WorldWideScience

Sample records for video-based augmented reality

  1. Approach and Evaluation of a Mobile Video-Based and Location-Based Augmented Reality Platform for Information Brokerage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastageeri, H.; Storz, M.; Koukofikis, A.; Knauth, S.; Coors, V.

    2016-09-01

    Providing mobile location-based information for pedestrians faces many challenges. On one hand the accuracy of localisation indoors and outdoors is restricted due to technical limitations of GPS and Beacons. Then again only a small display is available to display information as well as to develop a user interface. Plus, the software solution has to consider the hardware characteristics of mobile devices during the implementation process for aiming a performance with minimum latency. This paper describes our approach by including a combination of image tracking and GPS or Beacons to ensure orientation and precision of localisation. To communicate the information on Points of Interest (POIs), we decided to choose Augmented Reality (AR). For this concept of operations, we used besides the display also the acceleration and positions sensors as a user interface. This paper especially goes into detail on the optimization of the image tracking algorithms, the development of the video-based AR player for the Android platform and the evaluation of videos as an AR element in consideration of providing a good user experience. For setting up content for the POIs or even generate a tour we used and extended the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard Augmented Reality Markup Language (ARML).

  2. APPROACH AND EVALUATION OF A MOBILE VIDEO-BASED AND LOCATION-BASED AUGMENTED REALITY PLATFORM FOR INFORMATION BROKERAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dastageeri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing mobile location-based information for pedestrians faces many challenges. On one hand the accuracy of localisation indoors and outdoors is restricted due to technical limitations of GPS and Beacons. Then again only a small display is available to display information as well as to develop a user interface. Plus, the software solution has to consider the hardware characteristics of mobile devices during the implementation process for aiming a performance with minimum latency. This paper describes our approach by including a combination of image tracking and GPS or Beacons to ensure orientation and precision of localisation. To communicate the information on Points of Interest (POIs, we decided to choose Augmented Reality (AR. For this concept of operations, we used besides the display also the acceleration and positions sensors as a user interface. This paper especially goes into detail on the optimization of the image tracking algorithms, the development of the video-based AR player for the Android platform and the evaluation of videos as an AR element in consideration of providing a good user experience. For setting up content for the POIs or even generate a tour we used and extended the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standard Augmented Reality Markup Language (ARML.

  3. Augmented reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrik Pucer

    2011-01-01

    .... In such a mixed reality, real and virtual objects coexist in the same environment. The reality, where users watch and use the real environment upgraded with virtual objects is called augmented reality...

  4. AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Bahn, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    Projektets grundlæggende idé er udvikling af visuel, æstetisk læring med Augmented Reality, hvor intentionen er at bidrage med konkrete undersøgelser og udforskning af begrebet Augmented Reality – herunder koblingen mellem det analoge og digitale i forhold til læring, multimodalitet og it...

  5. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher; Kjeldsen, Lars Peter Bech; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of iPad-facilitated application of augmented reality in the teaching of highly complex anatomical and physiological subjects in the training of nurses at undergraduate level. The general aim of the project is to investigate the potentials of this application in terms...... of augmented reality are discussed....

  6. Augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Pucer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we can obtain in a simple and rapid way most of the information that we need. Devices, such as personal computers and mobile phones, enable access to information in different formats (written, pictorial, audio or video whenever and wherever. Daily we use and encounter information that can be seen as virtual objects or objects that are part of the virtual world of computers. Everyone, at least once, wanted to bring these virtual objects from the virtual world of computers into real environments and thus mix virtual and real worlds. In such a mixed reality, real and virtual objects coexist in the same environment. The reality, where users watch and use the real environment upgraded with virtual objects is called augmented reality. In this article we describe the main properties of augmented reality. In addition to the basic properties that define a reality as augmented reality, we present the various building elements (possible hardware and software that provide an insight into such a reality and practical applications of augmented reality. The applications are divided into three groups depending on the information and functions that augmented reality offers, such as help, guide and simulator.

  7. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Radmer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer resultater fra pilotafprøvning i 7.-klasses fysik/kemi og biologi af to Augmented Reality (AR)-apps til naturfagsundervisning. Muligheder og udfordringer ved lærerens stilladsering af elevernes undersøgende samtale og modelleringskompetence er undersøgt med interview...

  8. Confronting an augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    John Hedberg; Robert Fitzgerald; James Steele; Anna Wilson; Matt Bacon; Danny Munnerley

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and suggest that they be used as drivers for research into effective educational applications of augmented reality. We discuss how multi-modal, sensorial...

  9. Augmented reality navigation in open surgery for hilar cholangiocarcinoma resection with hemihepatectomy using video-based in situ three-dimensional anatomical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui; Ma, Longfei; Xiang, Canhong; Wang, Xuedong; Li, Ang; Liao, Hongen; Dong, Jiahong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Patients who undergo hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCAC) resection with concomitant hepatectomy have a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality due to surgical trauma to the hepatic and biliary vasculature. Patient concerns: A 58-year-old Chinese man with yellowing skin and sclera, abdominal distension, pruritus, and anorexia for approximately 3 weeks. Diagnoses: Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed a mass over the biliary tree at the porta hepatis, which diagnosed to be s a hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Intervention: Three-dimensional (3D) images of the patient's hepatic and biliary structures were reconstructed preoperatively from CT data, and the 3D images were used for preoperative planning and augmented reality (AR)-assisted intraoperative navigation during open HCAC resection with hemihepatectomy. A 3D-printed model of the patient's biliary structures was also used intraoperatively as a visual reference. Outcomes: No serious postoperative complications occurred, and the patient was tumor-free at the 9-month follow-up examination based on CT results. Lessons: AR-assisted preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation might be beneficial in other patients with HCAC patients to reduce postoperative complications and ensure disease-free survival. In our postoperative analysis, we also found that, when the3D images were superimposed 3D-printed model using a see-through integral video graphy display device, our senses of depth perception and motion parallax were improved, compared with that which we had experienced intraoperatively using the videobased AR display system. PMID:28906410

  10. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  11. Augmented reality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  12. Confronting an augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hedberg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and suggest that they be used as drivers for research into effective educational applications of augmented reality. We discuss how multi-modal, sensorial augmentation of reality links to existing theories of education and learning, focusing on ideas of cognitive dissonance and the confrontation of new realities implied by exposure to new and varied perspectives. We also discuss connections with broader debates brought on by the social and cultural changes wrought by the increased digitalisation of our lives, especially the concept of the extended mind. Rather than offer a prescription for augmentation, our intention is to throw open debate and to provoke deep thinking about what interacting with and creating an augmented reality might mean for both teacher and learner.

  13. Interactive augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Moret Gabarró, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Projecte final de carrera realitzat en col.laboració amb el Royal Institute of Technology Augmented reality can provide a new experience to users by adding virtual objects where they are relevant in the real world. The new generation of mobile phones offers a platform to develop augmented reality application for industry as well as for the general public. Although some applications are reaching commercial viability, the technology is still limited. The main problem designers have to face w...

  14. Prototyping Augmented Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Learn to create augmented reality apps using Processing open-source programming language Augmented reality (AR) is used all over, and you may not even realize it. Smartphones overlay data onto live camera views to show homes for sale, restaurants, or historical sites. American football broadcasts use AR to show the invisible first-down line on the field to TV viewers. Nike and Budweiser, among others, have used AR in ads. Now, you can learn to create AR prototypes using 3D data, Processing open-source programming language, and other languages. This unique book is an easy-to-follow guide on how

  15. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  16. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they

  17. Augmented reality som wearable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler design og implementering af Augmented Reality (AR) i form af en wearable i sygeplejerskeuddannelsens anatomiundervisning, mere specifikt undervisning i lungeanatomi og respiration, med fokus på potentialer for visuel læring. Projektet undersøger, hvordan en udviklet AR...

  18. Augmented Reality og kulturarv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Kirkedahl Lysholm

    2013-01-01

    Museerne står overfor at skulle omfavne den digitale kultur i håndteringen af den store mængde viden, institutionerne repræsenterer. Augmented Reality-systemer forbinder ved hjælp af moderne teknologi det virtuelle med det virkelige, og kan derfor synes som en oplagt anvendelsesmulighed i...

  19. Augmented Reality i naturfagsundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radmer, Ole; Surland, Mogens; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    Augmented Reality (AR) giver ny mulighed for, at elever kan lave undersøgelser i naturfag med enkel teknologi, hvor animationer og simulationer kobles med det virkelige fænomen. I workshoppen kan I afprøve AR eksempler, udviklet i et internationalt EU projekt. Der vil være noget, der direkte kan...

  20. ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland; Kalz, Marco; Van Ulzen, Patricia; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., Klemke, R., Kalz, M., Van Ulzen, P., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality [Special issue]. Journal of Universal Computer Science - Technology for learning across physical and virtual spaces, 18(15), 2143-2164.

  1. AR DOC: Augmented reality documentaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality Documentaries (AR DOC) er et ’lille’ Shareplay projekt (ansøgte midler augmented reality cross media løsninger, til at skabe engagerende publikumsformidling...... indenfor oplevelsesindustrien. Projektet har genereret ny viden omkring, hvordan fysisk og digital formidling kan understøttes via Augmented Reality som formidlingsformat....

  2. Mobile Collaborative Augmented Reality: The Augmented Stroll

    OpenAIRE

    Renevier, Philippe; Nigay, Laurence

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The paper focuses on Augmented Reality systems in which interaction with the real world is augmented by the computer, the task being performed in the real world. We first define what mobile AR systems, collaborative AR systems and finally mobile and collaborative AR systems are. We then present the augmented stroll and its software design as one example of a mobile and collaborative AR system. The augmented stroll is applied to Archaeology in the MAGIC (Mobile Augmente...

  3. Augmented reality services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Koubek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We assume that one of the key reasons is in the difference between a standalone application and a web service. Both architectures have some advantages and disadvantages. The Standalone application (e.g. Nokia/OVI Maps provides the required functionality. From the user point of view, main asset of this “offline” approach is network connectivity independence. However, this kind of applications must be upgraded manually. Moreover, it is hard to get any data about the application usage because it requires additional actions from the user – data are usually acquired through conventional ways, such as email or web forms.The online service such as Google Maps (including its mobile application can offer the same functionality as the offline application. Nevertheless, a permanent connection to provider servers is necessary. This can be taken as a drawback. On the other hand, usage data collection is easier and can be done without the user intervention. The data collection provides a valuable analysis basis of the user habits and needs. This analysis is necessary for design of a complex “user” based solutions such as Google Now.Augmented reality applications are usually based on the first mentioned approach. In this article, we describe our model of augmented reality as a service and compare its features with standalone solutions. Further, other important key aspects for large emergence of augmented reality services in a mainstream market are discussed.

  4. Augmented reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  5. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  6. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes.

  7. Augmented reality in medical education?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-01-01

    .... Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer...

  8. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Augmented Reality Interface Tactical map with browser and manipulators / tangible markers Yes Yes Unknown No Kalphat (2009) Tactical......Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES) by Charles R Amburn, Nathan L Vey, and MAJ Jerry R Mize Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL Michael

  9. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  10. Understanding augmented reality concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality is not a technology. Augmented reality is a medium. Likewise, a book on augmented reality that only addresses the technology that is required to support the medium of augmented reality falls far short of providing the background that is needed to produce, or critically consume augmented reality applications. One reads a book. One watches a movie. One experiences augmented reality. Understanding Augmented Reality addresses the elements that are required to create compelling augmented reality experiences. The technology that supports

  11. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student i...... involvement. The AR-sci-project (Augmented Reality for SCIence education) addresses the issue of applying augmented reality in developing innovative science education and enhancing the quality of science teaching and learning....

  12. Augmented reality som wearable technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, Annette

    the potential of Augmented reality increasing students level of understanding, interaction and engagement with the object. I will demonstrate the technology and show you the human lungs in your body and the future perspectives of the technology. Organization: developed in collaboration with Mie Buhl, Professor......“How Augmented reality can facilitate learning in visualizing human anatomy “ At this station I demonstrate how Augmented reality can be used to visualize the human lungs in situ and as a wearable technology which establish connection between body, image and technology in education. I will show...

  13. Adaptive Augmented Reality: Plasticity of Augmentations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghouaiel, Nehla; Cieutat, Jean-Marc; JESSEL, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    International audience; An augmented reality system is used to complete the real world with virtual objects (computer generated) so they seem to coexist in the same space as the real world. The concept of plasticity [4][5] was first introduced for Human Computer Interaction (HCI). It denotes the ability of an HCI interface to fit the context of use defined by the user, the environment and the platform. We believe that plasticity is a very important notion in the domain of augmented reality. T...

  14. Military Applications of Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    interest in AR technology has a long history. The Ultrasound Augmented Reality project [State et al(1996)] is one note- worthy example of a project...Many military bases have “towns” for training that consist of concrete block buildings with multiple levels and architec- tural configurations. AR...Livingston MA, Hirota G, Garrett WF, Whitton MC, Pisano ED, Fuchs H (1996) Technologies for augmented reality systems: Realizing ultrasound -guided

  15. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  16. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  17. Crime Scenes as Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    , physical damage: they are all readable and interpretable signs. As augmented reality the crime scene carries a narrative which at first is hidden and must be revealed. Due to the process of investigation and the detective's ability to reason and deduce, the crime scene as place is reconstructed as virtual......Using the concept of augmented reality, this article will investigate how places in various ways have become augmented by means of different mediatization strategies. Augmentation of reality implies an enhancement of the places' emotional character: a certain mood, atmosphere or narrative surplus...... of meaning has been implemented. This may take place at different levels, which will be presented and investigated in this article and exemplified by some cases from the fields of tourism and computer games.                       The article suggests that we may use the forensic term crime scene in order...

  18. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  19. Augmented reality som wearable technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, Annette

    2016-01-01

    “How Augmented reality can facilitate learning in visualizing human anatomy “ At this station I demonstrate how Augmented reality can be used to visualize the human lungs in situ and as a wearable technology which establish connection between body, image and technology in education. I will show...... the potential of Augmented reality increasing students level of understanding, interaction and engagement with the object. I will demonstrate the technology and show you the human lungs in your body and the future perspectives of the technology. Organization: developed in collaboration with Mie Buhl, Professor...... MSO, Aalborg University, Copenhagen. Annette Rahn, MSc, senior lecturer and teacher in anatomy and physiology at the School of Nursing, VIA Health- and Welfare Technology, VIA University College....

  20. Augmented reality for anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rhys Gethin; John, Nigel William; Delieu, John Michael

    2010-03-01

    The use of Virtual Environments has been widely reported as a method of teaching anatomy. Generally such environments only convey the shape of the anatomy to the student. We present the Bangor Augmented Reality Education Tool for Anatomy (BARETA), a system that combines Augmented Reality (AR) technology with models produced using Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology, to provide the student with stimulation for touch as well as sight. The principal aims of this work were to provide an interface more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard, and to evaluate such a system as a viable supplement to traditional cadaver based education.

  1. Augmented Reality in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swenson, Hakon

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits and chall......Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits...

  2. Augmenting the access grid using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The Access Grid (AG) targets an advanced collaboration environment, with which multi-party group of people from remote sites can collaborate over high-performance networks. However, current AG still employs VIC (Video Conferencing Tool) to offer only pure video for remote communication, while most AG users expect to collaboratively refer and manipulate the 3D geometric models of grid services' results in live videos of AG session. Augmented Reality (AR) technique can overcome the deficiencies with its characteristics of combining virtual and real, real-time interaction and 3D registration, so it is necessary for AG to utilize AR to better assist the advanced collaboration environment. This paper introduces an effort to augment the AG by adding support for AR capability, which is encapsulated in the node service infrastructure, named as Augmented Reality Service (ARS). The ARS can merge the 3D geometric models of grid services' results and real video scene of AG into one AR environment, and provide the opportunity for distributed AG users to interactively and collaboratively participate in the AR environment with better experience.

  3. Augmented Reality for Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Harald; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Georgsen, Marianne

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. So far, however, most research has looked at the technology itself – and AR has been used primarily for commercial purposes. As a learning tool, AR supports an inquiry-based approach to science education with a high level of student i...

  4. Augmented Reality in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swensen, Hakon

    Augmented reality (AR) holds great promise as a learning tool. However, most extant studies in this field have focused on the technology itself. The poster presents findings from the first stage of the AR-sci project addressing the issue of applying AR for educational purposes. Benefits...

  5. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  6. Use of Augmented Reality in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jeřábek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with phenomena of augmented reality in context of didactics. The thesis aims to define augmented reality in conceptual and content area and focuses on augmented reality in the structure of educational tools and identification of its functions and use from the didactical standpoint. The thesis characterizes augmented reality as a specific technological-perceptual concept and establishes a system of perceptual, technological and resulting aspects that reflect important paramet...

  7. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangyu; Rui,

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  8. Comprehensible visualization for augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Denis; Mendez, Erick; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    This article presents interactive visualizations to support the comprehension of spatial relationships between virtual and real world objects for Augmented Reality (AR) applications. To enhance the clarity of such relationships we discuss visualization techniques and their suitability for AR. We apply them on different AR applications with different goals, e.g. in X-Ray vision or in applications which draw a user's attention to an object of interest. We demonstrate how Focus and Context (F+C) visualizations are used to affect the user's perception of hidden or nearby objects by presenting contextual information in the area of augmentation. We discuss the organization and the possible sources of data for visualizations in Augmented Reality and present cascaded and multi level F+C visualizations to address complex, cluttered scenes that are inevitable in real environments. This article also shows filters and tools to interactively control the amount of augmentation. It compares the impact of real world context preserving to a pure virtual and uniform enhancement of these structures for augmentations of real world imagery. Finally this paper discusses the stylization of sparse object representations for AR to improve X-Ray vision.

  9. Augmented reality building operations tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  10. Aspects of User Experience in Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen

    2016-01-01

    In Augmented Reality applications, the real environment is annotated or enhanced with computer-generated graphics.This is a topic that has been researched in the recent decades, but for many people this is a brand new and never heard of topic.The main focus of this thesis is investigations in human factors related to Augmented Reality. This is investigated partly as how Augmented Reality applications are used in unsupervised settings, and partly in specific evaluations related to user perform...

  11. Enhancing tourism with augmented and virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Augmented and virtual reality are on the advance. In the last twelve months, several interesting devices have entered the market. Since tourism is one of the fastest growing economic sectors in the world and has become one of the major players in international commerce, the aim of this thesis was to examine how tourism could be enhanced with augmented and virtual reality. The differences and functional principles of augmented and virtual reality were investigated, general uses were described ...

  12. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  13. Augmented reality in intraventricular neuroendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, T; Schaumann, A; Schulz, M; Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2017-06-01

    Individual planning of the entry point and the use of navigation has become more relevant in intraventricular neuroendoscopy. Navigated neuroendoscopic solutions are continuously improving. We describe experimentally measured accuracy and our first experience with augmented reality-enhanced navigated neuroendoscopy for intraventricular pathologies. Augmented reality-enhanced navigated endoscopy was tested for accuracy in an experimental setting. Therefore, a 3D-printed head model with a right parietal lesion was scanned with a thin-sliced computer tomography. Segmentation of the tumor lesion was performed using Scopis NovaPlan navigation software. An optical reference matrix is used to register the neuroendoscope's geometry and its field of view. The pre-planned ROI and trajectory are superimposed in the endoscopic image. The accuracy of the superimposed contour fitting on endoscopically visualized lesion was acquired by measuring the deviation of both midpoints to one another. The technique was subsequently used in 29 cases with CSF circulation pathologies. Navigation planning included defining the entry points, regions of interests and trajectories, superimposed as augmented reality on the endoscopic video screen during intervention. Patients were evaluated for postoperative imaging, reoperations, and possible complications. The experimental setup revealed a deviation of the ROI's midpoint from the real target by 1.2 ± 0.4 mm. The clinical study included 18 cyst fenestrations, ten biopsies, seven endoscopic third ventriculostomies, six stent placements, and two shunt implantations, being eventually combined in some patients. In cases of cyst fenestrations postoperatively, the cyst volume was significantly reduced in all patients by mean of 47%. In biopsies, the diagnostic yield was 100%. Reoperations during a follow-up period of 11.4 ± 10.2 months were necessary in two cases. Complications included one postoperative hygroma and one insufficient

  14. Augmented reality in dentistry: a current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Beom; Park, Young-Seok; Han, Jung-Suk

    2018-02-21

    Augmentation reality technology offers virtual information in addition to that of the real environment and thus opens new possibilities in various fields. The medical applications of augmentation reality are generally concentrated on surgery types, including neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery and plastic surgery. Augmentation reality technology is also widely used in medical education and training. In dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery is the primary area of use, where dental implant placement and orthognathic surgery are the most frequent applications. Recent technological advancements are enabling new applications of restorative dentistry, orthodontics and endodontics. This review briefly summarizes the history, definitions, features, and components of augmented reality technology and discusses its applications and future perspectives in dentistry.

  15. Augmented reality in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality.

  16. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  17. Aspects of User Experience in Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen

    In Augmented Reality applications, the real environment is annotated or enhanced with computer-generated graphics. This is a topic that has been researched in the recent decades, but for many people this is a brand new and never heard of topic. The main focus of this thesis is investigations...... in human factors related to Augmented Reality. This is investigated partly as how Augmented Reality applications are used in unsupervised settings, and partly in specific evaluations related to user performance in supervised settings. The thesis starts by introducing Augmented Reality to the reader......, followed by a presentation of the technical areas related to the field, and different human factor areas. As a contribution to the research area, this thesis presents five separate, but sequential, papers within the area of Augmented Reality....

  18. Augmented reality for improved safety

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, CERN experts have to operate in low visibility conditions or in the presence of possible hazards. Minimising the duration of the operation and reducing the risk of errors is therefore crucial to ensuring the safety of personnel. The EDUSAFE project integrates different technologies to create a wearable personnel safety system based on augmented reality.    The EDUSAFE integrated safety system uses a camera mounted on the helmet to monitor the working area.  In its everyday operation of machines and facilities, CERN adopts a whole set of measures and safety equipment to ensure the safety of its personnel, including personal wearable safety devices and access control systems. However, sometimes, scheduled and emergency maintenance work needs to be done in zones with potential cryogenic hazards, in the presence of radioactive equipment or simply in demanding conditions where visibility is low and moving around is difficult. The EDUSAFE Marie Curie Innovative&...

  19. Augmented Reality and Mobile Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilt, Ian

    The combined notions of augmented-reality (AR) and mobile art are based on the amalgamation of a number of enabling technologies including computer imaging, emergent display and tracking systems and the increased computing-power in hand-held devices such as Tablet PCs, smart phones, or personal digital assistants (PDAs) which have been utilized in the making of works of art. There is much published research on the technical aspects of AR and the ongoing work being undertaken in the development of faster more efficient AR systems [1] [2]. In this text I intend to concentrate on how AR and its associated typologies can be applied in the context of new media art practices, with particular reference to its application on hand-held or mobile devices.

  20. Reality Check: Basics of Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Tara J

    2017-01-01

    Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality applications all aim to enhance a user's current experience or reality. While variations of this technology are not new, within the last few years there has been a significant increase in the number of artificial reality devices or applications available to the general public. This column will explain the difference between augmented, virtual, and mixed reality and how each application might be useful in libraries. It will also provide an overview of the concerns surrounding these different reality applications and describe how and where they are currently being used.

  1. Everything Augmented: On the Real in Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Schraffenberger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is augmented in Augmented Reality (AR? In this paper, we review existing opinions and show how little consensus exists on this matter. Subsequently, we approach the question from a theoretical and technology-independent perspective. We identify spatial and content-based relationships between the virtual and the real as being decisive for AR and come to the conclusion that virtual content augments that to which it relates. Subsequently, we categorize different forms of AR based on what is augmented. We distinguish between augmented environments, augmented objects, augmented humans and augmented content and consider the possibility of augmented perception. The categories are illustrated with AR (art works and conceptual differences between them are pointed out. Moreover, we discuss what the real contributes to AR and how it can shape (future AR experiences. A summary of our findings and suggestions for future research and practice, such as research into multimodal and crossmodal AR, conclude the paper.

  2. Determination of student opinions in augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Bicen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and descriptive statistics. The results show that, with gamification methods, augmented reality content affected students’ opinions in a positive way. When QR codes are used in the classroom, students feel independent from classroom materials and can access various resources. Moreover, students think that, when augmented reality in the classroom is used, education is more enjoyable.

  3. Augmented Reality in Architecture: Rebuilding Archeological Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Prieto, J.; Castaño Perea, E.; Labrador Arroyo, F.

    2017-02-01

    With the development in recent years of augmented reality and the appearance of new mobile terminals and storage bases on-line, we find the possibility of using a powerful tool for transmitting architecture. This paper analyzes the relationship between Augmented Reality and Architecture. Firstly, connects the theoretical framework of both disciplines through the Representation concept. Secondly, describes the milestones and possibilities of Augmented Reality in the particular field of archaeological reconstruction. And lastly, once recognized the technology developed, we face the same analysis from a critical point of view, assessing their suitability to the discipline that concerns us is the architecture and within archeology.

  4. Augmented reality: past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, Laura

    2013-03-01

    A great opportunity has permitted to carry out a cultural, historical, architectural and social research with great impact factor on the international cultural interest. We are talking about the realization of a museum whose the main theme is the visit and the discovery of a monument of great prestige: the monumental building the "Steri" in Palermo. The museum is divided into sub themes including the one above all, that has aroused the international interest so much that it has been presented the instance to include the museum in the cultural heritage of UNESCO. It is the realization of a museum path that regards the cells of the Inquisition, which are located just inside of some buildings of the monumental building. The project, as a whole, is faced, in a total view, between the various competences implicated: historic, chemic, architectonic, topographic, drawing, representation, virtual communication, informatics. The birth of the museum will be a sum of the results of all these disciplines involved. Methodology, implementation, fruition, virtual museum, goals, 2D graphic restitution, effects on the cultural heritage and landscape environmental, augmented reality, Surveying 2D and 3D, hi-touch screen, Photogrammetric survey, Photographic survey, representation, drawing 3D and more than this has been dealt with this research.

  5. Digital Augmented Reality Audio Headset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Rämö

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality audio (ARA combines virtual sound sources with the real sonic environment of the user. An ARA system can be realized with a headset containing binaural microphones. Ideally, the ARA headset should be acoustically transparent, that is, it should not cause audible modification to the surrounding sound. A practical implementation of an ARA mixer requires a low-latency headphone reproduction system with additional equalization to compensate for the attenuation and the modified ear canal resonances caused by the headphones. This paper proposes digital IIR filters to realize the required equalization and evaluates a real-time prototype ARA system. Measurements show that the throughput latency of the digital prototype ARA system can be less than 1.4 ms, which is sufficiently small in practice. When the direct and processed sounds are combined in the ear, a comb filtering effect is brought about and appears as notches in the frequency response. The comb filter effect in speech and music signals was studied in a listening test and it was found to be inaudible when the attenuation is 20 dB. Insert ARA headphones have a sufficient attenuation at frequencies above about 1 kHz. The proposed digital ARA system enables several immersive audio applications, such as a virtual audio tourist guide and audio teleconferencing.

  6. Augmented reality for personalized nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    As our understanding of onset and progress of diseases at the genetic and molecular level rapidly progresses, the potential of advanced technologies, such as 3D-printing, Socially-Assistive Robots (SARs) or augmented reality (AR), that are applied to personalized nanomedicines (PNMs) to alleviate pathological conditions, has become more prominent. Among advanced technologies, AR in particular has the greatest potential to address those challenges and facilitate the translation of PNMs into formidable clinical application of personalized therapy. As AR is about to adapt additional new methods, such as speech, voice recognition, eye tracing and motion tracking, to enable interaction with host response or biological systems in 3-D space, a combination of multiple approaches to accommodate varying environmental conditions, such as public noise and atmosphere brightness, will be explored to improve its therapeutic outcomes in clinical applications. For instance, AR glasses still being developed by Facebook or Microsoft will serve as new platform that can provide people with the health information they are interested in or various measures through which they can interact with medical services. This review has addressed the current progress and impact of AR on PNMs and its application to the biomedical field. Special emphasis is placed on the application of AR based PNMs to the treatment strategies against senior care, drug addiction and medication adherence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Applied Augmented Reality for High Precision Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Clark

    Augmented Reality had a major consumer breakthrough this year with Pokemon Go. The underlying technologies that made that app a success with gamers can be applied to improve the efficiency and efficacy of workers. This session will explore some of the use cases for augmented reality in an industrial environment. In doing so, the environmental impacts and human factors that must be considered will be explored. Additionally, the sensors, algorithms, and visualization techniques used to realize augmented reality will be discussed. The benefits of augmented reality solutions in industrial environments include automated data recording, improved quality assurance, reduction in training costs and improved mean-time-to-resolution. As technology continues to follow Moore's law, more applications will become feasible as performance-per-dollar increases across all system components.

  8. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  9. Affordances in Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Gjøsæter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the affordances of augmented reality content in a mobile augmented reality application. A user study was conducted by performing a multi-camera video recording of seven think aloud sessions. The think aloud sessions consisted of individual users performing tasks, exploring and experiencing a mobile augmented reality (MAR application we developed for the iOS platform named ARad. We discuss the instrumental affordances we observed when users interacted with augmented reality content, as well as more complex affordances rising from conventions from media content, AR and the traditional WIMP paradigm. We find that remediation of traditional newspaper content through the MAR medium can provide engaging, pleasing and exciting user experiences. However, the some of the content still suffers from being shoveled onto the MAR platform without adapting it properly. Finally, we discuss what content was most successfully mediated to the user and how the content impacts the user experience.

  10. Determination of student opinions in augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Huseyin Bicen; Erkan Bal

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and descriptive statistics. The results show that, with gamification methods, augmented reality content affected students’ opinions in a positive way. When ...

  11. A Survey of Augmented Reality Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Bhorkar, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    Navigation has been a popular area of research in both academia and industry. Combined with maps, and different localization technologies, navigation systems have become robust and more usable. By combining navigation with augmented reality, it can be improved further to become realistic and user friendly. This paper surveys existing researches carried out in this area, describes existing techniques for building augmented reality navigation systems, and the problems faced.

  12. Augmented Reality for Maintenance and Repair (ARMAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    of tracking and display technologies, and computer graphics hardware and software, and has a long tradition of research in AR theory and practice ... practice , a user can learn to negotiate the nearby augmented controls while keeping their eyes focused on the repair area. Second, because the...2005, pp. 47-54. [8] A. C. Boud, D. J. Haniff, C. Baber , and S. J. Steiner, "Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality as a Training Tool for

  13. Augmented reality implementation methods in mainstream applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality has became an useful tool in many areas from space exploration to military applications. Although used theoretical principles are well known for almost a decade, the augmented reality is almost exclusively used in high budget solutions with a special hardware. However, in last few years we could see rising popularity of many projects focused on deployment of the augmented reality on dif­ferent mobile devices. Our article is aimed on developers who consider development of an augmented reality application for the mainstream market. Such developers will be forced to keep the application price, therefore also the development price, at reasonable level. Usage of existing image processing software library could bring a significant cut-down of the development costs. In the theoretical part of the article is presented an overview of the augmented reality application structure. Further, an approach for selection appropriate library as well as the review of the existing software libraries focused in this area is described. The last part of the article out­lines our implementation of key parts of the augmented reality application using the OpenCV library.

  14. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  15. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source...

  16. Interactive Assembly Guide using Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Larsen, Christian Lindequist

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an Augmented Reality system for aiding a pump assembling process at Grundfos, one of the leading pump producers. Stable pose estimation of the pump is required in order to augment the graphics correctly. This is achieved by matching image edges with synthesized edges from CAD...... norm. A dynamic visualization of the augmented graphics provides the user with guidance. Usability tests show that the accuracy of the system is sufficient for assembling the pump....

  17. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  18. Handling Occlusions for Robust Augmented Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madjid Maidi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Augmented Reality applications, the human perception is enhanced with computer-generated graphics. These graphics must be exactly registered to real objects in the scene and this requires an effective Augmented Reality system to track the user's viewpoint. In this paper, a robust tracking algorithm based on coded fiducials is presented. Square targets are identified and pose parameters are computed using a hybrid approach based on a direct method combined with the Kalman filter. An important factor for providing a robust Augmented Reality system is the correct handling of targets occlusions by real scene elements. To overcome tracking failure due to occlusions, we extend our method using an optical flow approach to track visible points and maintain virtual graphics overlaying when targets are not identified. Our proposed real-time algorithm is tested with different camera viewpoints under various image conditions and shows to be accurate and robust.

  19. Formwork application optimization by using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, R.; Petruse, R.; Brindasu, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    By using the PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) principle on the formwork case study, after determining the functions and the technical solutions, the application must be made as optimum as possible in order to assure productivity and provide the necessary information as quick as possible. The concept is to create a complex management for the formwork based on augmented reality. By taking into account the development rate of the information, augmented reality is tending to be one of the widest (in term of domain) visualization instrument. Also used in the construction domain, augmented reality can be applied also for the case of formwork design and management. The application of the solution will be retrieved in the construction of the product, its transportation and deposit. The usage of this concept will help reduce, even eliminate human or technical errors and can offer a precise state of a specific required formwork from the stock.

  20. Handling Occlusions for Robust Augmented Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidi Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Augmented Reality applications, the human perception is enhanced with computer-generated graphics. These graphics must be exactly registered to real objects in the scene and this requires an effective Augmented Reality system to track the user's viewpoint. In this paper, a robust tracking algorithm based on coded fiducials is presented. Square targets are identified and pose parameters are computed using a hybrid approach based on a direct method combined with the Kalman filter. An important factor for providing a robust Augmented Reality system is the correct handling of targets occlusions by real scene elements. To overcome tracking failure due to occlusions, we extend our method using an optical flow approach to track visible points and maintain virtual graphics overlaying when targets are not identified. Our proposed real-time algorithm is tested with different camera viewpoints under various image conditions and shows to be accurate and robust.

  1. Pemanfaatan Augmented Reality Pada Permainan Othello

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendy Layman Aguston

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi telah mengubah cara pengerjaan suatu pekerjaan dari cara konvensional menjadi cara yang lebih praktis. Dengan hadirnya teknologi Augmented Reality, cara bermain yang menggunakan pion dan membalikkan pion musuh secara manual menjadi lebih mudah dalam memainkan permainan selain juga dapat berinteraksi langsung. Pembuatan permainan Othello menggunakan program Unity dengan framework Vuforia untuk mewujudkan Augmented Reality pada permainan Othello. Untuk menerapkan Augmented Reality dengan baik, dibutuhkan papan permainan sebagai image target yang sesuai dengan kriteria, jenis kamera yang digunakan, jarak kamera terhadap papan permainan, intensitas cahaya yang ditangkap kamera, serta tingkat sensitivitas tombol virtual. Pada permainan Othello ini tersedia fitur komputer yang menggunakan algoritma Alpha Beta Pruning dengan 3 level kedalaman yang menggunakan perhitungan fungsi evaluasi berupa mobility, potential mobility dan penguasaan corner yang menghasilkan kemenangan mencapai 73,33% dari 15 kali uji coba terhadap aplikasi Othello serupa dan 78,34% dari 37 kali uji coba terhadap user.

  2. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive Cost of Using Augmented Reality Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, James; Ssin, Seung Youb; ElSayed, Neven A M; Dorrian, Jillian; Webb, David P; Walsh, James A; Simon, Timothy M; Irlitti, Andrew; Smith, Ross T; Kohler, Mark; Thomas, Bruce H

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of two cognitive load studies comparing three augmented reality display technologies: spatial augmented reality, the optical see-through Microsoft HoloLens, and the video see-through Samsung Gear VR. In particular, the two experiments focused on isolating the cognitive load cost of receiving instructions for a button-pressing procedural task. The studies employed a self-assessment cognitive load methodology, as well as an additional dual-task cognitive load methodology. The results showed that spatial augmented reality led to increased performance and reduced cognitive load. Additionally, it was discovered that a limited field of view can introduce increased cognitive load requirements. The findings suggest that some of the inherent restrictions of head-mounted displays materialize as increased user cognitive load.

  4. Guidelines for designing augmented reality games

    OpenAIRE

    Wetzel, Richard; McCall, Rod; Braun, Anne-Kathrin; Broll, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The growing popularity of augmented reality (AR) games in both a research and more recently commercial context has led for a need to take a closer look at design related issues which impact on player experience. While issues relating to this area have been considered, to date most of the emphasis has been on the technology aspects. Furthermore it is almost always assumed that the augmented reality element in itself will provide a sufficient experience for the player. This has led to a need to...

  5. Augmented reality for non-rigid surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Pilet, Julien

    2008-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the process of integrating virtual elements in reality, often by mixing computer graphics into a live video stream of a real scene. It requires registration of the target object with respect to the cameras. To this end, some approaches rely on dedicated hardware, such as magnetic trackers or infra-red cameras, but they are too expensive and cumbersome to reach a large public. Others are based on specifically designed markers which usually look like bar-codes. However...

  6. Augmented Reality Interfaces for Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Pedersen, David Bue; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Skovmand, Linda; Heun, Valentin; Maes, Pattie; Aanæs, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores potential use cases for using augmented reality (AR) as a tool to operate industrial machines. As a baseline we use an additive manufacturing system, more commonly known as a 3D printer. We implement novel augmented interfaces and controls using readily available open source frameworks and low cost hardware. Our results show that the technology enables richer and more intuitive printer control and performance monitoring than currently available on the market. Therefore, th...

  7. Augmented Reality in Tourism - Research and Applications Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anabel L. Kečkeš; Igor Tomičić

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality is a complex interdisciplinary field utilizing information technologies in diverse areas such as medicine, education, architecture, industry, tourism and others, augmenting the real...

  8. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  9. Get Real: Augmented Reality for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; DeBay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Kids love augmented reality (AR) simulations because they are like real-life video games. AR simulations allow students to learn content while collaborating face to face and interacting with a multimedia-enhanced version of the world around them. Although the technology may seem advanced, AR software makes it easy to develop content-based…

  10. Aplikasi Museum Zoologi Berbasis Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Gonydjaja, Rosny; Mayongga, Yongki

    2014-01-01

    Museum Zoologi adalah museum yang terletak di kota Bogor, yang memilikikoleksi yang berkaitan dengan dunia satwa dari berbagai spesimen yangdiawetkan maupun fosil hewan. Pada awal pembangunannya tahun 1894,tempat ini berfungsi sebagai laboratorium zoologi yang menjadi wadahpenelitian yang berkaitan dengan pertanian dan zoologi, meliputi kegiataninventarisasi fauna Indonesia dengan nama Landbouw ZoologischLaboratorium. Augmented reality (AR) adalah sebuah lingkungan yangmenggabungkan dunia nya...

  11. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other

  12. Augmented Reality in Sports: Today and Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer BOZYER

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change experienced in the field of Information Technologies makes the informati cs more tangible in daily life. Today, it became possible to encounter with the informatics applications almost all the disciplines. As a matter of course, many informatics applications are put into the practice regarding the sports discipline. Because of the condition that the power of information processing has increased and the studies on wearable technol ogies in addition to the expert system design, augmented reality (AR has become a topic which gains imp ortance in the field of sports. There are many studies that are conducted with the aim of increasing the efficiency of physical activities done in many sports branches, ensuring a more fair management of competitions and providing the opportunity for spectators to watch the competitions in a more comfortable and efficient way. In this study; the information about the current augmented reality practices th at are used in various sports branches has been given and the mobile and interactive augmented reality practices which are possible to be seen in future have been mentioned. In addition, there is an augmented reality practice which is designed with the aim of ensuring that the shoots of sports people who are interested in archery, are more stable and of ensuring that the trainings and exercises are more efficient by stating to the sports people whether he or she is in the right position for shoot which is c alled as T shape seen at the time of releasing the arrow.

  13. Determination of Student Opinions in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicen, Huseyin; Bal, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and…

  14. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  15. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  16. The Educational Possibilities of Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabero, Julio; Barroso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA), which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted.…

  17. Temporal Coherence Strategies for Augmented Reality Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen; Tatzgern, Markus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal coherence of annotations is an important factor in augmented reality user interfaces and for information visualization. In this paper, we empirically evaluate four different techniques for annotation. Based on these findings, we follow up with subjective evaluations in a second experiment...

  18. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  19. Design Patterns for Augmented Reality Learning Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerich, Felix; Klemke, Roland; Hummes, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is expected to receive a major uptake with the recent availability of high quality wearable AR devices such as Microsoft’s Hololens. However, the design of interaction with AR applications and games is still a field of experimentation and upcoming innovations in

  20. Design Patterns for Augmented Reality Learning Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerich, Felix; Klemke, Roland; Hummes, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is expected to receive a major uptake with the recent availability of high quality wearable AR devices such as Microsoft’s Hololens. However, the design of interaction with AR applications and games is still a field of experimentation and upcoming innovations in sensor

  1. Accurate overlaying for mobile augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W; van der Schaaf, A; Lagendijk, RL; Jansen, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mobile augmented reality requires accurate alignment of virtual information with objects visible in the real world. We describe a system for mobile communications to be developed to meet these strict alignment criteria using a combination of computer vision. inertial tracking and low-latency

  2. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Augmented reality for Android application development

    CERN Document Server

    Grubert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial-based guide aimed at giving you hands-on practical experience to develop AR applications for Android.Augmented Reality for Android Application Development is for Android mobile application developers who are familiar with Android Development Tools and deployment, JMonkeyEngine, and the Vuforia SDK.

  4. Motion in Augmented Reality Games: An Engine for Creating Plausible Physical Interactions in Augmented Reality Games

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Mac Namee; David Beaney; Qingqing Dong

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of Augmented Reality (AR) games will require real and virtual objects to coexist in motion in immersive game environments. This will require the illusion that real and virtual objects interact physically together in a plausible way. The Motion in Augmented Reality Games (MARG) engine described in this paper has been developed to allow these kinds of game environments. The paper describes the design and implementation of the MARG engine and presents two proof-of-concept AR ...

  5. Mixed Reality with HoloLens: Where Virtual Reality Meets Augmented Reality in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Oren M; Rudy, Hayeem L; Lefkowitz, Aaron; Weimer, Katie A; Marks, Shelby M; Stern, Carrie S; Garfein, Evan S

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality and augmented reality devices have recently been described in the surgical literature. The authors have previously explored various iterations of these devices, and although they show promise, it has become clear that virtual reality and/or augmented reality devices alone do not adequately meet the demands of surgeons. The solution may lie in a hybrid technology known as mixed reality, which merges many virtual reality and augmented realty features. Microsoft's HoloLens, the first commercially available mixed reality device, provides surgeons intraoperative hands-free access to complex data, the real environment, and bidirectional communication. This report describes the use of HoloLens in the operating room to improve decision-making and surgical workflow. The pace of mixed reality-related technological development will undoubtedly be rapid in the coming years, and plastic surgeons are ideally suited to both lead and benefit from this advance.

  6. Virtual reality, augmented reality?I call it i-Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Grossmann, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    The new term improved reality (i-Reality) is suggested to include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). It refers to a real world that includes improved, enhanced and digitally created features that would offer an advantage on a particular occasion (i.e., a medical act). I-Reality may help us bridge the gap between the high demand for medical providers and the low supply of them by improving the interaction between providers and patients.

  7. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Yong Oock

    2017-05-01

    Recently, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  8. Augmented reality for mining teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Andrew J.; Kazman, Rick N.

    1995-12-01

    Automated mining has been proposed as a solution to reducing mining costs associated with labor and development. Quite simply, no-one will need to work underground. A series of special-purpose mining vehicles is currently being designed for both semi-autonomous operation and teleoperation. A preliminary implementation at INCO's North Mine complex in Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada, has met with great success. Improvements are required, however, in the presentation and integration of feedback from the remotely operated vehicle due to the poor video image quality. Depth cues in particular have been found to be deficient. Work currently underway at the University of Waterloo involves the development of a graphics engine responsible for the integration and rendering of data from various sources including: live video (analog and/or digital), range-finding data, an intelligent vision system, CAD mine models, and supervisory control and data acquisition systems. Graphical overlays on a live video feed are being examined as a means of enhancing and augmenting the human operator's visual input. We are investigating a tool-set which addresses the requirements of teleoperation in the context of a mining environment. This includes the integration of data from a number of different sources for the purpose of interactive mine planning and operation.

  9. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  10. Perancangan Augmented Reality untuk Peta Topografi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinna Yosanny

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Topography is the science about the earth's surface and other objects such as planets, satellites, and asteroids. Topography is studied at school and is found quite difficult to understand because it requires imagination to understand the meaning of contour maps as well as the lines. To motivate students in learning topography,we design an learning application of interactive topographic map with 3D features using Augmented reality technology. In this research we implement analysis and design method. The result achieved is a learning topographic map application based on augmented reality. The conclusion that can be drawn is the teaching and learning of topography can be more interesting with 3D features so that students can more easily recognize the meaning of contour lines in a topographic map.

  11. Camera Based Navigation System with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays smart mobile devices have enough processing power, memory, storage and always connected wireless communication bandwidth that makes them available for any type of application. Augmented reality (AR proposes a new type of applications that tries to enhance the real world by superimposing or combining virtual objects or computer generated information with it. In this paper we present a camera based navigation system with augmented reality integration. The proposed system aims to the following: the user points the camera of the smartphone towards a point of interest, like a building or any other place, and the application searches for relevant information about that specific place and superimposes the data over the video feed on the display. When the user moves the camera away, changing its orientation, the data changes as well, in real-time, with the proper information about the place that is now in the camera view.

  12. Interactive learning environments in augmented reality technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wojciechowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of creation of learning environments based on augmented reality (AR is considered. The concept of AR is presented as a tool for safe and cheap experimental learning. In AR learning environments students may acquire knowledge by personally carrying out experiments on virtual objects by manipulating real objects located in real environments. In the paper, a new approach to creation of interactive educational scenarios, called Augmented Reality Interactive Scenario Modeling (ARISM, is mentioned. In this approach, the process of building learning environments is divided into three stages, each of them performed by users with different technical and domain knowledge. The ARISM approach enables teachers who are not computer science experts to create AR learning environments adapted to the needs of their students.

  13. The effects of augmented reality on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuei-Fang

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a new approach to the implementation of Augmented Reality (AR) in the educational environment was taken by creating a Chemistry Augmented Reality Learning System (CARLS), using the existing teaching curriculum, together with physical activity. This system combined learning with three types of physical activity: aerobic fitness, muscle strength and flexibility fitness. This study reveals that the students using all three types of physical activity together with CARLS result in significantly higher academic performance compared to the traditional Keyboard-Mouse CAI (KMCAI). This improvement is most evident for the non-memorized knowledge component of Science. Moreover, the students in the AR group with 'muscle strength' physical activity had significantly more positive learning attitude change toward Science than those in the KMCAI group. A great additional benefit of our approach is that, students also obtained more physical fitness while learning.

  14. Survey on Urban Warfare Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban warfare has become one of the main forms of modern combat in the twenty-first century. The main reason why urban warfare results in hundreds of casualties is that the situational information of the combatant is insufficient. Accessing information via an Augmented Reality system can elevate combatants’ situational awareness to effectively improve the efficiency of decision-making and reduce the injuries. This paper begins with the concept of Urban Warfare Augmented Reality (UWAR and illuminates the objectives of developing UWAR, i.e., transparent battlefield, intuitional perception and natural interaction. Real-time outdoor registration, information presentation and natural interaction are presented as key technologies of a practical UWAR system. Then, the history and current research state of these technologies are summarized and their future developments are highlighted from three perspectives, i.e., (1 Better integration with Geographic Information System and Virtual Geographic Environment; (2 More intelligent software; (3 More powerful hardware.

  15. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other than using popular notions and definitions, in order to come to an understanding of multimodal AR. Three concepts are introduced. First, the commonly used terms 'real' and 'virtual' are redefined in ...

  16. Augmented REality Sandtables (ARESs) Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    knowledge and spatial-reasoning skills over traditional maps (e.g., paper map and digitized 2-D displays) by providing multimodal and multisensory learning...SUBJECT TERMS ARES, augmented reality, sand table, map reading , terrain, visualization, topography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...2.6 Procedure 5 3. Results and Discussion 6 3.1 Data Reduction and Analysis 6 3.1.1 Outlier Analysis 8 3.1.2 Normality Testing 8 3.1.3 Sphericity

  17. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  18. Augmented Reality to Training Spatial Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Contero, Manuel; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    La Laguna University has been offering courses for the development of spatial skills since 2004. Each year since that time spatial ability of engineering students has been measured before and after the courses to check progress after each training session. We have developed a spatial skills training course based on augmented reality and graphic engineering contents, and designed the AR_Dehaes tool, which is based on its own library the uses computer vision techniques for incorporating vis...

  19. AUGMENTED REALITY - STATE OF KNOWLEDGE, USE AND EXPERIMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Filofteia TUTUNEA

    2013-01-01

    Technologies for augmenting reality have been consolidated during the last decades, extending their applicability to more and more socio-economic areas. The rapid evolution of mobile technologies and virtualization of the digital environment have created auspicious conditions for massive extension and implementation of solutions for augmenting reality at global level. Experience has already shown that augmented reality, alongside virtual reality can offer very important support so...

  20. Adaptive information design for outdoor augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhöfer, Jan A; Govaers, Felix; El Mokni, Hichem; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality focuses on the enrichment of the user's natural field of view by consistent integration of text, symbols and interactive three-dimensional objects in real time. Placing virtual objects directly into the user's view in a natural context empowers highly dynamic applications. On the other hand, this necessitates deliberate choice of information design and density, in particular for deployment in hazardous environments like military combat scenarios. As the amount of information needed is not foreseeable and strongly depends on the individual mission, an appropriate system must offer adequate adaptation capabilities. The paper presents a prototypical, vehicle-mountable Augmented Reality vision system, designed for enhancing situation awareness in stressful urban warfare scenarios. Tracking, as one of the most crucial challenges for outdoor Augmented Reality, is accomplished by means of a Differential-GPS approach while the type of display to attach can be modified, ranging from ocular displays to standard LCD mini-screens. The overall concept also includes envisioning of own troops (blue forces), for which a multi-sensor tracking approach has been chosen. As a main feature, the system allows switching between different information categories, focusing on friendly, hostile, unidentified or neutral data. Results of an empirical study on the superiority of an in-view navigation cue approach conclude the paper.

  1. Mobile devices, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Digital Geoscience Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, H.; De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.

    2016-12-01

    Mobile devices are playing an increasing role in geoscience education. Affordances include instructor-student communication and class management in large classrooms, virtual and augmented reality applications, digital mapping, and crowd-sourcing. Mobile technologies have spawned the sub field of mobile learning or m-learning, which is defined as learning across multiple contexts, through social and content interactions. Geoscientists have traditionally engaged in non-digital mobile learning via fieldwork, but digital devices are greatly extending the possibilities, especially for non-traditional students. Smartphones and tablets are the most common devices but smart glasses such as Pivothead enable live streaming of a first-person view (see for example, https://youtu.be/gWrDaYP5w58). Virtual reality headsets such as Google Cardboard create an immersive virtual field experience and digital imagery such as GigaPan and Structure from Motion enables instructors and/or students to create virtual specimens and outcrops that are sharable across the globe. Whereas virtual reality (VR) replaces the real world with a virtual representation, augmented reality (AR) overlays digital data on the live scene visible to the user in real time. We have previously reported on our use of the AR application called FreshAiR for geoscientific "egg hunts." The popularity of Pokémon Go demonstrates the potential of AR for mobile learning in the geosciences.

  2. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming.

  3. International workshop on multimodal virtual and augmented reality (workshop summary)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hürst, W.O.; Iwai, Daisuke; Balakrishnan, Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are expected by many to become the next wave of computing with significant impacts on our daily lives. Motivated by this, we organized a workshop on “Multimodal Virtual and Augmented Reality (MVAR)” at the 18th ACM International Conference on

  4. The Perceptions of CEIT Postgraduate Students Regarding Reality Concepts: Augmented, Virtual, Mixed and Mirror Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taçgin, Zeynep; Arslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine perception of postgraduate Computer Education and Instructional Technologies (CEIT) students regarding the concepts of Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), Mixed Reality (MR), Augmented Virtuality (AV) and Mirror Reality; and to offer a table that includes differences and similarities between…

  5. A Mobile Augmented Reality Emulator for Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Munro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR provides a fusion of the real and virtual worlds by superimposing virtual objects on real world scenery. The implementation of AR on mobile devices is known as Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR. MAR is in its infancy and MAR development software is in the process of maturing. Dating back to the origin of Computer Science as an independent field, software development tools have been an integral part of the process of software creation. MAR, being a relatively new technology, is still lacking such related software development tools. With the rapid progression of mobile devices, the development of MAR applications fusing advanced Computer Vision techniques with mobile device sensors have become increasingly feasible. However, testing and debugging of MAR applications present a new challenge in that they require the developer be at the location that is being augmented at some point during the development process. In this research study, a MAR recorder application was developed as well as emulation class libraries for Android devices that allows the recording and off-site playback of video, location and motion sensor data. The research objective was to provide a software emulator which provides debugging, testing and prototyping capabilities for a MAR application including the ability to emulate the combination of computer vision with locational and motion sensors using previously recorded data. The emulator was evaluated using different mobile technologies. The results indicate that this research could assist developers of MAR applications to implement applications more rapidly, without being at the location.

  6. Recent Development of Augmented Reality in Surgery: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    P. Vávra; Roman,J.; P. Zonča; P. Ihnát; M. Němec; Kumar, J; Habib, N; El-Gendi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The development augmented reality devices allow physicians to incorporate data visualization into diagnostic and treatment procedures to improve work efficiency, safety, and cost and to enhance surgical training. However, the awareness of possibilities of augmented reality is generally low. This review evaluates whether augmented reality can presently improve the results of surgical procedures. Methods. We performed a review of available literature dating from 2010 to November 2...

  7. Maintenance applications of augmented reality for the Chinese aerospace industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Since augmented reality has not reached full maturity in use, it is not widely adopted within the aerospace industry. According to the literature review, minimal research efforts have been conducted to assess the cost-benefit or cost- effectiveness of augmented reality so far. Moreover, to the best of researcher’s knowledge, no research has been carried out to develop a systematic process for selecting and implementing augmented reality within the Chinese aerospace industry....

  8. Augmented reality for breast tumors visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Ali; Heydarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Gupta, Gopal; Tamil, Lakshman

    2016-08-01

    3D visualization of breast tumors are shown to be effective by previous studies. In this paper, we introduce a new augmented reality application that can help doctors and surgeons to have a more accurate visualization of breast tumors; this system uses a marker-based image-processing technique to render a 3D model of the tumors on the body. The model can be created using a combination of breast 3D mammography by experts. We have tested the system using an Android smartphone and a head-mounted device. This proof of concept can be useful for oncologists to have a more effective screening, and surgeons to plan the surgery.

  9. Extended overview techniques for outdoor augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veas, Eduardo; Grasset, Raphaël; Kruijff, Ernst; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we explore techniques that aim to improve site understanding for outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) applications. While the first person perspective in AR is a direct way of filtering and zooming on a portion of the data set, it severely narrows overview of the situation, particularly over large areas. We present two interactive techniques to overcome this problem: multi-view AR and variable perspective view. We describe in details the conceptual, visualization and interaction aspects of these techniques and their evaluation through a comparative user study. The results we have obtained strengthen the validity of our approach and the applicability of our methods to a large range of application domains.

  10. Toward natural fiducials for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchin, Paul; Martinez, Kirk

    2005-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) requires a mapping between the camera(s) and the world, so that virtual objects can be correctly registered. Current AR applications either use pre-prepared fiducial markers or specialist equipment or impose significant constraints on lighting and background. Each of these approaches has significant drawbacks. Fiducial markers are susceptible to loss or damage, can be awkward to work with and may require significant effort to prepare an area for Augmented interaction. Use of such markers may also present an imposition to non-augmented observers, especially in environments such as museums or historical landmarks. Specialist equipment is expensive and not universally available. Lighting and background constraints are often impractical for real-world applications. This paper presents initial results in using the palm of the hand as a pseudo-fiducial marker in a natural real-world environment, through colour, feature and edge analysis. The eventual aim of this research is to enable fiducial marker cards to be dispensed with entirely in some situations in order to allow more natural interaction in Augmented environments. Examples of this would be allowing users to "hold" virtual 3D objects in the palm of their hand or use gestures to interact with virtual objects.

  11. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  12. The Application of Augmented Reality Technology in Food Professional Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Shan

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the application of augmented reality technology in food professional education, combining with the current situation of applying virtual reality education, analyzes the problems existing in the virtual reality application in food professional education, puts forward some suggestions and finally prospects the developing trend of the technology of virtual reality now.

  13. Augmenting Your Own Reality: Student Authoring of Science-Based Augmented Reality Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent…

  14. Consumer Experience With Augmented Reality At Brands' Events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Javornik; Andreina Mandelli

    2013-01-01

    .... This exploratory study assesses the appropriateness of the variables of interactivity, telepresence and vividness for evaluating the customer experience with augmented reality at brands' events...

  15. Competitive Intelligence Analysis of Augmented Reality Technology Using Patent Information

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byeongki Jeong; Janghyeok Yoon

    2017-01-01

    .... Despite the growing attraction of augmented reality, trend analyses in this emerging technology have relied on qualitative literature review, failing to provide comprehensive competitive intelligence...

  16. The educational possibilities of Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA, which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted. The present paper shows various elements which, in our opinion, play an essential role when it comes to the incorporation of Augmented Reality into teaching, stressing the fact that this incorporation should not entail a technological problem but an educational and didactic issue. A mention is additionally made of several studies which have been performed with regard to the didactic exploitation of this emergent technology, as well as to the potential that it offers us. Our study forms part of an R&D&I initiative undertaken within the framework of the Plan Estatal de Fomento de la Investigación Científica y Técnica de Excelencia 2013-2016 [2013-16 State (National Plan for the Promotion of Excellence Scientific and Technical Research], with reference EDU2014-57446-P.

  17. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  18. Boosting physics education through mobile augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crǎciun, Dana; Bunoiu, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-12-01

    The integration of collaborative applications, based on modern learning technologies and the Internet, of various visualization techniques and digital strategies in open, flexible modern learning environments which facilitate access to resources, represents a challenge for physics teachers in Romania in general, and for novice teachers in particular. Although large efforts have been made worldwide to invest in educational technologies, their impact on the students' learning outcomes is quite modest. In this paper, we describe and analyze various curricular and extracurricular activities specifically designed for and undertaken by pre-service physics teachers. These activities employ new educational technologies, mobile augmented reality (MAR) and are based on modern teaching and learning theories. MAR is an extension for mobile devices of augmented reality, an interactive and in real time combination, of real and virtual objects overlaid in the real environment. The obtained results show that pre-service physics teachers are confident in using MAR in their teaching and learning activities, and consider that the activities performed helped them develop the skills necessary for science teachers in a technology-based society and to reflect upon the role of technology in the current Romanian educational context.

  19. AUGMENTED REALITY - STATE OF KNOWLEDGE, USE AND EXPERIMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Filofteia TUTUNEA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for augmenting reality have been consolidated during the last decades, extending their applicability to more and more socio-economic areas. The rapid evolution of mobile technologies and virtualization of the digital environment have created auspicious conditions for massive extension and implementation of solutions for augmenting reality at global level. Experience has already shown that augmented reality, alongside virtual reality can offer very important support solutions in modeling the real world with the aim of extending the human capabilities of perception, allowing the opening of a new phase in the world’s socio-economic development. Starting from the evident tendencies that have manifested at global level in the development and implementation of augmented reality technologies, the paper begins with the presentation of the most important aspects related to augmented reality technologies, highlighting their main areas of application, and presents the study realized for identifying the level of knowledge, use and effective experimentation of augmented reality applications by mobile device users. The results of this study could be very useful to the socio-economic environment, starting with the field of research, continuing with developers and providers of augmented reality solutions, manufacturers and providers of hardware infrastructure support for augmented reality solutions and systems, final users of these solutions, both individuals and businesses, and experimenting digital communities.

  20. Pose estimation for mobile devices and augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we introduce the reader to the field of Augmented Reality (AR) and describe aspects of an AR system. We show the current uses in treatment of phobias, games, sports and industry. We present the challenges for Optical See-Through Augmented Reality in which the real world is perceived

  1. Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marc Ericson C.; Chen, Angie; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kato, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology is mature for creating learning experiences for K-12 (pre-school, grade school, and high school) educational settings. We reviewed the applications intended to complement traditional curriculum materials for K-12. We found 87 research articles on augmented reality learning experiences (ARLEs) in the IEEE Xplore…

  2. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  3. The Local Games Lab ABQ: Homegrown Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in the use of augmented reality games formerly required extensive material resources and expertise to implement above and beyond what might be possible within the usual educational contexts. Currently, the more common availability of hardware in these contexts and the existence of easy-to-use, general purpose augmented reality design…

  4. Potential Use of Augmented Reality in LIS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this article is the use of augmented reality technology in library and information science education. The aim is to determine the scope and potential uses of augmented reality in the education of information professionals. In order to determine the scope and forms of potential use of AR technology in LIS education a two-step…

  5. Pose estimation for mobile devices and augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vliet, L.J.; Jonker, P.P.; Caarls, J.

    In this thesis we introduce the reader to the field of Augmented Reality (AR) and describe aspects of an AR system. We show the current uses in treatment of phobias, games, sports and industry. We present the challenges for Optical See-Through Augmented Reality in which the real world is perceived

  6. Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marc Ericson C.; Chen, Angie; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kato, Hirokazu

    Augmented reality (AR) technology is mature for creating learning experiences for K-12 (pre-school, grade school, and high school) educational settings. We reviewed the applications intended to complement traditional curriculum materials for K-12. We found 87 research articles on augmented reality learning experiences (ARLEs) in the IEEE Xplore…

  7. Augmented Reality at the Tactical and Operational Levels of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-24

    currently available AR smart -glasses and AR contact lenses . Microsoft – HoloLens. Microsoft has dedicated over a thousand employees and a billion dollars...Augmented Reality Visors, Glasses, and Contact Lenses .................................................................... 20 How Augmented Reality... contact lenses . As such, they provide continuous access to AR content. With their arrival, AR systems will fundamentally change how users interact

  8. ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Ternier, S., Tabuenca, B., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: Learning activities and interaction in augmented reality. In M. Specht, J. Multisilta, & M. Sharples (Eds.), Proceedings of the Mobile Augmented Reality for Education Workshop (pp. 10-13). October, 16-17, 2012, Helsinki, Finland.

  9. the use of augmented reality in command and control situation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abel

    Augmented reality is not completely new technology, but rather an interesting combination of existing technologies, ... Augmented reality applications are becoming more popular due to the remarkable progress in ultra-mobile ..... 1) increased loading on operators to provide status reports;. 2) dissemination of status reports;.

  10. Spatial augmented reality merging real and virtual worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Bimber, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Like virtual reality, augmented reality is becoming an emerging platform in new application areas for museums, edutainment, home entertainment, research, industry, and the art communities using novel approaches which have taken augmented reality beyond traditional eye-worn or hand-held displays. In this book, the authors discuss spatial augmented reality approaches that exploit optical elements, video projectors, holograms, radio frequency tags, and tracking technology, as well as interactive rendering algorithms and calibration techniques in order to embed synthetic supplements into the real

  11. PARAMETERS OF AUGMENTED REALITY AND ITS USE IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEŘÁBEK, Tomáš

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the issue of augmented reality and possibilities of its application in education. It briefly reports on selected results of a broader survey focused on technological, psychological, physiological and didactical aspects of the issue. It presumes that augmented reality has its unique place in technical teaching tools since it is a technological-perception concept, which in certain didactical situations creates more suitable perceptual environment than real environment itself on one hand, or virtual environment on the other. It focuses on identification of the technological-functional properties and specifics of augmented reality systems and on verification of model examples of augmented reality applications in school practice. It characterizes the course and results of empirical research project based on a descriptive case study exploring the cases of implementing selected application solutions of augmented reality into learning experience in accordance with the model of pro-active action research.

  12. Applying Augmented Reality in practical classes for engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, S. E.; Kholodilin, I. Yu; Nesterov, A. S.; Sokhina, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    In this article the Augmented Reality application for teaching engineering students of electrical and technological specialties is introduced. In order to increase the motivation for learning and the independence of students, new practical guidelines on Augmented Reality were developed in the application to practical classes. During the application development, the authors used software such as Unity 3D and Vuforia. The Augmented Reality content consists of 3D-models, images and animations, which are superimposed on real objects, helping students to study specific tasks. A user who has a smartphone, a tablet PC, or Augmented Reality glasses can visualize on-screen virtual objects added to a real environment. Having analyzed the current situation in higher education: the learner’s interest in studying, their satisfaction with the educational process, and the impact of the Augmented Reality application on students, a questionnaire was developed and offered to students; the study involved 24 learners.

  13. Augmented Reality as a Countermeasure for Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, James; Dorrlan, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan; Chatburn, Alex; Smith, Ross T; Carskadon, Mary A; Lushington, Kurt; Thomas, Bruce H

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to have serious deleterious effects on executive functioning and job performance. Augmented reality has an ability to place pertinent information at the fore, guiding visual focus and reducing instructional complexity. This paper presents a study to explore how spatial augmented reality instructions impact procedural task performance on sleep deprived users. The user study was conducted to examine performance on a procedural task at six time points over the course of a night of total sleep deprivation. Tasks were provided either by spatial augmented reality-based projections or on an adjacent monitor. The results indicate that participant errors significantly increased with the monitor condition when sleep deprived. The augmented reality condition exhibited a positive influence with participant errors and completion time having no significant increase when sleep deprived. The results of our study show that spatial augmented reality is an effective sleep deprivation countermeasure under laboratory conditions.

  14. Visualizing Sea Level Rise with Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Looking Glass is an application on the iPhone that visualizes in 3-D future scenarios of sea level rise, overlaid on live camera imagery in situ. Using a technology known as augmented reality, the app allows a layperson user to explore various scenarios of sea level rise using a visual interface. Then the user can see, in an immersive, dynamic way, how those scenarios would affect a real place. The first part of the experience activates users' cognitive, quantitative thinking process, teaching them how global sea level rise, tides and storm surge contribute to flooding; the second allows an emotional response to a striking visual depiction of possible future catastrophe. This project represents a partnership between a science journalist, MIT, and the Rhode Island School of Design, and the talk will touch on lessons this projects provides on structuring and executing such multidisciplinary efforts on future design projects.

  15. Augmented reality approach for metabolic pathways teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vega Garzón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A glycolysis paper puzzle has been used as strategy to teach metabolic pathways, but this kind of game demands a higher number of instructors and limits the follow up of the students’ difficulties. A technology called Augmented Reality (AR was applied to enable the puzzle usage in large audiences, and to provid feedback to students and instructors. Drafted as flashcards readable by an app installed in tablets, it conveys information as molecules 3D-structure, clues for correct assembling of the metabolic pathway and results of student progression in the activity. Such technological improvement brought more autonomy to students for solving proposed exercises and an embedded performance data collection system helpful to understand,and after to unravel students’ difficulties.

  16. Temporal Coherence Strategies for Augmented Reality Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen; Tatzqern, Markus; Madsen, Claus B; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Kalkofen, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Temporal coherence of annotations is an important factor in augmented reality user interfaces and for information visualization. In this paper, we empirically evaluate four different techniques for annotation. Based on these findings, we follow up with subjective evaluations in a second experiment. Results show that presenting annotations in object space or image space leads to a significant difference in task performance. Furthermore, there is a significant interaction between rendering space and update frequency of annotations. Participants improve significantly in locating annotations, when annotations are presented in object space, and view management update rate is limited. In a follow-up experiment, participants appear to be more satisfied with limited update rate in comparison to a continuous update rate of the view management system.

  17. Googles Augmented-Reality-Game "Ingress"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Stingeder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Das an das "Geocoaching"-Spielprinzip erinnernde Augmented-­Reality-Game "Ingress" ist auf allen mit Android-Betriebssystem ausgestatteten Smartphones spielbar. Das Alleinstellungsmerkmal des Spiels ist gleich­zeitig auch das beste Patent-Rezept für bzw. gegen notorisches "Couch-Potato-ing": Das Game-Design des "Draußenspiels" erfordert jedoch stets die physische Anwesenheit der SpielerInnen am realen Ort des Geschehens, meist touristisch attraktive Sehenswürdigkeiten und architektonisch markante Plätze. Sobald "Ingress" per App am Smart­phone gestartet wird, stehen Interaktionen und Machtverhältnisse auf dem Handy-Display im Dreh- und Angelpunkt des Geschehens. Die Spielgrafik ist auf das Wesentliche reduziert und erinnert an die Optik von Videospielen der 80er Jahre. "Ingress" im Allgemeinen sowie "Magnus13", die erste von Google organisierte Fan-Veranstaltung Österreichs mit mehreren Hundert TeilnehmerInnen und ist mit einer "digitalen Schnitzeljagd" vergleichbar: Gemeinsam ist der klassischen "Schnitzeljagd" und dem digitalen "Schere-Schein-Papier" Prinzip von "Ingress" die tragende Rolle des im Spiel entstehenden Gemeinschaftsgefühls, welche in einer hohen Langzeitmotivation mündet. Trotz aller Euphorie, ob des unkonventionellen Augmented-Reality-Spielkonzepts und des in Folge der sozialen Dynamik außergewöhnlichen Sucht­potentials, ist angesichts von Edward Snowden und vielfältiger NSA-Abhörmaßnahmen, eine gesunde Portion Skepsis angebracht: Welchen Zweck erfüllt "Ingress"? Gibt es ein verhülltes "Mittel zum Zweck"? Welche Gefahren bestehen mit einer systematischen Auswertung des umfangreichen, ortsrelevanten Daten-Sammelsuriums? "Ingress" verdeutlicht trotz aller Risiken den soziokulturellen Bedeutungswandel des digitalen Spiels: Spiele per se und das Spiel als soziale Interaktion sind aktuell dabei, alle Bereiche unseres Lebens zu erfassen.

  18. Augmented reality in neurosurgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Antonio; Cutolo, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marina; Cagnazzo, Federico; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    Neuronavigation has become an essential neurosurgical tool in pursuing minimal invasiveness and maximal safety, even though it has several technical limitations. Augmented reality (AR) neuronavigation is a significant advance, providing a real-time updated 3D virtual model of anatomical details, overlaid on the real surgical field. Currently, only a few AR systems have been tested in a clinical setting. The aim is to review such devices. We performed a PubMed search of reports restricted to human studies of in vivo applications of AR in any neurosurgical procedure using the search terms "Augmented reality" and "Neurosurgery." Eligibility assessment was performed independently by two reviewers in an unblinded standardized manner. The systems were qualitatively evaluated on the basis of the following: neurosurgical subspecialty of application, pathology of treated lesions and lesion locations, real data source, virtual data source, tracking modality, registration technique, visualization processing, display type, and perception location. Eighteen studies were included during the period 1996 to September 30, 2015. The AR systems were grouped by the real data source: microscope (8), hand- or head-held cameras (4), direct patient view (2), endoscope (1), and X-ray fluoroscopy (1) head-mounted display (1). A total of 195 lesions were treated: 75 (38.46 %) were neoplastic, 77 (39.48 %) neurovascular, and 1 (0.51 %) hydrocephalus, and 42 (21.53 %) were undetermined. Current literature confirms that AR is a reliable and versatile tool when performing minimally invasive approaches in a wide range of neurosurgical diseases, although prospective randomized studies are not yet available and technical improvements are needed.

  19. Merging Augmented Reality Based Features in Mobile Multimedia Museum Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Damala, Areti; Marchal, Isabelle; Houlier, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Augmented Reality (AR), a computer science field considered by many as a subfield of the broader concept of Mixed Reality, could alter dramatically the way we interact not only with computers but also with the real environment surrounding us, as well as with other human beings. Augmented Reality has so far been used for applications linked with military training, medicine, maintenance, architecture and urban planning, tourism, and entertainment. This last category embr...

  20. Augmented Reality in Tourism – Research and Applications Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kečkeš, Anabel L.; Igor Tomičić

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality is a complex interdisciplinary field utilizing information technologies in diverse areas such as medicine, education, architecture, industry, tourism and others, augmenting the real-time, real-world view with additional superimposed information in chosen format(s). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of both research and application aspects of using augmented reality technologies in tourism domain. While most research, and especially applications, are dealing wit...

  1. Augmented Reality versus Virtual Reality for 3D Object Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichenbauer, Max; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Taketom, Takafumi; Sandor, Christian; Kato, Hirokazu

    2018-02-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs) are on the verge of becoming commodity hardware available to the average user and feasible to use as a tool for 3D work. Some HMDs include front-facing cameras, enabling Augmented Reality (AR) functionality. Apart from avoiding collisions with the environment, interaction with virtual objects may also be affected by seeing the real environment. However, whether these effects are positive or negative has not yet been studied extensively. For most tasks it is unknown whether AR has any advantage over VR. In this work we present the results of a user study in which we compared user performance measured in task completion time on a 9 degrees of freedom object selection and transformation task performed either in AR or VR, both with a 3D input device and a mouse. Our results show faster task completion time in AR over VR. When using a 3D input device, a purely VR environment increased task completion time by 22.5 percent on average compared to AR ( ). Surprisingly, a similar effect occurred when using a mouse: users were about 17.3 percent slower in VR than in AR ( ). Mouse and 3D input device produced similar task completion times in each condition (AR or VR) respectively. We further found no differences in reported comfort.

  2. Augmented reality usage for prototyping speed up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Šťastný

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The integral part of production process in many companies is prototyping. Although, these companies commonly have high quality visualization tools (large screen projections, virtual reality, prototyping was never abandoned. There is a number of reasons. The most important is the possibility of model observation from any angle without any physical constraints and its haptic feedback. The interactivity of model adjustments is important as well. The direct work with the model allows the designers to focus on the creative process more than work with a computer. There is still a problem with a difficult adjustability of the model. More significant changes demand completely new prototype or at least longer time for its realization.The first part of the article describes our approach for solution of this problem by means of Augmented Reality. The merging of the real world model and digital objects allows streamline the work with the model and speed up the whole production phase significantly. The main advantage of augmented reality is the possibility of direct manipulation with the scene using a portable digital camera. Also adding digital objects into the scene could be done using identification markers placed on the surface of the model. Therefore it is not necessary to work with special input devices and lose the contact with the real world model. Adjustments are done directly on the model. The key problem of outlined solution is the ability of identification of an object within the camera picture and its replacement with the digital object. The second part of the article is focused especially on the identification of exact position and orientation of the marker within the picture. The identification marker is generalized into the triple of points which represents a general plane in space. There is discussed the space identification of these points and the description of representation of their position and orientation be means of transformation

  3. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Software Documentation]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  4. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Computer software]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  5. Virtual, augmented reality and serious games for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is a tremendous interest among researchers for the development of virtual, augmented reality and games technologies due to their widespread applications in medicine and healthcare. To date the major applications of these technologies include medical simulation, telemedicine, medical and healthcare training, pain control, visualisation aid for surgery, rehabilitation in cases such as stroke, phobia, and trauma therapies. Many recent studies have identified the benefits of using Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, or serious games in a variety of medical applications.   This research volume on Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1 offers an insightful introduction to the theories, development and applications of virtual, augmented reality and digital games technologies in medical and clinical settings and healthcare in general. It is divided into six sections: section one presents a selection of applications in medical education and healthcare management; Section two relates to th...

  6. Adaptive multimodal interaction in mobile augmented reality: A conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Rimaniza Zainal; Arshad, Haslina; Shukri, Saidatul A'isyah Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Recently, Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology in many mobile applications. Mobile AR was defined as a medium for displaying information merged with the real world environment mapped with augmented reality surrounding in a single view. There are four main types of mobile augmented reality interfaces and one of them are multimodal interfaces. Multimodal interface processes two or more combined user input modes (such as speech, pen, touch, manual gesture, gaze, and head and body movements) in a coordinated manner with multimedia system output. In multimodal interface, many frameworks have been proposed to guide the designer to develop a multimodal applications including in augmented reality environment but there has been little work reviewing the framework of adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. The main goal of this study is to propose a conceptual framework to illustrate the adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. We reviewed several frameworks that have been proposed in the field of multimodal interfaces, adaptive interface and augmented reality. We analyzed the components in the previous frameworks and measure which can be applied in mobile devices. Our framework can be used as a guide for designers and developer to develop a mobile AR application with an adaptive multimodal interfaces.

  7. Recent Development of Augmented Reality in Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vávra, P; Roman, J; Zonča, P; Ihnát, P; Němec, M; Kumar, J; Habib, N; El-Gendi, A

    2017-01-01

    The development augmented reality devices allow physicians to incorporate data visualization into diagnostic and treatment procedures to improve work efficiency, safety, and cost and to enhance surgical training. However, the awareness of possibilities of augmented reality is generally low. This review evaluates whether augmented reality can presently improve the results of surgical procedures. We performed a review of available literature dating from 2010 to November 2016 by searching PubMed and Scopus using the terms "augmented reality" and "surgery." Results. The initial search yielded 808 studies. After removing duplicates and including only journal articles, a total of 417 studies were identified. By reading of abstracts, 91 relevant studies were chosen to be included. 11 references were gathered by cross-referencing. A total of 102 studies were included in this review. The present literature suggest an increasing interest of surgeons regarding employing augmented reality into surgery leading to improved safety and efficacy of surgical procedures. Many studies showed that the performance of newly devised augmented reality systems is comparable to traditional techniques. However, several problems need to be addressed before augmented reality is implemented into the routine practice.

  8. FEATURES OF USING AUGMENTED REALITY TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT EDUCATIONAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury A. Kravchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the concept and technology of augmented reality, the rationale given the relevance and timeliness of its use to support educational processes. Paper is a survey and study of the possibility of using augmented reality technology in education. Architecture is proposed and constructed algorithms of the software system management QR-codes media objects. An overview of the features and uses of augmented reality technology to support educational processes is displayed, as an option of a new form of visual demonstration of complex objects, models and processes. 

  9. Augmented reality as a design tool for mobile interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Nielsen, Christina

    2000-01-01

    applications derived from the classification of augmented reality interfaces. The focus on physical interaction with objects of work and with the mobile device provides us with a range of interaction styles, based on e.g. gestures and manipulation of objects. Furthermore, issues of transparency and directness......This paper challenges user interface paradigms for mobile devices, by using the technical classification of augmented reality interfaces as a thinking tool to develop ideas for interaction with mobile devices. The paper presents future work scenarios from a wastewater treatment plant embodying PDA...... are addressed. The future scenarios indicate that the concepts of augmented reality support solving context problems in mobile design....

  10. Introduction to Mobile Augmented Reality Development in Unity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob W. Greene

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This lesson serves as an introduction to creating mobile augmented reality applications. Augmented reality (AR can be defined as the overlaying of digital content (images, video, text, sound, etc. onto physical objects or locations, and it is typically experienced by looking through the camera lens of an electronic device such as a smartphone, tablet, or optical head-mounted display (e.g. Microsoft Hololens. Although AR is a cutting-edge, complex technology, there are a number of user-friendly platforms that allow people with no previous coding experience to create compelling augmented reality experiences.

  11. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  12. Instrument Motion Metrics for Laparoscopic Skills Assessment in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Boel A; Chen, Chi-Ya; Noyes, Julie A; Ragle, Claude A

    2016-11-01

    To determine the construct and concurrent validity of instrument motion metrics for laparoscopic skills assessment in virtual reality and augmented reality simulators. Evaluation study. Veterinarian students (novice, n = 14) and veterinarians (experienced, n = 11) with no or variable laparoscopic experience. Participants' minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience was determined by hospital records of MIS procedures performed in the Teaching Hospital. Basic laparoscopic skills were assessed by 5 tasks using a physical box trainer. Each participant completed 2 tasks for assessments in each type of simulator (virtual reality: bowel handling and cutting; augmented reality: object positioning and a pericardial window model). Motion metrics such as instrument path length, angle or drift, and economy of motion of each simulator were recorded. None of the motion metrics in a virtual reality simulator showed correlation with experience, or to the basic laparoscopic skills score. All metrics in augmented reality were significantly correlated with experience (time, instrument path, and economy of movement), except for the hand dominance metric. The basic laparoscopic skills score was correlated to all performance metrics in augmented reality. The augmented reality motion metrics differed between American College of Veterinary Surgeons diplomates and residents, whereas basic laparoscopic skills score and virtual reality metrics did not. Our results provide construct validity and concurrent validity for motion analysis metrics for an augmented reality system, whereas a virtual reality system was validated only for the time score. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Robust and Accurate Algorithm for Wearable Stereoscopic Augmented Reality with Three Indistinguishable Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cutolo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of surgical navigation systems based on augmented reality (AR, the key challenge is to ensure the highest degree of realism in merging computer-generated elements with live views of the surgical scene. This paper presents an algorithm suited for wearable stereoscopic augmented reality video see-through systems for use in a clinical scenario. A video-based tracking solution is proposed that relies on stereo localization of three monochromatic markers rigidly constrained to the scene. A PnP-based optimization step is introduced to refine separately the pose of the two cameras. Video-based tracking methods using monochromatic markers are robust to non-controllable and/or inconsistent lighting conditions. The two-stage camera pose estimation algorithm provides sub-pixel registration accuracy. From a technological and an ergonomic standpoint, the proposed approach represents an effective solution to the implementation of wearable AR-based surgical navigation systems wherever rigid anatomies are involved.

  14. Recent Development of Augmented Reality in Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vávra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The development augmented reality devices allow physicians to incorporate data visualization into diagnostic and treatment procedures to improve work efficiency, safety, and cost and to enhance surgical training. However, the awareness of possibilities of augmented reality is generally low. This review evaluates whether augmented reality can presently improve the results of surgical procedures. Methods. We performed a review of available literature dating from 2010 to November 2016 by searching PubMed and Scopus using the terms “augmented reality” and “surgery.” Results. The initial search yielded 808 studies. After removing duplicates and including only journal articles, a total of 417 studies were identified. By reading of abstracts, 91 relevant studies were chosen to be included. 11 references were gathered by cross-referencing. A total of 102 studies were included in this review. Conclusions. The present literature suggest an increasing interest of surgeons regarding employing augmented reality into surgery leading to improved safety and efficacy of surgical procedures. Many studies showed that the performance of newly devised augmented reality systems is comparable to traditional techniques. However, several problems need to be addressed before augmented reality is implemented into the routine practice.

  15. Recent Development of Augmented Reality in Surgery: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vávra, P.; Zonča, P.; Ihnát, P.; El-Gendi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The development augmented reality devices allow physicians to incorporate data visualization into diagnostic and treatment procedures to improve work efficiency, safety, and cost and to enhance surgical training. However, the awareness of possibilities of augmented reality is generally low. This review evaluates whether augmented reality can presently improve the results of surgical procedures. Methods We performed a review of available literature dating from 2010 to November 2016 by searching PubMed and Scopus using the terms “augmented reality” and “surgery.” Results. The initial search yielded 808 studies. After removing duplicates and including only journal articles, a total of 417 studies were identified. By reading of abstracts, 91 relevant studies were chosen to be included. 11 references were gathered by cross-referencing. A total of 102 studies were included in this review. Conclusions The present literature suggest an increasing interest of surgeons regarding employing augmented reality into surgery leading to improved safety and efficacy of surgical procedures. Many studies showed that the performance of newly devised augmented reality systems is comparable to traditional techniques. However, several problems need to be addressed before augmented reality is implemented into the routine practice.

  16. Telerobotic control with stereoscopic augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Anu; Milgram, Paul; Drascic, David; Grodski, Julius J.

    1996-04-01

    Teleoperation in unstructured environments is conventionally restricted to direct manual control of the robot. Under such circumstances operator performance can be affected by inadequate visual feedback from the remote site, caused by, for example, limitations in the bandwidth of the communication channel. This paper introduces ARTEMIS (Augmented Reality TEleManipulation Interface System), a new display interface for enabling local teleoperation task simulation. An important feature of the interface is that the display can be generated in the absence of a model of the remote operating site. The display consists of a stereographical model of the robot overlaid on real stereovideo images from the remote site. This stereographical robot is used to simulate manipulation with respect to objects visible in the stereovideo image, following which sequences of robot control instructions can be transmitted to the remote site. In the present system, the update rate of video images can be very low, since continuous feedback is no longer needed for direct manual control of the robot. Several features of the system are presented and its advantages discussed, together with an illustrative example of a pick-and-place task.

  17. Augmented Reality Marker Hiding with Texture Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Norihiko; Sato, Tomokazu; Nakashima, Yuta; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2017-10-01

    Augmented reality (AR) marker hiding is a technique to visually remove AR markers in a real-time video stream. A conventional approach transforms a background image with a homography matrix calculated on the basis of a camera pose and overlays the transformed image on an AR marker region in a real-time frame, assuming that the AR marker is on a planar surface. However, this approach may cause discontinuities in textures around the boundary between the marker and its surrounding area when the planar surface assumption is not satisfied. This paper proposes a method for AR marker hiding without discontinuities around texture boundaries even under nonplanar background geometry without measuring it. For doing this, our method estimates the dense motion in the marker's background by analyzing the motion of sparse feature points around it, together with a smooth motion assumption, and deforms the background image according to it. Our experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in various environments with different background geometries and textures.

  18. Escape route simulator utilizing augmented reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Karen Salazar Ribeiro de; Mó, Antônio Carlos de A.; Santo, André Cotelli do E.; Silva, Marcio Henrique, E-mail: karensalazar.1190@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (UniCarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Due to increasing demand and interest in the interaction of technology platforms and integration of different types of systems and technologies, some tools are already providing practical ways to develop integrated applications. The tools explored by this article are Unity, a platform for game development, and Vuforia, an SDK, software development kit, for augmented reality creation. The coalition proposal of these resources is to create an intuitive escape route that can be used for the evacuation of buildings or open spaces in view of imminent danger, such as radiation leakage, and that can be accessed from a target available at the institution. It has also the intention of simulating situations that involve training of personnel in order to obtain methods that allow to save financial resources, and even to avoid that those who are involved are exposed to risks unnecessarily. The simulator is expected to help design, test, and improve ways to maintain the physical integrity of the facility and provide end users with a better sense of immersion and attractiveness. (author)

  19. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  20. Evaluating User Experience of Augmented Reality Eyeglasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Luciano; Orso, Valeria; Beretta, Andrea; Jacucci, Giulio; Spagnolli, Anna; Rimondi, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality based applications have been experimented with in various contexts. Typically, the interaction is supported by handled devices, which, in specific scenarios, may hinder the interaction and spoil the experience of use, as the user is forced to hold the device and to keep her eyes on it at all times. The recent launch on the market of light-weight, unobtrusive head-mounted displays may change this circumstance. Nevertheless, investigations are needed to understand if such head-worn devices effectively outperform handheld devices in terms of comfort and pleasant experience of use. Here we present two experiments aimed at assessing the comfort of wearing a head-worn, see-through AR viewer in both a controlled and a natural setting. Besides the comfort of wearing the device, aspects related to the user experience were also investigated in the field evaluation. Our findings suggest that the head-mounted display examined is comfortable to wear regardless of the context of use. Interestingly in the field trails, participants did not express concern for the impression they would have made on other people and the experience of use was overall pleasant. Possible issues related to visual fatigue emerged.

  1. Opportunistic tangible user interfaces for augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Steven; Feiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic Controls are a class of user interaction techniques that we have developed for augmented reality (AR) applications to support gesturing on, and receiving feedback from, otherwise unused affordances already present in the domain environment. By leveraging characteristics of these affordances to provide passive haptics that ease gesture input, Opportunistic Controls simplify gesture recognition, and provide tangible feedback to the user. In this approach, 3D widgets are tightly coupled with affordances to provide visual feedback and hints about the functionality of the control. For example, a set of buttons can be mapped to existing tactile features on domain objects. We describe examples of Opportunistic Controls that we have designed and implemented using optical marker tracking, combined with appearance-based gesture recognition. We present the results of two user studies. In the first, participants performed a simulated maintenance inspection of an aircraft engine using a set of virtual buttons implemented both as Opportunistic Controls and using simpler passive haptics. Opportunistic Controls allowed participants to complete their tasks significantly faster and were preferred over the baseline technique. In the second, participants proposed and demonstrated user interfaces incorporating Opportunistic Controls for two domains, allowing us to gain additional insights into how user interfaces featuring Opportunistic Controls might be designed.

  2. HUNT: Scavenger Hunt with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This project shows a creative approach to the familiar scavenger hunt game. It involved the implementation of an iPhone application, HUNT, with Augmented Reality (AR capability for the users to play the game as well as an administrative website that game organizers can use to create and make available games for users to play. Using the HUNT mobile app, users will first make a selection from a list of games, and they will then be shown a list of objects that they must seek. Once the user finds a correct object and scans it with the built-in camera on the smartphone, the application will attempt to verify if it is the correct object and then display associated multi-media AR content that may include images and videos overlaid on top of real world views. HUNT not only provides entertaining activities within an environment that players can explore, but the AR contents can serve as an educational tool. The project is designed to increase user involvement by using a familiar and enjoyable game as a basis and adding an educational dimension by incorporating AR technology and engaging and interactive multimedia to provide users with facts about the objects that they have located

  3. Virtual reality, augmented reality…I call it i-Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    The new term improved reality (i-Reality) is suggested to include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). It refers to a real world that includes improved, enhanced and digitally created features that would offer an advantage on a particular occasion (i.e., a medical act). I-Reality may help us bridge the gap between the high demand for medical providers and the low supply of them by improving the interaction between providers and patients.

  4. How Augmented Reality Enables Conceptual Understanding of Challenging Science Content

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan Yoon; Emma Anderson; Joyce Lin; Karen Elinich

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study we hypothesize that students acquire a more accurate understanding of the Bernoulli’s principle, a challenging science concept, by interacting with an augmented reality (AR) device...

  5. Die Welt als Spielfeld: Mobile Serious Games mit Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Schneider, Jan; Happe, Sven; Bockelmann, Timo; Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovations enable us to connect computer games with the environment they are played in: augmented reality games take the world as their playground. In this talk, the use of such technologies for mobile serious games is explored.

  6. Augmented Reality a Review on Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruse, Radu Emanuil; Bondrea, Ioan

    2014-11-01

    We present in this paper an overview of the concepts and potential industrial Augmented Reality applications that can be very efficient. We also present the basic technological requirements for an AR system

  7. Review and analysis of augmented reality literature for construction industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rankohi, Sara; Waugh, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    Research has identified various beneficial capabilities for augmented reality technologies in the AEC industry such as virtual site visits, comparing as-built and as-planned status of projects, pre...

  8. Human Performance Assessments when Using Augmented Reality for Navigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldiez, Brian F; Saptoka, Nabin; Aedunuthula, Prashanth

    2006-01-01

    Human performance executing search and rescue type of navigation is one area that can benefit from augmented reality technology when the proper computer generated information is added to a real scene...

  9. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    .... A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented...

  10. Mobile Augmented Reality enhances indoor navigation for wheelchair users

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oliveira, Luciene Chagas de; Soares, Alcimar Barbosa; Cardoso, Alexandre; Andrade, Adriano de Oliveira; Lamounier Júnior, Edgard Afonso

    2016-01-01

    ...). The main objective of this work is to propose an architecture based on Mobile Augmented Reality to support the development of indoor navigation systems dedicated to wheelchair users, that is also...

  11. Augmented Reality as a Telemedicine Platform for Remote Procedural Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiyao Wang; Michael Parsons; Jordan Stone-McLean; Peter Rogers; Sarah Boyd; Kristopher Hoover; Oscar Meruvia-Pastor; Minglun Gong; Andrew Smith

    2017-01-01

    .... In this research, we develop a new telepresence application using an Augmented Reality (AR) system. We explore the use of the Microsoft HoloLens to facilitate and enhance remote medical training...

  12. Hands in space: gesture interaction with augmented-reality interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, Mark; Piumsomboon, Tham; Huidong Bai

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at the Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand (HIT Lab NZ) are investigating free-hand gestures for natural interaction with augmented-reality interfaces. They've applied the results to systems for desktop computers and mobile devices.

  13. Dimensions of Mobile Augmented Reality for Learning: A First Inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus; Ternier, Stefaan; Greller, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Specht, M., Ternier, S., & Greller, W. (2011). Dimensions of Mobile Augmented Reality for Learning: A First Inventory. Journal of the Research for Educational Technology (RCET), 7(1), 117-127. Spring 2011.

  14. Hoe maak je gebruik van augmented reality in het onderwijs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Kester, Liesbeth; Schmitz, Birgit; Kluijfhout, Eric; Wolff, Charlotte; Maassen, Marcel; Gijselaers, Jérôme; Berkhout, Jeroen; Storm, Jeroen; Roks, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Ternier, S., Kester, L., Wolff, C., Maasen, M., Gijselaers, J., Berkhout, J., & Storm, J. (2012, 16 November). Hoe maak je gebruik van augmented reality in het onderwijs. Masterclass in de OpenU community Open Universiteit, Heerlen, Nederland. Beschikbaar op

  15. Use of augmented reality in command and control situation awareness

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, WH

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is not completely new technology, but rather an interesting combination of existing technologies, facilitated by the rapid progress made on ultra-portable devices such as smart cellular telephones. It has the potential to enhance...

  16. Topic Space: Rapid Prototyping a Mobile Augmented Reality Recommendation App

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jim Hahn; Ben Ryckman; Maria Lux

    2015-01-01

    With funding from an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Sparks! Ignition Grant, researchers from the University of Illinois Library designed and tested a mobile recommender app with augmented reality features...

  17. Augmented Reality in Tourism - Research and Applications Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel L. Kečkeš

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is a complex interdisciplinary field utilizing information technologies in diverse areas such as medicine, education, architecture, industry, tourism and others, augmenting the real-time, real-world view with additional superimposed information in chosen format(s. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of both research and application aspects of using augmented reality technologies in tourism domain. While most research, and especially applications, are dealing with and developing visual-based augmented reality systems, there is a relevant amount of research discussing the utilization of other human senses such as tactioception and audioception, both being discussed within this work. A comprehensive literature analysis within this paper resulted with the identification, compilation and categorization of the key factors having the most relevant impact on the success of utilization of augmented technology in tourism domain.

  18. Adaptive augmented reality for cultural heritage: ARtSENSE project

    OpenAIRE

    Damala, A.; Stojanovic, N.; Schuchert, Tobias; Moragues, J.; Cabrera, A.; Gilleade, K

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the new concept of Adaptive Augmented Reality (A2R), employed within the context of the creation of an AR guide for the museum visit, that is being developed in the context of an EU research project. The main objective of the project is to provide a prototype that enables a personalized experience for every individual visitor by adapting to the psychological state of the visitor the content presented through an augmented reality museum guidance system.

  19. A survey on haptic technologies for mobile augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Bermejo, Carlos; Hui, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) and Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) applications have gained much research and industry attention these days. The mobile nature of MAR applications limits users' interaction capabilities such as inputs, and haptic feedbacks. This survey reviews current research issues in the area of human computer interaction for MAR and haptic devices. The survey first presents human sensing capabilities and their applicability in AR applications. We classify haptic devices into two gro...

  20. Topic Space: Rapid Prototyping a Mobile Augmented Reality Recommendation App

    OpenAIRE

    Jim Hahn; Ben Ryckman; Maria Lux

    2015-01-01

    With funding from an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Sparks! Ignition Grant, researchers from the University of Illinois Library designed and tested a mobile recommender app with augmented reality features. By embedding open source optical character recognition software into a “Topic Space” module, the augmented reality app can recognize call numbers on a book in the library and suggest relevant items that are not shelved nearby. Topic Space can also show users items that are ...

  1. Technology Acceptance of Augmented Reality and Wearable Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, Fridolin; Klemke, Roland; Lefrere, Paul; Fominykh, Mikhail; Kuula, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality and Wearables are the recent media and computing technologies, similar, but different from established technologies, even mobile computing and virtual reality. Numerous proposals for measuring technology acceptance exist, but have not been applied, nor fine-tuned to such

  2. Visual Environment for Designing Interactive Learning Scenarios with Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, José Miguel; Ruiz-Rube, Iván; Dodero, Juan Manuel; Figueiredo, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) technology allows the inclusion of virtual elements on a vision of actual physical environment for the creation of a mixed reality in real time. This kind of technology can be used in educational settings. However, the current AR authoring tools present several drawbacks, such as, the lack of a mechanism for tracking the…

  3. Dex-ray: augmented reality neurosurgical navigation with a handheld video probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockro, Ralf A; Tsai, Yeo Tseng; Ng, Ivan; Hwang, Peter; Zhu, Chuangui; Agusanto, Kusuma; Hong, Liang Xiao; Serra, Luis

    2009-10-01

    We developed an augmented reality system that enables intraoperative image guidance by using 3-dimensional (3D) graphics overlaid on a video stream. We call this system DEX-Ray and report on its development and the initial intraoperative experience in 12 cases. DEX-Ray consists of a tracked handheld probe that integrates a lipstick-size video camera. The camera looks over the probe's tip into the surgical field. The camera's video stream is augmented with coregistered, multimodality 3D graphics and landmarks obtained during neurosurgical planning with 3D workstations. The handheld probe functions as a navigation device to view and point and as an interaction device to adjust the 3D graphics. We tested the system's accuracy in the laboratory and evaluated it intraoperatively with a series of tumor and vascular cases. DEX-Ray provided accurate and real-time video-based augmented reality display. The system could be seamlessly integrated into the surgical workflow. The see-through effect revealing 3D information below the surgically exposed surface proved to be of significant value, especially during the macroscopic phase of an operation, providing easily understandable structural navigational information. Navigation in deep and narrow surgical corridors was limited by the camera resolution and light sensitivity. The system was perceived as an improved navigational experience because the augmented see-through effect allowed direct understanding of the surgical anatomy beyond the visible surface and direct guidance toward surgical targets.

  4. Augmented Reality, the Future of Contextual Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkur, Roopesh Kevin; Panchoo, Akshay; Bhoyroo, Nitisha Kirtee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to show the relevance of augmented reality (AR) in mobile learning for the 21st century. With AR, any real-world environment can be augmented by providing users with accurate digital overlays. AR is a promising technology that has the potential to encourage learners to explore learning materials from a totally new…

  5. Telescopic multi-resolution augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; Frenchi, Christopher; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    To ensure a self-consistent scaling approximation, the underlying microscopic fluctuation components can naturally influence macroscopic means, which may give rise to emergent observable phenomena. In this paper, we describe a consistent macroscopic (cm-scale), mesoscopic (micron-scale), and microscopic (nano-scale) approach to introduce Telescopic Multi-Resolution (TMR) into current Augmented Reality (AR) visualization technology. We propose to couple TMR-AR by introducing an energy-matter interaction engine framework that is based on known Physics, Biology, Chemistry principles. An immediate payoff of TMR-AR is a self-consistent approximation of the interaction between microscopic observables and their direct effect on the macroscopic system that is driven by real-world measurements. Such an interdisciplinary approach enables us to achieve more than multiple scale, telescopic visualization of real and virtual information but also conducting thought experiments through AR. As a result of the consistency, this framework allows us to explore a large dimensionality parameter space of measured and unmeasured regions. Towards this direction, we explore how to build learnable libraries of biological, physical, and chemical mechanisms. Fusing analytical sensors with TMR-AR libraries provides a robust framework to optimize testing and evaluation through data-driven or virtual synthetic simulations. Visualizing mechanisms of interactions requires identification of observable image features that can indicate the presence of information in multiple spatial and temporal scales of analog data. The AR methodology was originally developed to enhance pilot-training as well as `make believe' entertainment industries in a user-friendly digital environment We believe TMR-AR can someday help us conduct thought experiments scientifically, to be pedagogically visualized in a zoom-in-and-out, consistent, multi-scale approximations.

  6. Improving Robotic Operator Performance Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.; Bowen, Charles K.; Pace, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) is a two-armed robot that functions as an extension to the end effector of the Space Station Robotics Manipulator System (SSRMS), currently in use on the International Space Station (ISS). Crew training for the SPDM is accomplished using a robotic hardware simulator, which performs most of SPDM functions under normal static Earth gravitational forces. Both the simulator and SPDM are controlled from a standard robotic workstation using a laptop for the user interface and three monitors for camera views. Most operations anticipated for the SPDM involve the manipulation, insertion, and removal of any of several types of Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU), modules which control various ISS functions. Alignment tolerances for insertion of the ORU into its receptacle are 0.25 inch and 0.5 degree from nominal values. The pre-insertion alignment task must be performed within these tolerances by using available video camera views of the intrinsic features of the ORU and receptacle, without special registration markings. Since optimum camera views may not be available, and dynamic orbital lighting conditions may limit periods of viewing, a successful ORU insertion operation may require an extended period of time. This study explored the feasibility of using augmented reality (AR) to assist SPDM operations. Geometric graphical symbols were overlaid on one of the workstation monitors to afford cues to assist the operator in attaining adequate pre-insertion ORU alignment. Twelve skilled subjects performed eight ORU insertion tasks using the simulator with and without the AR symbols in a repeated measures experimental design. Results indicated that using the AR symbols reduced pre-insertion alignment error for all subjects and reduced the time to complete pre-insertion alignment for most subjects.

  7. Transparent 3D display for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jisoo

    2012-11-01

    Two types of transparent three-dimensional display systems applicable for the augmented reality are demonstrated. One of them is a head-mounted-display-type implementation which utilizes the principle of the system adopting the concave floating lens to the virtual mode integral imaging. Such configuration has an advantage in that the threedimensional image can be displayed at sufficiently far distance resolving the accommodation conflict with the real world scene. Incorporating the convex half mirror, which shows a partial transparency, instead of the concave floating lens, makes it possible to implement the transparent three-dimensional display system. The other type is the projection-type implementation, which is more appropriate for the general use than the head-mounted-display-type implementation. Its imaging principle is based on the well-known reflection-type integral imaging. We realize the feature of transparent display by imposing the partial transparency to the array of concave mirror which is used for the screen of reflection-type integral imaging. Two types of configurations, relying on incoherent and coherent light sources, are both possible. For the incoherent configuration, we introduce the concave half mirror array, whereas the coherent one adopts the holographic optical element which replicates the functionality of the lenslet array. Though the projection-type implementation is beneficial than the head-mounted-display in principle, the present status of the technical advance of the spatial light modulator still does not provide the satisfactory visual quality of the displayed three-dimensional image. Hence we expect that the head-mounted-display-type and projection-type implementations will come up in the market in sequence.

  8. Usability engineering: domain analysis activities for augmented-reality systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Joseph; Swan, J. E., II; Hix, Deborah; Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Livingston, Mark; Brown, Dennis B.; Julier, Simon J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured, iterative, stepwise development process. Like the related disciplines of software and systems engineering, usability engineering is a combination of management principals and techniques, formal and semi- formal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system that displays heads- up battlefield intelligence information to a dismounted warrior. The paper discusses our general usability engineering process. We originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented reality system. The focus of this paper is our work on domain analysis, the first activity of the usability engineering process. We describe our plans for and our progress to date on our domain analysis for BARS. We give results in terms of a specific urban battlefield use case we have designed.

  9. Augmented reality aiding collimator exchange at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Héctor, E-mail: hector.martinez@sensetrix.com [SenseTrix, PL 20 FI-00101 Helsinki (Finland); Fabry, Thomas [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Laukkanen, Seppo [SenseTrix, PL 20 FI-00101 Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Jouni [Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 527, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Tabourot, Laurent [SYMME, Université de Savoie, Polytech Annecy-Chambéry, 5 chemin de Bellevue, 74944 Annecy le Vieux (France)

    2014-11-01

    Novel Augmented Reality techniques have the potential to have a large positive impact on the way remote maintenance operations are carried out in hazardous areas, e.g. areas where radiation doses that imply careful planning and optimization of maintenance operations are present. This paper describes an Augmented Reality strategy, system and implementation for aiding the remote collimator exchange in the LHC, currently the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. The proposed system relies on marker detection and multi-modal augmentation in real-time. A database system has been used to ensure flexibility. The system has been tested in a mock-up facility, showing real time performance and great potential for future use in the LHC. The technical-scientific difficulties identified during the development of the system and the proposed solutions described in this paper may help the development of future Augmented Reality systems for remote handling in scientific facilities.

  10. Augmented reality for biomedical wellness sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    Due to the commercial move and gaming industries, Augmented Reality (AR) technology has matured. By definition of AR, both artificial and real humans can be simultaneously present and realistically interact among one another. With the help of physics and physiology, we can build in the AR tool together with real human day-night webcam inputs through a simple interaction of heat transfer -getting hot, action and reaction -walking or falling, as well as the physiology -sweating due to activity. Knowing the person age, weight and 3D coordinates of joints in the body, we deduce the force, the torque, and the energy expenditure during real human movements and apply to an AR human model. We wish to support the physics-physiology AR version, PPAR, as a BMW surveillance tool for senior home alone (SHA). The functionality is to record senior walking and hand movements inside a home environment. Besides the fringe benefit of enabling more visits from grand children through AR video games, the PP-AR surveillance tool may serve as a means to screen patients in the home for potential falls at points around in house. Moreover, we anticipate PP-AR may help analyze the behavior history of SHA, e.g. enhancing the Smartphone SHA Ubiquitous Care Program, by discovering early symptoms of candidate Alzheimer-like midnight excursions, or Parkinson-like trembling motion for when performing challenging muscular joint movements. Using a set of coordinates corresponding to a set of 3D positions representing human joint locations, we compute the Kinetic Energy (KE) generated by each body segment over time. The Work is then calculated, and converted into calories. Using common graphics rendering pipelines, one could invoke AR technology to provide more information about patients to caretakers. Alerts to caretakers can be prompted by a patient's departure from their personal baseline, and the patient's time ordered joint information can be loaded to a graphics viewer allowing for high

  11. Augmented reality in laparoscopic surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Stéphane; Soler, Luc; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2011-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery represents one of the main evolutions of surgical techniques aimed at providing a greater benefit to the patient. However, minimally invasive surgery increases the operative difficulty since the depth perception is usually dramatically reduced, the field of view is limited and the sense of touch is transmitted by an instrument. However, these drawbacks can currently be reduced by computer technology guiding the surgical gesture. Indeed, from a patient's medical image (US, CT or MRI), Augmented Reality (AR) can increase the surgeon's intra-operative vision by providing a virtual transparency of the patient. AR is based on two main processes: the 3D visualization of the anatomical or pathological structures appearing in the medical image, and the registration of this visualization on the real patient. 3D visualization can be performed directly from the medical image without the need for a pre-processing step thanks to volume rendering. But better results are obtained with surface rendering after organ and pathology delineations and 3D modelling. Registration can be performed interactively or automatically. Several interactive systems have been developed and applied to humans, demonstrating the benefit of AR in surgical oncology. It also shows the current limited interactivity due to soft organ movements and interaction between surgeon instruments and organs. If the current automatic AR systems show the feasibility of such system, it is still relying on specific and expensive equipment which is not available in clinical routine. Moreover, they are not robust enough due to the high complexity of developing a real-time registration taking organ deformation and human movement into account. However, the latest results of automatic AR systems are extremely encouraging and show that it will become a standard requirement for future computer-assisted surgical oncology. In this article, we will explain the concept of AR and its principles. Then, we

  12. Current progress on augmented reality visualization in endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Ukimura, Osamu; Faber, Kenneth; Gill, Inderbir S

    2012-03-01

    Advancements in surgery are progressing at a rapid rate; however, there are still limitations, including the ability to accurately visualize the target organ, in particular during laparoscopic surgery. Augmented reality visualization is a novel technique that has been developed to allow the fusion of three-dimensional medical images, such as those from transrectal ultrasound or computed tomography/MRI, with live camera images in real-time. In this review, we describe the current advancements and future directions of augmented reality and its application to laparoscopic surgery. Geometrically-correct superimposed images can be generated by tracking of the laparoscope and registration of the target organ. The fused image between the live laparoscopic images and the reconstructed three-dimensional organ model aides the surgeon in his or her understanding of anatomical structures. Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries in both general surgery and urology have been performed with technical success to date. The primary limitation of the current augmented reality systems is its infancy in dynamic tracking of organ motion or deformation. Recently, augmented reality systems with organ tracking based on real-time image analysis were developed. Further improvement and/or development of such new technologies would resolve these issues. Augmented reality visualization is a significant advancement, improving the precision of laparoscopic/endoscopic surgery. New technologies to improve the dynamic tracking of organ motion or deformation are currently under investigation.

  13. Gunner Goggles: Implementing Augmented Reality into Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leo L; Wu, Hao-Hua; Bilici, Nadir; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that both smartphone and tablet integration into medical education has been lacking. At the same time, there is a niche for augmented reality (AR) to improve this process through the enhancement of textbook learning. Gunner Goggles is an attempt to enhance textbook learning in shelf exam preparatory review with augmented reality. Here we describe our initial prototype and detail the process by which augmented reality was implemented into our textbook through Layar. We describe the unique functionalities of our textbook pages upon augmented reality implementation, which includes links, videos and 3D figures, and surveyed 24 third year medical students for their impression of the technology. Upon demonstrating an initial prototype textbook chapter, 100% (24/24) of students felt that augmented reality improved the quality of our textbook chapter as a learning tool. Of these students, 92% (22/24) agreed that their shelf exam review was inadequate and 19/24 (79%) felt that a completed Gunner Goggles product would have been a viable alternative to their shelf exam review. Thus, while students report interest in the integration of AR into medical education test prep, future investigation into how the use of AR can improve performance on exams is warranted.

  14. [Display technologies for augmented reality in medical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Winkler, Alexander

    2018-02-20

    One of the main challenges for modern surgery is the effective use of the many available imaging modalities and diagnostic methods. Augmented reality systems can be used in the future to blend patient and planning information into the view of surgeons, which can improve the efficiency and safety of interventions. In this article we present five visualization methods to integrate augmented reality displays into medical procedures and the advantages and disadvantages are explained. Based on an extensive literature review the various existing approaches for integration of augmented reality displays into medical procedures are divided into five categories and the most important research results for each approach are presented. A large number of mixed and augmented reality solutions for medical interventions have been developed as research prototypes; however, only very few systems have been tested on patients. In order to integrate mixed and augmented reality displays into medical practice, highly specialized solutions need to be developed. Such systems must comply with the requirements with respect to accuracy, fidelity, ergonomics and seamless integration into the surgical workflow.

  15. Transforming Polar Research with Google Glass Augmented Reality (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2013-12-01

    Augmented reality is a new technology with the potential to accelerate the advancement of science, particularly in geophysical research. Augmented reality is defined as a live, direct or indirect, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented (or supplemented) by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. When paired with advanced computing techniques on cloud resources, augmented reality has the potential to improve data collection techniques, visualizations, as well as in-situ analysis for many areas of research. Google is currently a pioneer of augmented reality technology and has released beta versions of their wearable computing device, Google Glass, to a select number of developers and beta testers. This community of 'Glass Explorers' is the vehicle from which Google shapes the future of their augmented reality device. Example applications of Google Glass in geophysical research range from use as a data gathering interface in harsh climates to an on-site visualization and analysis tool. Early participation in the shaping of the Google Glass device is an opportunity for researchers to tailor this new technology to their specific needs. The purpose of this presentation is to provide geophysical researchers with a hands-on first look at Google Glass and its potential as a scientific tool. Attendees will be given an overview of the technical specifications as well as a live demonstration of the device. Potential applications to geophysical research in polar regions will be the primary focus. The presentation will conclude with an open call to participate, during which attendees may indicate interest in developing projects that integrate Google Glass into their research. Application Mockup: Penguin Counter Google Glass Augmented Reality Device

  16. Augmented Reality for the Improvement of Remote Laboratories: An Augmented Remote Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, J. M.; Mejias, A.; Marquez, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) provides huge opportunities for online teaching in science and engineering, as these disciplines place emphasis on practical training and unsuited to completely nonclassroom training. This paper proposes a new concept in virtual and remote laboratories: the augmented remote laboratory (ARL). ARL is being tested in the first…

  17. AUGMENTED REALITY AS A TEACHING TOOL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashko Rizov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of the technology has influenced its inevitable entrance in the learning processes. Teachers are often challenged to use the appropriate educational technology in the process of teaching in order to ease the learning process of students. Introducing new technology in the teaching process should utilize the new technology in any possible way in order to assist the teacher in transferring the knowledge and assist the students in grasping that knowledge. This paper should emphasize the benefits of using augmented reality in higher education, by measuring outcomes of the students which used augmented reality as a teaching tool in the courses. Results from the survey imply that students show significantly improved results in increasing the interest, understanding and interiorizing the learning material. University teachers found that using augmented reality is significantly improving the learning process of students and their teaching process in a pedagogical and technical sense. 

  18. A Foreign Language Learning Application using Mobile Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin-Alexandru DITA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is described a foreign language learning application using mobile augmented reality based on gamification method and text recognition. The mobile augmented reality is a technology that extends the real world elements with 2D or 3D computer generated objects and lets the users interact with them. A Gamification system is based on different mechanisms that increase the motivation of students, due to the impact that videogames have in their emotional, cognitive and social areas. The proposed solution applies Optical Character Recognition technique, using the camera of the mobile device, in order to identify the text written on a card. The implementation combines the features of gamification system and mobile augmented reality in order to make the learning process more easy and fun. This paper aims to present the results after testing the foreign language learning application in different scenarios.

  19. Integration Of Sensor Orientation Data Into An Augmented Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Artemčiukas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, such microelectromechanical sensors as accelerome­ters, gyroscopes and magnetometers are the dominant sensors in mobile devices. The market of mobile devices is constantly expanding and focused on sensor integration process by adding supplementary functionality for the applications; therefore, it is possible to adapt these sensors for augmented reality technology solutions. Many augmented reality solutions are based on computer vision processing methods in order to identify and track markers or other objects. However, the main problem is chaotic environment, lighting conditions where object recognition and tracking in real-time becomes difficult and sometimes is an impossible process. This paper analyses possibilities to apply microelectromechanical sensors. Additionally, it investigates quaternion use for sensor data to estimate reliable and accurate camera orientation and represent virtual content in augmented reality technology.

  20. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues.

  1. The Future of Learning and Training in Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangdon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Students acquire knowledge and skills through different modes of instruction that include classroom lectures with textbooks, computers, and the like. The availability and choice of learning innovation depends on the individual’s access to technologies and on the infrastructure environment of the surrounding community. In this rapidly changing society, information needs to be adopted and applied at the right time and right place to maintain efficiency in all settings. Augmented reality is one technology that dramatically shifts the timing and location of learning. This paper describes augmented reality, how it applies to learning, and its potential impact on future education.

  2. Il telerilevamento a supporto dell’Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Filippo Gemma

    2011-01-01

    Fondere insieme realtà e oggetti virtuali per muoversi al meglio con efficacia ed efficienza è quanto si propone, tramite la  Realtà Aumentata, la AGI, Analytical Graphics Inc. di Exton (USA), distribuita in esclusiva in Italia da GMSPAZIO che offre il sistema STK, storicamente conosciuto come Satellite ToolKit che offre più di quarantamila utenti nel mondo un esteso set di funzionalità capaci di soddisfare ogni tipo di esigenza.Remote  Sensing  and  Augmented RealityAugmented reality has bee...

  3. Augmented Reality in the environment of Heritage Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson José de Mattos Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The placement of elements that enhance the ambiance in assets and historic sites can serve to supply evidence to a greater understanding of the events associated with these sites. The functional organization grows in importance within the historic buildings, by the need to transmit the historical context of the time and the experience associated to the experience of the place. Technical augmented reality can simplify this transmission, valuing the equity and providing them with an overview of the proposed experiments. This paper discusses the technologies available and a methodological framework for the use of Augmented Reality in the context of historical heritage.

  4. Augmented-Virtual Reality: How to improve education systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernandez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of such technologies are still under investigation, the technology landscape offers opportunities to enhance face-to-face and online teaching, including contributions in the understanding of abstract concepts and training in real environments and situations. Barriers to technology use involve limited adoption of augmented and virtual reality technologies, and, more directly, necessary training of teachers in using such technologies within meaningful educational contexts. The author proposes a six-step methodology to aid adoption of these technologies as basic elements within the regular education: training teachers; developing conceptual prototypes; teamwork involving the teacher, a technical programmer, and an educational architect; and producing the experience, which then provides results in the subsequent two phases wherein teachers are trained to apply augmented- and virtual-reality solutions within their teaching methodology using an available subject-specific experience and then finally implementing the use of the experience in a regular subject with students. The essay concludes with discussion of the business opportunities facing virtual reality in face-to-face education as well as augmented and virtual reality in online education.

  5. Cranial implant design using augmented reality immersive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Evenhouse, Ray; Leigh, Jason; Charbel, Fady; Rasmussen, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Software tools that utilize haptics for sculpting precise fitting cranial implants are utilized in an augmented reality immersive system to create a virtual working environment for the modelers. The virtual environment is designed to mimic the traditional working environment as closely as possible, providing more functionality for the users. The implant design process uses patient CT data of a defective area. This volumetric data is displayed in an implant modeling tele-immersive augmented reality system where the modeler can build a patient specific implant that precisely fits the defect. To mimic the traditional sculpting workspace, the implant modeling augmented reality system includes stereo vision, viewer centered perspective, sense of touch, and collaboration. To achieve optimized performance, this system includes a dual-processor PC, fast volume rendering with three-dimensional texture mapping, the fast haptic rendering algorithm, and a multi-threading architecture. The system replaces the expensive and time consuming traditional sculpting steps such as physical sculpting, mold making, and defect stereolithography. This augmented reality system is part of a comprehensive tele-immersive system that includes a conference-room-sized system for tele-immersive small group consultation and an inexpensive, easily deployable networked desktop virtual reality system for surgical consultation, evaluation and collaboration. This system has been used to design patient-specific cranial implants with precise fit.

  6. Virtual and augmented reality technologies in Human Performance: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Crocetta,Tânia Brusque; Oliveira, Sandra Rogéria de; Liz, Carla Maria de; Andrade, Alexandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction : Today's society is influenced by Information and Communication Technologies. Toys that were once built by hand have been reinterpreted and have become highly commercialized products. In this context, games using Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) technologies are present in the everyday lives of children, youth and adults. Objective : To investigate how Physical Education professionals in Brazil have been making use of AR and VR games to benefit their wo...

  7. Using Augmented Reality in the Treatment of CRPS Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, L; Hansen, Helle Puggård; Baskarada, D; Nedergaard, N; Pedersen, R.B.; Vink, L G; Moeslund, T B; Lassen, Lone

    2010-01-01

      Background Mirror Visual Feedback (MVF) is an important part of therapeutic treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Unfortunately mirror boxes (MB) are not compatible with meaningful activities. Recently it was shown that Virtual Reality (VR) as MVF treatment makes this possible. This work examines Augmented Reality (AR) as MVF treatment.Materials and MethodsAn AR setup was built for CPRS patients with left arms as affected extremities. The AR displays a virtual left arm, which ...

  8. Exploring Urban Environments Using Virtual and Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Liarokapis, Fotis; Brujic-Okretic, Vesna; Papakonstantinou, Stelios

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of specific system architecture, based on mobile device, for navigation in urban environments. The aim of this work is to assess how virtual and augmented reality interface paradigms can provide enhanced location based services using real-time techniques in the context of these two different technologies. The virtual reality interface is based on faithful graphical representation of the localities of interest, coupled with sensory information on the location ...

  9. MHP Oriented Interactive Augmented Reality System for Sports Broadcasting Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Olaizola, Igor G.; Martirena, Inigo Barandiaran; Kammann, Tobias D.

    2006-01-01

    Television and movie images have been altered ever since it was technically possible. Nowadays embedding advertisements, or incorporating text and graphics in TV scenes, are common practice, but they can not be considered as integrated part of the scene. The introduction of new services for interactive augmented television is discussed in this paper. We analyse the main aspects related with the whole chain of augmented reality production.Interactivity is one of the most important added values...

  10. Classifying handheld Augmented Reality: Three categories linked by spatial mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Thomas; Nigay, Laurence; Kurata, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Session 1: Research papers; International audience; Handheld Augmented Reality (AR) relies on a spatial coupling of the on-screen content with the physical surrounding. To help the design of such systems and to classify existing AR systems, we present a framework made of three categories and two spatial relationships. Our framework highlights spatial relationships between the physical world, the representation of the physical world on screen and the augmentation on screen. Within this framewo...

  11. Evaluating Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Training for Industrial Maintenance and Assembly Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Nirit; Gutiérrez, Teresa; Webel, Sabine; Rodríguez, Jorge; Peveri, Matteo; Bockholt, Uli; Tecchia, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) platforms, developed within the scope of the SKILLS Integrated Project, for industrial maintenance and assembly (IMA) tasks training. VR and AR systems are now widely regarded as promising training platforms for complex and highly demanding IMA tasks. However,…

  12. ENGEMBANGAN VIRTUAL CLASS UNTUK PEMBELAJARAN AUGMENTED REALITY BERBASIS ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifiana Arief

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Augmanted Reality for android handphone has been a trend among collage students of computer department who join New Media course. To develop this application, the knowladge about visual presentation theory and case study of Augmanted Reality on android phoneneed to be conducted. Learning media through virtual class can facilitate the students’ needs in learning and developing Augmanted Reality. The method of this study in developing virtual class for Augmented Reality learning were: a having preparation to arrange learning unit, b analyzing and developing the content of learning materials, c designing storyboard or scenario of the virtual class, d making website of virtual class, e implementing the website as facility of online learning for Augmanted Reality. The available facilities in virtual class were to check learning units, to choose and download the material in the forms of e-book and presentation slides, to open the relevant website link for material enrichment as well as students’ practice with pre-test and post-test for measuring students’ understanding. By implementing virtual class for Augmanted Reality learning based Android, it is expected to provide alternative learning strategies for students that are interesting and easy to understand. The students are expected to be able to utilize this facility optimally in order to achieve the purposes of learning process and graduates’ competence. Keywords: VirtualClass, Augmented Reality (AR

  13. Aloqa and layar augmented reality feeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    Aloqa is a service that proactively notifies the user of Point Of Interests (POIs). It runs on iPhone, blackberry and android. With this tool you can easily get directions to events, places, buildings or other places of interests. Layar builds on the same principle, but has a browser that augments

  14. Augmenting your own reality: student authoring of science-based augmented reality games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent games, TimeLab 2100, players role-play citizens of the early 22nd century when global climate change is out of control. Through AR, they see their community as it might be nearly one hundred years in the future. TimeLab and other similar AR games balance location specificity and portability--they are games that are tied to a location and games that are movable from place to place. Focusing students on developing their own AR games provides the best of both virtual and physical worlds: a more portable solution that deeply connects young people to their own surroundings. A series of initiatives has focused on technical and pedagogical solutions to supporting students authoring their own games.

  15. Multimodal augmented reality : the norm rather than the exception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraffenberger, Hanna; van der Heide, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is commonly seen as a technology that overlays virtual imagery onto a participant's view of the world. In line with this, most AR research is focused on what we see. In this paper, we challenge this focus on vision and make a case for an experience-focused and

  16. Augmented Reality Based Doppler Lidar Data Visualization: Promises and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherukuru N. W.

    2016-01-01

    As a proof of concept, we used the lidar data from a recent field campaign and developed a smartphone application to view the lidar scan in augmented reality. In this paper, we give a brief methodology of this feasibility study, present the challenges and promises of using AR technology in conjunction with Doppler wind lidars.

  17. Learning Molecular Structures in a Tangible Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kikuo; Takase, Norio

    This article presents the characteristics of using a tangible table top environment produced by augmented reality (AR), aimed at improving the environment in which learners observe three-dimensional molecular structures. The authors perform two evaluation experiments. A performance test for a user interface demonstrates that learners with a…

  18. Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun, Ed.; Altinpulluk, Hakan, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Novel trends and innovations have enhanced contemporary educational environments. When applied properly, these computing advances can create enriched learning opportunities for students. "Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education" is a pivotal reference source for the latest academic research on the integration of…

  19. VirtualTable: a projection augmented reality game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Steenstrup, Kasper Hornbak

    2015-01-01

    VirtualTable is a projection augmented reality installation where users are engaged in an interactive tower defense game. The installation runs continuously and is designed to attract people to a table, which the game is projected onto. Any number of players can join the game for an optional period...

  20. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students' learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students' knowledge acquisition.…

  1. Augmented Reality Games: Using Technology on a Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard; Burton, Erin Peters; Frazier, Wendy; Cheng, Rebecca; Chmiel, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    As smartphones become more ubiquitous among adolescents, there is increasing potential for these as a tool to engage students in science instruction through innovative learning environments such as augmented reality (AR). Aligned with the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996) and integrating the three dimensions of "A Framework for K-12…

  2. The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Shein-Yung; Tsai, Chung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study uses augmented reality (AR) technology to integrate virtual objects into the real learning environment for language learning. The English AR classroom is constructed using the system prototyping method and evaluated by semi-structured in-depth interviews. According to the flow theory by Csikszenmihalyi in 1975 along with the immersive…

  3. Learning Physics through Play in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Noel; Danish, Joshua A.; Delacruz, Girlie; Kumar, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Physics through Play Project (LPP) engaged 6-8-year old students (n = 43) in a series of scientific investigations of Newtonian force and motion including a series of augmented reality activities. We outline the two design principles behind the LPP curriculum: 1) the use of socio-dramatic, embodied play in the form of participatory…

  4. Augmented Reality in science education – affordances for student learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Swensen, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    Most extant studies examining augmented reality (AR) have focused on the technology itself. This paper presents findings addressing the issue of AR for educational purposes based on a sequential survey distributed to 35 expert science teachers, ICT designers and science education researchers from...

  5. The use of augmented reality in command and control situation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Augmented reality is not completely new technology, but rather an interesting combination of existing technologies, facilitated by the rapid progress made on ultra-portable devices such as smart cellular telephones. It has the potential to enhance the situation awareness of military operators. This study identifies possible ...

  6. Augmented Reality in Education--Cases, Places and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt; Howe, Cathie; McCredie, Nerida; Robinson, Austin; Grover, David

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality is poised to profoundly transform Education as we know it. The capacity to overlay rich media onto the real world for viewing through web-enabled devices such as phones and tablet devices means that information can be made available to students at the exact time and place of need. This has the potential to reduce cognitive…

  7. Augmented Reality and Mobile Learning: The State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Rebecca; Adams, Anne; Gaved, Mark; Mor, Yishay; Thomas, Rhodri

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the state of the art in augmented reality (AR) for mobile learning. Previous work in the field of mobile learning has included AR as a component of a wider toolkit but little has been done to discuss the phenomenon in detail or to examine in a balanced fashion its potential for learning, identifying both positive…

  8. Player/Avatar Body Relations in Multimodal Augmented Reality Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality research is finally moving towards multimodal experiences: more and more applications do not only include visuals, but also audio and even haptics. The purpose of multimodality in these applications can be to increase realism or to increase the amount or quality of communicated

  9. Assessing Upper Extremity Motor Dysfunction Using an Augmented Reality Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cidota, M.A.; Bank, Paulina J.M.; Ouwehand, P.W.; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in technology offer new opportunities for a better understanding of how different disorders affect motor function. In this paper, we explore the potential of an augmented reality (AR) game implemented using free hand and body tracking to develop a uniform, cost-effective and objective

  10. Sensor fusion in head pose tracking for augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Lagendijk, R.L.; Jonker, P.P.; Persa, S.F.

    The focus of this thesis is on studying diverse techniques, methods and sensors for position and orientation determination with application to augmented reality applications. In Chapter 2 we reviewed a variety of existing techniques and systems for position determination. From a practical point of

  11. Current Status, Opportunities and Challenges of Augmented Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Liang, Jyh-Chong

    2013-01-01

    Although augmented reality (AR) has gained much research attention in recent years, the term AR was given different meanings by varying researchers. In this article, we first provide an overview of definitions, taxonomies, and technologies of AR. We argue that viewing AR as a concept rather than a type of technology would be more productive for…

  12. Using Augmented Reality to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Garzón, Juan Carlos; Magrini, Marcio Luiz; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding metabolism and metabolic pathways constitutes one of the central aims for students of biological sciences. Learning metabolic pathways should be focused on the understanding of general concepts and core principles. New technologies such Augmented Reality (AR) have shown potential to improve assimilation of biochemistry abstract…

  13. Sensor fusion in head pose tracking for augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persa, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on studying diverse techniques, methods and sensors for position and orientation determination with application to augmented reality applications. In Chapter 2 we reviewed a variety of existing techniques and systems for position determination. From a practical point of

  14. Effect on Academic Procrastination after Introducing Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendicho, Peña Fabiani; Mora, Carlos Efren; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; Rivero-Rodríguez, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Students suffer academic procrastination while dealing with frequent deadlines and working under pressure. This causes to delay their coursework and may affect their academic progress, despite feeling worse. Triggering students' motivation, like introducing technologies, helps to reduce procrastination. In this context, Augmented Reality has been…

  15. Learning Molecular Structures in a Tangible Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kikuo; Takase, Norio

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the characteristics of using a tangible table top environment produced by augmented reality (AR), aimed at improving the environment in which learners observe three-dimensional molecular structures. The authors perform two evaluation experiments. A performance test for a user interface demonstrates that learners with a…

  16. Using Augmented Reality Tools to Enhance Children's Library Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Tamara R.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) has been used and documented for a variety of commercial and educational purposes, and the proliferation of mobile devices has increased the average person's access to AR systems and tools. However, little research has been done in the area of using AR to supplement traditional library services, specifically for patrons aged…

  17. Aplikasi Augmented Reality Magic Book Pengenalan Binatang Untuk Siswa TK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dewa Gede Wahya Dhiyatmika

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is a technology combining 2 or 3 dimensional virtual objects into a real 3 dimensional environment and projected real time. Children at 5 to 7 years old, are in their golden age where they are getting more sensitive to stimulus and easier on learning new things, that they are easier on receiving new and interesting things. So, it seems to be important for children at this age to learn about living creature around them, one of it is learning about animals. Media about animal introduction for kindergarten students, such as book with 2 dimensional animal form, seems like incapable yet to excite children on learning about animal species. This Augmented Reality Magic Book Animals Introduction Application for Kindergarten Students has been developed using Android base with marker that identified 3 dimensional animal objects, their voices, and the informations about the animals using Augmented Reality Technology. Augmented Reality technology makes animal introduction to children become easier and more interesting, this application shows 3 dimensional form of animals and their voices with more innovative interface using Smartphone.

  18. Calibration, registration, and synchronization for high precision augmented reality haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Matthias; Bianchi, Gérald; Knoerlein, Benjamin; Székely, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    In our current research we examine the application of visuo-haptic augmented reality setups in medical training. To this end, highly accurate calibration, system stability, and low latency are indispensable prerequisites. These are necessary to maintain user immersion and avoid breaks in presence which potentially diminish the training outcome. In this paper we describe the developed calibration methods for visuo-haptic integration, the hybrid tracking technique for stable alignment of the augmentation, and the distributed framework ensuring low latency and component synchronization. Finally, we outline an early prototype system based on the multimodal augmented reality framework. The latter allows colocated visuo-haptic interaction with real and virtual scene components in a simplified open surgery setting.

  19. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Alice Chicchi Giglioli; Federica Pallavicini; Elisa Pedroli; Silvia Serino; Giuseppe Riva

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cogn...

  20. The Effect of an Augmented Reality Enhanced Mathematics Lesson on Student Achievement and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, Anne; Nadolny, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess student achievement and motivation during a high school augmented reality mathematics activity focused on dimensional analysis. Included in this article is a review of the literature on the use of augmented reality in mathematics and the combination of print with augmented reality, also known as interactive…

  1. Evaluating Augmented Reality to Complete a Chain Task for Elementary Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David F.; Moore, Eric J.; Wright, Rachel E.; McMahon, Don D.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Smith, Cate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of augmented reality to teach a chain task to three elementary-age students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Augmented reality blends digital information within the real world. This study used a marker-based augmented reality picture prompt to trigger a video model clip of a student…

  2. An Analysis of Engagement in a Combination Indoor/Outdoor Augmented Reality Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkestad, James; O'Shea, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a qualitative analysis of video captured during a dual indoor/outdoor Augmented Reality experience. Augmented Reality is the layering of virtual information on top of the physical world. This Augmented Reality experience asked students to interact with the San Diego Museum of Art and the Botanical Gardens in San…

  3. Augmented reality based real-time subcutaneous vein imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Zhao, Yitian; Song, Xianzheng; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-07-01

    A novel 3D reconstruction and fast imaging system for subcutaneous veins by augmented reality is presented. The study was performed to reduce the failure rate and time required in intravenous injection by providing augmented vein structures that back-project superimposed veins on the skin surface of the hand. Images of the subcutaneous vein are captured by two industrial cameras with extra reflective near-infrared lights. The veins are then segmented by a multiple-feature clustering method. Vein structures captured by the two cameras are matched and reconstructed based on the epipolar constraint and homographic property. The skin surface is reconstructed by active structured light with spatial encoding values and fusion displayed with the reconstructed vein. The vein and skin surface are both reconstructed in the 3D space. Results show that the structures can be precisely back-projected to the back of the hand for further augmented display and visualization. The overall system performance is evaluated in terms of vein segmentation, accuracy of vein matching, feature points distance error, duration times, accuracy of skin reconstruction, and augmented display. All experiments are validated with sets of real vein data. The imaging and augmented system produces good imaging and augmented reality results with high speed.

  4. Towards augmented reality: The dialectics of physical and virtual space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guga Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaces generated by new media technologies, no matter how abstract they may be, represent a qualitatively new form of the media environment. Moreover, they are integrated into everyday life in a way that they have become the constituents of social reality. Based on dualistic Cartesian understanding of real and virtual space, virtuality still carries a connotation of 'other' world, which is ontologically and phenomenologically different from 'reality'. However, virtuality as a characteristic of new media technologies should neither be equated with illusion, deception or fiction nor set in opposition to reality, given that it embodies real interactions. Instead, we could say that there are different types or levels of reality and that the virtual exists as reality qualitatively different from that of physical reality. Today, when every place on the planet, as well as social, political, and cultural activities, have their digital manifestations, can we still talk about virtual space as an isolated phenomenon? The ubiquitous use of new media technologies such as smartphones or wearables has profoundly transformed the experience of modern man. It is more and more determined by technologically mediated reality, i.e. augmented reality. In this regard, the key issues that will be addressed in this article are the ways technologically mediated spaces redefine not only the social relationships, but also the notions of identity, embodiment, and the self.

  5. Exploring Parents' Conceptions of Augmented Reality Learning and Approaches to Learning by Augmented Reality with Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Hung

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing attention to the role of parents in children's learning, what issues parents consider and how they behave when learning with their children when confronted with the emerging augmented reality (AR) technology may be worth exploring. This study was therefore conducted to qualitatively understand parents' conceptions of AR…

  6. Katalog Penjualan Rumah Berbasis Android Menggunakan Teknologi Augmented Reality dan Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alders Paliling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Penerapan teknologi augmented reality kian diminati oleh pihak produsen untuk memasarkan produk  yang dihasilkan. Teknologi augmented reality mampu meproyeksikan objek dua dimensi ataupun tiga dimensi kedalam lingkungan nyata. Teknologi virtual reality mampu membawa pengguna masuk kedalam lingkungan virtual sehingga pengguna merasa berada dalam lingkungan virtual. Penelitian ini menggunakan teknologi augmented reality yang mampu memproyeksikan objek tiga dimensi rumah sehingga katalog menjadi lebih nyata,  dan teknologi virtual reality yang membuat pengguna berinteraksi langsung dengan objek tiga dimensi rumah dan merasa berada di dalam rumah. Aplikasi yang dibangun memanfaatkan sensor accelerometer yang tertanam dalam perangkat mobile android yang memungkinkan pengguna melihat seisi ruangan dengan memiringkan perangkat mobile android kekiri dan kekanan. Jumlah kamera virtual yang digunakan berjumlah lima yang diletakkan di ruang tamu, ruang keluarga, ruang kamar utama, ruang kamar anak, dan ruang dapur. Aplikasi ini berjalan pada platform android dan menggunakan personal komputer sebagai server yang menyimpan data informasi rumah. Dengan adanya aplikasi ini pengguna dapat merasakan suasana berbeda dalam melihat sebuah katalog. . Kata kunci—Augmentd Reality, Virtual Reality, Katalog, Android

  7. Markerless client-server augmented reality system with natural features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shuangning; Sang, Xinzhu; Chen, Duo

    2017-10-01

    A markerless client-server augmented reality system is presented. In this research, the more extensive and mature virtual reality head-mounted display is adopted to assist the implementation of augmented reality. The viewer is provided an image in front of their eyes with the head-mounted display. The front-facing camera is used to capture video signals into the workstation. The generated virtual scene is merged with the outside world information received from the camera. The integrated video is sent to the helmet display system. The distinguishing feature and novelty is to realize the augmented reality with natural features instead of marker, which address the limitations of the marker, such as only black and white, the inapplicability of different environment conditions, and particularly cannot work when the marker is partially blocked. Further, 3D stereoscopic perception of virtual animation model is achieved. The high-speed and stable socket native communication method is adopted for transmission of the key video stream data, which can reduce the calculation burden of the system.

  8. Role of computer vision in augmented virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajeev; Molineros, Jose

    1995-03-01

    An important issue in augmented virtual reality is making the virtual world sensitive to the current state of the surrounding real world as the user interacts with it--changing gaze, manipulating an object, etc. For providing the right virtual stimulus at the right position and time, the system needs some sensor to interpret the surrounding scene. Computer vision holds great potential in providing the necessary interpretation of the scene. We present the preliminary design of a computer vision-based augmented reality system for helping a human in assembling an industrial part from its components. The context of assembly helps in keeping the computer vision task simple by exploiting the geometric model of the assembly components for recognition and pose estimation. The augmentation stimuli include labeling of objects in the scene, helping with sequencing using an assembly planner, visualization of assembly at different stages, handling errors by the human operator, etc. Such a system would have potential applications in assembling complex parts, maintenance, and education. We will present an overview of the design of the system and discuss some of the issues involved in computer vision-based augmented reality.

  9. An Efficiency Analysis of Augmented Reality Marker Recognition Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurpytė Dovilė

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the investigation of augmented reality system which is designed for identification and augmentation of 100 different square markers. Marker recognition efficiency was investigated by rotating markers along x and y axis directions in range from −90° to 90°. Virtual simulations of four environments were developed: a an intense source of light, b an intense source of light falling from the left side, c the non-intensive light source falling from the left side, d equally falling shadows. The graphics were created using the OpenGL graphics computer hardware interface; image processing was programmed in C++ language using OpenCV, while augmented reality was developed in Java programming language using NyARToolKit. The obtained results demonstrate that augmented reality marker recognition algorithm is accurate and reliable in the case of changing lighting conditions and rotational angles - only 4 % markers were unidentified. Assessment of marker recognition efficiency let to propose marker classification strategy in order to use it for grouping various markers into distinct markers’ groups possessing similar recognition properties.

  10. Augmented Reality Technologies on iPhone : What and how iPhone could achieve with Augmented Reality and 3D-graphics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hongyi

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality Technology becomes closer to normal life when found in hand-held devices. And hand-held devices get more and more computing power as the rising of chip energy efficiency. iPhone, as a quickly growing handset, is a promising platform for Augmented Reality application with its various built-in sensors. The author gave a review of iPhone platform regarding Augmented Reality. Then, the author attempted to carry out two prototypes of Augmented Reality games and performed evaluati...

  11. Mobile Augmented Reality enhances indoor navigation for wheelchair users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Chagas de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Introduction: Individuals with mobility impairments associated with lower limb disabilities often face enormous challenges to participate in routine activities and to move around various environments. For many, the use of wheelchairs is paramount to provide mobility and social inclusion. Nevertheless, they still face a number of challenges to properly function in our society. Among the many difficulties, one in particular stands out: navigating in complex internal environments (indoors. The main objective of this work is to propose an architecture based on Mobile Augmented Reality to support the development of indoor navigation systems dedicated to wheelchair users, that is also capable of recording CAD drawings of the buildings and dealing with accessibility issues for that population. Methods Overall, five main functional requirements are proposed: the ability to allow for indoor navigation by means of Mobile Augmented Reality techniques; the capacity to register and configure building CAD drawings and the position of fiducial markers, points of interest and obstacles to be avoided by the wheelchair user; the capacity to find the best route for wheelchair indoor navigation, taking stairs and other obstacles into account; allow for the visualization of virtual directional arrows in the smartphone displays; and incorporate touch or voice commands to interact with the application. The architecture is proposed as a combination of four layers: User interface; Control; Service; and Infrastructure. A proof-of-concept application was developed and tests were performed with disable volunteers operating manual and electric wheelchairs. Results The application was implemented in Java for the Android operational system. A local database was used to store the test building CAD drawings and the position of fiducial markers and points of interest. The Android Augmented Reality library was used to implement Augmented Reality and the Blender open source

  12. Augmented reality i en industriell tillverkningsprocess

    OpenAIRE

    Wass, Anton; Löwenborg Forsberg, Eddie

    2017-01-01

    Med den digitalisering som sker just nu i den industriella världen väcks stor nyfikenhet på hur framtidens tekniker såsom “Augmented Reality” kan appliceras i industriella tillverkningsprocesser. Målet med examensarbetet var att undersöka om och hur AR-teknik kan utnyttjas i industrin för att förbättra nuvarande arbetsprocesser. Två prototyper utvecklades för AR-glasögonen Microsoft HoloLens och utvärderades genom att jämföra tidigare arbetssätt med nya. Testerna av prototyperna visade att ef...

  13. Using Augmented Reality in the Treatment of CRPS Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L; Hansen, Helle Puggård; Baskarada, D

    . This work examines Augmented Reality (AR) as MVF treatment. Materials and Methods An AR setup was built for CPRS patients with left arms as affected extremities. The AR displays a virtual left arm, which mirrors the movements of the right arm, on images of the real world. To explore motivational benefits......  Background Mirror Visual Feedback (MVF) is an important part of therapeutic treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Unfortunately mirror boxes (MB) are not compatible with meaningful activities. Recently it was shown that Virtual Reality (VR) as MVF treatment makes this possible...

  14. Using augmented reality to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Garzón, Juan Carlos; Magrini, Marcio Luiz; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Understanding metabolism and metabolic pathways constitutes one of the central aims for students of biological sciences. Learning metabolic pathways should be focused on the understanding of general concepts and core principles. New technologies such Augmented Reality (AR) have shown potential to improve assimilation of biochemistry abstract concepts because students can manipulate 3D molecules in real time. Here we describe an application named Augmented Reality Metabolic Pathways (ARMET), which allowed students to visualize the 3D molecular structure of substrates and products, thus perceiving changes in each molecule. The structural modification of molecules shows students the flow and exchange of compounds and energy through metabolism. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):417-420, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Augmented Reality Based Doppler Lidar Data Visualization: Promises and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuru, N. W.; Calhoun, R.

    2016-06-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology in which the enables the user to view virtual content as if it existed in real world. We are exploring the possibility of using this technology to view radial velocities or processed wind vectors from a Doppler wind lidar, thus giving the user an ability to see the wind in a literal sense. This approach could find possible applications in aviation safety, atmospheric data visualization as well as in weather education and public outreach. As a proof of concept, we used the lidar data from a recent field campaign and developed a smartphone application to view the lidar scan in augmented reality. In this paper, we give a brief methodology of this feasibility study, present the challenges and promises of using AR technology in conjunction with Doppler wind lidars.

  16. An augmented reality haptic training simulator for spinal needle procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Colin; Hashtrudi-Zaad, Keyvan; Sellens, Rick; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the prototype for an augmented reality haptic simulation system with potential for spinal needle insertion training. The proposed system is composed of a torso mannequin, a MicronTracker2 optical tracking system, a PHANToM haptic device, and a graphical user interface to provide visual feedback. The system allows users to perform simulated needle insertions on a physical mannequin overlaid with an augmented reality cutaway of patient anatomy. A tissue model based on a finite-element model provides force during the insertion. The system allows for training without the need for the presence of a trained clinician or access to live patients or cadavers. A pilot user study demonstrates the potential and functionality of the system.

  17. Interframe coding of feature descriptors for mobile augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Mina; Chandrasekhar, Vijay; Tsai, Sam S; Chen, David; Girod, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    Streaming mobile augmented reality applications require both real-time recognition and tracking of objects of interest in a video sequence. Typically, local features are calculated from the gradients of a canonical patch around a keypoint in individual video frames. In this paper, we propose a temporally coherent keypoint detector and design efficient interframe predictive coding techniques for canonical patches, feature descriptors, and keypoint locations. In the proposed system, we strive to transmit each patch or its equivalent feature descriptor with as few bits as possible by modifying a previously transmitted patch or descriptor. Our solution enables server-based mobile augmented reality where a continuous stream of salient information, sufficient for image-based retrieval, and object localization, is sent at a bit-rate that is practical for today's wireless links and less than one-tenth of the bit-rate needed to stream the compressed video to the server.

  18. Use of display technologies for augmented reality enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is seen as an important tool for the future of user interfaces as well as training applications. An important application area for AR is expected to be in the digitization of training and worker instructions used in the Brilliant Factory environment. The transition of work instructions methods from printed pages in a book or taped to a machine to virtual simulations is a long step with many challenges along the way. A variety of augmented reality tools are being explored today for industrial applications that range from simple programmable projections in the work space to 3D displays and head mounted gear. This paper will review where some of these tool are today and some of the pros and cons being considered for the future worker environment.

  19. An acceptance model for smart glasses based tourism augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidy, Waqas Khalid; Arshad, Haslina; Huang, Jiung Yao

    2017-10-01

    Recent mobile technologies have revolutionized the way people experience their environment. Although, there is only limited research on users' acceptance of AR in the cultural tourism context, previous researchers have explored the opportunities of using augmented reality (AR) in order to enhance user experience. Recent AR research lack works that integrates dimensions which are specific to cultural tourism and smart glass specific context. Hence, this work proposes an AR acceptance model in the context of cultural heritage tourism and smart glasses capable of performing augmented reality. Therefore, in this paper we aim to present an AR acceptance model to understand the AR usage behavior and visiting intention for tourists who use Smart Glass based AR at UNESCO cultural heritage destinations in Malaysia. Furthermore, this paper identifies information quality, technology readiness, visual appeal, and facilitating conditions as external variables and key factors influencing visitors' beliefs, attitudes and usage intention.

  20. ChemPreview: an augmented reality-based molecular interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-01

    Human computer interfaces make computational science more comprehensible and impactful. Complex 3D structures such as proteins or DNA are magnified by digital representations and displayed on two-dimensional monitors. Augmented reality has recently opened another door to access the virtual three-dimensional world. Herein, we present an augmented reality application called ChemPreview with the potential to manipulate bio-molecular structures at an atomistic level. ChemPreview is available at https://github.com/wallerlab/chem-preview/releases, and is built on top of the Meta 1 platform https://www.metavision.com/. ChemPreview can be used to interact with a protein in an intuitive way using natural hand gestures, thereby making it appealing to computational chemists or structural biologists. The ability to manipulate atoms in real world could eventually provide new and more efficient ways of extracting structural knowledge, or designing new molecules in silico. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ARZombie: A Mobile Augmented Reality Game with Multimodal Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Cordeiro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality games have the power to extend virtual gaming into real world scenarios with real people, while enhancing the senses of the user. This paper describes the AR- Zombie game developed with the aim of studying and developing mobile augmented reality applications, specifically for tablets, using face recognition interaction techniques. The goal of the ARZombie player is to kill zombies that are detected through the display of the device. Instead of using markers as a mean of tracking the zombies, this game incorporates a facial recognition system, which will enhance the user experience by improving the interaction of players with the real world. As the player moves around the environment, the game will display virtual zombies on the screen if the detected faces are recognized as belonging to the class of the zombies. ARZombie was tested with users to evaluate the interaction proposals and its components were evaluated regarding the performance in order to ensure a better gaming experience.

  2. A new urban-plan system based on augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijun; Guan, Tao; Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Cheng

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes an Urban-Plan System based on augmented reality with tangible and interactive user interface. Virtual models, graphics generated by computer and physical materials have been used in whole urban-planning process. Participants can carry out their assignment collaboratively in direct and interactive manner and the final results can be browsed and modified in real-time. Augmented Reality enables users to achieve Urban-Plan more effectively and easily. One key object of our system is to enable users manipulate virtual models as they can do in real world. To achieve this, we must calculate the pose and position of camera relative to real world exactly. This paper uses computer vision technology and known marker to solve the above problem.

  3. Topic Space: Rapid Prototyping a Mobile Augmented Reality Recommendation App

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Hahn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With funding from an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS Sparks! Ignition Grant, researchers from the University of Illinois Library designed and tested a mobile recommender app with augmented reality features. By embedding open source optical character recognition software into a “Topic Space” module, the augmented reality app can recognize call numbers on a book in the library and suggest relevant items that are not shelved nearby. Topic Space can also show users items that are normally shelved in the starting location but that are currently checked out. Using formative UX methods, grant staff shaped app interface and functionality through early user testing. This paper reports results of UX testing; a redesigned mobile interface, and provides considerations on the future development of personalized recommendation functionality.

  4. Augmented Reality as a Visualizing facilitator in Nursing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, Annette; Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2014-01-01

    ’ understanding within anatomy and physiology. Aim: Against this background, the current project set out to investigate how and to what extent the application of augmented reality (AR) could help students gain a better understanding through an increased focus on contextualized visualization. The overall aim......Title: Augmented Reality as a visualizing facilitator in nursing education Background: Understanding the workings of the biological human body is as complex as the body itself, and because of their complexity, the phenomena of respiration and lung anatomy pose a special problem for nursing students...... of the project has been to uncover the pedagogical affordances of AR and increase student learning through its application, an area in which there seems to be very little research. In the context at hand, AR was expected to help create a realistic visualization of parts of the body “in situ” unlike videos...

  5. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Fernandez

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of suc...

  6. ARTutor—An Augmented Reality Platform for Interactive Distance Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Lytridis; Avgoustos Tsinakos; Ioannis Kazanidis

    2018-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) has been used in various contexts in recent years in order to enhance user experiences in mobile and wearable devices. Various studies have shown the utility of AR, especially in the field of education, where it has been observed that learning results are improved. However, such applications require specialized teams of software developers to create and maintain them. In an attempt to solve this problem and enable educators to easily create AR content for existing textb...

  7. Using augmented reality to enhance the shopping mall experience

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Filipe Lampreia Anes Estevens da

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand if consumers would use an Augmented Reality application on their smartphones while visiting a shopping mall. This application would have several features that would boost the shopping mall experience. In order to access the acceptance of this technological hypothesis an online survey was conducted to extract empirical data from a reliable sample. This empirical data is analysed and characterized with some descriptive statistics, as ...

  8. Augmented reality assisted surgery: a urologic training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Ryan M; Srikishen, Neel; Lipshultz, Larry I; Spiess, Philippe E; Carrion, Rafael E; Hakky, Tariq S

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality is widely used in aeronautics and is a developing concept within surgery. In this pilot study, we developed an application for use on Google Glass ® optical head-mounted display to train urology residents in how to place an inflatable penile prosthesis. We use the phrase Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery to describe this novel application of augmented reality in the setting of surgery. The application demonstrates the steps of the surgical procedure of inflatable penile prosthesis placement. It also contains software that allows for detection of interest points using a camera feed from the optical head-mounted display to enable faculty to interact with residents during placement of the penile prosthesis. Urology trainees and faculty who volunteered to take part in the study were given time to experience the technology in the operative or perioperative setting and asked to complete a feedback survey. From 30 total participants using a 10-point scale, educational usefulness was rated 8.6, ease of navigation was rated 7.6, likelihood to use was rated 7.4, and distraction in operating room was rated 4.9. When stratified between trainees and faculty, trainees found the technology more educationally useful, and less distracting. Overall, 81% of the participants want this technology in their residency program, and 93% see this technology in the operating room in the future. Further development of this technology is warranted before full release, and further studies are necessary to better characterize the effectiveness of Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery in urologic surgical training.

  9. Augmented reality assisted surgery: a urologic training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Dickey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is widely used in aeronautics and is a developing concept within surgery. In this pilot study, we developed an application for use on Google Glass ® optical head-mounted display to train urology residents in how to place an inflatable penile prosthesis. We use the phrase Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery to describe this novel application of augmented reality in the setting of surgery. The application demonstrates the steps of the surgical procedure of inflatable penile prosthesis placement. It also contains software that allows for detection of interest points using a camera feed from the optical head-mounted display to enable faculty to interact with residents during placement of the penile prosthesis. Urology trainees and faculty who volunteered to take part in the study were given time to experience the technology in the operative or perioperative setting and asked to complete a feedback survey. From 30 total participants using a 10-point scale, educational usefulness was rated 8.6, ease of navigation was rated 7.6, likelihood to use was rated 7.4, and distraction in operating room was rated 4.9. When stratified between trainees and faculty, trainees found the technology more educationally useful, and less distracting. Overall, 81% of the participants want this technology in their residency program, and 93% see this technology in the operating room in the future. Further development of this technology is warranted before full release, and further studies are necessary to better characterize the effectiveness of Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery in urologic surgical training.

  10. Il telerilevamento a supporto dell’Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Gemma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fondere insieme realtà e oggetti virtuali per muoversi al meglio con efficacia ed efficienza è quanto si propone, tramite la  Realtà Aumentata, la AGI, Analytical Graphics Inc. di Exton (USA, distribuita in esclusiva in Italia da GMSPAZIO che offre il sistema STK, storicamente conosciuto come Satellite ToolKit che offre più di quarantamila utenti nel mondo un esteso set di funzionalità capaci di soddisfare ogni tipo di esigenza.Remote  Sensing  and  Augmented RealityAugmented reality has been used for years  in  the  broadcast  industry.  You see it every time the National Football League paints a yellow first-down line on the playing field. While it is com-monplace and easy to execute in con-trolled environments with fixed cam-era  positions,  predetermined  angles and known terrain, the opposite is true in uncontrolled environments, such as battlefields in Kandahar. Nonetheless, augmented reality is essential for the warfighter, and the global intelligence community (IC is faced with the chal-lenge  of  efficiently  creating  and  dis-seminating intelligence products from increasing  amounts  of  video  data. AGI’s  Insight3D  development  library is helping to overcome many hurdles of ISR-focused augmented reality.

  11. Location Based Augmented Reality for Interactive Television Drama

    OpenAIRE

    van der Stelt, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores augmented reality (AR) for Java enabled consumer mobile phones for use in an interactive TV drama. The problems that are faced when dealing with limited processing power and memory constraints are examined and so are the minimum demands set on the telephones. A discussion of what AR is and where the development of mobile AR stands today is presented. Based on a dialogue with Swedish Television (SVT) and the evaluation of current mobile phones a possible solution is presen...

  12. Fully Automated and Stable Registration for Augmented Reality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lepetit, V.; Vacchetti, L; Thalmann, D; Fua, P.

    2003-01-01

    We present a fully automated approach to camera registration for augmented reality systems. It relies on purely passive vision techniques to solve the initialization and real-time tracking problems, given a rough CAD model of parts of the real scene. It does not require a controlled environment, for example placing markers. It handles arbitrarily complex models, occlusions, large camera displacements and drastic aspect changes. This is made possible by two major contributions: the first one i...

  13. See-through 3D technology for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Li, Gang; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young

    2017-06-01

    Augmented reality is recently attracting a lot of attention as one of the most spotlighted next-generation technologies. In order to get toward realization of ideal augmented reality, we need to integrate 3D virtual information into real world. This integration should not be noticed by users blurring the boundary between the virtual and real worlds. Thus, ultimate device for augmented reality can reconstruct and superimpose 3D virtual information on the real world so that they are not distinguishable, which is referred to as see-through 3D technology. Here, we introduce our previous researches to combine see-through displays and 3D technologies using emerging optical combiners: holographic optical elements and index matched optical elements. Holographic optical elements are volume gratings that have angular and wavelength selectivity. Index matched optical elements are partially reflective elements using a compensation element for index matching. Using these optical combiners, we could implement see-through 3D displays based on typical methodologies including integral imaging, digital holographic displays, multi-layer displays, and retinal projection. Some of these methods are expected to be optimized and customized for head-mounted or wearable displays. We conclude with demonstration and analysis of fundamental researches for head-mounted see-through 3D displays.

  14. Augmented reality-assisted bypass surgery: embracing minimal invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Bijlenga, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The overlay of virtual images on the surgical field, defined as augmented reality, has been used for image guidance during various neurosurgical procedures. Although this technology could conceivably address certain inherent problems of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures, this potential has not been explored to date. We evaluate the usefulness of an augmented reality-based setup, which could help in harvesting donor vessels through their precise localization in real-time, in performing tailored craniotomies, and in identifying preoperatively selected recipient vessels for the purpose of anastomosis. Our method was applied to 3 patients with Moya-Moya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomoses and 1 patient who underwent an occipital artery-to-posteroinferior cerebellar artery bypass because of a dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery. Patients' heads, skulls, and extracranial and intracranial vessels were segmented preoperatively from 3-dimensional image data sets (3-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, angio-magnetic resonance imaging, angio-computed tomography), and injected intraoperatively into the operating microscope's eyepiece for image guidance. In each case, the described setup helped in precisely localizing donor and recipient vessels and in tailoring craniotomies to the injected images. The presented system based on augmented reality can optimize the workflow of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures by providing essential anatomical information, entirely integrated to the surgical field, and help to perform minimally invasive procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro cardiac catheter navigation via augmented reality surgical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Moore, John; Wiles, Andrew; Lo, Jennifer; Wedlake, Chris; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Catheter-driven cardiac interventions have emerged in response to the need of reducing invasiveness associated with the traditional cut-and-sew techniques. Catheter manipulation is traditionally performed under real-time fluoroscopy imaging, resulting in an overall trade-off of procedure invasiveness for radiation exposure of both the patient and clinical staff. Our approach to reducing and potentially eliminating the use of flouroscopy in the operating room entails the use of multi-modality imaging and magnetic tracking technologies, wrapped together into an augmented reality environment for enhanced intra-procedure visualization and guidance. Here we performed an in vitro study in which a catheter was guided to specific targets located on the endocardial atrial surface of a beating heart phantom. "Therapy delivery" was modeled in the context of a blinded procedure, mimicking a beating heart, intracardiac intervention. The users navigated the tip of a magnetically tracked Freezor 5 CRYOCATH catheter to the specified targets. Procedure accuracy was determined as the distance between the tracked catheter tip and the tracked surgical target at the time of contact, and it was assessed under three different guidance modalities: endoscopic, augmented reality, and ultrasound image guidance. The overall RMS targeting accuracy achieved under augmented reality guidance averaged to 1.1 mm. This guidance modality shows significant improvements in both procedure accuracy and duration over ultrasound image guidance alone, while maintianing an overall targeting accuracy comparable to that achieved under endoscopic guidance.

  16. Augmented reality and ubiquitous computing : The hidden potentialities of augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberati, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to highlight the augmented reality’s potentialities, depicting its main characteristics and focusing attention on what its goal should be in order to have a new technology completely different from those that already exist. From a technological point of view, augmented

  17. Contextualized Interdisciplinary Learning in Mainstream Schools Using Augmented Reality-Based Technology: A Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The use of augmented reality (AR) tools, where virtual objects such as tables and graphs can be displayed and be interacted with in real scenes created from imaging devices, in mainstream school curriculum is uncommon, as they are potentially costly and sometimes bulky. Thus, such learning tools are mainly applied in tertiary institutions, such as…

  18. Augmented reality: a class of displays on the reality-virtuality continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Paul; Takemura, Haruo; Utsumi, Akira; Kishino, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we discuss augmented reality (AR) displays in a general sense, within the context of a reality-virtuality (RV) continuum, encompassing a large class of `mixed reality' (MR) displays, which also includes augmented virtuality (AV). MR displays are defined by means of seven examples of existing display concepts in which real objects and virtual objects are juxtaposed. Essential factors which distinguish different MR display systems from each other are presented, first by means of a table in which the nature of the underlying scene, how it is viewed, and the observer's reference to it are compared, and then by means of a three dimensional taxonomic framework comprising: extent of world knowledge, reproduction fidelity, and extent of presence metaphor. A principal objective of the taxonomy is to clarify terminology issues and to provide a framework for classifying research across different disciplines.

  19. An augmented reality application for studying atomic orbitals : orbitário

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Jorge; Kirner, Claudio; Fiolhais, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    "Virtual environments seem to facilitate the formation of correct conceptual models. The main contributing factor is interaction. Augmented reality is a new sort of virtual reality with a new form of interaction. We present Orbitário, an augmented reality application for studying atomic orbitals."

  20. Augmented Reality Environments in Learning, Communicational and Professional Contexts in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Gutiérrez, Jorge; Meneses Fernández, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores educational and professional uses of augmented learning environment concerned with issues of training and entertainment. We analyze the state-of-art research of some scenarios based on augmented reality. Some examples for the purpose of education and simulation are described. These applications show that augmented reality can…

  1. FlyAR: augmented reality supported micro aerial vehicle navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollmann, Stefanie; Hoppe, Christof; Langlotz, Tobias; Reitmayr, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Micro aerial vehicles equipped with high-resolution cameras can be used to create aerial reconstructions of an area of interest. In that context automatic flight path planning and autonomous flying is often applied but so far cannot fully replace the human in the loop, supervising the flight on-site to assure that there are no collisions with obstacles. Unfortunately, this workflow yields several issues, such as the need to mentally transfer the aerial vehicle’s position between 2D map positions and the physical environment, and the complicated depth perception of objects flying in the distance. Augmented Reality can address these issues by bringing the flight planning process on-site and visualizing the spatial relationship between the planned or current positions of the vehicle and the physical environment. In this paper, we present Augmented Reality supported navigation and flight planning of micro aerial vehicles by augmenting the user’s view with relevant information for flight planning and live feedback for flight supervision. Furthermore, we introduce additional depth hints supporting the user in understanding the spatial relationship of virtual waypoints in the physical world and investigate the effect of these visualization techniques on the spatial understanding.

  2. Live texturing of augmented reality characters from colored drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnenat, Stéphane; Ngo, Dat Tien; Zünd, Fabio; Ryffel, Mattia; Noris, Gioacchino; Rothlin, Gerhard; Marra, Alessia; Nitti, Maurizio; Fua, Pascal; Gross, Markus; Sumner, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Coloring books capture the imagination of children and provide them with one of their earliest opportunities for creative expression. However, given the proliferation and popularity of digital devices, real-world activities like coloring can seem unexciting, and children become less engaged in them. Augmented reality holds unique potential to impact this situation by providing a bridge between real-world activities and digital enhancements. In this paper, we present an augmented reality coloring book App in which children color characters in a printed coloring book and inspect their work using a mobile device. The drawing is detected and tracked, and the video stream is augmented with an animated 3-D version of the character that is textured according to the child's coloring. This is possible thanks to several novel technical contributions. We present a texturing process that applies the captured texture from a 2-D colored drawing to both the visible and occluded regions of a 3-D character in real time. We develop a deformable surface tracking method designed for colored drawings that uses a new outlier rejection algorithm for real-time tracking and surface deformation recovery. We present a content creation pipeline to efficiently create the 2-D and 3-D content. And, finally, we validate our work with two user studies that examine the quality of our texturing algorithm and the overall App experience.

  3. Intra-operative augmented reality in distal locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Roberto; Esposito, Marco; Diotte, Benoit; Weidert, Simon; Euler, Ekkehard; Thaller, Peter; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    To design an augmented reality solution that assists surgeons during the distal locking of intramedullary nailing procedures. Traditionally, the procedure is performed under X-ray guidance and requires a significant amount of time and radiation exposure. To absolve these complications, we propose video guidance that allows surgeons to achieve both the down-the-beam position of the intramedullary nail and its subsequent locking. For the down-the-beam position, the IM nail pose in X-ray is calculated using a 2D/3D registration scheme and later related to the patient leg pose which is calculated using video-tracked AR markers. For the distal locking, surgeons use an augmented radiolucent drill in which its tip position is detected and tracked in real-time under video guidance. To evaluate the feasibility of our solution, we performed a preclinical study on dry bone phantom with the participation of four clinicians. Participants achieved 100 % success rate in the down-the beam positioning and 93 % success rate in distal locking using only two X-ray images in 100 s. We confirmed that intra-operative navigation using augmented reality provides an alternative way to perform distal locking in a safe and timely manner.

  4. Augmented reality as an aid in maxillofacial surgery: validation of a wearable system allowing maxillary repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiali, Giovanni; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Cutolo, Fabrizio; Freschi, Cinzia; Caramella, Davide; Bianchi, Alberto; Marchetti, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    We present a newly designed, localiser-free, head-mounted system featuring augmented reality as an aid to maxillofacial bone surgery, and assess the potential utility of the device by conducting a feasibility study and validation. Our head-mounted wearable system facilitating augmented surgery was developed as a stand-alone, video-based, see-through device in which the visual features were adapted to facilitate maxillofacial bone surgery. We implement a strategy designed to present augmented reality information to the operating surgeon. LeFort1 osteotomy was chosen as the test procedure. The system is designed to exhibit virtual planning overlaying the details of a real patient. We implemented a method allowing performance of waferless, augmented-reality assisted bone repositioning. In vitro testing was conducted on a physical replica of a human skull, and the augmented reality system was used to perform LeFort1 maxillary repositioning. Surgical accuracy was measured with the aid of an optical navigation system that recorded the coordinates of three reference points (located in anterior, posterior right, and posterior left positions) on the repositioned maxilla. The outcomes were compared with those expected to be achievable in a three-dimensional environment. Data were derived using three levels of surgical planning, of increasing complexity, and for nine different operators with varying levels of surgical skill. The mean error was 1.70 ± 0.51 mm. The axial errors were 0.89 ± 0.54 mm on the sagittal axis, 0.60 ± 0.20 mm on the frontal axis, and 1.06 ± 0.40 mm on the craniocaudal axis. The simplest plan was associated with a slightly lower mean error (1.58 ± 0.37 mm) compared with the more complex plans (medium: 1.82 ± 0.71 mm; difficult: 1.70 ± 0.45 mm). The mean error for the anterior reference point was lower (1.33 ± 0.58 mm) than those for both the posterior right (1.72 ± 0.24 mm) and posterior left points (2.05 ± 0.47 mm). No significant difference

  5. Crime Scenes as Augmented Reality:Models for Enhancing Places Emotionally by Means of Narratives, Fictions and Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Using the concept of augmented reality, this article will investigate how places in various ways have become augmented by means of different mediatization strategies. Augmentation of reality implies an enhancement of the places' emotional character: a certain mood, atmosphere or narrative surplus of meaning has been implemented. This may take place at different levels, which will be presented and investigated in this article and exemplified by some cases from the fields of tourism and compute...

  6. Simulation and augmented reality in endovascular neurosurgery: lessons from aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitha, Alim P; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Janjua, Major Jameel J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular neurosurgery is a discipline strongly dependent on imaging. Therefore, technology that improves how much useful information we can garner from a single image has the potential to dramatically assist decision making during endovascular procedures. Furthermore, education in an image-enhanced environment, especially with the incorporation of simulation, can improve the safety of the procedures and give interventionalists and trainees the opportunity to study or perform simulated procedures before the intervention, much like what is practiced in the field of aviation. Here, we examine the use of simulators in the training of fighter pilots and discuss how similar benefits can compensate for current deficiencies in endovascular training. We describe the types of simulation used for endovascular procedures, including virtual reality, and discuss the relevant data on its utility in training. Finally, the benefit of augmented reality during endovascular procedures is discussed, along with future computerized image enhancement techniques.

  7. Preliminary development of augmented reality systems for spinal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu Q.; Ramjist, Joel M.; Jivraj, Jamil; Jakubovic, Raphael; Deorajh, Ryan; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Surgical navigation has been more actively deployed in open spinal surgeries due to the need for improved precision during procedures. This is increasingly difficult in minimally invasive surgeries due to the lack of visual cues caused by smaller exposure sites, and increases a surgeon's dependence on their knowledge of anatomical landmarks as well as the CT or MRI images. The use of augmented reality (AR) systems and registration technologies in spinal surgeries could allow for improvements to techniques by overlaying a 3D reconstruction of patient anatomy in the surgeon's field of view, creating a mixed reality visualization. The AR system will be capable of projecting the 3D reconstruction onto a field and preliminary object tracking on a phantom. Dimensional accuracy of the mixed media will also be quantified to account for distortions in tracking.

  8. Augmented reality technology and application in aerodrome building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Du, Qingyun

    2007-06-01

    Paper discusses the function and meaning of AR in the aerodrome construction project. In the initial stages of the aerodrome building, it applies the advanced technology including 3S (RS, GIS and GPS) techniques, augmented reality, virtual reality and digital image processing techniques, and so on. Virtual image or other information that is created by the computer is superimposed with the surveying district which the observer stands is looking at. When the observer is moving in the district, the virtual information is changing correspondingly, just like the virtual information really exists in real environment. The observer can see the scene of aerodrome if he puts on clairvoyant HMD (head mounted display). If we have structural information of the aerodrome in database, AR can supply X-ray of the building just like pipeline, wire and framework in walls.

  9. Application of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality to Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Alaric; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Sung Tae; Pardeshi, Sunil; Lee, Seung Hyun; Eun, Sung-Jong; Whangbo, Taeg Keun

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality have introduced a considerable number of new devices into the consumer market. This momentum is also affecting the medical and health care sector. Although many of the theoretical and practical foundations of virtual reality (VR) were already researched and experienced in the 1980s, the vastly improved features of displays, sensors, interactivity, and computing power currently available in devices offer a new field of applications to the medical sector and also to urology in particular. The purpose of this review article is to review the extent to which VR technology has already influenced certain aspects of medicine, the applications that are currently in use in urology, and the future development trends that could be expected.

  10. Magnetosensitive e-skins with directional perception for augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón Bermúdez, Gilbert Santiago; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy D; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Lebanov, Ana; Bischoff, Lothar; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G; Makarov, Denys

    2018-01-01

    Electronic skins equipped with artificial receptors are able to extend our perception beyond the modalities that have naturally evolved. These synthetic receptors offer complimentary information on our surroundings and endow us with novel means of manipulating physical or even virtual objects. We realize highly compliant magnetosensitive skins with directional perception that enable magnetic cognition, body position tracking, and touchless object manipulation. Transfer printing of eight high-performance spin valve sensors arranged into two Wheatstone bridges onto 1.7-μm-thick polyimide foils ensures mechanical imperceptibility. This resembles a new class of interactive devices extracting information from the surroundings through magnetic tags. We demonstrate this concept in augmented reality systems with virtual knob-turning functions and the operation of virtual dialing pads, based on the interaction with magnetic fields. This technology will enable a cornucopia of applications from navigation, motion tracking in robotics, regenerative medicine, and sports and gaming to interaction in supplemented reality.

  11. Application of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality to Urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality have introduced a considerable number of new devices into the consumer market. This momentum is also affecting the medical and health care sector. Although many of the theoretical and practical foundations of virtual reality (VR) were already researched and experienced in the 1980s, the vastly improved features of displays, sensors, interactivity, and computing power currently available in devices offer a new field of applications to the medical sector and also to urology in particular. The purpose of this review article is to review the extent to which VR technology has already influenced certain aspects of medicine, the applications that are currently in use in urology, and the future development trends that could be expected. PMID:27706017

  12. Magnetosensitive e-skins with directional perception for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón Bermúdez, Gilbert Santiago; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy D.; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Lebanov, Ana; Bischoff, Lothar; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2018-01-01

    Electronic skins equipped with artificial receptors are able to extend our perception beyond the modalities that have naturally evolved. These synthetic receptors offer complimentary information on our surroundings and endow us with novel means of manipulating physical or even virtual objects. We realize highly compliant magnetosensitive skins with directional perception that enable magnetic cognition, body position tracking, and touchless object manipulation. Transfer printing of eight high-performance spin valve sensors arranged into two Wheatstone bridges onto 1.7-μm-thick polyimide foils ensures mechanical imperceptibility. This resembles a new class of interactive devices extracting information from the surroundings through magnetic tags. We demonstrate this concept in augmented reality systems with virtual knob-turning functions and the operation of virtual dialing pads, based on the interaction with magnetic fields. This technology will enable a cornucopia of applications from navigation, motion tracking in robotics, regenerative medicine, and sports and gaming to interaction in supplemented reality. PMID:29376121

  13. UIAR Common Sense : an Augmented Reality Framework for Creating Games to Collect Common Sense from Users

    OpenAIRE

    Dankov, Svetoslav; Rzepka, Rafal; Araki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) applications have become widespread with the continued miniaturization of technology. With the increasing use of smart phones, which often provide increased processing power, enhanced and open software platforms, Augmented Reality has become instrumental in the way we perceive our surroundings and the information that it carries. Augmented Reality has also become a welcome visualization tool for many fields, not restricted to Human-Computer Interaction. In th...

  14. The Development of Augmented Reality to Enhance Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Keith; Brooks, Nathaniel P

    2017-12-22

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) reduces unnecessary tissue damage to the patient but obscures the natural surgical interface that is provided by open surgical procedures. Multiple feedback mechanisms, mainly visual and tactile, are greatly reduced in MIS. Microscopes, endoscopes, and image-guided navigation traditionally provide enough visual information for successful minimally invasive procedures, although the limited feedback makes these procedures more difficult to learn. Research has been performed to develop alternative solutions that regain additional feedback. Augmented reality (AR), a more recent guidance innovation that overlays digital visual data physically, has begun to be implemented in various applications to improve the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive procedures. This review focuses on the recent implementation of augmented display and direct visual overlay and discusses how these innovations address common feedback concerns associated with minimally invasive surgeries.

  15. Augmented reality application for training in pipe defects ultrasonic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amza Cătălin Gheorghe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development process of an Augmented Reality (AR application used for training operators in using ultrasonic equipment for non-destructive testing (NDT of pipework. The application provides workers useful information regarding the process steps, the main components of ultrasonic equipment and the proper modality of placing, aligning and moving it on pipe and weld. Using tablet or mobile phone device, an operator can see on screen written details and images on standardized working method, thus offering assistance during the training process. Allowing 3D augmented visualization of ultrasonic equipment overlaid on the real-world environment consisting in pipes and welds, the AR application makes the NDT process easier to understand and learn, as the initial evaluation results showed.

  16. FCJ-150 AffeXity: Performing Affect with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Kozel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This discussion of affect and performance is based on early research for an artistic project called AffeXity exploring the use of augmented reality to embed affective choreographies in urban spaces. Affect is understood in terms of intensities and contingency, while performance is defined as a triangulation of bodily movement, emergence and shimmering. After a brief reflection on how technical development and artistic processes impact each other, the middle section of this article contains ‘an inventory of shimmers’ which are words from the processes of dance improvisation, video capture and editing. A methodological perspective is proposed. It is called affective sensibility.

  17. An augmented reality simulator for ultrasound guided needle placement training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, D; Zhu, Y; Ratnalingam, R; Gardner, P; Kessel, D

    2007-10-01

    Details are presented of a low cost augmented-reality system for the simulation of ultrasound guided needle insertion procedures (tissue biopsy, abscess drainage, nephrostomy etc.) for interventional radiology education and training. The system comprises physical elements; a mannequin, a mock ultrasound probe and a needle, and software elements; generating virtual ultrasound anatomy and allowing data collection. These two elements are linked by a pair of magnetic 3D position sensors. Virtual anatomic images are generated based on anatomic data derived from full body CT scans of live humans. Details of the novel aspects of this system are presented including; image generation, registration and calibration.

  18. Beyond laser safety glasses: augmented reality in optics laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercioli, Franco

    2017-02-01

    Blocking visibility of a laser beam after a pair of safety goggles have been worn is always an unpleasant experience. Working blindly is hard, sometimes even dangerous, and safety could be again at risk. A safe, clear view of the laser beam path would be highly desirable. This paper presents a technique for laboratory laser safety, using a smartphone's camera and display, in conjunction with an augmented reality headset to allow clear viewing of laser experiments without any risk of laser eye injury. Use of the technique is demonstrated, and strengths and weaknesses of the solution are discussed.

  19. Magic cards: a new augmented-reality approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuynck, Olivier; Menendez, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) commonly uses markers for detection and tracking. Such multimedia applications associate each marker with a virtual 3D model stored in the memory of the camera-equipped device running the application. Application users are limited in their interactions, which require knowing how to design and program 3D objects. This generally prevents them from developing their own entertainment AR applications. The Magic Cards application solves this problem by offering an easy way to create and manage an unlimited number of virtual objects that are encoded on special markers.

  20. Augmented Reality as a Technology Bringing Interactivity to Print Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seisto, Anu; Aikala, Maiju; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technique of superimposing virtual objects in the user's view of the real world, providing a novel visualization technology for a wide range of applications. Hence, it is a user interface technology that combines the perception of real environments with digital......, virtual information. AR is also a promising tool for creating playfulness connected to printed items. In this study we present one example of creating an interactive and playful advertisement for a printed magazine by innovating possible outcomes together with a publisher (Aller), an advertiser (brand...

  1. Latency and distortion of electromagnetic trackers for augmented reality systems

    CERN Document Server

    Himberg, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) systems are often used to superimpose virtual objects or information on a scene to improve situational awareness. Delays in the display system or inaccurate registration of objects destroy the sense of immersion a user experiences when using AR systems. AC electromagnetic trackers are ideal for these applications when combined with head orientation prediction to compensate for display system delays. Unfortunately, these trackers do not perform well in environments that contain conductive or ferrous materials due to magnetic field distortion without expensive calibration

  2. Augmented Reality Training for Assembly and Maintenance Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preusche Carsten

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR points out to be a good technology for training in the field of maintenance and assembly, as instructions or rather location-dependent information can be directly linked and/or attached to physical objects. Since objects to maintain usually contain a large number of similar components (e.g. screws, plugs, etc. the provision of location-dependent information is vitally important. Another advantage is that AR-based training takes place with the real physical devices of the training scenario. Thus, the trainee also practices the real use of the tools whereby the corresponding sensorimotor skills are trained.

  3. Towards immersive and adaptive augmented reality exposure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünser, Andreas; Grasset, Raphaël; Farrant, Hamish

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel augmented reality based exposure therapy system for phobia treatment. This allows patients to see virtual fear stimuli overlaid onto the real world and to fully interact with them in real time. Extending on previous work, we focus on creating a controllable and interactive system (through gesture recognition and physiological sensors) with a visually realistic context. Our goal is a very life-like system that allows full parameterization over stimulus intensity and other factors necessary for an effective exposure therapy system.

  4. Holographic Rovers: Augmented Reality and the Microsoft HoloLens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toler, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality is an emerging field in technology, and encompasses Head Mounted Displays, smartphone apps, and even projected images. HMDs include the Meta 2, Magic Leap, Avegant Light Field, and the Microsoft HoloLens, which is evaluated specifically. The Microsoft HoloLens is designed to be used as an AR personal computer, and is being optimized with that goal in mind. Microsoft allied with the Unity3D game engine to create an SDK for interested application developers that can be used in the Unity environment.

  5. How Augmented Reality Affects the Learning Experience at a Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Lando, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    It is well documented that Augmented Reality (AR) enhances and supports learning. Earlier research compares AR applications with existing methods. Published research typically focuses on one AR in general. Nevertheless, there are different ways of using AR. This paper gives further insight into how to use AR as a learning tool as part of a museum experience. It focuses on AR through smartphones, where the world is measured through the phone’s sensors and the virtual content is displayed on th...

  6. Heating circulation pump disassembly process improved with augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegeltija Srđan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to introduce possibilities of implementation of augmented reality (AR concept in disassembly process. Basic concept of AR implementation in various applications, as well as developed concept in disassembly system is presented. Main objective of this paper was to test the influence of implementation of AR in disassembly process with the goal to shorten overall duration of disassembly process. In this paper the experimental setup of developed concept in disassembly system for heating circulation pump that was conducted in laboratory conditions is shown, and conclusions are presented.

  7. Augmented reality cube game for cognitive training: an interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boletsis, Costas; Mccallum, Simon

    2014-01-01

    There is the potential that cognitive activity may delay cognitive decline in people with mild cognitive impairment. Games provide both cognitive challenge and motivation for repeated use, a prerequisite for long lasting effect. Recent advances in technology introduce several new interaction methods, potentially leading to more efficient, personalized cognitive gaming experiences. In this paper, we present an Augmented Reality (AR) cognitive training game, utilizing cubes as input tools, and we test the cube interaction with a pilot study. The results of the study revealed the marker occlusion problem, and that novice AR users can adjust to the developed AR environment after a small number of sessions.

  8. Context-aware Augmented Reality in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katić, Darko; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Görtler, Jochen; Spengler, Patrick; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Röhl, Sebastian; Suwelack, Stefan; Kenngott, Hannes Götz; Wagner, Martin; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2013-03-01

    Augmented Reality is a promising paradigm for intraoperative assistance. Yet, apart from technical issues, a major obstacle to its clinical application is the man-machine interaction. Visualization of unnecessary, obsolete or redundant information may cause confusion and distraction, reducing usefulness and acceptance of the assistance system. We propose a system capable of automatically filtering available information based on recognized phases in the operating room. Our system offers a specific selection of available visualizations which suit the surgeon's needs best. The system was implemented for use in laparoscopic liver and gallbladder surgery and evaluated in phantom experiments in conjunction with expert interviews. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Augmented Reality Art: A Matter of (non)Destination

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the ambivalence of “destination”—namely the ambivalence of the user’s interpellation—as one of the key features of augmented reality (AR) art. It calls attention to the special status of the spectator whose participation is at once a requirement and an uncertainty, a prediction and an anxiety, a principle of localization and a questioning of the very capacity to localize. This ambivalence is endemic to AR environments which rely on mobile, networking, tracking, sensing and...

  10. The Efficiency Analysis of the Augmented Reality Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė Kurpytė

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the investigation of the efficiency of augmented reality algorithm that depends on the rotation angles and lighting conditions. The following were the target subject parameters: three degrees of freedom perspective of the rotation and side lighting that forms a shadow. Static parameters of subjects with the ability to change them were as follow: the distance between the marker and the camera, camera, processor, and the distance from the light source. The study is based on an open source Java programming language algorithm, where the algorithm is tested with 10 markers. It was found that the rotation error did not exceed 2%.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Virtual and augmented reality technologies in Human Performance: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Brusque Crocetta

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Today's society is influenced by Information and Communication Technologies. Toys that were once built by hand have been reinterpreted and have become highly commercialized products. In this context, games using Augmented Reality (AR and Virtual Reality (VR technologies are present in the everyday lives of children, youth and adults. Objective : To investigate how Physical Education professionals in Brazil have been making use of AR and VR games to benefit their work. Materials and methods : We only included studies that addressed exercise or physical activity using AR or VR games. We searched the databases of Virtual Health Library (VHL and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, using the words augmented reality, virtual reality, exergames, Wii and serious games. Results : Nineteen articles were included in the systematic review. The most frequently used device was the Nintendo(r Wii, with over 25 different kinds of games. With regard to the subjects of the studies, four studies were conducted with healthy individuals (mean = 65.7, three with patients with Parkinson's disease (mean = 18.0, three with elderly women (mean = 7.7 and two with patients with stroke injury (mean = 6.0. Conclusion : Many physical therapists and occupational therapists use serious games with AR or VR technologies as another work tool, especially for rehabilitation practices. The fact that these technologies are also used in Physical Education classes in Brazil indicates that electronic games are available and can be a tool that can contribute to the widespread adoption of exercise as an enjoyable form of recreation.

  12. Augmented reality art from an emerging technology to a novel creative medium

    CERN Document Server

    Geroimenko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This is the first ever book on augmented reality art. It is written by a team of world-leading artists, researchers and practitioners, pioneering in the use of augmented reality technology as a novel artistic medium. The book explores a wide range of major aspects of augmented reality art and its enabling technology. It is intended to be a starting point and essential reading not only for artists, researchers and technology developers, but also for students (both graduates and undergraduates) and everyone who is interested in emerging augmented reality technology and its current and future app

  13. The status of augmented reality in laparoscopic surgery as of 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Sylvain; Nicolau, Stéphane A; Soler, Luc; Doignon, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    This article establishes a comprehensive review of all the different methods proposed by the literature concerning augmented reality in intra-abdominal minimally invasive surgery (also known as laparoscopic surgery). A solid background of surgical augmented reality is first provided in order to support the survey. Then, the various methods of laparoscopic augmented reality as well as their key tasks are categorized in order to better grasp the current landscape of the field. Finally, the various issues gathered from these reviewed approaches are organized in order to outline the remaining challenges of augmented reality in laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Context-Aware Based Efficient Training System Using Augmented Reality and Gravity Sensor for Healthcare Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoksoo; Jung, Sungmo; Song, Jae-Gu; Kang, Byong-Ho

    As augmented reality and a gravity sensor is of growing interest, siginificant developement is being made on related technology, which allows application of the technology in a variety of areas with greater expectations. In applying Context-aware to augmented reality, it can make useful programs. A traning system suggested in this study helps a user to understand an effcienct training method using augmented reality and make sure if his exercise is being done propery based on the data collected by a gravity sensor. Therefore, this research aims to suggest an efficient training environment that can enhance previous training methods by applying augmented reality and a gravity sensor.

  15. Architecture and Key Techniques of Augmented Reality Maintenance Guiding System for Civil Aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    hong, Zhou; Wenhua, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality technology is introduced into the maintenance related field for strengthened information in real-world scenarios through integration of virtual assistant maintenance information with real-world scenarios. This can lower the difficulty of maintenance, reduce maintenance errors, and improve the maintenance efficiency and quality of civil aviation crews. Architecture of augmented reality virtual maintenance guiding system is proposed on the basis of introducing the definition of augmented reality and analyzing the characteristics of augmented reality virtual maintenance. Key techniques involved, such as standardization and organization of maintenance data, 3D registration, modeling of maintenance guidance information and virtual maintenance man-machine interaction, are elaborated emphatically, and solutions are given.

  16. Using Augmented Reality to Bring interactivity to Metabolism Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galembeck E.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A glycolysis paper puzzle designed to introduce students to theprinciples of metabolic pathways have being used for several years, and it seems to helpstudents to learn the topic. We noticed that both the number of instructors and the timethey spend with the students, plays a major role in the success of the activity. Aninsufficient number of instructors do not permit adequate contact with all the students,which frustrate and discourage them. OBJECTIVES: In order to bring this activity to largeraudiences with a few instructors, we added a technological tool called augmented reality tothe paper puzzle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The app was developed using Unity, and3D molecules obtained from Protein Data Bank. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Using thisapp the students were able to check their achievements as they progress through theactivity. The augmented reality also allowed the addition of more information to the cardslike answers to frequently asked questions and information via flashcards. The virtualflashcards displayed on the tablet screens show information such as the molecular 3Dstructure, and clues for assembling the puzzle. CONCLUSIONS: The above-mentionedtechnological improvement has enabled its use in larger classrooms with fewer instructorssince the students are able to have access to clues and discuss with the peers. Thus, thepaper puzzle is still the way students interact with each other, but the technological supportgives them more autonomy to solve the proposed exercises.

  17. archAR: an archaeological augmented reality experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Bridgette; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    We present an application for Android phones or tablets called "archAR" that uses augmented reality as an alternative, portable way of viewing archaeological information from UCSD's Levantine Archaeology Laboratory. archAR provides a unique experience of flying through an archaeological dig site in the Levantine area and exploring the artifacts uncovered there. Using a Google Nexus tablet and Qualcomm's Vuforia API, we use an image target as a map and overlay a three-dimensional model of the dig site onto it, augmenting reality such that we are able to interact with the plotted artifacts. The user can physically move the Android device around the image target and see the dig site model from any perspective. The user can also move the device closer to the model in order to "zoom" into the view of a particular section of the model and its associated artifacts. This is especially useful, as the dig site model and the collection of artifacts are very detailed. The artifacts are plotted as points, colored by type. The user can touch the virtual points to trigger a popup information window that contains details of the artifact, such as photographs, material descriptions, and more.

  18. Mobile Marketing: Usage of Augmented Reality in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim İLHAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The developing number of applications by smart devices provides an expanding diversity of travel-related services. In the most recent decade, marketers and advertisers have developed more innovative practices to attract consumers. One of these new marketing tools is augmented reality (AR application with the smart technologies, which is considered as an advertising and new marketing communication instrument that increases awareness and helps get information. The use of augmented reality has unfolded across several sectors in recent years. One in every of the areas of wherever this technology will notice a possible use is that the tourism industry. AR is taken into account extremely vital for promoting in several industries; but, within the tourism industry there exist comparatively few researches and articles despite the very fact that tourism may fine benefit from the applications for these practices. Therefore this study aimed to seeks; 1 To identify the potentials of the AR applications within the tourism industry. 2 To identify the AR applications in several tourism businesses at the tourism industry from the attitude of promoting, for instance hotels, restaurants, museums and transportation

  19. Perancangan dan Implementasi Augmented Reality sebagai Media Promosi Penjualan Perumahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Zuniargo Prabowo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Untuk melakukan promosi sebuah perumahan banyak cara yang dapat dilakukan, misalnya dengan menggunakan brosur yang mana informasinya disampaikan dalam media dua dimensi, maket yang mana informasinya sudah dapat disampaikan dalam media tiga dimensi tetapi harus memerlukan ruang yang tidak sedikit untuk mewujudkannya demi mendapatkan hasil yang maksimal. Yang menjadi masalah disini adalah bagaimana menjadikan suatu informasi tersebut menjadi interaktif dan lebih menarik bagi konsumen. Dengan menggunakan teknik promosi berbasis augmented reality yang dibuat dengan menggunakan ARTool Kit sebagai komponen yang utama dan dengan menggunakan 3DS Max sebagai software untuk menghasilkan gambar yang menarik. Proses perancangan dan pembuatan teknik promosiini akan menggunkan metode waterfall. Kelebihan dari model waterfall adalah struktur tahap pengembangan sistem jelas, dokumentasi dihasilkan disetiap tahap pengembangan, dan sebuah tahap dijalankan setelah tahap sebelumnya selesai dijalankan (tidak ada tumpang tindih pelaksanaan tahap. Hasil dari perancangan aplikasi ini adalah terealisasinya suatu aplikasi untuk kepentingan promosipenjualan perumahan yang lebih menarik dan interaktif dengan konsumen berbasis augmented reality. Dengan adanya aplikasi ini diharapkan metode promosi dapat berkembang dengan lebih menarik dan tentunya dengan mengandalkan teknologitanpa membutuhkan ruang yang banyak untuk mencapai hasil yang maksimal.

  20. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H S; Park, Y K; Gupta, S; Yoon, C; Han, I; Kim, H-S; Choi, H; Hong, J

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137-143. © 2017 Cho et al.

  1. Graphical user interface concepts for tactical augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenta, Chris; Murphy, Anne; Hinton, Jeremy; Cook, James; Sherrill, Todd; Snarski, Steve

    2010-04-01

    Applied Research Associates and BAE Systems are working together to develop a wearable augmented reality system under the DARPA ULTRA-Vis program†. Our approach to achieve the objectives of ULTRAVis, called iLeader, incorporates a full color 40° field of view (FOV) see-thru holographic waveguide integrated with sensors for full position and head tracking to provide an unobtrusive information system for operational maneuvers. iLeader will enable warfighters to mark-up the 3D battle-space with symbologic identification of graphical control measures, friendly force positions and enemy/target locations. Our augmented reality display provides dynamic real-time painting of symbols on real objects, a pose-sensitive 360° representation of relevant object positions, and visual feedback for a variety of system activities. The iLeader user interface and situational awareness graphical representations are highly intuitive, nondisruptive, and always tactically relevant. We used best human-factors practices, system engineering expertise, and cognitive task analysis to design effective strategies for presenting real-time situational awareness to the military user without distorting their natural senses and perception. We present requirements identified for presenting information within a see-through display in combat environments, challenges in designing suitable visualization capabilities, and solutions that enable us to bring real-time iconic command and control to the tactical user community.

  2. Spatial augmented reality for product appearance design evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ki Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality based on projection, called “Spatial Augmented Reality (SAR”, is a new technology that can produce immersive contents by overlapping virtuality and real-world environment. It has been paid attention as the next generation digital contents in media art and human–computer interaction (HCI. In this paper, we present a new methodology to evaluate the product appearance design more intuitively by means of SAR technique. The proposed method first projects the high-quality rendered image considering the optical property of materials onto the mock-up of a product. We also conduct a projector-camera calibration to compensate a color distortion according to a projector, a projection surface and environment lighting. The design evaluation methodology we propose offers more flexible and intuitive evaluation environment to a designer and user (evaluator than previous methods that are performed via a digital display. At the end of this research, we have conducted a case study for designing and evaluating appearance design of an automobile.

  3. Mobile markerless augmented reality and its application in forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, Thomas; Heim, Eric; Haase, Sven; Prüfer, Sabine; Müller, Michael; Seitel, Alexander; Fangerau, Markus; Wiebe, Tamara; Iszatt, Justin; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hornegger, Joachim; Yen, Kathrin; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2015-05-01

    During autopsy, forensic pathologists today mostly rely on visible indication, tactile perception and experience to determine the cause of death. Although computed tomography (CT) data is often available for the bodies under examination, these data are rarely used due to the lack of radiological workstations in the pathological suite. The data may prevent the forensic pathologist from damaging evidence by allowing him to associate, for example, external wounds to internal injuries. To facilitate this, we propose a new multimodal approach for intuitive visualization of forensic data and evaluate its feasibility. A range camera is mounted on a tablet computer and positioned in a way such that the camera simultaneously captures depth and color information of the body. A server estimates the camera pose based on surface registration of CT and depth data to allow for augmented reality visualization of the internal anatomy directly on the tablet. Additionally, projection of color information onto the CT surface is implemented. We validated the system in a postmortem pilot study using fiducials attached to the skin for quantification of a mean target registration error of [Formula: see text] mm. The system is mobile, markerless, intuitive and real-time capable with sufficient accuracy. It can support the forensic pathologist during autopsy with augmented reality and textured surfaces. Furthermore, the system enables multimodal documentation for presentation in court. Despite its preliminary prototype status, it has high potential due to its low price and simplicity.

  4. Textual Dualism and Augmented Reality in the Russian Empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Antley

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While the current focus on how digital technology alters our conception of the self and its place in the broader perceived reality yields fascinating insight into modern issues, there is much to be gained by analyzing the presence of dualist and augmented reality discourses in a pre-digital era. This essay will examine the ontological interplay of textual dualist norms in the Russian and Soviet states of the 19th and early 20th centuries and how those norms were challenged by augmented claims embodied in rumors, refrains, and the spelling of names. By utilizing the informational concepts of mobility and asynchronicity, three Russian historical vignettes—the Emancipation of the Serfs in 1861, the documentation of Jews in Imperial Russia, and the attempts by Trotsky to realize Soviet symchka—demonstrate that not only are dualist discourses prevalent in periods outside of the contemporary, but also that the way in which those conflicts framed themselves in the past directly influences their deployment in today’s digital world.

  5. Realidad aumentada en medicina Augmented reality in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Ortiz Rangel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la realidad aumentada representa una forma reciente de visualización que combina, de manera funcional, la virtualidad con la realidad misma, generando posibilidades nuevas para la interpretación de información antes no disponible, que abren nuevas maneras para aprender y reconocer los datos, procesarlos en información y convertirlos fácilmente en conocimiento. Las diferentes formas para llevar a cabo experiencias en realidad aumentada, se encuentran listas desde diferentes plataformas informáticas y de telecomunicaciones, que facilitan adelantar proyectos en este sentido, de manera rápida y económica. La Medicina, y particularmente la Cardiología, pueden asistirse de este tipo de medios para complementar la información disponible en otros formatos, y pasarlos a la tridimensionalidad, desde donde la interpretación de imágenes sobre objetos 3D está servida para estos propósitos.Nowadays, Augmented Reality represents a new form of visualization that combines virtuality with reality in a functional way, creating new possibilities for the interpretation of information that was not previously available. These possibilities lead to new ways of learning and acknowledging data, to process them into information and to convert them into knowledge easily. Various ways to carry out experiments in Augmented Reality are available from different computing and telecommunications platforms, which facilitate the fast and economic development of projects. Medicine, and cardiology in particular, can take advantage of this new type of media to complement the information yet available, transforming it into other formats and passing them to three dimensions, wherever these images are an appropriate complement.

  6. VERIFICATION OF IMAGE BASED AUGMENTED REALITY FOR URBAN VISUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fuse

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, visualization of urban scenes with various information attracts attention. For the transmission of urban scenes, virtual reality has been widely used. Since the virtual reality requires comprehensive and detailed three dimensional models, the manual dependent modelling takes a lot of time and effort. On the other hand, it has been tackled that various data is superimposed on the scene which the users see at the time instead of comprehensive modelling, which is well known as augmented reality (AR. Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM has been attempted using simple video cameras for the AR. This method estimates exterior orientation factors of the camera, and three dimensional reconstructions of feature points simultaneously. The method, however, has been applied to only small indoor space. This paper investigates the applicability of the popular method of SALM to wide outdoor space, and improves the stability of the method. Through the application, the tracked feature points successfully are greatly reduced compared with application in indoor environment. According to the experimental result, simple markers or GPS are introduced as auxiliary information. The markers gives the stability of optimization, and GPS gives real scale to AR spaces. Additionally, feature points tracking method is modified by assigning amplitude of displacement and depth. The effect of the markers and GPS are confirmed. On the other hand, some limitations of the method are understood. As a result, more impressive visualization will be accomplished.

  7. Augmented versus virtual reality laparoscopic simulation: what is the difference? A comparison of the ProMIS augmented reality laparoscopic simulator versus LapSim virtual reality laparoscopic simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botden, Sanne M. B. I.; Buzink, Sonja N.; Schijven, Marlies P.; Jakimowicz, Jack J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging new modality for laparoscopic skills training; however, most simulators lack realistic haptic feedback. Augmented reality (AR) is a new laparoscopic simulation system offering a combination of physical objects and VR simulation. Laparoscopic

  8. Experimental Reality: Principles for the Design of Augmented Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlou, Saadi

    The Laboratory of Design for Cognition at EDF R&D (LDC) is a living laboratory, which we created to develop Augmented Environment (AE) for collaborative work, more specifically “cognitive work” (white collars, engineers, office workers). It is a corporate laboratory in a large industry, where natural activity of real users is observed in a continuous manner in various spaces (project space, meeting room, lounge, etc.) The RAO room, an augmented meeting room, is used daily for “normal” meetings; it is also the “mother room” of all augmented meeting rooms in the company, where new systems, services, and devices are tested. The LDC has gathered a unique set of data on the use of AE, and developed various observation and design techniques, described in this chapter. LDC uses novel techniques of digital ethnography, some of which were invented there (SubCam, offsat) and some of which were developed elsewhere and adapted (360° video, WebDiver, etc.). At LDC, some new theories have also been developed to explain behavior and guide innovation: cognitive attractors, experimental reality, and the triple-determination framework.

  9. Augmented Reality: Sustaining iPad-facilitated Visualisation Pedagogy in Nursing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher; Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of iPad-facilitated application of augmented reality in the teaching of highly complex anatomical and physiological subjects in the training of nurses at undergraduate level. The general aim of the project is to investigate the potentials of this application in terms...... of augmented reality are discussed....

  10. Social Augmented Reality: Enhancing Context-Dependent Communication and Informal Learning at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejoska, Jana; Bauters, Merja; Purma, Jukka; Leinonen, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    Our design proposal of social augmented reality (SoAR) grows from the observed difficulties of practical applications of augmented reality (AR) in workplace learning. In our research we investigated construction workers doing physical work in the field and analyzed the data using qualitative methods in various workshops. The challenges related to…

  11. Learning Anatomy via Mobile Augmented Reality: Effects on Achievement and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Sevda; Kapakin, Samet; Göktas, Yüksel

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR), a new generation of technology, has attracted the attention of educators in recent years. In this study, a MagicBook was developed for a neuroanatomy topic by using mobile augmented reality (mAR) technology. This technology integrates virtual learning objects into the real world and allow users to interact with the…

  12. Augmented Reality Trends in Education: A Systematic Review of Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacca, Jorge; Baldiris, Silvia; Fabregat, Ramon; Graf, Sabine; Kinshuk

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in applying Augmented Reality (AR) to create unique educational settings. So far, however, there is a lack of review studies with focus on investigating factors such as: the uses, advantages, limitations, effectiveness, challenges and features of augmented reality in educational settings.…

  13. Mobile Augmented Reality in Supporting Peer Assessment: An Implementation in a Fundamental Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chung-Hsien; Chao, Stefan; Kinshuk; Chao, Kuo-Hung

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a conceptual framework for supporting mobile peer assessment by incorporating augmented reality technology to eliminate limitation of reviewing and assessing. According to the characteristics of mobile technology and augmented reality, students' work can be shown in various ways by considering the locations and situations. This…

  14. At se det usete - Rumlig visualisering af solsystemet med fysiske prototyper og Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Larsen, Lasse Juel; Lyk, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen bidrager med et eksempel på anvendelse af Augmented Reality til at understøtte undervisning i Solsystemet i en 6. klasse. Augmented Reality forbinder den fysiske og virtuelle verden i fx 3D-kloder, der svæver hen over lærebogen. Der blev i forløbet udviklet en app, hvor eleverne kunne se...

  15. A Mobile Service Oriented Multiple Object Tracking Augmented Reality Architecture for Education and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanarungrot, Sasithorn; White, Martin; Newbury, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of our service-oriented architecture to support mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality applications applied to education and learning scenarios. The architecture is composed of a mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality client, a web service framework, and dynamic content providers. Tracking of…

  16. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pallavicini, Federica; Pedroli, Elisa; Serino, Silvia; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  17. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Alice Chicchi Giglioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user’s sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user’s experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  18. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pedroli, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology. PMID:26339283

  19. EgoSAR: Towards a personalized spatial augmented reality experience in multi-user environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ridel, Brett; Mignard-Debise, Lois; Granier, Xavier; Reuter, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Common spatial augmented reality techniques use video projection to superimpose virtual information over a physical scene. As the augmentation happens directly in the real world, multiple users can see the augmented scene, however, the augmentation is the same for all users. We introduce EgoSAR, a new approach that makes it possible to have a personalized, view-dependent augmentation, in multiuser environments. Our key idea is to use retroreflective material for the pe...

  20. Tangible Interaction in Learning Astronomy through Augmented Reality Book-Based Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Aw Kien; Badioze Zaman, Halimah

    Live Solar System (LSS) is an Augmented Reality book-based educational tool. Augmented Reality (AR) has its own potential in the education field, because it can provide a seamless interaction between real and virtual objects. LSS applied the Tangible Augmented Reality approach in designing its user interface and interaction. Tangible Augmented Reality is an interface which combines the Tangible User Interface and Augmented Reality Interface. They are naturally complement each other. This paper highlights the tangible interaction in LSS. LSS adopts the 'cube' as the common physical object input device. Thus, LSS does not use the traditional computer input devices such as the mouse or keyboard. To give users a better exploration experience, Visual Information Seeking Mantra principle was applied in the design of LSS. Hence, LSS gives users an effective interactive-intuitive horizontal surface learning environment.

  1. D3D augmented reality imaging system: proof of concept in mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present images from simulated breast microcalcifications and assess the pattern of the microcalcifications with a technical development called "depth 3-dimensional (D3D) augmented reality". A computer, head display unit, joystick, D3D augmented reality software, and an in-house script of simulated data of breast microcalcifications in a ductal distribution were used. No patient data was used and no statistical analysis was performed. The D3D augmented reality system demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception by presenting a unique image to each eye, focal point convergence, head position tracking, 3D cursor, and joystick fly-through. The D3D augmented reality imaging system offers image viewing with depth perception and focal point convergence. The D3D augmented reality system should be tested to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  2. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Boone, John M; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice.

  3. MODEL ANTARMUKA AUGMENTED REALITY INTERAKTIF MENGGUNAKAN APPRECIATIVE LEARNING DALAM APLIKASI PEMBELAJARAN AKSARA JAWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ageng Setiyanto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Teknologi Augmented Reality telah banyak digunakan dalam media pembelajaran sebagai media yang dapat membantu proses pembelajaran. Namun, peran sebagian besar penerapan teknologi Augmented Reality tersebut hanya sebatas sebagai elemen interaktif dan visual saja tanpa memiliki arah ke aktivitas pembelajaran yang terkonsep. Dalam pembelajaran bahasa dan huruf, dalam hal ini adalah aksara Jawa, aktivitas pembelajaran yang terkonsep adalah salah satu faktor vital untuk keberhasilan tujuan pembelajaran. Aksara Jawa sebagai bagian dari budaya bangsa perlu diperkenalkan sejak dini sehingga dimasukkan dalam kurikulum di sekolah. Penelitian ini membahas tentang model antarmuka manusia dan komputer berbasis augmented reality yang menyajikan aktivitas pembelajaran yang terkonsep. Konsep yang digunakan dalam pengembangan aktivitas pembelajaran adalah Appreciative Learning yang mempunyai empat tahapan dalam pengembangan aktivitas, yaitu Discovery, Design, Destiny dan Dream. Hasil dari penelitian ini adalah model aktivitas yang dirancang untuk penerapan Augmented Reality dalam pembelajaran aksara Jawa. Kata Kunci : antarmuka manusia komputer, Augmented Reality, pendidikan, Appreciative Learning.

  4. Augmented Reality Implementation in Watch Catalog as e-Marketing Based on Mobile Aplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrianto, D.; Luwinda, F. A.; Yesmaya, V.

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality is one of important methods to provide user with a better interactive user interface. In this research, Augmented Reality in Mobile Application will be applied to provide user with useful information related with Watch Catalogue. This research will be focused on design and implementation an application using Augmented Reality. The process model used in this research is Extreme Programming. Extreme Programming have a several steps which are planning, design, coding, and testing. The result of this research is Augmented Reality application based on Android. This research will be conclude that implementation of Augmented Reality based on Android in Watch Catalogue will help customer to collect the useful information related to the specific object of watch.

  5. Video-guided calibration of an augmented reality mobile C-arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Naik, Hemal; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-11-01

    The augmented reality (AR) fluoroscope augments an X-ray image by video and provides the surgeon with a real-time in situ overlay of the anatomy. The overlay alignment is crucial for diagnostic and intra-operative guidance, so precise calibration of the AR fluoroscope is required. The first and most complex step of the calibration procedure is the determination of the X-ray source position. Currently, this is achieved using a biplane phantom with movable metallic rings on its top layer and fixed X-ray opaque markers on its bottom layer. The metallic rings must be moved to positions where at least two pairs of rings and markers are isocentric in the X-ray image. The current "trial and error" calibration process currently requires acquisition of many X-ray images, a task that is both time consuming and radiation intensive. An improved process was developed and tested for C-arm calibration. Video guidance was used to drive the calibration procedure to minimize both X-ray exposure and the time involved. For this, a homography between X-ray and video images is estimated. This homography is valid for the plane at which the metallic rings are positioned and is employed to guide the calibration procedure. Eight users having varying calibration experience (i.e., 2 experts, 2 semi-experts, 4 novices) were asked to participate in the evaluation. The video-guided technique reduced the number of intra-operative X-ray calibration images by 89% and decreased the total time required by 59%. A video-based C-arm calibration method has been developed that improves the usability of the AR fluoroscope with a friendlier interface, reduced calibration time and clinically acceptable radiation doses.

  6. A see through future: augmented reality and health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a method whereby virtual objects are superimposed on the real world. AR technology is becoming increasingly accessible and affordable and it has many potential health applications. This paper discusses current research on AR health applications such as medical education and medical practice. Some of the potential future uses for this technology (e.g., health information systems, consumer health applications) will also be presented. Additionally, there will be a discussion outlining some of usability and human factors challenges associated with AR in healthcare. It is expected that AR will become increasingly prevalent in healthcare; however, further investigation is required to demonstrate that they provide benefits over traditional methods. Moreover, AR applications must be thoroughly tested to ensure they do not introduce new errors into practice and have patient safety implications.

  7. Pose tracking for augmented reality applications in outdoor archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Georges; Asmar, Daniel; Elhajj, Imad; Al-Harithy, Howayda

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, agencies around the world have invested huge amounts of effort toward digitizing many aspects of the world's cultural heritage. Of particular importance is the digitization of outdoor archaeological sites. In the spirit of valorization of this digital information, many groups have developed virtual or augmented reality (AR) computer applications themed around a particular archaeological object. The problem of pose tracking in outdoor AR applications is addressed. Different positional systems are analyzed, resulting in the selection of a monocular camera-based user tracker. The limitations that challenge this technique from map generation, scale, anchoring, to lighting conditions are analyzed and systematically addressed. Finally, as a case study, our pose tracking system is implemented within an AR experience in the Byblos Roman theater in Lebanon.

  8. Usage Concepts of Augmented Reality Technology in Islamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norabeerah Saforrudin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The augmented reality (AR has been identified to be suitable for use in education. However, studies that particularly identify this concept are still rare. Therefore, this qualitative study was conducted with objectives to determine the perception of teacher educators from the Islamic Study Department, Teacher Training Institute in Central Zone of Malaysia towards AR, and to develop a usage concept that can be implemented when teaching and learning Islamic Study. Explorative case study method involving three teacher educators was used. They were interviewed by using an in-depth semi-structured interview schedule. From the interview, all responses provided by the informants are very positive and admitted that AR technology is suitable to be used in the Islamic Study. The usage concepts discussed in this paper can be used as guidelines to those who are interested in developing or using the AR application based on Islamic Study topics.

  9. APPLICATION OF AUGMENTED REALITY IN FACADE REDESIGN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEJIĆ Petar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR is a computer technology where the perception of the user is enhanced by the seamless blending between real environment and computer-generated virtual objects coexisting in the same space. When it comes to a redesign of the existing facades, it is necessary to create a visual presentation of the proposed changes. For this reason, contemporary architectural approach assumes creating a digital 3D model of the newly designed facade. Since the façade redesign is a real world change, the AR can be used for newly designed facade project presentation. In this paper a case study of the AR application for façade redesign presentation of a single family house located in Babušnica (Serbia is presented.

  10. OLD FACADE PRESENTATION ON REAL BUILDINGS USING AUGMENTED REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINKOVIĆ Jovan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons for construction work on the facade of an object over time. Such work can positively or negatively affect the architectural value of a building. In Serbia there are numerous examples of negative changes of facade geometry in the period following the Second World War. Facade decoration of many important buildings from the period of classicism, secession and early modernism was completely removed, so that today's appearance can be hardly connected to the original. In this paper, the process of digital reconstruction and presentation of the former building facade on the corner of Dusanova street and Prijezdina street in Nis, Serbia, is presented. Method of semiautomatic photogrammetry is used for 3D model creation of the former facade geometry and presented in real locations using augmented reality technology.

  11. Real-time tomographic holography for augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, John M; Siegel, Mel; Stetten, George

    2010-07-15

    The concept and instantiation of real-time tomographic holography (RTTH) for augmented reality is presented. RTTH enables natural hand-eye coordination to guide invasive medical procedures without requiring tracking or a head-mounted device. It places a real-time virtual image of an object's cross section into its actual location, without noticeable viewpoint dependence (e.g., parallax error). The virtual image is viewed through a flat narrowband holographic optical element (HOE) with optical power that generates an in-situ virtual image (within 1 m of the HOE) from a small spatial light modulator display without obscuring a direct view of the physical world. Rigidly fixed upon a medical ultrasound probe, an RTTH device could show the scan in its actual location inside the patient, even as the probe was moved relative to the patient.

  12. Toward Standard Usability Questionnaires for Handheld Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marc Ericson C; Polvi, Jarkko; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Sandor, Christian; Kato, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Usability evaluations are important to improving handheld augmented reality (HAR) systems. However, no standard questionnaire considers perceptual and ergonomic issues found in HAR. The authors performed a systematic literature review to enumerate these issues. Based on these issues, they created a HAR usability scale that consists of comprehensibility and manipulability scales. These scales measure general system usability, ease of understanding the information presented, and ease of handling the device. The questionnaires' validity and reliability were evaluated in four experiments, and the results show that the questionnaires consistently correlate with other subjective and objective measures of usability. The questionnaires also have good reliability based on the Cronbach's alpha. Researchers and professionals can directly use these questionnaires to evaluate their own HAR applications or modify them with the insights presented in this article.

  13. Simulating low-cost cameras for augmented reality compositing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Georg; Murray, David W

    2010-01-01

    Video see-through Augmented Reality adds computer graphics to the real world in real time by overlaying graphics onto a live video feed. To achieve a realistic integration of the virtual and real imagery, the rendered images should have a similar appearance and quality to those produced by the video camera. This paper describes a compositing method which models the artifacts produced by a small low-cost camera, and adds these effects to an ideal pinhole image produced by conventional rendering methods. We attempt to model and simulate each step of the imaging process, including distortions, chromatic aberrations, blur, Bayer masking, noise, sharpening, and color-space compression, all while requiring only an RGBA image and an estimate of camera velocity as inputs.

  14. Pose Estimation for Augmented Reality: A Hands-On Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Eric; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Spindler, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    Augmented reality (AR) allows to seamlessly insert virtual objects in an image sequence. In order to accomplish this goal, it is important that synthetic elements are rendered and aligned in the scene in an accurate and visually acceptable way. The solution of this problem can be related to a pose estimation or, equivalently, a camera localization process. This paper aims at presenting a brief but almost self-contented introduction to the most important approaches dedicated to vision-based camera localization along with a survey of several extension proposed in the recent years. For most of the presented approaches, we also provide links to code of short examples. This should allow readers to easily bridge the gap between theoretical aspects and practical implementations.

  15. Efficient Verification of Holograms Using Mobile Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Andreas Daniel; Arth, Clemens; Grubert, Jens; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    Paper documents such as passports, visas and banknotes are frequently checked by inspection of security elements. In particular, optically variable devices such as holograms are important, but difficult to inspect. Augmented Reality can provide all relevant information on standard mobile devices. However, hologram verification on mobiles still takes long and provides lower accuracy than inspection by human individuals using appropriate reference information. We aim to address these drawbacks by automatic matching combined with a special parametrization of an efficient goal-oriented user interface which supports constrained navigation. We first evaluate a series of similarity measures for matching hologram patches to provide a sound basis for automatic decisions. Then a re-parametrized user interface is proposed based on observations of typical user behavior during document capture. These measures help to reduce capture time to approximately 15 s with better decisions regarding the evaluated samples than what can be achieved by untrained users.

  16. An augmented reality assistance platform for eye laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee Ping Ong; Lee, Jimmy Addison; Jun Cheng; Beng Hai Lee; Guozhen Xu; Laude, Augustinus; Teoh, Stephen; Tock Han Lim; Wong, Damon W K; Jiang Liu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel augmented reality assistance platform for eye laser surgery. The aims of the proposed system are for the application of assisting eye doctors in pre-planning as well as providing guidance and protection during laser surgery. We developed algorithms to automatically register multi-modal images, detect macula and optic disc regions, and demarcate these as protected areas from laser surgery. The doctor will then be able to plan the laser treatment pre-surgery using the registered images and segmented regions. Thereafter, during live surgery, the system will automatically register and track the slit lamp video frames on the registered retina images, send appropriate warning when the laser is near protected areas, and disable the laser function when it points into the protected areas. The proposed system prototype can help doctors to speed up laser surgery with confidence without fearing that they may unintentionally fire laser in the protected areas.

  17. Augmented Reality System for the musealization of archaeological sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Esclapés

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are presenting a multi-marker and semi-immersive system for augmented reality to visualize and interact with archaeological sites, specifically those located in inaccessible or complex environments, such as caves or underwater locations. The use of this system in museum exhibitions helps visitors to come closer to archaeological heritage. As an example for the implementation of this system, an archaeological site has been used. It is the “Cova del Barranc del Migdia”, located in the “Sierra del Montgó”, Xàbia (Spain. The product obtained has been exhibited in various museums nationwide.

  18. Mobile Journalism and Augmented Reality: the context in your hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Canavilhas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of new mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are changing how we interact with news. Accessing information from these devices has all the advantages offered by newspapers on the web, also allowing more personalized consumption. Apart from the obvious advantages of using this type of individual handsets,now they sum up the possibility of enjoying technical features such as GPS receiver, accelerometer or video cameras embedded in those devices. These technologies could enrich the news contents and a good example of this potential is the Augmented Reality (AR: the possibility of placing layers of virtual information on real images captured at the moment is an opportunity to enrich the news with a contextualization that can be continuously updated. This paper seeks to explain the role of AR on mobile journalism.

  19. Holographic and light-field imaging for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jong-Young; Jang, Changwon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Chang-Kun

    2017-02-01

    We discuss on the recent state of the augmented reality (AR) display technology. In order to realize AR, various seethrough three-dimensional (3D) display techniques have been reported. We describe the AR display with 3D functionality such as light-field display and holography. See-through light-field display can be categorized by the optical elements which are used for see-through property: optical elements controlling path of the light-fields and those generating see-through light-field. Holographic display can be also a good candidate for AR display because it can reconstruct wavefront information and provide realistic virtual information. We introduce the see-through holographic display using various optical techniques.

  20. ARTutor—An Augmented Reality Platform for Interactive Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Lytridis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR has been used in various contexts in recent years in order to enhance user experiences in mobile and wearable devices. Various studies have shown the utility of AR, especially in the field of education, where it has been observed that learning results are improved. However, such applications require specialized teams of software developers to create and maintain them. In an attempt to solve this problem and enable educators to easily create AR content for existing textbooks, the ARTutor platform was developed. It consists of a web-based application that acts as an AR authoring tool, and an accompanying mobile application that is used to access and interact with the educational AR content. In addition, the ARTutor application allows students to ask questions verbally and receive answers based on the contents of the book. This means that the system is suitable for distance learning and promotes self-study and independent learning.

  1. Using Augmented Reality to Plan Virtual Construction Worksite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Current construction worksite layout planning heavily relies on 2D paper media where the worksite planners sketch the future layout adjacent to their real environment. This traditional approach turns out to be ineffective and prone to error because only experienced and well-trained planners are able to generate the effective layout design with paper sketch. Augmented Reality (AR, as a new user interface technology, introduces a completely new perspective for construction worksite planning. This paper disucsses the related AR work and issues in construction and describes the concept and prototype of an AR-based construction planning tool, AR Planner with virtual elements sets and tangible interface. The focus of the paper is to identify and integrate worksite planning rules into the AR planner with the purpose of intelligently preventing potential planning errors and process inefficiency, thus maximizing the overall productivity. Future work includes refining and verifying AR Planner in realistic projects.

  2. Using Augmented Reality to Plan Virtual Construction Worksite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Current construction worksite layout planning heavily relies on 2D paper media where the worksite planners sketch the future layout adjacent to their real environment. This traditional approach turns out to be ineffective and prone to error because only experienced and well-trained planners are able to generate the effective layout design with paper sketch. Augmented Reality (AR, as a new user interface technology, introduces a completely new perspective for construction worksite planning. This paper disucsses the related AR work and issues in construction and describes the concept and prototype of an AR-based construction planning tool, AR Planner with virtual elements sets and tangible interface. The focus of the paper is to identify and integrate worksite planning rules into the AR planner with the purpose of intelligently preventing potential planning errors and process inefficiency, thus maximizing the overall productivity. Future work includes refining and verifying AR Planner in realistic projects.

  3. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy—which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates—requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy. PMID:26133175

  4. Augmented Reality Prototype for Visualizing Large Sensors’ Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folorunso Olufemi A.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the development of an augmented reality (AR based scientific visualization system prototype that supports identification, localisation, and 3D visualisation of oil leakages sensors datasets. Sensors generates significant amount of multivariate datasets during normal and leak situations which made data exploration and visualisation daunting tasks. Therefore a model to manage such data and enhance computational support needed for effective explorations are developed in this paper. A challenge of this approach is to reduce the data inefficiency. This paper presented a model for computing information gain for each data attributes and determine a lead attribute.The computed lead attribute is then used for the development of an AR-based scientific visualization interface which automatically identifies, localises and visualizes all necessary data relevant to a particularly selected region of interest (ROI on the network. Necessary architectural system supports and the interface requirements for such visualizations are also presented.

  5. Gravbox - The First Augmented Reality Sandbox for Gravitational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Jacob; Deam, Sophie; Reed, Mason; Bettis, Wyatt; Lu, Jianbo; Luppen, Zachary; Maier, Erin; McCurdy, Ross; Moore, Sadie; Fu, Hai

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational effects are an overarching theme in astronomy education, yet existing classroom demonstrations are insufficient in elucidating complex gravitational interactions. Inspired by the augmented reality (AR) sandbox developed by geologists, we have developed Gravbox, the first AR sandbox to demonstrate gravitational dynamics. The arbitrary topography of the sand surface represents the mass distribution of a two-dimensional universe. The computer reads the topography with a Kinect camera, calculates the orbit of a test particle with user-defined position and velocity, and projects the topography contour map and orbit animation with an overhead projector, all within a duty cycle of one second. This creates an interactive and intuitive tool to help students at all levels understand gravitational effects. In this contribution, we will describe the development of the Gravbox prototype and show its current capabilities. The Gravbox software will be publicly available along with a building tutorial.

  6. AFFECTIVE COMPUTING AND AUGMENTED REALITY FOR CAR DRIVING SIMULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoș Datcu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Car simulators are essential for training and for analyzing the behavior, the responses and the performance of the driver. Augmented Reality (AR is the technology that enables virtual images to be overlaid on views of the real world. Affective Computing (AC is the technology that helps reading emotions by means of computer systems, by analyzing body gestures, facial expressions, speech and physiological signals. The key aspect of the research relies on investigating novel interfaces that help building situational awareness and emotional awareness, to enable affect-driven remote collaboration in AR for car driving simulators. The problem addressed relates to the question about how to build situational awareness (using AR technology and emotional awareness (by AC technology, and how to integrate these two distinct technologies [4], into a unique affective framework for training, in a car driving simulator.

  7. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M

    2015-08-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy-which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates-requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  8. Multithreaded hybrid feature tracking for markerless augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehee; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel markerless camera tracking approach and user interaction methodology for augmented reality (AR) on unprepared tabletop environments. We propose a real-time system architecture that combines two types of feature tracking. Distinctive image features of the scene are detected and tracked frame-to-frame by computing optical flow. In order to achieve real-time performance, multiple operations are processed in a synchronized multi-threaded manner: capturing a video frame, tracking features using optical flow, detecting distinctive invariant features, and rendering an output frame. We also introduce user interaction methodology for establishing a global coordinate system and for placing virtual objects in the AR environment by tracking a user's outstretched hand and estimating a camera pose relative to it. We evaluate the speed and accuracy of our hybrid feature tracking approach, and demonstrate a proof-of-concept application for enabling AR in unprepared tabletop environments, using bare hands for interaction.

  9. Pemanfaatan Augmented Reality Dalam Memvisualisasikan Produk Perumahan Melalui Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny A Suryawinata

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To attract house buyers, many ways is done by the developers to promote their products, such as by using multiple marketing medias namely television, radio, internet, newspapers or distribute flyers during the exhibition. It is not uncommon that the said use of multiple media elements still make prospective buyers feel confused, because they can not imagine the shape of the house, since all they see is a flat two dimensional (2D object. To obtain detailed product information house of course they have to visit the exhibition or housing sales office that would spend the time and cost. This is why the authors proposed an application that can display 3D images over the Internet by using Augmented Reality technology, so that prospective home buyers can access these applications anytime and anywhere. 

  10. Meaningful assessment method for laparoscopic suturing training in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botden, Sanne M B I; de Hingh, I H J T; Jakimowicz, J J

    2009-10-01

    To be an effective training tool, a laparoscopic simulator has to provide metrics that are meaningful and informative to the trainee. Time, path length and smoothness are often used parameters, but are not very informative on the quality of the performance. This study aims to validate a newly developed assessment method for laparoscopic suturing on the ProMIS augmented reality simulator, and compares it with scores of objective observers. Twenty-four participants practised their suturing skills on the augmented reality suturing module: experienced participants (n = 10), >50 clinical laparoscopic suturing experience; and novice participants (n = 14), without laparoscopic experience. The performances were recorded and assessed by two unrelated observers and compared with the assessment scores. The assessment score was a calculation of time spent in the correct area and quality (strength) of the knot. To test the accuracy of the individual assessment parameters, we compared these with each other. The experienced participants had significantly higher performance scores than the novice participants in the beginner-level mode (mean 95.73 vs. 60.89, standard deviation 2.63 vs. 17.09, p < 0.001, independent t-test). The performance scores of the assessment method (n = 43) correlated significantly with the scorings of the objective observers (Spearman's rho 0.672; p < 0.001). The parameter time spent in correct area had a calculated significant correlation with the strength of the knot (n = 229, Spearman's rho 0.257, p < 0.001), but this was clinically irrelevant. This assessment method is a valid tool for objectively assessing laparoscopic suturing skills. Although assessment parameters can correlate, to provide informative feedback it is important to combine meaningful measurements in the assessment of suturing skills.

  11. Visualizing UAS-collected imagery using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Damon M.; Beidleman, Brittany; McAlinden, Ryan; Borel-Donohue, Christoph C.

    2017-05-01

    One of the areas where augmented reality will have an impact is in the visualization of 3-D data. 3-D data has traditionally been viewed on a 2-D screen, which has limited its utility. Augmented reality head-mounted displays, such as the Microsoft HoloLens, make it possible to view 3-D data overlaid on the real world. This allows a user to view and interact with the data in ways similar to how they would interact with a physical 3-D object, such as moving, rotating, or walking around it. A type of 3-D data that is particularly useful for military applications is geo-specific 3-D terrain data, and the visualization of this data is critical for training, mission planning, intelligence, and improved situational awareness. Advances in Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), photogrammetry software, and rendering hardware have drastically reduced the technological and financial obstacles in collecting aerial imagery and in generating 3-D terrain maps from that imagery. Because of this, there is an increased need to develop new tools for the exploitation of 3-D data. We will demonstrate how the HoloLens can be used as a tool for visualizing 3-D terrain data. We will describe: 1) how UAScollected imagery is used to create 3-D terrain maps, 2) how those maps are deployed to the HoloLens, 3) how a user can view and manipulate the maps, and 4) how multiple users can view the same virtual 3-D object at the same time.

  12. Augmented reality and the interest for consumers in their buying process

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Luís Filipe de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand if a technology that is recently available for the majority of the consumers, like Augmented Reality, can be an interesting component in their buying process, and at the same time understand if this technology can be used by the companies to effectively reach the customers. Augmented Reality is a technology that mixes the real and virtual worlds through proper devices and applications, generating augmented content that is not possib...

  13. Invisible waves and hidden realms: augmented reality and experimental art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzanka, Silvia

    2012-03-01

    Augmented reality is way of both altering the visible and revealing the invisible. It offers new opportunities for artistic exploration through virtual interventions in real space. In this paper, the author describes the implementation of two art installations using different AR technologies, one using optical marker tracking on mobile devices and one integrating stereoscopic projections into the physical environment. The first artwork, De Ondas y Abejas (The Waves and the Bees), is based on the widely publicized (but unproven) hypothesis of a link between cellphone radiation and the phenomenon of bee colony collapse disorder. Using an Android tablet, viewers search out small fiducial markers in the shape of electromagnetic waves hidden throughout the gallery, which reveal swarms of bees scattered on the floor. The piece also creates a generative soundscape based on electromagnetic fields. The second artwork, Urban Fauna, is a series of animations in which features of the urban landscape become plants and animals. Surveillance cameras become flocks of birds while miniature cellphone towers, lampposts, and telephone poles grow like small seedlings in time-lapse animation. The animations are presented as small stereoscopic projections, integrated into the physical space of the gallery. These two pieces explore the relationship between nature and technology through the visualization of invisible forces and hidden alternate realities.

  14. Training for planning tumour resection: augmented reality and human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S H; Chen, Elvis C S; Khan, Ali R; Peters, Terry M; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Eagleson, Roy

    2015-06-01

    Planning surgical interventions is a complex task, demanding a high degree of perceptual, cognitive, and sensorimotor skills to reduce intra- and post-operative complications. This process requires spatial reasoning to coordinate between the preoperatively acquired medical images and patient reference frames. In the case of neurosurgical interventions, traditional approaches to planning tend to focus on providing a means for visualizing medical images, but rarely support transformation between different spatial reference frames. Thus, surgeons often rely on their previous experience and intuition as their sole guide is to perform mental transformation. In case of junior residents, this may lead to longer operation times or increased chance of error under additional cognitive demands. In this paper, we introduce a mixed augmented-/virtual-reality system to facilitate training for planning a common neurosurgical procedure, brain tumour resection. The proposed system is designed and evaluated with human factors explicitly in mind, alleviating the difficulty of mental transformation. Our results indicate that, compared to conventional planning environments, the proposed system greatly improves the nonclinicians' performance, independent of the sensorimotor tasks performed ( ). Furthermore, the use of the proposed system by clinicians resulted in a significant reduction in time to perform clinically relevant tasks ( ). These results demonstrate the role of mixed-reality systems in assisting residents to develop necessary spatial reasoning skills needed for planning brain tumour resection, improving patient outcomes.

  15. Ecosystem of learning with "augmented reality": educational possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero Almenara

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When we speak about «augmented reality» (AR, we can say that we are in front of an emergent technology that is acquiring a great impulse in the educational area. The technology of the AR offers us different possibilities to move to contexts of formation out of the traditional scenes of the formation, to interact real time with the reality, to visualize not perceptible phenomena, to compare an object or phenomenon from different perspectives. These aspects are doing that in the last four years the number of published article in the field of the education has increased progressively. But from our point of view when we refer to his penetration in the educational area, if we do not think about the models and educational paradigms and educational and psychological theories that must give coverage, as well as the role that the teachers and student must play with the same ones, we can see it has happened with other technologies that presented as the future and did not come to the present. They are on these aspects about which we want to think in the present article.

  16. Advanced Navigation Aids System based on Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyong OH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many maritime accidents have been caused by human-error including such things as inadequate watch keeping and/or mistakes in ship handling. Also, new navigational equipment has been developed using Information Technology (IT technology to provide various kinds of information for safe navigation. Despite these efforts, the reduction of maritime accidents has not occurred to the degree expected because, navigational equipment provides too much information, and this information is not well organized, such that users feel it to be complicated rather than helpful. In this point of view, the method of representation of navigational information is more important than the quantity of that information and research is required on the representation of information to make that information more easily understood and to allow decisions to be made correctly and promptly. In this paper, we adopt Augmented Reality (AR technologies for the representation of information. AR is a 3D computer graphics technology that blends virtual reality and the real world. Recently, this technology has been widely applied in our daily lives because it can provide information more effectively to users. Therefore, we propose a new concept, a navigational system based on AR technology; we review experimental results from a ship-handling simulator and from an open sea test to verify the efficiency of the proposed system.

  17. Augmented Reality as a Telemedicine Platform for Remote Procedural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyao; Parsons, Michael; Stone-McLean, Jordan; Rogers, Peter; Boyd, Sarah; Hoover, Kristopher; Meruvia-Pastor, Oscar; Gong, Minglun; Smith, Andrew

    2017-10-10

    Traditionally, rural areas in many countries are limited by a lack of access to health care due to the inherent challenges associated with recruitment and retention of healthcare professionals. Telemedicine, which uses communication technology to deliver medical services over distance, is an economical and potentially effective way to address this problem. In this research, we develop a new telepresence application using an Augmented Reality (AR) system. We explore the use of the Microsoft HoloLens to facilitate and enhance remote medical training. Intrinsic advantages of AR systems enable remote learners to perform complex medical procedures such as Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) without visual interference. This research uses the HoloLens to capture the first-person view of a simulated rural emergency room (ER) through mixed reality capture (MRC) and serves as a novel telemedicine platform with remote pointing capabilities. The mentor's hand gestures are captured using a Leap Motion and virtually displayed in the AR space of the HoloLens. To explore the feasibility of the developed platform, twelve novice medical trainees were guided by a mentor through a simulated ultrasound exploration in a trauma scenario, as part of a pilot user study. The study explores the utility of the system from the trainees, mentor, and objective observers' perspectives and compares the findings to that of a more traditional multi-camera telemedicine solution. The results obtained provide valuable insight and guidance for the development of an AR-supported telemedicine platform.

  18. Augmented Reality as a Telemedicine Platform for Remote Procedural Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyao Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, rural areas in many countries are limited by a lack of access to health care due to the inherent challenges associated with recruitment and retention of healthcare professionals. Telemedicine, which uses communication technology to deliver medical services over distance, is an economical and potentially effective way to address this problem. In this research, we develop a new telepresence application using an Augmented Reality (AR system. We explore the use of the Microsoft HoloLens to facilitate and enhance remote medical training. Intrinsic advantages of AR systems enable remote learners to perform complex medical procedures such as Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS without visual interference. This research uses the HoloLens to capture the first-person view of a simulated rural emergency room (ER through mixed reality capture (MRC and serves as a novel telemedicine platform with remote pointing capabilities. The mentor’s hand gestures are captured using a Leap Motion and virtually displayed in the AR space of the HoloLens. To explore the feasibility of the developed platform, twelve novice medical trainees were guided by a mentor through a simulated ultrasound exploration in a trauma scenario, as part of a pilot user study. The study explores the utility of the system from the trainees, mentor, and objective observers’ perspectives and compares the findings to that of a more traditional multi-camera telemedicine solution. The results obtained provide valuable insight and guidance for the development of an AR-supported telemedicine platform.

  19. Towards Robot teaching based on Virtual and Augmented Reality Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennakr, Said; Domingues, Christophe; Benchikh, Laredj; Otmane, Samir; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    A complex system is a system made up of a great number of entities in local and simultaneous interaction. Its design requires the collaboration of engineers of various complementary specialties, so that it is necessary to invent new design methods. Indeed, currently the industry loses much time between the moment when the product model is designed and when the latter is serially produced on the lines of factories. This production is generally ensured by automated and more often robotized means. A deadline is thus necessary for the development of the automatisms and the robots work on a new product model. In this context we launched a study based on the principle of the mechatronics design in Augmented Reality-Virtual Reality. This new approach will bring solutions to problems encountered in many application scopes, but also to problems involved in the distance which separates the offices from design of vehicles and their production sites. This new approach will minimize the differences of errors between the design model and real prototype.

  20. EyeAR: Refocusable Augmented Reality Content through Eye Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Constantine Rompapas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR superimposes computer graphics (CG onto a user’s view of the real world. A key quality problem in this field is to achieve coherence between reality and CG when the user’s eyes refocus or change pupil size. We designed and evaluated a display that improves coherence by measuring the user’s eye state and continuously adapting CG accordingly. Our tabletop prototype emulates an Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display, a common AR display device. In our evaluation, participants observed three pillars at different depths. We then challenged them to identify a virtual pillar among the three while freely refocusing their eyes. Results show that our design significantly improved realism. Compared to Light Field Displays, our design aims to simplify display-optics while providing similar quality. We could only partially achieve this goal. We discuss the lessons we learned and how we plan to overcome the remaining challenges. The experimental protocol from our evaluation is useful for display developers as it can be used to measure the coherence of a display.

  1. Technologies and Algorithms for Building the Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Blagoveshchenskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the Augmented Reality technology itself and its current implementations. In the first part of the article the authors give a short historical reference to the origins of the name ”augmented reality”, by whom it was introduced and what it means. Later in the article two major approaches to building AR are described. The first one is based on the usage of a marker, and the second one is marker-free. The first approach is examined in detail. In order to analyze video stream and recognize known objects in it, algorithms of the Computer Vision are used. The authors give a short description and the main characteristics only of two of them: genetic algorithms and feature detection & description. For a programmatic implementation of those algorithms one can use special libraries like OpenCV and AForge.NET, also mentioned in the article. Both of them give vast functional capabilities in image processing and object recognition. At the end of the article is given an example of creating AR using the OpenCV library. Main attention is payed to the problem of making projection of a 3D model on the marker’s plane. This example can be used as the foundation for a custom AR framework.

  2. Applied Operations Research: Augmented Reality in an Industrial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality is the application of computer generated data or graphics onto a real world view. Its use provides the operator additional information or a heightened situational awareness. While advancements have been made in automation and diagnostics of high value critical equipment to improve readiness, reliability and maintenance, the need for assisting and support to Operations and Maintenance staff persists. AR can improve the human machine interface where computer capabilities maximize the human experience and analysis capabilities. NASA operates multiple facilities with complex ground based HVCE in support of national aerodynamics and space exploration, and the need exists to improve operational support and close a gap related to capability sustainment where key and experienced staff consistently rotate work assignments and reach their expiration of term of service. The initiation of an AR capability to augment and improve human abilities and training experience in the industrial environment requires planning and establishment of a goal and objectives for the systems and specific applications. This paper explored use of AR in support of Operation staff in real time operation of HVCE and its maintenance. The results identified include identification of specific goal and objectives, challenges related to availability and computer system infrastructure.

  3. Registration using natural features for augmented reality systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, M L; Ong, S K; Nee, A Y C

    2006-01-01

    Registration is one of the most difficult problems in augmented reality (AR) systems. In this paper, a simple registration method using natural features based on the projective reconstruction technique is proposed. This method consists of two steps: embedding and rendering. Embedding involves specifying four points to build the world coordinate system on which a virtual object will be superimposed. In rendering, the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) feature tracker is used to track the natural feature correspondences in the live video. The natural features that have been tracked are used to estimate the corresponding projective matrix in the image sequence. Next, the projective reconstruction technique is used to transfer the four specified points to compute the registration matrix for augmentation. This paper also proposes a robust method for estimating the projective matrix, where the natural features that have been tracked are normalized (translation and scaling) and used as the input data. The estimated projective matrix will be used as an initial estimate for a nonlinear optimization method that minimizes the actual residual errors based on the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) minimization method, thus making the results more robust and stable. The proposed registration method has three major advantages: 1) It is simple, as no predefined fiducials or markers are used for registration for either indoor and outdoor AR applications. 2) It is robust, because it remains effective as long as at least six natural features are tracked during the entire augmentation, and the existence of the corresponding projective matrices in the live video is guaranteed. Meanwhile, the robust method to estimate the projective matrix can obtain stable results even when there are some outliers during the tracking process. 3) Virtual objects can still be superimposed on the specified areas, even if some parts of the areas are occluded during the entire process. Some indoor and outdoor experiments have

  4. The Influences of the 2D Image-Based Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Hsin-Hun; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Chen, Sherry Y.; Tarng, Wernhuar

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) learning environments can provide students with concepts of the simulated phenomena, but users are not allowed to interact with real elements. Conversely, augmented reality (AR) learning environments blend real-world environments so AR could enhance the effects of computer simulation and promote students' realistic experience.…

  5. CityGuideTour Toruń - tourist application using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgrzyn, Magdalena; Mościcka, Albina

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the article is to show the possibilities of augmented reality in the fi eld of geodesy and cartography. It discusses the concept of augmented reality, its origins and development, as well as areas of the existing applications. The practical functioning of augmented reality in the area of geodesy and cartography is presented on the example of an application developed for the tourist city of Toruń, created with the use of CityGuideTour software. The principles of developing an application and the way it operates are also discussed. As a result, a fully operational bilingual application is available free of charge on the Web.

  6. Egocentric depth judgments in optical, see-through augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Edward; Jones, Adam; Kolstad, Eric; Livingston, Mark A; Smallman, Harvey S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract-A fundamental problem in optical, see-through augmented reality (AR) is characterizing how it affects the perception of spatial layout and depth. This problem is important because AR system developers need to both place graphics in arbitrary spatial relationships with real-world objects, and to know that users will perceive them in the same relationships. Furthermore, AR makes possible enhanced perceptual techniques that have no real-world equivalent, such as x-ray vision, where AR users are supposed to perceive graphics as being located behind opaque surfaces. This paper reviews and discusses protocols for measuring egocentric depth judgments in both virtual and augmented environments, and discusses the well-known problem of depth underestimation in virtual environments. It then describes two experiments that measured egocentric depth judgments in AR. Experiment I used a perceptual matching protocol to measure AR depth judgments at medium and far-field distances of 5 to 45 meters. The experiment studied the effects of upper versus lower visual field location, the x-ray vision condition, and practice on the task. The experimental findings include evidence for a switch in bias, from underestimating to overestimating the distance of AR-presented graphics, at approximately 23 meters, as well as a quantification of how much more difficult the x-ray vision condition makes the task. Experiment II used blind walking and verbal report protocols to measure AR depth judgments at distances of 3 to 7 meters. The experiment examined real-world objects, real-world objects seen through the AR display, virtual objects, and combined real and virtual objects. The results give evidence that the egocentric depth of AR objects is underestimated at these distances, but to a lesser degree than has previously been found for most virtual reality environments. The results are consistent with previous studies that have implicated a restricted field-of-view, combined with an

  7. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. "DJINNI" is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient's state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  8. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Ben-Moussa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  9. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup. PMID:28503155

  10. Augmented Reality for Assistance of Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the development of a surgical assistance system based on augmented reality to support joint replacement procedures and implantation of prosthetic knee. Images of the scene were captured in order to detect the visual markers located on the lateral surface of the patient’s leg for overlapping the 3D models of the prosthesis and the joint, as well as the tool used by the medical specialist. With the marker identification, it was possible to compute its position and orientation for locating the virtual models, obtaining a monitoring system for giving accurate information about the procedure. Also it can be used as training platform for surgeons, without having volunteers or patients for performing real surgeries; instead they can train in a virtual environment. The results have shown an efficient system in terms of cost-benefit relation, taking into account the materials used for developing the system; nevertheless, the accuracy of the algorithm decreases according to the distance between the markers.

  11. Navigation surgery using an augmented reality for pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Onda, Shinji; Yasuda, Jungo; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of navigation surgery using augmented reality technology (AR-based NS) for pancreatectomy. The 3D reconstructed images from CT were created by segmentation. The initial registration was performed by using the optical location sensor. The reconstructed images were superimposed onto the real organs in the monitor display. Of the 19 patients who had undergone hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery using AR-based NS, the accuracy, visualization ability, and utility of our system were assessed in five cases with pancreatectomy. The position of each organ in the surface-rendering image corresponded almost to that of the actual organ. Reference to the display image allowed for safe dissection while preserving the adjacent vessels or organs. The locations of the lesions and resection line on the targeted organ were overlaid on the operating field. The initial mean registration error was improved to approximately 5 mm by our refinements. However, several problems such as registration accuracy, portability and cost still remain. AR-based NS contributed to accurate and effective surgical resection in pancreatectomy. The pancreas appears to be a suitable organ for further investigations. This technology is promising to improve surgical quality, training, and education. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Perancangan Aplikasi Multimedia Untuk Pembelajaran Gerbang Logika Menggunakan Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosdelima Hutahaean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the rapid development of technology is also growing media that is used as a method of learning in education. One of them to learning logic states, in addition to reading the book at this time there has a new learning method that is more pronounced in 3 dimensions to increase understanding in learning the logic gates using Augmented Reality. Steps design multimedia for learning the logic gates begins with a literature study, data collection, analysis and system design and then implementation and testing the system. Testing methods using a black-box, which includes testing functionality testing camera angles and distances to the markers as well as testing the light intensity. The result of the design this application shows that for angle of 30 0 with a distance of 30 cm – 40 cm, angle of 45 0 with a distance of 40 cm – 70 cm and angle of 60 0 with a distance of 50 cm – 90 cm and light intensity 4 lx – 19 lx is a good composition can display the object 3 dimensions.

  13. [Registration technology for mandibular angle osteotomy based on augmented reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Zhe-Yuan; Zhu, Yi-Jia

    2010-12-01

    To establish an effective path to register the operative plan to the real model of mandible made by rapid prototyping (RP) technology. Computerize tomography (CT) was performed on 20 patients to create 3D images, and computer aided operation planning information can be merged with the 3D images. Then dental cast was used to fix the signal which can be recognized by the software. The dental cast was transformed to 3D data with a laser scanner and a programmer that run on a personal computer named Rapidform matching the dental cast and the mandible image to generate the virtual image. Then the registration was achieved by video monitoring system. By using this technology, the virtual image of mandible and the cutting planes both can overlay the real model of mandible made by RP. This study found an effective way for registration by using dental cast, and this way might be a powerful option for the registration of augmented reality. Supported by Program for Innovation Research Team of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission.

  14. Explore and experience: mobile augmented reality for medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Noll, Christoph; von Jan, Ute

    2013-01-01

    In medicine, especially in basic education, it may sometimes be inappropriate to integrate real patients into classes due to ethical issues that must be avoided. Nevertheless, the quality of medical education may suffer without the use of real cases. This is especially true of medical specialties such as legal medicine: survivors of a crime are already subjected to procedures that constitute a severe emotional burden and may cause additional distress even without the added presence of students. Using augmented reality based applications may alleviate this ethical dilemma by giving students the possibility to practice the necessary skills based on virtual but nevertheless almost realistic cases. The app "mARble®" that is presented in this paper follows this approach. The currently available learning module for legal medicine gives users an opportunity to learn about various wound patterns by virtually overlaying them on their own skin and is applicable in different learning settings. Preliminary evaluation results covering learning efficiency and emotional components of the learning process are promising. Content modules for other medical specialtiesare currently under construction.

  15. Study on Mobile Augmented Reality Adoption for Mayo Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmo Miranda Bojórquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study applied to undergraduates in order to know how the cultural dimensions affect their perceptions of the acceptance and use of new technologies in a student-centered learning environment. A total of 85 undergraduate students from the Autonomous Indigenous University of Mexico (UAIM participated in the study. Each student was asked to use a mobile augmented reality (MAR application designed to learn Mayo language (language spoken in Northwestern Mexico. Afterwards, the students responded to a survey with items concerning the use and technology acceptance and about cultural dimensions of individualism and uncertainty avoidance. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to analyze the data collected from students. Results provide evidence that the individualism contributes positively to perceived ease of use of the MAR app, and uncertainty avoidance has no impact. The findings showed that the MAR system could be easily used if it includes a natural way to promote collaborative work. In addition, to gain the trust of students, the uncertainty avoidance needs to be reduced by enriching the help information offered for app use.

  16. Analisis Penggunaan Marker Tracking Pada Augmented Reality Huruf Hijaiyah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyti Eka Apriyani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teknologi augmented reality berdasarkan metode pelacakan (tracking  terbagi menjadi dua yaitu marker based tracking dan markerless. Kedua metode ini memiliki persamaan yaitu dipengaruhi oleh jarak pendeteksian dan intensitas cahaya dalam keberhasilannya memunculkan suatu objek. Akan tetapi belum diketahui berapa jarak yang tepat dan kondisi intensitas cahaya yang ideal bagi kedua metode tersebut. Penelitian ini diusulkan untuk menganalisis pengaruh jarak pendeteksian serta integritas cahaya terhadap metode marker based tracking dan markerless. Variasi jarak yang digunakan adalah 5cm, 10cm, 20cm, 30cm, 40cm, 50cm, dan 80cm sebagai sub indikator jarak pendeteksian kemudian untuk mendapatkan variasi besarnya intensitas cahaya digunakan sumber cahaya matahari, lampu berwarna kuning, merah, hijau, biru, dan putih (terang. Metode pengujian yang digunakan yaitu menentukan jarak minimum dan jarak maksimum pendeteksian serta menentukan besarnya intensitas cahaya untuk memunculkan  suatu objek. Hasil pengujian ini adalah jarak minimum dan maksimum pendeteksian serta intensitas cahaya yang didapatkan untuk kedua metode yang diusulkan yaitu marker based tracking memiliki rata-rata jarak minimum 7.5 cm dan maksimum 80.5 cm. Sedangkan markerless rata-rata jarak minimum 3.8 cm dan maksimum 300 cm. Sistem dapat memunculkan objek pada intensitas 97 lux -1605 lux

  17. Implementation of augmented reality in operative dentistry learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llena, C; Folguera, S; Forner, L; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of augmented reality (AR) in the gaining of knowledge and skills amongst dental students in the design of cavity preparations and analyse their degree of satisfaction. AR cavity models were prepared for use with computers and mobile devices. Forty-one students were divided into two groups (traditional teaching methods vs AR). Questionnaires were designed to evaluate knowledge and skills, with the administration of a satisfaction questionnaire for those using AR. The degree of compliance with the standards in cavity design was assessed. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare knowledge and skills between the two groups, and the Wilcoxon test was applied to compare intragroup differences. The chi-square test in turn was used to compare the qualitative parameters of the cavity designs between the groups. Statistical significance was considered for P.05). Although the results corresponding to most of the studied skills parameters were better in the experimental group, significant differences (P<.05) were only founded for cavity depth and extent for Class I and divergence of the buccal and lingual walls for the Class II. The experience was rated as favourable or very favourable by 100% of the participants. The students showed preference for computers (60%) vs mobile devices (10%). The AR techniques favoured the gaining of knowledge and skills and were regarded as a useful tool by the students. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cross-organizational collaboration supported by Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Susanna; Johansson, Björn J E; Jönsson, Arne

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a study where Augmented Reality (AR) technology has been used as a tool for supporting collaboration between the rescue services, the police and military personnel in a crisis management scenario. There are few studies on how AR systems should be designed to improve cooperation between actors from different organizations while at the same time supporting individual needs. In the present study, an AR system was utilized for supporting joint planning tasks by providing organization specific views of a shared map. The study involved a simulated emergency event conducted in close to real settings with representatives from the organizations for which the system is developed. As a baseline, a series of trials without the AR system was carried out. Results show that the users were positive toward the AR system and would like to use it in real work. They also experience some performance benefits of using the AR system compared to their traditional tools. Finally, the problem of designing for collaborative work as well as the benefits of using an iterative design processes is discussed. © 2011 IEEE

  19. AREA: an augmented reality system for epidural anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Lessoway, Victoria A; Khallaghi, Siavash; Cheng, Alexis; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2012-01-01

    Spinal needle injection procedures are used for anesthesia and analgesia, such as lumbar epidurals. These procedures require careful placement of a needle, both to ensure effective therapy delivery and to avoid damaging sensitive tissue such as the spinal cord. An important step in such procedures is the accurate identification of the vertebral levels, which is currently performed using manual palpation with a reported 30% success rate for correct identification. An augmented reality system was developed to help identify the lumbar vertebral levels. The system consists of an ultrasound transducer tracked in real time by a trinocular camera system, an automatic ultrasound panorama generation module that provides an extended view of the lumbar vertebrae, an image processing technique that automatically identifies the vertebral levels in the panorama image, and a graphical interface that overlays the identified levels on a live camera view of the patient's back. Validation was performed on ultrasound data obtained from 10 subjects with different spine arching. The average success rate for segmentation of the vertebrae was 85%. The automatic level identification had an average accuracy of 6.6 mm. The prototype system demonstrates better accuracy for identifying the vertebrae than traditional manual methods.

  20. Augmented reality system for freehand guide of magnetic endovascular devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrini, S; Cutolo, F; Freschi, C; Ferrari, M; Ferrari, V

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic guide of endovascular devices or magnetized therapeutic microparticles to the specific target in the arterial tree is increasingly studied, since it could improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Most proposed systems use external permanent magnets attached to robotic manipulators or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems to guide internal carriers to the region of treatment. We aim to simplify this type of procedures, avoiding or reducing the need of robotic arms and MRI systems in the surgical scenario. On account of this we investigated the use of a wearable stereoscopic video see-through augmented reality system to show the hidden vessel to the surgeon; in this way, the surgeon is able to freely move the external magnet, following the showed path, to lead the endovascular magnetic device towards the desired position. In this preliminary study, we investigated the feasibility of such an approach trying to guide a magnetic capsule inside a vascular mannequin. The high rate of success and the positive evaluation provided by the operators represent a good starting point for further developments of the system.

  1. Pose estimation for augmented reality applications using genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying Kin; Wong, Kin Hong; Chang, Michael Ming Yuen

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a genetic algorithm that tackles the pose-estimation problem in computer vision. Our genetic algorithm can find the rotation and translation of an object accurately when the three-dimensional structure of the object is given. In our implementation, each chromosome encodes both the pose and the indexes to the selected point features of the object. Instead of only searching for the pose as in the existing work, our algorithm, at the same time, searches for a set containing the most reliable feature points in the process. This mismatch filtering strategy successfully makes the algorithm more robust under the presence of point mismatches and outliers in the images. Our algorithm has been tested with both synthetic and real data with good results. The accuracy of the recovered pose is compared to the existing algorithms. Our approach outperformed the Lowe's method and the other two genetic algorithms under the presence of point mismatches and outliers. In addition, it has been used to estimate the pose of a real object. It is shown that the proposed method is applicable to augmented reality applications.

  2. Truthful Color Reproduction in Spatial Augmented Reality Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menk, Christoffer; Koch, Reinhard

    2013-02-01

    Spatial augmented reality is especially interesting for the design process of a car, because a lot of virtual content and corresponding real objects are used. One important issue in such a process is that the designer can trust the visualized colors on the real object, because design decisions are made on basis of the projection. In this paper, we present an interactive visualization technique which is able to exactly compute the RGB values for the projected image, so that the resulting colors on the real object are equally perceived as the real desired colors. Our approach computes the influences of the ambient light, the material, the pose and the color model of the projector to the resulting colors of the projected RGB values by using a physically based computation. This information allows us to compute the adjustment for the RGB values for varying projector positions at interactive rates. Since the amount of projectable colors does not only depend on the material and the ambient light, but also on the pose of the projector, our method can be used to interactively adjust the range of projectable colors by moving the projector to arbitrary positions around the real object. We further extend the mentioned method so that it is applicable to multiple projectors. All methods are evaluated in a number of experiments.

  3. A spatially augmented reality sketching interface for architectural daylighting design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yu; Yapo, Theodore C; Young, Christopher; Cutler, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We present an application of interactive global illumination and spatially augmented reality to architectural daylight modeling that allows designers to explore alternative designs and new technologies for improving the sustainability of their buildings. Images of a model in the real world, captured by a camera above the scene, are processed to construct a virtual 3D model. To achieve interactive rendering rates, we use a hybrid rendering technique, leveraging radiosity to simulate the interreflectance between diffuse patches and shadow volumes to generate per-pixel direct illumination. The rendered images are then projected on the real model by four calibrated projectors to help users study the daylighting illumination. The virtual heliodon is a physical design environment in which multiple designers, a designer and a client, or a teacher and students can gather to experience animated visualizations of the natural illumination within a proposed design by controlling the time of day, season, and climate. Furthermore, participants may interactively redesign the geometry and materials of the space by manipulating physical design elements and see the updated lighting simulation. © 2011 IEEE Published by the IEEE Computer Society

  4. Augmented Reality-Based Navigation System for Wrist Arthroscopy: Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L.; Liverneaux, Philippe A.; Obdeijn, Miryam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip arthroscopy. These systems, however, rely on optical or mechanical sensors, which turn out to be restricting and cumbersome. The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of a navigation system based on electromagnetic sensors in video surgery. Methods We used an electromagnetic localization device (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada) to track the movements in space of both the camera and the instruments. We have developed a dedicated application in the Python language, using the VTK library for the graphic display and the OpenCV library for camera calibration. Results A prototype has been designed and evaluated for wrist arthroscopy. It allows display of the theoretical position of instruments onto the arthroscopic view with useful accuracy. Discussion The augmented reality view represents valuable assistance when surgeons want to position the arthroscope or locate their instruments. It makes the maneuver more intuitive, increases comfort, saves time, and enhances concentration. PMID:24436832

  5. Shape recognition and pose estimation for mobile Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbi, Nate; Bergig, Oriel; El-Sana, Jihad; Billinghurst, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Nestor is a real-time recognition and camera pose estimation system for planar shapes. The system allows shapes that carry contextual meanings for humans to be used as Augmented Reality (AR) tracking targets. The user can teach the system new shapes in real time. New shapes can be shown to the system frontally, or they can be automatically rectified according to previously learned shapes. Shapes can be automatically assigned virtual content by classification according to a shape class library. Nestor performs shape recognition by analyzing contour structures and generating projective-invariant signatures from their concavities. The concavities are further used to extract features for pose estimation and tracking. Pose refinement is carried out by minimizing the reprojection error between sample points on each image contour and its library counterpart. Sample points are matched by evolving an active contour in real time. Our experiments show that the system provides stable and accurate registration, and runs at interactive frame rates on a Nokia N95 mobile phone. © 2011 IEEE

  6. Use of augmented reality in laparoscopic gynecology to visualize myomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel, Nicolas; Collins, Toby; Pizarro, Daniel; Debize, Clement; Grémeau, Anne-Sophie; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel

    2017-03-01

    To report the use of augmented reality (AR) in gynecology. AR is a surgical guidance technology that enables important hidden surface structures to be visualized in endoscopic images. AR has been used for other organs, but never in gynecology and never with a very mobile organ like the uterus. We have developed a new AR approach specifically for uterine surgery and demonstrated its use for myomectomy. Tertiary university hospital. Three patients with one, two, and multiple myomas, respectively. AR was used during laparoscopy to localize the myomas. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the patient's uterus and myomas were constructed before surgery from T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The intraoperative 3D shape of the uterus was determined. These models were automatically aligned and "fused" with the laparoscopic video in real time. The live fused video made the uterus appear semitransparent, and the surgeon can see the location of the myoma in real time while moving the laparoscope and the uterus. With this information, the surgeon can easily and quickly decide on how best to access the myoma. We developed an AR system for gynecologic surgery and have used it to improve laparoscopic myomectomy. Technically, the software we developed is very different to approaches tried for other organs, and it can handle significant challenges, including image blur, fast motion, and partial views of the organ. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactive augmented reality system for product design review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Giandomenico; Re, Guido Maria

    2010-01-01

    The product development process, of industrial products, includes a phase dedicated to the design review that is a crucial phase where various experts cooperate in selecting the optimal product shape. Although computer graphics allows us to create very realistic virtual representations of the products, it is not uncommon that designers decide to build physical mock-ups of their newly conceived products because they need to physically interact with the prototype and also to evaluate the product within a plurality of real contexts. This paper describes the hardware and software development of our Augmented Reality design review system that allows to overcome some issues related to the 3D visualization and to the interaction with the virtual objects. Our system is composed by a Video See Through Head Mounted Display, which allows to improve the 3D visualization by controlling the convergence of the video cameras automatically, and a wireless control system, which allows us to create some metaphors to interact with the virtual objects. During the development of the system, in order to define and tune the algorithms, we have performed some testing sessions. Then, we have performed further tests in order to verify the effectiveness of the system and to collect additional data and comments about usability and ergonomic aspects.

  8. Spatial augmented reality on industrial CNC-machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwal, Alex; Gustafsson, Jonny; Lindfors, Christoffer

    2008-02-01

    In this work we present how Augmented Reality (AR) can be used to create an intimate integration of process data with the workspace of an industrial CNC (computer numerical control) machine. AR allows us to combine interactive computer graphics with real objects in a physical environment - in this case, the workspace of an industrial lathe. ASTOR is an autostereoscopic optical see-through spatial AR system, which provides real-time 3D visual feedback without the need for user-worn equipment, such as head-mounted displays or sensors for tracking. The use of a transparent holographic optical element, overlaid onto the safety glass, allows the system to simultaneously provide bright imagery and clear visibility of the tool and workpiece. The system makes it possible to enhance visibility of occluded tools as well as to visualize real-time data from the process in the 3D space. The graphics are geometrically registered with the workspace and provide an intuitive representation of the process, amplifying the user's understanding and simplifying machine operation.

  9. Development of a mobile borehole investigation software using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Lee, S.; Oh, M.; Yun, D. E.; Kim, S.; Park, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is one of the most developing technologies in smartphone and IT areas. While various applications have been developed using the AR, there are a few geological applications which adopt its advantages. In this study, a smartphone application to manage boreholes using AR has been developed. The application is consisted of three major modules, an AR module, a map module and a data management module. The AR module calculates the orientation of the device and displays nearby boreholes distributed in three dimensions using the orientation. This module shows the boreholes in a transparent layer on a live camera screen so the user can find and understand the overall characteristics of the underground geology. The map module displays the boreholes on a 2D map to show their distribution and the location of the user. The database module uses SQLite library which has proper characteristics for mobile platforms, and Binary XML is adopted to enable containing additional customized data. The application is able to provide underground information in an intuitive and refined forms and to decrease time and general equipment required for geological field investigations.

  10. A brief review of augmented reality science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Valarmathie; Bakar, Juliana Aida Abu; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews several literatures concerning the theories and model that could be applied for science motivation for upper secondary school learners (16-17 years old) in order to make the learning experience more amazing and useful. The embedment of AR in science could bring an awe-inspiring transformation on learners' viewpoint towards the respective subject matters. Augmented Reality is able to present the real and virtual learning experience with the addition of multiple media without replacing the real environment. Due to the unique feature of AR, it attracts the mass attention of researchers to implement AR in science learning. This impressive technology offers learners with the ultimate visualization and provides an astonishing and transparent learning experience by bringing to light the unseen perspective of the learning content. This paper will attract the attention of researchers in the related field as well as academicians in the related discipline. This paper aims to propose several related theoretical guidance that could be applied in science motivation to transform the learning in an effective way.

  11. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  12. Quantifying attention shifts in augmented reality image-guided neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Étienne; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D Louis; Popa, Tiberiu; Kersten-Oertel, Marta

    2017-10-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) has allowed for more minimally invasive procedures, leading to better patient outcomes, reduced risk of infection, less pain, shorter hospital stays and faster recoveries. One drawback that has emerged with IGS is that the surgeon must shift their attention from the patient to the monitor for guidance. Yet both cognitive and motor tasks are negatively affected with attention shifts. Augmented reality (AR), which merges the realworld surgical scene with preoperative virtual patient images and plans, has been proposed as a solution to this drawback. In this work, we studied the impact of two different types of AR IGS set-ups (mobile AR and desktop AR) and traditional navigation on attention shifts for the specific task of craniotomy planning. We found a significant difference in terms of the time taken to perform the task and attention shifts between traditional navigation, but no significant difference between the different AR set-ups. With mobile AR, however, users felt that the system was easier to use and that their performance was better. These results suggest that regardless of where the AR visualisation is shown to the surgeon, AR may reduce attention shifts, leading to more streamlined and focused procedures.

  13. Pemanfaatan Augmented Reality untuk Pembelajaran Pengenalan Alat Musik Piano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Setya Nugraha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dalam bidang musik banyak cara yang dapat dijadikan jalan pembelajaran mengenai teori tentang musik. Cara yang paling mudah yaitu dengan belajar sekaligus bermain alat musik itu sendiri. Dalam hal ini terfokus pada teori musik keyboard atau piano. Dengan cara tersebut dapat dipastikan ilmu akan mudah diserap. Yang menjadi masalah disini yaitu bagaimana menjadikan metode pembelajaran itu menyenangkan dan tidak membosankan atau membingungkan. Dengan menggunakan metode pembelajaran berbasis augmented reality yang dibuat dengan menggunakan Unity sebagai komponen yang utama dan dengan menggunakan 3DS Max sebagai software untuk menghasilkan gambar yang menarik. Proses perancangan dan pembuatan metode pembelajaran ini menggunakan prototyping. Dengan prototyping, desain menjadi cepat dibuat dan dapat dicoba. Semakin cepat dibuat dan semakin banyak percobaan yang dilakukan, dapat dengan cepat juga memperbaiki bug yang ada sehingga menghasilkan hasil yang lebih baik. Hasil dari perancangan aplikasi ini adalah terealisasinya suatu aplikasi metode pembelajaran teori pada piano yang dapat mempermudah user belajar tentang chord piano. Dengan adanya aplikasi diharapkan user dapat belajar dengan lebih menyenangkan dengan cara yang mudah untuk mendapatkan ilmu tentang chord piano.

  14. Augmented reality 3D display based on integral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huan; Zhang, Han-Le; He, Min-Yang; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Integral imaging (II) is a good candidate for augmented reality (AR) display, since it provides various physiological depth cues so that viewers can freely change the accommodation and convergence between the virtual three-dimensional (3D) images and the real-world scene without feeling any visual discomfort. We propose two AR 3D display systems based on the theory of II. In the first AR system, a micro II display unit reconstructs a micro 3D image, and the mciro-3D image is magnified by a convex lens. The lateral and depth distortions of the magnified 3D image are analyzed and resolved by the pitch scaling and depth scaling. The magnified 3D image and real 3D scene are overlapped by using a half-mirror to realize AR 3D display. The second AR system uses a micro-lens array holographic optical element (HOE) as an image combiner. The HOE is a volume holographic grating which functions as a micro-lens array for the Bragg-matched light, and as a transparent glass for Bragg mismatched light. A reference beam can reproduce a virtual 3D image from one side and a reference beam with conjugated phase can reproduce the second 3D image from other side of the micro-lens array HOE, which presents double-sided 3D display feature.

  15. MetaTree: augmented reality narrative explorations of urban forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ruth; Margolis, Todd; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; Mendelowitz, Eitan

    2012-03-01

    As cities world-wide adopt and implement reforestation initiatives to plant millions of trees in urban areas, they are engaging in what is essentially a massive ecological and social experiment. Existing air-borne, space-borne, and fieldbased imaging and inventory mechanisms fail to provide key information on urban tree ecology that is crucial to informing management, policy, and supporting citizen initiatives for the planting and stewardship of trees. The shortcomings of the current approaches include: spatial and temporal resolution, poor vantage point, cost constraints and biological metric limitations. Collectively, this limits their effectiveness as real-time inventory and monitoring tools. Novel methods for imaging and monitoring the status of these emerging urban forests and encouraging their ongoing stewardship by the public are required to ensure their success. This art-science collaboration proposes to re-envision citizens' relationship with urban spaces by foregrounding urban trees in relation to local architectural features and simultaneously creating new methods for urban forest monitoring. We explore creating a shift from overhead imaging or field-based tree survey data acquisition methods to continuous, ongoing monitoring by citizen scientists as part of a mobile augmented reality experience. We consider the possibilities of this experience as a medium for interacting with and visualizing urban forestry data and for creating cultural engagement with urban ecology.

  16. Augmented Reality Image Guidance in Minimally Invasive Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Daniel; Mayer, Erik; Chen, Dongbin; Anstee, Ann; Vale, Justin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip'eddie'

    This paper presents our work aimed at providing augmented reality (AR) guidance of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALP) using the da Vinci system. There is a good clinical case for guidance due to the significant rate of complications and steep learning curve for this procedure. Patients who were due to undergo robotic prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer underwent preoperative 3T MRI scans of the pelvis. These were segmented and reconstructed to form 3D images of pelvic anatomy. The reconstructed image was successfully overlaid onto screenshots of the recorded surgery post-procedure. Surgeons who perform minimally-invasive prostatectomy took part in a user-needs analysis to determine the potential benefits of an image guidance system after viewing the overlaid images. All surgeons stated that the development would be useful at key stages of the surgery and could help to improve the learning curve of the procedure and improve functional and oncological outcomes. Establishing the clinical need in this way is a vital early step in development of an AR guidance system. We have also identified relevant anatomy from preoperative MRI. Further work will be aimed at automated registration to account for tissue deformation during the procedure, using a combination of transrectal ultrasound and stereoendoscopic video.

  17. Augmented reality-based navigation system for wrist arthroscopy: feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Obdeijn, Miryam; Liverneaux, Philippe A

    2013-11-01

    In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip arthroscopy. These systems, however, rely on optical or mechanical sensors, which turn out to be restricting and cumbersome. The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of a navigation system based on electromagnetic sensors in video surgery. We used an electromagnetic localization device (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada) to track the movements in space of both the camera and the instruments. We have developed a dedicated application in the Python language, using the VTK library for the graphic display and the OpenCV library for camera calibration. A prototype has been designed and evaluated for wrist arthroscopy. It allows display of the theoretical position of instruments onto the arthroscopic view with useful accuracy. The augmented reality view represents valuable assistance when surgeons want to position the arthroscope or locate their instruments. It makes the maneuver more intuitive, increases comfort, saves time, and enhances concentration.

  18. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  19. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  20. Augmented reality enabling intelligence exploitation at the edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Sue E.; Roy, Heather; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Patton, Debra

    2015-05-01

    Today's Warfighters need to make quick decisions while interacting in densely populated environments comprised of friendly, hostile, and neutral host nation locals. However, there is a gap in the real-time processing of big data streams for edge intelligence. We introduce a big data processing pipeline called ARTEA that ingests, monitors, and performs a variety of analytics including noise reduction, pattern identification, and trend and event detection in the context of an area of operations (AOR). Results of the analytics are presented to the Soldier via an augmented reality (AR) device Google Glass (Glass). Non-intrusive AR devices such as Glass can visually communicate contextually relevant alerts to the Soldier based on the current mission objectives, time, location, and observed or sensed activities. This real-time processing and AR presentation approach to knowledge discovery flattens the intelligence hierarchy enabling the edge Soldier to act as a vital and active participant in the analysis process. We report preliminary observations testing ARTEA and Glass in a document exploitation and person of interest scenario simulating edge Soldier participation in the intelligence process in disconnected deployment conditions.

  1. Inattentional blindness increased with augmented reality surgical navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley H L; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) surgical navigation systems, designed to increase accuracy and efficiency, have been shown to negatively impact on attention. We wished to assess the effect "head-up" AR displays have on attention, efficiency, and accuracy, while performing a surgical task, compared with the same information being presented on a submonitor (SM). Fifty experienced otolaryngology surgeons (n = 42) and senior otolaryngology trainees (n = 8) performed an endoscopic surgical navigation exercise on a predissected cadaveric model. Computed tomography-generated anatomic contours were fused with the endoscopic image to provide an AR view. Subjects were randomized to perform the task with a standard endoscopic monitor with the AR navigation displayed on an SM or with AR as a single display. Accuracy, task completion time, and the recognition of unexpected findings (a foreign body and a critical complication) were recorded. Recognition of the foreign body was significantly better in the SM group (15/25 [60%]) compared with the AR alone group (8/25 [32%]; p = 0.02). There was no significant difference in task completion time (p = 0.83) or accuracy (p = 0.78) between the two groups. Providing identical surgical navigation on a SM, rather than on a single head-up display, reduced the level of inattentional blindness as measured by detection of unexpected findings. These gains were achieved without any measurable impact on efficiency or accuracy. AR displays may distract the user and we caution injudicious adoption of this technology for medical procedures.

  2. Augmented Shared Reality Tools for Collaborative Science on a Planetary Exploration Analogue Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsted, K. A.

    2010-04-01

    An astronaut with field-geology tasks must collaborate with Earth-bound scientists, via an augmented reality system. We are investigating this scenario via an analogue mission in Hawaii, and will present the results.

  3. The magnificent adventure of a ‘Fragment’. Block NXLVI Parthenon North Frieze In Augmented Reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valeria Amoretti; Alessandra Cirafici; Donato Maniello

    2015-01-01

    ... from the existing ones- for museum enjoyment. The object of the totem was the creation of a documentary about the full scale reproduction of block NXLVI of the north frieze of the Parthenon. With the words “augmented reality...

  4. Viseu Mobile: A location based Augmented Reality tour guide for mobile devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martins, M.L; Malta, C; Costa, V

    2015-01-01

    ...’ experience when visiting the town of Viseu. The paper starts by presenting a reflection on Augmented Reality and its potential and applications, with a special emphasis on the tourism industry...

  5. Designing and implementing outdoor augmented reality system based on ARToolKit

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zongyi; Liu, Yongqi; Chang, Yong; Hu, Shenghua

    2007-06-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the overlay of virtual computer graphics images on real world objects, and has many potential applications in industrial operations and academic research. ARToolKit is a C and C++ language software library that allows programmers develop Augmented Reality applications easily. Since the registration method of ARToolKit is based on computer vision, ARToolKit is not suitable for outdoor environment. ARToolKit needs to be improved for outdoor augmented reality. Source code of ARToolkit is improved in this paper. The registration method of vision is kept down, and 3D Electronic compass+RTKGPS is added, so that the registration method of 3D can be carried out not only indoor environment, but also outdoor environment. The paper discusses the framework of outdoor 3D underground pipeline augmented reality system based on ARToolKit.

  6. Mobile Platform Augmented Reality for Enhanced Operations on the International Space Station Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To develop an Augmented Reality system that runs on a small portable device to aid crew in routine maintenance activities by providing enhanced information and...

  7. Robust and Accurate Algorithm for Wearable Stereoscopic Augmented Reality with Three Indistinguishable Markers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cutolo, Fabrizio; Freschi, Cinzia; Mascioli, Stefano; Parchi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In the context of surgical navigation systems based on augmented reality (AR), the key challenge is to ensure the highest degree of realism in merging computer-generated elements with live views of the surgical scene...

  8. Challenges, Opportunities, and Future Trends of Emerging Techniques for Augmented Reality-Based Maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Manuri, Federico; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Pezzolla, Pietro; Montuschi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a well-known technology that can be exploited to provide mass-market users an effective and customizable support in a large spectrum of personal applications, by overlapping computer-generated...

  9. Combining Shape-Changing Interfaces and Spatial Augmented Reality Enables Extended Object Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindlbauer, David; Grønbæk, Jens Emil; Birk, Morten

    2016-01-01

    for increasing the realism of 3D objects such as bump mapping. This extensible framework helps us identify challenges of the two techniques and benefits of their combination. We utilize our prototype shape-changing device enriched with spatial augmented reality through projection mapping to demonstrate...... the concept. We present a novel mechanical distance-fields algorithm for real-time fitting of mechanically constrained shape-changing devices to arbitrary 3D graphics. Furthermore, we present a technique for increasing effective screen real estate for spatial augmented reality through view-dependent shape......We propose combining shape-changing interfaces and spatial augmented reality for extending the space of appearances and interactions of actuated interfaces. While shape-changing interfaces can dynamically alter the physical appearance of objects, the integration of spatial augmented reality...

  10. Enhancing the Tourism Experience through Mobile Augmented Reality: Challenges and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Kounavis, Chris D.; Kasimati, Anna E.; Efpraxia D. Zamani

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of Augmented Reality (AR) applications for the needs of tourism. It describes the technology’s evolution from pilot applications into commercial mobile applications. We address the technical aspects of mobile AR application development, emphasizing the technologies that render the delivery of augmented reality content possible and experientially superior. We examine the state of the art, providing an analysis concerning the development and the objectives of each a...

  11. Spatial user interfaces for large-scale projector-based augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Michael R; Smith, Ross T; Walsh, James A; Thomas, Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Spatial augmented reality applies the concepts of spatial user interfaces to large-scale, projector-based augmented reality. Such virtual environments have interesting characteristics. They deal with large physical objects, the projection surfaces are nonplanar, the physical objects provide natural passive haptic feedback, and the systems naturally support collaboration between users. The article describes how these features affect the design of spatial user interfaces for these environments and explores promising research directions and application domains.

  12. A service oriented mobile augmented reality architecture for media content visualization in digital heritage experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Rattanarungrot, Sasithorn

    2016-01-01

    Mobile augmented reality has become an influential tool for digital content representation and visualization of media content in terms of enhancing users’ experience and improving the adaptability and usability of typical augmented reality applications, such as in e-commerce shopping, virtual museum, or digital heritage scenarios. This research proposes a new Service Oriented Mobile AR Architecture called SOMARA, which includes a novel mobile AR client application.\\ud \\ud SOMARA takes advanta...

  13. Augmented Reality as a Method for Expanded Presentation of Objects of Digitized Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Kolev, Alexander; Dimov, Dimo

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is the latest among information technologies in modern electronics industry. The essence is in the addition of advanced computer graphics in real and/or digitized images. This paper gives a brief analysis of the concept and the approaches to implementing augmented reality for an expanded presentation of a digitized object of national cultural and/or scientific heritage. ACM Computing Classification System (1998): H.5.1, H.5.3, I.3.7.

  14. Feasibility of Augmented Reality in Clinical Simulations: Using Google Glass With Manikins

    OpenAIRE

    Chaballout, Basil; Molloy, Margory; Vaughn, Jacqueline; Brisson III, Raymond; Shaw, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies show that students who use fidelity-based simulation technology perform better and have higher retention rates than peers who learn in traditional paper-based training. Augmented reality is increasingly being used as a teaching and learning tool in a continual effort to make simulations more realistic for students. Objective The aim of this project was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using augmented reality via Google Glass during clinical simulation scenario...

  15. Rancangan Media Pembelajaran Berupa Aplikasi Augmented Reality Berbasis Marker pada Perangkat Android

    OpenAIRE

    Ambarwulan, Diah; Muliyati, Dewi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This preliminary study focused on the technique of instructional media that is integrated with Augmented Reality to increase the interest of studies student. This study uses the book as a medium that brought information representing a 3D model of the atom objects. The program is made with markerlessbased techniques so that the user interface become more attractive. This paper emphasizes the techniques of designing learning media in the form of Augmented Reality applications to be ...

  16. Implementasi Augmented Reality (AR) Pada Pengenalan Ikan Hias Menggunakan Metode Markerless Berbasis Android

    OpenAIRE

    Aditya, Fahmi Aga

    2016-01-01

    Ornamental fish is a fish that is loved by the people. Ornamental fish are divided into two types, freshwater fish and sea water fish. Currently there are still many people who do not know the type of ornamental fish overall. Therefore an android made based on mobile application uses augmented reality technology. Augmented reality is a technology that combines 2D or 3D virtual objects into real circle and projecting the virtual objects in real time. The method used in this appl...

  17. What is going on in augmented reality simulation in laparoscopic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botden, Sanne M B I; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2009-08-01

    To prevent unnecessary errors and adverse results of laparoscopic surgery, proper training is of paramount importance. A safe way to train surgeons for laparoscopic skills is simulation. For this purpose traditional box trainers are often used, however they lack objective assessment of performance. Virtual reality laparoscopic simulators assess performance, but lack realistic haptic feedback. Augmented reality (AR) combines a virtual reality (VR) setting with real physical materials, instruments, and feedback. This article presents the current developments in augmented reality laparoscopic simulation. Pubmed searches were performed to identify articles regarding surgical simulation and augmented reality. Identified companies manufacturing an AR laparoscopic simulator received the same questionnaire referring to the features of the simulator. Seven simulators that fitted the definition of augmented reality were identified during the literature search. Five of the approached manufacturers returned a completed questionnaire, of which one simulator appeared to be VR and was therefore not applicable for this review. Several augmented reality simulators have been developed over the past few years and they are improving rapidly. We recommend the development of AR laparoscopic simulators for component tasks of procedural training. AR simulators should be implemented in current laparoscopic training curricula, in particular for laparoscopic suturing training.

  18. Augmenting the Thermal Flux Experiment: A Mixed Reality Approach with the HoloLens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Kuhn, J.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), technologies have made huge progress during the last years and also reached the field of education. The virtuality continuum, ranging from pure virtuality on one side to the real world on the other, has been successfully covered by the use of immersive technologies like head-mounted…

  19. Augmenting the Thermal Flux Experiment: A Mixed Reality Approach with the HoloLens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Kuhn, J.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.

    In the field of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), technologies have made huge progress during the last years and also reached the field of education. The virtuality continuum, ranging from pure virtuality on one side to the real world on the other, has been successfully covered by the use of immersive technologies like head-mounted…

  20. ProMIS Augmented Reality Training of Laparoscopic Procedures Face Validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botden, Sanne M. B. I.; Buzink, Sonja N.; Schijven, Marlies P.; Jakimowicz, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Conventional video trainers lack the ability to assess the trainee objectively, but offer modalities that are often missing in virtual reality simulation, such as realistic haptic feedback. The ProMIS augmented reality laparoscopic simulator retains the benefit of a traditional box

  1. Systematic review on the effectiveness of augmented reality applications in medical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsom, E. Z.; Graafland, M.; Schijven, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Computer-based applications are increasingly used to support the training of medical professionals. Augmented reality applications (ARAs) render an interactive virtual layer on top of reality. The use of ARAs is of real interest to medical education because they blend digital elements with the

  2. Game-Based Evacuation Drill Using Augmented Reality and Head-Mounted Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Junya; Mitsuhara, Hiroyuki; Shishibori, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evacuation drills should be more realistic and interactive. Focusing on situational and audio-visual realities and scenario-based interactivity, the authors have developed a game-based evacuation drill (GBED) system that presents augmented reality (AR) materials on tablet computers. The paper's current research purpose is to improve…

  3. Integrating Augmented Reality in Higher Education: A Multidisciplinary Study of Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delello, Julie A.; McWhorter, Rochell R.; Camp, Kerri M.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an emerging technology that blends physical objects with virtual reality. Through the integration of digital and print media, a gap between the "on and offline" worlds are merged, radically shifting student-computer interaction in the classroom. This research examined the results of a multiple case study on the…

  4. Constructing Liminal Blends in a Collaborative Augmented-Reality Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Noel; Danish, Joshua A.; DeLiema, David

    2015-01-01

    In vision-based augmented-reality (AR) environments, users view the physical world through a video feed or device that "augments" the display with a graphical or informational overlay. Our goal in this manuscript is to ask "how" and "why" these new technologies create opportunities for learning. We suggest that AR is…

  5. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Riva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During our life we undergo many personal changes: we change our house, our school, our work and even our friends and partners. However, our daily experience shows clearly that in some situations subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: a the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict; b this reduction is achieved through (1 an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2 an internal or external reorganization of this experience; c personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages; d clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper will focus on the two leading virtual technologies – Augmented Reality (AR and Virtual Reality (VR – exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience, by focusing on the high level of self-reflectiveness and personal efficacy induced by their emotional engagement and sense of presence. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual’s worldview.

  6. Exploratory Application of Augmented Reality/Mixed Reality Devices for Acute Care Procedure Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Leo; Zhang, Xiao Chi; Collins, Scott A.; Karim, Naz; Merck, Derek L.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MR), and virtual reality devices are enabling technologies that may facilitate effective communication in healthcare between those with information and knowledge (clinician/specialist; expert; educator) and those seeking understanding and insight (patient/family; non-expert; learner). Investigators initiated an exploratory program to enable the study of AR/MR use-cases in acute care clinical and instructional settings. Methods Academic clinician educators, computer scientists, and diagnostic imaging specialists conducted a proof-of-concept project to 1) implement a core holoimaging pipeline infrastructure and open-access repository at the study institution, and 2) use novel AR/MR techniques on off-the-shelf devices with holoimages generated by the infrastructure to demonstrate their potential role in the instructive communication of complex medical information. Results The study team successfully developed a medical holoimaging infrastructure methodology to identify, retrieve, and manipulate real patients’ de-identified computed tomography and magnetic resonance imagesets for rendering, packaging, transfer, and display of modular holoimages onto AR/MR headset devices and connected displays. Holoimages containing key segmentations of cervical and thoracic anatomic structures and pathology were overlaid and registered onto physical task trainers for simulation-based “blind insertion” invasive procedural training. During the session, learners experienced and used task-relevant anatomic holoimages for central venous catheter and tube thoracostomy insertion training with enhanced visual cues and haptic feedback. Direct instructor access into the learner’s AR/MR headset view of the task trainer was achieved for visual-axis interactive instructional guidance. Conclusion Investigators implemented a core holoimaging pipeline infrastructure and modular open-access repository to generate and enable access to modular

  7. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During life, many personal changes occur. These include changing house, school, work, and even friends and partners. However, the daily experience shows clearly that, in some situations, subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: (a) the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict); (b) this reduction is achieved through (1) an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2) an internal or external reorganization of this experience; (c) personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages that however happen in discontinuous and non-linear ways; and (d) clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper focuses on the two leading virtual technologies – augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) – exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience by focusing on the high level of personal efficacy and self-reflectiveness generated by their sense of presence and emotional engagement. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering, and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual’s worldview. PMID:27746747

  8. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During life, many personal changes occur. These include changing house, school, work, and even friends and partners. However, the daily experience shows clearly that, in some situations, subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: (a) the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict); (b) this reduction is achieved through (1) an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2) an internal or external reorganization of this experience; (c) personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages that however happen in discontinuous and non-linear ways; and (d) clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper focuses on the two leading virtual technologies - augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) - exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience by focusing on the high level of personal efficacy and self-reflectiveness generated by their sense of presence and emotional engagement. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering, and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual's worldview.

  9. Augmented reality application utility for aviation maintenance work instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcho, John Bryan

    Current aviation maintenance work instructions do not display information effectively enough to prevent costly errors and safety concerns. Aircraft are complex assemblies of highly interrelated components that confound troubleshooting and can make the maintenance procedure difficult (Drury & Gramopadhye, 2001). The sophisticated nature of aircraft maintenance necessitates a revolutionized training intervention for aviation maintenance technicians (United States General Accounting Office, 2003). Quite simply, the paper based job task cards fall short of offering rapid access to technical data and the system or component visualization necessary for working on complex integrated aircraft systems. Possible solutions to this problem include upgraded standards for paper based task cards and the use of integrated 3D product definition used on various mobile platforms (Ropp, Thomas, Lee, Broyles, Lewin, Andreychek, & Nicol, 2013). Previous studies have shown that incorporation of 3D graphics in work instructions allow the user to more efficiently and accurately interpret maintenance information (Jackson & Batstone, 2008). For aircraft maintenance workers, the use of mobile 3D model-based task cards could make current paper task card standards obsolete with their ability to deliver relevant, synchronized information to and from the hangar. Unlike previous versions of 3D model-based definition task cards and paper task cards, which are currently used in the maintenance industry, 3D model based definition task cards have the potential to be more mobile and accessible. Utilizing augmented reality applications on mobile devices to seamlessly deliver 3D product definition on mobile devices could increase the efficiency, accuracy, and reduce the mental workload for technicians when performing maintenance tasks (Macchiarella, 2004). This proposal will serve as a literary review of the aviation maintenance industry, the spatial ability of maintenance technicians, and benefits of

  10. Medical telementoring using an augmented reality transparent display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Daniel; Popescu, Voicu; Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; Shanghavi, Aditya; Gomez, Gerardo; Marley, Sherri; Mullis, Brian; Wachs, Juan P

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to design and implement a novel surgical telementoring system called the System for Telementoring with Augmented Reality (STAR) that uses a virtual transparent display to convey precise locations in the operating field to a trainee surgeon. This system was compared with a conventional system based on a telestrator for surgical instruction. A telementoring system was developed and evaluated in a study which used a 1 × 2 between-subjects design with telementoring system, that is, STAR or conventional, as the independent variable. The participants in the study were 20 premedical or medical students who had no prior experience with telementoring. Each participant completed a task of port placement and a task of abdominal incision under telementoring using either the STAR or the conventional system. The metrics used to test performance when using the system were placement error, number of focus shifts, and time to task completion. When compared with the conventional system, participants using STAR completed the 2 tasks with less placement error (45% and 68%) and with fewer focus shifts (86% and 44%), but more slowly (19% for each task). Using STAR resulted in decreased annotation placement error, fewer focus shifts, but greater times to task completion. STAR placed virtual annotations directly onto the trainee surgeon's field of view of the operating field by conveying location with great accuracy; this technology helped to avoid shifts in focus, decreased depth perception, and enabled fine-tuning execution of the task to match telementored instruction, but led to greater times to task completion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Augmented reality cues and elderly driver hazard perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Mark C; Rusch, Michelle L; Lee, John D; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Thomas, Geb; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of augmented reality (AR) cues in improving driving safety among elderly drivers who are at increased crash risk because of cognitive impairments. Cognitively challenging driving environments pose a particular crash risk for elderly drivers. AR cuing is a promising technology to mitigate risk by directing driver attention to roadway hazards. We investigate whether AR cues improve or interfere with hazard perception in elderly drivers with age-related cognitive decline. A total of 20 elderly (M = 73 years, SD = 5) licensed drivers with a range of cognitive abilities measured by a speed-of-processing (SOP) composite participated in a 1-hr drive in an interactive, fixed-base driving simulator. Each participant drove through six straight, 6-mile-long, rural roadway scenarios following a lead vehicle. AR cues directed attention to potential roadside hazards in three of the scenarios, and the other three were uncued (baseline) drives. Effects of AR cuing were evaluated with respect to (a) detection of hazardous target objects, (b) interference with detecting nonhazardous secondary objects, and (c) impairment in maintaining safe distance behind a lead vehicle. AR cuing improved the detection of hazardous target objects of low visibility. AR cues did not interfere with detection of nonhazardous secondary objects and did not impair ability to maintain safe distance behind a lead vehicle. SOP capacity did not moderate those effects. AR cues show promise for improving elderly driver safety by increasing hazard detection likelihood without interfering with other driving tasks, such as maintaining safe headway.

  12. Sharing skills: using augmented reality for human-robot collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Bjorn; Steinhaus, Peter; Walther, Marcus; Dillmann, Ruediger

    2004-05-01

    Both stationary 'industrial' and autonomous mobile robots nowadays pervade many workplaces, but human-friendly interaction with them is still very much an experimental subject. One of the reasons for this is that computer and robotic systems are very bad at performing certain tasks well and robust. A prime example is classification of sensor readings: Which part of a 3D depth image is the cup, which the saucer, which the table? These are tasks that humans excel at. To alleviate this problem, we propose a team approah, wherein the robot records sensor data and uses an Augmented-Reality (AR) system to present the data to the user directly in the 3D environment. The user can then perform classification decisions directly on the data by pointing, gestures and speech commands. After the classification has been performed by the user, the robot takes the classified data and matches it to its environment model. As a demonstration of this approach, we present an initial system for creating objects on-the-fly in the environment model. A rotating laser scanner is used to capture a 3D snapshot of the environment. This snapshot is presented to the user as an overlay over his view of the scene. The user classifies unknown objects by pointing at them. The system segments the snapshot according to the user's indications and presents the results of segmentation back to the user, who can then inspect, correct and enhance them interactively. After a satisfying result has been reached, the laser-scanner can take more snapshots from other angles and use the previous segmentation hints to construct a 3D model of the object.

  13. Augmented reality in the slaughterhouse - A future operation facility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bager Christensen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present case study sums up the results of an initial attempt to adapt the emerging technology of Augmented Reality (AR to support routine operations performed in Danish slaughterhouse facilities. Our aim is to reveal the applicability of off-the-shelf components and programming platforms to the trimming and boning process for pork bellies. The AR technology has demonstrated lucrative applications in industrial QA procedures and even farm management applications (Wu, Xiao & Guo, 2013 appear to benefit from applying the technology. With the ever-increasing turnover of labour in the meat industry, we investigate here the application of AR-assisted production procedures as a potential management tool and support tool to assist a novice operator in a specific trimming operation. The case study concerns the trimming and cutting of pork bellies, a widely used and versatile procedure in the Danish pork meat industry. Many similar belly products made from similar raw materials are exported to specific customers and markets. Due to biological variability between pigs, final products are produced with variability in yield, despite the fact that the final product qualities are similar. The best management option is to use the correct raw material for each product, thus generating fewer by-products and increasing the volume/weight of the final product. The application of AR to the cutting operation appears to increase the production yield; however, the operators need training in order to benefit fully from the efficiency and capacity of the application rather than adopting the standard procedure of oral communication of instructions.

  14. Augmented Reality Cues and Elderly Driver Hazard Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Mark C.; Rusch, Michelle L.; Lee, John D.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Thomas, Geb; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effectiveness of augmented reality (AR) cues in improving driving safety in elderly drivers who are at increased crash risk due to cognitive impairments. Background Cognitively challenging driving environments pose a particular crash risk for elderly drivers. AR cueing is a promising technology to mitigate risk by directing driver attention to roadway hazards. This study investigates whether AR cues improve or interfere with hazard perception in elderly drivers with age-related cognitive decline. Methods Twenty elderly (Mean= 73 years, SD= 5 years), licensed drivers with a range of cognitive abilities measured by a speed of processing (SOP) composite participated in a one-hour drive in an interactive, fixed-base driving simulator. Each participant drove through six, straight, six-mile-long rural roadway scenarios following a lead vehicle. AR cues directed attention to potential roadside hazards in three of the scenarios, and the other three were uncued (baseline) drives. Effects of AR cueing were evaluated with respect to: 1) detection of hazardous target objects, 2) interference with detecting nonhazardous secondary objects, and 3) impairment in maintaining safe distance behind a lead vehicle. Results AR cueing improved the detection of hazardous target objects of low visibility. AR cues did not interfere with detection of nonhazardous secondary objects and did not impair ability to maintain safe distance behind a lead vehicle. SOP capacity did not moderate those effects. Conclusion AR cues show promise for improving elderly driver safety by increasing hazard detection likelihood without interfering with other driving tasks such as maintaining safe headway. PMID:23829037

  15. Augmented reality in healthcare education: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Egui; Hadadgar, Arash; Masiello, Italo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effective development of healthcare competencies poses great educational challenges. A possible approach to provide learning opportunities is the use of augmented reality (AR) where virtual learning experiences can be embedded in a real physical context. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art in terms of user acceptance, the AR applications developed and the effect of AR on the development of competencies in healthcare. Methods. We conducted an integrative review. Integrative reviews are the broadest type of research review methods allowing for the inclusion of various research designs to more fully understand a phenomenon of concern. Our review included multi-disciplinary research publications in English reported until 2012. Results. 2529 research papers were found from ERIC, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science and Springer-link. Three qualitative, 20 quantitative and 2 mixed studies were included. Using a thematic analysis, we’ve described three aspects related to the research, technology and education. This study showed that AR was applied in a wide range of topics in healthcare education. Furthermore acceptance for AR as a learning technology was reported among the learners and its potential for improving different types of competencies. Discussion. AR is still considered as a novelty in the literature. Most of the studies reported early prototypes. Also the designed AR applications lacked an explicit pedagogical theoretical framework. Finally the learning strategies adopted were of the traditional style ‘see one, do one and teach one’ and do not integrate clinical competencies to ensure patients’ safety. PMID:25071992

  16. [Potentials of monocular augmented reality technology in automobile production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmeier, J; Cucera, A; Fritzsche, L; Brau, H; Duthweiler, M; Lang, G K

    2007-07-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technologies can enrich the real environment with visual data, which has potential benefits for optimising the operator's working process. It offers the possibility to provide context-sensitive information independently of the user's location and position. Data are presented to the dominant eye on a semi-transparent mirror using a head-mounted display (HMD) unit that works with retinal laser technology. In this study the potential benefits and drawbacks of this new AR technology were evaluated. 45 participants without any visual impairment were randomly assigned to 3 groups and completed a variety of tasks during a simulated working day. Group 1 received conventional working aids (paper-based documents) to support the task processing. Group 2 additionally wore an HMD unit that was switched off. Group 3 wore a functioning HMD without any additional aids. Evaluation was carried out by means of a standardised questionnaire (BMS) and a concentration test ("d2 Aufmerksamkeits-Belastungs-Test"). No significant differences between the 3 groups were found in terms of mental strain, concentration-test performance and physical or mental complaints reported in a follow-up interview. Around 20 % of the subjects noticed a higher pressure and blurred vision in both eyes as well as headaches. Half of the participants complained about deficiencies concerning the ergonomic hardware design of the AR system. Changes in objective ophthalmological investigation parameters were not observed. Subjects reported reduced acceptance of the HMD based on non-ophthalmological reasons, for example, the weight of the unit or the length of the cable. However, for some specific working tasks, advantages in process optimisation and operator support were observed.

  17. Augmented reality in healthcare education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Egui; Hadadgar, Arash; Masiello, Italo; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effective development of healthcare competencies poses great educational challenges. A possible approach to provide learning opportunities is the use of augmented reality (AR) where virtual learning experiences can be embedded in a real physical context. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art in terms of user acceptance, the AR applications developed and the effect of AR on the development of competencies in healthcare. Methods. We conducted an integrative review. Integrative reviews are the broadest type of research review methods allowing for the inclusion of various research designs to more fully understand a phenomenon of concern. Our review included multi-disciplinary research publications in English reported until 2012. Results. 2529 research papers were found from ERIC, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science and Springer-link. Three qualitative, 20 quantitative and 2 mixed studies were included. Using a thematic analysis, we've described three aspects related to the research, technology and education. This study showed that AR was applied in a wide range of topics in healthcare education. Furthermore acceptance for AR as a learning technology was reported among the learners and its potential for improving different types of competencies. Discussion. AR is still considered as a novelty in the literature. Most of the studies reported early prototypes. Also the designed AR applications lacked an explicit pedagogical theoretical framework. Finally the learning strategies adopted were of the traditional style 'see one, do one and teach one' and do not integrate clinical competencies to ensure patients' safety.

  18. Augmented reality in healthcare education: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egui Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effective development of healthcare competencies poses great educational challenges. A possible approach to provide learning opportunities is the use of augmented reality (AR where virtual learning experiences can be embedded in a real physical context. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art in terms of user acceptance, the AR applications developed and the effect of AR on the development of competencies in healthcare.Methods. We conducted an integrative review. Integrative reviews are the broadest type of research review methods allowing for the inclusion of various research designs to more fully understand a phenomenon of concern. Our review included multi-disciplinary research publications in English reported until 2012.Results. 2529 research papers were found from ERIC, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science and Springer-link. Three qualitative, 20 quantitative and 2 mixed studies were included. Using a thematic analysis, we’ve described three aspects related to the research, technology and education. This study showed that AR was applied in a wide range of topics in healthcare education. Furthermore acceptance for AR as a learning technology was reported among the learners and its potential for improving different types of competencies.Discussion. AR is still considered as a novelty in the literature. Most of the studies reported early prototypes. Also the designed AR applications lacked an explicit pedagogical theoretical framework. Finally the learning strategies adopted were of the traditional style ‘see one, do one and teach one’ and do not integrate clinical competencies to ensure patients’ safety.

  19. Smart Glasses for Neurosurgical Navigation by Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Watanabe, Eiju; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Kuniaki; Kumakiri, Atsushi; Noguchi, Akio; Nagane, Motoo; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-24

    Wearable devices with heads-up displays or smart glasses can overlay images onto the sight of the wearer. This technology has never been applied to surgical navigation. To assess the applicability and accuracy of smart glasses for augmented reality (AR)-based neurosurgical navigation. Smart glasses were applied to AR-based neurosurgical navigation. Three-dimensional computer graphics were created based on preoperative magnetic resonance images and visualized in see-through smart glasses. Optical markers were attached to the smart glasses and the patient's head for accurate navigation. Two motion capture cameras were used for registration and continuous monitoring of the location of the smart glasses in relation to the patient's head. After the accuracy was assessed with a phantom, this technique was applied in 2 patients with brain tumors located in the brain surface. A stereoscopic view by image overlay through the smart glasses was successful in the phantom and in both patients. Hands-free neuronavigation inside the operative field was available from any angles and distances. The targeting error in the phantom measured in 75 points ranged from 0.2 to 8.1 mm (mean 3.1 ± 1.9 mm, median 2.7 mm). The intraoperative targeting error between the visualized and real locations in the 2 patients (measured in 40 points) ranged from 0.6 to 4.9 mm (mean 2.1 ± 1.1 mm, median 1.8 mm). Smart glasses enabled AR-based neurosurgical navigation in a hands-free fashion. Stereoscopic computer graphics of targeted brain tumors corresponding to the surgical field were clearly visualized during surgery.

  20. Fireballs in the Sky: An Augmented Reality Citizen Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Fireballs in the Sky is an innovative Australian citizen science program that connects the public with the research of the Desert Fireball Network (DFN). This research aims to understand the early workings of the solar system, and Fireballs in the Sky invites people around the world to learn about this science, contributing fireball sightings via a user-friendly augmented reality mobile app. Tens of thousands of people have downloaded the app world-wide and participated in the science of meteoritics. The Fireballs in the Sky app allows users to get involved with the Desert Fireball Network research, supplementing DFN observations and providing enhanced coverage by reporting their own meteor sightings to DFN scientists. Fireballs in the Sky reports are used to track the trajectories of meteors - from their orbit in space to where they might have landed on Earth. Led by Phil Bland at Curtin University in Australia, the Desert Fireball Network (DFN) uses automated observatories across Australia to triangulate trajectories of meteorites entering the atmosphere, determine pre-entry orbits, and pinpoint their fall positions. Each observatory is an autonomous intelligent imaging system, taking 1000 by 36 megapixel all-sky images throughout the night, using neural network algorithms to recognize events. They are capable of operating for 12 months in a harsh environment, and store all imagery collected. We developed a completely automated software pipeline for data reduction, and built a supercomputer database for storage, allowing us to process our entire archive. The DFN currently stands at 50 stations distributed across the Australian continent, covering an area of 2.5 million square kilometers. Working with DFN's partners at NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, the team is expanding the network beyond Australia to locations around the world. Fireballs in the Sky allows a growing public base to learn about and participate in this exciting research.

  1. Augmented reality using ultra-wideband radar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam; Koenig, Francois; Sherbondy, Kelly

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has been investigating the utility of ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology for detecting concealed targets in various applications. We have designed and built a vehicle-based, low-frequency UWB SAR radar for proof-of-concept demonstration in detecting obstacles for autonomous navigation, detecting concealed targets (mines, etc.), and mapping internal building structures to locate enemy activity. Although the low-frequency UWB radar technology offers valuable information to complement other technologies due to its penetration capability, it is very difficult to comprehend the radar imagery and correlate the detection list from the radar with the objects in the real world. Using augmented reality (AR) technology, we can superimpose the information from the radar onto the video image of the real world in real-time. Using this, Soldiers would view the environment and the superimposed graphics (SAR imagery, detection locations, digital map, etc.) via a standard display or a head-mounted display. The superimposed information would be constantly changed and adjusted for every perspective and movement of the user. ARL has been collaborating with ITT Industries to implement an AR system that integrates the video data captured from the real world and the information from the UWB radar. ARL conducted an experiment and demonstrated the real-time geo-registration of the two independent data streams. The integration of the AR sub-system into the radar system is underway. This paper presents the integration of the AR and SAR systems. It shows results that include the real-time embedding of the SAR imagery and other information into the video data stream.

  2. Evaluating the Effect on User Perception and Performance of Static and Dynamic Contents Deployed in Augmented Reality Based Learning Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Mauricio Hincapié; Díaz, Christian Andrés; Moreno, Gustavo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of technology to improve teaching and learning experiences in the classroom has been promoted. One of these technologies is augmented reality, which allows overlaying layers of virtual information on real scene with the aim of increasing the perception that user has of reality. Augmented reality has proved to offer several…

  3. Laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training in medical students as assessed by augmented reality simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Fujita, Isturo; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Fujikura, Terumichi; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-11-01

    Definitive assessment of laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training is best obtained during an actual operation. However, this is impossible in medical students. Therefore, we developed an alternative assessment technique using an augmented reality simulator. Nineteen medical students completed a 6-week training program using a virtual reality simulator (LapSim). The pretest and post-test were performed using an object-positioning module and cholecystectomy on an augmented reality simulator(ProMIS). The mean performance measures between pre- and post-training on the LapSim were compared with a paired t-test. In the object-positioning module, the execution time of the task (P reality simulator improved the operative skills of medical students as objectively evaluated by assessment using an augmented reality simulator instead of an actual operation. We hope that these findings help to establish an effective training program for medical students. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Augmented reality in the surgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: technique assessment and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Bijlenga, Philippe; Schaller, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Augmented reality technology has been used for intraoperative image guidance through the overlay of virtual images, from preoperative imaging studies, onto the real-world surgical field. Although setups based on augmented reality have been used for various neurosurgical pathologies, very few cases have been reported for the surgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVM). We present our experience with AVM surgery using a system designed for image injection of virtual images into the operating microscope's eyepiece, and discuss why augmented reality may be less appealing in this form of surgery. N = 5 patients underwent AVM resection assisted by augmented reality. Virtual three-dimensional models of patients' heads, skulls, AVM nidi, and feeder and drainage vessels were selectively segmented and injected into the microscope's eyepiece for intraoperative image guidance, and their usefulness was assessed in each case. Although the setup helped in performing tailored craniotomies, in guiding dissection and in localizing drainage veins, it did not provide the surgeon with useful information concerning feeder arteries, due to the complexity of AVM angioarchitecture. The difficulty in intraoperatively conveying useful information on feeder vessels may make augmented reality a less engaging tool in this form of surgery, and might explain its underrepresentation in the literature. Integrating an AVM's hemodynamic characteristics into the augmented rendering could make it more suited to AVM surgery.

  5. Mixing realities? An application of augmented reality for the treatment of cockroach phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, C M; Juan, M C; Baños, R M; Alcañiz, M; Guillén, V; Rey, B

    2005-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) refers to the introduction of virtual elements in the real world. That is, the person is seeing an image composed of a visualization of the real world, and a series of virtual elements that, at that same moment, are super-imposed on the real world. The most important aspect of AR is that the virtual elements supply to the person relevant and useful information that is not contained in the real world. AR has notable potential, and has already been used in diverse fields, such as medicine, the army, coaching, engineering, design, and robotics. Until now, AR has never been used in the scope of psychological treatment. Nevertheless, AR presents various advantages. Just like in the classical systems of virtual reality, it is possible to have total control over the virtual elements that are super-imposed on the real world, and how one interacts with those elements. AR could involve additional advantages; on one side it could be less expensive since it also uses the real world (this does not need to be modeled), and it could facilitate the feeling of presence (the sensation of being there), and reality judgment (the fact of judging the experience as real) of the person since the environment he or she is in, and what he or she is seeing is, in fact the "reality." In this paper, we present the data of the first case study in which AR has been used for the treatment of a specific phobia, cockroaches phobia. It addresses a system of AR that permits exposure to virtual cockroaches super-imposed on the real world. In order to carry out the exposure, the guidelines of Ost with respect to "one-session treatment" were followed. The results are promising. The participant demonstrated notable fear and avoidance in the behavioral avoidance test before the treatment, and not only was an important decrease in the scores of fear and avoidance observed after the treatment, but also the participant was capable of approaching, interacting, and killing live

  6. Augmented Reality Experience: From High-Resolution Acquisition to Real Time Augmented Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Clini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a research project “dUcale” that experiments ICT solutions for the museum of Palazzo Ducale (Urbino. In this project, the famed painting the “Città Ideale” becomes a case to exemplify a specific approach to the digital mediation of cultural heritage. An augmented reality (AR mobile application, able to enhance the museum visit experience, is presented. The computing technologies involved in the project (websites, desktop and social applications, mobile software, and AR constitute a persuasive environment for the artwork knowledge. The overall goal of our research is to provide to cultural institutions best practices efficiently on low budgets. Therefore, we present a low cost method for high-resolution acquisition of paintings; the image is used as a base in AR approach. The proposed methodology consists of an improved SIFT extractor for real time image. The other novelty of this work is the multipoint probabilistic layer. Experimental results demonstrated the robustness of the proposed approach with extensive use of the AR application in front of the “Città Ideale” painting. To prove the usability of the application and to ensure a good user experience, we also carried out several users tests in the real scenario.

  7. LOCATIVE MEDIA INTERVENTIONISM – A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR CRITICAL REVIEW OF AUGMENTED REALITY APPLICATIONS IN THE PARTICIPATORY SPATIAL DESIGN CONTEXT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Khan; Lian Loke

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers an analytical framework for a critical review of augmented reality visualisations in the domain of participatory spatial design in general and Participatory Architecture in particular...

  8. Augmented reality in neurovascular surgery: feasibility and first uses in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten-Oertel, Marta; Gerard, Ian; Drouin, Simon; Mok, Kelvin; Sirhan, Denis; Sinclair, David S; Collins, D Louis

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this report is to present a prototype augmented reality (AR) intra-operative brain imaging system. We present our experience of using this new neuronavigation system in neurovascular surgery and discuss the feasibility of this technology for aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs). We developed an augmented reality system that uses an external camera to capture the live view of the patient on the operating room table and to merge this view with pre-operative volume-rendered vessels. We have extensively tested the system in the laboratory and have used the system in four surgical cases: one aneurysm, two AVMs and one AVF case. The developed AR neuronavigation system allows for precise patient-to-image registration and calibration of the camera, resulting in a well-aligned augmented reality view. Initial results suggest that augmented reality is useful for tailoring craniotomies, localizing vessels of interest, and planning resection corridors. Augmented reality is a promising technology for neurovascular surgery. However, for more complex anomalies such as AVMs and AVFs, better visualization techniques that allow one to distinguish between arteries and veins and determine the absolute depth of a vessel of interest are needed.

  9. A New Hybrid Approach for Augmented Reality Maintenance in Scientific Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Martínez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance in scientific facilities is a difficult issue, especially in large and hazardous facilities, due to the complexity of tasks and equipment. Augmented reality is a technology that has already shown great promise in the maintenance field. With the help of augmented reality applications, maintenance tasks can be carried out faster and more safely. The problem with current applications is that they are small-scale prototypes that do not easily scale to large facility maintenance applications. This paper presents a new hybrid approach that enables the creation of augmented reality maintenance applications for large and hazardous scientific facilities. In this paper, a new augmented reality marker and the algorithm for its recognition is proposed. The performance of the algorithm is verified in three test cases, showing promising results in two of them. Improvements in robustness in the third test case in which the camera is moving quickly or when light conditions are extreme are subject to further studies. The proposed new approach will be integrated into an existing augmented reality maintenance system.

  10. A novel augmented reality system for displaying inferior alveolar nerve bundles in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Fei; Chai, Gang; Pan, Jun J; Jiang, Taoran; Lin, Li; Xin, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-02-15

    Augmented reality systems can combine virtual images with a real environment to ensure accurate surgery with lower risk. This study aimed to develop a novel registration and tracking technique to establish a navigation system based on augmented reality for maxillofacial surgery. Specifically, a virtual image is reconstructed from CT data using 3D software. The real environment is tracked by the augmented reality (AR) software. The novel registration strategy that we created uses an occlusal splint compounded with a fiducial marker (OSM) to establish a relationship between the virtual image and the real object. After the fiducial marker is recognized, the virtual image is superimposed onto the real environment, forming the "integrated image" on semi-transparent glass. Via the registration process, the integral image, which combines the virtual image with the real scene, is successfully presented on the semi-transparent helmet. The position error of this navigation system is 0.96 ± 0.51 mm. This augmented reality system was applied in the clinic and good surgical outcomes were obtained. The augmented reality system that we established for maxillofacial surgery has the advantages of easy manipulation and high accuracy, which can improve surgical outcomes. Thus, this system exhibits significant potential in clinical applications.

  11. A novel augmented reality system for displaying inferior alveolar nerve bundles in maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Fei; Chai, Gang; Pan, Jun J.; Jiang, Taoran; Lin, Li; Xin, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality systems can combine virtual images with a real environment to ensure accurate surgery with lower risk. This study aimed to develop a novel registration and tracking technique to establish a navigation system based on augmented reality for maxillofacial surgery. Specifically, a virtual image is reconstructed from CT data using 3D software. The real environment is tracked by the augmented reality (AR) software. The novel registration strategy that we created uses an occlusal splint compounded with a fiducial marker (OSM) to establish a relationship between the virtual image and the real object. After the fiducial marker is recognized, the virtual image is superimposed onto the real environment, forming the “integrated image” on semi-transparent glass. Via the registration process, the integral image, which combines the virtual image with the real scene, is successfully presented on the semi-transparent helmet. The position error of this navigation system is 0.96 ± 0.51 mm. This augmented reality system was applied in the clinic and good surgical outcomes were obtained. The augmented reality system that we established for maxillofacial surgery has the advantages of easy manipulation and high accuracy, which can improve surgical outcomes. Thus, this system exhibits significant potential in clinical applications. PMID:28198442

  12. Feasibility of Augmented Reality in Clinical Simulations: Using Google Glass With Manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaballout, Basil; Molloy, Margory; Vaughn, Jacqueline; Brisson Iii, Raymond; Shaw, Ryan

    2016-03-07

    Studies show that students who use fidelity-based simulation technology perform better and have higher retention rates than peers who learn in traditional paper-based training. Augmented reality is increasingly being used as a teaching and learning tool in a continual effort to make simulations more realistic for students. The aim of this project was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using augmented reality via Google Glass during clinical simulation scenarios for training health science students. Students performed a clinical simulation while watching a video through Google Glass of a patient actor simulating respiratory distress. Following participation in the scenarios students completed two surveys and were questioned if they would recommend continued use of this technology in clinical simulation experiences. We were able to have students watch a video in their field of vision of a patient who mimicked the simulated manikin. Students were overall positive about the implications for being able to view a patient during the simulations, and most students recommended using the technology in the future. Overall, students reported perceived realism with augmented reality using Google Glass. However, there were technical and usability challenges with the device. As newer portable and consumer-focused technologies become available, augmented reality is increasingly being used as a teaching and learning tool to make clinical simulations more realistic for health science students. We found Google Glass feasible and acceptable as a tool for augmented reality in clinical simulations.

  13. Affine-representation- based Calibrationfree Augmented Reality Using Image-based Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Can; Ma, Lizhuang

    2005-01-01

    Affine-representation-based calibrationfree augmented reality avoids the complicated measurements and calibration of the camera and renders virtual objects without any metric information, thus provides better usability over traditional augmented reality systems. However, the lack of metric information makes lighting computation impossible. In this paper, a novel image-based approach is proposed to simulate the lighting effect on the virtual object. The approach requires a preprocess phase in which the source images are made, and in rendering phase, the source images are selected according to the camera viewing direction. This approach provides virtual objects rendered under affine-based calibration-free augmented reality systems with a 3-D look and feel, and thus will improve the quality of the video output and the user experience under such systems.

  14. Usability engineering for augmented reality: employing user-based studies to inform design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Joseph L; Swan, J Edward

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge, and thus opportunity, in the field of human-computer interaction and specifically usability engineering is designing effective user interfaces for emerging technologies that have no established design guidelines or interaction metaphors or introduce completely new ways for users to perceive and interact with technology and the world around them. Clearly, augmented reality is one such emerging technology. We propose a usability engineering approach that employs user-based studies to inform design, by iteratively inserting a series of user-based studies into a traditional usability engineering lifecycle to better inform initial user interface designs. We present an exemplar user-based study conducted to gain insight into how users perceive text in outdoor augmented reality settings and to derive implications for design in outdoor augmented reality. We also describe lessons learned from our experiences conducting user-based studies as part of the design process.

  15. Face Detection for Augmented Reality Application Using Boosting-based Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Hbali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality has gained an increasing research interest over the few last years. Customers requirements have become more intense and more demanding, the need of the different industries to re-adapt their products and enhance them by recent advances in the computer vision and more intelligence has become a necessary. In this work we present a marker-less augmented reality application that can be used and expanded in the e-commerce industry. We take benefit of the well known boosting techniques to train and evaluate different face detectors using the multi-block local binary features. The work purpose is to select the more relevant training parameters in order to maximize the classification accuracy. Using the resulted face detector, the position of the face will serve as a marker in the proposed augmented reality.

  16. PEMBUATAN MOBILE TOUR GUIDE MUSEUM SANGIRAN DENGAN AUGMENTED REALITY BERBASIS MARKERLESS TRACKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fendi Aji Purnomo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Museum Purbakala Sangiran merupakan salah satu museum yang menyimpan benda purbakala. Digitalisasi objek purbakala merupakan salah satu usaha pelestarian yang dilakukan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk melakukan digitalisasi informasi benda-benda purbakala di ruang pamer Museum Sangiran dengan menggunakan teknologi Augmented reality berbasis Android. Metodologi penelitian dalam pengembangan Augmented reality untuk Mobile Guide Museum Sangiran menggunakan metode waterfall, yaitu tahap analisis, perancangan, desain & script, serta pengujian dilakukan melalui survey kuisioner. Analisis pengujian aplikasi terhadap daya tarik pengunjung dilakukan berbasis angket kuisioner dengan skala butir pertanyaan menggunakan skala Likert dengan skala 6. Hasil analisis berupa validitas dan realibilitas menghasilkan alpha cronbach 0,97 sehingga semua butir pertanyaan dinyatakan valid dan reliable. Tanggapan responden terhadap aplikasi Mobile Guide Museum Sangiran bernilai setuju-sangat setuju diwujudkan dalam 5 aspek yaitu ketertarikan terhadap aplikasi 93%, kemudahan mendapatkan informasi 97%, kemudahan navigasi 100%, interaktifitas aplikasi 94%, dan inovasi aplikasi 97%. Kata kunci: benda purbakala, markerless, mobile augmented reality.

  17. Emerging technology in surgical education: combining real-time augmented reality and wearable computing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Brent A; Menendez, Mariano E; Oladeji, Lasun O; Fryberger, Charles T; Dantuluri, Phani K

    2014-11-01

    The authors describe the first surgical case adopting the combination of real-time augmented reality and wearable computing devices such as Google Glass (Google Inc, Mountain View, California). A 66-year-old man presented to their institution for a total shoulder replacement after 5 years of progressive right shoulder pain and decreased range of motion. Throughout the surgical procedure, Google Glass was integrated with the Virtual Interactive Presence and Augmented Reality system (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama), enabling the local surgeon to interact with the remote surgeon within the local surgical field. Surgery was well tolerated by the patient and early surgical results were encouraging, with an improvement of shoulder pain and greater range of motion. The combination of real-time augmented reality and wearable computing devices such as Google Glass holds much promise in the field of surgery. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Fiia: A Model-Based Approach to Engineering Collaborative Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher; Smith, J. David; Phillips, W. Greg; Graham, T. C. Nicholas

    Augmented reality systems often involve collaboration among groups of people. While there are numerous toolkits that aid the development of such augmented reality groupware systems (e.g., ARToolkit and Groupkit), there remains an enormous gap between the specification of an AR groupware application and its implementation. In this chapter, we present Fiia, a toolkit which simplifies the development of collaborative AR applications. Developers specify the structure of their applications using the Fiia modeling language, which abstracts details of networking and provides high-level support for specifying adapters between the physical and virtual world. The Fiia.Net runtime system then maps this conceptual model to a runtime implementation. We illustrate Fiia via Raptor, an augmented reality application used to help small groups collaboratively prototype video games.

  19. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14deg, 28deg, and 47deg) were examined to determine their effect on subjects ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  20. Extending the Tracking Distance of Fiducial Markers for Large Indoor Augmented Reality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RABBI, I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Marker-based tracking systems provide fast, accurate and real-time tracking solution for controlled indoor augmented reality applications. Due to the short tracking distance of marker-based technique, this approach is rarely used in large indoor augmented reality applications. This paper presents the design and implementation of a new layered marker that extends the tracking distance to large environment. A step by step procedure is given to design a layered marker for any large indoor environment. The tracking method of the designed marker is presented for accurate results in a specific environment. The method of designing and tracking layered marker is demonstrated using a standard toolkit framework. The results produced while evaluating the layered marker reveal that this marker extends the tracking distance to large indoor augmented reality applications.