickness measured with fdOCT. All 6 eyes had an abnormally thin (1% confidence limit) RNF layer (RNFL) on fdOCT and abnormal (hyporeflective) regions of RNF bundles on AO-SLO in corresponding regions. However, regions of abnormal, but equal, RNFL thickness on fdOCT scans varied in appearance on AO-SLO images. These regions could be largely devoid of RNF bundles (5 eyes), have abnormal-appearing bundles of lower contrast (6 eyes), or have isolated areas with a few relatively normal-appearing bundles (2 eyes). There also were local variations in reflectivity of the fdOCT RNFL that corresponded to the variations in AO-SLO RNF bundle appearance. Relatively similar 10-2 defects with similar fdOCT RNFL thickness profiles can have very different degrees of RNF bundle damage as seen on fdOCT and AO-SLO. While the results point to limitations of fdOCT RNFL thickness as typically analyzed, they also illustrate the potential for improving fdOCT by attending to variations in local intensity.

  14. Quantitative characterization of cleavage and hydrogen-assisted quasi-cleavage fracture surfaces with the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merson, E. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Kudrya, A.V.; Trachenko, V.A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and the Physics of Strength, NUST MISiS, Moscow 119490 (Russian Federation); Merson, D. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Kazan Federal University, Naberezhnye Chelny 423812, Republic of Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Danilov, V. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Department of Engineering Design and Materials, Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-05-17

    “True” cleavage (TC) and quasi-cleavage (QC) fracture surfaces of low-carbon steel specimens tested in liquid nitrogen and after hydrogen charging respectively were investigated by quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Topological and crystallographic features of the TC fracture surface are found in good agreement with the generally accepted cleavage mechanism: TC facets diameters correspond to those of grains; the crack path strictly follows the crystallographic orientation of grains and the most of the cleavage cracks are parallel to {100} planes. On the 2D SEM images, the QC facets appeared resembling the TC ones in terms of river line patterns, shapes and sizes. However, the substantial differences between the topography of these two kinds of fracture surfaces were revealed by 3D CLSM: the average misorientation angle between QC facets and the roughness of the QC fracture surface were much lower than those measured for TC. It is demonstrated that all these features are attributed to the specific fracture mechanism operating during hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  15. Quantitative characterization of cleavage and hydrogen-assisted quasi-cleavage fracture surfaces with the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merson, E.; Kudrya, A.V.; Trachenko, V.A.; Merson, D.; Danilov, V.; Vinogradov, A.

    2016-01-01

    “True” cleavage (TC) and quasi-cleavage (QC) fracture surfaces of low-carbon steel specimens tested in liquid nitrogen and after hydrogen charging respectively were investigated by quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Topological and crystallographic features of the TC fracture surface are found in good agreement with the generally accepted cleavage mechanism: TC facets diameters correspond to those of grains; the crack path strictly follows the crystallographic orientation of grains and the most of the cleavage cracks are parallel to {100} planes. On the 2D SEM images, the QC facets appeared resembling the TC ones in terms of river line patterns, shapes and sizes. However, the substantial differences between the topography of these two kinds of fracture surfaces were revealed by 3D CLSM: the average misorientation angle between QC facets and the roughness of the QC fracture surface were much lower than those measured for TC. It is demonstrated that all these features are attributed to the specific fracture mechanism operating during hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  16. Attempt of correlative observation of morphological synaptic connectivity by combining confocal laser-scanning microscope and FIB-SEM for immunohistochemical staining technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Honma, Satoru; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    Ten years have passed since a serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) method was developed [1]. In this innovative method, samples were automatically sectioned with an ultramicrotome placed inside a scanning electron microscope column, and the block surfaces were imaged one after another by SEM to capture back-scattered electrons. The contrast-inverted images obtained by the SBF-SEM were very similar to those acquired using conventional TEM. SFB-SEM has made easy to acquire image stacks of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the mesoscale, which is taken with the confocal laser-scanning microcopy(CF-LSM).Furthermore, serial-section SEM has been combined with the focused ion beam (FIB) milling method [2]. FIB-incorporated SEM (FIB-SEM) has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional images with a higher z-axis resolution com- pared to ultramicrotome-equipped SEM.We tried immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in CF-LSM. Dendrites of neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively.We showed that conventional immuno-cytochemical staining for TEM was applicable to FIB-SEM. Furthermore, several synaptic contacts, which were thought to exist on the basis of CF-LSM findings, were confirmed with FIB-SEM, revealing the usefulness of the combined method of CF-LSM and FIB-SEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image-guided feedback of intraocular injections in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Oscar R.; Terrones, Benjamin D.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Rodent models are robust tools for understanding human retinal disease and function because of their similarities with human physiology and anatomy and availability of genetic mutants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been well-established for ophthalmic imaging in rodents and enables depth-resolved visualization of structures and image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease. Similarly, fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) has demonstrated utility for imaging endogenous and exogenous fluorescence and scattering contrast in the mouse retina. Complementary volumetric scattering and en face fluorescence contrast from OCT and cSLO, respectively, enables cellular-resolution longitudinal imaging of changes in ophthalmic structure and function. We present a non-contact multimodal OCT+cSLO small animal imaging system with extended working distance to the pupil, which enables imaging during and after intraocular injection. While injections are routinely performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the location and volume delivered is not precisely controlled and difficult to reproduce. Animals were imaged using a custom-built OCT engine and scan-head combined with a modified commercial cSLO scan-head. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. When combined with imagesegmentation, we believe OCT can be used to precisely identify injection locations and quantify injection volumes. Fluorescence cSLO can provide complementary contrast for either fluorescently labeled compounds or transgenic cells for improved specificity. Our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections, which may be used for real-time image-guided injections.

  18. The fractional laser-induced coagulation zone characterized over time by laser scanning confocal microscopy-A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhaf, Christina A; Lin, Lynlee L; Dang, Nhung; Freeman, Michael; Haedersdal, Merete; Prow, Tarl W

    2018-01-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) is an acknowledged technique to increase uptake of topical agents in skin. Micro thermal ablation zones (MAZs) consist of ablated vertical channels surrounded by a coagulation zone (CZ). Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) images individual MAZs at 733 nm (reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM)). Further, LSCM can image sodium fluorescein (NaF) fluorescence with 488 nm excitation (fluorescence confocal microcopy (FCM)), a small hydrophilic test molecule (370 MW, log P -1.52), which may simulate uptake, bio-distribution and kinetics of small hydrophilic drugs. To explore LSCM for combined investigations of CZ thickness and uptake, bio-distribution and kinetics of NaF in AFXL-exposed skin. Excised human abdominal skin samples were exposed to AFXL (15 mJ/microbeam, 2% density) and NaF gel (1000 μg/ml, 10 μl/cm2) in six repetitions, including untreated control samples. CZ thickness and spatiotemporal fluorescence intensities (FI) were quantified up to four hours after NaF application by RCM and FCM. Test sites were scanned to a depth of 200 μm, quantifying thickness of skin compartments (stratum corneum, epidermis, upper dermis), individual CZ thicknesses and FI in CZ and surrounding skin. RCM images established skin morphology to a depth of 200 μm. The CZ thickness measurements were feasible to a depth of 50 μm, and remained unchanged over time at 50 μm (P > 0.5). FI were detected to a depth of 160 μm and remained constant in CZ up to four hours after NaF application (15 minutes: 79 AU (73-92 AU), 60 minutes: 72 AU (58-82 AU), four hours: 78 AU (71-90 AU), P > 0.1). In surrounding skin, FI increased significantly over time, but remained lower than FI in CZ (15 minutes: 21 AU (17-22 AU), 60 minutes: 21 AU (19-26 AU), four hours: 42 (31- 48 AU), P = 0.03). AFXL-processed skin generated higher FI compared to non-laser processed skin in epidermis and upper dermis at 60 minutes and four hours

  19. The effect of milk processing on the microstructure of the milk fat globule and rennet induced gel observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, L; Dagastine, R R; Kentish, S E; Gras, S L

    2010-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was successfully used to observe the effect of milk processing on the size and the morphology of the milk fat globule in raw milk, raw ultrafiltered milk, and standardized and pasteurized milk prepared for cheese manufacture (cheese-milk) and commercial pasteurized and homogenized milk. Fat globule size distributions for the milk preparations were analyzed using both image analysis and light scattering and both measurements produced similar data trends. Changes to the native milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were tracked using a MFGM specific fluorescent stain that allowed MFGM proteins and adsorbed proteins to be differentiated on the fat globule surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the identity of native MFGM proteins isolated from the surface of fat globules within raw, UF retentate, and cheese-milk preparations, whereas only casein was detected on the surface of fat globules in homogenized milk. The microstructure, porosity, and gel strength of the rennet induced gel made from raw milk and cheese-milk was also found to be comparable and significantly different to that made from homogenized milk. Our results highlight the potential use of CLSM as a tool to observe the structural details of the fat globule and associated membrane close to its native environment.

  20. New insights into the painting stratigraphy of L'Homme blesse by Gustave Courbet combining scanning macro-XRF and confocal micro-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Ina; Eveno, Myriam; Pichon, Laurent; Laval, Eric; Mottin, Bruno; Mueller, Katharina; Calligaro, Thomas; Mysak, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The painting L'Homme blesse by Gustave Courbet kept at the Musee d'Orsay in Paris has been recently studied by X-ray radiography, SEM-EDX observation of paint cross sections and confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence analyses (CXRF) at locations where the cross section samples were taken. This study allowed the establishment of the paint palette used by Courbet for the three paint compositions. Eight or more paint layers could be evidenced. In the view of the complexity of this painting, further analyses using two-dimensional scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence imaging (MA-XRF) providing chemical images corresponding to the superimposition of all detectable paint layers were employed. This method is combined with CXRF for depth-resolved paint layer analysis. Large elemental maps of Hg, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ba, Pb and Ca were obtained by MA-XRF on the painting and are discussed in combination with depth profiles obtained by CXRF on strategic points where three painting compositions overlap. The order of three successive compositions of this painting were determined in this study. This work also highlights the benefits of using complementary imaging methods to obtain a complete three-dimensional vision of the chemistry and stratigraphy of paintings. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasensitive and selective gold film-based detection of mercury (II) in tap water using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Ge, Jiechao; Wu, Jiasheng; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pengfei

    2013-09-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01ng/ml for Hg(2+) ions in ultrapure and tap water based on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg(2+)-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg(2+) ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. The coefficients obtained for ultrapure and tap water were 0.99902 and 0.99512, respectively, for the linear part over a range of 0.01-100ng/ml. The results show that the double-effect sensor has potential for practical applications with ultra sensitivity and selectivity, especially in online or real-time monitoring of Hg(2+) ions pollution in tap water with the further improvement of portable LSCI-SPR instrument. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of transdermal delivery of nanoemulsions in ex vivo porcine skin using two-photon microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghoon; Kim, Jin Woong; Lee, Yong Joong; Delmas, Thomas; Kim, Changhwan; Park, Soyeun; Lee, Ho

    2014-10-01

    This study experimentally evaluates the self-targeting ability of asiaticoside-loaded nanoemulsions compared with nontargeted nanoemulsions in ex vivo experiments with porcine skin samples. Homebuilt two-photon and confocal laser-scanning microscopes were employed to noninvasively examine the transdermal delivery of two distinct nanoemulsions. Prior to the application of nanoemulsions, we noninvasively observed the morphology of porcine skin using two-photon microscopy. We have successfully visualized the distributions of the targeted and nontargeted nanoemulsions absorbed into the porcine skin samples. Asiaticoside-loaded nanoemulsions showed an improved ex vivo transdermal delivery through the stratum corneum compared with nonloaded nanoemulsions. As a secondary measure, nanoemulsions-applied samples were sliced in the depth direction with a surgical knife in order to obtain the complete depth-direction distribution profile of Nile red fluorescence. XZ images demonstrated that asiaticoside-loaded nanoemulsion penetrated deeper into the skin compared with nontargeted nanoemulsions. The basal layer boundary is clearly visible in the case of the asiaticoside-loaded skin sample. These results reaffirm the feasibility of using self-targeting ligands to improve permeation through the skin barrier for cosmetics and topical drug applications.

  3. New insights into the painting stratigraphy of L'Homme blesse by Gustave Courbet combining scanning macro-XRF and confocal micro-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Ina [Staatliche Museen zu Berlin-Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Rathgen-Forschungslabor, Berlin (Germany); Laboratoire d' Archeologie Moleculaire et Structurale, Sorbonne Universites, Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Paris (France); Eveno, Myriam; Pichon, Laurent; Laval, Eric; Mottin, Bruno [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), Paris (France); Mueller, Katharina [Laboratoire d' Archeologie Moleculaire et Structurale, Sorbonne Universites, Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Paris (France); Calligaro, Thomas [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche Chimie Paris, Paris (France); Mysak, Erin [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), Paris (France); Yale University, Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The painting L'Homme blesse by Gustave Courbet kept at the Musee d'Orsay in Paris has been recently studied by X-ray radiography, SEM-EDX observation of paint cross sections and confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence analyses (CXRF) at locations where the cross section samples were taken. This study allowed the establishment of the paint palette used by Courbet for the three paint compositions. Eight or more paint layers could be evidenced. In the view of the complexity of this painting, further analyses using two-dimensional scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence imaging (MA-XRF) providing chemical images corresponding to the superimposition of all detectable paint layers were employed. This method is combined with CXRF for depth-resolved paint layer analysis. Large elemental maps of Hg, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ba, Pb and Ca were obtained by MA-XRF on the painting and are discussed in combination with depth profiles obtained by CXRF on strategic points where three painting compositions overlap. The order of three successive compositions of this painting were determined in this study. This work also highlights the benefits of using complementary imaging methods to obtain a complete three-dimensional vision of the chemistry and stratigraphy of paintings. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of fungiform taste-bud distribution among age groups using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo in combination with gustatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Sano, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the distribution of taste buds in fungiform papillae (FP) and gustatory function between young and elderly age groups. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used because it allows many FP to be observed non-invasively in a short period of time. The age of participants (n = 211) varied from 20 to 83 yr. The tip and midlateral region of the tongue were observed. Taste buds in an average of 10 FP in each area were counted. A total of 2,350 FP at the tongue tip and 2,592 FP in the midlateral region could be observed. The average number of taste buds was similar among all age groups both at the tongue tip and in the midlateral region. The taste function, measured by electrogustometry, among participants 20-29 yr of age was significantly lower than that in the other age groups; however, there was no difference among any other age groups in taste function. These results indicate that the peripheral gustatory system is well maintained anatomically and functionally in elderly people. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Reproductive system abnormalities in Schistosoma mansoni adult worms isolated from Nectomys squamipes (Muridae: Sigmodontinae: brightfield and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Renata Heisler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni adult worms with genital anomalies isolated from Nectomys squamipes (Muridae: Sigmodontinae were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy under the reflected mode. One male without testicular lobes (testicular agenesia/anorchism and two females, one with an atrophied ovary and another with 17 uterine eggs, were identified. The absence of testicular lobes occurred in a worm presenting otherwise normal male adult characteristics: tegument, tubercles and a gynaecophoric canal with spines. In both female specimens the digestive tube showed a vacuolated appearance, and the specimen with supernumerary uterine eggs exhibited a developing miracidium and an egg with a formed shell. The area of the ventral sucker was similar in both specimens however the tegument thickness, ovary and vitelline glands of the specimen with the atrophied ovary were smaller than those of the one with supernumerary eggs. These reported anomalies in the reproductive system call attention to the need to improve our understanding of genetic regulation and the possible role of environmental influences upon trematode development.

  6. Morphological aspects of Schistosoma mansoni adult worms isolated from nourished and undernourished mice: a comparative analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Renata Heisler

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition hampers the course of schistosomiasis mansoni infection just as normal growth of adult worms. A comparative morphometric study on adult specimens (male and female recovered from undernourished (fed with a low protein diet - regional basic diet and nourished (rodent commercial laboratory food, NUVILAB white mice was performed. Tomographic images and morphometric analysis of the oral and ventral suckers, reproductive system and tegument were obtained by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. Undernourished male specimens presented smaller morphometric values (length and width of the reproductive system (first, third and last testicular lobes and thickness of the tegument than controls. Besides that, it was demonstrated that the dorsal surface of the male worms bears large tubercles unevenly distributed, but kept grouped and flat. At the subtegumental region, vacuolated areas were detected. It was concluded that the inadequate nutritional status of the vertebrate host has a negative influence mainly in the reproductive system and topographical somatic development of male adult Schistosoma mansoni, inducing some alterations on the structure of the parasite.

  7. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Bombarda de ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B. These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C. Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p0.05. The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05. Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods.

  8. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the rat meninges and choroid plexus: three-dimensional localisation by environmental scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G; Wealthall, Rosamund J; Deverall, Marie; Cooper, Stephanie J; Griffin, Brendan

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation provides novel information on the topographical distribution of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in normal meninges and choroid plexus of the rat central nervous system (CNS). Whole-mounts of meninges and choroid plexus of Lewis rats were incubated with various anti-leucocyte monoclonal antibodies and either visualised with gold-conjugated secondary antibody followed by silver enhancement and subsequent examination by environmental scanning electron microscopy or by the use of fluorochromes and confocal microscopy. Large numbers of MHC class II(+) putative DCs were identified on the internal or subarachnoid aspect of dural whole-mounts, on the surface of the cortex (pia/arachnoid) and on the surface of the choroid plexus. Occupation of these sites would allow DCs access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and therefore allow antigens into the subarachnoid space and ventricles. By contrast, macrophages were less evident at sites exposed to CSF and were more frequently located within the connective tissue of the dura/arachnoid and choroid plexus stroma and also in a sub-pial location. The present data suggest that DC may be strategically located within the CNS to sample CSF-borne antigens. Furthermore, the data suggest that CNS tissue samples collected without careful removal of the meninges may inadvertently be contaminated by DCs and meningeal macrophages.

  9. Assessment of statistical agreement of three techniques for the study of cut marks: 3D digital microscope, laser scanning confocal microscopy and micro-photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-González, Miguel Ángel; Aramendi, Julia; Yravedra, José; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; González-Aguilera, Diego; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    In the last few years, the study of cut marks on bone surfaces has become fundamental for the interpretation of prehistoric butchery practices. Due to the difficulties in the correct identification of cut marks, many criteria for their description and classification have been suggested. Different techniques, such as three-dimensional digital microscope (3D DM), laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and micro-photogrammetry (M-PG) have been recently applied to the study of cut marks. Although the 3D DM and LSCM microscopic techniques are the most commonly used for the 3D identification of cut marks, M-PG has also proved to be very efficient and a low-cost method. M-PG is a noninvasive technique that allows the study of the cortical surface without any previous preparation of the samples, and that generates high-resolution models. Despite the current application of microscopic and micro-photogrammetric techniques to taphonomy, their reliability has never been tested. In this paper, we compare 3D DM, LSCM and M-PG in order to assess their resolution and results. In this study, we analyse 26 experimental cut marks generated with a metal knife. The quantitative and qualitative information registered is analysed by means of standard multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics to assess the similarities and differences obtained with the different methodologies. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Biofilm formation on the Provox ActiValve: Composition and ingrowth analyzed by Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Bus-Spoor, Carien; Buijssen, Kevin J D A; van As-Brooks, Corina; de Goffau, Marcus C; Tonk, Rudi H; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M; van der Laan, Bernard F A M

    2016-04-01

    The most frequent cause of voice prosthesis failure is microbial biofilm formation on the silicone valve, leading to destruction of the material and transprosthetic leakage. The Provox ActiValve valve is made of fluoroplastic, which should be insusceptible to destruction. The purpose of this study was to determine if fluoroplastic is insusceptible to destruction by Candida species. Thirty-three dysfunctional Provox ActiValves (collected 2011-2013). Biofilm analysis was performed with Illumina paired-end sequencing (IPES), assessment of biofilm-material interaction with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). IPES (n = 10) showed that Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are dominant populations on fluoroplastic and silicone. Microbial diversity is significantly lower on fluoroplastic. Lactobacillus gasseri is the prevalent bacterial strain on most voice prostheses. FISH and CLSM (n = 23): in none of the cases was ingrowth of Candida species present in the fluoroplastic. Fluoroplastic material of Provox ActiValve seems insusceptible to destruction by Candida species, which could help improve durability of voice prostheses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E432-E440, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Considerations in the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to characterize rumen methanogens and define their spatial distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Edith R; Henderson, Gemma; Janssen, Peter H; Cox, Faith; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-06-01

    In this study, methanogen-specific coenzyme F420 autofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to identify rumen methanogens and define their spatial distribution in free-living, biofilm-, and protozoa-associated microenvironments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with temperature-controlled hybridization was used in an attempt to describe methanogen diversity. A heat pretreatment (65 °C, 1 h) was found to be a noninvasive method to increase probe access to methanogen RNA targets. Despite efforts to optimize FISH, 16S rRNA methanogen-specific probes, including Arch915, bound to some cells that lacked F420, possibly identifying uncharacterized Methanomassiliicoccales or reflecting nonspecific binding to other members of the rumen bacterial community. A probe targeting RNA from the methanogenesis-specific methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr) gene was shown to detect cultured Methanosarcina cells with signal intensities comparable to those of 16S rRNA probes. However, the probe failed to hybridize with the majority of F420-emitting rumen methanogens, possibly because of differences in cell wall permeability among methanogen species. Methanogens were shown to integrate into microbial biofilms and to exist as ecto- and endosymbionts with rumen protozoa. Characterizing rumen methanogens and defining their spatial distribution may provide insight into mitigation strategies for ruminal methanogenesis.

  12. In situ detection of the Zn(2+) release process of ZnO NPs in tumour cells by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenshuang; Tang, Xiaoling; Li, Yong; Sun, Yang; Kong, Jilie; Qingguang, Ren

    2016-08-01

    The use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer is not yet clear for human clinical applications, which is primarily due to the lack of a better understanding of the action mechanisms and cellular consequences of the direct exposure of cells to these NPs. In this work, the authors have selected zinquin ethyl ester, a Zn(2+)-specific fluorescent molecular probe, to efficiently differentiate ZnO NPs and Zn(2+), and combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to in situ study the Zn(2+) release process of ZnO NPs in cancer cell system through detecting the change of Zn(2+) level over time. During the experiments, the authors have designed the test group ZnO-2 in addition to assess the influence of a long-term storage on the characteristics of ZnO NPs in aqueous solution, and the Zn(2+) release process of ZnO NPs in cancer cell system. After three-month storage at room temperature, the release process became earlier and faster, which was consistent with previous results of transmission electron microscope, UV-Vis and PL spectra. It is a good detection method that combination of Zn(2+)-specific fluorescent molecular probe and CLSM, which will be helpful for ZnO NPs using in clinical research.

  13. The development of exo-erythrocytic schizonts of Plasmodium berghei in vitro from gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated sporozoites: a study using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinden, E.; Couchman, A.; Suhrbier, A.; Marsh, F.; Winger, L.; Ranawaka, G.

    1991-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy has been used to study the distribution of antigens expressed by the liver stages of Plasmodium berghei in cultured hepatoma cells. The 3-dimensional images obtained of intact parasites clearly show complex patterns of antigen expression not apparent when using conventional IFAT or immunoelectron microscopy. A liver-stage specific antigen (Pbl 1) was shown to be confined to the parasitophorous vacuole; the vacuole has extensive diverticulae extending into the host cell. Small parasites were detected for the first time in 'mature' cultures. These did not represent a distinct population, but the 'tail' of a broad continuum of parasite sizes. Irradiated sporozoites produce a transient population of slow-growing parasites which express a very limited range of antigens de novo in the invaded hepatoma cell. A comparison of the reactivity of normal EE parasites with anti-circumsporozoite antibody and with ant-Pbl 1 suggests that the former reagent may reliably be used to identify sporozoites invading host cells, but should not be used to determine the number of parasites that successfully undergo intrahepatic development. Anti-Pbl-1 indicates on 33% of invaded sporozoites identified by anti-CSP subsequently differentiate. (author)

  14. Intensive care unit environmental surfaces are contaminated by multidrug-resistant bacteria in biofilms: combined results of conventional culture, pyrosequencing, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Johani, K; Gosbell, I B; Jacombs, A S W; Almatroudi, A; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Jensen, S; Vickery, K

    2015-09-01

    Hospital-associated infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and are expensive to treat. Organisms causing these infections can be sourced from the inanimate environment around a patient. Could the difficulty in eradicating these organisms from the environment be because they reside in dry surface biofilms? The intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral hospital was decommissioned and the opportunity to destructively sample clinical surfaces was taken in order to investigate whether multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) had survived the decommissioning process and whether they were present in biofilms. The ICU had two 'terminal cleans' with 500 ppm free chlorine solution; items from bedding, surrounds, and furnishings were then sampled with cutting implements. Sections were sonicated in tryptone soya broth and inoculated on to chromogenic plates to demonstrate MDROs, which were confirmed with the Vitek2 system. Genomic DNA was extracted directly from ICU samples, and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for femA to detect Staphylococcus aureus and the microbiome by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed on environmental samples. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were cultured from 52% (23/44) of samples cultured. S. aureus PCR was positive in 50%. Biofilm was demonstrated in 93% (41/44) of samples by CLSM and/or SEM. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that the biofilms were polymicrobial and contained species that had multidrug-resistant strains. Dry surface biofilms containing MDROs are found on ICU surfaces despite terminal cleaning with chlorine solution. How these arise and how they might be removed requires further study. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Adham A; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P; Huang, George T-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of tissue fibrosis in skin biopsies from patients with systemic sclerosis employing confocal laser scanning microscopy: an objective outcome measure for clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Joanna; Del Galdo, Francesco; Kissin, Eugene Y.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To obtain an objective, unbiased assessment of skin fibrosis in patients with SSc for use in clinical trials of SSc disease-modifying therapeutics. Methods. Skin biopsies from the dorsal forearm of six patients with diffuse SSc and six healthy controls, and skin biopsies from the forearm of one patient with diffuse SSc before and following 1 year treatment with mycophenolate mofetil were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with specific antibodies against collagen types I and III or fibronectin. The integrated density of fluorescence (IDF) was calculated employing National Institutes of Health-ImageJ software in at least four different fields per biopsy spanning the full dermal thickness. Results. The intensities of collagen types I and III and fibronectin IDF were 174, 147 and 139% higher in SSc skin than in normal skin, respectively. All differences were statistically significant. The sum of the IDF values obtained for the three proteins yielded a comprehensive fibrosis score. The average fibrosis score for the six SSc samples was 28.3 × 106 compared with 18.6 × 106 for the six normal skin samples (P < 0.0001). Comparison of skin biopsies obtained from the same SSc patient before treatment and after 12 months of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil showed a reduction of 39% in total fibrosis score after treatment. Conclusions. CLSM followed by quantitative image analysis provides an objective and unbiased assessment of skin fibrosis in SSc and could be a useful end-point for clinical trials with disease-modifying agents to monitor the response or progression of the disease. PMID:20202926

  17. In situ observation of the growth of biofouling layer in osmotic membrane bioreactors by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Xinhua; Tang, Chuyang; Li, Xiufen; Yu, Guanghui

    2015-05-15

    Since the concept of the osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was introduced in 2008, it has attracted growing interests for its potential applications in wastewater treatment and reclamation; however, the fouling mechanisms of forward osmosis (FO) membrane especially the development of biofouling layer in the OMBR are not yet clear. Here, the fouled FO membranes were obtained from the OMBRs on days 3, 8 and 25 in sequence, and then the structure and growing rule of the biofouling layer formed on the FO membrane samples were in-situ characterized by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM images indicated that the variations in abundance and distribution of polysaccharides, proteins and microorganisms in the biofouling layer during the operation of OMBRs were significantly different. Before the 8th day, their biovolume dramatically increased. Subsequently, the biovolumes of β-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and proteins continued increasing and leveled off after 8 days, respectively, while the biovolumes of α-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms decreased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) played a significant role in the formation and growth of biofouling layer, while the microorganisms were seldom detected on the upper fouling layer after 3 days. Based on the results obtained in this study, the growth of biofouling layer on the FO membrane surface in the OMBR could be divided into three stages. Initially, EPS was firstly deposited on the FO membrane surface, and then microorganisms associated with EPS located in the initial depositing layer to form clusters. After that, the dramatic increase of the clusters of EPS and microorganisms resulted in the quick growth of biofouling layer during the flux decline of the OMBR. However, when the water flux became stable in the OMBR, some microorganisms and EPS would be detached from the FO membrane surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Demonstration of intermediate cells during human prostate epithelial differentiation in situ and in vitro using triple-staining confocal scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leenders, G; Dijkman, H; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C; Ruiter, D; Schalken, J

    2000-08-01

    In human prostate epithelium, morphologically basal and luminal cells can be discriminated. The basal cell layer that putatively contains progenitor cells of the secretory epithelium is characterized by the expression of keratins (K) 5 and 14. Luminal cells represent the secretory compartment of the epithelium and express K8 and 18. We developed a technique for the simultaneous analysis of K5, 14, and 18 to identify intermediate cell stages in the prostate epithelium and to study the dynamic aspects of its differentiation in vitro. Nonmalignant prostate tissue and primary epithelial cultures were immunohistochemically characterized using triple staining with antibodies for K5, K14, and K18. Antibodies for K18 and K5 were conjugated directly with fluorochromes Alexa 488 and 546. K14 was visualized indirectly with streptavidin-Cy5. Keratin expression was analyzed by confocal scanning microscopy. The occurrence of exocrine and neuroendocrine differentiation in culture was determined via antibodies to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), chromogranin A, and serotonin. We found that basal cells expressed either K5(++)/14(++)/18+ or K5(++)/18+. The majority of luminal cells expressed K18(++), but colocalization of K5+/18(++) were recognized. Epithelial monolayer cultures predominantly revealed the basal cell phenotype K5(++)/14(++)/18+, whereas intermediate subpopulations expressing K5+/14+/18(++) and K5+/18(++) were also identified. On confluence, differentiation was induced as multicellular gland-like buds, and extensions became evident on top of the monolayer. These structures were composed of K18(++)- and K5+/18(+)-positive cell clusters surrounded by phenotypically basal cells. Few multicellular structures and cells in the monolayer showed exocrine differentiation (PSA+), but expression of chromogranin A and serotonin was absent. We conclude that simultaneous evaluation of keratin expression is useful for analyzing epithelial differentiation in the prostate. During this

  19. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Edmond Kahn,1 Nicolas Tissot,3 Perrine Frere,3 Aurélien Dauphin,3 Mohamed Boumhras,2,4 Claude-Marie Bachelet,3 Frédérique Frouin,1 Gérard Lizard21Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM U678/UMR-S UPMC, CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 2Equipe Biochimie du Peroxysome, Inflammation et Métabolisme Lipidique EA7270, Faculté des Sciences Gabriel, Université de Bourgogne-INSERM Dijon, France; 3Plateforme d'Imagerie cellulaire, UPMC, Paris, France; 4Laboratory of Biochemistry and Neuroscience, Applied Toxicology Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, Settat, MoroccoAbstract: In the present study, we make use of the ability of two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs equipped with tunable lasers to produce spectral excitation image sequences. Furthermore, unmixing, which is usually performed on emission image sequences, is performed on these excitation image sequences. We use factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS, which produces factor images, to unmix spectral image sequences of stained structures in tissue sections to provide images of characterized stained cellular structures. This new approach is applied to histological tissue sections of mouse aorta containing labeled iron nanoparticles stained with Texas Red and counterstained with SYTO13, to obtain visual information about the accumulation of these nanoparticles in the arterial wall. The possible presence of Texas Red is determined using a two-photon CLSM associated with FAMIS via the excitation spectra. Texas Red and SYTO13 are thus differentiated, and corresponding factor images specify their possible presence and cellular localization. In conclusion, the designed protocol shows that sequences of images obtained by excitation in a two-photon CLSM enables characterization of Texas Red-stained nanoparticles and other markers. This methodology offers an alternative and complementary solution to the conventional use of emission

  20. Video rate morphological processor based on a redundant number representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczborski, Wojciech; Attikiouzel, Yianni; Crebbin, Gregory A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper presents a video rate morphological processor for automated visual inspection of printed circuit boards, integrated circuit masks, and other complex objects. Inspection algorithms are based on gray-scale mathematical morphology. Hardware complexity of the known methods of real-time implementation of gray-scale morphology--the umbra transform and the threshold decomposition--has prompted us to propose a novel technique which applied an arithmetic system without carrying propagation. After considering several arithmetic systems, a redundant number representation has been selected for implementation. Two options are analyzed here. The first is a pure signed digit number representation (SDNR) with the base of 4. The second option is a combination of the base-2 SDNR (to represent gray levels of images) and the conventional twos complement code (to represent gray levels of structuring elements). Operation principle of the morphological processor is based on the concept of the digit level systolic array. Individual processing units and small memory elements create a pipeline. The memory elements store current image windows (kernels). All operation primitives of processing units apply a unified direction of digit processing: most significant digit first (MSDF). The implementation technology is based on the field programmable gate arrays by Xilinx. This paper justified the rationality of a new approach to logic design, which is the decomposition of Boolean functions instead of Boolean minimization.

  1. Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    The confocal microscope is appropriate for imaging cells or the measurement of industrial artefacts. However, junior researchers and instrument users sometimes misuse imaging concepts and metrological characteristics, such as position resolution in industrial metrology and scale resolution in bio-imaging. And, metrological characteristics or influence factors in 3D measurement such as height assessment error caused by 3D coupling effect are so far not yet identified. In this book, the authors outline their practices by the working experiences on standardization and system design. This book assumes little previous knowledge of optics, but rich experience in engineering of industrial measurements, in particular with profile metrology or areal surface topography will be very helpful to understand the theoretical concerns and value of the technological advances. It should be useful for graduate students or researchers as extended reading material, as well as microscope users alongside their handbook.

  2. Confocal Raman Microscopy; applications in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the use of confocal Raman microscopy and spectroscopy in the field of tissue engineering. Moreover, it describes the combination of two already existing technologies, namely scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy in one apparatus for the enhancement

  3. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  4. Realization of a video-rate distributed aperture millimeter-wave imaging system using optical upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Christopher; Martin, Richard; Dillon, Thomas; Yao, Peng; Mackrides, Daniel; Harrity, Charles; Zablocki, Alicia; Shreve, Kevin; Bonnett, James; Curt, Petersen; Prather, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    Passive imaging using millimeter waves (mmWs) has many advantages and applications in the defense and security markets. All terrestrial bodies emit mmW radiation and these wavelengths are able to penetrate smoke, fog/clouds/marine layers, and even clothing. One primary obstacle to imaging in this spectrum is that longer wavelengths require larger apertures to achieve the resolutions desired for many applications. Accordingly, lens-based focal plane systems and scanning systems tend to require large aperture optics, which increase the achievable size and weight of such systems to beyond what can be supported by many applications. To overcome this limitation, a distributed aperture detection scheme is used in which the effective aperture size can be increased without the associated volumetric increase in imager size. This distributed aperture system is realized through conversion of the received mmW energy into sidebands on an optical carrier. This conversion serves, in essence, to scale the mmW sparse aperture array signals onto a complementary optical array. The side bands are subsequently stripped from the optical carrier and recombined to provide a real time snapshot of the mmW signal. Using this technique, we have constructed a real-time, video-rate imager operating at 75 GHz. A distributed aperture consisting of 220 upconversion channels is used to realize 2.5k pixels with passive sensitivity. Details of the construction and operation of this imager as well as field testing results will be presented herein.

  5. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  6. Exploring the diversity of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm architecture by high-throughput confocal laser scanning microscopy and the predominance of the honeycomb-like morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Morgan; Piveteau, Pascal; Desvaux, Mickaël; Brisse, Sylvain; Briandet, Romain

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is involved in food-borne illness with a high mortality rate. The persistence of the pathogen along the food chain can be associated with its ability to form biofilms on inert surfaces. While most of the phenotypes associated with biofilms are related to their spatial organization, most published data comparing biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes isolates are based on the quantitative crystal violet assay, which does not give access to structural information. Using a high-throughput confocal-imaging approach, the aim of this work was to decipher the structural diversity of biofilms formed by 96 L. monocytogenes strains isolated from various environments. Prior to large-scale analysis, an experimental design was created to improve L. monocytogenes biofilm formation in microscopic-grade microplates, with special emphasis on the growth medium composition. Microscopic analysis of biofilms formed under the selected conditions by the 96 isolates revealed only weak correlation between the genetic lineages of the isolates and the structural properties of the biofilms. However, a gradient in their geometric descriptors (biovolume, mean thickness, and roughness), ranging from flat multilayers to complex honeycomb-like structures, was shown. The dominant honeycomb-like morphotype was characterized by hollow voids hosting free-swimming cells and localized pockets containing mixtures of dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Association of tongue brushing with the number of fungiform taste buds and taste perception: A preliminary study using confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with a filter-paper disc method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Junichi; Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Yoshida, Hisato; Fujita, Ryousuke; Sano, Kazuo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of tongue brushing with the number of fungiform taste buds and taste perception using a confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with a filter-paper disc method (FPDM). Twenty-four subjects with or without a habit of tongue brushing (11 males and 13 females, 20-46 years old) participated in this study. Nine of the 24 subjects had no habit of tongue brushing (Group 1, n=9). Fifteen subjects had a habit of tongue brushing, and the brushing regions of the tongue were as follows: central region (Group 2, n=7), or entire region (Group 3, n=8) of the tongue dorsum. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, the average number of taste buds per fungiform papilla (FP) was counted. Taste perception was evaluated using an FPDM. These observations were performed in the midlateral region of the tongue since the distribution of fungiform papillae is large in the midlateral region compared to that in the central region. The subjects in Group 3 showed a significantly decreased number of fungiform taste buds compared to Group 1 and Group 2. Group 3 also showed significantly higher FPDM scores than the other two groups. Excessive tongue brushing of the entire tongue dorsum, including the midlateral region, may have an association with the decreased number of FP and taste buds and decreased taste sensation. To avoid these conditions, instituting proper tongue brushing methods, such as limiting it to the central region of the tongue and using a light touch, is suggested and is important for the subjects who are eager to participate in tongue brushing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A fluorescence in situ staining method for investigating spores and vegetative cells of Clostridia by confocal laser scanning microscopy and structured illuminated microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, P; Ong, L; Gras, S; Pellegrino, L

    2018-04-18

    Non-pathogenic spore-forming Clostridia are of increasing interest due to their application in biogas production and their capability to spoil different food products. The life cycle for Clostridium includes a spore stage that can assist in survival under environmentally stressful conditions, such as extremes of temperature or pH. Due to their size, spores can be investigated by a range of microscopic techniques, many of which involve sample pre-treatment. We have developed a quick, simple and non-destructive fluorescent staining procedure that allows a clear differentiation between spores and vegetative cells and effectively stains spores, allowing recovery and tracking in subsequent experiments. Hoechst 34580, Propidium iodide and wheat germ agglutinin WGA 488 were used in combination to stain four strains of Clostridia at different life cycle stages. Staining was conducted without drying the sample, preventing changes induced by dehydration and cells observed by confocal laser scanner microscopy or using a super-resolution microscope equipped with a 3D-structured illumination module. Dual staining with Hoechst/Propidium iodide differentiated spores from vegetative cells, provided information on the viability of cells and was successfully applied to follow spore production induced by heating. Super-resolution microscopy of spores probed by Hoechst 34580 also allowed chromatin to be visualised. Direct staining of a cheese specimen using Nile Red and Fast Green allowed in situ observation of spores within the cheese and their position within the cheese matrix. The proposed staining method has broad applicability and can potentially be applied to follow Clostridium spore behaviour in a range of different environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for highly localized damage in internal tin and powder-in-tube Nb{sub 3}Sn strands rolled before reaction obtained from coupled magneto-optical imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyanskii, A A; Lee, P J; Jewell, M C; Larbalestier, D C [Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Barzi, E; Turrioni, D; Zlobin, A V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Nb{sub 3}Sn strands for high-current, high-field magnets must be cabled before reaction while the conductor is still composed of ductile components. Even though still in the ductile, deformable state, significant damage can occur in this step, which expresses itself by inhomogeneous A15 formation, Sn leakage or even worse effects during later reaction. In this study, we simulate cabling damage by rolling recent high performance powder-in-tube (PIT) and internal tin (IT) strands in controlled increments, applying standard Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatments, and then examining the local changes using magneto-optical imaging (MOI), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). These combined characterizations allow any local damage to the filament architecture to be made clear. MOI directly reveals the local variation of superconductivity while CLSM is extremely sensitive in revealing Sn leakage beyond the diffusion barrier into the stabilizing Cu. These techniques reveal a markedly different response to deformation by the PIT and IT strands. The study demonstrates that these tools can provide a local, thorough, and detailed view of how strands degrade and thus complement more complex extracted strand studies.

  11. Collection of trace evidence of explosive residues from the skin in a death due to a disguised letter bomb. The synergy between confocal laser scanning microscope and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Baroni, Davide; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2010-04-15

    In most deaths caused by explosive, the victim's body becomes a depot for fragments of explosive materials, so contributing to the collection of trace evidence which may provide clues about the specific type of device used with explosion. Improvised explosive devices are used which contain "homemade" explosives rather than high explosives because of the relative ease with which such components can be procured. Many methods such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, stereomicroscopy, capillary electrophoresis are available for use in the identification of explosive residues on objects and bomb fragments. Identification and reconstruction of the distribution of explosive residues on the decedent's body may give additional hints in assessing the position of the victim in relation to the device. Traditionally these residues are retrieved by swabbing the body and clothing during the early phase, at autopsy. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and other analytical methods may be used to analyze the material swabbed from the victim body. The histological examination of explosive residues on skin samples collected during the autopsy may reveal significant details. The information about type, quantity and particularly about anatomical distribution of explosive residues obtained utilizing confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) together with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), may provide very significant evidence in the clarification and reconstruction of the explosive-related events. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Low axial drift stage and temperature controlled liquid cell for z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in an inverted confocal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allgeyer, Edward S.; Sterling, Sarah M.; Neivandt, David J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    A recent iteration of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), z-scan FCS, has drawn attention for its elegant solution to the problem of quantitative sample positioning when investigating two-dimensional systems while simultaneously providing an excellent method for extracting calibration-free diffusion coefficients. Unfortunately, the measurement of planar systems using (FCS and) z-scan FCS still requires extremely mechanically stable sample positioning, relative to a microscope objective. As axial sample position serves as the inherent length calibration, instabilities in sample position will affect measured diffusion coefficients. Here, we detail the design and function of a highly stable and mechanically simple inverted microscope stage that includes a temperature controlled liquid cell. The stage and sample cell are ideally suited to planar membrane investigations, but generally amenable to any quantitative microscopy that requires low drift and excellent axial and lateral stability. In the present work we evaluate the performance of our custom stage system and compare it with the stock microscope stage and typical sample sealing and holding methods.

  13. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Neville, Craig; Grottkau, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  14. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  15. Histochemical study of trans-polyisoprene accumulation by spectral confocal laser scanning microscopy and a specific dye showing fluorescence solvatochromism in the rubber-producing plant, Eucommia ulmoides Oliver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Tatsushi; Harada, Yoko; Bamba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Akio

    2013-09-01

    A microscopic technique combining spectral confocal laser scanning microscopy with a lipophilic fluorescent dye, Nile red, which can emit trans-polyisoprene specific fluorescence, was developed, and unmixed images of synthesized trans-polyisoprene in situ in Eucommia ulmoides were successfully obtained. The images showed that trans-polyisoprene was initially synthesized as granules in non-articulated laticifers that changed shape to fibers during laticifer maturation. Non-articulated laticifers are developed from single laticiferous cells, which are differentiated from surrounding parenchyma cells in the cambium. Therefore, these observations suggested that trans-polyisoprene biosynthesis first started in laticifer cells as granules and then the granules accumulated and fused in the inner space of the laticifers over time. Finally, laticifers were filled with the synthesized trans-polyisoprene, which formed a fibrous structure fitting the laticifers shape. Both trans- and cis-polyisoprene are among the most important polymers naturally produced by plants, and this microscopic technique combined with histological study should provide useful information in the fields of plant histology, bioindustry and phytochemistry.

  16. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M; Meneses, J; Gharbi, T

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  17. UNC Pembroke Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    an aggregation-dependent manner. Biochim Biophys Acta (Mol. Basis of Disease) 1812:1664-1674. Technology Transfer 1    Scientific progress and...receptors and presynaptic markers in an aggregation-dependent manner. Biochim Biophys Acta (Mol. Basis of Disease) 1812:1664-1674.

  18. Pigment organization effects on energy transfer and Chl a emission imaged in the diatoms C. meneghiniana and P. tricornutum in vivo: a confocal laser scanning fluorescence (CLSF) microscopy and spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premvardhan, Lavanya; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Büchel, Claudia

    2013-09-26

    The (auto)fluorescence from three diatom strains, Cyclotella meneghiniana (Cm), Phaeodactylum tricornutum 1a (Pt1a), and Phaeodactylum UTex (PtUTex), has been imaged in vivo to submicrometer resolution using confocal laser scanning fluorescence (CLSF) microscopy. The diatoms are excited at 473 and 532 nm, energy primarily absorbed by the carotenoid fucoxanthin (Fx) found within the fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c proteins (FCPs). On the basis of the fluorescence spectra measured in each image voxel, we obtain information about the spatial and energetic distribution of the terminal Chl a emitters, localized in the FCPs and the reaction centers of the PSII protein complexes, and the nature and location of the primary absorbers that are linked to these emitters; 532 nm excites the highly efficient Fx(red) light harvesters, and lesser amounts of Fx(green)s, that are enriched in some FCPs and preferentially transfer energy to PSII, compared to 473 nm, which excites almost equal amounts of all three previously identified sets of Fx--Fx(red), Fx(green) and Fx(blue)--as well as Chl c. The heterogeneous Chl a emission observed from the (C)LSF images indicates that the different Fx's serve different final emitters in P. tricornutum and suggest, at least in C. meneghiniana , a localization of FCPs with relatively greater Fx(red) content at the chloroplast edges, but with overall higher FCP concentration in the interior of the plastid. To better understand our results, the concentration-dependent ensemble-averaged diatom solution spectra are compared to the (auto)fluorescence spectra of individual diatoms, which indicate that pigment packing effects at an intracellular level do affect the diatoms' spectral properties, in particular, concerning a 710 nm emission band apparent under stress conditions. A species-specific response of the spectral signature to the incident light is also discussed in terms of the presence of a silica shell in Cm but not in Pt1a nor PtUTex.

  19. Confocal microscopy imaging of the biofilm matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  20. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: LASER POWER MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser power abstract The reliability of the confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) to obtain intensity measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. The laser power test appears to be one ...

  1. Ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum based on the gold film sensor using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hg2+ ions are one of the most toxic heavy metal ion pollutants, and are caustic and carcinogenic materials with high cellular toxicity. The Hg2+ ions can accumulate in the human body through the food chain and cause serious and permanent damage to the brain with both acute and chronic toxicity. According to the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines, Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml (10 nM) in drinking water. If the Hg2+ ions are higher than 2.5 ng/ml in serum, that will bring mercury poisoning. The traditional testing for Hg2+ ions includes atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. These methods are usually coupled with gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. However, these instrument-based techniques are rather complicated, time-consuming, costly, and unsuitable for online and portable use. An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01 ng/ml for Hg2+ ions in fetal calf serum and that is lower than that was required Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. This sensor was designed on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg2+-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg2+ ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. A good liner relation was got with the coefficients of 0.9116 in 30% fetal calf serums with the linear part over a range of 0.01 ng/ml to10 ng/ml.

  2. Evaluating the Toxicity/Fixation Balance for Corneal Cross-Linking With Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG) and Riboflavin-UVA (CXL) in an Ex Vivo Rabbit Model Using Confocal Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Young; Babar, Natasha; Munteanu, Emilia Laura; Takaoka, Anna; Zyablitskaya, Mariya; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Trokel, Stephen L; Paik, David C

    2016-04-01

    To develop methods to delineate the relationship between endothelial cell toxicity and tissue fixation (toxicity/fixation) using sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), a formaldehyde releaser, and riboflavin-UVA photochemical corneal cross-linking (CXL) for therapeutic tissue cross-linking of the cornea. Eleven fresh cadaveric rabbit heads were used for ex vivo corneal cross-linking simulation. After epithelial debridement, the tissue was exposed to 1/4 max (9.8 mM) or 1/3 max (13 mM) SMG at pH 8.5 for 30 minutes or riboflavin-UVA (CXL). The contralateral cornea served as a paired control. Postexposure, cross-linking efficacy was determined by thermal denaturation temperature (Tm) and endothelial damage was assessed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer staining (The Live/Dead Kit). Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy was used to generate live/dead cell counts using a standardized algorithm. The ΔTm after CXL, 1/3 SMG, and 1/4 SMG was 2.2 ± 0.9°C, 1.3 ± 0.5°C, and 1.1 ± 0.5°C, respectively. Endothelial cell damage was expressed as the percent of dead cells/live + dead cells counted per high-power field. The values were 3 ± 1.7% (control) and 8.9 ± 11.1% (CXL) (P = 0.390); 1 ± 0.2% (control) and 19.5 ± 32.2% (1/3 max SMG) (P = 0.426); and 2.7 ± 2.4% (control) and 2.8 ± 2.2% (1/4 max SMG) (P = 0.938). The values for endothelial toxicity were then indexed over the shift in Tm to yield a toxicity/fixation index. The values were as follows: 2.7 for CXL, 14 for 1/3 max, and 0.1 for 1/4 max. Quarter max (1/4 max = 9.8 mM) SMG effectively cross-linked tissue and was nontoxic to endothelial cells. Thus, SMG is potentially a compound that could achieve both desired effects.

  3. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  4. Confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Săftoiu, Adrian; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) has been shown to predict relapse in ulcerative colitis in remission, but little is currently known about its role in Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to identify reproducible CLE features in patients with Crohn's disease...

  5. Confocal Imaging of porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S.; Crawshaw, D.; Boek, D.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate rocks, which hold approximately 50% of the world's oil and gas reserves, have a very complicated and heterogeneous structure in comparison with sandstone reservoir rock. We present advances with different techniques to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the micro-geometry of carbonate pores. The main goal here is to develop a technique to obtain two dimensional and three dimensional images using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. CLSM is used in epi-fluorescent imaging mode, allowing for the very high optical resolution of features well below 1μm size. Images of pore structures were captured using CLSM imaging where spaces in the carbonate samples were impregnated with a fluorescent, dyed epoxy-resin, and scanned in the x-y plane by a laser probe. We discuss the sample preparation in detail for Confocal Imaging to obtain sub-micron resolution images of heterogeneous carbonate rocks. We also discuss the technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including its advantages and limitation. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in carbonates, characterizing sub-resolution porosity in two dimensional images. We then describe approaches to extract statistical information about porosity using image processing and spatial correlation function. We have managed to obtain very low depth information in z -axis (~ 50μm) to develop three dimensional images of carbonate rocks with the current capabilities and limitation of CLSM technique. Hence, we have planned a novel technique to obtain higher depth information to obtain high three dimensional images with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes.

  6. A low-cost, high-resolution, video-rate imaging optical radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.T.; Nellums, R.O.; Lebien, S.M.; Diegert, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grantham, J.W.; Monson, T. [Air Force Research Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a unique type of portable low-cost range imaging optical radar (laser radar or LADAR). This innovative sensor is comprised of an active floodlight scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is a solid-state device (no moving parts) that offers significant size, performance, reliability, and simplicity advantages over other types of 3-D imaging sensors. This unique flash LADAR is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is well suited for many government and commercial uses. This paper presents an update of Sandia`s development of the Scannerless Range Imager technology and applications, and discusses the progress that has been made in evolving the sensor into a compact, low, cost, high-resolution, video rate Laser Dynamic Range Imager.

  7. Digital differential confocal microscopy based on spatial shift transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wilson, T; Wang, H; Tan, J

    2014-11-01

    Differential confocal microscopy is a particularly powerful surface profilometry technique in industrial metrology due to its high axial sensitivity and insensitivity to noise. However, the practical implementation of the technique requires the accurate positioning of point detectors in three-dimensions. We describe a simple alternative based on spatial transformation of a through-focus series of images obtained from a homemade beam scanning confocal microscope. This digital differential confocal microscopy approach is described and compared with the traditional Differential confocal microscopy approach. The ease of use of the digital differential confocal microscopy system is illustrated by performing measurements on a 3D standard specimen. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Integrated Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Kim, Chulhong; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality imaging system by integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and fluorescence confocal microscopy to provide optical absorption and fluorescence contrasts simultaneously. By sharing the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence images are acquired in a single scan. The micrometer resolution allows imaging of both blood and lymphatic vessels down to the capillary level. Simultaneous photoacoustic...

  9. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  10. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion...

  11. Video-rate or high-precision: a flexible range imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Cree, Michael J.; Carnegie, Dale A.; Payne, Andrew D.; Conroy, Richard M.; Godbaz, John P.; Jongenelen, Adrian P. P.

    2008-02-01

    A range imaging camera produces an output similar to a digital photograph, but every pixel in the image contains distance information as well as intensity. This is useful for measuring the shape, size and location of objects in a scene, hence is well suited to certain machine vision applications. Previously we demonstrated a heterodyne range imaging system operating in a relatively high resolution (512-by-512) pixels and high precision (0.4 mm best case) configuration, but with a slow measurement rate (one every 10 s). Although this high precision range imaging is useful for some applications, the low acquisition speed is limiting in many situations. The system's frame rate and length of acquisition is fully configurable in software, which means the measurement rate can be increased by compromising precision and image resolution. In this paper we demonstrate the flexibility of our range imaging system by showing examples of high precision ranging at slow acquisition speeds and video-rate ranging with reduced ranging precision and image resolution. We also show that the heterodyne approach and the use of more than four samples per beat cycle provides better linearity than the traditional homodyne quadrature detection approach. Finally, we comment on practical issues of frame rate and beat signal frequency selection.

  12. Molecular confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Klausen, Pia Helene; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    While flexible endoscopy is essential for macroscopic evaluation, confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) has recently emerged as an endoscopic method enabling visualization at a cellular level. Two systems are currently available, one based on miniprobes that can be inserted via a conventional...... during on-going endoscopy), a novel world of molecular evaluation opens up. The method of molecular CLE could potentially be used for estimating the expression of important receptors in carcinomas, subsequently resulting in immediate individualization of treatment regimens, but also for improving...

  13. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface. (paper)

  14. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  15. Real time three-dimensional space video rate sensors for millimeter waves imaging based very inexpensive plasma LED lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Assaf; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested to develop inexpensive but sensitive Millimeter Wave (MMW) detectors that can be used in focal plane arrays (FPAs), in order to implement real time MMW imaging. Real time MMW imaging systems are required for many varied applications in many fields as homeland security, medicine, communications, military products and space technology. It is mainly because this radiation has high penetration and good navigability through dust storm, fog, heavy rain, dielectric materials, biological tissue, and diverse materials. Moreover, the atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low and the scattering is also low compared to NIR and VIS. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to provide a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. In last few years we advanced in research and development of sensors using very inexpensive (30-50 cents) Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) plasma indicator lamps as MMW detectors. This paper presents three kinds of GDD sensor based lamp Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). Those three kinds of cameras are different in the number of detectors, scanning operation, and detection method. The 1st and 2nd generations are 8 × 8 pixel array and an 18 × 2 mono-rail scanner array respectively, both of them for direct detection and limited to fixed imaging. The last designed sensor is a multiplexing frame rate of 16x16 GDD FPA. It permits real time video rate imaging of 30 frames/ sec and comprehensive 3D MMW imaging. The principle of detection in this sensor is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) system while each of the 16 GDD pixel lines is sampled simultaneously. Direct detection is also possible and can be done with a friendly user interface. This FPA sensor is built over 256 commercial GDD lamps with 3 mm diameter International Light, Inc., Peabody, MA model 527 Ne indicator lamps as pixel detectors. All three sensors are fully supported

  16. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  17. Spinning-disk confocal microscopy: present technology and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, John; Berman, Richard; Browne, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell imaging requires not only high temporal resolution but also illumination powers low enough to minimize photodamage. Traditional single-point laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is generally limited by both the relatively slow speed at which it can acquire optical sections by serial raster scanning (a few Hz) and the higher potential for phototoxicity. These limitations have driven the development of rapid, parallel forms of confocal microscopy, the most popular of which is the spinning-disk confocal microscope (SDCM). Here, we briefly introduce the SDCM technique, discuss its strengths and weaknesses against LSCM, and update the reader on some recent developments in SDCM technology that improve its performance and expand its utility for life science research now and in the future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: SPECTROSCOPY AND FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The reliability of the CLSM to obtain specific measurements and quantify fluorescence data is dependent on using a correctly aligned machine that contains a stable laser power. For man...

  19. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CALIBRATION, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of emitted signals. The accuracy of these measurements demands that...

  20. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR MEASUREMENTS, QUANTITATION AND SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  1. Smartphone confocal microscopy for imaging cellular structures in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Esther E; Semeere, Aggrey; Osman, Hany; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; González, Salvador; Martin, Jeffery N; Anderson, R Rox; Tearney, Guillermo J; Kang, Dongkyun

    2018-04-01

    We report development of a low-cost smartphone confocal microscope and its first demonstration of in vivo human skin imaging. The smartphone confocal microscope uses a slit aperture and diffraction grating to conduct two-dimensional confocal imaging without using any beam scanning devices. Lateral and axial resolutions of the smartphone confocal microscope were measured as 2 and 5 µm, respectively. In vivo confocal images of human skin revealed characteristic cellular structures, including spinous and basal keratinocytes and papillary dermis. Results suggest that the smartphone confocal microscope has a potential to examine cellular details in vivo and may help disease diagnosis in resource-poor settings, where conducting standard histopathologic analysis is challenging.

  2. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of small animal organs, albeit at lower resolution (30,000 sampling points/image). In rodent models, imaging was performed using various fluorescent staining protocols including fluorescently labelled receptor ligands, labelled antibodies, FITC-dextrans, vital dyes and labelled cells administered topically or intravenously. Abdominal organs of large animals were accessed laparoscopically and contrasted using i.v. fluorescein-sodium. Articular cartilage of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and sub-cellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high

  3. Research and application on imaging technology of line structure light based on confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenfeng; Xiao, Zexin; Wang, Xiaofen

    2009-11-01

    In 2005, the theory of line structure light confocal microscopy was put forward firstly in China by Xingyu Gao and Zexin Xiao in the Institute of Opt-mechatronics of Guilin University of Electronic Technology. Though the lateral resolution of line confocal microscopy can only reach or approach the level of the traditional dot confocal microscopy. But compared with traditional dot confocal microscopy, it has two advantages: first, by substituting line scanning for dot scanning, plane imaging only performs one-dimensional scanning, with imaging velocity greatly improved and scanning mechanism simplified, second, transfer quantity of light is greatly improved by substituting detection hairline for detection pinhole, and low illumination CCD is used directly to collect images instead of photoelectric intensifier. In order to apply the line confocal microscopy to practical system, based on the further research on the theory of the line confocal microscopy, imaging technology of line structure light is put forward on condition of implementation of confocal microscopy. Its validity and reliability are also verified by experiments.

  4. Fused oblique incidence reflectometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, Matthew D.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2011-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy provides real-time high resolution cellular level images via a minimally invasive procedure, but relies on exogenous fluorophores, has a relatively limited penetration depth (100 μm) and field of view (700 μm), and produces a high rate of detailed information to the user. A new catheter based multi-modal system has been designed that combines confocal imaging and oblique incidence reflectometry (OIR), which is a non-invasive method capable of rapidly extracting tissue absorption, μa, and reduced scattering, μ's, spectra from tissue. The system builds on previous developments of a custom slit-scan multi-spectral confocal microendoscope and is designed to rapidly switch between diffuse spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging modes of operation. An experimental proof-of-principle catheter has been developed that consists of a fiber bundle for traditional confocal fluorescence imaging and a single OIR source fiber which is manually redirected at +/- 26 degrees. Diffusely scattered light from each orientation of the source fiber is collected via the fiber bundle, with a frame of data representing spectra collected at a range of distances from the OIR source point. Initial results with intralipid phantoms show good agreement to published data over the 550-650 nm spectral range. We successfully imaged and measured the optical properties of rodent cardiac muscle.

  5. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study on thermoresponsive

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monodisperse poly(N -isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) particles loaded with cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes (4.7 nm and 5.6 nm) were synthesized in aqueous medium by bonding the capping agent on the quantum dots to the amide groups of PNIPAM and incubating the samples at 45° ...

  6. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quantification of Multilayer Samples by Confocal μXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R. Daniel; Sanchez, H. J.; Rubio, M.; Perez, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    The confocal setup consists of x-ray lenses in the excitation as well as in the detection channel. In this configuration, a micro volume defined by the overlap of the foci of both x-ray lenses is analyzed. Scanning this micro volume through the sample, 1-3 dimensional studies can be performed. For intermediate thin homogeneous layers a scanning in the normal direction to the surface sample provides information of its thickness and elemental composition. For multilayer samples it also provides the order of each layer in the stratified structure. For the confocal setup, we used a glass monocapillary in the excitation channel and a monolithic half polycapillary in the detection channel. The experiment was carried out at the D09B beamline of the LNLS using white beam. In the present work, a new algorithm was applied to analyze in detail by confocal μXRF a sample of three paint layers on a glass substrate. Using the proposed algorithm, information about thickness and elemental densities was obtained for each layer of these samples.

  8. Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy of Oral Streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.

    Raman spectroscopy has been used in a variety of applications throughout the field of biomedical optics. It has the ability to acquire chemically-specific information in a non-invasive manner, without the need for exogenous markers. This makes it useful in the identification of bacterial species, as well as in the study of tissues and other cells. In this work, a species identification model has been created in order to discriminate between the oral bacterial species Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans. These are two of the most prevalent species within the human mouth and their relative concentrations can be an indicator of a patient's oral health and risk of tooth decay. They are predominantly found within plaque on the tooth's surface. To study a simplified model for dental plaque, we have examined S. sanguinis and S. mutans grown in biofilm forms. Raman spectroscopy has been implemented here through a confocal microscope. The optical system has been equipped with computationally controlled stages to allow for automated scanning, including autofocusing to probe a consistent depth within a sample. A spectrum has been acquired from each position within a scan and sent for spectral preprocessing before being submitted for species identification. This preprocessing includes an algorithm that has been developed to remove fluorescence features from known contaminants within the confocal volume, to include signal from a fluorescent substrate. Species classification has been accomplished using a principal component score-fed logistic regression model constructed from a variety of biofilm samples that have been transferred and allowed to dry, as might occur with the study of plaque samples. This binary classification model has been validated on other samples with identical preparations. The model has also been transferred to determine the species of hydrated biofilms studied in situ. Artificially mixed biofilms have been examined to test the spatial

  9. Lateral resolution testing of a novel developed confocal microscopic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Yunhai; Chang, Jian; Huang, Wei; Xue, Xiaojun; Xiao, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscope has been widely used in biology, medicine and material science owing to its advantages of high resolution and tomographic imaging. Based on a set of confirmatory experiments and system design, a novel confocal microscopic imaging system is developed. The system is composed of a conventional fluorescence microscope and a confocal scanning unit. In the scanning unit a laser beam coupling module provides four different wavelengths 405nm 488nm 561nm and 638nm which can excite a variety of dyes. The system works in spot-to-spot scanning mode with a two-dimensional galvanometer. A 50 microns pinhole is used to guarantee that stray light is blocked and only the fluorescence signal from the focal point can be received . The three-channel spectral splitter is used to perform fluorescence imaging at three different working wavelengths simultaneously. The rat kidney tissue slice is imaged using the developed confocal microscopic imaging system. Nucleues labeled by DAPI and kidney spherule curved pipe labeled by Alexa Fluor 488 can be imaged clearly and respectively, realizing the distinction between the different components of mouse kidney tissue. The three-dimensional tomographic imaging of mouse kidney tissue is reconstructed by several two-dimensional images obtained in different depths. At last the resolution of the confocal microscopic imaging system is tested quantitatively. The experimental result shows that the system can achieve lateral resolution priority to 230nm.

  10. Multi-spectral confocal microendoscope for in-vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew Robert

    The concept of in-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy is introduced. A slit-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) was built to demonstrate the technique. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a custom built slit-scan confocal microscope fitted with a custom built imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The design and performance of the miniature objective and focus assembly are discussed. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3mum lateral resolution and 30mum axial resolution. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible chromatic range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 7nm to 18nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersive power of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. Recent data from the grayscale imaging mode are presented. Preliminary multi-spectral results from phantoms, cell cultures, and excised human tissue are presented to demonstrate the potential of in-vivo multi-spectral imaging.

  11. Confocal imaging of butterfly tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Craig R

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular events responsible for morphological change requires the ability to examine gene expression in a wide range of organisms in addition to model systems to determine how the differences in gene expression correlate with phenotypic differences. There are approximately 12,000 species of butterflies, most, with distinct patterns on their wings. The most important tool for studying gene expression in butterflies is confocal imaging of butterfly tissue by indirect immunofluorescence using either cross-reactive antibodies from closely related species such as Drosophila or developing butterfly-specific antibodies. In this report, we describe how indirect immunofluorescence protocols can be used to visualize protein expression patterns on the butterfly wing imaginal disc and butterfly embryo.

  12. Characterization of the main error sources of chromatic confocal probes for dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouira, H; El-Hayek, N; Yuan, X; Anwer, N

    2014-01-01

    Chromatic confocal probes are increasingly used in high-precision dimensional metrology applications such as roughness, form, thickness and surface profile measurements; however, their measurement behaviour is not well understood and must be characterized at a nanometre level. This paper provides a calibration bench for the characterization of two chromatic confocal probes of 20 and 350 µm travel ranges. The metrology loop that includes the chromatic confocal probe is stable and enables measurement repeatability at the nanometer level. With the proposed system, the major error sources, such as the relative axial and radial motions of the probe with respect to the sample, the material, colour and roughness of the measured sample, the relative deviation/tilt of the probe and the scanning speed are identified. Experimental test results show that the chromatic confocal probes are sensitive to these errors and that their measurement behaviour is highly dependent on them. (paper)

  13. In vitro confocal imaging of the rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B R; Paddock, S

    1990-05-01

    We were able to observe in vitro the fine structure of the rabbit cornea using a laser scanning confocal microscope, especially in the regions between Descemet's membrane and the epithelial basal lamina. We observed submicrometre filaments throughout the stroma with high concentrations adjacent to Descemet's membrane, and found extensive interconnecting processes between stromal keratocytes. There are numerous regions containing nerve plexuses in the stroma. We found a deeply convoluted basal lamina adjacent to the epithelium, and observed regions containing junctions between endothelial cells in fluorescent images of rabbit corneas stained with the actin-specific compound fluorescein phalloidin.

  14. A low error reconstruction method for confocal holography to determine 3-dimensional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, P.B., E-mail: pbjacque@nps.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, EOW 548,800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Herring, R.A. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, EOW 548,800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    A confocal holography microscope developed at the University of Victoria uniquely combines holography with a scanning confocal microscope to non-intrusively measure fluid temperatures in three-dimensions (Herring, 1997), (Abe and Iwasaki, 1999), (Jacquemin et al., 2005). The Confocal Scanning Laser Holography (CSLH) microscope was built and tested to verify the concept of 3D temperature reconstruction from scanned holograms. The CSLH microscope used a focused laser to non-intrusively probe a heated fluid specimen. The focused beam probed the specimen instead of a collimated beam in order to obtain different phase-shift data for each scan position. A collimated beam produced the same information for scanning along the optical propagation z-axis. No rotational scanning mechanisms were used in the CSLH microscope which restricted the scan angle to the cone angle of the probe beam. Limited viewing angle scanning from a single view point window produced a challenge for tomographic 3D reconstruction. The reconstruction matrices were either singular or ill-conditioned making reconstruction with significant error or impossible. Establishing boundary conditions with a particular scanning geometry resulted in a method of reconstruction with low error referred to as 'wily'. The wily reconstruction method can be applied to microscopy situations requiring 3D imaging where there is a single viewpoint window, a probe beam with high numerical aperture, and specified boundary conditions for the specimen. The issues and progress of the wily algorithm for the CSLH microscope are reported herein. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of an optical confocal holography device to measure 3D temperature of a heated fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing of multiple holograms containing the cumulative refractive index through the fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reconstruction issues due to restricting angular scanning to the numerical aperture of the

  15. A low error reconstruction method for confocal holography to determine 3-dimensional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, P.B.; Herring, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    A confocal holography microscope developed at the University of Victoria uniquely combines holography with a scanning confocal microscope to non-intrusively measure fluid temperatures in three-dimensions (Herring, 1997), (Abe and Iwasaki, 1999), (Jacquemin et al., 2005). The Confocal Scanning Laser Holography (CSLH) microscope was built and tested to verify the concept of 3D temperature reconstruction from scanned holograms. The CSLH microscope used a focused laser to non-intrusively probe a heated fluid specimen. The focused beam probed the specimen instead of a collimated beam in order to obtain different phase-shift data for each scan position. A collimated beam produced the same information for scanning along the optical propagation z-axis. No rotational scanning mechanisms were used in the CSLH microscope which restricted the scan angle to the cone angle of the probe beam. Limited viewing angle scanning from a single view point window produced a challenge for tomographic 3D reconstruction. The reconstruction matrices were either singular or ill-conditioned making reconstruction with significant error or impossible. Establishing boundary conditions with a particular scanning geometry resulted in a method of reconstruction with low error referred to as “wily”. The wily reconstruction method can be applied to microscopy situations requiring 3D imaging where there is a single viewpoint window, a probe beam with high numerical aperture, and specified boundary conditions for the specimen. The issues and progress of the wily algorithm for the CSLH microscope are reported herein. -- Highlights: ► Evaluation of an optical confocal holography device to measure 3D temperature of a heated fluid. ► Processing of multiple holograms containing the cumulative refractive index through the fluid. ► Reconstruction issues due to restricting angular scanning to the numerical aperture of the beam. ► Minimizing tomographic reconstruction error by defining boundary

  16. Submillimeter Confocal Imaging Active Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, John; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cwik, Thomas; Rowell, Mark; Hacker, John

    2009-01-01

    The term submillimeter confocal imaging active module (SCIAM) denotes a proposed airborne coherent imaging radar system that would be suitable for use in reconnaissance, surveillance, and navigation. The development of the SCIAM would include utilization and extension of recent achievements in monolithic microwave integrated circuits capable of operating at frequencies up to and beyond a nominal radio frequency of 340 GHz. Because the SCIAM would be primarily down-looking (in contradistinction to primarily side-looking), it could be useful for imaging shorter objects located between taller ones (for example, objects on streets between buildings). The SCIAM would utilize a confocal geometry to obtain high cross-track resolution, and would be amenable to synthetic-aperture processing of its output to obtain high along-track resolution. The SCIAM (see figure) would include multiple (two in the initial version) antenna apertures, separated from each other by a cross-track baseline of suitable length (e.g., 1.6 m). These apertures would both transmit the illuminating radar pulses and receive the returns. A common reference oscillator would generate a signal at a controllable frequency of (340 GHz + (Delta)f)/N, where (Delta)f is an instantaneous swept frequency difference and N is an integer. The output of this oscillator would be fed to a frequency- multiplier-and-power-amplifier module to obtain a signal, at 340 GHz + (Delta)f, that would serve as both the carrier signal for generating the transmitted pulses and a local-oscillator (LO) signal for a receiver associated with each antenna aperture. Because duplexers in the form of circulators or transmit/receive (T/R) switches would be lossy and extremely difficult to implement, the antenna apertures would be designed according to a spatial-diplexing scheme, in which signals would be coupled in and out via separate, adjacent transmitting and receiving feed horns. This scheme would cause the transmitted and received beams

  17. Development of confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, A.R.; Huang, R.; Mass, J.; Bisulca, C.; Bilderback, D.H.; Gruner, S.; Gao, N.

    2006-01-01

    A confocal X-ray fluorescence microscope was built at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to obtain compositional depth profiles of historic paintings. The microscope consists of a single-bounce, borosilicate monocapillary optic to focus the incident beam onto the painting and a commercial borosilicate polycapillary lens to collect the fluorescent X-rays. The resolution of the microscope was measured by scanning a variety of thin metal films through this confocal volume while monitoring the fluorescence signal. The capabilities of the technique were then probed using test paint microstructures with up to four distinct layers, each having a thickness in the range of 10-80 microns. Results from confocal XRF were compared with those from stand-alone XRF and visible light microscopy of the paint cross-sections. A large area, high-resolution scanner is currently being built to perform 3D scans on moderately sized paintings. (orig.)

  18. Confocal Endomicroscopy of Colorectal Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Ussui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is one of several novel methods that provide real-time, high-resolution imaging at a micron scale via endoscopes. CLE has the potential to be a disruptive technology in that it can change the current algorithms that depend on biopsy to perform surveillance of high-risk conditions. Furthermore, it allows on-table decision making that has the potential to guide therapy in real time and reduce the need for repeated procedures. CLE and related technologies are often termed “virtual biopsy” as they simulate the images seen in traditional histology. However, the imaging of living tissue allows more than just pragmatic convenience; it also allows imaging of living tissue such as active capillary circulation, cellular death, and vascular and endothelial translocation, thus extending beyond what is capable in traditional biopsy. Immediate potential applications of CLE are to guide biopsy sampling in Barrett's esophagus and inflammatory bowel disease surveillance, evaluation of colorectal polyps, and intraductal imaging of the pancreas and bile duct. Data on these applications is rapidly emerging, and more is needed to clearly demonstrate the optimal applications of CLE. In this paper, we will focus on the role of CLE as applied to colorectal polyps detected during colonoscopy.

  19. Spatial scan statistics using elliptic windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2006-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters. This article shows that the usually applied elimination of secondary clusters as implemented in SatScan is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of a set of confocal elliptic...

  20. Confocal microscopy studies of morphology and apoptosis: ovaries, limbs, embryos and insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-stored images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ap...

  1. Confocal microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D visualizaiton of rat kidney glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  2. Confocal Microscopy of thick tissue sections: 3D Visualization of rat kidney glomeruli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as a technique capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer-acquired images as a virtual 3-dimentional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning approac...

  3. Insight into the Microbial Multicellular Lifestyle via Flow-Cell Technology and Confocal Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Sternberg, Claus; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-01

    , industry, and human health. Accordingly a number of biofilm model systems, molecular tools, microscopic techniques, and image analysis programs have been employed for the study of biofilms under controlled and reproducible conditions. Studies using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of biofilms...

  4. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: FOUNDATIONS FOR QUANTIFYING CYTOMETRIC APPLICATIONS WITH SPECTROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. The goal of a CLSM is to acquire and quantify fluorescence and in some instruments acquire spectral characterization of the emitted signal. The accuracy of these measurements demands t...

  5. An FFT-based Method for Attenuation Correction in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Bakker, M.

    1993-01-01

    A problem in three-dimensional imaging by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) in the (epi)fluorescence mode is the darkening of the deeper layers due to absorption and scattering of both the excitation and the fluorescence light. In this paper we propose a new method to correct for these

  6. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment...

  7. Aorta Fluorescence Imaging by Using Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chun-Yang; Tsai, Jui-che; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The activated leukocyte attacked the vascular endothelium and the associated increase in VEcadherin number was observed in experiments. The confocal microscopic system with a prism-based wavelength filter was used for multiwavelength fluorescence measurement. Multiwavelength fluorescence imaging based on the VEcadherin within the aorta segment of a rat was achieved. The confocal microscopic system capable of fluorescence detection of cardiovascular tissue is a useful tool for measuring the bi...

  8. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaberg, Emilie; Sabelström, Per; Strandh, Christer; Szekely, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes

  9. Confocal Microscopy for Process Monitoring and Wide-Area Height Determination of Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotube Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Piwko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Confocal microscopy is introduced as a new and generally applicable method for the characterization of the vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT forest height. With this technique process control is significantly intensified. The topography of the substrate and VACNT can be mapped with a height resolution down to 15 nm. The advantages of confocal microscopy, compared to scanning electron microscopy (SEM, are demonstrated by investigating the growth kinetics of VACNT using Al2O3 buffer layers with varying thicknesses. A process optimization using confocal microscopy for fast VACNT forest height evaluation is presented.

  10. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  11. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved.

  12. Comparison between optical techniques and confocal microscopy for defect detection on thin wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, Philip; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2004-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy (CM) are not suitable for on-line surface inspection of fine metallic wires. In the recent years, some optical techniques have been developed to be used for those tasks. However, they need a rigorous validation. In this work, we have used confocal microscopy to obtain the topography z(x,y) of wires with longitudinal defects, such as dielines. The topography has been used to predict the light scattered by the wire. These simulations have been compared with experimental results, showing a good agreement

  13. Microsphere imaging with confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung Su; An, Kyung Won; Lee, Jai Hyung

    2002-01-01

    We have acquired images of polystyrene and fused-silica microsphere by using conventional optical microscopy, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, and performed comparative analysis of these images. Different from conventional optical microscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy had good optical sectioning capability. In addition, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had better lateral resolution than conventional optical microscopy. These results are attributed to confocality and nonlinearity of confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy, respectively.

  14. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Angela C.; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Kruit, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  15. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narváez, Angela C., E-mail: a.c.narvaez@tudelft.nl, E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P., E-mail: a.c.narvaez@tudelft.nl, E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Kruit, Pieter [Imaging Physics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-06-23

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  16. Confocal microlaparoscope for imaging the fallopian tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzu-Yu; Rouse, Andrew R.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2014-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ovarian cancer can originate in the fallopian tube. Unlike many other cancers, poor access to the ovary and fallopian tubes has limited the ability to study the progression of this deadly disease and to diagnosis it during the early stage when it is most amenable to therapy. A rigid confocal microlaparoscope system designed to image the epithelial surface of the ovary in vivo was previously reported. A new confocal microlaparoscope with an articulating distal tip has been developed to enable in vivo access to human fallopian tubes. The new microlaparoscope is compatible with 5-mm trocars and includes a 2.2-mm-diameter articulating distal tip consisting of a bare fiber bundle and an automated dye delivery system for fluorescence confocal imaging. This small articulating device should enable the confocal microlaparoscope to image early stage ovarian cancer arising inside the fallopian tube. Ex vivo images of animal tissue and human fallopian tube using the new articulating device are presented along with in vivo imaging results using the rigid confocal microlaparoscope system.

  17. Performance verification of focus variation and confocal microscopes measuring tilted ultra-fine surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Baruffi, Federico; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of two optical instruments, scilicet a laser scanning confocal microscope and a focus-variation microscope, was investigated considering measurements of tilted surfaces. The measured samples were twelve steel artefacts for mould surface finish reference, covering Sa roughness...... parameter in the range (101—103) nm. The 3D surface texture parameters considered were Sa, Sq and Sdq. The small working distance of the confocal microscope objectives influenced the measurement setup, preventing from selecting a high tilting angle. The investigation was carried out comparing measurements...... of flat surfaces (0° tilt) with measurements of 12.5° tilted surfaces. The confocal microscope results showed a high sensitivity to tilting due to the laser beam reflection on the metal surfaces. The focus variation microscope results were more robust with respect to the considered angular variation...

  18. A novel method for enhancing the lateral resolution and image SNR in confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youhua; Zhu, Dazhao; Fang, Yue; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    There is always a tradeoff between the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in confocal microscopy. In particular, the pinhole size is very important for maintaining a balance between them. In this paper, we propose a method for improving the lateral resolution and image SNR in confocal microscopy without making any changes to the hardware. By using the fluorescence emission difference (FED) approach, we divide the images acquired by different pinhole sizes into one image acquired by the central pinhole and several images acquired by ring-shaped pinholes. Then, they are added together with the deconvolution method. Simulation and experimental results for fluorescent particles and cells show that our method can achieve a far better resolution than a large pinhole and a higher SNR than a small pinhole. Moreover, our method can improve the performance of classic confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to a certain extent, especially CLSM with a continuously variable pinhole.

  19. Confocal laser endomicroscopy in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Săftoiu, Adrian; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy enables real-time in vivo microscopy during endoscopy and can predict relapse in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in remission. However, little is known about how endomicroscopic features change with time. The aim of this longitudinal study...... was to correlate colonic confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) in ulcerative colitis with histopathology and macroscopic appearance before and after intensification of medical treatment. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with ulcerative colitis in clinical relapse and 7 control subjects referred for colonoscopy were...

  20. Model wavefront sensor for adaptive confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin J.; Neil, Mark A. A.; Wilson, Tony

    2000-05-01

    A confocal microscope permits 3D imaging of volume objects by the inclusion of a pinhole in the detector path which eliminates out of focus light. This configuration is however very sensitive to aberrations induced by the specimen or the optical system and would therefore benefit from an adaptive optics approach. We present a wavefront sensor capable of measuring directly the Zernike components of an aberrated wavefront and show that it is particularly applicable to the confocal microscope since only those wavefronts originating in the focal region contribute to the measured aberration.

  1. Portable oral cancer detection using a miniature confocal imaging probe with a large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youmin; Raj, Milan; McGuff, H. Stan; Bhave, Gauri; Yang, Bin; Shen, Ting; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a MEMS micromirror enabled handheld confocal imaging probe for portable oral cancer detection, where a comparatively large field of view (FOV) was generated through the programmable Lissajous scanning pattern of the MEMS micromirror. Miniaturized handheld MEMS confocal imaging probe was developed, and further compared with the desktop confocal prototype under clinical setting. For the handheld confocal imaging system, optical design simulations using CODE VR® shows the lateral and axial resolution to be 0.98 µm and 4.2 µm, where experimental values were determined to be 3 µm and 5.8 µm, respectively, with a FOV of 280 µm×300 µm. Fast Lissajous imaging speed up to 2 fps was realized with improved Labview and Java based real-time imaging software. Properties such as 3D imaging through autofocusing and mosaic imaging for extended lateral view (6 mm × 8 mm) were examined for carcinoma real-time pathology. Neoplastic lesion tissues of giant cell fibroma and peripheral ossifying fibroma, the fibroma inside the paraffin box and ex vivo gross tissues were imaged by the bench-top and handheld imaging modalities, and further compared with commercial microscope imaging results. The MEMS scanner-based handheld confocal imaging probe shows great promise as a potential clinical tool for oral cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Portable oral cancer detection using a miniature confocal imaging probe with a large field of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Youmin; Raj, Milan; Bhave, Gauri; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Xiaojing; McGuff, H. Stan; Shen, Ting

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a MEMS micromirror enabled handheld confocal imaging probe for portable oral cancer detection, where a comparatively large field of view (FOV) was generated through the programmable Lissajous scanning pattern of the MEMS micromirror. Miniaturized handheld MEMS confocal imaging probe was developed, and further compared with the desktop confocal prototype under clinical setting. For the handheld confocal imaging system, optical design simulations using CODE V R® shows the lateral and axial resolution to be 0.98 µm and 4.2 µm, where experimental values were determined to be 3 µm and 5.8 µm, respectively, with a FOV of 280 µm×300 µm. Fast Lissajous imaging speed up to 2 fps was realized with improved Labview and Java based real-time imaging software. Properties such as 3D imaging through autofocusing and mosaic imaging for extended lateral view (6 mm × 8 mm) were examined for carcinoma real-time pathology. Neoplastic lesion tissues of giant cell fibroma and peripheral ossifying fibroma, the fibroma inside the paraffin box and ex vivo gross tissues were imaged by the bench-top and handheld imaging modalities, and further compared with commercial microscope imaging results. The MEMS scanner-based handheld confocal imaging probe shows great promise as a potential clinical tool for oral cancer diagnosis and treatment. (paper)

  3. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Fluid Inclusions Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A.; Mulukutla, G.; Sahagian, D.; Bodnar, B.

    2009-05-01

    Fluid inclusions preserve valuable information regarding hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. The molar quantities of liquid and gaseous components in the inclusions can be estimated from their volumetric measurements at room temperatures combined with knowledge of the PVTX properties of the fluid and homogenization temperatures. Thus, accurate measurements of inclusion volumes and their two phase components are critical. One of the greatest advantages of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) in application to fluid inclsion analsyis is that it is affordable for large numbers of samples, given the appropriate software analysis tools and methodology. Our present work is directed toward developing those tools and methods. For the last decade LSCM has been considered as a potential method for inclusion volume measurements. Nevertheless, the adequate and accurate measurement by LSCM has not yet been successful for fluid inclusions containing non-fluorescing fluids due to many technical challenges in image analysis despite the fact that the cost of collecting raw LSCM imagery has dramatically decreased in recent years. These problems mostly relate to image analysis methodology and software tools that are needed for pre-processing and image segmentation, which enable solid, liquid and gaseous components to be delineated. Other challenges involve image quality and contrast, which is controlled by fluorescence of the material (most aqueous fluid inclusions do not fluoresce at the appropriate laser wavelengths), material optical properties, and application of transmitted and/or reflected confocal illumination. In this work we have identified the key problems of image analysis and propose some potential solutions. For instance, we found that better contrast of pseudo-confocal transmitted light images could be overlayed with poor-contrast true-confocal reflected light images within the same stack of z-ordered slices. This approach allows one to narrow

  4. Latest developments and opportunities for 3D analysis of biological samples by confocal μ-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Roberto D.; Sanchez, Hector J.; Perez, Carlos A.; Rubio, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis performed with a primary radiation focused in the micrometer range is known as micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF). It is characterized by a penetration depth higher than other micro-analytical methods, reaching hundreds of micrometers in biological samples. This characteristic of the X-ray beam can be employed in 3D analysis. An innovative method to perform 3D analysis by μ-XRF is the so-called confocal setup. The confocal setup consists of X-ray lenses in the excitation as well as in the detection channel. In this configuration, a micro-volume defined by the overlap of the foci of both X-ray lenses is analyzed. Scanning this micro-volume through the sample can be used to perform a study in three dimensions. At present, X-ray lenses used in confocal μ-XRF experiments are mainly glass capillaries and polycapillaries. Glass capillaries are used in the excitation channel with sources of high photon flux like synchrotron radiation. Half polycapillaries or conical polycapillary concentrators are used almost exclusively in the detection channel. Spatial resolution of the confocal μ-XRF depends on the dimensions of the foci of both X-ray lenses. The overlap of these foci forms an ellipsoid which is the probing volume of the confocal setup. The axis length of the probing volume reported in confocal μ-XRF experiments are of order of few tens of micrometer. In our confocal setup, we used a commercial glass monocapillary in the excitation channel and a monolithic half polycapillary in the detection channel. The polycapillary was home-made by means of drawing of multibundles of glass capillaries in a heating furnace. The experiment was carried out at the beamline D09B-XRF of the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, LNLS) using white beam. A model for the theoretical description of X-ray fluorescence intensity registered by confocal μ-XRF was introduced by Malzer and Kanngieβer [2005. A model for the

  5. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. August 2003 physics pp. 373–384. Fluorescence confocal polarizing ... and focal conic domains in flat samples of lamellar LCs are practically indistinguishable. ... or less) LC layer confined between two transparent plates. ... in studies of electro-optic effects such as the Frederiks effect, defects, surface anchoring,.

  6. Line-scanning tomographic optical microscope with isotropic transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdátsy, Gábor; Dudás, László; Erdélyi, Miklós; Szabó, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    An imaging method and optical system, referred to as a line-scanning tomographic optical microscope (LSTOM) using a combination of line-scanning technique and CT reconstruction principle, is proposed and studied theoretically and experimentally. In our implementation a narrow focus line is scanned over the sample and the reflected light is measured in a confocal arrangement. One such scan is equivalent to a transverse projection in tomography. Repeating the scanning procedure in several directions, a number of transverse projections are recorded from which the image can be obtained using conventional CT reconstruction algorithms. The resolution of the image is independent of the spatial dimensions and structure of the applied detector; furthermore, the transfer function of the system is isotropic. The imaging performance of the implemented confocal LSTOM was compared with a point-scanning confocal microscope, based on recorded images. These images demonstrate that the resolution of the confocal LSTOM exceeds (by 15%) the resolution limit of a point-scanning confocal microscope

  7. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  8. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  9. Chondrocytes provide a model for in-situ confocal microscopy and 3D reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Michelle S.; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.

    1994-04-01

    Hyaline cartilage is composed of chondrocytes that reside in lacunae surrounded by extracellular matrix molecules. Microscopic and histochemical features of cartilage have been studied with many techniques. Many of these techniques can be time consuming and may alter natural cartilage characteristics. In addition, the orientation and order of sectioned tissue must be maintained to create 3D reconstructions. We show that confocal laser scanning microscopy may replace traditional methods for studying cartilage.

  10. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Lentigo Maligna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamo, R; Pampín, A; Floristán, U

    2016-12-01

    Lentigo maligna is the most common type of facial melanoma. Diagnosis is complicated, however, as it shares clinical and dermoscopic characteristics with other cutaneous lesions of the face. Reflectance confocal microscopy is an imaging technique that permits the visualization of characteristic features of lentigo maligna. These include a disrupted honeycomb pattern and pagetoid cells with a tendency to show folliculotropism. These cells typically have a dendritic morphology, although they may also appear as round cells measuring over 20μm with atypical nuclei. Poorly defined dermal papillae and atypical cells may be seen at the dermal-epidermal junction and can form bridges resembling mitochondrial structures. Other characteristic findings include junctional swelling with atypical cells located around the follicles, resembling caput medusae. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a very useful tool for diagnosing lentigo maligna. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Fungal keratitis - improving diagnostics by confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Esben; Heegaard, S; Prause, J U

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Introducing a simple image grading system to support the interpretation of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) images in filamentous fungal keratitis. Setting: Clinical and confocal studies took place at the Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Histopathological...... analysis was performed at the Eye Pathology Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Methods: A recent series of consecutive patients with filamentous fungal keratitis is presented to demonstrate the results from in-house IVCM. Based upon our experience...... with IVCM and previously published images, we composed a grading system for interpreting IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis. Results: A recent case series of filamentous fungal keratitis from 2011 to 2012 was examined. There were 3 male and 3 female patients. Mean age was 44.5 years (range 12...

  12. Clinical applications of corneal confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tavakoli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitra Tavakoli1, Parwez Hossain2, Rayaz A Malik11Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK; 2University of Southampton, Southampton Eye Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: Corneal confocal microscopy is a novel clinical technique for the study of corneal cellular structure. It provides images which are comparable to in-vitro histochemical techniques delineating corneal epithelium, Bowman’s layer, stroma, Descemet’s membrane and the corneal endothelium. Because, corneal confocal microscopy is a non invasive technique for in vivo imaging of the living cornea it has huge clinical potential to investigate numerous corneal diseases. Thus far it has been used in the detection and management of pathologic and infectious conditions, corneal dystrophies and ecstasies, monitoring contact lens induced corneal changes and for pre and post surgical evaluation (PRK, LASIK and LASEK, flap evaluations and Radial Keratotomy, and penetrating keratoplasty. Most recently it has been used as a surrogate for peripheral nerve damage in a variety of peripheral neuropathies and may have potential in acting as a surrogate marker for endothelial abnormalities.Keywords: corneal confocal microscopy, cornea, infective keratitis, corneal dystrophy, neuropathy

  13. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang [THz Research Center, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  14. Purinergic receptors have different effects in rat exocrine pancreas. Calcium signals monitored by fura-2 using confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Nitschke, Roland; Amstrup, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic ducts have several types of purinergic P2 receptors, however, nothing is known about P2 receptors in acini. The aim was to establish whether acini express functional P2 receptors coupled to intracellular Ca2+ signals and to measure the signals ratiometrically in a confocal laser scanning...

  15. Renal scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  16. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  17. High resolution 3D confocal microscope imaging of volcanic ash particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Gill, Ian; Petford, Nick

    2017-07-15

    We present initial results from a novel high resolution confocal microscopy study of the 3D surface structure of volcanic ash particles from two recent explosive basaltic eruptions, Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grimsvötn (2011), in Iceland. The majority of particles imaged are less than 100μm in size and include PM 10 s, known to be harmful to humans if inhaled. Previous studies have mainly used 2D microscopy to examine volcanic particles. The aim of this study was to test the potential of 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy as a reliable analysis tool for these materials and if so to what degree high resolution surface and volume data could be obtained that would further aid in their classification. First results obtained using an Olympus LEXT scanning confocal microscope with a ×50 and ×100 objective lens are highly encouraging. They reveal a range of discrete particle types characterised by sharp or concave edges consistent with explosive formation and sudden rupture of magma. Initial surface area/volume ratios are given that may prove useful in subsequent modelling of damage to aircraft engines and human tissue where inhalation has occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microscopia confocal en operados de queratoplastia perforante Confocal microscopy in patients operated from penetrating keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulema Gómez Castillo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La microscopia confocal es un examen exploratorio, práctico y poco invasivo que permite conocer las características microscópicas del tejido corneal después del trasplante, por lo que constituye una herramienta muy útil en el manejo de los pacientes operados de queratoplastia. El presente trabajo tiene como finalidad describir las características del tejido corneal en pacientes operados de este tipo de trasplante, mediante la microscopia confocal in vivo. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, de corte transversal, en 40 ojos de 40 pacientes operados de queratoplastia perforante, en el Servicio de Córnea del Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer", de marzo de 2006 a marzo de 2007. Se confeccionó una historia clínica oftalmológica y se les realizó a todos el examen de microscopia confocal en el injerto corneal con el microscopio confocal CONFOSCAN 4. RESULTADOS: La queratopatía bullosa pseudofáquica fue la afección más frecuente previa a la cirugía y estuvo presente en el 77,5 % de los pacientes. En el 72,5 % de los intervenidos se encontró una disminución del grosor corneal. El epitelio presentó alteraciones en el 62,5 % de los pacientes. Todos presentaron afectación de la forma y el tamaño celular endotelial. En el 82,5 % de los pacientes se observó ausencia de plexos nerviosos. CONCLUSIONES: La microscopia confocal como nueva ciencia en el campo de la oftalmología, favorece el seguimiento evolutivo de las queratoplastias perforantes y con esto no solo a prevenir la aparición de posibles complicaciones, sino además de garantizar el éxito de la cirugía y la función refractiva de la córnea.Confocal microscopy is a practical, exploratory and less invassive examination that allows finding out the microscopic characteristics of the corneal tissue after transplantation, so it is a very useful tool for the management of patients operated from keratoplasty. The present paper was aimed at describing

  19. Confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dali; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Mao, Xinyue; Zhao, Weiqian

    2014-09-01

    A confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration is proposed to obtain a fast and accurate measurement for submicrometer pore size of nuclear track-etched membranes (NTEMs). This method facilitates the online inspection of the pore size evolution during etching. Combining confocal microscopy with super-resolution image restoration significantly improves the lateral resolution of the NTEM image, yields a reasonable circle edge-setting criterion of 0.2408, and achieves precise pore edge detection. Theoretical analysis shows that the minimum measuring diameter can reach 0.19 μm, and the root mean square of the residuals is only 1.4 nm. Edge response simulation and experiment reveal that the edge response of the proposed method is better than 80 nm. The NTEM pore size measurement results obtained by the proposed method agree well with that obtained by scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Client Perceptions of Helpfulness in Therapy: a Novel Video-Rating Methodology for Examining Process Variables at Brief Intervals During a Single Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocklin, Alexandra A; Mansell, Warren; Emsley, Richard; McEvoy, Phil; Preston, Chloe; Comiskey, Jody; Tai, Sara

    2017-11-01

    The value of clients' reports of their experiences in therapy is widely recognized, yet quantitative methodology has rarely been used to measure clients' self-reported perceptions of what is helpful over a single session. A video-rating method using was developed to gather data at brief intervals using process measures of client perceived experience and standardized measures of working alliance (Session Rating Scale; SRS). Data were collected over the course of a single video-recorded session of cognitive therapy (Method of Levels Therapy; Carey, 2006; Mansell et al., 2012). We examined the acceptability and feasibility of the methodology and tested the concurrent validity of the measure by utilizing theory-led constructs. Eighteen therapy sessions were video-recorded and clients each rated a 20-minute session of therapy at two-minute intervals using repeated measures. A multi-level analysis was used to test for correlations between perceived levels of helpfulness and client process variables. The design proved to be feasible. Concurrent validity was borne out through high correlations between constructs. A multi-level regression examined the independent contributions of client process variables to client perceived helpfulness. Client perceived control (b = 0.39, 95% CI .05 to 0.73), the ability to talk freely (b = 0.30, SE = 0.11, 95% CI .09 to 0.51) and therapist approach (b = 0.31, SE = 0.14, 95% CI .04 to 0.57) predicted client-rated helpfulness. We identify a feasible and acceptable method for studying continuous measures of helpfulness and their psychological correlates during a single therapy session.

  2. Cooperative scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  3. Confocal microscopic observation of structural changes in glass-ionomer cements and tooth interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T F; Pagliari, D; Sidhu, S K; Naasan, M A

    1998-03-01

    This study aimed to develop techniques to allow dynamic imaging of a cavity before, during and after placement of glass-ionomer restorative materials. Cavities were cut in recently extracted third molars and the teeth longitudinally sectioned. Each hemisected tooth surface was placed in green modelling compound at 90 to the optical axis of the microscope. The cavity surface was imaged using a video rate confocal microscope in conjunction with an internally focusable microscope objective. The sample on the stage was pushed up to the objective lens which 'clamped' the cover glass onto it. Water, glycerine or oil was placed below the coverglass, with oil above. Internal tooth structures were imaged by changing the internal focus of the objective. The restorative material was then placed into the cavity. Video images were stored either onto video tape or digitally, using a frame grabber, computer and mass memory storage. Software controls produced time-lapse recordings of the interface over time. Preliminary experiments have examined the placement and early maturation of conventional glass-ionomer cements and a syringeable resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Initial contact of the cement matrix and glass particles was visible as the plastic material rolled past the enamel and dentine, before making a bond. Evidence for water movement from the dentine into the cement has also been seen. After curing, the early dimensional changes in the cements due to water flux were apparent using the time-lapse facility. This new technique enables examination of developing tooth/restoration interfaces and the tracking of movement in materials.

  4. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for minimal-invasive tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenzinger, M.; Bille, J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the project ''stereotactic laser-neurosurgery'' is the development of a system for careful and minimal-invasive resection of brain tumors with ultrashort laser pulses through a thin probe. A confocal laser-scanning-microscope is integrated in the probe. In this paper, the simulation of its optical properties by a laboratory setup and the expansion by the ability for fluorescence microscopy are reported. For a valuation of the imaging properties, the point-spread-function in three dimensions and the axial depth-transfer-function were measured and thus, among other things, the resolving power and the capacity for depth discrimination were analysed. The microscope will enable intra-operative detection of tumor cells by the method of immunofluorescence. As a first model of the application in the brain, cell cultures, that fluorescein-labelled antibodies were bound to specifically, were used in this work. Due to the fluorescence signal, it was possible to detect and identify clearly the areas that had been marked in this manner, proving the suitability of the setup for minimal-invasive tumor diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Confocal fluorescence techniques in industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian; Gall, Karsten; Palo, Kaupo; Kask, Peet; Brand, Leif

    2003-06-01

    The FCS+plus family of evaluation tools for confocal fluorescence spectroscopy, which was developed during recent years, offers a comprehensive view to a series of fluorescence properties. Originating in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and using similar experimental equipment, a system of signal processing methods such as fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) was created to analyze in detail the fluctuation behavior of fluorescent particles within a small area of detection. Giving simultaneous access to molecular parameters like concentration, translational and rotational diffusion, molecular brightness, and multicolor coincidence, this portfolio was enhanced by more traditional techniques of fluorescence lifetime as well as time-resolved anisotropy determination. The cornerstones of the FCS+plus methodology will be shortly described. The inhibition of a phosphatase enzyme activity gives a comprehensive industrial application that demonstrates FCS+plus' versatility and its potential for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  6. Confocal examination of subsurface cracking in ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, Maged K

    2009-10-01

    The original ceramic surface finish and its microstructure may have an effect on crack propagation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between crack propagation and ceramic microstructure following cyclic fatigue loading, and to qualitatively evaluate and quantitatively measure the surface and subsurface crack depths of three types of ceramic restorations with different microstructures using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Twenty (8 x 4 x 2 mm(3)) blocks of AllCeram (AC), experimental ceramic (EC, IPS e.max Press), and Sensation SL (SSL) were prepared, ten glazed and ten polished of each material. Sixty antagonist enamel specimens were made from the labial surfaces of permanent incisors. The ceramic abraders were attached to a wear machine, so that each enamel specimen presented at 45 degrees to the vertical movement of the abraders, and immersed in artificial saliva. Wear was induced for 80K cycles at 60 cycles/min with a load of 40 N and 2-mm horizontal deflection. The specimens were examined for cracks at baseline, 5K, 10K, 20K, 40K, and 80K cycles. Twenty- to 30-microm deep subsurface cracking appeared in SSL, with 8 to 10 microm in AC, and 7 microm close to the margin of the wear facets in glazed EC after 5K cycles. The EC showed no cracks with increasing wear cycles. Seventy-microm deep subsurface cracks were detected in SSL and 45 microm in AC after 80K cycles. Statistically, there was significant difference among the three materials (p 0.05) in crack depth within the same ceramic material with different surface finishes. The ceramic materials with different microstructures showed different patterns of subsurface cracking.

  7. Evaluation and purchase of confocal microscopes: Numerous factors to consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purchase of a confocal microscope can be a complex and difficult decision for an individual scientist, group or evaluation committee. This is true even for scientists that have used confocal technology for many years. The task of reaching the optimal decision becomes almost i...

  8. Radionuclide scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  9. 'En face' ex vivo reflectance confocal microscopy to help the surgery of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinasse, Marine; Cinotti, Elisa; Grivet, Damien; Labeille, Bruno; Prade, Virginie; Douchet, Catherine; Cambazard, Frédéric; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe; Perrot, Jean Luc

    2017-07-01

    Ex vivo confocal microscopy is a recent imaging technique for the perioperative control of skin tumour margins. Up to date, it has been used in the fluorescence mode and with vertical sections of the specimen margins. The aim of this study was to evaluate its use in the reflectance mode and with a horizontal ('en face') scanning of the surgical specimen in a series of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid. Prospective consecutive cohort study was performed at the University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, France. Forty-one patients with 42 basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid participated in this study. Basal cell carcinomas were excised with a 2-mm-wide clinically safe margin. The surgical specimens were analysed under ex vivo confocal microscopy in the reflectance mode and with an en face scanning in order to control at a microscopic level if the margins were free from tumour invasion. Histopathogical examination was later performed in order to compare the results. Sensitivity and specificity of ex vivo confocal microscopy for the presence of tumour-free margins. Ex vivo confocal microscopy results were consistent with histopathology in all cases (tumour-free margins in 40 out of 42 samples; sensitivity and specificity of 100%). Ex vivo confocal microscopy in the reflectance mode with an 'en face' scanning can control tumour margins of eyelid basal cell carcinomas and optimize their surgical management. This procedure has the advantage on the fluorescent mode of not needing any contrast agent to examine the samples. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. 4Pi-confocal microscopy of live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, Karsten; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W.

    2002-06-01

    By coherently adding the spherical wavefronts of two opposing lenses, two-photon excitation 4Pi-confocal fluorescence microscopy has achieved three-dimensional imaging with an axial resolution 3-7 times better than confocal microscopy. So far this improvement was possible only in glycerol-mounted, fixed cells. Here we report 4Pi-confocal microscopy of watery objects and its application to the imaging of live cells. Water immersion 4Pi-confocal microscopy of membrane stained live Escherichia coli bacteria attains a 4.3 fold better axial resolution as compared to the best water immersion confocal microscope. The resolution enhancement results into a vastly improved three-dimensional representation of the bacteria. The first images of live biological samples with an all-directional resolution in the 190-280 nm range are presented here, thus establishing a new resolution benchmark in live cell microscopy.

  11. Confocal non-line-of-sight imaging based on the light-cone transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Toole, Matthew; Lindell, David B.; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2018-03-01

    How to image objects that are hidden from a camera’s view is a problem of fundamental importance to many fields of research, with applications in robotic vision, defence, remote sensing, medical imaging and autonomous vehicles. Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) imaging at macroscopic scales has been demonstrated by scanning a visible surface with a pulsed laser and a time-resolved detector. Whereas light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems use such measurements to recover the shape of visible objects from direct reflections, NLOS imaging reconstructs the shape and albedo of hidden objects from multiply scattered light. Despite recent advances, NLOS imaging has remained impractical owing to the prohibitive memory and processing requirements of existing reconstruction algorithms, and the extremely weak signal of multiply scattered light. Here we show that a confocal scanning procedure can address these challenges by facilitating the derivation of the light-cone transform to solve the NLOS reconstruction problem. This method requires much smaller computational and memory resources than previous reconstruction methods do and images hidden objects at unprecedented resolution. Confocal scanning also provides a sizeable increase in signal and range when imaging retroreflective objects. We quantify the resolution bounds of NLOS imaging, demonstrate its potential for real-time tracking and derive efficient algorithms that incorporate image priors and a physically accurate noise model. Additionally, we describe successful outdoor experiments of NLOS imaging under indirect sunlight.

  12. Quantitative comparison of X-ray fluorescence microtomography setups: Standard and confocal collimator apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukalina, M. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: marina@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Simionovici, A. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, University of Grenoble, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: alexandre.simionovici@ujf-grenoble.fr; Zaitsev, S. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zaitsev@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Vanegas, C.J. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vanegas@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru

    2007-07-15

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest for fluorescence spectroscopy, as provided by modern setups which allow 2D and 3D imaging of elemental distributions. Two directions are currently under development: the SR-based fluorescence tomography in polar scanning geometry, provided by the new generation of X-ray microprobes and the confocal scanning geometry, which can be fielded in both SR and laboratory environments. The new probes bring forth a new age in fluorescence spectrometry: high resolution, high intensity and high sensitivity which allow 3D elemental mapping of volumes. The major task now is the development of these complex tools into fully quantitative probes, reproducible and straightforward for general use. In this work we analyze two X-ray fluorescence microtomography techniques: an apparatus tomography using a confocal collimator for the data collection and a standard first generation Computed Tomography (CT) in the parallel scanning scheme. We calculate the deposited dose (amount of energy deposited and distributed in the sample during the data collection time) and find the conditions for the choice of the tomography scheme.

  13. [Revealing the chemical changes of tea cell wall induced by anthracnose with confocal Raman microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Hu, Xiao-qian; Lou, Bing-gan; He, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Healthy tea and tea infected by anthracnose were first studied by confocal Raman microscopy to illustrate chemical changes of cell wall in the present paper. Firstly, Raman spectra of both healthy and infected sample tissues were collected with spatial resolution at micron-level, and ultrastructure of healthy and infected tea cells was got from scanning electron microscope. These results showed that there were significant changes in Raman shift and Raman intensity between healthy and infected cell walls, indicating that great differences occurred in chemical compositions of cell walls between healthy and infected samples. In details, intensities at many Raman bands which were closely associated with cellulose, pectin, esters were reduced after infection, revealing that the content of chemical compounds such as cellulose, pectin, esters was decreased after infection. Subsequently, chemical imaging of both healthy and infected tea cell walls were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of cellulose and microscopic spatial structure. It was found that not only the content of cellulose was reduced greatly after infection, but also the ordered structure of cellulose was destroyed by anthracnose infection. Thus, confocal Raman microscopy was shown to be a powerful tool to detect the chemical changes in cell wall of tea caused by anthracnose without any chemical treatment or staining. This research firstly applied confocal Raman microscopy in phytopathology for the study of interactive relationship between host and pathogen, and it will also open a new way for intensive study of host-pathogen at cellular level.

  14. Ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy for fast evaluation of tumour margins during Mohs surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennàssar, A; Vilata, A; Puig, S; Malvehy, J

    2014-02-01

    Ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) enables real-time imaging of skin morphology directly in freshly excised tissue. FCM displays wide field-of-view mosaics with cellular resolution, thus enabling a rapid bedside pathology. An application of interest is rapid detection of residual basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in skin excisions during Mohs surgery. We sought to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of ex vivo imaging with FCM for the detection of residual BCC in Mohs tissue excisions, and to calculate the time invested up to the diagnosis for both FCM and frozen sections. Eighty consecutive BCCs were prospectively collected and the margins scanned with ex vivo FCM, including excisions with and without residual BCC of all major subtypes. Each mosaic was divided into two or four, resulting in 480 submosaics for study. Every confocal submosaic was assessed for the presence or absence of BCC and compared with standard frozen sections as the gold standard. Furthermore, the time spent for each technique was calculated and compared. The overall sensitivity and specificity of detecting residual BCC were 88% and 99%, respectively. Moreover, the new technique reduced by almost two-thirds the time invested when compared with the processing of a frozen section (P confocal mosaicing microscopy in fresh tissue for rapid surgical pathology, potentially to expedite and guide Mohs surgery with high accuracy. This observation is an important step towards the goal of using real-time surgical pathology for skin tumours. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavislan James M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS, 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and

  16. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and

  17. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  18. Compensation of inhomogeneous fluorescence signal distribution in 2D images acquired by confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan; Čapek, Martin; Kubínová, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 9 (2011), s. 831-838 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal laser scanning microscopy * image enhancement * morphology filters Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.792, year: 2011

  19. Cell volume and geometric parameters determination in living cells using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: David Hevia, Aida Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta Alonso-Gervós, Isabel Quirós-González, Henar M Cimadevilla, Carmen Gómez-Cordovés, Rosa M Sainz & Juan C Mayo ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a simple, easy, fast and reproducible method aimed to know the geometric parameters of living cells based on confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with 3D reconstruction software. Briefly, the method is based on intrinsic fluorescence properties of acridine orange (AO), a...

  20. Using STED and ELSM confocal microscopy for a better knowledge of fused silica polished glass interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catrin, Rodolphe; Neauport, Jerome; Taroux, Daniel; Corbineau, Thomas; Cormont, Philippe; Maunier, Cedric; Legros, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics and nature of close surface defects existing in fused silica polished optical surfaces were explored. Samples were deliberately scratched using a modified polishing process in presence of different fluorescent dyes. Various techniques including Epi-fluorescence Laser Scanning Mode (ELSM) or Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) confocal microscopy were used to measure and quantify scratches that are sometimes embedded under the polished layer. We show using a nondestructive technique that depth of the modified region extends far below the surface. Moreover cracks of 120 nm width can be present ten micrometers below the surface. (authors)

  1. Insights into esophagus tissue architecture using two-photon confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nenrong; Wang, Yue; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human esophageal mucosa were evaluated using the two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy (TPLSCM), based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The distribution of epithelial cells, muscle fibers of muscularis mucosae has been distinctly obtained. Furthermore, esophageal submucosa characteristics with cancer cells invading into were detected. The variation of collagen, elastin and cancer cells is very relevant to the pathology in esophagus, especially early esophageal cancer. Our experimental results indicate that the MPM technique has the much more advantages for label-free imaging, and has the potential application in vivo in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early esophageal cancer.

  2. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) - a new imaging technique for in situ localization of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Stepp, Herbert; Sroka, Ronald; Heide, Michael; Liedl, Bernhard; Reese, Sven; Becker, Armin J; Stief, Christian G; Kölle, Sabine

    2015-05-01

    In azoospermic patients, spermatozoa are routinely obtained by testicular sperm extraction (TESE). However, success rates of this technique are moderate, because the site of excision of testicular tissue is determined arbitrarily. Therefore the aim of this study was to establish probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) a noval biomedical imaging technique, which provides the opportunity of non-invasive, real-time visualisation of tissue at histological resolution. Using pCLE we clearly visualized longitudinal and horizontal views of the tubuli seminiferi contorti and localized vital spermatozoa. Obtained images and real-time videos were subsequently compared with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of spermatozoa and tissues, respectively. Comparative visualization of single native Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, left) and probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE, right) using Pro Flex(TM) UltraMini O after staining with acriflavine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  4. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  5. Preliminary results on the anatomy of the larval musculature of Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Thecostraca) using phalloidin staining in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the larval muscular systems in Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) was investigated by using phalloidin staining to visualize filamentous F-actin in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The larval musculature contains an anterior muscle complex associated...

  6. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Electrophoretic Detection and Confocal Microscopic Imaging of Tyrosine Nitrated Proteins in Plant Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dhara; Singh, Neha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2018-01-01

    Tyrosine nitrated proteins can be detected in plant cells electrophoretically and their distribution can be monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging. One-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D PAGE) followed by Western blotting using polyclonal antibody against 3-nitrotyrosine residues enables detection of tyrosine nitrated proteins in plant cells. Here we describe detection of tyrosine nitrated proteins in the homogenates derived from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedling cotyledons. Total soluble proteins obtained from tissue homogenates are resolved using vertical gel electrophoresis followed by their electrophoretic transfer on to a microporous membrane support for immunodetection. Spatial distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins can be visualized using an antibody against 3-nitrotyrosine residues. Immunofluorescent localization is performed by cutting 7 μm thick wax sections of tissue followed by incubation in primary anti-nitrotyrosine antibody (dilution 1:200) and secondary Cy-3 labeled anti-rabbit IgG antibody (dilution 1:1500). Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis is undertaken using argon lasers (ex: 530-550 nm and em: 570 nm) at pinhole 1. Modulation in the abundance and spatial localization of tyrosine nitrated proteins in plant tissues can be monitored using these techniques.

  8. [In Vivo Study of Chitin in Fungal Hyphae Based on Confocal Raman Microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Zhou, Bin-xiong; Hu, Xiao-qian; Sun, Chan-jun; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is an important structural polysaccharide of fungal cell wall. In this paper, aerial hyphae of Colletotrichum camelliae Massee was first studied by confocal Raman microscopy in vivo. Firstly, the optimal experimental parameters of hyphae for collecting the Raman spectra were determined, and the typical Raman spectra of hyphae, chitin standard and background were acquired. By comparing analysis, characteristic peaks of chitin were found in hyphae. Then, a region of interesting on hyphae was selected for Raman scanning. Through principal component analysis, the Raman signal of hyphae and background in the scanning area can be separated clearly. Combined with loading weight plot, two main characteristic peaks of hyphae were obtained, 1 622 cm(-1) was belong to chitin and 1 368 cm(-1) was assigned to pectic polysaccharide. Finally, two and three dimension chemical images of fungal hyphae were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of chitin in a nondestructive way.

  9. Toward real-time virtual biopsy of oral lesions using confocal laser endomicroscopy interfaced with embedded computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Patricia S P; Tandjung, Stephanus S; Movania, Muhammad Mobeen; Chiew, Wei-Ming; Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Seah, Hock-Soon; Lin, Feng; Qian, Kemao; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2012-05-01

    Oral lesions are conventionally diagnosed using white light endoscopy and histopathology. This can pose a challenge because the lesions may be difficult to visualise under white light illumination. Confocal laser endomicroscopy can be used for confocal fluorescence imaging of surface and subsurface cellular and tissue structures. To move toward real-time "virtual" biopsy of oral lesions, we interfaced an embedded computing system to a confocal laser endomicroscope to achieve a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence imaging system. A field-programmable gated array computing platform was programmed to enable synchronization of cross-sectional image grabbing and Z-depth scanning, automate the acquisition of confocal image stacks and perform volume rendering. Fluorescence imaging of the human and murine oral cavities was carried out using the fluorescent dyes fluorescein sodium and hypericin. Volume rendering of cellular and tissue structures from the oral cavity demonstrate the potential of the system for 3-D fluorescence visualization of the oral cavity in real-time. We aim toward achieving a real-time virtual biopsy technique that can complement current diagnostic techniques and aid in targeted biopsy for better clinical outcomes.

  10. Scanning holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natali, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the scanning of 1000 holograms taken in HOBC at CERN. Each hologram is triggered by an interaction in the chamber, the primary particles being pions at 340 GeV/c. The aim of the experiment is the study of charm production. The holograms, recorded on 50 mm film with the ''in line'' technique, can be analyzed by shining a parallel expanded laser beam through the film, obtaining immediately above it the real image of the chamber which can then be scanned and measured with a technique half way between emulsions and bubble chambers. The results indicate that holograms can be analyzed as quickly and reliably as in other visual techniques and that to them is open the same order of magnitude of large scale experiments

  11. Bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    Oftentimes, in managing podiatric complaints, clinical and conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient in determining a patient's problem. This is especially true in the early stages of bone infection. Bone scanning or imaging can provide additional information in the diagnosis of the disorder. However, bone scans are not specific and must be correlated with clinical, radiographic, and laboratory evaluation. In other words, bone scanning does not provide the diagnosis but is an important bit of information aiding in the process of diagnosis. The more useful radionuclides in skeletal imaging are technetium phosphate complexes and gallium citrate. These compounds are administered intravenously and are detected at specific time intervals postinjection by a rectilinear scanner with minification is used and the entire skeleton can be imaged from head to toe. Minification allows visualization of the entire skeleton in a single image. A gamma camera can concentrate on an isolated area. However, it requires multiple views to complete the whole skeletal image. Recent advances have allowed computer augmentation of the data received from radionucleotide imaging. The purpose of this chapter is to present the current radionuclides clinically useful in podiatric patients

  12. Scanning differential polarization microscope: Its use to image linear and circular differential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Maestre, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope that couples the sensitivity of single-beam measurement of circular dichroism and circular differential scattering with the simultaneous measurement of linear dichroism and linear differential scattering has been developed. The microscope uses a scanning microscope stage and single-point illumination to give the very shallow depth of field found in confocal microscopy. This microscope can operate in the confocal mode as well as in the near confocal condition that can allow one to program the coherence and spatial resolution of the microscope. This microscope has been used to study the change in the structure of chromatin during the development of sperm in Drosophila

  13. Morphology of protein polymer hybrid films studied by AFM and scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foubert, P.; Hannink, J.M.; Köhn, F.; Gronheid, R.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Feyter, de S.; Schryver, de F.C.

    2003-01-01

    Protein–polymer hybrids can act as giant monolayer-forming amphiphiles at the air–water interface. Using biotinylated polystyrene (PSb) as the hydrophobic part and streptavidin (SAv) as a hydrophilic end of the giant amphiphile, monolayer formation and subsequent deposition leads to a well defined

  14. Applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy in research into organic semiconductor thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiek, Manuela; Balzer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    At the center of opto-electronic devices are thin layers of organic semiconductors, which need to be sandwiched between planar electrodes. With the growing demand for opto-electronic devices now and in the future, new electrode materials are needed to meet the requirements of organic semiconductors...

  15. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czaniková, K.; Ilčíková, M.; Krupa, I.; Mičušík, M.; Kasák, P.; Pavlova, Ewa; Mosnáček, J.; Chorvát Jr., D.; Omastová, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2013), 104001_1-104001_10 ISSN 0964-1726 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanocomposites * multiwalled carbon nanotubes * electron microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.449, year: 2013

  16. Combined Scanning Confocal Ultrasound Diagnostic and Treatment System for Bone Quality Assessment and Fracture Healing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this study are to develop a combined diagnostic and treatment ultrasound technology for early prediction of bone disorder and guided acceleration...

  17. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    demonstrated the applicability of fluorescence CLSM for a detailed study of experimental skin irritants in vivo. Essential findings were disturbed and widened cell borders, swelling of keratinocytes by PA and induction of a parakeratotic shift by SLS with clusters of keratinocytes holding nuclei...... more complicated than reflectance CLSM and may not be applicable to any irritant. SLS applied epicutaneously interacted with the skin surface and coupling to the microscope and was thus found to be more difficult to study technically than PA. PA dissolved in isopropanol is for technical reasons...

  18. Engineered Molecular Layers For Organic Electronic Applications: A Confocal Scanning Raman Spectroscopy (CSRS) Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez-Sierra, Beynor-Antonio; Kolotovska, Viktoriia; Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio

    2011-01-01

    We present CSRS maps of magnetically modified vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) thin films forming conduction channels in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). The VOPc films with a nominal thickness of about 100 nm were produced by organic molecular beam deposition in high vacuum. During the growth conditions the substrates were exposed to a magnetic field (B) from a bar magnet. The CSRS maps revealed significant changes of the organic fields upon preparation conditions. The highest field effect mobility, electrical current and anisotropy of the CSRS-topography is achieved in layers grown with B parallel to the substrate plane, while intermediate and lowest values are achieved in devices grown with B perpendicular to the substrate and without, respectively.

  19. Dual filtered backprojection for micro-rotation confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laksameethanasan, Danai; Brandt, Sami S; Renaud, Olivier; Shorte, Spencer L

    2009-01-01

    Micro-rotation confocal microscopy is a novel optical imaging technique which employs dielectric fields to trap and rotate individual cells to facilitate 3D fluorescence imaging using a confocal microscope. In contrast to computed tomography (CT) where an image can be modelled as parallel projection of an object, the ideal confocal image is recorded as a central slice of the object corresponding to the focal plane. In CT, the projection images and the 3D object are related by the Fourier slice theorem which states that the Fourier transform of a CT image is equal to the central slice of the Fourier transform of the 3D object. In the micro-rotation application, we have a dual form of this setting, i.e. the Fourier transform of the confocal image equals the parallel projection of the Fourier transform of the 3D object. Based on the observed duality, we present here the dual of the classical filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and apply it in micro-rotation confocal imaging. Our experiments on real data demonstrate that the proposed method is a fast and reliable algorithm for the micro-rotation application, as FBP is for CT application

  20. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  1. Three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table on graphics processing units for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Woo; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-01-20

    A three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table method is proposed and implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Since the proposed method is designed to be well matched with the software and memory structures of GPUs, the number of compute-unified-device-architecture kernel function calls can be significantly reduced. This results in a great increase of the computational speed of the proposed method, allowing video-rate generation of the computer-generated hologram (CGH) patterns of 3D scenes. Experimental results reveal that the proposed method can generate 39.8 frames of Fresnel CGH patterns with 1920×1080 pixels per second for the test 3D video scenario with 12,088 object points on dual GPU boards of NVIDIA GTX TITANs, and they confirm the feasibility of the proposed method in the practical application fields of electroholographic 3D displays.

  2. Quantitative analysis of microbicide concentrations in fluids, gels and tissues using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranat Chuchuen

    Full Text Available Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Microbicide Concentrations in Fluids, Gels and Tissues Using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchuen, Oranat; Henderson, Marcus H.; Sykes, Craig; Kim, Min Sung; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Katz, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold standard LC-MS/MS data

  4. Nano-displacement measurement based on virtual pinhole confocal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Long; Kuang, Cuifang; Xue, Yi; Liu, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A virtual pinhole confocal system based on charge-coupled device (CCD) detection and image processing techniques is built to measure axial displacement with 10 nm resolution, preeminent flexibility and excellent robustness when facing spot drifting. Axial displacement of the sample surface is determined by capturing the confocal laser spot using a CCD detector and quantifying the energy collected by programmable virtual pinholes. Experiments indicate an applicable measuring range of 1000 nm (Gaussian fitting r = 0.9902) with a highly linear range of 500 nm (linear fitting r = 0.9993). A concentric subtraction algorithm is introduced to further enhance resolution. Factors affecting measuring precision, sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio are discussed using theoretical deductions and diffraction simulations. The virtual pinhole technique has promising applications in surface profiling and confocal imaging applications which require easily-customizable pinhole configurations. (paper)

  5. A Simple Model for Nonlinear Confocal Ultrasonic Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhou, Lin; Si, Li-Sheng; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2007-01-01

    A confocally and coaxially arranged pair of focused transmitter and receiver represents one of the best geometries for medical ultrasonic imaging and non-invasive detection. We develop a simple theoretical model for describing the nonlinear propagation of a confocal ultrasonic beam in biological tissues. On the basis of the parabolic approximation and quasi-linear approximation, the nonlinear Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is solved by using the angular spectrum approach. Gaussian superposition technique is applied to simplify the solution, and an analytical solution for the second harmonics in the confocal ultrasonic beam is presented. Measurements are performed to examine the validity of the theoretical model. This model provides a preliminary model for acoustic nonlinear microscopy.

  6. Fabry-Perot confocal resonator optical associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Thomas J.; Rogers, Steven K.; Vogel, George A.

    1993-03-01

    A unique optical associative memory architecture is presented that combines the optical processing environment of a Fabry-Perot confocal resonator with the dynamic storage and recall properties of volume holograms. The confocal resonator reduces the size and complexity of previous associative memory architectures by folding a large number of discrete optical components into an integrated, compact optical processing environment. Experimental results demonstrate the system is capable of recalling a complete object from memory when presented with partial information about the object. A Fourier optics model of the system's operation shows it implements a spatially continuous version of a discrete, binary Hopfield neural network associative memory.

  7. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  8. Confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker for acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, Loay; Viestenz, Arne; Schnabel, Philipp Albert; Fries, Fabian N; Hager, Tobias; SzentmÁry, Nora; Seitz, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    Acanthameoba keratitis is a serious ophthalmological condition with a potentially vision-threatening prognosis. Early diagnosis and recognition of relapse, and the detection of persistent Acanthamoeba cysts, are essential for informing the prognosis and managing the condition. We suggest the use of in vivo confocal microscopy not only to identify the early signs of relapse after keratoplasty in patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis, but also as an additional follow-up tool after antimicrobial crosslinking. This study shows that in vivo confocal microscopy is, in experienced hands, a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Clin. Anat. 31:60-63, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  10. Microscopia confocal in vivo na cistinose: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A cistinose é doença autossômica recessiva rara caracterizada pelo acúmulo do aminoácido cistina livre dentro dos lisossomos e geralmente é fatal na primeira década de vida na ausência de transplante renal. O presente estudo tem por objetivo relatar os achados da microscopia confocal in vivo em paciente adulto com cistinose infantil. O exame de microscopia confocal in vivo revelou que há diferenças quanto à intensidade de acometimento, tamanho e forma dos depósitos nas diversas camadas corneanas.

  11. An invertebrate embryologist's guide to routine processing of confocal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dassow, George

    2014-01-01

    It is almost impossible to use a confocal microscope without encountering the need to transform the raw data through image processing. Adherence to a set of straightforward guidelines will help ensure that image manipulations are both credible and repeatable. Meanwhile, attention to optimal data collection parameters will greatly simplify image processing, not only for convenience but for quality and credibility as well. Here I describe how to conduct routine confocal image processing tasks, including creating 3D animations or stereo images, false coloring or merging channels, background suppression, and compressing movie files for display.

  12. Depth-variant blind restoration with pupil-phase constraints for 3D confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadj, Saima Ben; Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Engler, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional images of confocal laser scanning microscopy suffer from a depth-variant blur, due to refractive index mismatch between the different mediums composing the system as well as the specimen, leading to optical aberrations. Our goal is to develop an image restoration method for 3D confocal microscopy taking into account the blur variation with depth. The difficulty is that optical aberrations depend on the refractive index of the biological specimen. The depth-variant blur function or the Point Spread Function (PSF) is thus different for each observation. A blind or semi-blind restoration method needs to be developed for this system. For that purpose, we use a previously developed algorithm for the joint estimation of the specimen function (original image) and the 3D PSF, the continuously depth-variant PSF is approximated by a convex combination of a set of space-invariant PSFs taken at different depths. We propose to add to that algorithm a pupil-phase constraint for the PSF estimation, given by the the optical instrument geometry. We thus define a blind estimation algorithm by minimizing a regularized criterion in which we integrate the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm allowing to include these physical constraints. We show the efficiency of this method relying on some numerical tests

  13. Chromatic confocal microscopy for multi-depth imaging of epithelial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsovsky, Cory; Shelton, Ryan; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel chromatic confocal microscope capable of volumetric reflectance imaging of microstructure in non-transparent tissue. Our design takes advantage of the chromatic aberration of aspheric lenses that are otherwise well corrected. Strong chromatic aberration, generated by multiple aspheres, longitudinally disperses supercontinuum light onto the sample. The backscattered light detected with a spectrometer is therefore wavelength encoded and each spectrum corresponds to a line image. This approach obviates the need for traditional axial mechanical scanning techniques that are difficult to implement for endoscopy and susceptible to motion artifact. A wavelength range of 590-775 nm yielded a >150 µm imaging depth with ~3 µm axial resolution. The system was further demonstrated by capturing volumetric images of buccal mucosa. We believe these represent the first microstructural images in non-transparent biological tissue using chromatic confocal microscopy that exhibit long imaging depth while maintaining acceptable resolution for resolving cell morphology. Miniaturization of this optical system could bring enhanced speed and accuracy to endomicroscopic in vivo volumetric imaging of epithelial tissue. PMID:23667789

  14. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-01-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity

  15. In vivo near-infrared dual-axis confocal microendoscopy in the human lower gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Ra, Hyejun; Qiu, Zhen; Friedland, Shai; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Loewke, Kevin; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Wang, Thomas D.; Mandella, Michael J.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared confocal microendoscopy is a promising technique for deep in vivo imaging of tissues and can generate high-resolution cross-sectional images at the micron-scale. We demonstrate the use of a dual-axis confocal (DAC) near-infrared fluorescence microendoscope with a 5.5-mm outer diameter for obtaining clinical images of human colorectal mucosa. High-speed two-dimensional en face scanning was achieved through a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner while a micromotor was used for adjusting the axial focus. In vivo images of human patients are collected at 5 frames/sec with a field of view of 362×212 μm2 and a maximum imaging depth of 140 μm. During routine endoscopy, indocyanine green (ICG) was topically applied a nonspecific optical contrasting agent to regions of the human colon. The DAC microendoscope was then used to obtain microanatomic images of the mucosa by detecting near-infrared fluorescence from ICG. These results suggest that DAC microendoscopy may have utility for visualizing the anatomical and, perhaps, functional changes associated with colorectal pathology for the early detection of colorectal cancer.

  16. In vivo confocal microscopy of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnifili, Luca; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Fasanella, Vincenzo; Di Staso, Silvio; Mastropasqua, Alessandra; Brescia, Lorenza; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2014-07-29

    To investigate modifications with aging of the presence, distribution and morphologic features of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) in healthy human subjects using laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). A total of 108 (age range, 17-75 years) subjects were enrolled. In vivo confocal microscopy of the tarsal and bulbar conjunctiva, and impression cytology (IC) with CD3 (intra-epithelial T-lymphocytes) and CD20 (intra-epithelial B-lymphocytes) antibody immunofluorescence staining were performed. The main outcomes were subepithelial lymphocyte density (LyD), follicular density (FD), and follicular area (FA). The secondary outcomes were follicular reflectivity (FR), and lymphocyte density (FLyD), and CD3 and CD20 positivity. Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue was observed in all subjects (97% only superior and 3% in both superior and inferior tarsum). Lymphocyte density ranged from 7.8 to 165.8 cells/mm(2) (46.42 [18.37]; mean [SD]), FD from 0.5 to 19.4 follicles/mm(2) (5.3 [3.6]), and FA from 1110 to 96,280 mm(2) (26,440 [26,280]). All three parameters showed a highly significant inverse cubic relationship with age (P lymphoid structures. These modifications may account for the decrease of mucosal immune response and increase of ocular surface diseases in the elderly. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Multicolor probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: a new world for in vivo and real-time cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Tom; Doussoux, François; Cazaux, Matthieu; Schmid, Guillaume; Linard, Nicolas; Durin, Marie-Amélie; Gharbi, Hédi; Lacombe, François

    2013-03-01

    Since its inception in the field of in vivo imaging, endomicroscopy through optical fiber bundles, or probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (pCLE), has extensively proven the benefit of in situ and real-time examination of living tissues at the microscopic scale. By continuously increasing image quality, reducing invasiveness and improving system ergonomics, Mauna Kea Technologies has turned pCLE not only into an irreplaceable research instrument for small animal imaging, but also into an accurate clinical decision making tool with applications as diverse as gastrointestinal endoscopy, pulmonology and urology. The current implementation of pCLE relies on a single fluorescence spectral band making different sources of in vivo information challenging to distinguish. Extending the pCLE approach to multi-color endomicroscopy therefore appears as a natural plan. Coupling simultaneous multi-laser excitation with minimally invasive, microscopic resolution, thin and flexible optics, allows the fusion of complementary and valuable biological information, thus paving the way to a combination of morphological and functional imaging. This paper will detail the architecture of a new system, Cellvizio Dual Band, capable of video rate in vivo and in situ multi-spectral fluorescence imaging with a microscopic resolution. In its standard configuration, the system simultaneously operates at 488 and 660 nm, where it automatically performs the necessary spectral, photometric and geometric calibrations to provide unambiguously co-registered images in real-time. The main hardware and software features, including calibration procedures and sub-micron registration algorithms, will be presented as well as a panorama of its current applications, illustrated with recent results in the field of pre-clinical imaging.

  18. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  19. Evaluation and purchase of confocal microscopes: numerous factors to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Robert M; Chua, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The purchase of a confocal microscope is a difficult decision. Many factors need to be considered, which include hardware, software, company, support, service, and price. These issues are discussed to help guide the purchasing process. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonlinear Image Restoration in Confocal Microscopy : Stability under Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we study the noise stability of iterative algorithms developed for attenuation correction in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy using FT methods. In each iteration the convolution of the previous estimate is computed. It turns out that the estimators are robust to noise perturbation.

  2. Confocal stereology: an efficient tool for measurement of microscopic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 1 (2015), s. 13-28 ISSN 0302-766X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : 3-D images * confocal microscopy * geometrical characteristics * spatial probes * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.948, year: 2015

  3. Improvement in volume estimation from confocal sections after image deconvolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Difato, Francesco; Mazzone, F.; Scaglione, S.; Fato, M.; Beltrame, F.; Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří; Ramoino, P.; Vicidomini, G.; Diaspro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2004), s. 151-155 ISSN 1059-910X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : confocal microscopy * image deconvolution * point spread function Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2004

  4. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum of tobacco cells using confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radochová, Barbora; Janáček, Jiří; Schwarzerová, K.; Demjénová, E.; Tomori, Z.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 11 (2005), s. 181-185 ISSN 1580-3139 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * endoplasmic reticulum * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  5. Volumetry of human taste buds using laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, T; Srur, E; Stachs, O; Pau, H W

    2009-10-01

    In vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy is a relatively new, non-invasive method for assessment of oral cavity epithelia. The penetration depth of approximately 200-400 microm allows visualisation of fungiform papillae and their taste buds. This paper describes the technique of in vivo volumetry of human taste buds. Confocal laser scanning microscopy used a diode laser at 670 nm for illumination. Digital laser scanning confocal microscopy equipment consisted of the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph HRTII and the Rostock Cornea Module. Volume scans of fungiform papillae were used for three-dimensional reconstruction of the taste bud. This technique supplied information on taste bud structure and enabled measurement and calculation of taste bud volume. Volumetric data from a 23-year-old man over a nine-day period showed only a small deviation in values. After three to four weeks, phenomenological changes in taste bud structures were found (i.e. a significant increase in volume, followed by disappearance of the taste bud and appearance of a new taste bud). The data obtained indicate the potential application of this non-invasive imaging modality: to evaluate variation of taste bud volume in human fungiform papillae with ageing; to study the effects of chorda tympani nerve transection on taste bud volume; and to demonstrate recovery of taste buds in patients with a severed chorda tympani nerve who show recovery of gustatory sensibility after surgery.

  6. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M.; Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A.; Giammatteo, M.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S.; L'Aquila Univ., L'Aquila

    2000-01-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F3+ and F2 aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations [it

  7. Magnetically Triggered Release From Giant Unilamellar Vesicles: Visualization By Means Of Confocal Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Nappini, Silvia

    2011-04-07

    Magnetically triggered release from magnetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) loaded with Alexa fluorescent dye was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) under a low-frequency alternating magnetic field (LF-AMF). Core/shell cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MP@SiO 2(RITC)) were prepared and adsorbed on the GUV membrane. The MP@SiO 2(RITC) location and distribution on giant lipid vesicles were determined by 3D-CLSM projections, and their effect on the release properties and GUV permeability under a LF-AMF was investigated by CLSM time-resolved experiments. We show that the mechanism of release of the fluorescent dye during the LF-AMF exposure is induced by magnetic nanoparticle energy and mechanical vibration, which promote the perturbation of the GUV membrane without its collapse. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Methods of Hematoxylin and Erosin Image Information Acquisition and Optimization in Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Woong Bae; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Kwang Gi; Choi, Yongdoo; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-07-01

    We produced hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining-like color images by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which can obtain the same or more information in comparison to conventional tissue staining. We improved images by using several image converting techniques, including morphological methods, color space conversion methods, and segmentation methods. An image obtained after image processing showed coloring very similar to that in images produced by H&E staining, and it is advantageous to conduct analysis through fluorescent dye imaging and microscopy rather than analysis based on single microscopic imaging. The colors used in CLSM are different from those seen in H&E staining, which is the method most widely used for pathologic diagnosis and is familiar to pathologists. Computer technology can facilitate the conversion of images by CLSM to be very similar to H&E staining images. We believe that the technique used in this study has great potential for application in clinical tissue analysis.

  9. Electric field and energy of a point electric charge between confocal hyperbolaidal electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley-Koo, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2001-06-01

    The electric potential and intensity field, as well as the energy of a point electric charge between confocal hyperboloidal electrodes is evaluated as a superposition of prolate spheroidal harmonics using the Green-function technique. This study is motivated by the need to model the electric field between the tip and the sample in a scanning tunnelling microscope, and it can also be applied to a conductor-insulator-conductor junction. [Spanish] Los campos de potencial y de intensidad electrica, asi como la energia de una carga electrica puntual entre electrodos hiperboloidales confocales se evaluan como superposiciones de armonicos esferoidales prolatos usando la tecnica de la funcion de Green. Este estudio ha sido motivado por la necesidad de modelar el campo electrico entre la punta y la muestra de un microscopio de tunelamiento y barrido, y se puede aplicar tambien a una union de conductor-aislante-conductor.

  10. Detecting plant silica fibres in animal tissue by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, M J; Smith, R J; van Blaaderen, A; Crafton, T; O'Neill, C H

    1994-04-01

    Silica fibres from the inflorescence bracts of the grass Phalaris canariensis L. cause dermatitis, and have been implicated in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer in northeastern Iran. Here we describe a method for labelling these fibres so that they can be located in mammalian tissue. Fluorescein was covalently linked to isolated, purified fibres with the silane coupling agent 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane. The labelled hairs were then rubbed into the backs of mice. These were later killed and their skin fixed, stained and sliced at a thickness of 250 microns. A confocal laser scanning microscope gave brilliant images of the fibres at any depth up to 100 microns or more beneath the surface of the slice. Fibres penetrated deeply into the dermis. Several cubic millimetres of tissue could be surveyed in 1 h. The number of fibres present was approximately 2 mm-3 initially, falling to 0.1 mm-3 after 7 days.

  11. Confocal micro-PIV measurement of droplet formation in a T-shaped micro-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, M; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T; Oshima, M

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate a mechanism of microdroplet formation using 'multicolor confocal micro particle image velocimetry (PIV)' technique. The present system can measure dynamical behavior of multiphase flow separately and simultaneously. It also enables to identify the interactions between two immiscible fluids. We have applied this system to measure the water droplet formation at a micro T-shaped junction. We have also succeeded in dispersing fluorescent tracer particles into both phases. The interaction between the internal flow of to-be-dispersed water phase and of continuous oil phase is measured as a liquid-liquid multiphase flow. As a result of PIV measurement and interface scanning, the relationship between flow structure of each phase and interface shape is clarified. It indicates that the gap between the tip of to-be-dispersed phase and capillary wall, and interface area play an important role in the flow structure and shear stress on the interface.

  12. Measurement of chemical and geometrical surface changes in a wear track by a confocal height sensor and confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winogrodzka, A.; Valefi, Mahdiar; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical and chemical changes in the wear track can cause a drift in friction level. In this paper, chemical and geometrical surface changes in wear tracks are analyzed. For this, a setup with a confocal height sensor was developed to measure the local height changes on the wear track, combined

  13. Surface profile measurement by using the integrated Linnik WLSI and confocal microscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chung; Shen, Ming-Hsing; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Yu, Yun-Ting; Wang, Tzu-Fong

    2017-06-01

    The white-light scanning interferometer (WLSI) and confocal microscope (CM) are the two major optical inspection systems for measuring three-dimensional (3D) surface profile (SP) of micro specimens. Nevertheless, in practical applications, WLSI is more suitable for measuring smooth and low-slope surfaces. On the other hand, CM is more suitable for measuring uneven-reflective and low-reflective surfaces. As for aspect of surface profiles to be measured, the characteristics of WLSI and CM are also different. WLSI is generally used in semiconductor industry while CM is more popular in printed circuit board industry. In this paper, a self-assembled multi-function optical system was integrated to perform Linnik white-light scanning interferometer (Linnik WLSI) and CM. A connecting part composed of tubes, lenses and interferometer was used to conjunct finite and infinite optical systems for Linnik WLSI and CM in the self-assembled optical system. By adopting the flexibility of tubes and lenses, switching to perform two different optical measurements can be easily achieved. Furthermore, based on the shape from focus method with energy of Laplacian filter, the CM was developed to enhance the on focal information of each pixel so that the CM can provide all-in-focus image for performing the 3D SP measurement and analysis simultaneously. As for Linnik WLSI, eleven-step phase shifting algorithm was used to analyze vertical scanning signals and determine the 3D SP.

  14. Femtosecond laser subsurface scleral treatment in cadaver human sclera and evaluation using two-photon and confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yan, Ying; Lian, Fuqiang; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide and is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Partial-thickness drainage channels can be created with femtosecond laser in the translucent sclera for the potential treatment of glaucoma. We demonstrate the creation of partial-thickness subsurface drainage channels with the femtosecond laser in the cadaver human eyeballs and describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in cadaver human eyes. A femtosecond laser operating at a wavelength of 1700 nm was scanned along a rectangular raster pattern to create the partial thickness subsurface drainage channels in the sclera of cadaver human eyes. Analysis of the dimensions and location of these channels is important in understanding their effects. We describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in cadaver human eyes. High-resolution images, hundreds of microns deep in the sclera, were obtained to allow determination of the shape and dimension of such partial thickness subsurface scleral channels. Our studies suggest that the confocal and two-photon microscopy can be used to investigate femtosecond-laser created partial-thickness drainage channels in the sclera of cadaver human eyes.

  15. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo [Beijing Normal University, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Lin, Xue [Northwest University, School of Cultural Heritage, Xi' an (China)

    2016-09-15

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces. (orig.)

  16. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo; Lin, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces. (orig.)

  17. GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated GPU accelerated real-time confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on the analog mean-delay (AMD) method. Our algorithm was verified for various fluorescence lifetimes and photon numbers. The GPU processing time was faster than the physical scanning time for images up to 800 × 800, and more than 149 times faster than a single core CPU. The frame rate of our system was demonstrated to be 13 fps for a 200 × 200 pixel image when observing maize vascular tissue. This system can be utilized for observing dynamic biological reactions, medical diagnosis, and real-time industrial inspection. PMID:28018724

  18. A deep view in cultural heritage - confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy for depth resolved elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanngiesser, B.; Malzer, W.; Mantouvalou, I.; Sokaras, D.; Karydas, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) techniques have been developed mostly for the elemental analysis of homogeneous bulk or very simple layered materials. Further on, the microprobe version of both techniques is applied for 2D elemental mapping of surface heterogeneities. At typical XRF/PIXE fixed geometries and exciting energies (15-25 keV and 2-3 MeV, respectively), the analytical signal (characteristic X-ray radiation) emanates from a variable but rather extended depth within the analyzed material, according to the exciting probe energy, set-up geometry, specimen matrix composition and analyte. Consequently, the in-depth resolution offered by XRF and PIXE techniques is rather limited for the characterization of materials with micrometer-scale stratigraphy or 3D heterogeneous structures. This difficulty has been over-passed to some extent in the case of an X-ray or charged particle microprobe by creating the so-called confocal geometry. The field of view of the X-ray spectrometer is spatially restricted by a polycapillary X-ray lens within a sensitive microvolume formed by the two inter-sectioned focal regions. The precise scanning of the analyzed specimen through the confocal microvolume results in depth-sensitive measurements, whereas the additional 2D scanning microprobe possibilities render to element-specific 3D spatial resolution (3D micro-XRF and 3D micro-PIXE). These developments have contributed since 2003 to a variety of fields of applications in environmental, material and life sciences. In contrast to other elemental imaging methods, no size restriction of the objects investigated and the non-destructive character of analysis have been found indispensable for cultural heritage (CH) related applications. The review presents a summary of the experimental set-up developments at synchrotron radiation beamlines, particle accelerators and desktop spectrometers that have driven methodological developments and

  19. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  20. Optical sectioning using a digital Fresnel incoherent-holography-based confocal imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Roy; Katz, Barak; Rosen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of confocal microscope using Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH). Presented here is a confocal configuration of FINCH using a phase pinhole and point illumination that is able to suppress out-of-focus information from the recorded hologram and hence combine the super-resolution capabilities of FINCH with the sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy. PMID:26413560

  1. Optical sectioning using a digital Fresnel incoherent-holography-based confocal imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Kelner, Roy; Katz, Barak; Rosen, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new type of confocal microscope using Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH). Presented here is a confocal configuration of FINCH using a phase pinhole and point illumination that is able to suppress out-of-focus information from the recorded hologram and hence combine the super-resolution capabilities of FINCH with the sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy.

  2. EUS-Guided Needle-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an excellent tool for imaging the gastrointestinal tract, as well as surrounding structures. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become the standard of care for the tissue sampling of a variety of masses and lymph nodes within and around...... the gut, providing further diagnostic and staging information. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel endoscopic method that enables imaging at a subcellular level of resolution during endoscopy, allowing up to 1000-fold magnification of tissue and providing an optical biopsy. A new procedure...... that has been developed in the past few years is needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), which involves a mini-CLE probe that can be passed through a 1 9-gauge needle during EUS-FNA. This enables the real-time visualization of tissue at a microscopic level, with the potential to further improve...

  3. Assessment of nerve ultrastructure by fibre-optic confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushway, T R; Lanzetta, M; Cox, G; Trickett, R; Owen, E R

    1996-01-01

    Fibre-optic technology combined with confocality produces a microscope capable of optical thin sectioning. In this original study, tibial nerves have been stained in a rat model with a vital dye, 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide, and analysed by fibre-optic confocal microscopy to produce detailed images of nerve ultrastructure. Schwann cells, nodes of Ranvier and longitudinal myelinated sheaths enclosing axons were clearly visible. Single axons appeared as brightly staining longitudinal structures. This allowed easy tracing of multiple signal axons within the nerve tissue. An accurate measurement of internodal lengths was easily accomplished. This technique is comparable to current histological techniques, but does not require biopsy, thin sectioning or tissue fixing. This study offers a standard for further in vivo microscopy, including the possibility of monitoring the progression of nerve regeneration following microsurgical neurorraphy.

  4. Inverted follicular keratosis: dermoscopic and reflectance confocal microscopic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot-Carbo, M; Abrego, A; Gonzalez, T; Alarcon, I; Alos, L; Carrera, C; Malvehy, J; Puig, S

    2013-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis (IFK) is a rare benign tumor which usually appears as a firm papule on the face. The diagnosis is generally made by histopathology because the clinical appearance is difficult to differentiate from other lesions. Dermoscopic features of IFK have not been established to date. Herein we describe the dermoscopic findings of 4 cases of IFK. Radial peripheral hairpin vessels surrounded by a whitish halo arranged around a central white-yellowish amorphous area were observed in 3 cases, and glomerular vessels were present in the central area of one of them. The fourth case also presented a central white amorphous area but showed arborizing vessels. Reflectance confocal microscopy (available in 1 case) revealed a broadened honeycomb pattern, epidermal projections and hairpin and glomerular vessels. To our knowledge this is the first case series describing the dermoscopic features of inverted follicular keratosis and the first confocal microscopy description of this entity.

  5. Confocal Microscope Alignment of Nanocrystals for Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitra, Loren; Watari, Moyu; Matsuura, Takashi; Shimamoto, Naonobu; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    We have installed and tested an Olympus LEXT confocal microscope at the 34-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The beamline is for Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXD) experiments in which a nanometre-sized crystal is aligned inside a focussed X-ray beam. The microscope was required for three-dimensional (3D) sample alignment to get around sphere-of-confusion issues when locating Bragg peaks in reciprocal space. In this way, and by use of strategic sample preparations, we have succeeded in measuring six Bragg peaks from a single 200 nm gold crystal and obtained six projections of its internal displacement field. This enables the clear identification of stacking-fault bands within the crystal. The confocal alignment method will allow a full determination of the strain tensor provided three or more Bragg reflections from the same crystal are found.

  6. Design considerations of a real-time clinical confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1991-06-01

    A real-time clinical confocal light microscope provides the ophthalmologist with a new tool for the observation of the cornea and the ocular lens. In addition, the ciliary body, the iris, and the sclera can be observed. The real-time light microscopic images have high contrast and resolution. The transverse resolution is about one half micron and the range resolution is one micron. The following observations were made with visible light: corneal epithelial cells, wing cells, basal cells, Bowman's membrane, nerve fibers, basal lamina, fibroblast nuclei, Descemet's membrane, endothelial cells. Observation of the in situ ocular lens showed lens capsule, lens epithelium, lens fibrils, the interior of lens fibrils. The applications of the confocal microscope include: eye banking, laser refractive surgery, observation of wound healing, observation of the iris, the sciera, the ciliary body, the ocular lens, and the intraocular lens. Digital image processing can produce three-dimensional reconstructions of the cornea and the ocular lens.

  7. Three dimensional subsurface elemental identification of minerals using confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Seshadri, Srivatsan; Havrilla, George J.; Yuan, Xiaoli; Feser, Michael; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Current non-destructive elemental characterization methods, such as scanning electron microscopy-based energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (MXRF), are limited to either elemental identification at the surface (SEM–EDS) or suffer from an inability to discriminate between surface or depth information (MXRF). Thus, a non-destructive elemental characterization of individual embedded particles beneath the surface is impossible with either of these techniques. This limitation can be overcome by using laboratory-based 3D confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (confocal MXRF). This technique utilizes focusing optics on the X-ray source and detector which allows for spatial discrimination in all three dimensions. However, the voxel-by-voxel serial acquisition of a 3D elemental scan can be very time-intensive (~ 1 to 4 weeks) if it is necessary to locate individual embedded particles of interest. As an example, if each point takes a 5 s measurement time, a small volume of 50 × 50 × 50 pixels leads to an acquisition time of approximately 174 h, not including sample stage movement time. Initially screening the samples for particles of interest using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) can significantly reduce the time required to spatially locate these particles. Once located, these individual particles can be elementally characterized with confocal MXRF. Herein, we report the elemental identification of high atomic number surface and subsurface particles embedded in a mineralogical matrix by coupling micro-CT and confocal MXRF. Synergistically, these two X-ray based techniques first rapidly locate and then elementally identify individual subsurface particles. - Highlights: • Coupling of confocal X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray computed tomography • Qualitative elemental identification of surface and subsurface mineral particles • Non-destructive particle size measurements • Utilization of

  8. Three dimensional subsurface elemental identification of minerals using confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, Nikolaus L., E-mail: ncordes@lanl.gov [Polymers and Coatings Group, Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Seshadri, Srivatsan, E-mail: srivatsan.seshadri@zeiss.com [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Havrilla, George J. [Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering, Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yuan, Xiaoli [Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre, University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Brisbane, QLD 4068 (Australia); Feser, Michael [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Patterson, Brian M. [Polymers and Coatings Group, Material Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current non-destructive elemental characterization methods, such as scanning electron microscopy-based energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (MXRF), are limited to either elemental identification at the surface (SEM–EDS) or suffer from an inability to discriminate between surface or depth information (MXRF). Thus, a non-destructive elemental characterization of individual embedded particles beneath the surface is impossible with either of these techniques. This limitation can be overcome by using laboratory-based 3D confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (confocal MXRF). This technique utilizes focusing optics on the X-ray source and detector which allows for spatial discrimination in all three dimensions. However, the voxel-by-voxel serial acquisition of a 3D elemental scan can be very time-intensive (~ 1 to 4 weeks) if it is necessary to locate individual embedded particles of interest. As an example, if each point takes a 5 s measurement time, a small volume of 50 × 50 × 50 pixels leads to an acquisition time of approximately 174 h, not including sample stage movement time. Initially screening the samples for particles of interest using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) can significantly reduce the time required to spatially locate these particles. Once located, these individual particles can be elementally characterized with confocal MXRF. Herein, we report the elemental identification of high atomic number surface and subsurface particles embedded in a mineralogical matrix by coupling micro-CT and confocal MXRF. Synergistically, these two X-ray based techniques first rapidly locate and then elementally identify individual subsurface particles. - Highlights: • Coupling of confocal X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray computed tomography • Qualitative elemental identification of surface and subsurface mineral particles • Non-destructive particle size measurements • Utilization of

  9. Reflectance confocal microscopy features of thin versus thick melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardynal, Agnieszka; Olszewska, Małgorzata; de Carvalho, Nathalie; Walecka, Irena; Pellacani, Giovanni; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2018-01-24

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) plays an increasingly important role in differential diagnosis of melanoma. The aim of the study was to assess typical confocal features of thin (≤1mm according to Breslow index) versus thick (>1mm) melanomas. 30 patients with histopathologically confirmed cutaneous melanoma were included in the study. Reflectance confocal microscopy was performed with Vivascope equipment prior to excision. Fifteen melanomas were thin (Breslow thickness ≤ 1mm) and 15 were thick melanomas (Breslow thickness >1mm). In the RCM examination, the following features were more frequently observed in thin compared to thick melanomas: edged papillae (26.7% vs 0%, p=0.032) and areas with honeycomb or cobblestone pattern (33.3% vs 6.7%, p=0.068). Both features are present in benign melanocytic lesions, so in melanoma are good prognostic factors. The group of thick melanomas compared to the group of thin melanomas in the RCM images presented with greater frequency of roundish cells (100% vs 40%, p=0.001), non-edged papillae (100% vs 60%, p=0.006), numerous pagetoid cells (73.3% vs 33.3%, p=0.028), numerous atypical cells at dermal-epidermal junction (53.3% vs 20%, p=0.058) and epidermal disarray (93.3% vs 66.7%, p=0.068). Non-invasive imaging methods helps in deepening of knowledge about the evolution and biology of melanoma. The most characteristic features for thin melanomas in confocal examination are: fragments of cobblestone or honeycomb pattern and edged papillae (as good prognostic factors). The features of thick melanomas in RCM examination are: roundish cells, non-edged papillae, numerous pagetoid cells at dermal-epidermal junction and epidermal disarray.

  10. Confocal endomicroscopy: Is it time to move on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Medranda, Carlos

    2016-01-10

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy permits in-vivo microscopy evaluation during endoscopy procedures. It can be used in all the parts of the gastrointestinal tract and includes: Esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, biliary tract through and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and pancreas through needles during endoscopic ultrasound procedures. Many researches demonstrated a high correlation of results between confocal laser endomicroscopy and histopathology in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal lesions; with accuracy in about 86% to 96%. Moreover, in spite that histopathology remains the gold-standard technique for final diagnosis of any diseases; a considerable number of misdiagnosis rate could be present due to many factors such as interpretation mistakes, biopsy site inaccuracy, or number of biopsies. Theoretically; with the diagnostic accuracy rates of confocal laser endomicroscopy could help in a daily practice to improve diagnosis and treatment management of the patients. However, it is still not routinely used in the clinical practice due to many factors such as cost of the procedure, lack of codification and reimbursement in some countries, absence of standard of care indications, availability, physician image-interpretation training, medico-legal problems, and the role of the pathologist. These limitations are relative, and solutions could be found based on new researches focused to solve these barriers.

  11. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. © 2015 Hayashi and Okada. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. The challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, A; Chen, J; Yang, C; Ding, Y; Zeng, Q; Tan, L

    2018-05-24

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common skin tumors seen by dermatologists. It should be differentiated with many diseases, especially skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been applied for evaluation of SK. There are a few studies that describe the RCM of SK. The aim of the study was to find the challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. A total of 390 patients with a clinical suspicious diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis were enrolled in this study, and lesions from each patient were imaged with RCM. Thirty-seven of these patients performed a biopsy in order to be given a histological diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of RCM diagnosis and histological diagnosis, and then found the RCM characteristics of biopsy-proven lesions. According to RCM images, 258 of 390 (66.2%) patients were diagnosed with SK, 97 of 390 (24.9%) patients could not be diagnosed by the dermatologist according to RCM. Of all 37 biopsied lesions, 23 were SK, 6 were actinic keratosis, 2 were basal cell carcinoma, and 2 were squamous cell carcinoma. It is challenge to diagnose seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. It may due to the variable clinical and RCM appearances of SK, and limited depth of RCM. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ex vivo confocal microscopy: a new diagnostic technique for mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, A; Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Perrot, J L; Cambazard, F

    2016-05-01

    Skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscopy (EVCM) has so far mainly been employed to identify cutaneous tumours on freshly excised samples. We present two cases where EVCM has been used to diagnose cutaneous mucormycosis. The skin biopsies were evaluated by the skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscope VivaScope 2500(®) (MAVIG GmbH, Munich Germany) under both reflectance and fluorescence mode. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination were later performed. Mucormycetes observed by EVCM presented as hyper-reflective elongated 20 μm in diameter structures with perpendicular ramifications. Fungi were found both under reflectance and fluorescence mode and were better visible with acridine orange under fluorescence EVCM. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination found the same elongated and branching structures confirming the presence of Mucormycetes. Ex vivo confocal microscopy has both the advantages of being fast as the direct optical examination, and to be able to show the localisation of the fungi in the tissue like the histological examination. In our cases, EVCM allowed to rapidly confirm the clinical diagnosis of mucormycosis, which is essential for the treatment of this fungal infection. Further studies are needed to compare the performance of EVCM with the findings of conventional histological and mycological examinations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Confocal fluorometer for diffusion tracking in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, D.; Zilioli, A.; Tan, N.; Buttenschoen, K.; Chikkanna, B.; Reynolds, J.; Marsden, B.; Hughes, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the development of a non-contacting instrument, called fScan, based on scanning confocal fluorometry for assessing the diffusion of materials through a tissue matrix. There are many areas in healthcare diagnostics and screening where it is now widely accepted that the need for new quantitative monitoring technologies is a major pinch point in patient diagnostics and in vitro testing. With the increasing need to interpret 3D responses this commonly involves the need to track the diffusion of compounds, pharma-active species and cells through a 3D matrix of tissue. Methods are available but to support the advances that are currently only promised, this monitoring needs to be real-time, non-invasive, and economical. At the moment commercial meters tend to be invasive and usually require a sample of the medium to be removed and processed prior to testing. This methodology clearly has a number of significant disadvantages. fScan combines a fiber based optical arrangement with a compact, free space optical front end that has been integrated so that the sample's diffusion can be measured without interference. This architecture is particularly important due to the "wet" nature of the samples. fScan is designed to measure constructs located within standard well plates and a 2-D motion stage locates the required sample with respect to the measurement system. Results are presented that show how the meter has been used to evaluate movements of samples through collagen constructs in situ without disturbing their kinetic characteristics. These kinetics were little understood prior to these measurements.

  15. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  16. 3D Image Analysis of Geomaterials using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulukutla, G.; Proussevitch, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2009-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is one of the most significant advances in optical microscopy of the last century. It is widely used in biological sciences but its application to geomaterials lingers due to a number of technical problems. Potentially the technique can perform non-invasive testing on a laser illuminated sample that fluoresces using a unique optical sectioning capability that rejects out-of-focus light reaching the confocal aperture. Fluorescence in geomaterials is commonly induced using epoxy doped with a fluorochrome that is impregnated into the sample to enable discrimination of various features such as void space or material boundaries. However, for many geomaterials, this method cannot be used because they do not naturally fluoresce and because epoxy cannot be impregnated into inaccessible parts of the sample due to lack of permeability. As a result, the confocal images of most geomaterials that have not been pre-processed with extensive sample preparation techniques are of poor quality and lack the necessary image and edge contrast necessary to apply any commonly used segmentation techniques to conduct any quantitative study of its features such as vesicularity, internal structure, etc. In our present work, we are developing a methodology to conduct a quantitative 3D analysis of images of geomaterials collected using a confocal microscope with minimal amount of prior sample preparation and no addition of fluorescence. Two sample geomaterials, a volcanic melt sample and a crystal chip containing fluid inclusions are used to assess the feasibility of the method. A step-by-step process of image analysis includes application of image filtration to enhance the edges or material interfaces and is based on two segmentation techniques: geodesic active contours and region competition. Both techniques have been applied extensively to the analysis of medical MRI images to segment anatomical structures. Preliminary analysis suggests that there is distortion in the

  17. Imaging theory of nonlinear second harmonic and third harmonic generations in confocal microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhilie; XING Da; LIU Songhao

    2004-01-01

    The imaging theory of nonlinear second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in confocal microscopy is presented in this paper. The nonlinear effect of SHG and THG on the imaging properties of confocal microscopy has been analyzed in detail by the imaging theory. It is proved that the imaging process of SHG and THG in confocal microscopy, which is different from conventional coherent imaging or incoherent imaging, can be divided into two different processes of coherent imaging. The three-dimensional point spread functions (3D-PSF) of SHG and THG confocal microscopy are derived based on the nonlinear principles of SHG and THG. The imaging properties of SHG and THG confocal microscopy are discussed in detail according to its 3D-PSF. It is shown that the resolution of SHG and THG confocal microscopy is higher than that of single-and two-photon confocal microscopy.

  18. Dimensional metrology of lab-on-a-chip internal structures: a comparison of optical coherence tomography with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D R; Halter, M; Hwang, J

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of internal structures in a polymeric microfluidic device, especially of a final product, will require a different set of optical metrology tools than those traditionally used for microelectronic devices. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising technique to characterize the internal structures of poly(methyl methacrylate) devices where the subsurface structures often cannot be imaged by conventional wide field optical microscopy. The structural details of channels in the devices were imaged with OCT and analyzed with an in-house written ImageJ macro in an effort to identify the structural details of the channel. The dimensional values obtained with OCT were compared with laser-scanning confocal microscopy images of channels filled with a fluorophore solution. Attempts were also made using confocal reflectance and interferometry microscopy to measure the channel dimensions, but artefacts present in the images precluded quantitative analysis. OCT provided the most accurate estimates for the channel height based on an analysis of optical micrographs obtained after destructively slicing the channel with a microtome. OCT may be a promising technique for the future of three-dimensional metrology of critical internal structures in lab-on-a-chip devices because scans can be performed rapidly and noninvasively prior to their use. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Orbital single particle tracking on a commercial confocal microscope using piezoelectric stage feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzanò, L; Gratton, E

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Tracking (SPT) is a technique used to locate fluorescent particles with nanometer precision. In the orbital tracking method the position of a particle is obtained analyzing the distribution of intensity along a circular orbit scanned around the particle. In combination with an active feedback this method allows tracking of particles in 2D and 3D with millisecond temporal resolution. Here we describe a SPT setup based on a feedback approach implemented with minimal modification of a commercially available confocal laser scanning microscope, the Zeiss LSM 510, in combination with an external piezoelectric stage scanner. The commercial microscope offers the advantage of a user-friendly software interface and pre-calibrated hardware components. The use of an external piezo-scanner allows the addition of feedback into the system but also represents a limitation in terms of its mechanical response. We describe in detail this implementation of the orbital tracking method and discuss advantages and limitations. As an example of application to live cell experiments we perform the 3D tracking of acidic vesicles in live polarized epithelial cells. (paper)

  20. Confocal microscopy for astrocyte in vivo imaging: Recycle and reuse in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alvarez, Alberto; Araque, Alfonso; Martín, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging is one of the ultimate and fundamental approaches for the study of the brain. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) constitutes the state-of-the-art technique in current neuroscience to address questions regarding brain cell structure, development and function, blood flow regulation and metabolism. This technique evolved from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which impacted the field with a major improvement in image resolution of live tissues in the 1980s compared to widefield microscopy. While nowadays some of the unparalleled features of 2PLSM make it the tool of choice for brain studies in vivo, such as the possibility to image deep within a tissue, LSCM can still be useful in this matter. Here we discuss the validity and limitations of LSCM and provide a guide to perform high-resolution in vivo imaging of the brain of live rodents with minimal mechanical disruption employing LSCM. We describe the surgical procedure and experimental setup that allowed us to record intracellular calcium variations in astrocytes evoked by sensory stimulation, and to monitor intact neuronal dendritic spines and astrocytic processes as well as blood vessel dynamics. Therefore, in spite of certain limitations that need to be carefully considered, LSCM constitutes a useful, convenient, and affordable tool for brain studies in vivo. PMID:23658537

  1. Automated Microscopy: Macro Language Controlling a Confocal Microscope and its External Illumination: Adaptation for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Gábor; Kaňa, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthesis research employs several biophysical methods, including the detection of fluorescence. Even though fluorescence is a key method to detect photosynthetic efficiency, it has not been applied/adapted to single-cell confocal microscopy measurements to examine photosynthetic microorganisms. Experiments with photosynthetic cells may require automation to perform a large number of measurements with different parameters, especially concerning light conditions. However, commercial microscopes support custom protocols (through Time Controller offered by Olympus or Experiment Designer offered by Zeiss) that are often unable to provide special set-ups and connection to external devices (e.g., for irradiation). Our new system combining an Arduino microcontroller with the Cell⊕Finder software was developed for controlling Olympus FV1000 and FV1200 confocal microscopes and the attached hardware modules. Our software/hardware solution offers (1) a text file-based macro language to control the imaging functions of the microscope; (2) programmable control of several external hardware devices (light sources, thermal controllers, actuators) during imaging via the Arduino microcontroller; (3) the Cell⊕Finder software with ergonomic user environment, a fast selection method for the biologically important cells and precise positioning feature that reduces unwanted bleaching of the cells by the scanning laser. Cell⊕Finder can be downloaded from http://www.alga.cz/cellfinder. The system was applied to study changes in fluorescence intensity in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells under long-term illumination. Thus, we were able to describe the kinetics of phycobilisome decoupling. Microscopy data showed that phycobilisome decoupling appears slowly after long-term (>1 h) exposure to high light.

  2. Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy for Ex Vivo Diagnosis of Conjunctival Tumors: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovieno, Alfonso; Longo, Caterina; De Luca, Mariacarla; Piana, Simonetta; Fontana, Luigi; Ragazzi, Moira

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the potential use of fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) for ex vivo diagnosis and excision margin assessment of conjunctival neoplasms. Validity study. setting: Single institution. Consecutive patients with clinically suspicious conjunctival lesions. Conjunctival lesions were excised in toto using a standard "no-touch technique" by a single surgeon (A.I.). Collected specimens were examined with a commercially available laser scanning fluorescence confocal microscope after immersion in a 0.6 mM solution of acridine orange dye for 10-20 seconds. Specimens were subsequently processed with standard histologic analysis. FCM diagnosis of the nature and extension of conjunctival lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients were included in the study (11 male, 5 female; mean age 58.1 ± 26.1 years, range 10-90 years). The median time needed to process and analyze a sample with FCM was 15 minutes. Eleven of 16 lesions were identified by FCM as squamous (2 benign papillomas, 2 grade 2 conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasias, 7 in situ squamous carcinomas) and 5 as nonsquamous (1 pingueculum, 1 dermolipoma, 2 melanocytic nevi, 1 melanoma). In all cases FCM was able to detect horizontal and vertical extension of the lesion. All FCM findings were confirmed by corresponding subsequent histologic examination. FCM provides a fast ex vivo preliminary diagnosis of suspicious conjunctival lesions with good histologic details and margin assessment, and may represent a novel tool for intraoperative and postsurgical management of conjunctival tumors. This is the first study to investigate ex vivo FCM application in ophthalmology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  5. Poly(diacetylene) Monolayers Studied with a Fluorescence Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, Marco H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Gaub, Hermann E.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1994-01-01

    A novel and powerful method to study the optical properties of thin lipid films which a resolution superior to confocal microscopy is presented. With a scanning near-field optical microscope, fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett film of diethylene glycol diamine pentacosadiynoic amide are

  6. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, N J; Hendrikse, F; March, W F

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a confocal Raman spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive assessment of corneal hydration in vivo in two legally blind subjects. A laser beam (632.8 nm; 15 mJ) was maintained on the cornea by using a microscope objective lens (x25 magnification, NA = 0.5, f = 10 mm) both for focusing the incident light as well as collecting the Raman backscattered light, in a 180 degrees backscatter configuration. An optical fiber, acting as the confocal pinhole for elimination of light from out-of-focus places, was coupled to a spectrometer that dispersed the collected light onto a sensitive array detector for rapid spectral data acquisition over a range from 2,890 to 3,590/cm(-1). Raman spectra were recorded from the anterior 100-150 microm of the cornea over a period before and after topical application of a mild dehydrating solution. The ratio between the amplitudes of the signals at 3,400/cm(-1) (OH-vibrational mode of water) and 2,940/cm(-1) (CH-vibrational mode of proteins) was used as a measure for corneal hydration. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR = 25) Raman spectra were obtained from the human corneas by using 15 mJ of laser light energy. Qualitative changes in the hydration of the anteriormost part of the corneas could be observed as a result of the dehydrating agent. With adequate improvements in system safety, confocal Raman spectroscopy could potentially be applied clinically as a noninvasive tool for the assessment of corneal hydration in vivo.

  7. 3D confocal imaging in CUBIC-cleared mouse heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehrhoff, I.; Bocancea, D.; Vaquero, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Lorrio, M.T.; Ripoll, J.; Desco, M.; Gomez-Gaviro, M.V.

    2016-07-01

    Acquiring high resolution 3D images of the heart enables the ability to study heart diseases more in detail. Here, the CUBIC (clear, unobstructed brain imaging cocktails and computational analysis) clearing protocol was adapted for thick mouse heart sections to increase the penetration depth of the confocal microscope lasers into the tissue. The adapted CUBIC clearing of the heart lets the antibody penetrate deeper into the tissue by a factor of five. The here shown protocol enables deep 3D highresolution image acquisition in the heart. This allows a much more accurate assessment of the cellular and structural changes that underlie heart diseases. (Author)

  8. Confocal laser feedback tomography for skin cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Alireza; Du, Benjamin Wensheng; Taimre, Thomas; Bertling, Karl; Wilson, Stephen; Soyer, H Peter; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2017-09-01

    Tomographic imaging of soft tissue such as skin has a potential role in cancer detection. The penetration of infrared wavelengths makes a confocal approach based on laser feedback interferometry feasible. We present a compact system using a semiconductor laser as both transmitter and receiver. Numerical and physical models based on the known optical properties of keratinocyte cancers were developed. We validated the technique on three phantoms containing macro-structural changes in optical properties. Experimental results were in agreement with numerical simulations and structural changes were evident which would permit discrimination of healthy tissue and tumour. Furthermore, cancer type discrimination was also able to be visualized using this imaging technique.

  9. 3D confocal imaging in CUBIC-cleared mouse heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrhoff, I.; Bocancea, D.; Vaquero, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Lorrio, M.T.; Ripoll, J.; Desco, M.; Gomez-Gaviro, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring high resolution 3D images of the heart enables the ability to study heart diseases more in detail. Here, the CUBIC (clear, unobstructed brain imaging cocktails and computational analysis) clearing protocol was adapted for thick mouse heart sections to increase the penetration depth of the confocal microscope lasers into the tissue. The adapted CUBIC clearing of the heart lets the antibody penetrate deeper into the tissue by a factor of five. The here shown protocol enables deep 3D highresolution image acquisition in the heart. This allows a much more accurate assessment of the cellular and structural changes that underlie heart diseases. (Author)

  10. Volume visualization of biological tissue specimens using confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Martin; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Smrčka, P.; Hána, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2006), s. 240-244 ISSN 0301-5491. [Biomedical Engineering Conference of Young Biomedical Engineers and Researchers /2./. Kladno, 19.07.2006-21.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500200510; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  11. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, G.; Pawlak, K.; Pomozi, I.; Tóth, E. A.; Molnár, A.; Matkó, J.; Garab, G.

    2014-03-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316-25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM.

  12. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, G; Pawlak, K; Garab, G; Pomozi, I; Tóth, E A; Molnár, A; Matkó, J

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316–25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM. (paper)

  13. Microscopia confocal en córneas de cien ojos sanos Confocal microscopy results of one hundred healthy eye corneas

    OpenAIRE

    Zulema Gómez Castillo; Keyly Fernández García; Alain Pérez Tejeda; Susana Márquez Villalón; Madelyn Jareño Ochoa; Judith Cuevas Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar las estructuras celulares por microscopia confocal, Confoscan 4, en córneas sanas en nuestro medio. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio prospectivo longitudinal a 100 ojos sanos de médicos que trabajan en nuestra institución, y pacientes que asistieron al servicio de córnea. Esta investigación fue desde mayo de 2007 a mayo 2008, en el Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer", La Habana. En los médicos se examinaron ambos ojos y en los pacientes el ojo no afectado. S...

  14. Microscopia confocal de la córnea en facoemulsificación Confocal microscopy of the cornea on phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Raúl Hernández Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar los cambios estructurales de la córnea en la cirugía de catarata por facoemulsificación sin complicaciones. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio prospectivo de pacientes operados de catarata por facoemulsificación coaxial por la técnica de pre chop sin complicaciones. A estos se les realizó microscopia confocal de la córnea con el CONFOSCAN 4 (Nidek Technologies con el objetivo de 40x y adaptador Z-Ring. Se realizó el estudio en el preoperatorio y en el posoperatorio (a las 24 horas, después de una semana, de un mes y a los tres meses. Resultados: Se demostraron cambios estructurales en la córnea como células epiteliales con núcleos hiperreflectivos alargadas en ocasiones y áreas de hiperreflectividad anómala a las 24 horas del posoperatorio. Persistieron queratocitos activados y la disminución de la hiperreflectividad de la matriz extracelular que desapareció al mes. Conclusiones: Aunque por biomicroscopia no se observen alteraciones corneales en el posoperatorio de la cirugía de catarata por facoemulsificación, sí se pueden demostrar por microscopia confocal de la córnea. Estas variaciones no influyen en la recuperación visual óptima de los pacientes.Objective: To determine the structural changes in the cornea in the cataract surgery using phacoemulsification without complications. Methods: A prospective study of patients operated on from cataract using the coaxial phacoemulsification (Pre Chop technique without complications was carried out. These patients also underwent confocal microscopy of the cornea with Confoscan4 (Nidek Technologies with 40x target and Z - Ring adapter. The study was performed in the preoperative period and postoperative period for 24 hours, one week, one month and three months after surgery. Results: Structural changes were observed in the cornea such as epithelial cells with hypereflectivity nucleus, occasionally elongated, , areas of anomalous hypereflectivity 24 hours after

  15. Confocal stereology and image analysis: methods for estimating geometrical characteristics of cells and tissues from three-dimensional confocal images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří; Karen, Petr; Radochová, Barbora; Difato, Francesco; Krekule, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl.1 (2004), s. S47-S55 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/01/0257; GA ČR GA310/02/1470; GA AV ČR KJB6011309; GA AV ČR KJB5039302 Grant - others:SI - CZ(CZ) KONTAKT 001/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : confocal microscopy * image analysis * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  16. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongda Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling.

  17. CCDiode: an optimal detector for laser confocal microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawley, James B.; Blouke, Morley M.; Janesick, James R.

    1996-04-01

    The laser confocal microscope (LCM) is now an established research tool in biology and materials science. In biological applications, it is usually employed to detect the location of fluorescent market molecules and, under these conditions, signal levels from bright areas are often digitizer. To maintain the desired +/- 3 e noise level at the relatively high data rate of 1 MHz, our new device utilizes 64 separate readout amplifier/digitizer systems, operating in sequence. The resulting detector is more compact, efficient and reliable than the PMT it replaces but as its sensitive area is smaller than that of a PMT, it will require auxiliary optics when used with any LCM having a large (mm) pinhole. As the signal light is parallel, a simple lens mounted axially and with the CCDiode at its focus would suffice. Future versions may use 3 X 3 or 5 X 5 arrays of sensors to `track' the confocal spot as it is deflected by inhomogeneities of the specimen, change its effective size or shape or detect system misalignment.

  18. The confocal plane grating spectrometer at BESSY II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könnecke, R.; Follath, R.; Pontius, N.; Schlappa, J.; Eggenstein, F.; Zeschke, T.; Bischoff, P.; Schmidt, J.-S.; Noll, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► At the electron storage ring BESSY II a confocal plane grating RIXS endstation with a spot size of 4 μm × 1 μm is presently being installed. ► A resolving power above 10,000 is expected for low energy excitations below 500 eV. ► The sample will be excited with a photon flux up to 10 15 photons/(s 300 mA 0.1%bandwidth). ► Sample environments for solid, gaseous and liquid samples will be provided. ► A fast detecting system is being set up for future pump-probe experiments. -- Abstract: At BESSY II a confocal plane grating spectrometer for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is currently under commissioning. The new endstation operates with a source size of 4 × 1 μm 2 provided by its dedicated beamline. The RIXS-spectrometer covers an energy range from 50 eV to 1000 eV, providing a resolving power E/ΔE of 5000–15,000. The beamline allows full polarization control and gives a photon flux of up to 7 × 10 14 photons/s/0.1 A/0.1%bandwidth by offering a resolving power E/ΔE of 4000–12,000

  19. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beaudet

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  20. Live Imaging of Shoot Meristems on an Inverted Confocal Microscope Using an Objective Lens Inverter Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchuk, Zachary L.; Perdue, Tony D.

    2017-01-01

    Live imaging of above ground meristems can lead to new insights in plant development not possible from static imaging of fixed tissue. The use of an upright confocal microscope offers several technical and biological advantages for live imaging floral or shoot meristems. However, many departments and core facilities possess only inverted confocal microscopes and lack the funding for an additional upright confocal microscope. Here we show that imaging of living apical meristems can be performed on existing inverted confocal microscopes with the use of an affordable and detachable InverterScope accessory. PMID:28579995

  1. Live Imaging of Shoot Meristems on an Inverted Confocal Microscope Using an Objective Lens Inverter Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchuk, Zachary L; Perdue, Tony D

    2017-01-01

    Live imaging of above ground meristems can lead to new insights in plant development not possible from static imaging of fixed tissue. The use of an upright confocal microscope offers several technical and biological advantages for live imaging floral or shoot meristems. However, many departments and core facilities possess only inverted confocal microscopes and lack the funding for an additional upright confocal microscope. Here we show that imaging of living apical meristems can be performed on existing inverted confocal microscopes with the use of an affordable and detachable InverterScope accessory.

  2. Visualization and quantitation of abundant macroautophagy in virus-infected cells by confocal three-dimensional fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Wallen; Yamada, Masaki; Moninger, Thomas; Grose, Charles

    2013-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), a viremic illness typified by an exanthem consisting of several hundred vesicles. When VZV reactivates from latency in the spinal ganglia during late adulthood, the emerging virus causes a vesicular dermatomal rash (herpes zoster or shingles). To expand investigations of autophagy during varicella and zoster, newer 3D imaging technology was combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide animations of autophagosomes in the vesicular rash. First, the cells were immunolabeled with antibodies against VZV proteins and the LC3 protein, an integral autophagosomal protein. Antibody reagents lacking activity against the human blood group A1 antigen were selected. After laser excitation of the samples, optimized emission detection bandwidths were configured by Zeiss Zen control software. Confocal Z-stacks comprising up to 40 optical slices were reconstructed into 3D animations with the aid of Imaris software. With this imaging technology, individual autophagosomes were clearly detectable as spheres within each vesicular cell. To enumerate the number of autophagosomes, data sets from 50 cells were reconstructed as 3D fluorescence images and analyzed with MeasurementPro software. The mean number of autophagosomes per infected vesicular cell was >100, although over 200 autophagosomes were seen in a few cells. In summary, macroautophagy was easily quantitated within VZV-infected cells after immunolabeling and imaging by 3D confocal animation technology. These same 3D imaging techniques will be applicable for investigations of autophagy in other virus-infected cells. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J., E-mail: gsimpson@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, 560 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  4. WE-FG-BRA-04: A Portable Confocal Microscope to Image Live Cell Damage Response Induced by Therapeutic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, C; Flint, D; Grosshans, D; Sawakuchi, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sadetaporn, D [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Asaithamby, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To construct a custom and portable fluorescence confocal laser-scanning microscope (FCLSM) that can be placed in the path of therapeutic radiation beams to study real-time radiation-induced damage response in live cells. Methods: We designed and constructed a portable FCLSM with three laser diodes for excitation (405, 488, and 635 nm). An objective lens focuses the excitation light and collects fluorescence from the sample. A pair of galvanometer mirrors scans/collects the laser beam/fluorescence along the focal plane (x/y-directions). A stepper motor stage scans in the axial direction and positions the x/y of the image field. Barrier filters and dichroic mirrors are used to route the spectral emission bands to the appropriate photodetector. An avalanche photodiode collects near-infrared fluorescence; a photodiode collects back-reflected 635 nm light; and a photomultiplier tube collects green fluorescence in the range of eGFP/eYFP. A 200-µm diameter pinhole was used to implement the confocal geometry for near-infrared and red channels and a 150-µm diameter pinhole for the green channel. Data acquisition and system control were achieved using a high-throughput data acquisition card. In-house software developed in LabVIEW was used to control the hardware, collect data from the photodetectors and reconstruct the confocal images. Results: 6 frames/s can be acquired for a 25 µm{sup 2} (128×128 pixels) field of view, visualizing the entire volume of the cell nucleus (∼10 µm depth) in <10 s. To demonstrate the usefulness of our FCLSM, we imaged gold nanoshells in live cells, radiation-induced damage in fibrosarcoma cells expressing eGFP tagged to a DNA repair protein, and neurons expressing eGFP. The system can also image particle tracks in fluorescent nuclear track detectors. Conclusion: We developed a versatile and portable FCLSM that allows radiobiology studies in live cells exposed to therapeutic radiation. The FCLSM can be placed in any vertical beam

  5. WE-FG-BRA-04: A Portable Confocal Microscope to Image Live Cell Damage Response Induced by Therapeutic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, C; Flint, D; Grosshans, D; Sawakuchi, G; Sadetaporn, D; Asaithamby, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a custom and portable fluorescence confocal laser-scanning microscope (FCLSM) that can be placed in the path of therapeutic radiation beams to study real-time radiation-induced damage response in live cells. Methods: We designed and constructed a portable FCLSM with three laser diodes for excitation (405, 488, and 635 nm). An objective lens focuses the excitation light and collects fluorescence from the sample. A pair of galvanometer mirrors scans/collects the laser beam/fluorescence along the focal plane (x/y-directions). A stepper motor stage scans in the axial direction and positions the x/y of the image field. Barrier filters and dichroic mirrors are used to route the spectral emission bands to the appropriate photodetector. An avalanche photodiode collects near-infrared fluorescence; a photodiode collects back-reflected 635 nm light; and a photomultiplier tube collects green fluorescence in the range of eGFP/eYFP. A 200-µm diameter pinhole was used to implement the confocal geometry for near-infrared and red channels and a 150-µm diameter pinhole for the green channel. Data acquisition and system control were achieved using a high-throughput data acquisition card. In-house software developed in LabVIEW was used to control the hardware, collect data from the photodetectors and reconstruct the confocal images. Results: 6 frames/s can be acquired for a 25 µm 2 (128×128 pixels) field of view, visualizing the entire volume of the cell nucleus (∼10 µm depth) in <10 s. To demonstrate the usefulness of our FCLSM, we imaged gold nanoshells in live cells, radiation-induced damage in fibrosarcoma cells expressing eGFP tagged to a DNA repair protein, and neurons expressing eGFP. The system can also image particle tracks in fluorescent nuclear track detectors. Conclusion: We developed a versatile and portable FCLSM that allows radiobiology studies in live cells exposed to therapeutic radiation. The FCLSM can be placed in any vertical beam line

  6. Using Photoshop with images created by a confocal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Many pure colors and grayscales tones that result from confocal imaging are not reproducible to output devices, such as printing presses, laptop projectors, and laser jet printers. Part of the difficulty in predicting the colors and tones that will reproduce lies in both the computer display, and in the display of unreproducible colors chosen for fluorophores. The use of a grayscale display for confocal channels and a LUT display to show saturated (clipped) tonal values aids visualization in the former instance and image integrity in the latter. Computer monitors used for post-processing in order to conform the image to the output device can be placed in darkened rooms, and the gamma for the display can be set to create darker shadow regions, and to control the display of color. These conditions aid in visualization of images so that blacks are set to grayer values that are more amenable to faithful reproduction. Preferences can be set in Photoshop for consistent display of colors, along with other settings to optimize use of memory. The Info window is opened so that tonal information can be shown via readouts. Images that are saved as indexed color are converted to grayscale or RGB Color, 16-bit is converted to 8-bit when desired, and colorized images from confocal software is returned to grayscale and re-colorized according to presented methods so that reproducible colors are made. Images may also be sharpened and noise may be reduced, or more than one image layered to show colocalization according to specific methods. Images are then converted to CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) for consequent assignment of pigment percentages for printing presses. Changes to single images and multiple images from image stacks are automated for efficient and consistent image processing changes. Some additional changes are done to those images destined for 3D visualization to better separate regions of interest from background. Files are returned to image stacks, saved and

  7. Confocal Raman spectrocopy for the analysis of nail polish evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Maria; Vaz, Joana; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Nail polishes are cosmetic paints that may be susceptible of forensic analysis offering useful information to assist in a crime reconstruction. Although the nail polish appearance could allow a quick visual identification of the sample, this analysis is subjected to the perception and subjective interpretation of the forensic examiner. The chemical analysis of the nail polishes offers great deal of information not subjected to analyst interpretation. Confocal Raman spectroscopy is a well-suited technique for the analysis of paints due to its non-invasive and non-destructive nature and its ability to supply information about the organic and inorganic components of the sample. In this work, 77 regular and gel nail polishes were analyzed with confocal Raman spectroscopy using two laser wavelengths (532 and 780 nm). The sample behavior under the two laser wavelengths and the differences in the spectra taken at different points of the sample were studied for each nail polish. Additionally, the spectra obtained for all the nail polishes were visually compared. The results concluded that the longer laser wavelength prevents sample burning and fluorescence effects; the similarity among the spectra collected within the sample is not directly related with the presence of glitter particles; and 64% of the samples analyzed showed a characteristic spectrum. Additionally, the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy for the forensic analysis of nail polishes evidence in the form of flakes or smudges on different surfaces were studied. The results showed that both types of evidence can be analyzed by the technique. Also, two non-invasive sampling methods for the collection of the evidence from the nails of the suspect or the victim were proposed: (i) to use acetone-soaked cotton swabs to remove the nail varnishes and (ii) to scrape the nail polish from the nail with a blade. Both approaches, each exhibiting advantages and drawbacks in terms of transport and handling were appropriate

  8. Living Matter Observations with a Novel Hyperspectral Supercontinuum Confocal Microscope for VIS to Near-IR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca R. Bertani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A broad range hyper-spectroscopic microscope fed by a supercontinuum laser source and equipped with an almost achromatic optical layout is illustrated with detailed explanations of the design, implementation and data. The real novelty of this instrument, a confocal spectroscopic microscope capable of recording high resolution reflectance data in the VIS-IR spectral range from about 500 nm to 2.5 μm wavelengths, is the possibility of acquiring spectral data at every physical point as defined by lateral coordinates, X and Y, as well as at a depth coordinate, Z, as obtained by the confocal optical sectioning advantage. With this apparatus we collect each single scanning point as a whole spectrum by combining two linear spectral detector arrays, one CCD for the visible range, and one InGaAs infrared array, simultaneously available at the sensor output channel of the home made instrument. This microscope has been developed for biomedical analysis of human skin and other similar applications. Results are shown illustrating the technical performances of the instrument and the capability in extracting information about the composition and the structure of different parts or compartments in biological samples as well as in solid statematter. A complete spectroscopic fingerprinting of samples at microscopic level is shown possible by using statistical analysis on raw data or analytical reflectance models based on Abelés matrix transfer methods.

  9. Combination of confocal principle and aperture stop separation improves suppression of crystalline lens fluorescence in an eye model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Blum, Johannes; Link, Dietmar; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique to detect changes in the human retina. The autofluorescence decay over time, generated by endogenous fluorophores, is measured in vivo. The strong autofluorescence of the crystalline lens, however, superimposes the intensity decay of the retina fluorescence, as the confocal principle is not able to suppress it sufficiently. Thus, the crystalline lens autofluorescence causes artifacts in the retinal fluorescence lifetimes determined from the intensity decays. Here, we present a new technique to suppress the autofluorescence of the crystalline lens by introducing an annular stop into the detection light path, which we call Schweitzer's principle. The efficacy of annular stops with an outer diameter of 7 mm and inner diameters of 1 to 5 mm are analyzed in an experimental setup using a model eye based on fluorescent dyes. Compared to the confocal principle, Schweitzer's principle with an inner diameter of 3 mm is able to reduce the simulated crystalline lens fluorescence to 4%, while 42% of the simulated retina fluorescence is preserved. Thus, we recommend the implementation of Schweitzer's principle in scanning laser ophthalmoscopes used for fundus autofluorescence measurements, especially the FLIO device, for improved image quality.

  10. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  11. Self-interference fluorescence microscopy with three-phase detection for depth-resolved confocal epi-fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaf, Boy; de Boer, Johannes F

    2017-03-20

    Three-dimensional confocal fluorescence imaging of in vivo tissues is challenging due to sample motion and limited imaging speeds. In this paper a novel method is therefore presented for scanning confocal epi-fluorescence microscopy with instantaneous depth-sensing based on self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SIFM). A tabletop epi-fluorescence SIFM setup was constructed with an annular phase plate in the emission path to create a spectral self-interference signal that is phase-dependent on the axial position of a fluorescent sample. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on a 3 × 3 fiber-coupler was developed for a sensitive phase analysis of the SIFM signal with three photon-counter detectors instead of a spectrometer. The Mach-Zehnder interferometer created three intensity signals that alternately oscillated as a function of the SIFM spectral phase and therefore encoded directly for the axial sample position. Controlled axial translation of fluorescent microsphere layers showed a linear dependence of the SIFM spectral phase with sample depth over axial image ranges of 500 µm and 80 µm (3.9 × Rayleigh range) for 4 × and 10 × microscope objectives respectively. In addition, SIFM was in good agreement with optical coherence tomography depth measurements on a sample with indocyanine green dye filled capillaries placed at multiple depths. High-resolution SIFM imaging applications are demonstrated for fluorescence angiography on a dye-filled capillary blood vessel phantom and for autofluorescence imaging on an ex vivo fly eye.

  12. Efficiency of the confocal method of laser endomicroscopy in complex diagnoses of diseases of common bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaskin, S G; Korniletsky, I D; Panchenkov, D N; Chertyuk, V B; Sazonov, D V; Zabozlayev, F G; Danilevskaya, O V; Mokshina, N V

    2017-01-01

    One of the more frequent manifestations of diseases of the bile ducts are its’ strictures or stenoses that could be of either malignant or benign nature. Current methods of diagnosing this pathology include computer tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, these methods are not always informative, which makes this a current and topical problem. A fundamentally new method that broadens the capabilities of ERCP when diagnosing diseases of the bile duct accompanied by the development of strictures or stenoses is probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE). The method is based on the principle of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The most elaborate complications arise with the presence of the pre-existing pancreatobiliary pathology: pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis, acute cholangitis, etc. Early stage cholangiocarcinoma diagnosis can be difficult (and not always possible) even with the help of modern research methods. For the timely diagnostic it is advantageous to conduct pCLE and targeted biopsy of the zone with most manifested changes. In all instances, the first use of the pCLE method for diagnostic purposes allowed us to clarify and correctly verify the diagnosis. When concerning the diseases of the bile duct, the modern stage of pCLE development can be of critical importance when other methods are not effective. (paper)

  13. Comparison of stromal corneal nerves between normal and keratoconus patients using confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Fernández, M; Hernández Quintela, E; Naranjo Tackman, R

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the differences in stromal corneal nerves between normal patients and keratoconus patients. A total of 140 eyes of 70 normal patients (group A) and 122 eyes of 87 keratoconus patients (group B) were examined with the confocal microscope, with a central scan of the total corneal thickness being taken. The morphology and thickness of the corneal stromal nerves were evaluated by using the Navis v. 3.5.0. software. Nerve thickness was obtained from the mean between the widest and the narrowest portions of each stromal nerve. Corneal stromal nerves were observed as irregular linear hyper-reflective structures with wide and narrow portions in all cases. Mean corneal stromal nerves thickness in group A was 5.7±1.7 (range from 3.3 to 10.4 μ), mean corneal stromal nerves thickness in group B was 7.2±1.9 (range from 3.5 to 12.0 μ). There was a statistical significant difference (P<.05) in stromal corneal nerves thickness between group A and group B. Stromal corneal nerves morphology was similar in both groups, but stromal nerves were thicker in keratoconus patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Kaluzny

    Full Text Available We investigated the autofluorescence (AF signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD using 488 nm excitation.The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496-610 nm, 6 nm resolution. The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch's Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered.Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch's Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02.The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo.

  15. Confocal quantification of cis-regulatory reporter gene expression in living sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Sagar; Hanser, Bridget; Davidson, Eric H; Fraser, Scott E

    2006-11-15

    Quantification of GFP reporter gene expression at single cell level in living sea urchin embryos can now be accomplished by a new method of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eggs injected with a tissue-specific GFP reporter DNA construct were grown to gastrula stage and their fluorescence recorded as a series of contiguous Z-section slices that spanned the entire embryo. To measure the depth-dependent signal decay seen in the successive slices of an image stack, the eggs were coinjected with a freely diffusible internal fluorescent standard, rhodamine dextran. The measured rhodamine fluorescence was used to generate a computational correction for the depth-dependent loss of GFP fluorescence per slice. The intensity of GFP fluorescence was converted to the number of GFP molecules using a conversion constant derived from CLSM imaging of eggs injected with a measured quantity of GFP protein. The outcome is a validated method for accurately counting GFP molecules in given cells in reporter gene transfer experiments, as we demonstrate by use of an expression construct expressed exclusively in skeletogenic cells.

  16. Quantitative analyses of Streptococcus mutans biofilms with quartz crystal microbalance, microjet impingement and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreth, J; Hagerman, E; Tam, K; Merritt, J; Wong, D T W; Wu, B M; Myung, N V; Shi, W; Qi, F

    2004-10-01

    Microbial biofilm formation can be influenced by many physiological and genetic factors. The conventional microtiter plate assay provides useful but limited information about biofilm formation. With the fast expansion of the biofilm research field, there are urgent needs for more informative techniques to quantify the major parameters of a biofilm, such as adhesive strength and total biomass. It would be even more ideal if these measurements could be conducted in a real-time, non-invasive manner. In this study, we used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and microjet impingement (MJI) to measure total biomass and adhesive strength, respectively, of S. mutans biofilms formed under different sucrose concentrations. In conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the COMSTAT software, we show that sucrose concentration affects the biofilm strength, total biomass, and architecture in both qualitative and quantitative manners. Our data correlate well with previous observations about the effect of sucrose on the adherence of S. mutans to the tooth surface, and demonstrate that QCM is a useful tool for studying the kinetics of biofilm formation in real time and that MJI is a sensitive, easy-to-use device to measure the adhesive strength of a biofilm.

  17. Efficacy of oral exfoliative cytology in diabetes mellitus patients: a light microscopic and confocal microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Deepika; Malathi, N; Reddy, B Thirupathi

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a global problem. By monitoring the health status of these individuals, diabetic complications can be prevented. We aimed to analyze alterations in the morphology and cytomorphometry of buccal epithelial cells of type 2 DM patients using oral exfoliative cytology technique and determine its importance in public health screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. The study was carried out in 100 type 2 DM patients and 30 healthy individuals. Smears were taken from the right buccal mucosa and stained by the Papanicolaou technique. Staining with Acridine orange was carried out to view qualitative changes with confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM-510 Meta). The cytomorphometry was evaluated using IMAGE PRO PLUS 5.5 software with Evolution LC camera. All findings were statistically analyzed. The results showed that with increase in fasting plasma glucose levels, there is significant increase in nuclear area, decrease in cytoplasmic area, and increase in nuclear cytoplasmic ratio (p inclusion, candida and keratinization. In the present study, we found significant alterations in the cytomorphometry and cytomorphology of buccal epithelial cells of type 2 DM patients. This study supports and extends the view that these cellular changes can alert the clinician to the possibility of diabetes and aid in monitoring of diabetes throughout the lifetime of the patient.

  18. Time-Lapse, in Situ Imaging of Ice Crystal Growth Using Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Moreno; Noirjean, Cecile; Dedovets, Dmytro; Maria, Juliette; Deville, Sylvain

    2016-11-30

    Ice crystals nucleate and grow when a water solution is cooled below its freezing point. The growth velocities and morphologies of the ice crystals depend on many parameters, such as the temperature of ice growth, the melting temperature, and the interactions of solutes with the growing crystals. Three types of morphologies may appear: dendritic, cellular (or fingerlike), or the faceted equilibrium form. Understanding and controlling which type of morphology is formed is essential in several domains, from biology to geophysics and materials science. Obtaining, in situ, three dimensional observations without introducing artifacts due to the experimental technique is nevertheless challenging. Here we show how we can use laser scanning confocal microscopy to follow in real-time the growth of smoothed and faceted ice crystals in zirconium acetate solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative observations can be made. In particular, we can precisely measure the lateral growth velocity of the crystals, a measure otherwise difficult to obtain. Such observations should help us understand the influence of the parameters that control the growth of ice crystals in various systems.

  19. PIV as a method for quantifying root cell growth and particle displacement in confocal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Hans, Joachim; Bransby, M Fraser; Valentine, Tracy A

    2010-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantifies displacement of patches of pixels between successive images. We evaluated PIV as a tool for microscopists by measuring displacements of cells and of a surrounding granular medium in confocal laser scanning microscopy images of Arabidopsis thaliana roots labeled with cell-membrane targeted green fluorescent protein. Excellent accuracy (e.g., displacement standard deviation PIV-predicted and actual displacements (r(2) > 0.83). Root mean squared error for these distorted images was 0.4-1.1 pixels, increasing at higher magnification factors. Cell growth and rhizosphere deformation were tracked with good temporal (e.g., 1-min interval) and spatial resolution, with PIV patches located on recognizable cell features being tracked more successfully. Appropriate choice of GFP-label was important to decrease small-scale biological noise due to intracellular motion. PIV of roots grown in stiff 2% versus 0.7% agar showed patterns of cell expansion consistent with physically impeded roots of other species. Roots in glass ballotini underwent rapid changes in growth direction on a timescale of minutes, associated with localized arching of ballotini. By tracking cell vertices, we monitored automatically cell length, width, and area every minute for 0.5 h for cells in different stages of development. In conclusion, PIV measured displacements successfully in images of living root cells and the external granular medium, revealing much potential for use by microscopists. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Radiopharmaceutical scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to dispersions useful in preparing radiopharmaceutical scanning agents, to technetium labelled dispersions, to methods for preparing such dispersions and to their use as scanning agents

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  2. Nuclear Heart Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Nuclear Heart Scan Nuclear Heart Scan Also known as Nuclear Stress Test , ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake ... you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special instructions ...

  4. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  5. Materials and corrosion characterization using the confocal resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigges, C.P.; Sorensen, N.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Improved characterization and process control is important to many Sandia and DOE programs related to manufacturing. Many processes/structures are currently under-characterized including thin film growth, corrosion and semiconductor structures, such as implant profiles. A sensitive tool is required that is able to provide lateral and vertical imaging of the electromagnetic properties of a sample. The confocal resonator is able to characterize the surface and near-surface impedance of materials. This device may be applied to a broad range of applications including in situ evaluation of thin film processes, physical defect detection/characterization, the characterization of semiconductor devices and corrosion studies. In all of these cases, the technology should work as a real-time process diagnostic or as a feedback mechanism regarding the quality of a manufacturing process. This report summarizes the development and exploration of several diagnostic applications.

  6. Confocal mapping of myelin figures with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung-Ren; Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Hung Ji; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2018-01-01

    We employ confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (CMRS) with submicron spatial resolution to study the myelin structures (cylindrical lamellae) composed of nested surfactant C12E3 or lipid DMPC bilayers. The CMRS mapping indicates that for a straight C12E3 myelin, the surfactant concentration increases with the myelin width and is higher in the center region than in the peripheral region. For a curved C12E3 myelin, the convex side has a higher surfactant concentration than the corresponding concave side. The spectrum of DMPC myelins undergoes a qualitative change as the temperature increases above 60 °C, suggesting that the surfactant molecules may be damaged. Our work demonstrates the utility of CMRS in bio-soft material research.

  7. Confocal imaging of protein distributions in porous silicon optical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stefano, Luca; D'Auria, Sabato

    2007-01-01

    The performances of porous silicon optical biosensors depend strongly on the arrangement of the biological probes into their sponge-like structures: it is well known that in this case the sensing species do not fill the pores but instead cover their internal surface. In this paper, the direct imaging of labelled proteins into different porous silicon structures by using a confocal laser microscope is reported. The distribution of the biological matter in the nanostructured material follows a Gaussian behaviour which is typical of the diffusion process in the porous media but with substantial differences between a porous silicon monolayer and a multilayer such as a Bragg mirror. Even if semi-quantitative, the results can be very useful in the design of the porous silicon based biosensing devices

  8. Ex vivo confocal microscopy: an emerging technique in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Jean Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Cambazard, Frédéric; Rubegni, Pietro

    2018-01-01

    This review aims to give an overview of the current available applications of ex vivo confocal microscopy (EVCM) in dermatology. EVCM is a relatively new imaging technique that allows microscopic examination of freshly excised unfixed tissue. It enables a rapid examination of the skin sample directly in the surgery room and thus represents an alternative to the intraoperative micrographic control of the surgical margins of cutaneous tumors by standard microscopic examination on cryopreserved sections during Mohs surgery. Although this technique has mainly been developed for the margin’s control of basal cell carcinoma, many other skin tumors have been studied, including melanoma. Use of EVCM is continuing to evolve, and many possible applications are under investigation, such as the study of nails and hair diseases and the diagnosis of skin infections. PMID:29785327

  9. Scanning gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Batter, J.F. Jr.; Stout, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning system for a gamma camera providing for the overlapping of adjacent scan paths is described. A collimator mask having tapered edges provides for a graduated reduction in intensity of radiation received by a detector thereof, the reduction in intensity being graduated in a direction normal to the scanning path to provide a blending of images of adjacent scan paths. 31 claims, 15 figures

  10. Diagnosis of thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia using confocal and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Saira; Bilal, Muhammad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Firdous, Shamaraz; Aziz, Uzma; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2017-11-01

    Anemia is the most prevalent blood disorder, categorized into thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia. In anemia, the morphology of erythrocytes is disturbed, thus leading to abnormal functioning of the erythrocytes. Globally, thalassemia affects 1.3% of individuals and is one of the most widespread monogenic disorders in Pakistan. All over the World, women and children are most frequently affected by a type of nutritional deficiency known as iron deficiency anemia. The morphological changes that occur in erythrocytes due to these diseases are investigated in this study at the nano-scale level. Fifty samples of blood from individuals suffering from thalassemia or iron deficiency anemia were obtained from different hospitals in Rawalpindi and Islamabad. The blood samples were scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to check the morphological changes in both types of anemia. According to the present study, thalassemia is most prevalent in females in the age group between 5 and 15 years old, and iron deficiency is most prevalent in females in the age groups of 16-25 and 36-45 years old. Erythrocyte morphology is the significant determinant for diagnosing and discriminating between these two types of diseases. The study reports deformed erythrocytes in anemic patients, which were different from the ones that existed in the control. Thalassemia erythrocytes showed a crenated shape, iron deficiency anemia erythrocytes showed an elliptocyte shape and healthy erythrocytes showed a biconcave disk shape when using AFM and LSCM. These techniques seem to be very promising, cheap and less time consuming in determining the structure-function relationship of erythrocytes of thalassemic and iron deficiency anemic patients. The results of LSCM and AFM are quite useful in determining the morphological changes in erythrocytes and to study the disease at the molecular level within short period of time. Hence, we encourage employing

  11. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  12. Improved axial resolution of FINCH fluorescence microscopy when combined with spinning disk confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Nisan; Brooker, Gary

    2014-09-22

    FINCH holographic fluorescence microscopy creates super-resolved images with enhanced depth of focus. Addition of a Nipkow disk real-time confocal image scanner is shown to reduce the FINCH depth of focus while improving transverse confocal resolution in a combined method called "CINCH".

  13. Microscopia confocal en córneas de cien ojos sanos Confocal microscopy results of one hundred healthy eye corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulema Gómez Castillo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analizar las estructuras celulares por microscopia confocal, Confoscan 4, en córneas sanas en nuestro medio. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio prospectivo longitudinal a 100 ojos sanos de médicos que trabajan en nuestra institución, y pacientes que asistieron al servicio de córnea. Esta investigación fue desde mayo de 2007 a mayo 2008, en el Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer", La Habana. En los médicos se examinaron ambos ojos y en los pacientes el ojo no afectado. Se recopilaron un total de 50 casos sin afección corneal. Resultados: De los 100 ojos estudiados, 64 tenían paquimetrías por encima del valor medio. Estuvieron presentes los tres tipos de células epiteliales en casi la totalidad de los pacientes; así como los queratocitos en las diferentes profundidades del estroma corneal. La mayoría de los ojos tenían un conteo celular endotelial por encima de 2 500, cifra comprendida dentro de los valores normales. Se encontraron fibras nerviosas en cada una de sus capas. Conclusiones: La microscopia confocal se presenta como una nueva herramienta que permite observar en vivo la histología corneal y complementar las observaciones de la biomicroscopia convencional. Esto constituye un reto para el mejor entendimiento de la histopatología corneal. De esta manera podemos actuar de forma profiláctica y terapéutica, en el seguimiento y evolución de patologías corneales.Objective: This paper is aimed at analyzing the corneal cellular structures through Confoscan S4-aided confocal microscopy in apparently healthy corneas. Methods: A prospective longitudinal study of 100 healthy eyes from practicing doctors, and from patients who had attended the corneal service at “Ramón Pando Ferrer” Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology in Havana since May 2007 was conducted. Both eyes of participating doctors were examined whereas the non-affected eye was examined in the patients. A total of 50 cases with no corneal

  14. Estudio del endotelio corneal en el queratocono por microscopia confocal Study of the corneal endothelium confocal microscopy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Benítez Merino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los hallazgos morfométricos del endotelio corneal por microscopia confocal con CONFOSCAN S-4. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo transversal de 102 ojos con queratocono en el período de septiembre de 2008 a septiembre 2009. A estos pacientes se les realizó microscopia confocal con CosfoscanS-4 para el estudio del endotelio corneal atendiendo el grado de queratocono. Se analizó el comportamiento de la evolución del queratocono según edad y sexo. Las imágenes fueron analizadas y procesadas mediante un programa informático diseñado específicamente para esto. Resultados: Fueron semejantes las edades de los pacientes con queratocono grado I y II, (35,2 y 34,7 años, los grado III presentaron una edad promedio mayor (38,4 años, sin diferencias significativas (p= 0,279. El sexo femenino predominó en 80,4 % de los pacientes. El 100 % de los queratoconos grado III tuvieron endotelios patológicos. Los valores promedios de la densidad celular en los queratoconos grado III (2585,9 células/mm² resultó no significativo (p= 0,339. El polimegatismo en los queratoconos grado III para un 48,69 % fue significativo (p= 0,002. En el pleomorfismo resultó significativo las diferencias observadas entre los tres grados (p= 0,002. Conclusión: Predominó el queratocono grado II para las mujeres y el grado I para los hombres. Los hallazgos morfológicos se manifestaron en la forma y tamaño de las células endoteliales. En córneas con queratocono grado II y III confluyeron células de mediano y gran tamaño con pérdida de su hexagonalidad. La densidad celular se mantuvo dentro del rango de valores normales para cualquier grado de queratocono.Objective: To describe the morphometric findings of the corneal endothelium confocal microscopy with CONFOSCAN S-4 Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study of 102 eyes with keratoconus performed from September 2008 to September 2009. The study patients had undergone confocal microscopy with

  15. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...... laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. Study design/Materials and Methods The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 m......J/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. Results OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged...

  16. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela-Lopis, I; Donath, E; Romero, G; Rojas, E; Moya, S E

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al 2 O 3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO 2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  17. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela-Lopis, I.; Romero, G.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S. E.; Donath, E.

    2011-07-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al2O3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  18. The application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guangcui; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yude; Liu, Hehe; Zhao, Weigang; Zhang, Ruixia; Min, Qin; Peng, Song

    2013-01-01

    A confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics was proposed for determining surface topography. This confocal topography method involves elemental sensitivity and can be used to classify the objects according to their elemental composition while obtaining their surface topography. To improve the spatial resolution of this confocal topography technology, the center of the confocal micro-volume was overlapped with the output focal spot of the polycapillary X-ray, focusing the lens in the excitation channel. The input focal spot of the X-ray lens parallel to the detection channel was used to determine the surface position of the sample. The corresponding surface adaptive algorithm was designed to obtain the surface topography. The surface topography of a ceramic chip was obtained. This confocal MXRF surface topography method could find application in the materials sciences

  19. Ca(2+ release events in cardiac myocytes up close: insights from fast confocal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav M Shkryl

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal properties of Ca(2+ transients during excitation-contraction coupling and elementary Ca(2+ release events (Ca(2+ sparks were studied in atrial and ventricular myocytes with ultra-fast confocal microscopy using a Zeiss LSM 5 LIVE system that allows sampling rates of up to 60 kHz. Ca(2+ sparks which originated from subsarcolemmal junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR release sites in atrial myocytes were anisotropic and elongated in the longitudinal direction of the cell. Ca(2+ sparks in atrial cells originating from non-junctional SR and in ventricular myocytes were symmetrical. Ca(2+ spark recording in line scan mode at 40,000 lines/s uncovered step-like increases of [Ca(2+]i. 2-D imaging of Ca(2+ transients revealed an asynchronous activation of release sites and allowed the sequential recording of Ca(2+ entry through surface membrane Ca(2+ channels and subsequent activation of Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release. With a latency of 2.5 ms after application of an electrical stimulus, Ca(2+ entry could be detected that was followed by SR Ca(2+ release after an additional 3 ms delay. Maximum Ca(2+ release was observed 4 ms after the beginning of release. The timing of Ca(2+ entry and release was confirmed by simultaneous [Ca(2+]i and membrane current measurements using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. In atrial cells activation of discrete individual release sites of the j-SR led to spatially restricted Ca(2+ release events that fused into a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+]i that subsequently propagated in a wave-like fashion towards the center of the cell. In ventricular myocytes asynchronous Ca(2+ release signals from discrete sites with no preferential subcellular location preceded the whole-cell Ca(2+ transient. In summary, ultra-fast confocal imaging allows investigation of Ca(2+ signals with a time resolution similar to patch clamp technique, however in a less invasive fashion.

  20. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of ∼15 (micro)m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 (micro)m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  1. The Use of Intravital Two-Photon and Thick Section Confocal Imaging to Analyze B Lymphocyte Trafficking in Lymph Nodes and Spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung; Hwang, Il-Young; Kehrl, John H

    2018-01-01

    Intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TP-LSM) has allowed the direct observation of immune cells in intact organs of living animals. In the B cell biology field TP-LSM has detailed the movement of B cells in high endothelial venules and during their transmigration into lymph organs; described the movement and positioning of B cells within lymphoid organs; outlined the mechanisms by which antigen is delivered to B cells; observed B cell interacting with T cells, other cell types, and even with pathogens; and delineated the egress of B cells from the lymph node (LN) parenchyma into the efferent lymphatics. As the quality of TP-LSM improves and as new fluorescent probes become available additional insights into B cell behavior and function await new investigations. Yet intravital TP-LSM has some disadvantages including a lower resolution than standard confocal microscopy, a narrow imaging window, and a shallow depth of imaging. We have found that supplementing intravital TP-LSM with conventional confocal microscopy using thick LN sections helps to overcome some of these shortcomings. Here, we describe procedures for visualizing the behavior and trafficking of fluorescently labeled, adoptively transferred antigen-activated B cells within the inguinal LN of live mice using two-photon microscopy. Also, we introduce procedures for fixed thick section imaging using standard confocal microscopy, which allows imaging of fluorescently labeled cells deep in the LN cortex and in the spleen with high resolution.

  2. Image scanning microscopy using a SPAD detector array (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Marco; Tortarolo, Giorgio; Buttafava, Mauro; Tosi, Alberto; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    The use of an array of detectors can help overcoming the traditional limitation of confocal microscopy: the compromise between signal and theoretical resolution. Each element independently records a view of the sample and the final image can be reconstructed by pixel reassignment or by inverse filtering (e.g. deconvolution). In this work, we used a SPAD array of 25 detectors specifically designed for this goal and our scanning microscopy control system (Carma) to acquire the partial images and to perform online image processing. Further work will be devoted to optimize the image reconstruction step and to improve the fill-factor of the detector.

  3. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  4. Scanning of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robillard, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Centers against cancer of Caen, Angers, Montpellier, Strasbourg and 'the Curie Foundation' have confronted their experience in detection of bone metastases by total body scanning. From the investigation by this procedure, of 1,467 patients with cancer, it results: the confrontation between radio and scanning shows a rate of false positive and false negative identical to the literature ones; the countage scanning allows to reduce the number of false positive; scanning allows to direct bone biopsy and to improve efficiency of histological examination [fr

  5. Classifying distinct basal cell carcinoma subtype by means of dermatoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Lallas, Aimilios; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Rabinovitz, Harold; Moscarella, Elvira; Ciardo, Silvana; Zalaudek, Iris; Oliviero, Margaret; Losi, Amanda; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Piana, Simonetta; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The current guidelines for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) suggest a different therapeutic approach according to histopathologic subtype. Although dermatoscopic and confocal criteria of BCC have been investigated, no specific studies were performed to evaluate the distinct reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) aspects of BCC subtypes. To define the specific dermatoscopic and confocal criteria for delineating different BCC subtypes. Dermatoscopic and confocal images of histopathologically confirmed BCCs were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Frequencies of dermatoscopic and confocal parameters are provided. Univariate and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Discriminant analyses were performed to define the independent confocal criteria for distinct BCC subtypes. Eighty-eight BCCs were included. Dermatoscopically, superficial BCCs (n=44) were primarily typified by the presence of fine telangiectasia, multiple erosions, leaf-like structures, and revealed cords connected to the epidermis and epidermal streaming upon RCM. Nodular BCCs (n=22) featured the classic dermatoscopic features and well outlined large basaloid islands upon RCM. Infiltrative BCCs (n=22) featured structureless, shiny red areas, fine telangiectasia, and arborizing vessels on dermatoscopy and dark silhouettes upon RCM. The retrospective design. Dermatoscopy and confocal microscopy can reliably classify different BCC subtypes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intravital Confocal and Two-photon Imaging of Dual-color Cells and Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ufuk; Andresen, Volker; Baggett, Brenda; Utzinger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    To optimize imaging of cells in three dimensional culture we studied confocal backscattering, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and autofluorescence as source of contrast in extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics and evaluated the attenuation as well as bleaching of endogenous cellular fluorescence signals. All common ECM mimics exhibit contrast observable with confocal reflectance microscopy. SHG imaging on collagen I based hydrogels provides high contrast and good optical penetration depth. Agarose is a useful embedding medium because it allows for large optical penetration and exhibits minimal autofluorescence while still providing good reflectance to detect voids in the embedding medium. We labeled breast cancer cells’ outline with DsRed2 and nucleus with eGFP. DsRed2 can be excited with confocal imaging at 568nm, and with two photon excitation (TPE) in the red and longer NIR. eGFP was excited at 488nm for confocal and in the NIR for TPE. While there is small difference in the bleaching rate for eGFP between confocal and TPE we observed significant difference for DsRed2 where bleaching is strongest during TPE in the red wavelengths and smallest during confocal imaging. After a few hundred microns depth in a collagen I hydrogel, TPE fluorescence becomes twice as strong compared to confocal imaging. PMID:23380006

  7. Conversion efficiency of implanted ions by confocal micro-luminescence mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshko, Y.; Huang, Mengbing; Gorokhovsky, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the further development of the statistical approach to determine the conversion efficiency of implanted ions into emitting centers and present the measurement method based on the confocal micro-luminescence mapping. It involves the micro-luminescence mapping with a narrow-open confocal aperture, followed by the statistical analysis of the photoluminescence signal from an ensemble of emitting centers. The confocal mapping method has two important advantages compared to the recently discussed aperture-free method (J. Lumin. 131 (2011) 489): it is less sensitive to errors in the laser spot size and has a well defined useful area. The confocal mapping has been applied to the Xe center in diamond. The conversion efficiency has been found to be about 0.28, which is in good agreement with the results of the aperture-free method. - Highlights: ► Conversion efficiency of implanted ions into emitting centers – statistical approach. ► Micro-luminescence mapping with open and narrow confocal aperture – comparison. ► Advantages of the confocal micro-luminescence mapping. ► Confocal micro-luminescence mapping has been applied to the Xe center in diamond. ► The conversion efficiency has been found to be about 0.28.

  8. Application of function-oriented roughness parameters using confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klauer

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical measuring instruments are widely used for the functional characterization of surface topography. However, due to the interaction of the surface with the incident light, effects occur that can influence the measured topography height values and the obtained surface texture parameters. Therefore, we describe a systematic investigation of the influences of optical surface topography measurement on the acquisition of function-oriented roughness parameters. The same evaluation areas of varying cylinder liners which represent a typical application of function-oriented roughness parameters were measured with a confocal microscope and a stylus instrument. Functional surface texture parameters as given in the standards ISO 13565–2, ISO 13565–3 and ISO 25178–2 were evaluated for both measurement methods and compared. The transmission of specific surface features was described and a correlation analysis for the surface topographies obtained with the different measurement methods and their resulting functional roughness parameters was carried out. Keywords: Functional surface characterization, Optical metrology, Topography measurement, Roughness

  9. Application of Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Dermatology Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Esra Koku Aksu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM is a non-invasive method, imaging cellular structures in living skin at a level close to the histological resolution. It is easier to diagnose melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin tumors especially in difficult cases when RCM features have been identified. Determination of the cellular features, presence of cellular and structural atypia with RCM allows the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Preoperative differential diagnosis of malignant lesions, determining preoperative lesion borders in complicated cases, identification of local recurrence after excision of malignant lesions, monitoring the treatment efficacy in patients using topical treatment and who can not be operated, are the main areas of RCM in tumoral lesions. Besides, RCM is helpful in the establishing the diagnosis of inflammatory disease like psoriasis, contact dermatitis, lichen planus and in evaluation of therapeutic efficacy, detecting of infestation like tinea, skabiyes, demodicosis and determining the level of bullae in bullous disease. Due to being noninvasive, RCM is preferred in cosmetology, in clinical research and practice for the evaluation of the effectiveness of cosmetic products and cosmetic procedures.

  10. A new method for depth profiling reconstruction in confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe

    2018-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is commonly used to reconstruct depth profiles of chemical species in multicomponent systems and to image nuclear and cellular details in human tissues via image intensity measurements of optical sections. However, the performance of this technique is reduced by inherent effects related to wave diffraction phenomena, refractive index mismatch and finite beam spot size. All these effects distort the optical wave and cause an image to be captured of a small volume around the desired illuminated focal point within the specimen rather than an image of the focal point itself. The size of this small volume increases with depth, thus causing a further loss of resolution and distortion of the profile. Recently, we proposed a theoretical model that accounts for the above wave distortion and allows for a correct reconstruction of the depth profiles for homogeneous samples. In this paper, this theoretical approach has been adapted for describing the profiles measured from non-homogeneous distributions of emitters inside the investigated samples. The intensity image is built by summing the intensities collected from each of the emitters planes belonging to the illuminated volume, weighed by the emitters concentration. The true distribution of the emitters concentration is recovered by a new approach that implements this theoretical model in a numerical algorithm based on the Maximum Entropy Method. Comparisons with experimental data and numerical simulations show that this new approach is able to recover the real unknown concentration distribution from experimental profiles with an accuracy better than 3%.

  11. Distribution of Biomolecules in Porous Nitrocellulose Membrane Pads Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and High-Speed Cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Maan, Abid Aslam; Khan, Muhammad Kashif Iqbal; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of our research was to study the distribution of inkjet printed biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads of different brands. We produced microarrays of fluorophore-labeled IgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on FAST, Unisart, and Oncyte-Avid slides and compared the spot

  12. Quantitative evaluation of experimental choroidal neovascularization by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy: fluorescein angiogram parallels heparan sulfate proteoglycan expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Regatieri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop a quantitative method to evaluate laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV in a rat model using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2 (HRA2 imaging. The expression of two heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG related to inflammation and angiogenesis was also investigated. CNV lesions were induced with argon laser in 21 heterozygous Zucker rats and after three weeks a fluorescein angiogram and autofluorescence exams were performed using HRA2. The area and greatest linear dimension were measured by two observers not aware of the protocol. Bland-Altman plots showed agreement between the observers, suggesting that the technique was reproducible. After fluorescein angiogram, HSPG (perlecan and syndecan-4 were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. There was a significant increase in the expression of perlecan and syndecan-4 (P < 0.0001 in retinas bearing CNV lesions compared to control retinas. The expression of these two HSPG increased with increasing CNV area. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the rat retina damaged with laser shots presented increased expression of perlecan and syndecan-4. Moreover, we observed that the overexpression occurred in the outer layer of the retina, which is related to choroidal damage. It was possible to develop a standardized quantitative method to evaluate CNV in a rat model using HRA2. In addition, we presented data indicating that the expression of HSPG parallels the area of CNV lesion. The understanding of these events offers opportunities for studies of new therapeutic interventions targeting these HSPG.

  13. QUANTITATIVE FLUORESCENCE OF 5-FU-TREATED FETAL RAT LIMBS USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY AND LYSOTRACKER RED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: LysoTracker Red (LT) is a paraformaldehyde fixable probe that concentrates into acidic compartments of cells and tissues. After cell death a high level of lysosomal activity (acidic enzyme) is expressed resulting from phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies by neighboring ce...

  14. Extrusion and intrusion evolution in cyclically strained cast superalloy Inconel 738LC using confocal laser scanning microscope and AFM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obrtlík, Karel; Juliš, M.; Man, Jiří; Podrábský, T.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 241, - (2010), Art. No. 012054 ISSN 1742-6588. [ICSMA-15 (15th International Conference on the Strength of Materials). Dresden, 16.08.2009-21.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200410502; GA ČR GA106/07/1507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : fatigue * persistent slip marking * Inconel 738LC Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/240/1/012054

  15. Calibration and quantification of fast intracellular motion (FIM) in living cells using correlation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Pavel; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Boyde, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 25, - (2003), s. 230-239 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/99/0368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : fast intracellular motion * living cell ů video rate confocal laser scanning microscopy Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.733, year: 2003

  16. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  17. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Marie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    With a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) a vibrating surface is automatically scanned over predefined grid points, and data processed for displaying vibration properties like mode shapes, natural frequencies, damping ratios, and operational deflection shapes. Our SLDV – a PSV-500H from...

  18. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ...

  19. Transverse section scanning mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus is described for scanning a transverse, radionuclide scan-field using an array of focussed collimators. The collimators are movable tangentially on rails, driven by a single motor via a coupled screw. The collimators are also movable in a radial direction on rails driven by a step motor via coupled screws and bevel gears. Adjacent bevel gears rotate in opposite directions so adjacent collimators move in radially opposite directions. In use, the focal point of each collimator scans at least half of the scan-field, e.g. a human head located in the central aperture, and the electrical outputs of detectors associated with each collimator are used to determine the distribution of radioactive emission intensity at a number of points in the scan-field. (author)

  20. LIDAR COMBINED SCANNING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Elizarov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The results of lidar combined scanning unit development for locating leaks of hydrocarbons are presented The unit enables to perform high-speed scanning of the investigated space in wide and narrow angle fields. Method. Scanning in a wide angular field is produced by one-line scanning path by means of the movable aluminum mirror with a frequency of 20Hz and amplitude of 20 degrees of swing. Narrowband scanning is performed along a spiral path by the deflector. The deflection of the beam is done by rotation of the optical wedges forming part of the deflector at an angle of ±50. The control function of the scanning node is performed by a specialized software product written in C# programming language. Main Results. This scanning unit allows scanning the investigated area at a distance of 50-100 m with spatial resolution at the level of 3 cm. The positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space is 15'. The developed scanning unit gives the possibility to browse the entire investigated area for the time not more than 1 ms at a rotation frequency of each wedge from 50 to 200 Hz. The problem of unambiguous definition of the beam geographical coordinates in space is solved at the software level according to the rotation angles of the mirrors and optical wedges. Lidar system coordinates are determined by means of GPS. Practical Relevance. Development results open the possibility for increasing the spatial resolution of scanning systems of a wide range of lidars and can provide high positioning accuracy of the laser beam in space.

  1. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montereali, R.M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Fisica, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Giammatteo, M. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Centro di Microscopia Elettronica; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2000-07-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F{sub 3}{sup +} and F{sub 2} aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. [Italian] L'irraggiamento con elettroni di bassa energia del fluoruro di litio (LiF), in forma di cristalli e film, induce la formazione di difetti primari F e centri di colore aggregati stabili in un sottile strato localizzato alla superficie del materiale investigato. Per la prima volta un microscopio confocale a scansione (CLSM) in modalita' fluorescenza e' stato usato per ricostruire la distribuzione di centri di colore laser attivi ad alta efficienza di emissione nel visibile, in strisce colorate ottenute con elettroni da 12 e 16 keV su film di LiF evaporati termicamente su vetro. La formazione dei difetti aggregati F2 e F3+ risulta ristretta spazialmente nella regione di penetrazione degli elettroni e proporzionale al profilo della distribuzione dell'energia da essi depositata, ricavata tramite simulazioni Monte Carlo.

  2. Imaging Amyloid Tissues Stained with Luminescent Conjugated Oligothiophenes by Hyperspectral Confocal Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofie; Bäck, Marcus; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per

    2017-10-20

    Proteins that deposit as amyloid in tissues throughout the body can be the cause or consequence of a large number of diseases. Among these we find neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease afflicting primarily the central nervous system, and systemic amyloidosis where serum amyloid A, transthyretin and IgG light chains deposit as amyloid in liver, carpal tunnel, spleen, kidney, heart, and other peripheral tissues. Amyloid has been known and studied for more than a century, often using amyloid specific dyes such as Congo red and Thioflavin T (ThT) or Thioflavin (ThS). In this paper, we present heptamer-formyl thiophene acetic acid (hFTAA) as an example of recently developed complements to these dyes called luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs). hFTAA is easy to use and is compatible with co-staining in immunofluorescence or with other cellular markers. Extensive research has proven that hFTAA detects a wider range of disease associated protein aggregates than conventional amyloid dyes. In addition, hFTAA can also be applied for optical assignment of distinct aggregated morphotypes to allow studies of amyloid fibril polymorphism. While the imaging methodology applied is optional, we here demonstrate hyperspectral imaging (HIS), laser scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These examples show some of the imaging techniques where LCOs can be used as tools to gain more detailed knowledge of the formation and structural properties of amyloids. An important limitation to the technique is, as for all conventional optical microscopy techniques, the requirement for microscopic size of aggregates to allow detection. Furthermore, the aggregate should comprise a repetitive β-sheet structure to allow for hFTAA binding. Excessive fixation and/or epitope exposure that modify the aggregate structure or conformation can render poor hFTAA binding and hence pose limitations to accurate imaging.

  3. Mitochondrial behavior during oogenesis in zebrafish: a confocal microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Zhong; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-03-01

    The behavior of mitochondria during early oogenesis remains largely unknown in zebrafish. We used three mitochondrial probes (Mito Tracker Red CMXRos, Mito Tracker Green FM, and JC-1) to stain early zebrafish oocyte mitochondria, and confocal microscopy to analyze mitochondrial aggregation and distribution. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we traced mitochondrial movement. The microtubule assembly inhibitor nocodazole and microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB) were used to analyze the role of microtubules and microfilaments on mitochondrial movement. By using the dual emission probe, JC-1, and oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), we determined the distribution of active and inactive (low-active) mitochondria. Green/red fluorescence ratios of different sublocations in different oocyte groups stained by JC-1 were detected in merged (green and red) images. Our results showed that mitochondria exhibited a unique distribution pattern in early zebrafish oocytes. They tended to aggregate into large clusters in early stage I oocytes, but in a threadlike state in latter stage I oocytes. We detected a lower density mitochondrial area and a higher density mitochondrial area on opposite sides of the germinal vesicle. The green/red fluorescence ratios in different sublocations in normal oocytes were about 1:1. This implies that active mitochondria were distributed in all sublocations. FCCP treatment caused significant increases in the ratios. CB and nocodazole treatment caused an increase of the ratios in clusters and mitochondrial cloud, but not in dispersed areas. Mitochondria in different sublocations underwent fast dynamic movement. Inhibition or disruption of microtubules or microfilaments resulted in even faster mitochondrial free movement.

  4. Aqueous Colloid + Polymer Depletion System for Confocal Microscopy and Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nayoung; Umanzor, Esmeralda J.; Conrad, Jacinta C.

    2018-05-01

    We developed a model depletion system with colloidal particles that were refractive index- and density-matched to 80 (w/w)% glycerol in water, and characterized the effect of interparticle interactions on the structure and dynamics of non-equilibrium phases. 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl methacrylate copolymer particles were synthesized following Kodger et al. (Sci. Rep. 5, 14635 (2015)). Particles were dispersed in glycerol/water solutions to generate colloidal suspensions with good control over electrostatic interactions and a moderately high background viscosity of 55 mPa-s. To probe the effects of charge screening and depletion attractions on the suspension phase behavior, we added NaCl and polyacrylamide (M_w = 186 kDa) at various concentrations to particle suspensions formulated at volume fractions of phi = 0.05 and 0.3 and imaged the suspensions using confocal microscopy. The particles were nearly hard spheres at a NaCl concentration of 20 mM, but aggregated when the concentration of NaCl was further increased. Changes in the particle structure and dynamics with increasing concentration of the depletant polyacrylamide followed the trends expected from earlier experiments on depletion-driven gelation. Additionally, we measured the viscosity and corrected first normal stress difference of suspensions formulated at phi = 0.4 with and without added polymer. The solvent viscosity was suitable for rheology measurements without the onset of instabilities such as secondary flows or edge fracture. These results validate this system as an alternative to one common model system, suspensions of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles and polystyrene depletants in organic solvents, for investigating phase behavior and flow properties in attractive colloidal suspensions.

  5. RELIABILITY OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS: USE OF MULTISPECTRAL BEADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is a need for a standardized, impartial calibration, and validation protocol on confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to have testing tools to provide a reproducible way to evaluate instrument performance. ...

  6. A four-phase strategy for the implementation of reflectance confocal microscopy in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogedoorn, L.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.; Wolberink, E.A.W.; Peppelman, M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is gradually implemented in dermatology. Strategies for further implementation and practical 'hands on' guidelines are lacking. OBJECTIVE: The primary outcome was to conduct a general strategy for further implementation of RCM. The secondary outcome

  7. Ex Vivo (Fluorescence) Confocal Microscopy in Surgical Pathology: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    First developed in 1957, confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging tool that can be used to obtain near real-time reflected light images of untreated human tissue with nearly histologic resolution. Besides its research applications, in the last decades, confocal microscopy technology has been proposed as a useful device to improve clinical diagnosis, especially in ophthalmology, dermatology, and endomicroscopy settings, thanks to advances in instrument development. Compared with the wider use of the in vivo tissue assessment, ex vivo applications of confocal microscopy are not fully explored. A comprehensive review of the current literature was performed here, focusing on the reliable applications of ex vivo confocal microscopy in surgical pathology and on some potential evolutions of this new technique from pathologists' viewpoint.

  8. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  9. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.; Peters, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99m Tc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99m Tc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67 Ga citrate and 111 In white blood cells ( 111 In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  10. Intraoperative confocal microscopy in the visualization of 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence in low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, Nader; Snyder, Laura A; Honea, Norissa J; Coons, Stephen W; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Smith, Kris A; Spetzler, Robert F

    2011-10-01

    Greater extent of resection (EOR) for patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) corresponds with improved clinical outcome, yet remains a central challenge to the neurosurgical oncologist. Although 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced tumor fluorescence is a strategy that can improve EOR in gliomas, only glioblastomas routinely fluoresce following 5-ALA administration. Intraoperative confocal microscopy adapts conventional confocal technology to a handheld probe that provides real-time fluorescent imaging at up to 1000× magnification. The authors report a combined approach in which intraoperative confocal microscopy is used to visualize 5-ALA tumor fluorescence in LGGs during the course of microsurgical resection. Following 5-ALA administration, patients with newly diagnosed LGG underwent microsurgical resection. Intraoperative confocal microscopy was conducted at the following points: 1) initial encounter with the tumor; 2) the midpoint of tumor resection; and 3) the presumed brain-tumor interface. Histopathological analysis of these sites correlated tumor infiltration with intraoperative cellular tumor fluorescence. Ten consecutive patients with WHO Grades I and II gliomas underwent microsurgical resection with 5-ALA and intraoperative confocal microscopy. Macroscopic tumor fluorescence was not evident in any patient. However, in each case, intraoperative confocal microscopy identified tumor fluorescence at a cellular level, a finding that corresponded to tumor infiltration on matched histological analyses. Intraoperative confocal microscopy can visualize cellular 5-ALA-induced tumor fluorescence within LGGs and at the brain-tumor interface. To assess the clinical value of 5-ALA for high-grade gliomas in conjunction with neuronavigation, and for LGGs in combination with intraoperative confocal microscopy and neuronavigation, a Phase IIIa randomized placebo-controlled trial (BALANCE) is underway at the authors' institution.

  11. Visualizing Epithelial Expression in Vertical and Horizontal Planes With Dual Axes Confocal Endomicroscope Using Compact Distal Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoming; Li, Haijun; Duan, Xiyu; Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Juan; Oldham, Kenn R; Wang, Thomas D

    2017-07-01

    The epithelium is a thin layer of tissue that lines hollow organs, such as colon. Visualizing in vertical cross sections with sub-cellular resolution is essential to understanding early disease mechanisms that progress naturally in the plane perpendicular to the tissue surface. The dual axes confocal architecture collects optical sections in tissue by directing light at an angle incident to the surface using separate illumination and collection beams to reduce effects of scattering, enhance dynamic range, and increase imaging depth. This configuration allows for images to be collected in the vertical as well as horizontal planes. We designed a fast, compact monolithic scanner based on the principle of parametric resonance. The mirrors were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and were coated with aluminum to maximize near-infrared reflectivity. We achieved large axial displacements [Formula: see text] and wide lateral deflections >20°. The MEMS chip has a 3.2×2.9 mm 2 form factor that allows for efficient packaging in the distal end of an endomicroscope. Imaging can be performed in either the vertical or horizontal planes with [Formula: see text] depth or 1 ×1 mm 2 area, respectively, at 5 frames/s. We systemically administered a Cy5.5-labeled peptide that is specific for EGFR, and collected near-infrared fluorescence images ex vivo from pre-malignant mouse colonic epithelium to reveal the spatial distribution of this molecular target. Here, we demonstrate a novel scanning mechanism in a dual axes confocal endomicroscope that collects optical sections of near-infrared fluorescence in either vertical or horizontal planes to visualize molecular expression in the epithelium.

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine ( ... for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will I experience during ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate changes in the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should ... such as an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an ... abnormal was found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for ...

  15. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  16. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  17. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  18. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  20. Heart CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make to decrease the risk of heart disease. Risks Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or ... or had thyroid cancer. A physician may perform these imaging tests to: determine if the gland is ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... Actual scanning time for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will ... diagnostic procedures have been used for more than five decades, and there are no known long-term ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Scan and Uptake Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information needed to make a diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Nuclear medicine is less expensive and ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation ... high as with other imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI. However, nuclear medicine scans are more ...

  9. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... as an overactive thyroid gland, a condition called hyperthyroidism , cancer or other growths assess the nature of ... an x-ray or CT scan, surgeries or treatments using iodinated contrast material within the last two ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... painless. However, during the thyroid scan, you may feel uncomfortable when lying completely still with your head ... When the radiotracer is given intravenously, you will feel a slight pin prick when the needle is ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... energy. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? The thyroid scan is used ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. If you had an intravenous line ... found, and should not be a cause of concern for you. Actual scanning time for each thyroid ...

  15. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ...

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... the gland following medication use, surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy top of page How should I prepare? You ... You will receive specific instructions based on the type of scan you are undergoing. top of page ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  18. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification describes a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to the adjustable fan beam and its collimator system, together with the facility for taking a conventional x-radiograph without moving the patient. (U.K.)

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

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    Full Text Available ... exam of any medications you are taking, including vitamins and herbal supplements. You should also inform them ... of scan you are undergoing. top of page What does the equipment look like? The special camera ...

  20. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.