WorldWideScience

Sample records for video students discover

  1. Improving Web-Based Student Learning Through Online Video Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott; Redman, S.

    2010-01-01

    Students in online courses continue to lag their peers in comparable face-to-face (F2F) courses (Ury 2004, Slater & Jones 2004). A meta-study of web-based vs. classroom instruction by Sitzmann et al (2006) discovered that the degree of learner control positively influences the effectiveness of instruction: students do better when they are in control of their own learning. In particular, web-based courses are more effective when they incorporate a larger variety of instructional methods. To address this need, we developed a series of online videos to demonstrate various astronomical concepts and provided them to students enrolled in an online introductory astronomy course at Penn State University. We found that the online students performed worse than the F2F students on questions unrelated to the videos (t = -2.84), but that the online students who watched the videos performed better than the F2F students on related examination questions (t = 2.11). We also found that the online students who watched the videos performed significantly better than those who did not (t = 3.43). While the videos in general proved helpful, some videos were more helpful than others. We will discuss our thoughts on why this might be, and future plans to improve upon this study. These videos are freely available on iTunesU, YouTube, and Google Video.

  2. College Student Video Gaming and Parental Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chue, Maechi

    2011-01-01

    Video gaming is prevalent among college students, and researchers have documented negative consequences from some students' excessive video gaming, but the study of past and current parental influence on college student video gaming is limited. This study collected data from college students from several Midwestern U.S. universities using an…

  3. Video Creation: A Tool for Engaging Students to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Students today process information very differently than those of previous generations. They are used to getting their news from 140-character tweets, being entertained by You-Tube videos, and Googling everything. Thus, traditional passive methods of content delivery do not work well for many of these millennials. All students, regardless of career goals, need to become scientifically literate to be able to function in a world where scientific issues are of increasing importance. Those who have had experience applying scientific reasoning to real-world problems in the classroom will be better equipped to make informed decisions in the future. The problem to be solved is how to present scientific content in a manner that fosters student learning in today's world. This presentation will describe how the appeal of technology and social communication via creation of documentary-style videos has been used to engage students to learn scientific concepts in a university non-science major course focused on energy and the environment. These video projects place control of the learning experience into the hands of the learner and provide an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills. Students discover how to locate scientifically reliable information by limiting searches to respected sources and synthesize the information through collaborative content creation to generate a "story". Video projects have a number of advantages over research paper writing. They allow students to develop collaboration skills and be creative in how they deliver the scientific content. Research projects are more effective when the audience is larger than just a teacher. Although our videos are used as peer-teaching tools in the classroom, they also are shown to a larger audience in a public forum to increase the challenge. Video will be the professional communication tool of the future. This presentation will cover the components of the video production process and instructional lessons

  4. Using Video Game Design to Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael A.; Jones, Brett D.; Akalin, Sehmuz

    2017-01-01

    Because video games are so popular with young people, researchers have explored ways to use game play to engage students in school subjects (Peppler & Kafai, 2007; Rockwell & Kee, 2011; Small, 2011). Motivating students in science is especially important because of declines both in the number of young people who choose science careers and…

  5. Student Perceptions of Online Tutoring Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sligar, Steven R.; Pelletier, Christopher D.; Bonner, Heidi Stone; Coghill, Elizabeth; Guberman, Daniel; Zeng, Xiaoming; Newman, Joyce J.; Muller, Dorothy; Dennis, Allen

    2017-01-01

    Online tutoring is made possible by using videos to replace or supplement face to face services. The purpose of this research was to examine student reactions to the use of lecture capture technology in a university tutoring setting and to assess student knowledge of some features of Tegrity lecture capture software. A survey was administered to…

  6. Virtual communities in a secondary school – Discovering the internal grammar of video games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to show how the creation of an innovative scenario, introducing video games and online communities as educational resources in the classroom, facilitates the development of new literacies in the context of participatory culture. The experience described was carried out during the 2010-2011 academic year in a secondary school located in Madrid. The workshop was organized using a social simulation video game, The Sims 3, and the online community Play and Learn, created specifically for this project. From an ethnographic perspective, the article focuses mainly on analyzing what happened outside the game sessions, when the students became involved in the online community after interacting with the game in the classroom. The fact that they participated in a virtual conversational space (through a forum serves to support the game and encourage reflection from all participants. The results show that social relationships were developed within the online community, where individual contributions proved especially important for group discussion. Participation made it possible for students to become aware of the speech and rules of the game and to improve the acquisition process of new literacies.

  7. Commentary: discovering a different model of medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Traditional medical schools in modern academic health centers make discoveries, create new knowledge and technology, provide innovative care to the sickest patients, and educate future academic and practicing physicians. Unfortunately, the growth of the research and clinical care missions has sometimes resulted in a loss of emphasis on the general professional education of medical students. The author concludes that it may not be practical for many established medical schools to functionally return to the reason they were created: for the education of medical students.He had the opportunity to discover a different model of medical student education at the first new MD-granting medical school created in the United States in 25 years (in 2000), the Florida State University College of Medicine. He was initially skeptical about how its distributed regional campuses model, using practicing primary care physicians to help medical students learn in mainly ambulatory settings, could be effective. But his experience as a faculty member at the school convinced him that the model works very well.He proposes a better alignment of form and function for many established medical schools and an extension of the regional community-based model to the formation of community-based primary care graduate medical education programs determined by physician workforce needs and available resources.

  8. Interactive Video Courseware for Graphic Communications Teachers and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mark

    1985-01-01

    At Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, interactive video serves both as an instructional tool and a project for creative students in graphic communications. The package facilitates courseware development and teaches students simultaneously about microcomputer and video technology. (SK)

  9. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  10. Letting students discover the power, and the limits, of simple models: Coulomb's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohacek, Peter; Vonk, Matthew; Dill, Joseph; Boehm, Emma

    2017-09-01

    The inverse-square law pops up all over. It's a simplified model of reality that describes light, sound, gravity, and static electricity. But when it's brought up in class, students are often just handed the equations. They rarely have an opportunity to discover Coulomb's law or Newton's law of gravitation for themselves. It's not hard to understand why. A quantitative demonstration of Coulomb's law can be difficult. The forces are smaller than many force sensors can measure and static electricity tends to be finicky. In addition, off-the-shelf units are expensive or difficult to use. As a result, many instructors skip this lab in favor of qualitative demonstrations or simulations. Adolf Cortel sought to remedy this by designing a straightforward experiment for measuring Coulomb's law using charged metalized-glass spheres (Christmas ornaments) and an electronic balance. Building on Cortel's design, we've made a series of video-based experiments that students can use to discover the relationships that underlie electric force.

  11. Can student-produced video transform university teaching?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    as preparation for the two week intensive field course. The overall objective of the redesign was to modernize and improve the quality of the students learning experience, by exploring the potentials of video and online tools to create flexible, student-centered and student-activating education. The student...... produced three types of videos during the course: Video 1 was independently produced by the students, guided by online tasks and instructions. These videos were student produced learning material, showing cases from all over Europe. The videos was collected and presented in a "visual database" in Google...

  12. Denying humanness to others: a newly discovered mechanism by which violent video games increase aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; McLatchie, Neil

    2011-05-01

    Past research has provided abundant evidence that playing violent video games increases aggressive behavior. So far, these effects have been explained mainly as the result of priming existing knowledge structures. The research reported here examined the role of denying humanness to other people in accounting for the effect that playing a violent video game has on aggressive behavior. In two experiments, we found that playing violent video games increased dehumanization, which in turn evoked aggressive behavior. Thus, it appears that video-game-induced aggressive behavior is triggered when victimizers perceive the victim to be less human.

  13. The Use of a Performance Assessment for Identifying Gifted Lebanese Students: Is DISCOVER Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance- based assessment in identifying gifted Lebanese students. The sample consisted of 248 students (121 boys, 127 girls) from Grades 3-5 at two private schools in Beirut, Lebanon. Students were administered DISCOVER and the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices…

  14. Effective Educational Videos: Principles and Guidelines for Maximizing Student Learning from Video Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational videos have become an important part of higher education, providing an important content-delivery tool in many flipped, blended, and online classes. Effective use of video as an educational tool is enhanced when instructors consider three elements: how to manage cognitive load of the video; how to maximize student engagement with the video; and how to promote active learning from the video. This essay reviews literature relevant to each of these principles and suggests practical ways instructors can use these principles when using video as an educational tool. PMID:27789532

  15. Virtual Communities in a Secondary School--Discovering the Internal Grammar of Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Laura; García-Pernía, María Ruth; Cortés, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to show how the creation of an innovative scenario, introducing video games and online communities as educational resources in the classroom, facilitates the development of new literacies in the context of participatory culture. The experience described was carried out during the 2010-2011 academic year in a secondary school…

  16. Streaming Video to Enhance Students' Reflection in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Wildschut, Liesbeth; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation case study that describes the experiences of 15 students and 2 teachers using a video-based learning environment, DiViDU, to facilitate students' daily reflection activities in a composition course and a ballet course. To support dance students' reflection processes streaming video was applied as follows: video…

  17. The Student Video Productions Handbook. A Guide to Planning and Teaching Student Video Productions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Michael; Walker, Bob, Ed.

    This handbook provides novice video production teachers with a basic course outline containing information, activities, and lessons for use with high school students in an introductory television course. The contents are divided into five major sections: (1) before class begins, (2) preproduction, (3) production, (4) postproduction, and (5) the…

  18. Geoscience Videos and Their Role in Supporting Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggen, Jennifer; McDonnell, David

    2017-01-01

    A series of short (5 to 7 minutes long) geoscience videos were created to support student learning in a flipped class setting for an introductory geology class at North Carolina State University. Videos were made using a stylus, tablet, microphone, and video editing software. Essentially, we narrate a slide, sketch a diagram, or explain a figure…

  19. Using Video Modeling and Video Prompting to Teach Core Academic Content to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Edwards, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are constantly searching for evidence-based practices that are effective in teaching academic skills to students with learning disabilities (LD). Video modeling (VM) and video prompting have become popular instructional interventions for many students across a wide range of different disability classifications, including those with…

  20. Discovering Student Web Usage Profiles Using Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alice; Belo, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, Web based platforms are quite common in any university, supporting a very diversified set of applications and services. Ranging from personal management to student evaluation processes, Web based platforms are doing a great job providing a very flexible way of working, promote student enrolment, and making access to academic information…

  1. Medical students' perceptions of video-linked lectures and video-streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mattick

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Video-linked lectures allow healthcare students across multiple sites, and between university and hospital bases, to come together for the purposes of shared teaching. Recording and streaming video-linked lectures allows students to view them at a later date and provides an additional resource to support student learning. As part of a UK Higher Education Academy-funded Pathfinder project, this study explored medical students' perceptions of video-linked lectures and video-streaming, and their impact on learning. The methodology involved semi-structured interviews with 20 undergraduate medical students across four sites and five year groups. Several key themes emerged from the analysis. Students generally preferred live lectures at the home site and saw interaction between sites as a major challenge. Students reported that their attendance at live lectures was not affected by the availability of streamed lectures and tended to be influenced more by the topic and speaker than the technical arrangements. These findings will inform other educators interested in employing similar video technologies in their teaching.Keywords: video-linked lecture; video-streaming; student perceptions; decisionmaking; cross-campus teaching.

  2. Online Video Modules for Improvement in Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Matthew; Thomas, Sunil; Kohli, Chiranjeev

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this teaching innovation was to incorporate a comprehensive set of short online video modules covering key topics from the undergraduate principles of marketing class, and to evaluate its effectiveness in improving student learning. A quasiexperimental design was used to compare students who had access to video modules with a…

  3. Using Online Video to Support Student Learning and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Pamela; Shea, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Online videos are used increasingly in higher education teaching as part of the explosion of Web 2.0 tools that are now available. YouTube is one popular example of a video-sharing resource that both faculty and students can use effectively, both inside and outside of the classroom, to engage students in their learning, energize classroom…

  4. Explaining Student Behavior at Scale : The Influence of Video Complexity on Student Dwelling Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der F.; Ginn, J.H.; Zee, van der T.; Haywood, J.; Aleven, V.; Kay, J.; Roll, I.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding why and how students interact with educational videos is essential to further improve the quality of MOOCs. In this paper, we look at the complexity of videos to explain two related aspects of student behavior: the dwelling time (how much time students spend watching a video) and the

  5. Student use of flipped classroom videos in a therapeutics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanwala, Asad E; Erstad, Brian L; Murphy, John E

    To evaluate the extent of student use of flipped classroom videos. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a college of pharmacy therapeutics course in the Unites States. In one section of the course (four sessions) all content was provided in the form of lecture videos that students had to watch prior to class. Class time was spent discussing patient cases. For half of the sessions, there was an electronic quiz due prior to class. The outcome measure was video view time in minutes. Adequate video view time was defined as viewing ≥75% of total video duration. Video view time was compared with or without quizzes using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There were 100 students in the class and all were included in the study. Overall, 74 students had adequate video view time prior to session 1, which decreased to 53 students for session 2, 53 students for session 3, and 36 students for session 4. Median video view time was greater when a quiz was required [80 minutes (IQR: 38-114) versus 69 minutes (IQR: 3-105), p flipped classroom is low and decreases with time. Preparation is higher when there is a quiz required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Student-generated instructional videos facilitate learning through positive emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Pirhonen, Juhani; Rasi, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    The central focus of this study is a learning method in which university students produce instructional videos about the content matter as part of their learning process, combined with other learning assignments. The rationale for this is to promote a more multimodal pedagogy, and to provide students opportunities for a more learner-centred, motivating, active, engaging and productive role in their learning process. As such we designed a ‘video course’ where the students needed to produce an ...

  7. Incidence of and sequels to medical problems discovered in medical students during study-related activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, J; Boendermaker, PM; Muntinghe, H

    2003-01-01

    Purpose Students often act as subjects during practical and clinical skills training sessions. This routine seems to be quite acceptable for them but may present side-effects. Disorders, sometimes of a serious nature, have been discovered in medical students during clinical skills training. Because

  8. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Discover and Deliver Change for Surgical Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabai, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine efficacious teaching-learning strategies that community college stakeholders employ that enhance surgical technology student outcomes. Knowles's adult learning theory, constructivist theory, and appreciative inquiry served as the theoretical foundation for this study. Discovering effective aspects and…

  9. Student-Generated Instructional Videos Facilitate Learning through Positive Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Juhani; Rasi, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    The central focus of this study is a learning method in which university students produce instructional videos about the content matter as part of their learning process, combined with other learning assignments. The rationale for this is to promote a more multimodal pedagogy, and to provide students opportunities for a more learner-centred,…

  10. Using Video Effectively in Diverse Classes: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Anthony; Budde-Sung, Amanda E. K.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an exploratory study into the perceptions of a culturally and linguistically diverse cohort of management students (n = 236) about the use of video as a teaching and learning tool. The results show that while students are generally favorable toward audiovisual materials, the choice of content, how the medium…

  11. The Video Toaster Meets Science + English + At-Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryess, Charlie

    1992-01-01

    Describes an experimental Science-English class for at-risk students which was team taught and used technology--particularly a Video Toaster (a videotape editing machine)--as a motivator. Discusses procedures for turning videotape taken on field trips into three- to five-minute student productions on California's water crisis. (SR)

  12. Students Designing Video Games about Immunology: Insights for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Neda; Sheridan, Kimberly; Williams, Asia; Clark, Kevin; Stegman, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Exposing American K-12 students to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content is a national initiative. Game Design Through Mentoring and Collaboration targets students from underserved communities and uses their interest in video games as a way to introduce science, technology, engineering, and math topics. This article describes a…

  13. Digital Video as a Personalized Learning Assignment: A Qualitative Study of Student Authored Video Using the ICSDR Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurie O.; Cox, Thomas D.

    2018-01-01

    Students within this study followed the ICSDR (Identify, Conceptualize/Connect, Storyboard, Develop, Review/Reflect/Revise) development model to create digital video, as a personalized and active learning assignment. The participants, graduate students in education, indicated that following the ICSDR framework for student-authored video guided…

  14. Is Pluto a planet? Student powered video rap ';battle' over tiny Pluto's embattled planetary standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisser, K.; Cruikshank, D. P.; McFadden, T.

    2013-12-01

    Is Pluto a planet? Some creative low income Bay-area middle-schoolers put a musical spin on this hot science debate with a video rap ';battle' over tiny Pluto's embattled planetary standing. The students' timing was perfect, with NASA's New Horizons mission set to conduct the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moons in July 2015. Pluto - the last of the nine original planets to be explored by spacecraft - has been the subject of scientific study and speculation since Clyde Tombaugh discovered it in 1930, orbiting the Sun far beyond Neptune. Produced by the students and a very creative educator, the video features students 'battling' back and forth over the idea of Pluto being a planet. The group collaborated with actual space scientists to gather information and shot their video before a 'green screen' that was eventually filled with animations and visuals supplied by the New Horizons mission team. The video debuted at the Pluto Science Conference in Maryland in July 2013 - to a rousing response from researchers in attendance. The video marks a nontraditional approach to the ongoing 'great planet debate' while educating viewers on a recently discovered region of the solar system. By the 1990s, researchers had learned that Pluto possessed multiple exotic ices on its surface, a complex atmosphere and seasonal cycles, and a large moon (Charon) that likely resulted from a giant impact on Pluto itself. It also became clear that Pluto was no misfit among the planets - as had long been thought - but the largest and brightest body in a newly discovered 'third zone' of our planetary system called the Kuiper Belt. More recent observations have revealed that Pluto has a rich system of satellites - five known moons - and a surface that changes over time. Scientists even speculate that Pluto may possess an internal ocean. For these and other reasons, the 2003 Planetary Decadal Survey ranked a Pluto/Kuiper Belt mission as the highest priority mission for NASA's newly created

  15. Investigating Students' Use and Adoption of "With-Video Assignments": Lessons Learnt for Video-Based Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Ilias O.; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mikalef, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The use of video-based open educational resources is widespread, and includes multiple approaches to implementation. In this paper, the term "with-video assignments" is introduced to portray video learning resources enhanced with assignments. The goal of this study is to examine the factors that influence students' intention to adopt…

  16. Structured student-generated videos for first-year students at a dental school in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hanan; Khan, Saad A; Toh, Chooi G

    2013-05-01

    Student-generated videos provide an authentic learning experience for students, enhance motivation and engagement, improve communication skills, and improve collaborative learning skills. This article describes the development and implementation of a student-generated video activity as part of a knowledge, observation, simulation, and experience (KOSE) program at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It also reports the students' perceptions of an activity that introduced first-year dental students (n=44) to clinical scenarios involving patients and dental team aiming to improve professional behavior and communication skills. The learning activity was divided into three phases: preparatory phase, video production phase, and video-watching. Students were organized into five groups and were instructed to generate videos addressing given clinical scenarios. Following the activity, students' perceptions were assessed with a questionnaire. The results showed that 86 percent and 88 percent, respectively, of the students agreed that preparation of the activity enhanced their understanding of the role of dentists in provision of health care and the role of enhanced teamwork. In addition, 86 percent and 75 percent, respectively, agreed that the activity improved their communication and project management skills. Overall, the dental students perceived that the student-generated video activity was a positive experience and enabled them to play the major role in driving their learning process.

  17. Video Game Playing and Academic Performance in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen R.; Stermer, Steven Paul; Burgess, Melinda C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The relations between media consumption, especially TV viewing, and school performance have been extensively examined. However, even though video game playing may have replaced TV viewing as the most frequent form of media usage, relatively little research has examined its relations to school performance, especially in older students. We surveyed…

  18. Teaching Bioethics via the Production of Student-Generated Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Christopher J. R.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that science is not conducted in a vacuum and that advances in the biosciences have ethical and social implications for the wider community. An exercise is described in which undergraduate students work in teams to produce short videos about the science and ethical dimensions of current developments in biomedicine.…

  19. Case Study: Student-Produced Videos for the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes a way of building a library of student-produced videos to use in the flipped classroom.

  20. Motivational Videos and the Library Media Specialist: Teachers and Students on Film--Take 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohot, Cameron Brooke; Pfortmiller, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Today's students are bombarded with digital imagery and sound nearly 24 hours of the day. Video use in the classroom is engaging, and a teacher can instantly grab her students' attention. The content of the videos comes from many sources; the curriculum, the student handbook, and even the school rules. By creating the videos, teachers are not only…

  1. Students Perceptions about the Use of Video Games in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgonjon, Jeroen; Valcke, Martin; Soetaert, Ronald; Schellens, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Video games are often regarded as promising teaching and learning tools for the 21st century. One of the main arguments is that video games are appealing to contemporary students. However, there are indications that video game acceptance cannot be taken for granted. In this study, a path model to examine and predict student acceptance of video…

  2. The Effects of Video Self-Modeling on High School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Szu-Yin; Baker, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Video self-modeling has been proven to be effective with other populations with challenging behaviors, but only a few studies of video self-modeling have been conducted with high school students with emotional and behavioral disorders. This study aimed to focus on analyzing the effects of video self-modeling on four high school students with…

  3. Exploring physics students' engagement with online instructional videos in an introductory mechanics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Aiken, John M.; Seaton, Daniel T.; Douglas, Scott S.; Greco, Edwin F.; Thoms, Brian D.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of new educational technologies has stimulated interest in using online videos to deliver content in university courses. We examined student engagement with 78 online videos that we created and were incorporated into a one-semester flipped introductory mechanics course at the Georgia Institute of Technology. We found that students were more engaged with videos that supported laboratory activities than with videos that presented lecture content. In particular, the percentage of students accessing laboratory videos was consistently greater than 80% throughout the semester. On the other hand, the percentage of students accessing lecture videos dropped to less than 40% by the end of the term. Moreover, the fraction of students accessing the entirety of a video decreases when videos become longer in length, and this trend is more prominent for the lecture videos than the laboratory videos. The results suggest that students may access videos based on perceived value: students appear to consider the laboratory videos as essential for successfully completing the laboratories while they appear to consider the lecture videos as something more akin to supplemental material. In this study, we also found that there was little correlation between student engagement with the videos and their incoming background. There was also little correlation found between student engagement with the videos and their performance in the course. An examination of the in-video content suggests that students engaged more with concrete information that is explicitly required for assignment completion (e.g., actions required to complete laboratory work, or formulas or mathematical expressions needed to solve particular problems) and less with content that is considered more conceptual in nature. It was also found that students' in-video accesses usually increased toward the embedded interaction points. However, students did not necessarily access the follow-up discussion of these

  4. Student Video Viewing Habits in an Online Mechanics of Materials Engineering Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Dale Hildebrand

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the video viewing habits of students in a sophomore-level, online Mechanics of Materials (MoM course offered in Spring 2017 and how those habits affected student course grades. Data on student engagement and viewership were collected from a MoM course through a learning management system. This data was compared with length of videos, video content, and video types. With viewership being the focus of the study, it was determined that student engagement decreased over the semester, the content of a video affected its viewership, and viewing rates fluctuated depending on the exam. The other finding was that an increase in viewership tended to indicate an improvement in students’ grades. While the videos are an effective means of improving students’ course grade, changes could be made to improve the videos and increase engagement.

  5. Effects of Video Streaming Technology on Public Speaking Students' Communication Apprehension and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupagne, Michel; Stacks, Don W.; Giroux, Valerie Manno

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether video streaming can reduce trait and state communication apprehension, as well as improve communication competence, in public speaking classes. Video streaming technology has been touted as the next generation of video feedback for public speaking students because it is not limited by time or space and allows Internet…

  6. Video Modeling and Observational Learning to Teach Gaming Access to Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Amy D.; Gast, David L.; Knight, Victoria F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both video modeling and observational learning to teach age-appropriate recreation and leisure skills (i.e., accessing video games) to students with autism spectrum disorder. Effects of video modeling were evaluated via a multiple probe design across participants and criteria for mastery were based on…

  7. Using Progressive Video Prompting to Teach Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability to Shoot a Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Burk, Bradley; Burk, Bradley; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of a modified video prompting procedure, namely progressive video prompting, to increase technique accuracy of shooting a basketball in the school gymnasium of three 11th-grade students with moderate intellectual disability. The intervention involved participants viewing video clips of an adult model who…

  8. Using Focus Groups to Develop a Nutrition Education Video for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delores C. S.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Frazee, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Study used focus group interviews with ninth graders to help develop a nutrition education video and teacher's guide for Florida high schools. Students believed a video would be successful, expressed interest in 10 nutrition topics, recommended using teen actors with varying body types, and suggested no more than three or four topics per video.…

  9. Viewer Discussion is Advised. Video Clubs Focus Teacher Discussion on Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. van Es

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Video is being used widely in professional development. Yet, little is known about how to design video-based learning environments that are productive for teacher learning. One promising model is a video club (Sherin, 2000. Video clubs bring teachers together to view and analyze video segments from one another’s classrooms. The idea is that by watching and discussing video segments focused on student thinking, teachers will learn practices for identifying and analyzing noteworthy student thinking during instruction and can use what they learn to inform their instructional decisions. This paper addresses issues to consider when setting up a video club for teacher education, such as defining goals for using video, establishing norms for viewing and discussing one another’s teaching, selecting clips for analysis, and facilitating teacher discussions. Si consiglia la discussione tra osservatori. Nei Video Club gli insegnanti mettono a fuoco le modalità con cui gli studenti apprendono.Il video è stato ampiamente utilizzato per la formazione professionale. Tuttavia poche sono le conoscenze relative alla progettazione di ambienti di apprendimento basati su video che siano efficaci per la formazione degli insegnanti. Un modello promettente è il “video club” (Sherin, 2000. Video club uniscono insegnanti che guardano ed analizzano insieme segmenti video delle proprie rispettive classi. L'idea è che gli insegnanti, guardando e discutendo segmenti video centrati sul pensiero degli alunni, imparino ad adottare durante l’insegnamento pratiche d'identificazione e analisi di pensieri degli alunni degni di nota e possano poi utilizzare ciò che hanno imparato nelle decisioni didattiche. Questo articolo affronta le questioni da considerare quando si configura un video club per la formazione degli insegnanti, come ad esempio la definizione di obiettivi per l'utilizzo dei video, le norme per la visione e discussione dei rispettivi video, la selezione

  10. Learning About Energy Resources Through Student Created Video Documentaries in the University Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2010-12-01

    Students enrolled in an undergraduate non-science majors’ Energy Perspectives course created 10-15 minute video documentaries on topics related to Energy Resources and the Environment. Video project topics included wave, biodiesel, clean coal, hydro, solar and “off-the-grid” energy technologies. No student had any prior experience with creating video projects. Students had Liberal Arts academic backgrounds that included Anthropology, Theater Arts, International Studies, English and Early Childhood Education. Students were required to: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write a narrative, 4) construct a project storyboard, 5) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 6) record the narrative, and 7) construct the video documentary. This study describes the instructional approach of using student created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors’ science course. Two knowledge survey instruments were used for assessment purposes. Each instrument was administered Pre-, Mid- and Post course. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries. Results showed students acquired enhanced technology skills especially with regard to research techniques, writing skills and video editing. The second survey assessed students’ content knowledge acquired from each documentary. Results indicated students’ increased their content knowledge of energy resource topics. Students reported very favorable evaluations concerning their experience with creating “Ken Burns” video project documentaries.

  11. Student Interactions with Online Videos in a Large Hybrid Mechanics of Materials Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Benjamin; Bir, Devayan D.

    2018-01-01

    The hybrid course format has gained popularity in the engineering education community over the past few years. Although studies have examined student outcomes and attitudes toward hybrid courses, a limited number of studies have examined how students interact with online videos in hybrid courses. This study examined the video-viewing behaviors of…

  12. The Effect of Music Videos on College Students' Perceptions of Rape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Melinda C. R.; Burpo, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    This paper examined the effect of sexualized portrayals of female artists in music videos on college students' perceptions of date rape. 132 college students were randomly assigned to view a music video that contained either high or low levels of sexuality and sexual objectification and were then asked to rate the guilt of the male in a scenario…

  13. Enhancing Students' Speaking Skills through "Kunci Inggris" Videos in Islamic Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlangga, Rifqi Aulia

    2016-01-01

    Personal ability of a teacher when integrated with good learning material will make his students get more involved and absorb teaching material better hence improving their foreign language. There are many materials may be used to teach, one of them is videos. The video is expected to trigger students' enthusiasm and improve their motivation. Even…

  14. Students' Acceptance of an Educational Videos Platform: A Study in A Portuguese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carolina; Alvelos, Helena; Teixeira, Leonor

    2018-01-01

    The Educast is an educational videos' platform that captures simultaneously video and digital support materials. This paper presents a study on the acceptance of Educast, by students, using the Technology Acceptance Model--TAM. The data was collected through a questionnaire applied to 54 students which results were analyzed using descriptive…

  15. Effects of Commercial Web Videos on Students' Attitude toward Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yaming; Ting, Yu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study values the broad range of web videos produced by businesses to introduce new technologies while also promoting their products. When the promoted technology is related to the topic taught in a school course, it may be beneficial for students to watch such videos. However, most students view the web as a source for entertainment, and may…

  16. The Effect of Digital Video Games on EFL Students' Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the effect of a commercial digital video game on high school students' language learning motivation. Participants were 241 male students randomly assigned to one of the following three treatments: Readers, who intensively read the game's story; Players, who played the digital video game; and Watchers, who watched two classmates…

  17. Effects of a Brief Video Intervention on White University Students' Racial Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soble, Jason R.; Spanierman, Lisa B.; Liao, Hsin-Ya

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of a brief video intervention on the racial attitudes of White university students. One hundred thirty-eight self-identified White students were randomly assigned to either an experimental condition in which they viewed a video documenting the pervasiveness of institutional racism and White privilege in the…

  18. The Effect of Music in Video Mediated Instruction on Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabi, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study of secondary school students in Nigeria to determine whether use of musical accompaniment on videotape recordings used in instruction of economic geography had any effects on students' learning. Results offer inconclusive differences in effect between video instruction accompanied by music and video instruction without music.…

  19. Effect of 3D animation videos over 2D video projections in periodontal health education among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhulipalla, Ravindranath; Marella, Yamuna; Katuri, Kishore Kumar; Nagamani, Penupothu; Talada, Kishore; Kakarlapudi, Anusha

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence about the distinguished effect of 3D oral health education videos over conventional 2 dimensional projections in improving oral health knowledge. This randomized controlled trial was done to test the effect of 3 dimensional oral health educational videos among first year dental students. 80 first year dental students were enrolled and divided into two groups (test and control). In the test group, 3D animation and in the control group, regular 2D video projections pertaining to periodontal anatomy, etiology, presenting conditions, preventive measures and treatment of periodontal problems were shown. Effect of 3D animation was evaluated by using a questionnaire consisting of 10 multiple choice questions given to all participants at baseline, immediately after and 1month after the intervention. Clinical parameters like Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), and Oral Hygiene Index Simplified (OHI-S) were measured at baseline and 1 month follow up. A significant difference in the post intervention knowledge scores was found between the groups as assessed by unpaired t-test (p3D animation videos are more effective over 2D videos in periodontal disease education and knowledge recall. The application of 3D animation results also demonstrate a better visual comprehension for students and greater health care outcomes.

  20. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Won; Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2014-03-21

    Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources.

  1. The Effects of Instructional Design on Student Engagement with Video Lectures at Cyber Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Costley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The number of students enrolled in online courses that use video lectures is on the rise. However, research shows that the number of students watching video lectures is low, and the number watching videos to completion is even lower. Background: This paper seeks to understand this problem by looking for correlations between instructional design and student engagement with video lectures. Methodology: Students at a cyber-university in South Korea (n=1801 were surveyed on their perception of the instructional design used in the courses they took and their engagement with online video lectures. Contribution: This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by demonstrating positive correlations between instructional design, watching, and finishing video lectures. Findings: While most other research has found low levels of online lecture viewership, this paper found significantly higher numbers watching and finishing videos. Other major findings of the paper are that five key elements of instructional design for online learning environments (designing methods, setting the curriculum, establishing time parameters, establishing netiquette, and utilizing the medium effectively all correlated positively with students watching and finishing video lectures. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: Based on findings in this paper, it is recommended that practitioners consider taking actions when designing their instruction for online courses. These include batching their video lectures together by topic, devoting greater resources to helping students utilize the medium, and communicate time parameters in a way that encourages students to view video lectures in a timely manner. Recommendation for Researchers: As the watching of video lectures in this study was mandatory for learners, an interesting area of further research would be to examine whether that decision led to higher numbers of students watching them. Future Research: It is important for

  2. Do medical students watch video clips in eLearning and do these facilitate learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2007-06-01

    There is controversial evidence of the impact of individual learning style on students' performance in computer-aided learning. We assessed the association between the use of multimedia materials, such as video clips, and collaborative communication tools with learning outcome among medical students. One hundred and twenty-one third-year medical students attended a course in medical informatics (0.7 credits) consisting of lectures, small group sessions and eLearning material. The eLearning material contained six learning modules with integrated video clips and collaborative learning tools in WebCT. Learning outcome was measured with a course exam. Approximately two-thirds of students (68.6%) viewed two or more videos. Female students were significantly more active video-watchers. No significant associations were found between video-watching and self-test scores or the time used in eLearning. Video-watchers were more active in WebCT; they loaded more pages and more actively participated in discussion forums. Video-watching was associated with a better course grade. Students who watched video clips were more active in using collaborative eLearning tools and achieved higher course grades.

  3. An ethnographic approach to studying the student experience: The student perspective through free form video diaries. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Cashmore

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a longitudinal project, in its third year, involving free-form video diaries by undergraduate students, reflecting on aspects of their experience that are significant to them. Sixty four students, from three cohorts, have been given video cameras and they return regular (weekly short videos covering whatever is important to them. Focus group sessions enable discussion of specific issues. We have coded video data so that we, and others, will be able to draw on it. The data provides insight, from the student perspective, into many issues including friendships, induction, assessment, modes of study, teamwork etc. As an example, we will present some of our findings in relation to academic and social transitions experienced by students throughout their first year. However, a key question is how can we make this rich resource of video data available so that it can inform a wider range of studies across the international higher education community?

  4. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human anatomy and physiology to student nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Rabab El-Sayed Hassan El-Sayed; Samar El-Hoseiny Abd El-Raouf El-Sayed

    2013-01-01

    Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses. Data were collected from 27 students in a Bachelor of Nursing program and experimental control was achieved using an alternating-treatments design. Overall, students experienced 10 lecture...

  5. Design and Evaluation of Health Literacy Instructional Video for Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Santanello, PhD; Lakesha M Butler, PharmD, BCPS; Radhika Devraj, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To describe the development of a health literacy video tailored for pharmacy students. 2) To compare the use of a health literacy video as an instructional method to a previously used health literacy instructional strategy by using both and: a) assessing pharmacy students' perceptions of their ability to communicate with low health literacy patients and b) assessing pharmacy students' perceptions of their overall understanding of the role of health literacy in a pharmacy settin...

  6. Student learning outcomes associated with video vs. paper cases in a public health dentistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Pickrell, Jacqueline E; Riedy, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Educational technologies such as video cases can improve health professions student learning outcomes, but few studies in dentistry have evaluated video-based technologies. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes associated with video and paper cases used in an introductory public health dentistry course. This was a retrospective cohort study with a historical control group. Based on dual coding theory, the authors tested the hypotheses that dental students who received a video case (n=37) would report better affective, cognitive, and overall learning outcomes than students who received a paper case (n=75). One-way ANOVA was used to test the hypotheses across ten cognitive, two affective, and one general assessment measures (α=0.05). Students in the video group reported a significantly higher overall mean effectiveness score than students in the paper group (4.2 and 3.3, respectively; p<0.001). Video cases were also associated with significantly higher mean scores across the remaining twelve measures and were effective in helping students achieve cognitive (e.g., facilitating good discussions, identifying public health problems, realizing how health disparities might impact their future role as dentists) and affective (e.g., empathizing with vulnerable individuals, appreciating how health disparities impact real people) goals. Compared to paper cases, video cases significantly improved cognitive, affective, and overall learning outcomes for dental students.

  7. Evaluating Student Self-Assessment through Video-Recorded Patient Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Tammy R; Kearney, Rachel C; Kissell, Denise; Salisbury, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if the use of a video-recorded clinical session affects the accuracy of dental hygiene student self-assessment and dental hygiene instructor feedback. A repeated measures experiment was conducted. The use of the ODU 11/12 explorer was taught to students and participating faculty through video and demonstration. Students then demonstrated activation of the explorer on a student partner using the same technique. While faculty completed the student assessment in real time, the sessions were video recorded. After completing the activation of the explorer, students and faculty completed an assessment of the student's performance using a rubric. A week later, both students and faculty viewed the video of the clinical skill performance and reassessed the student's performance using the same rubric. The student videos were randomly assigned a number, so faculty reassessed the performance without access to the student's identity or the score that was initially given. Twenty-eight students and 4 pre-clinical faculty completed the study. Students' average score was 4.68±1.16 on the first assessment and slightly higher 4.89±1.45 when reviewed by video. Faculty average scores were 5.07±2.13 at the first assessment and 4.79±2.54 on the second assessment with the video. No significant differences were found between the differences in overall scores, there was a significant difference in the scores of the grading criteria compared to the expert assessment scores (p=0.0001). This pilot study shows that calibration and assessment without bias in education is a challenge. Analyzing and incorporating new techniques can result in more exact assessment of student performance and self-assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  9. Video Game Addiction among High School Students in Hordaland; Prevalence and Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Bjordal, Sunniva Alsvik; Skumsnes, Toril; Ørland, Anette

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of video game addiction among high school students (N = 531) in Hordaland county, Norway. Video game addiction measured by the Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents was estimated both by a monothetic and a polythetic format. The prevalence was found to be 2.5% and 12.5%, respectively. Regression analyses were conducted where video game addiction comprised the dependent variable. Demographic variables, depression, anxiety, lone...

  10. Is Video Podcast Supplementation as a Learning Aid Beneficial to Dental Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalludi, Shivananda; Punja, Dhiren; Rao, Raghavendra; Dhar, Murali

    2015-12-01

    Podcasting has recently emerged as an important information technology tool for health professionals. Podcasts can be viewed online or downloaded to a user computer or a handheld multimedia device like a portable MP3 player, smart phone and tablet device. The principal advantage of the podcast is that the presentation of information need not be linked with any particular time or location. Since students are familiar with newer technology tools and may be using it on a regular basis, video podcast could serve as a convenient tool for students to help remember both conceptual and factual information. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitude of first year dental students towards video podcast supplementation and to assess the efficacy of video podcast as a teaching aid in comparison to text book reading. First year dental students were recruited for this study. A didactic lecture class was conducted for the students (n=100). The students were then randomly divided into two groups. Students present in group A (n=46) underwent a video podcast session followed by a multiple choice question test. This was followed by student feedback to assess the usefulness of video podcast. Students belonging to group B (n=54) had a study session for 20 minutes followed by the MCQ test. Students then underwent the video podcast session followed by feedback to assess the utility of video podcast. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to compare the difference in the median MCQ score between the two groups. The findings revealed a significant gain in the median MCQ score in the intervention group (group A) when compared to control group (Group B). In the feedback form, 89% of students agreed that the video podcast might be useful as it would enable them to view slides and hear the lectures repeatedly. Students who underwent the video podcast session performed significantly better in the MCQ test compared to students who underwent text book reading alone. This demonstrates an

  11. EMPOWERING STUDENTS OF INTERNATIONAL CLASS PROGRAMIAIN SALATIGA IN THE PRODUCTION OF PRAYING TUTORIAL VIDEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifqi Aulia Erlangga

    2017-02-01

    responses from students. They feel that by watching the video and see the audio and visual movements of the prayer contained in the video can make them able to remember more clearly how to do praying, especially for praying that is not done everyday.

  12. Snapshots of Student Thinking: An Exploration of Video Cases for Extending Prospective Teachers' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Mariano, Gina J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the relationships between prospective teachers' content knowledge, student understanding, and pedagogy using video cases. The emphasis was on the extent to which the participants utilized constructs of Technology Pedagogy And Content Knowledge. Ten prospective teachers viewed video cases of students…

  13. Incorporating Video Modeling into a School-Based Intervention for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kaitlyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Video modeling is an intervention strategy that has been shown to be effective in improving the social and communication skills of students with autism spectrum disorders, or ASDs. The purpose of this tutorial is to outline empirically supported, step-by-step instructions for the use of video modeling by school-based speech-language…

  14. Patient Demonstration Videos in Predoctoral Endodontic Education: Aspects Perceived as Beneficial by Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Hadeel Y; Ohlin, Johan; Ahlquist, Michael; Tessma, Mesfin K; Zary, Nabil

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the perceived benefits of video-mediated demonstrations in learning endodontics. Participants in the study were 75 third-year students enrolled in the undergraduate dentistry program at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. After the endodontic preclinical course, the students were introduced to the treatment protocol in the clinic by watching two live patient-demonstrated videos. The first video demonstrated how to communicate with the patient and perform diagnosis and root canal instrumentation. The second video illustrated how to perform bacterial sampling and root canal filling. After the students watched each video, a questionnaire was used to evaluate their opinions about various steps of the endodontic treatment protocol and the benefit of such educational material for their practice. Of the total 75 students, 72 completed the first questionnaire (96% response rate), and 65 completed the second questionnaire (87% response rate). The results showed that the students perceived high value in the video demonstrations related to treatment procedure. A statistically significant difference was observed between the perceived benefits of the first and second sessions in communication and treatment procedure (p<0.001). Further studies are needed to assess improvement in the design and delivery format for video demonstrations to enhance their effectiveness as a teaching modality for endodontics.

  15. How Much Does Student Engagement with Videos and Forums in a MOOC Affect Their Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafini, Fernanda Cesar; Chae, Chungil; Park, Eunsung; Jablokow, Kathryn Weed

    2017-01-01

    Engagement in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is based on students who self-organize their participation according to their own goals and interests. Visual materials such as videos and discussion forums are basic ways of engaging students in MOOCs. Student achievement in MOOCs is typically measured using assessments distributed throughout the…

  16. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video…

  17. Lens on Climate Change: Making Climate Meaningful through Student-Produced Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Anne U.; Oonk, David J.; Smith, Lesley; Boykoff, Maxwell T.; Osnes, Beth; Sullivan, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Learning about climate change is tangible when it addresses impacts that can be observed close to home. In this program, sixty-four diverse middle and high school students produced videos about locally relevant climate change topics. Graduate and undergraduate students provided mentorship. The program engaged students in research and learning…

  18. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered…

  19. Video Modeling and Prompting: A Comparison of Two Strategies for Teaching Cooking Skills to Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Bouck, Emily C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Flanagan, Sara M.; Bassette, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Self-operated video prompting and video modeling was compared when used by three secondary students with mild intellectual disabilities as they completed novel recipes during cooking activities. Alternating between video systems, students completed twelve recipes within their classroom kitchen. An alternating treatment design with a follow-up and…

  20. The Effectiveness of Streaming Video on Medical Student Learning: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bridge, Patrick D.; Jackson, Matt; Robinson, Leah

    2009-01-01

    Information technology helps meet today’s medical students’ needs by providing multiple curriculum delivery methods. Video streaming is an e-learning technology that uses the Internet to deliver curriculum while giving the student control of the content’s delivery. There have been few studies conducted on the effectiveness of streaming video in medical schools. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted using three groups of students (n_1736) to determine if the availability of streaming vide...

  1. Practicality in Virtuality: Finding Student Meaning in Video Game Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Timothy; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual differences between video game learning and traditional classroom and laboratory learning. It explores the notion of virtual experience by comparing a commonly used high school laboratory protocol on DNA extraction with a similar experience provided by a biotechnology themed video game. When considered conceptually, the notion of virtual experience is not limited to those experiences generated by computer aided technology, as with a video game or computer simulation. The notion of virtuality can apply to many real world experiences as well. It is proposed that the medium of the learning experience, be it video game or classroom, is not an important distinction to consider; instead, we should seek to determine what kinds of meaningful experiences apply for both classrooms and video games.

  2. Promoting retention, enabling success: Discovering the potential of student support circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Janice; Walters, Caroline; Toohill, Jocelyn; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Retention of students is critical to education programs and future workforce. A mixed methods study evaluated student engagement within a Bachelor of Midwifery program and connection with career choice through participation in student support circles. Centred on the Five Senses of Success Framework (sense of capability, purpose, identity, resourcefulness and connectedness) and including four stages of engagement (creating space, preparing self, sharing stories, focused conversations), the circles support and develop student and professional identity. Of 80 students 43 (54%) provided responses to a two item survey assessed against a five point Likert scale to determine utility. Using a nominal group technique, student's voices gave rich insight into the personal and professional growth that participation in the student support circles provided. Evaluated as helpful to first year students in orientating to university study and early socialisation into the profession, the circles appear to influence the development of a strong sense of professional identity and personal midwifery philosophy based on the relational nature of the midwife being with woman rather than doing midwifery. This suggests that student support circles positively influence perceptions and expectations, contributing to a shared sense of purpose and discipline connection, for enhancing student retention and future workforce participation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Use of video cases in clinical education is rarely used systematically. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical students (n = 127) reported by questionnaire whether they had or had not seen a bedside case of each of 22 specific clinical conditions during their five-week clinical course...... the intervention, this share was 75% (218/289) (p = 0.06). Furthermore, internal as well as external examiners found video cases valuable, but the use of videos did not change the average examination grade. CONCLUSION: A video case supplement to teaching in clinical paediatrics was considered to be of value...... for teaching. We were successful in establishing an educational resource that students considered useful. Internal and external examiners found that a short video case was a valuable supplementary tool during the oral examination. FUNDING: The University of Copenhagen funded the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION...

  4. Discovering How Students Search a Library Web Site: A Usability Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Susan; Greene, Courtney

    2002-01-01

    Discusses results of a usability study at the University of Illinois Chicago that investigated whether Internet search engines have influenced the way students search library Web sites. Results show students use the Web site's internal search engine rather than navigating through the pages; have difficulty interpreting library terminology; and…

  5. Involving Students in a Collaborative Project to Help Discover Inexpensive, Stable Materials for Solar Photoelectrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunson, Paige N.; Winkler, Gates R.; Winkler, Jay R.; Parkinson, Bruce A.; Christus, Jennifer D. Schuttlefield

    2013-01-01

    In general, laboratory experiments focus on traditional chemical disciplines. While this approach allows students the ability to learn and explore fundamental concepts in a specific area, it does not always encourage students to explore interdisciplinary science. Often little transfer of knowledge from one area to another is observed, as students…

  6. `Discover, Understand, Implement, and Transfer': Effectiveness of an intervention programme to motivate students for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Kerstin; Köller, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Considerable research has focused on how best to satisfy modern societies' needs for skilled labour in the field of science. The present study evaluated an intervention programme designed to increase secondary school students' motivation to pursue a science career. Students from 3 schools of the highest educational track participated for up to 2 years in the intervention programme, which was implemented as an elective in the school curriculum. Our longitudinal study design for evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention programme included all students at the grade levels involved in the programme with students who did not participate serving as a control group. Mixed-model analyses of variance showed none of the intended effects of the intervention programme on science motivation; latent growth models corroborated these results. When the programme began, students who enrolled in the science elective (n = 92) were already substantially more motivated than their classmates (n = 228). Offering such an intervention programme as an elective did not further increase the participating students' science motivation. It seems worthwhile to carry out intervention programmes with talented students who show (comparatively) little interest in science at the outset rather than with highly motivated students who self-select into the programme.

  7. "Discover, Understand, Implement, and Transfer": Effectiveness of an Intervention Programme to Motivate Students for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Kerstin; Köller, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has focused on how best to satisfy modern societies' needs for skilled labour in the field of science. The present study evaluated an intervention programme designed to increase secondary school students' motivation to pursue a science career. Students from 3 schools of the highest educational track participated for up to 2…

  8. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  9. Effects of video modeling on communicative social skills of college students with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rose A; Rispoli, Mandy; Ganz, Jennifer B; Boles, Margot B; Orr, Kristie

    2012-01-01

    Empirical support regarding effective interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within a postsecondary community is limited. Video modeling, an empirically supported intervention for children and adolescents with ASD, may prove effective in addressing the needs of individuals with ASD in higher education. This study evaluated the effects of video modeling without additional treatment components to improve social-communicative skills, specifically, eye contact, facial expression, and conversational turntaking in college students with ASD. This study utilized a multiple baseline single-case design across behaviors for two post-secondary students with ASD to evaluate the effects of the video modeling intervention. Large effect sizes and statistically significant change across all targeted skills for one participant and eye contact and turntaking for the other participant were obtained. The use of video modeling without additional intervention may increase the social skills of post-secondary students with ASD. Implications for future research are discussed.

  10. The effectiveness of streaming video on medical student learning: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Patrick D; Jackson, Matt; Robinson, Leah

    2009-08-19

    Information technology helps meet today's medical students' needs by providing multiple curriculum delivery methods. Video streaming is an e-learning technology that uses the Internet to deliver curriculum while giving the student control of the content's delivery. There have been few studies conducted on the effectiveness of streaming video in medical schools. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted using three groups of students (n = 1736) to determine if the availability of streaming video in Years 1-2 of the basic science curriculum affected overall Step 1 scores for first-time test-takers. The results demonstrated a positive effect on program outcomes as streaming video became more readily available to students. Based on these findings, streaming video technology seems to be a viable tool to complement in-class delivery methods, to accommodate the needs of medical students, and to provide options for meeting the challenges of delivering the undergraduate medical curriculum. Further studies need to be conducted to continue validating the effectiveness of streaming video technology.

  11. Phys FilmMakers: teaching science students how to make YouTube-style videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Rebecca L.; Kuhai, Alvina; Turlej, Laurence Z. J.; Rivlin, Tom; McKemmish, Laura K.

    2018-01-01

    Phys FilmMakers (PFM) is a new type of course in which a science expert and science communicator partner teach physics students how to make YouTube-style videos on cutting-edge scientific research within the university department. Here, we describe this new course, outline its key components and provide recommendations for others considering implementing a similar FilmMakers-style course using feedback from course tutors and students. We discuss successful and less successful teaching techniques as well as use our experience to identify areas that science students in particular often have difficulties: finding an interesting ‘hook’ for the video, imagining creative B-roll and making a succinct video by removing extraneous (though usually correct and often interesting) material. The course has two major components: workshop sessions in which students learn the key elements of film-making and independent video production where PFM students partner with senior PhD or post-doc researchers to produce a video on their research. This partnership with the department means that the videos produced serve not only as interesting ‘edutainment’ to encourage teenagers and young adults into Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths subjects, but also provide valuable outreach for the academic department.

  12. A Walk Down the Red Carpet: Students as Producers of Digital Video-Based Knowledge.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Disengaged and apathetic students are common in many undergraduate classrooms. Learning to these students is a passive process, typified by a consumer-like attitude. One approach to engage students, and enhance the learning experience, is to integrate active learning into the curriculum. The purpose of the pedagogical evaluative study described here was to investigate if student researched, designed and created digital video could act as a viable reusable peer learning resource. Although the ...

  13. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Video Games to Enhance Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Israel, Maya; Beecher, Constance C.; Basham, James D.

    2013-10-01

    Science education video game research points toward promising, but inconclusive results in both student learning outcomes and attitudes. However, student-level variables other than gender have been largely absent from this research. This study examined how students' reading ability level and disability status are related to their video game-playing behaviors outside of school and their perceptions about the use of science video games during school. Thirty-four teachers and 876 sixth- through ninth-grade students from 14 states participated in the study. All student groups reported that they would prefer to learn science from a video game rather than from traditional text, laboratory-based, or Internet environments. Chi-square analyses indicated a significant association between reading ability level, disability status, and key areas of interest including students' use of video games outside of school, their perceptions of their scientific abilities, and whether they would pursue a career in the sciences. Implications of these findings and areas for future research are identified.

  14. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human anatomy and physiology to student nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabab El-Sayed Hassan El-Sayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses. Data were collected from 27 students in a Bachelor of Nursing program and experimental control was achieved using an alternating-treatments design. Overall, students experienced 10 lectures, which delivered by the teacher as either video-based or PowerPoint-based lectures. Results revealed that video-based lectures offer more successes and reduce failures in the immediate and follow-up measures as compared with the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology that was based on printout illustrations, but these differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, nurse students appeared positive about their learning experiences, as they rated highly all the items assessing their acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures. KEYWORDS: Video-based lecture, Traditional, Print-based illustration

  15. Using Student Learning and Development Outcomes to Evaluate a First-Year Undergraduate Group Video Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Johnson, Brady

    2012-01-01

    Students in an interdisciplinary undergraduate introductory course were required to complete a group video project focused on nutrition and healthy eating. A mixed-methods approach to data collection involved observing and rating video footage of group work sessions and individual and focus group interviews. These data were analyzed and used to evaluate the effectiveness of the assignment in light of two student learning outcomes and two student development outcomes at the University of Minnesota. Positive results support the continued inclusion of the project within the course, and recommend the assignment to other programs as a viable means of promoting both content learning and affective behavioral objectives. PMID:22383619

  16. Discovering Reliable Sources of Biochemical Thermodynamic Data to Aid Students' Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Me´ndez, Eduardo; Cerda´, María F.

    2016-01-01

    Students of physical chemistry in biochemical disciplines need biochemical examples to capture the need, not always understood, of a difficult area in their studies. The use of thermodynamic data in the chemical reference state may lead to incorrect interpretations in the analysis of biochemical examples when the analysis does not include relevant…

  17. Positive Psychology in Cross-Cultural Narratives: Mexican Students Discover Themselves While Learning Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Rebecca L.; Cuéllar, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Using the principles of positive psychology and the tools of narrative research, this article focuses on the psychology of five language learners who crossed cultural and linguistic borders. All five were university students learning Chinese in Mexico, and two of them also studied Chinese in China. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze…

  18. Big Data with Small Cases: A Method for Discovering Students Centered Contexts for Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a methodology that could assist teachers in understanding their students' primary needs or interests to decide on the kind of examples or contexts to be used in the classroom. The methodology was tested on 100 volunteers from university (N = 50) and high school (N = 50) in Ankara, Turkey. The participants were asked to write…

  19. Discovering the Theorist in Tupac: How to Engage Your Students with Popular Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenning, Emily

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces creative pedagogical techniques for exploring theory in the undergraduate classroom. Using criminal justice and criminological theories as a primary example, it describes a technique that professors from any theory-driven discipline can use to engage students through popular music, from hip-hop to musical theater in order to…

  20. Teaching physical activities to students with significant disabilities using video modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I; Mizrachi, Sharona V; Sabielny, Linsey M; Jimenez, Eliseo D

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of video modeling on teaching physical activities to three adolescents with significant disabilities. The study implemented a multiple baseline across six physical activities (three per student): jumping rope, scooter board with cones, ladder drill (i.e., feet going in and out), ladder design (i.e., multiple steps), shuttle run, and disc ride. Additional prompt procedures (i.e., verbal, gestural, visual cues, and modeling) were implemented within the study. After the students mastered the physical activities, we tested to see if they would link the skills together (i.e., complete an obstacle course). All three students made progress learning the physical activities, but only one learned them with video modeling alone (i.e., without error correction). Video modeling can be an effective tool for teaching students with significant disabilities various physical activities, though additional prompting procedures may be needed.

  1. Using web-based video to enhance physical examination skills in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orientale, Eugene; Kosowicz, Lynn; Alerte, Anton; Pfeiffer, Carol; Harrington, Karen; Palley, Jane; Brown, Stacey; Sapieha-Yanchak, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Physical examination (PE) skills among U.S. medical students have been shown to be deficient. This study examines the effect of a Web-based physical examination curriculum on first-year medical student PE skills. Web-based video clips, consisting of instruction in 77 elements of the physical examination, were created using Microsoft Windows Moviemaker software. Medical students' PE skills were evaluated by standardized patients before and after implementation of the Internet-based video. Following implementation of this curriculum, there was a higher level of competency (from 87% in 2002-2003 to 91% in 2004-2005), and poor performances on standardized patient PE exams substantially diminished (from a 14%-22%failure rate in 2002-2003, to 4% in 2004-2005. A significant improvement in first-year medical student performance on the adult PE occurred after implementing Web-based instructional video.

  2. Developing Community and Building Knowledge Online Using a Virtual Reality Environment and Student-Created Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.

    2018-01-01

    Within an online science teacher education course, an important although secondary goal was to prepare students for a high-stakes licensure portfolio at some time after course completion. Thus, various communication technologies including synchronous virtual reality meetings and asynchronous student self-created video commentaries were interwoven…

  3. Introducing Statistical Research to Undergraduate Mathematical Statistics Students Using the Guitar Hero Video Game Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramler, Ivan P.; Chapman, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a semester-long project, based on the popular video game series Guitar Hero, designed to introduce upper-level undergraduate statistics students to statistical research. Some of the goals of this project are to help students develop statistical thinking that allows them to approach and answer open-ended research…

  4. Development of Students' Conceptual Thinking by Means of Video Analysis and Interactive Simulations at Technical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockicko, Peter; Krišták, Luboš; Nemec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Video analysis, using the program Tracker (Open Source Physics), in the educational process introduces a new creative method of teaching physics and makes natural sciences more interesting for students. This way of exploring the laws of nature can amaze students because this illustrative and interactive educational software inspires them to think…

  5. Video Review in Self-Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Lucio R.; Das, Rolee Pathak

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a student self-assessment activity of a video-recorded counseling session and evaluate its impact on student self-perceptions of specific communication skills. This activity was incorporated into a core-communications course within the third professional year of a Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Student…

  6. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  7. The Use of Concept Maps in Creating a Short Video with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocsál, Ákos; Tóth, Renáta

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental project in which media students created a short video. The students in groups of 4 or 5 used concept maps for collected their ideas about organizing the project. The analysis of the concept maps revealed that two groups were product-oriented, one group was workflow-oriented, and two groups used…

  8. Using Video Models to Teach Students with Disabilities to Play the Wii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrow, Lauren A.; Spriggs, Amy D.; Knight, Victoria F.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated effects of video modeling (VM) when teaching recreation and leisure skills to three high school students with moderate intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder. Results, evaluated via a multiple probe across participants design, indicated that VM was effective for teaching all students to play the Wii.…

  9. Teaching Psychology to Student Nurses: The Use of "Talking Head" Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Tait, Desiree J. R.; Tait, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Psychology is a central part of undergraduate nursing curricula in the UK. However, student nurses report difficulties recognising the relevance and value of psychology. We sought to strengthen first-year student nurses' application of psychology by developing a set of digital stories based around "Talking Head" video clips where…

  10. Using Web-Based Video as an Assessment Tool for Student Performance in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredricks, Susan; Dudkin, Elizabeth; Kistler, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the potential for using video responses to specific questions as part of the assessment process in an organic chemistry class. These exercises have been used with a postbaccalaureate cohort of 40 students, learning in an online environment, over a period of four years. A second cohort of 25 second-year students taking the…

  11. Leveling Up: Video Games, Development and the Narrated Everyday Experiences of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Vanessa L.

    2016-01-01

    Video games have become an integral part of the day to day lives of many people across gender, race, and age in the United States. They have become particularly important in the college student population, with nearly two thirds of all college students playing on a regular basis (Lee, 2003). While much of the scholarly research in this area…

  12. A video-based learning activity is effective for preparing physiotherapy students for practical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Benjamin K; Horan, Sean A

    2013-12-01

    To examine a video-based learning activity for engaging physiotherapy students in preparation for practical examinations and determine student performance outcomes. Multi-method employing qualitative and quantitative data collection procedures. Tertiary education facility on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Physiotherapy students in their first year of a two-year graduate entry program. Questionnaire-based surveys and focus groups were used to examine student perceptions and satisfaction. Surveys were analysed based on the frequency of responses to closed questions made on a 5-pont Likert scale, while a thematic analysis was performed on focus group transcripts. t-Tests were used to compare student awarded marks and examiner awarded marks and evaluate student performance. Sixty-two physiotherapy students participated in the study. Mean response rate for questionnaires was 93% and eight students (13%) participated in the focus group. Participants found the video resources effective to support their learning (98% positive) and rating the video examples to be an effective learning activity (96% positive). Themes emergent from focus group responses were around improved understanding, reduced performance anxiety, and enjoyment. Students were, however, critical of the predictable nature of the example performances. Students in the current cohort supported by the video-based preparation activity exhibited greater practical examination marks than those from the previous year who were unsupported by the activity (mean 81.6 SD 8.7 vs. mean 78.1 SD 9.0, p=0.01). A video-based learning activity was effective for preparing physiotherapy students for practical examinations and conferred benefits of reduced anxiety and improved performance. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Exploratory Study on the Reasons and Preferences of Six Malaysian Students on the Video Games Played

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Eow Yee; Baki, Roselan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons why six Malaysian students from upper secondary school are playing video games, types of games and the features preferred. A qualitative method was being used in the study. Purposive sampling was conducted in selecting the students. The findings indicated that students played video games for a…

  14. The Students Experiences With Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Ørngreen, Rikke; Buus, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The Bachelor's Degree Programme of Biomedical Laboratory Science at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on-site or to attend classes from home via live video-stream. Our...... previous studies revealed that the live-streamed sessions compared to on-site teaching reduced interaction and dialogue between attendants, and that the main reasons were technological issues and the teacher’s choice of teaching methods. One of our goals therefore became to develop methods and implement...... transparency in the live video-streamed teaching sessions during a 5-year period of continuous development of technological and pedagogical solutions for live-streamed teaching. Data describing student’s experiences were gathered in a longitudinal study of four sessions from 2012 to 2017 using a qualitative...

  15. Causes and Effects of Online Video Game Playing Among Junior-Senior High School Students in Malang East Java

    OpenAIRE

    Eskasasnanda, I Dewa Putu

    2017-01-01

    Science and technology development causes a lot of changes in any fields including the form of popular games among the Junior and Senior High School students in Indonesia. The traditional games that are famous formerly have been replaced by the modern games like online video game. This article discusses the cause and effect of the online video game playing on the Junior and Senior High Schools students in Malang. This study reveal that students play video games online due to peers pressure; a...

  16. Dashboard Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleue, Alan D.; Depcik, Chris; Peltier, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Last school year, I had a web link emailed to me entitled "A Dashboard Physics Lesson." The link, created and posted by Dale Basier on his "Lab Out Loud" blog, illustrates video of a car's speedometer synchronized with video of the road. These two separate video streams are compiled into one video that students can watch and analyze. After seeing…

  17. Live lectures or online videos: students' resource choices in a first-year university mathematics module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Emma; Meehan, Maria; Parnell, Andrew

    2018-05-01

    In Maths for Business, a mathematics module for non-mathematics specialists, students are given the choice of completing the module content via short online videos, live lectures or a combination of both. In this study, we identify students' specific usage patterns with both of these resources and discuss their reasons for the preferences they exhibit. In 2015-2016, we collected quantitative data on each student's resource usage (attendance at live lectures and access of online videos) for the entire class of 522 students and employed model-based clustering which identified four distinct resource usage patterns with lectures and/or videos. We also collected qualitative data on students' perceptions of resource usage through a survey administered at the end of the semester, to which 161 students responded. The 161 survey responses were linked to each cluster and analysed using thematic analysis. Perceived benefits of videos include flexibility of scheduling and pace, and avoidance of large, long lectures. In contrast, the main perceived advantages of lectures are the ability to engage in group tasks, to ask questions, and to learn 'gradually'. Students in the two clusters with high lecture attendance achieved, on average, higher marks in the module.

  18. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  19. Video capture on student-owned mobile devices to facilitate psychomotor skills acquisition: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Glori; Bergmann, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Objective : We evaluated the feasibility of using mobile device technology to allow students to record their own psychomotor skills so that these recordings can be used for self-reflection and formative evaluation. Methods : Students were given the choice of using DVD recorders, zip drive video capture equipment, or their personal mobile phone, device, or digital camera to record specific psychomotor skills. During the last week of the term, they were asked to complete a 9-question survey regarding their recording experience, including details of mobile phone ownership, technology preferences, technical difficulties, and satisfaction with the recording experience and video critique process. Results : Of those completing the survey, 83% currently owned a mobile phone with video capability. Of the mobile phone owners 62% reported having email capability on their phone and that they could transfer their video recording successfully to their computer, making it available for upload to the learning management system. Viewing the video recording of the psychomotor skill was valuable to 88% of respondents. Conclusions : Our results suggest that mobile phones are a viable technology to use for the video capture and critique of psychomotor skills, as most students own this technology and their satisfaction with this method is high.

  20. Video Modeling of SBIRT for Alcohol Use Disorders Increases Student Empathy in Standardized Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafio, Anthony; Anderson, Victoria; Frank, Julia

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of adding video models of brief alcohol assessment and counseling to a standardized patient (SP) curriculum that covers and tests acquisition of this skill. The authors conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort study of third- and fourth-year medical students between 2013 and 2015. All students completed a standardized patient (SP) encounter illustrating the diagnosis of alcohol use disorder, followed by an SP exam on the same topic. Beginning in August 2014, the authors supplemented the existing formative SP exercise on problem drinking with one of two 5-min videos demonstrating screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment (SBIRT). P values and Z tests were performed to evaluate differences between students who did and did not see the video in knowledge and skills related to alcohol use disorders. One hundred ninety-four students were included in this analysis. Compared to controls, subjects did not differ in their ability to uncover and accurately characterize an alcohol problem during a standardized encounter (mean exam score 41.29 vs 40.93, subject vs control, p = 0.539). However, the SPs' rating of students' expressions of empathy were significantly higher for the group who saw the video (81.63 vs 69.79%, p videos would improve students' recognition and knowledge of alcohol-related conditions. However, feedback from the SPs produced the serendipitous finding that the communication skills demonstrated in the videos had a sustained effect in enhancing students' professional behavior.

  1. Discovering the Motivations of Students when Using an Online Learning Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat George Saadé

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In an educational setting, the use of online learning tools impacts student performance. Motivation and beliefs play an important role in predicting student decisions to use these learning tools. However, IT-personality entailing playfulness on the web, perceived personal innovativeness, and enjoyment may have an impact on motivations. In this study, we investigate the influence of IT-personality traits on motivation and beliefs. The study includes 95 participants. A survey was conducted after using the learning tool for one semester. Assessment of the psychometric properties of the scales proved acceptable and confirmatory factor analysis supported the proposed hypotheses. With the exception of the impact of enjoyment on motivation, all other hypotheses demonstrate behavior different from other contexts: playfulness on the web and perceived personal innovativeness have little to no impact on motivation; motivation in turn has the opposite strong and significant effect on beliefs. Specifically, we found that motivation has a strong impact on students’ attitudes and consequently attitudes were found to determine intentions where the variance explained is 50% (attitude and 28% (intentions. These results give way to interesting interpretations as they relate to learning.

  2. Evaluation of 3 dimensional video to dissemination of nuclear energy by high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Marins, Eugenio R.; Chelles, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Educational videos can enhance the information transmission, making it more didactic. The use of virtual reality technologies can turn the environment even more entertaining through 3D projections, due to its imersive characteristics. Using these technologies can improve learning, since they provide more ludic means, as compared to traditional ones, such as texts, oral presentations and static images. This paper encompass the development of an educational video and an assessment carried out with students through a questionnaire. Students' assessment is in agreement with this work's objectives. They found the activity fun, enjoyable, and the use of 3D video drew students' attention to important details of the contents, such as power generation; the way nuclear power plants are distributed to cities; their distribution in the world including Brazil; that nuclear power is safe, economical and efficient; the understanding of nuclear energy as a clean and harmless power source; in addition to applications in medicine. (author)

  3. Evaluation of 3 dimensional video to dissemination of nuclear energy by high school students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legey, Ana Paula; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Marins, Eugenio R.; Chelles, Daniel R., E-mail: ana.legey@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.br, E-mail: eugenio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: daniel.chelles@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Educational videos can enhance the information transmission, making it more didactic. The use of virtual reality technologies can turn the environment even more entertaining through 3D projections, due to its imersive characteristics. Using these technologies can improve learning, since they provide more ludic means, as compared to traditional ones, such as texts, oral presentations and static images. This paper encompass the development of an educational video and an assessment carried out with students through a questionnaire. Students' assessment is in agreement with this work's objectives. They found the activity fun, enjoyable, and the use of 3D video drew students' attention to important details of the contents, such as power generation; the way nuclear power plants are distributed to cities; their distribution in the world including Brazil; that nuclear power is safe, economical and efficient; the understanding of nuclear energy as a clean and harmless power source; in addition to applications in medicine. (author)

  4. Medical students review of formative OSCE scores, checklists, and videos improves with student-faculty debriefing meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W; Ceccolini, Gabbriel; Feinn, Richard; Rockfeld, Jennifer; Rosenberg, Ilene; Thomas, Listy; Cassese, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Performance feedback is considered essential to clinical skills development. Formative objective structured clinical exams (F-OSCEs) often include immediate feedback by standardized patients. Students can also be provided access to performance metrics including scores, checklists, and video recordings after the F-OSCE to supplement this feedback. How often students choose to review this data and how review impacts future performance has not been documented. We suspect student review of F-OSCE performance data is variable. We hypothesize that students who review this data have better performance on subsequent F-OSCEs compared to those who do not. We also suspect that frequency of data review can be improved with faculty involvement in the form of student-faculty debriefing meetings. Simulation recording software tracks and time stamps student review of performance data. We investigated a cohort of first- and second-year medical students from the 2015-16 academic year. Basic descriptive statistics were used to characterize frequency of data review and a linear mixed-model analysis was used to determine relationships between data review and future F-OSCE performance. Students reviewed scores (64%), checklists (42%), and videos (28%) in decreasing frequency. Frequency of review of all metric and modalities improved when student-faculty debriefing meetings were conducted (p<.001). Among 92 first-year students, checklist review was associated with an improved performance on subsequent F-OSCEs (p = 0.038) by 1.07 percentage points on a scale of 0-100. Among 86 second year students, no review modality was associated with improved performance on subsequent F-OSCEs. Medical students review F-OSCE checklists and video recordings less than 50% of the time when not prompted. Student-faculty debriefing meetings increased student data reviews. First-year student's review of checklists on F-OSCEs was associated with increases in performance on subsequent F-OSCEs, however this

  5. Development and evaluation of online video teaching resources to enhance student knowledge of livestock handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupiec, C; Pope, S; Taylor, R; Carroll, D; Ward, M H; Celi, P

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of online audiovisual materials to support the acquisition of animal handling skills by students of veterinary and animal science. A series of video clips (Livestock Handling modules) demonstrating livestock handling procedures was created and delivered online to students enrolled in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney. The effectiveness of these modules for supporting student learning was evaluated via an online survey. The survey also sought feedback on how students could be better prepared for handling livestock. The survey indicated that students found the videos a useful part of their learning experience, particularly by familiarising them with correct handling procedures and emphasising the importance of safety when handling livestock. Students also highlighted that online delivery supported flexible learning. Suggested improvements of the Livestock Handling modules centred around broadening the content of the videos and improving the user-friendliness of online access. Student feedback regarding how the Faculty could better prepare them for livestock handling was dominated by requests for more opportunities to practise animal handling using live animals. The Livestock Handling audiovisual tool is a valuable supplementary resource for developing students' proficiency in safe and effective handling of livestock. However, the results also clearly reveal a perception by students that more hands-on experience is required for acquisition of animal handling skills. These findings will inform future development of the Faculty's animal handling program. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  6. Peer Assessment of Student-Produced Mechanics Lab Report Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings…

  7. Harnessing Students' Interest in Physics with Their Own Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Many physics teachers assign projects where students are asked to measure real-world motion. One purpose of this student-centered activity is to cultivate the relevance of physics in their lives. Typical project topics may include measuring the speed of a student's fastball and calculating how much reaction time batters are given. Another student…

  8. Video Content Search System for Better Students Engagement in the Learning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanoud Alotaibi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As a component of the e-learning educational process, content plays an essential role. Increasingly, the video-recorded lectures in e-learning systems are becoming more important to learners. In most cases, a single video-recorded lecture contains more than one topic or sub-topic. Therefore, to enable learners to find the desired topic and reduce learning time, e-learning systems need to provide a search capability for searching within the video content. This can be accomplished by enabling learners to identify the video or portion that contains a keyword they are looking for. This research aims to develop Video Content Search system to facilitate searching in educational videos and its contents. Preliminary results of an experimentation were conducted on a selected university course. All students needed a system to avoid time-wasting problem of watching long videos with no significant benefit. The statistics showed that the number of learners increased during the experiment. Future work will include studying impact of VCS system on students’ performance and satisfaction.

  9. Mechanics of Student-Directed Multi-University Internet Video-Conferencing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, A. J.; Mann, C. P.; Rose, W. I.; Stix, J.

    2007-12-01

    Connecting graduate students with experts in a given discipline is vital to their success but has often been challenging because of logistics, costs, and scheduling. Advances in Internet video-conferencing now allow multiple parties to meet simultaneously in a virtual classroom environment. Here we describe the mechanics of a recent student-directed graduate-level course that enabled students to directly engage in scientific discussion with experts. Conducted under the auspices of the Earth Hazards (EHaz) Consortium, the spring 2007 Volcano Instability course connected nine previously disparate groups over North America in a combined learning and cultural experience. Each week course participants (including the guest speaker, students and university professors) reviewed current journal articles and a speaker presentation, and used Marratech Internet video- conferencing software to meet online and discuss the material with an expert on the subject. Internet video-conferencing provides an inexpensive and innovative approach to teaching across international boundaries. The EHaz 2007 Volcano Instability course connected 14 experts with 64 students and professors. Many universities can participate through this approach, allowing an advanced graduate class that normally contains 4 - 8 students on one campus to become a class of 50 or more dispersed over many campuses. As evidenced by overwhelmingly positive course evaluations, the approach was stimulating and conducive to learning, and has great potential for application over many other disciplines. This dynamic interaction between students and experts will ultimately raise the standard of instruction and motivate students to self-guide their learning experience to levels of greater understanding.

  10. Video Games, Internet and Social Networks: A Study among French School students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dany, Lionel; Moreau, Laure; Guillet, Clémentine; Franchina, Carmelo

    2016-11-25

    Aim : Screen-based media use is gradually becoming a public health issue, especially among young people.Method : A local descriptive observational study was conducted in 11 colleges of the Bouches-du-Rhône department. All middle high school students were asked to fill in a questionnaire comprising questions about their demographic characteristics, their screen-based media use (Internet, video games, social networks), any problematic use (video games and social networks), self-esteem and quality of life.Results : A total of 950 college students (mean age : 12.96 years) participated in the research. The results show a high level and a very diverse screen-based media use. Boys more frequently played video games and girls go more frequently used social networks. The levels of problematic use were relatively low for all middle high school students. The level of problematic video game use was significantly higher in boys, and the level of problematic social network use was higher in girls.Conclusion : Differences in the use of video games or social networks raise the general issue of gender differences in society. This study indicates the need for more specific preventive interventions for screen-based media use. The addictive “nature” of certain practices needs to be studied in more detail.

  11. The Case of Design-Oriented Pedagogy: What Students' Digital Video Stories Say about Emerging Learning Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Liljeström; Jorma, Enkenberg; Sinikka, Pöllänen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study in which multi-age students (aged 6-12, N?=?32) in small groups made autonomous inquiries about the phenomenon of winter fishing within the framework of design-oriented pedagogy. The research analyzed storytelling videos that the students produced as learning objects. These videos revealed a picture of the…

  12. Impact of current video game playing on robotic simulation skills among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öge, Tufan; Borahay, Mostafa A; Achjian, Tamar; Kılıç, Sami Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of current and prior video game playing on initial robotic simulation skill acquisition. This cross-sectional descriptive study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-1) was conducted at a medical university training center. The study subjects were medical students who currently played video games (Group I) and those who had not played video games in the last 2 years (Group II). The robotic skills of both groups were assessed using simulation. Twenty-two students enrolled in this study; however, only 21 completed it. The median age of the participants was 23 (22-24) years and 24 (23-26) years in Groups I and II, respectively. Among the participants, 15 (71.4%) were male and 6 (28.5%) were female, and 90.4% of the students started playing video games in primary school. When the 2 groups were compared according to the completion time of each exercise, Group I finished more quickly than Group II in the Peg Board-1 exercise (p>0.05), whereas Group II had better results in 3 exercises including Pick and Place, Ring and Rail, and Thread the Rings-1. However, none of the differences were found to be statistically significant (p>.05), and according to the overall scores based on the time to complete exercises, economy of motion, instrument collision, use of excessive instrument force, instruments out of view, and master workspace range, the scores were not statistically different between Groups I and II (p>.05). According to the basic robotic simulation exercise results, there was no difference between medical students who used to play video games and those who still played video games. Studies evaluating baseline visuospatial skills with larger sample sizes are needed.

  13. Peer assessment of student-produced mechanics lab report videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings to lab reports than do experts, that peers begin the semester by giving high ratings most frequently and end the semester with frequent middle ratings, and that peers go through the semester without much change in the frequency of low ratings. We then use student interviews to develop a model for student engagement with peer assessment. This model is based on two competing influences which appear to shape peer evaluation behavior: a strong disinclination to give poor ratings with a complementary preference to give high ratings when in doubt, and an attempt to develop an expertlike criticality when assessing peers' work.

  14. Relation between Video Game Addiction and Interfamily Relationships on Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbaz, Selen Demirtas; Ulas, Ozlem; Kizildag, Seval

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to analyze whether or not the following three variables of "Discouraging Family Relations," "Supportive Family Relations," "Total Time Spent on the Computer," and "Grade Point Average (GPA)" predict elementary school students' video game addiction rates, and whether or not there exists a…

  15. An Exploration of Elementary School Counselors' Perceptions of Students' Exposure to Violent Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Tammy Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This study explored elementary school counselors' perceptions of working with students exposed to violent video games. Certified elementary school counselors participated in both an online survey and individual interviews, revealing their observations regarding elementary school children and the phenomenon of gaming. An emphasis was placed on…

  16. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Use Public Bus Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda; O'Brien, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to push a "request to stop bus signal" and exit a city bus in response to target landmarks. A multiple probe design across three students and one bus route was used to evaluate effectiveness of…

  17. Enabling Access and Enhancing Comprehension of Video Content for Postsecondary Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evmenova, Anya S.; Behrmann, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a great need for new innovative tools to integrate individuals with intellectual disability into educational experiences. This multiple baseline study examined the effects of various adaptations for improving factual and inferential comprehension of non-fiction videos by six postsecondary students with intellectual disability. Video…

  18. The Perspective of Six Malaysian Students on Playing Video Games: Beneficial or Detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Roselan; Yee Leng, Eow; Wan Ali, Wan Zah; Mahmud, Rosnaini; Hamzah, Mohd. Sahandri Gani

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a glimpse into understanding the potential benefits as well as harm of playing video games from the perspective of six Malaysian secondary school students, aged 16-17 years old. The rationale of the study is to enable parents, educators, administrators and policy makers to develop a sound understanding on the impact of playing…

  19. Identifying Key Features of Student Performance in Educational Video Games and Simulations through Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre; Chung, Gregory K. W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment cycle of "evidence-centered design" (ECD) provides a framework for treating an educational video game or simulation as an assessment. One of the main steps in the assessment cycle of ECD is the identification of the key features of student performance. While this process is relatively simple for multiple choice tests, when…

  20. Medical students¿ assessment of pediatric patients - teaching and evaluation using video cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    and examination for pediatric medicine.MethodsMedical students on a pediatric clerkship at the University of Copenhagen assessed eight short pediatric video cases during autumn 2011 and spring 2012. Two independent observers evaluated a subset of records in a pilot study. A blind evaluation was made...

  1. The Impact of Video Technology on Student Performance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palao, Jose Manuel; Hastie, Peter Andrew; Guerrero Cruz, Prudencia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of video feedback on student learning in physical education, while also examining the teacher's responses to the innovation. Three classes from one Spanish high school participated in different conditions for learning hurdles in a track and field unit. These conditions compared…

  2. Student-Created Homework Problems Based on YouTube Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Matthew W.; Marr, David W. M.; Herring, Andrew M.; Way, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by YouTube videos, students created homework problems as part of a class project. The project has been successful at different parts of the semester and demonstrated learning of course concepts. These new problems were implemented both in class and as part of homework assignments without significant changes. Examples from a material and…

  3. Effect of YouTube Videos and Pictures on EFL Students' Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styati, Erlik Widiyani

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at investigating the effect of YouTube videos and pictures as the authentic materials on Indonesian EFL students' writing performance. The experimental research is conducted by using quasi-experimental design. This research employed two groups: an experimental and control group. This is to see which group is effective to be used…

  4. Readers, Players, and Watchers: EFL Students' Vocabulary Acquisition through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated vocabulary acquisition through a commercial digital video game compared to a traditional pencil-and-paper treatment. Chosen through cluster sampling, 241 male high school students (age 12-18) participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to one of the following groups. The first group, called Readers,…

  5. Student-Designed Public Service Announcement (PSA) Videos to Enhance Motivation and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Educators often focus on enhancing student motivation and engagement. This article describes an activity with these aims, in which undergraduates (a) learn about theories and research on means of persuasion and (b) in small groups design and record a public service announcement (PSA) video, write a brief paper that outlines the theories used to…

  6. Community College Uses a Video-Game Lab to Lure Students to Computer Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    A computer lab has become one of the most popular hangouts at Northern Virginia Community College after officials decided to load its PCs with popular video games, install a PlayStation and an Xbox, and declare it "for gamers only." The goal of this lab is to entice students to take game-design and other IT courses. John Min, dean of…

  7. The Effects of Video Feedback Coaching for Teachers on Scientific Knowledge of Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vondel, Sabine; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of a video feedback coaching intervention for upper-grade primary school teachers on students' cognitive gains in scientific knowledge. This teaching intervention was designed with the use of inquiry-based learning principles for teachers, such as the empirical cycle and the posing of…

  8. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  9. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  10. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students......' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed...

  11. Using Video to Improve Pronunciation of The Second Years Students of FKI UIR Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Al Malikul Ikhwanda

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to find out the use of video to improve students’ pronunciation. The study employed a classroom action research. The participants of this study were 37 students. They were the second year students of FKIP (faculty of teacher training and education) in Islamic University Riau (UIR) Pekanbaru, Indonesia. This study was conducted in two cycles. Each cycle comprised four meetings. The data of this research were obtained through (1) observation sheets, (2) field note...

  12. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses?

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Jennifer L.; Suchman, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they...

  13. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about

  14. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  15. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  16. Peer assessment of student-produced mechanics lab report videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S. Douglas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine changes in students’ rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers’ physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings to lab reports than do experts, that peers begin the semester by giving high ratings most frequently and end the semester with frequent middle ratings, and that peers go through the semester without much change in the frequency of low ratings. We then use student interviews to develop a model for student engagement with peer assessment. This model is based on two competing influences which appear to shape peer evaluation behavior: a strong disinclination to give poor ratings with a complementary preference to give high ratings when in doubt, and an attempt to develop an expertlike criticality when assessing peers’ work.

  17. Smartphone Apps in Education: Students Create Videos to Teach Smartphone Use as Tool for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Kara; Murphy, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are regular classroom accessories. Educators should work with children to understand the capacity of smartphones for learning and civic engagement, rather than being a classroom distraction. This research supports a collaborative project the authors engaged in with students in two states to discover what the perception of smartphone…

  18. Using Student Video Cases to Assess Pre-service Elementary Teachers' Engineering Teaching Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Tejaswini; Wendell, Kristen

    2017-10-01

    Our study addresses the need for new approaches to prepare novice elementary teachers to teach both science and engineering, and for new tools to measure how well those approaches are working. This in particular would inform the teacher educators of the extent to which novice teachers are developing expertise in facilitating their students' engineering design work. One important dimension to measure is novice teachers' abilities to notice the substance of student thinking and to respond in productive ways. This teacher noticing is particularly important in science and engineering education, where students' initial, idiosyncratic ideas and practices influence the likelihood that particular instructional strategies will help them learn. This paper describes evidence of validity and reliability for the Video Case Diagnosis (VCD) task, a new instrument for measuring pre-service elementary teachers' engineering teaching responsiveness. To complete the VCD, participants view a 6-min video episode of children solving an engineering design problem, describe in writing what they notice about the students' science ideas and engineering practices, and propose how a teacher could productively respond to the students. The rubric for scoring VCD responses allowed two independent scorers to achieve inter-rater reliability. Content analysis of the video episode, systematic review of literature on science and engineering practices, and solicitation of external expert educator responses establish content validity for VCD. Field test results with three different participant groups who have different levels of engineering education experience offer evidence of construct validity.

  19. Interactive video tutorials for enhancing problem solving, reasoning, and meta-cognitive skills of introductory physics students

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of interactive video tutorial-based problems to help introductory physics students learn effective problem solving heuristics. The video tutorials present problem solving strategies using concrete examples in an interactive environment. They force students to follow a systematic approach to problem solving and students are required to solve sub-problems (research-guided multiple choice questions) to show their level of understanding at every stage of prob lem solvin...

  20. Investigation of blended learning video resources to teach health students clinical skills: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Elisabeth; Rands, Hazel; Frommolt, Valda; Kain, Victoria; Plugge, Melanie; Mitchell, Marion

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this review is to inform future educational strategies by synthesising research related to blended learning resources using simulation videos to teach clinical skills for health students. An integrative review methodology was used to allow for the combination of diverse research methods to better understand the research topic. This review was guided by the framework described by Whittemore and Knafl (2005), DATA SOURCES: Systematic search of the following databases was conducted in consultation with a librarian using the following databases: SCOPUS, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, PsycINFO databases. Keywords and MeSH terms: clinical skills, nursing, health, student, blended learning, video, simulation and teaching. Data extracted from the studies included author, year, aims, design, sample, skill taught, outcome measures and findings. After screening the articles, extracting project data and completing summary tables, critical appraisal of the projects was completed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Ten articles met all the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. The MMAT scores varied from 50% to 100%. Thematic analysis was undertaken and we identified the following three themes: linking theory to practice, autonomy of learning and challenges of developing a blended learning model. Blended learning allowed for different student learning styles, repeated viewing, and enabled links between theory and practice. The video presentation needed to be realistic and culturally appropriate and this required both time and resources to create. A blended learning model, which incorporates video-assisted online resources, may be a useful tool to teach clinical skills to students of health including nursing. Blended learning not only increases students' knowledge and skills, but is often preferred by students due to its flexibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  2. Gaming Worlds: Secondary Students Creating An Interactive Video Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Amanda; Ho, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Since the summer of 2006, the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), in the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex, has invited secondary students to participate in their summer SEED program on campus. The program was developed by the Dean of the School of Architecture and the Chair of the Art + Art History Department. SEED (Strategies, Events, Episodes +…

  3. Discovering Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Aboufadel, Edward

    1999-01-01

    An accessible and practical introduction to wavelets. With applications in image processing, audio restoration, seismology, and elsewhere, wavelets have been the subject of growing excitement and interest over the past several years. Unfortunately, most books on wavelets are accessible primarily to research mathematicians. Discovering Wavelets presents basic and advanced concepts of wavelets in a way that is accessible to anyone with only a fundamental knowledge of linear algebra. The basic concepts of wavelet theory are introduced in the context of an explanation of how the FBI uses wavelets

  4. Efficacy of video-guided laryngoscope in airway management skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirovifar, Ali; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Golzari, Samad Ej; Soleimanpour, Hassan; Eslampour, Yashar; Fattahi, Vahid

    2014-10-01

    Video-guided laryngoscopy, though unproven in achieving better success rates of laryngoscopy outcome and intubation, seems to provide better glottic visualization compared with direct laryngoscopy. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of video-guided laryngoscope (VGL) in the airway management skills of medical students. Medical students throughout their anesthesiology rotations were enrolled in this study. All students received standard training in the airway management during their course and were randomly allocated into two 20 person groups. In Group D, airway management was performed by direct laryngoscopy via Macintosh blade and in Group G intubation was performed via VGL. Time to intubation, number of laryngoscopy attempts and success rate were noted. Successful intubation was considered as the primary outcome. All data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were used for analysis of categorical variables. For analyzing continuous variables independent t-test was used. P Time to intubation was significantly less in Group G as compared to Group D (P: 0.02). Successful intubation in Group G was less frequently when compared to Group D (P: 0.66). Need for attending intervention, esophageal intubation and hypoxemic events during laryngoscopy were less in Group G; this, however, was statistically insignificant. The use of video-guided laryngoscopy improved the first attempt success rate, time to intubation, laryngoscopy attempts and airway management ability of medical students compared to direct laryngoscopy.

  5. The use of student-driven video projects as an educational and outreach tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A.; Farrell, W.; Klemm, T.

    2014-12-01

    With recent technological advances, the barriers to filmmaking have been lowered, and it is now possible to record and edit video footage with a smartphone or a handheld camera and free software. Students accustomed to documenting their every-day experiences for multimedia-rich social networking sites feel excited and creatively inspired when asked to take on ownership of more complex video projects. With a small amount of guidance on shooting primary and secondary footage and an overview of basic interview skills, students are self-motivated to identify the learning themes with which they resonate most strongly and record their footage in a way that is true to their own experience. The South Central Climate Science Center (SC-CSC) is one of eight regional centers formed by the U.S. Department of the Interior in order to provide decision makers with the science, tools, and information they need to address the impacts of climate variability and change on their areas of responsibility. An important component of this mission is to innovate in the areas of translational science and science communication. This presentation will highlight how the SC-CSC used student-driven video projects to document our Early Career Researcher Workshop and our Undergraduate Internship for Underrepresented Minorities. These projects equipped the students with critical thinking and project management skills, while also providing a finished product that the SC-CSC can use for future outreach purposes.

  6. PhD students at Science & Technology exploring student learning in a collaborative video-circle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Hougaard, Rikke F.

    examined using video, audio and questionnaires. The TAs reported a high level of outcomes and referred to the importance of the video as evidence supporting the discussions. The importance of the collaboration between peers and staff (educational developers) was emphasized: highlighting the benefit...

  7. Creating a YouTube-Like Collaborative Environment in Mathematics: Integrating Animated Geogebra Constructions and Student-Generated Screencast Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jill; Roulet, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the integration of student-generated GeoGebra applets and Jing screencast videos to create a YouTube-like medium for sharing in mathematics. The value of combining dynamic mathematics software and screencast videos for facilitating communication and representations in a digital era is demonstrated herein. We share our…

  8. Relationships among video gaming proficiency and spatial orientation, laparoscopic, and traditional surgical skills of third-year veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather A Towle; Millard, Ralph P; Constable, Peter D; Freeman, Lyn J

    2014-02-01

    To determine the relationships among traditional and laparoscopic surgical skills, spatial analysis skills, and video gaming proficiency of third-year veterinary students. Prospective, randomized, controlled study. A convenience sample of 29 third-year veterinary students. The students had completed basic surgical skills training with inanimate objects but had no experience with soft tissue, orthopedic, or laparoscopic surgery; the spatial analysis test; or the video games that were used in the study. Scores for traditional surgical, laparoscopic, spatial analysis, and video gaming skills were determined, and associations among these were analyzed by means of Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient (rs). A significant positive association (rs = 0.40) was detected between summary scores for video game performance and laparoscopic skills, but not between video game performance and traditional surgical skills scores. Spatial analysis scores were positively (rs = 0.30) associated with video game performance scores; however, that result was not significant. Spatial analysis scores were not significantly associated with laparoscopic surgical skills scores. Traditional surgical skills scores were not significantly associated with laparoscopic skills or spatial analysis scores. Results of this study indicated video game performance of third-year veterinary students was predictive of laparoscopic but not traditional surgical skills, suggesting that laparoscopic performance may be improved with video gaming experience. Additional studies would be required to identify methods for improvement of traditional surgical skills.

  9. Effects of Video Podcasting on Psychomotor and Cognitive Performance, Attitudes and Study Behaviour of Student Physical Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. Allen; Smith, A. Russell

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Multimedia is an effective tool to teach psychomotor skills to health care students. Video podcasting is a next step as educators seek methods to present psychomotor skills efficiently. The purposes of this pilot study were (1) compare the effectiveness of video podcasting to live demonstration for teaching psychomotor skills to Doctor of…

  10. Comparison of Student Performance in Video Game Format vs. Traditional Approach in Introductory Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Daniel; Kregenow, Julia M.; Palma, Christopher; Plummer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In Spring of 2014, Penn State debuted an online Introductory Astronomy (AST 001) section that was designed as a video game. Previous studies have shown that well-designed games help learners to build accurate understanding of embedded concepts and processes and aid learner motivation, which strongly contributes to a student's willingness to learn. We start by presenting the learning gains as measured with the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) from this new course design. We further compare the learning gains from the video game section with learning gains measured from more traditional online formats and in-person lecture sections of AST 001 taught at Penn State over the last five years to evaluate the extent to which this new medium for online Astronomy education supports student learning.

  11. Audiovisual physics reports: students' video production as a strategy for the didactic laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinicius Pereira, Marcus; de Souza Barros, Susana; de Rezende Filho, Luiz Augusto C.; Fauth, Leduc Hermeto de A.

    2012-01-01

    Constant technological advancement has facilitated access to digital cameras and cell phones. Involving students in a video production project can work as a motivating aspect to make them active and reflective in their learning, intellectually engaged in a recursive process. This project was implemented in high school level physics laboratory classes resulting in 22 videos which are considered as audiovisual reports and analysed under two components: theoretical and experimental. This kind of project allows the students to spontaneously use features such as music, pictures, dramatization, animations, etc, even when the didactic laboratory may not be the place where aesthetic and cultural dimensions are generally developed. This could be due to the fact that digital media are more legitimately used as cultural tools than as teaching strategies.

  12. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Using Student-Produced Video to Validate Head-to-Toe Assessment Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpora, Christina; Prion, Susan

    2018-03-01

    This study explored third-semester baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the value of using student-produced video as an approach for learning head-to-toe assessment, an essential clinical nursing skill taught in the classroom. A cognitive apprenticeship model guided the study. The researchers developed a 34-item survey. A convenience sample of 72 students enrolled in an applied assessment and nursing fundamentals course at a university in the western United States provided the data. Most students reported a videotaping process that worked, supportive faculty, valuable faculty review of their work, confidence, a sense of performance independence, the ability to identify normal assessment findings, and few barriers to learning. The results suggested that a student-produced video approach to learning head-to-toe assessment was effective. Further, the study demonstrated how to leverage available instructional technology to provide meaningful, personalized instruction and feedback to students about an essential nursing skill. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):154-158.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The relationship between the physical activity of students from Lublin’s universities, and video games

    OpenAIRE

    Polski Andrzej; Iwaniak Karol; Sobotka-Polska Karolina; Rogowska Magdalena; Poleszak Ewa

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, gaming has become more popular, and young people spend more and more time playing such games. It is thought that this a major factor responsible for the lowered physical activity of today's society. For a better understanding of the issue, we assessed how many students spend their free time playing video games, and how this form of recreation affects their levels of physical activity. The investigation of the relationship between physical act...

  15. Effectiveness of Using a Portable Video Game for Promoting Healthy Dietary Behavior among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Shiba, Eri

    2009-01-01

    Currently the use of new technologies takes on a growing importance in education. This study assessed the effectiveness of a 2-week intervention using portable video game machine "Nintendo DS" and the software "Koharu no DS Uchigohan (Koharu' s DS home cooking)" to increase knowledge and consciousness of cooking and to promote healthier dietary behavior among college students. A pretest was administered to participants before the intervention. In addition to the same test, the questionnaire a...

  16. Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Samantha; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Barr, Caitlin

    2018-03-27

    Effective clinical communication is pivotal to the provision of quality hearing health care. To date, audiology students reportedly felt ill-prepared when counseling patients about their hearing impairment, yet there is a paucity of studies exploring how clinical communication is taught and learned in audiology programs. Thus, the aims of the study were (a) to explore final year audiology students' perspectives of their own clinical communication skills during an in-house university clinical placement and (b) to explore students' perceptions of their clinical communication education. Using a qualitative description approach, students were asked to coview their filmed clinical encounter using video reflexivity during a semistructured interview on clinical communication education. Fifteen final year graduate audiology students from The University of Melbourne, Australia, participated in the study. The interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically. The overarching themes of striving to be patient-centered, assessment shapes behavior, and power relations emerged from students' reflection of their own clinical encounter. In addition, the theme what students want described the perceived teaching methods that assisted students' clinical communication practices. The findings of this study highlight the challenges that students perceived during their clinical placement as they strive to enact a patient-centered interaction. An assessment rubric that incorporates communication skills can provide greater opportunities for feedback and self-reflection. Additionally, clinical communication education that adopts experiential learning and is longitudinally integrated into the curriculum can further reinforce students' communication learning needs.

  17. Nursing students' perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hege M; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann; Slettebø, Åshild

    2018-03-01

    Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. To assess nursing students' perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. A pilot study was conducted. An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. A paper-based survey was used to assess students' perceptions of the SG's educational value. Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Enhancing OSCE preparedness with video exemplars in undergraduate nursing students. A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, D; Byrne, J; Higgins, N; Weeks, B; Shuker, M-A; Coyne, E; Mitchell, M; Johnston, A N B

    2017-07-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are designed to assess clinical skill performance and competency of students in preparation for 'real world' clinical responsibilities. OSCEs are commonly used in health professional education and are typically associated with high levels of student anxiety, which may present a significant barrier to performance. Students, including nursing students, have identified that flexible access to exemplar OSCEs might reduce their anxiety and enable them to better prepare for such examinations. To implement and evaluate an innovative approach to preparing students for OSCEs in an undergraduate (registration) acute care nursing course. A set of digitized OSCE exemplars were prepared and embedded in the University-based course website as part of usual course learning activities. Use of the exemplars was monitored, pre and post OSCE surveys were conducted, and qualitative data were collected to evaluate the approach. OSCE grades were also examined. The online OSCE exemplars increased self-rated student confidence, knowledge, and capacity to prepare and provided clarity around assessment expectations. OSCE exemplars were accessed frequently and positively received; but did not impact on performance. Video exemplars aid student preparation for OSCEs, providing a flexible, innovative and clear example of the assessment process. Video exemplars improved self-rated student confidence and understanding of performance expectations, leading to increased engagement and reduced anxiety when preparing for the OSCE, but not overall OSCE performance. Such OSCE exemplars could be used to increase staff capacity and improve the quality of the student learning experience. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Patient Case Video Vignettes to Improve Students' Understanding of Cross-cultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Sally; Cryder, Brian; Mazan, Jennifer; Quiñones-Boex, Ana; Cyganska, Angelika

    2017-04-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and assess whether simulated patient case videos improve students' understanding of and attitudes toward cross-cultural communication in health care. Design. Third-year pharmacy students (N=159) in a health care communications course participated in a one-hour lecture and two-hour workshop on the topic of cross-cultural communication. Three simulated pharmacist-patient case vignettes highlighting cross-cultural communication barriers, the role of active listening, appropriate use of medical interpreters, and useful models to overcome communication barriers were viewed and discussed in groups of 20 students during the workshop. Assessment. A pre-lecture and post-workshop assessed the effect on students' understanding of and attitudes toward cross-cultural communication. Understanding of cross-cultural communication concepts increased significantly, as did comfort level with providing cross-cultural care. Conclusion. Use of simulated patient case videos in conjunction with an interactive workshop improved pharmacy students' understanding of and comfort level with cross-cultural communication skills and can be useful tools for cultural competency training in the curriculum.

  20. Discovering Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Andersen, J.; Antipin, O.; Azuelos, G.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underly...... the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of leptons, by laying out the framework to discover these models at the Large Hadron Collider....... of underlying gauge theories leading to minimal models of Technicolor, the comparison with electroweak precision data, the low energy effective theory, the spectrum of the states common to most of the Technicolor models, the decays of the composite particles and the experimental signals at the Large Hadron...... Collider. The level of the presentation is aimed at readers familiar with the Standard Model but who have little or no prior exposure to Technicolor. Several extensions of the Standard Model featuring a composite Higgs can be reduced to the effective Lagrangian introduced in the text. We establish...

  1. Reducing cyberbullying: A theory of reasoned action-based video prevention program for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, Ashley N; Kelley, Michelle L; Pearson, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of cyberbullying prevention/intervention programs. The goals of the present study were to develop a Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)-based video program to increase cyberbullying knowledge (1) and empathy toward cyberbullying victims (2), reduce favorable attitudes toward cyberbullying (3), decrease positive injunctive (4) and descriptive norms about cyberbullying (5), and reduce cyberbullying intentions (6) and cyberbullying behavior (7). One hundred sixty-seven college students were randomly assigned to an online video cyberbullying prevention program or an assessment-only control group. Immediately following the program, attitudes and injunctive norms for all four types of cyberbullying behavior (i.e., unwanted contact, malice, deception, and public humiliation), descriptive norms for malice and public humiliation, empathy toward victims of malice and deception, and cyberbullying knowledge significantly improved in the experimental group. At one-month follow-up, malice and public humiliation behavior, favorable attitudes toward unwanted contact, deception, and public humiliation, and injunctive norms for public humiliation were significantly lower in the experimental than the control group. Cyberbullying knowledge was significantly higher in the experimental than the control group. These findings demonstrate a brief cyberbullying video is capable of improving, at one-month follow-up, cyberbullying knowledge, cyberbullying perpetration behavior, and TRA constructs known to predict cyberbullying perpetration. Considering the low cost and ease with which a video-based prevention/intervention program can be delivered, this type of approach should be considered to reduce cyberbullying. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Effect of Problem-Solving Video Games on the Science Reasoning Skills of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanetti, Tina M.

    As the world continues to rapidly change, students are faced with the need to develop flexible skills, such as science reasoning that will help them thrive in the new knowledge economy. Prensky (2001), Gee (2003), and Van Eck (2007) have all suggested that the way to engage learners and teach them the necessary skills is through digital games, but empirical studies focusing on popular games are scant. One way digital games, especially video games, could potentially be useful if there were a flexible and inexpensive method a student could use at their convenience to improve selected science reasoning skills. Problem-solving video games, which require the use of reasoning and problem solving to answer a variety of cognitive challenges could be a promising method to improve selected science reasoning skills. Using think-aloud protocols and interviews, a qualitative study was carried out with a small sample of college students to examine what impact two popular video games, Professor Layton and the Curious Village and Professor Layton and the Diabolical Box, had on specific science reasoning skills. The subject classified as an expert in both gaming and reasoning tended to use more higher order thinking and reasoning skills than the novice reasoners. Based on the assessments, the science reasoning of college students did not improve during the course of game play. Similar to earlier studies, students tended to use trial and error as their primary method of solving the various puzzles in the game and additionally did not recognize when to use the appropriate reasoning skill to solve a puzzle, such as proportional reasoning.

  3. Technical Skills Training for Veterinary Students: A Comparison of Simulators and Video for Teaching Standardized Cardiac Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, Rachel E; Schaffer-White, Andrea B; Long, Hanna; Alawneh, John I

    The goal of the study was to evaluate alternative student-centered approaches that could replace autopsy sessions and live demonstration and to explore refinements in assessment procedures for standardized cardiac dissection. Simulators and videos were identified as feasible, economical, student-centered teaching methods for technical skills training in medical contexts, and a direct comparison was undertaken. A low-fidelity anatomically correct simulator approximately the size of a horse's heart with embedded dissection pathways was constructed and used with a series of laminated photographs of standardized cardiac dissection. A video of a standardized cardiac dissection of a normal horse's heart was recorded and presented with audio commentary. Students were allowed to nominate a preference for learning method, and students who indicated no preference were randomly allocated to keep group numbers even. Objective performance data from an objective structure assessment criterion and student perception data on confidence and competency from surveys showed both innovations were similarly effective. Evaluator reflections as well as usage logs to track patterns of student use were both recorded. A strong selection preference was identified for kinesthetic learners choosing the simulator and visual learners choosing the video. Students in the video cohort were better at articulating the reasons for dissection procedures and sequence due to the audio commentary, and student satisfaction was higher with the video. The major conclusion of this study was that both methods are effective tools for technical skills training, but consideration should be given to the preferred learning style of adult learners to maximize educational outcomes.

  4. Parent-child relationships and self‑control in male university students' desire to play video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasizadeh, Sina; Jani, Masih; Keshvari, Mahtab

    2018-06-12

    To determine the relationship between the parent-child relationship, self-control and demographic characteristics and the desire to play video games among male university students at one university in Iran. This was a correlational, descriptive, applied study. A total of 103 male students were selected randomly as a study sample from the population of male students at Isfahan University in Iran. Data collection tools used were the Video Games Questionnaire, Tanji's Self-Control Scale, Parent-Child Relationship Questionnaire, and Demographic Questionnaire. Data were analysed using stepwise regression analysis. This study found several factors increased male students' desire to play video games. Demographic characteristics associated with increased tendency to play video games among male students in Iran are older age, larger number of family members, lower parental level of education and higher socio-economic class, while other significant factors are a lower level of self‑control and a poorer parent-child relationship. PARTICIPANTS': higher socio-economic class, lower level of self-control and older age explained 8.2%, 5.2% and 5.9% of their desire to play video games, respectively. These three variables together accounted for significantly 16.9% of a male student's desire to play video games in this study ( P video games in Iran. Moreover, lower levels of self-control and a poorer parent-child relationship were found to be accompanied by a greater desire to play video games among male university students. © 2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  5. The effect of student self-video of performance on clinical skill competency: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-03-01

    Emerging technologies and student information technology literacy are enabling new methods of teaching and learning for clinical skill performance. Facilitating experiential practice and reflection on performance through student self-video, and exposure to peer benchmarks, may promote greater levels of skill competency. This study examines the impact of student self-video on the attainment of clinical skills. A total of 60 Physiotherapy students (100%) consented to participate in the randomised controlled trial. One group (50%) was taught a complex clinical skill with regular practical tutoring, whilst the other group (50%) supplemented the tutoring with a self-video task aimed at promoting reflection on performance. Student skill performance was measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Students also completed an anonymous questionnaire, which explored their perception of their learning experiences. Students received significantly higher scores in the OSCE when the examined clinical skill had been supplemented with a self-video of performance task (P = 0.048). Descriptive analysis of the questionnaires relating to student perceptions on the teaching methods identified that the self-video of performance task utilised contributed to improvement in their clinical performance and their confidence for future clinical practice. Students identified a number of aspects of the submission process that contributed to this perception of educational value. The novel results of this study demonstrate that greater clinical skill competency is achieved when traditional tutoring methods are supplemented with student self-video of performance tasks. Additional benefits included the ability of staff and students to monitor longitudinal performance, and an increase in feedback opportunities.

  6. [Anesthesia for medical students : A brief guide to practical anesthesia in adults with a web-based video illustration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, S; Schlafer, O; Abram, J; Kreutziger, J; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2016-12-01

    In Germany, Austria and Switzerland, anesthesiologists are the second largest group of physicians in hospitals, but this does not correspond to the amount of anesthesiology teaching that medical students receive in medical schools. Accordingly, the chances of medical students recognizing anesthesiology as a promising personal professional career are smaller than in other disciplines with large teaching components. Subsequent difficulties to recruit anesthesiology residents are likely, although many reasons support anesthesiology as a professional career.Traditional strategies to teach medical students in anesthesiology in medical school consist of airway management or cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts in manikins. Anesthesiology is a complex interaction consisting of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, clinical evaluation, experience, knowledge, and manual skills. While some medical schools offer teaching in high fidelity simulators, clinical teaching in the operating room is often limited. When medical students opt for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology, there is a chance to demonstrate the fascinating world of anesthesiology, but this chance has to be utilized carefully by anesthesiologists, as young talents have to be discovered, supported, and challenged.We have put together a short guide for medical students for a clinical rotation in anesthesiology in adults in order to generate basic knowledge and interest in anesthesiology as well as a sense of achievement. Basic knowledge about premedication, induction, maintenance and strategies for anesthesia is discussed. Further, the most important anesthesia drugs are discussed and manual skills, such as intravenous cannulation, mask ventilation, intubation, and regional anesthesia are featured with QR-code based video illustrations on a smartphone or personal computer. We did not discuss possible local mannerism and special patient groups (e. g., children, special medical history), local guidelines

  7. The efficacy of video monitoring-supported student self-evaluation of dental explorer skills in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, R; Takaku, S; Ozaki, T

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether having dental hygiene students monitor video recordings of their dental explorer skills is an effective means of proper self-evaluation in dental hygiene education. The study participants comprised students of a dental hygiene training school who had completed a module on explorer skills using models, and a dental hygiene instructor who was in charge of lessons. Questions regarding 'posture', 'grip', 'finger rest' and 'operation' were set to evaluate explorer skills. Participants rated each item on a two-point scale: 'competent (1)' or 'not competent (0)'. The total score was calculated for each evaluation item in evaluations by students with and without video monitoring, and in evaluations by the instructor with video monitoring. Mean scores for students with and without video monitoring were compared using a t-test, while intraclass correlation coefficients were found by reliability analysis of student and instructor evaluations. A total of 37 students and one instructor were subject to analysis. The mean score for evaluations with and without video monitoring differed significantly for posture (P Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley& Sons Ltd.

  8. THE ROLE OF THE VIDEO INTERACTION GUIDANCE IN THE ENRICHMENT OF STUDENT TEACHERS’ SOCIAL SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŠÍROVÁ, Eva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The school is a complicated social organism. The integration in it could be complicated for teacher novices, who have studied theoretically psychological and pedagogical aspects of learning, but have not many opportunities to develop their professional abilities in the real education. The article deals with using of the video interaction guidance (VIG in the education of the teachers to support their professional development – above all in the area of communication skills. The improvement of the communication significantly helps to create a positive, relaxed, but learning centred climate whereby increases the efficiency of the whole teaching process. The investigation of using of the VIG in the preparation of student teachers is presented in the form of quantitative research and an illustrative case-study. Results of the research suggest that the positive video feedback provides a valuable opportunity for personal, professional and social development for both teachers and pupils across the range of contexts. The VIG improves the communication skills of student teachers, therefore enhances effective learning and teaching and minimises negative contact, e.g. misunderstanding, inattention or conflict. As a consequence, the using of the VIG had a positive impact on the self-esteem and mental hygiene of student teachers who have started fully enjoy the teaching, being energized by it.

  9. Video Podcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne Mette; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    This project’s aim was to support and facilitate master’s students’ preparation and collaboration by making video podcasts of short lectures available on YouTube prior to students’ first face-to-face seminar. The empirical material stems from group interviews, from statistical data created through...... YouTube analytics and from surveys answered by students after the seminar. The project sought to explore how video podcasts support learning and reflection online and how students use and reflect on the integration of online activities in the videos. Findings showed that students engaged actively...

  10. Effectiveness of Student-Generated Video as a Teaching Tool for an Instrumental Technique in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeremy T.; Box, Melinda C.; Eguren, Kristen E.; Parker, Thomas A.; Saraldi-Gallardo, Victoria M.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia instruction has been shown to serve as an effective learning aid for chemistry students. In this study, the viability of student-generated video instruction for organic chemistry laboratory techniques and procedure was examined and its effectiveness compared to instruction provided by a teaching assistant (TA) was evaluated. After…

  11. Simulation videos presented in a blended learning platform to improve Australian nursing students' knowledge of family assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Elisabeth; Frommolt, Valda; Rands, Hazel; Kain, Victoria; Mitchell, Marion

    2018-07-01

    The provision of simulation to enhance learning is becoming common practice as clinical placement becomes harder to secure within Bachelor of Nursing programs. The use of simulation videos within a blended learning platform enables students to view best practice and provides relevant links between theory and practice. Four simulation videos depicting family assessment viewed by a cohort of Australian undergraduate nursing students were evaluated. These videos were professionally developed using actors and experienced family nurses. Surveys were used to explore the students' self-assessed knowledge, confidence and learning preferences before and after exposure to blended learning resources. Students' engagement with the simulated videos was captured via the Learning Management System. Time 1 survey was completed by 163 students and Time 2 by 91 students. There was a significant increase in students' perceived knowledge of family theory Item 1 from a mean 4.13 (SD = 1.04) at Time 1 to 4.74 (SD = 0.89) (Z = -4.54 p blended learning resource increases the students' understanding of family assessment and is worth incorporating into future development of courses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Live Lectures or Online Videos: Students' Resource Choices in a First-Year University Mathematics Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Emma; Meehan, Maria; Parnell, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    In "Maths for Business", a mathematics module for non-mathematics specialists, students are given the choice of completing the module content via short online videos, live lectures or a combination of both. In this study, we identify students' specific usage patterns with both of these resources and discuss their reasons for the…

  13. Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Incorporation of Demonstrations, Popular Media Videos, and Animations Concerning Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Students often struggle with learning complex chemistry concepts. In today's society with the advances in multimedia technology, educators have a variety of tools available to help students learn these concepts. These tools include demonstrations, videos in the popular media, and animations; referred to collectively as multimethods. With the…

  14. Motivating EFL Students: E-Learning Enjoyment as a Predictor of Vocabulary Learning through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined e-learning enjoyment to see if it could predict high school students' vocabulary learning through a digital video game. Furthermore, the difference between those who played and those who watched the game was assessed. Participants of the study were male, high school, EFL students (N = 136, age 12-18) randomly assigned to…

  15. Video Productions as Learning Resources in Students' Knowledge Building in the Ubiquitous Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch; Ørngreen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    The chapter investigates how video productions may facilitate students’ knowledge building. The video productions in question may either be existing video productions directly aimed for educational use, video productions created in other contexts, but used in educational settings, or video produc...

  16. An Emerging Learning Design for Student-Generated "iVideos"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Matthew; Jones, Glynis; Roberts, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an emerging learning design for a popular genre of learner-generated video projects: "Ideas Videos" or "iVideos." These advocacy-style videos are short, two-minute, digital videos designed "to evoke powerful experiences about educative ideas" (Wong, Mishra, Koehler & Siebenthal, 2007, p1). We…

  17. The relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools, Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshadat, S; Ghasemi, S R; Ahmadian, M; RajabiGilan, N

    2014-01-09

    Computer or video games are a popular recreational activity and playing them may constitute a large part of leisure time. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran, in 2012. Our total sample was 573 students and our tool was the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and social relationships questionnaires. Survey respondents reported spending an average of 71.07 (SD 72.1) min/day on computer or video games. There was a significant relationship between time spent playing games and general mental health (P computer or video games with social relationships and their subscales, including trans-local relationships (P games (P < 0.02) and its dimensions, except for family relationships.

  18. Use of condensed videos in a flipped classroom for pharmaceutical calculations: Student perceptions and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloudeman, Mark W; Shah-Manek, Bijal; Wong, Terri H; Vo, Christina; Ip, Eric J

    2018-02-01

    The flipped teaching method was implemented through a series of multiple condensed videos for pharmaceutical calculations with student perceptions and academic performance assessed post-intervention. Student perceptions from the intervention group were assessed via an online survey. Pharmaceutical exam scores of the intervention group were compared to the control group. The intervention group spent a greater amount of class time on active learning. The majority of students (68.2%) thought that the flipped teaching method was more effective to learn pharmaceutical calculations than the traditional method. The mean exam scores of the intervention group were not significantly different than the control group (80.5 ± 15.8% vs 77.8 ± 16.8%; p = 0.253). Previous studies on the flipped teaching method have shown mixed results in regards to student perceptions and exam scores, where either student satisfaction increased or exam scores improved, but rarely both. The flipped teaching method was rated favorably by a majority of students. The flipped teaching method resulted in similar outcomes in pharmaceutical calculations exam scores, and it appears to be an acceptable and effective option to deliver pharmaceutical calculations in a Doctor of Pharmacy program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patients as teachers, medical students as filmmakers: the video slam, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Dan; Tomasa, Lynne; Koff, Nancy Alexander

    2009-09-01

    In 2006-2007 and 2007-2008, the authors pilot-tested a filmmaking project, (medical students filmed patients) to assess the project's potential to teach about the challenges of living with serious chronic illness. Two years of second-year medical students (N = 32) from The University of Arizona, working in groups of two or three, were paired with patients and filmed multiple home visits during eight months. Students edited their films to 7 to 10 minutes and added transitions, titles, and music. A mixed audience of students and faculty viewed the resulting 12 films in a "Video Slam." Faculty also used the films in the formal curriculum to illustrate teaching points related to chronic illness. Student filmmakers, on average, made 4.4 visits, collected 5.6 hours of film, and edited for 26.6 hours. Students reported that the project affected what they planned to cover in clinic visits, increased their plans to involve patients in care, enhanced their appreciation for patient-centered care, improved their knowledge of community resources, improved their understanding of allied health professionals' roles, and taught them about patients' innovative adaptations. Overall, students rated the project highly for its impact on their education (mean = 4.52 of 5). Student and faculty viewers of the films (N = 74) found the films compelling (mean = 4.95 of 5) and informative (mean = 4.93 of 5). The authors encountered the ethical dilemmas of deciding who controls the patients' recorded stories and navigating between patient anonymity/confidentiality and allowing patients to use their stories to teach.

  20. Student Teachers' Modeling of Acceleration Using a Video-Based Laboratory in Physics Education: A Multimodal Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Trudel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study intends to model kinematics learning of a pair of student teachers when exposed to prescribed teaching strategies in a video-based laboratory. Two student teachers were chosen from the Francophone B.Ed. program of the Faculty of Education of a Canadian university. The study method consisted of having the participants interact with a video-based laboratory to complete two activities for learning properties of acceleration in rectilinear motion. Time limits were placed on the learning activities during which the researcher collected detailed multimodal information from the student teachers' answers to questions, the graphs they produced from experimental data, and the videos taken during the learning sessions. As a result, we describe the learning approach each one followed, the evidence of conceptual change and the difficulties they face in tackling various aspects of the accelerated motion. We then specify advantages and limits of our research and propose recommendations for further study.

  1. Video gaming and gender differences in digital and printed reading performance among 15-year-olds students in 26 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovi, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Video games are a favorite leisure-time activity among teenagers worldwide. This study examines cross-national gender differences in reading achievement and video gaming and whether video gaming explains gender differences in reading achievement and differences in performance between paper-based and computer-based reading. We use data from a representative sample of 145,953 students from 26 countries who sat the PISA 2012 assessments and provided self-reports on use of video games. Although boys tend to have poorer results in both the computer-based and the paper-based reading assessments, boys' under achievement is smaller when the assessment is delivered on computer than when it is delivered on paper. Boys underperformance compared to girls in the two reading assessments is particularly pronounced among low-achieving students. Among both boys and girls moderate use of single-player games is associated with a performance advantage. However, frequent engagement with collaborative online games is generally associated with a steep reduction in achievement, particularly in the paper-based test and particularly among low-achieving students. Excessive gaming may hinder academic achievement, but moderate gaming can promote positive student outcomes. In many countries video gaming explains the difference in the gender gap in reading between the paper-based and the computer-based assessments. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte; Mors, Ole; Ringsted, Charlotte; Morcke, Anne Mette

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed interviews. Students taught with text-based patient cases emphasized excitement and drama towards the personal clinical narratives presented by the teachers during the course, but never referred to the patient cases. Authority and boundary setting were regarded as important in managing patients. Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact on students' patient-centeredness. Video-based patient cases are probably more effective than text-based patient cases in fostering patient-centered perspectives in medical students. Teachers sharing stories from their own clinical experiences stimulates both engagement and excitement, but may also provoke unintended stigma and influence an authoritative approach in medical students towards managing patients in clinical psychiatry.

  3. A brief report on the relationship between self-control, video game addiction and academic achievement in normal and ADHD students

    OpenAIRE

    Haghbin, Maryam; Shaterian, Fatemeh; Hosseinzadeh, Davood; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Over the last two decades, research into video game addiction has grown increasingly. The present research aimed to examine the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement of normal and ADHD high school students. Based on previous research it was hypothesized that (i) there would be a relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement (ii) video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would ...

  4. Video surveillance captures student hand hygiene behavior, reactivity to observation, and peer influence in Kenyan primary schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Pickering

    Full Text Available In-person structured observation is considered the best approach for measuring hand hygiene behavior, yet is expensive, time consuming, and may alter behavior. Video surveillance could be a useful tool for objectively monitoring hand hygiene behavior if validated against current methods.Student hand cleaning behavior was monitored with video surveillance and in-person structured observation, both simultaneously and separately, at four primary schools in urban Kenya over a study period of 8 weeks.Video surveillance and in-person observation captured similar rates of hand cleaning (absolute difference <5%, p = 0.74. Video surveillance documented higher hand cleaning rates (71% when at least one other person was present at the hand cleaning station, compared to when a student was alone (48%; rate ratio  = 1.14 [95% CI 1.01-1.28]. Students increased hand cleaning rates during simultaneous video and in-person monitoring as compared to single-method monitoring, suggesting reactivity to each method of monitoring. This trend was documented at schools receiving a handwashing with soap intervention, but not at schools receiving a sanitizer intervention.Video surveillance of hand hygiene behavior yields results comparable to in-person observation among schools in a resource-constrained setting. Video surveillance also has certain advantages over in-person observation, including rapid data processing and the capability to capture new behavioral insights. Peer influence can significantly improve student hand cleaning behavior and, when possible, should be exploited in the design and implementation of school hand hygiene programs.

  5. Exploring Cultural Horizons: Connecting Australian Students with Asian Students via Video-Conferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Chris; Auh, Myung-Sook; Pegg, John; Cybula, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The need for Australian school students to develop a strong understanding of Asian culture has been recognised in the cross-curriculum priority, "Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia," of the Australian Curriculum. School students in rural and remote Australia have limited opportunities to engage with Asians and learn about their…

  6. Nursing students' self-evaluation using a video recording of foley catheterization: effects on students' competence, communication skills, and learning motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon Sook; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    An opportunity for a student to evaluate his or her own performance enhances self-awareness and promotes self-directed learning. Using three outcome measures of competency of procedure, communication skills, and learning motivation, the effects of self-evaluation using a video recording of the student's Foley catheterization was investigated in this study. The students in the experimental group (n = 20) evaluated their Foley catheterization performance by reviewing the video recordings of their own performance, whereas students in the control group (n = 20) received written evaluation guidelines only. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had better scores on competency (p communication skills (p performance developed by reviewing a videotape appears to increase the competency of clinical skills in nursing students. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Children's and students' independent work in the sphere of discovering and understanding the world and in science and social studies teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Zorica S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies worldwide suggest that one of the key problems in education is the training of students to independently select, combine and coordinate the use of different learning strategies in an effective manner. In order for the individual to be able to adapt learning strategies to the learning context, he or she must first master them, which requires the creation of conditions that enable children and students to independently practice certain academic skills in accordance with their experience, i.e. their previously acquired skills, and the nature of the learning content. This paper presents the results of a study which sought to examine the presence prevalence, quality and character of independent work among children in the 5 to 10 age range in the sphere of discovering and understanding the world and in science and social studies teaching. A descriptive method using the research technique of systematic observation was employed. The results suggest that there is a lack of activities that can adequately support the training of children and students for independent work and learning, that activities characterized by a higher degree of autonomy decline with children's and students' age, and that the character of children's and students' independent learning activities is not appropriate to the nature of the learning content.

  8. Intubation learning curve: comparison between video and direct laryngoscopy by inexperienced students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadi, H; Massoudi, N; Fathi, M; Jaffari, A; Gharaei, B; Moshki, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct laryngoscopy (DL) is considered the most common method of tracheal intubation. On the other hand, evidence shows the growing role of video laryngoscopy in danger airway administration. Objectives: Due to the importance of a proper training to accomplish an accurate and fast intubation by the student of anesthesia, this research was conducted to assess the effects of DL and video laryngoscopy (Glidescope VL) training on the success rate of tracheal intubation by low-skill students. Materials/Patients and styles: 50 undergraduate students of anesthesiology took part in this randomized control educational intervention. Having no considerable experience in intubation, they were selected and divided randomly into two equal groups (n = 25); video-laryngoscopy via GlideScope VL and direct laryngoscopy (DL) via a Macintosh blade were prepared by the same experienced anesthesiologist. All the participants practiced intubation six times on the same mannequin within a routine airway situation. The maximum acceptable time for each intubation was 3 minutes and three times of successful intubation was considered as an appropriate intubation skill. The required time for laryngoscopy and intubation at each stage, the grade of glottis view, the reasons for an unsuccessful intubation and the amount of successful intubations were recorded and compared between groups. Results: There was a clear variation between the 2 teams, in all the steps, based on the required time for laryngoscopy and intubation (p = 0.0001). Data analysis was performed by using repeated measures data which demonstrated that the necessary time for laryngoscopy and intubation during the study was clearly lower in the GlideScope VL team (p = .0001). In first five rounds of training, the glottis view in the DL group was significantly better than in the VL group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the result of today' study, routine airway intubation by using GlideScope VL is significantly faster than

  9. Secrets of Science. Videos 1-13. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Publishing Group, Burbank, CA. Discover Magazine.

    Discoveries in science and technology are being made at such a rapid pace that it is often difficult for many teachers to stay abreast of new and relevant information. To assist teachers in keeping their students well informed of new discoveries in science, Discover Magazine developed a 13-part video series entitled "Secrets of Science." In each…

  10. The reach of Spanish-language YouTube videos on physical examinations made by undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Ramos-Rincón

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the performance and reach of YouTube videos on physical examinations made by Spanish university students. We analyzed performance metrics for 4 videos on physical examinations in Spanish that were created by medical students at Miguel Hernández University (Elche, Spain and are available on YouTube, on the following topics: the head and neck (7:30, the cardiovascular system (7:38, the respiratory system (13:54, and the abdomen (11:10. We used the Analytics application offered by the YouTube platform to analyze the reach of the videos from the upload date (February 17, 2015 to July 28, 2017 (2 years, 5 months, and 11 days. The total number of views, length of watch-time, and the mean view duration for the 4 videos were, respectively: 164,403 views (mean, 41,101 views; range, 12,389 to 94,573 views, 425,888 minutes (mean, 106,472 minutes; range, 37,889 to 172,840 minutes, and 2:56 minutes (range, 1:49 to 4:03 minutes. Mexico was the most frequent playback location, followed by Spain, Colombia, and Venezuela. Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico had the most views per 100,000 population. Spanish-language tutorials are an alternative tool for teaching physical examination skills to students whose first language is not English. The videos were especially popular in Uruguay, Ecuador, and Mexico.

  11. The reach of Spanish-language YouTube videos on physical examinations made by undergraduate medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance and reach of YouTube videos on physical examinations made by Spanish university students. We analyzed performance metrics for 4 videos on physical examinations in Spanish that were created by medical students at Miguel Hernández University (Elche, Spain) and are available on YouTube, on the following topics: the head and neck (7:30), the cardiovascular system (7:38), the respiratory system (13:54), and the abdomen (11:10). We used the Analytics application offered by the YouTube platform to analyze the reach of the videos from the upload date (February 17, 2015) to July 28, 2017 (2 years, 5 months, and 11 days). The total number of views, length of watch-time, and the mean view duration for the 4 videos were, respectively: 164,403 views (mean, 41,101 views; range, 12,389 to 94,573 views), 425,888 minutes (mean, 106,472 minutes; range, 37,889 to 172,840 minutes), and 2:56 minutes (range, 1:49 to 4:03 minutes). Mexico was the most frequent playback location, followed by Spain, Colombia, and Venezuela. Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico had the most views per 100,000 population. Spanish-language tutorials are an alternative tool for teaching physical examination skills to students whose first language is not English. The videos were especially popular in Uruguay, Ecuador, and Mexico. PMID:29278903

  12. The reach of Spanish-language YouTube videos on physical examinations made by undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Rincón, José M; Belinchón-Romero, Isabel; Sánchez-Ferrer, Francisco; Torre, Guillermo Martínez-de la; Harris, Meggan; Sánchez-Fernández, Javier

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance and reach of YouTube videos on physical examinations made by Spanish university students. We analyzed performance metrics for 4 videos on physical examinations in Spanish that were created by medical students at Miguel Hernández University (Elche, Spain) and are available on YouTube, on the following topics: the head and neck (7:30), the cardiovascular system (7:38), the respiratory system (13:54), and the abdomen (11:10). We used the Analytics application offered by the YouTube platform to analyze the reach of the videos from the upload date (February 17, 2015) to July 28, 2017 (2 years, 5 months, and 11 days). The total number of views, length of watch-time, and the mean view duration for the 4 videos were, respectively: 164,403 views (mean, 41,101 views; range, 12,389 to 94,573 views), 425,888 minutes (mean, 106,472 minutes; range, 37,889 to 172,840 minutes), and 2:56 minutes (range, 1:49 to 4:03 minutes). Mexico was the most frequent playback location, followed by Spain, Colombia, and Venezuela. Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico had the most views per 100,000 population. Spanish-language tutorials are an alternative tool for teaching physical examination skills to students whose first language is not English. The videos were especially popular in Uruguay, Ecuador, and Mexico.

  13. Increasing Reasoning Awareness: Video Analysis of Students' Two-Party Virtual Patient Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelbring, Samuel; Parodis, Ioannis; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2018-02-27

    Collaborative reasoning occurs in clinical practice but is rarely developed during education. The computerized virtual patient (VP) cases allow for a stepwise exploration of cases and thus stimulate active learning. Peer settings during VP sessions are believed to have benefits in terms of reasoning but have received scant attention in the literature. The objective of this study was to thoroughly investigate interactions during medical students' clinical reasoning in two-party VP settings. An in-depth exploration of students' interactions in dyad settings of VP sessions was performed. For this purpose, two prerecorded VP sessions lasting 1 hour each were observed, transcribed in full, and analyzed. The transcriptions were analyzed using thematic analysis, and short clips from the videos were selected for subsequent analysis in relation to clinical reasoning and clinical aspects. Four categories of interactions were identified: (1) task-related dialogue, in which students negotiated a shared understanding of the task and strategies for information gathering; (2) case-related insights and perspectives were gained, and the students consolidated and applied preexisting biomedical knowledge into a clinical setting; (3) clinical reasoning interactions were made explicit. In these, hypotheses were followed up and clinical examples were used. The researchers observed interactions not only between students and the VP but also (4) interactions with other resources, such as textbooks. The interactions are discussed in relation to theories of clinical reasoning and peer learning. The dyad VP setting is conducive to activities that promote analytic clinical reasoning. In this setting, components such as peer interaction, access to different resources, and reduced time constraints provided a productive situation in which the students pursued different lines of reasoning. ©Samuel Edelbring, Ioannis Parodis, Ingrid E Lundberg. Originally published in JMIR Medical Education (http

  14. The Impact of an Online Educational Video and a Medical Amnesty Policy on College Students' Intentions to Seek Help in the Presence of Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster-Aaland, Laura; Thompson, Kevin; Eighmy, Myron

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact of a medical amnesty policy and an online alcohol poisoning video on college students' intentions to seek help when witnessing alcohol poisoning symptoms. Students were randomly assigned to receive an amnesty policy, alcohol poisoning video, or both. The group that received both treatments was most likely to seek…

  15. Discovering Randomness, Recovering Expertise: The Different Approaches to the Quality in Measurement of Coulomb and Gauss and of Today's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Susanne; Heering, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss different approaches to the quality (or uncertainty) of measurement data considering both historical examples and today's students' views. Today's teaching of data analysis is very much focussed on the application of statistical routines (often called the "Gaussian approach" to error analysis). Studies on…

  16. Discovering the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    1999-04-01

    Discovering the Solar System Barrie W. Jones The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK Discovering the Solar System is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Solar System and of the ways in which the various bodies have been investigated and modelled. The approach is thematic, with sequences of chapters on the interiors of planetary bodies, on their surfaces, and on their atmospheres. Within each sequence there is a chapter on general principles and processes followed by one or two chapters on specific bodies. There is also an introductory chapter, a chapter on the origin of the Solar System, and a chapter on asteroids, comets and meteorites. Liberally illustrated with diagrams, black and white photographs and colour plates, Discovering the Solar System also features: * tables of essential data * question and answers within the text * end of section review questions with answers and comments Discovering the Solar System is essential reading for all undergraduate students for whom astronomy or planetary science are components of their degrees, and for those at a more advanced level approaching the subject for the first time. It will also be of great interest to non-specialists with a keen interest in astronomy. A small amount of scientific knowledge is assumed plus familiarity with basic algebra and graphs. There is no calculus. Praise for this book includes: ".certainly qualifies as an authoritative text. The author clearly has an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject." Meteorics and Planetary Science ".liberally doused with relevant graphs, tables, and black and white figures of good quality." EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union ".one of the best books on the Solar System I have seen. The general accuracy and quality of the content is excellent." Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  17. Improving student learning via mobile phone video content: Evidence from the BridgeIT India project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Matthew; Quraishy, Zubeeda Banu; Velamuri, Malathi

    2015-08-01

    Past efforts invested in computer-based education technology interventions have generated little evidence of affordable success at scale. This paper presents the results of a mobile phone-based intervention conducted in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in 2012-13. The BridgeIT project provided a pool of audio-visual learning materials organised in accordance with a system of syllabi pacing charts. Teachers of Standard 5 and 6 English and Science classes were notified of the availability of new videos via text messages (SMS), which they downloaded onto their phones using an open-source application and showed, with suggested activities, to students on a TV screen using a TV-out cable. In their evaluation of this project, the authors of this paper found that the test scores of children who experienced the intervention improved by 0.36 standard deviations in English and 0.98 standard deviations in Science in Andhra Pradesh, relative to students in similar classrooms who did not experience the intervention. Differences between treatment and control schools in Tamil Nadu were less marked. The intervention was also cost-effective, relative to other computer-based interventions. Based on these results, the authors argue that is possible to use mobile phones to produce a strong positive and statistically significant effect in terms of teaching and learning quality across a large number of classrooms in India at a lower cost per student than past computer-based interventions.

  18. The relationship between the physical activity of students from Lublin’s universities, and video games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polski Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of computer technology, gaming has become more popular, and young people spend more and more time playing such games. It is thought that this a major factor responsible for the lowered physical activity of today's society. For a better understanding of the issue, we assessed how many students spend their free time playing video games, and how this form of recreation affects their levels of physical activity. The investigation of the relationship between physical activity and playing computer games was undertaken via a questionnaire containing 16 questions, and this was applied to a representative sample of 138 students drawn from Lublin’s universities. The results of this show that males are more physically active (85% compared to 75% women. However, only 9% men and 13% women train every day. To keep the body in shape, the most common activity for the respondents is aerobics training (approx. 30%, walking and cycling. Such exercise is performed to improve or keep in shape, and as a form of relaxation. However, one third of all respondents play video games, 70% of these are males and only 16% are females. What is more, our results show that there was no correlation between level of physical activity and gaming. In both groups, about 80% of all respondents are physically active. Yet, among the players, there are more overweight people (28%, as compared to 10% in the non-player group. Still, players, in contrast to popular opinion, are more active than non-playing people. No association was found between playing computer games and health problems.

  19. The Effect of Differentiated Video Presentation Formats on Community College Students' Preferences for Selected Excerpts of Western Classical Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracey Jean

    2009-01-01

    This study was an examination of participants' preference for classical music excerpts presented in differentiated types of music video formats. Participants (N = 83) were volunteer students enrolled in intact music appreciation classes at a suburban community college located in a Midwestern city. Participants listened to and viewed music video…

  20. Use of Video-Based Cases as a Medium to Develop Critical Thinking Skills in Health Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Maher, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    One learning strategy that, at present, has not been widely used in graduate Physical Therapy education is "video based cases". The use of visually unfolding case-base experience provides students a unique opportunity to experience real patient scenarios in their classroom environment. The purpose of this paper is to provide data on student…

  1. Learning with Technology: Video Modeling with Concrete-Representational-Abstract Sequencing for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Hughes, Elizabeth M.; Shinaberry, Megan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video modeling intervention with concrete-representational-abstract instructional sequence in teaching mathematics concepts to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A multiple baseline across skills design of single-case experimental methodology was used to determine the…

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Video-Modeling Based Interventions for Reduction of Challenging Behaviors for Students with EBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losinski, Mickey; Wiseman, Nicole; White, Sherry A.; Balluch, Felicity

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the use of video modeling (VM)-based interventions to reduce the challenging behaviors of students with emotional or behavioral disorders. Each study was evaluated using Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC's) quality indicators for evidence-based practices. In addition, study effects were calculated along the three…

  3. Effects of Video Self-Modeling on Eliminating Public Undressing by Elementary-Aged Students with Developmental Disabilities during Urination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Takeuchi, Ai; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of video self-modeling (VSM) for eliminating the public undressing of two elementary-aged students with developmental disabilities during urination. A multiple-probe design across participants revealed that the degree of exposed body parts decreased immediately after introduction of VSM. However, exposure…

  4. Evaluation of Generalized Performance across Materials When Using Video Technology by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Foster, Ashley L.; Bryant, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of four high school-aged students with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and moderate intellectual disability to generalize performance of skills when using materials different from those presented through video models. An adapted alternating treatments design was used to evaluate student…

  5. A brief report on the relationship between self-control, video game addiction and academic achievement in normal and ADHD students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghbin, Maryam; Shaterian, Fatemeh; Hosseinzadeh, Davood; Griffiths, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, research into video game addiction has grown increasingly. The present research aimed to examine the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement of normal and ADHD high school students. Based on previous research it was hypothesized that (i) there would be a relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement (ii) video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between male and female students, and (iii) the relationship between video game addiction, self-control and academic achievement would differ between normal students and ADHD students. The research population comprised first grade high school students of Khomeini-Shahr (a city in the central part of Iran). From this population, a sample group of 339 students participated in the study. The survey included the Game Addiction Scale (Lemmens, Valkenburg & Peter, 2009), the Self-Control Scale (Tangney, Baumeister & Boone, 2004) and the ADHD Diagnostic checklist (Kessler et al., 2007). In addition to questions relating to basic demographic information, students' Grade Point Average (GPA) for two terms was used for measuring their academic achievement. These hypotheses were examined using a regression analysis. Among Iranian students, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, and academic achievement differed between male and female students. However, the relationship between video game addiction, self-control, academic achievement, and type of student was not statistically significant. Although the results cannot demonstrate a causal relationship between video game use, video game addiction, and academic achievement, they suggest that high involvement in playing video games leaves less time for engaging in academic work.

  6. The effects of video games on the receptive vocabulary proficiency of Swedish ESL students

    OpenAIRE

    Cabraja, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Playing video games is an activity that takes up an increasing amount of children’s and adolescent’s spare time. While some previous studies have highlighted the negative aspects of video games, little research has been carried out on the linguistic learning opportunities that video games present. This study primarily investigates if Swedish second language learners of English can increase their vocabulary proficiency in English with the use of video games. In order to answer the research que...

  7. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Khorasani, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2015-04-01

    Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students' ability intaking informed consent from patients. This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students  of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics coursebefore their 'clinical clerkship'training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group(n=28) was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1(n=22) were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issuesthrough the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics ofinformed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anovatest.P-Value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. The mean scores results of A2, A1and B groupwere found to be7.21 , 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8,respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (plecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better.it should be considered that mixed methodsof teaching should be used together for better result.

  8. [Internet and video games among students of Reunion Island in 2010: uses, misuses, perceptions and associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricquebourg, M; Bernède-Bauduin, C; Mété, D; Dafreville, C; Stojcic, I; Vauthier, M; Galland, M-C

    2013-12-01

    Describe the uses of Internet and video games and quantify associated problematic uses. Information on student practices concerning the use of the Internet and video games was collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Problematic uses were identified with specific tools (Young criteria and Tejeiro criteria) and with self-evaluative questions. Information on life events with traumatic potential and use of psychoactive substances was also collected. Logistic regression models were applied to identify possible associated factors. Based on a sample of 1119 subjects, this study showed that students in Reunion Island are very concerned by the uses of the Internet and video games (98% and 46% of respondents). The prevalence of problematic use of the Internet accounted for 6% of respondents. Problematic uses of video games involved 8% of students (18% of gamers). Young people seemed unaware of their problematic practices and were seeking informations. The public respondent was also characterized by vulnerable situations (traumatic events induring their lives, consumption of psychoactive substances). Significant associations (with no identified causality) were examined, in particular between problematic uses of Internet and video games, and life events with traumatic potential. These first estimates of the prevalence of problematic use of Internet and video games on Reunion Island are important to promote locally collective awareness about these modern addictions. These results will be used to guide local actions of prevention and care, especially among younger generations. But it is necessary to conduct further work to better identify the factors associated with these problematic uses (determinants, comorbidities addictive…). Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Does teaching method affect students' perceptions regarding communication patterns in pediatric dentistry? A comparison of lecture and video methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwitzki, Matthias; Meller, Christina; Beyer, Christine

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dental students' perceptions regarding six communication patterns for use in pediatric dentistry differed depending on whether they were taught by lecturing or by video-based teaching. Prior to the introduction of interpersonal skills in a clinical course in pediatric dentistry, four consecutive cohorts of students (n=107) in a German dental school were divided equally into two groups. Group one (n=57) was taught by video sequences and group two (n=50) by conventional lecture. Six communication patterns were presented: involvement of the child's toy(s), speaking in positive phrases, mentioning a personal aspect, recalling positive behavior of the patient, addressing fear verbally, and complimenting the patient. Immediately after the presentation, students were asked by means of a questionnaire about their assessment of and intentions regarding the clinical application of the communication patterns presented. After completion of the course, they were asked about the communication patterns that had been used. There were significant differences for three communication patterns in favor of video-based teaching (pstudents perceived differences between video-based teaching and lecturing regarding ease of use, but they did not seem to benefit from one method over the other regarding clinical application.

  10. The Use of Video Cases in a Multimedia Learning Environment for Facilitating High School Students' Inquiry into a Problem from Varying Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydney, Janet Mannheimer; Grincewicz, Amy

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the connection between the use of video cases within a multimedia learning environment and students' inquiry into a socio-scientific problem. The software program was designed based on principles from the Cognitive Flexibility Theory (CFT) and incorporated video cases of experts with differing perspectives. Seventy-nine 10th-grade students in an urban high school participated in this study. After watching the expert videos, students generated investigative questions and reflected on how their ideas changed over time. This study found a significant correlation between the time students spent watching the expert videos and their ability to consider the problem's perspectives as well as their ability to integrate these perspectives within their questions. Moreover, problem-solving ability and time watching the videos were detected as possible influential predictors of students' consideration of the problem's perspectives within their questions. Although students watched all video cases in equivalent ways, one of the video cases, which incorporated multiple perspectives as opposed to just presenting one perspective, appeared most influential in helping students integrate the various perspectives into their own thinking. A qualitative analysis of students' reflections indicated that many students appreciated the complexity, authenticity, and ethical dimensions of the problem. It also revealed that while the majority of students thought critically about the problem, some students still had naïve or simplistic ways of thinking. This study provided some preliminary evidence that offering students the opportunity to watch videos of different perspectives may influence them to think in alternative ways about a complex problem.

  11. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  12. Is video review of patient encounters an effective tool for medical student learning? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammoud MM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Maya M Hammoud1, Helen K Morgan1, Mary E Edwards2, Jennifer A Lyon2, Casey White31Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Health Sciences Center Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Faculty Affairs and Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USAPurpose: To determine if video review of student performance during patient encounters is an effective tool for medical student learning.Methods: Multiple bibliographic databases that include medical, general health care, education, psychology, and behavioral science literature were searched for the following terms: medical students, medical education, undergraduate medical education, education, self-assessment, self-evaluation, self-appraisal, feedback, videotape, video recording, televised, and DVD. The authors examined all abstracts resulting from this search and reviewed the full text of the relevant articles as well as additional articles identified in the reference lists of the relevant articles. Studies were classified by year of student (preclinical or clinical and study design (controlled or non-controlled.Results: A total of 67 articles met the final search criteria and were fully reviewed. Most studies were non-controlled and performed in the clinical years. Although the studies were quite variable in quality, design, and outcomes, in general video recording of performance and subsequent review by students with expert feedback had positive outcomes in improving feedback and ultimate performance. Video review with self-assessment alone was not found to be generally effective, but when linked with expert feedback it was superior to traditional feedback alone.Conclusion: There are many methods for integrating effective use of video-captured performance into a program of learning. We recommend combining student self-assessment with feedback

  13. Utilizing an Innovative Preceptor Video Mini-Series to Prepare Students for Experiential Rotations: Does it Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig D Cox

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine whether an innovative Mini-Series training model originally developed for preceptors could be beneficial to pharmacy students prior to and/or after beginning their introductory or advanced pharmacy practice experiences. Methods: This program consists of twelve incremental video episodes, each ranging from five to eight minutes in length. It tells the story of a young pharmacy preceptor as she guides a third and fourth year student through a challenging six-week clinical hospital rotation. Two to three reflection questions were written for each individual episode, focusing on student issues portrayed in the videos. Two-hour viewing sessions, consisting of all (12 video episodes and facilitated student reflection were held for 2nd – 4th year professional students on two campuses. At conclusion of each session, students completed a short evaluation to gauge the effectiveness and potential application of the Mini-Series program. Results: Fifty-six (56 students (22 fourth-year, 6 third-ear, and 28 second-year participated in the voluntary viewing sessions. All students either agreed or strongly agreed that the Mini-Series program was entertaining and educational. In addition, 82% of students strongly agreed this program would be beneficial for students prior to taking their first experiential rotation, while only 47% strongly agreed it would be beneficial after they had started rotations. On a 5-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree, 5=strongly agree, participants reported a mean of 4.6 that this medium is more effective than traditional lecture orientations held by the Office of Experiential Programs. On three open-ended questions, students provided a diversity of suggestions for enhancing the Mini-Series to make it more effective for students. Implications: The “Mini-Series” model was well received by students as a training medium to deliver educational content. As a result, more programs are being developed

  14. Introducing an Information-Seeking Skill in a School Library to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Using Video Modeling and Least-to-Most Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Patricia T.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a video peer modeling and least-to-most prompting intervention in the school library setting, targeting the instructional delivery of an information-literacy skill to students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Research studies have evaluated the effectiveness of video-modeling procedures in the…

  15. Impact of Nigerian Home Video/Movie Industry on the Moral Behaviours of Secondary School Students in Ebonyi State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Nkechi C.

    2016-01-01

    Impact of home video/movie industry on the moral behaviour of secondary school students is a search for the impact of home video in moral upbringing of school children. The study adopted a survey design approach of investigation: The area of study is Ebonyi State and the population comprised all the 322 CRS teachers in the state. 200 teachers were…

  16. Effect of a procedural video CD and study guide on the practical fixed prosthodontic performance of Iranian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Sakineh; Azari, Abbas; Mahgoli, Hosseinali; Akhoundi, Nasrin

    2012-03-01

    Dental students in programs around the world typically pass preclinical courses before entering the clinic and working on actual patients. Since fixed prosthodontics is a preclinical course that requires a great deal of effort, students may experience a substantial amount of stress that may affect their self-confidence and/or clinical performance. In this study, an instructional video CD (VCD) and study guide depicting the step-by-step procedures involved in a metal-ceramic tooth preparation and provisional crown fabrication was prepared. Students at the Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, were divided randomly into two groups. Group A students trained as usual with live patients, and Group B students were given a copy of the VCD and study guide following a lecture. The students in Group B were encouraged to read the study guide and watch the VCD after live demonstrations. Then, both groups practiced individually on mannequins. At the end of the course, the students completed a sixteen-item questionnaire about their stress level, self-confidence, and knowledge base. The results showed that the students exposed to the extra media performed significantly better on some practical phases, e.g., laboratory procedures. A moderate, insignificant correlation was detected between exposure to media and decreasing the students' stress and self-esteem. We concluded that supplementary teaching aids such as a VCD and study guide may improve the clinical performance of dental students to some extent, but the live demonstration is still preferred by students.

  17. Student Responses to a Flipped Introductory Physics Class with built-in Post-Video Feedback Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Roberto

    We present and analyze student responses to multiple Introductory physics classes in a university setting, taught in a ''flipped'' class format. The classes included algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics. Outside class, students viewed over 100 online video lectures on Classical Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Modern Physics prepared by this author and in some cases, by a third-party lecture package available over YouTube. Inside the class, students solved and discussed problems and conceptual issues in greater detail. A pre-class online quiz was deployed as an important source of feedback. I will report on the student reactions to the feedback mechanism, student responses using data based on anonymous surveys, as well as on learning gains from pre-/post- physics diagnostic tests. The results indicate a broad mixture of responses to different lecture video packages that depend on learning styles and perceptions. Students preferred the online quizzes as a mechanism to validate their understanding. The learning gains based on FCI and CSEM surveys were significant.

  18. A prospective, blinded evaluation of a video-assisted '4-stage approach' during undergraduate student practical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Katrin; Wand, Saskia; Schmid, Oliver; Roessler, Markus; Quintel, Michael; Leissner, Kay B; Russo, Sebastian G

    2014-05-22

    The 4-stage approach (4-SA) is used as a didactic method for teaching practical skills in international courses on resuscitation and the structured care of trauma patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate objective and subjective learning success of a video-assisted 4-SA in teaching undergraduate medical students. The participants were medical students learning the principles of the acute treatment of trauma patients in their multidiscipline course on emergency and intensive care medicine. The participants were quasi- randomly divided into two groups. The 4-SA was used in both groups. In the control group, all four steps were presented by an instructor. In the study group, the first two steps were presented as a video. At the end of the course a 5-minute objective, structured clinical examination (OSCE) of a simulated trauma patient was conducted. The test results were divided into objective results obtained through a checklist with 9 dichotomous items and the assessment of the global performance rated subjectively by the examiner on a Likert scale from 1 to 6. 313 students were recruited; the results of 256 were suitable for analysis. The OSCE results were excellent in both groups and did not differ significantly (control group: median 9, interquantil range (IQR) 8-9, study group: median 9, IQR 8-9; p = 0.29). The global performance was rated significantly better for the study group (median 1, IQR 1-2 vs. median 2, IQR 1-3; p students in their evaluation after the course, was greater in the study group (85% vs. 80%). It is possible to employ video assistance in the classical 4-SA with comparable objective test results in an OSCE. The global performance was significantly improved with use of video assistance.

  19. The NASA eClips 4D Program: Impacts from the First Year Quasi-Experimental Study on Video Development and Viewing on Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, B.; Davis, H. B.; Harper-Neely, J.; Bowers, S.

    2017-12-01

    NASA eClips™ is a multi-media educational program providing educational resources relevant to the formal K-12 classroom. Science content for the NASA eClips™ 4D elements is drawn from all four divisions of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as cross-divisional topics. The suite of elements fulfills the following SMD education objectives: Enable STEM education, Improve U.S. scientific literacy, Advance national education goals (CoSTEM), and Leverage efforts through partnerships. A component of eClips™ was the development of NASA Spotlite videos (student developed videos designed to increase student literacy and address misconceptions of other students) by digital media students. While developing the Sptolite videos, the students gained skills in teamwork, working in groups to accomplish a task, and how to convey specific concepts in a video. The teachers felt the video project was a good fit for their courses and enhanced what the students were already learning. Teachers also reported that the students learned knowledge and skills that would help them in future careers including how to gain a better understanding of a project and the importance of being knowledgeable about the topic. The student developed eClips videos were then used as part of interactive lessons to help other students learn about key science concepts. As part of our research, we established a quasi-experimental design where one group of students received the intervention including the Spotlite videos (intervention group) and one group did not receive the intervention (comparison group). An overall comparison of post scores between intervention group and comparison group students showed intervention groups had significantly higher scores in three of the four content areas - Ozone, Clouds, and Phase Change.

  20. The use of animation video in teaching to enhance the imagination and visualization of student in engineering drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail M., E.; Mahazir I., Irwan; Othman, H.; Amiruddin M., H.; Ariffin, A.

    2017-05-01

    The rapid development of information technology today has given a new breath toward usage of computer in education. One of the increasingly popular nowadays is a multimedia technology that merges a variety of media such as text, graphics, animation, video and audio controlled by a computer. With this technology, a wide range of multimedia element can be developed to improve the quality of education. For that reason, this study aims to investigate the use of multimedia element based on animated video that was developed for Engineering Drawing subject according to the syllabus of Vocational College of Malaysia. The design for this study was a survey method using a quantitative approach and involved 30 respondents from Industrial Machining students. The instruments used in study is questionnaire with correlation coefficient value (0.83), calculated on Alpha-Cronbach. Data was collected and analyzed descriptive analyzed using SPSS. The study found that multimedia element for animation video was use significant have capable to increase imagination and visualization of student. The implications of this study provide information of use of multimedia element will student effect imagination and visualization. In general, these findings contribute to the formation of multimedia element of materials appropriate to enhance the quality of learning material for engineering drawing.

  1. [The effects of case-based learning using video on clinical decision making and learning motivation in undergraduate nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Si-Ra

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of case-base learning (CBL) using video on clinical decision-making and learning motivation. This research was conducted between June 2009 and April 2010 as a nonequivalent control group non-synchronized design. The study population was 44 third year nursing students who enrolled in a college of nursing, A University in Korea. The nursing students were divided into the CBL and the control group. The intervention was the CBL with three cases using video. The controls attended a traditional live lecture on the same topics. With questionnaires objective clinical decision-making, subjective clinical decision-making, and learning motivation were measured before the intervention, and 10 weeks after the intervention. Significant group differences were observed in clinical decision-making and learning motivation. The post-test scores of clinical decision-making in the CBL group were statistically higher than the control group. Learning motivation was also significantly higher in the CBL group than in the control group. These results indicate that CBL using video is effective in enhancing clinical decision-making and motivating students to learn by encouraging self-directed learning and creating more interest and curiosity in learning.

  2. BEATING ISIS IN THE DIGITAL SPACE: FOCUS TESTING ISIS DEFECTOR COUNTER-NARRATIVE VIDEOS WITH AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allision McDowell-Smith

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ISIS recruits on a 24/7 basis in over 21 languages over the Internet using videos, memes, tweets and other social media postings and swarming in on anyone that retweets, likes or endorses their materials to try to seduce them into the group. Their unprecedented social media drive has resulted in over 30,000 foreign fighters from more than 100 countries migrating to Syria and Iraq. ISIS recruitment in the U.S. is for the most part Internet based and has resulted in the actual and attempted recruitment of over 100 individuals residing in the U.S. with over 200 Americans traveling to Syria to join terrorist groups. To date very little counter-narrative material exists and most of it is cognitive versus emotionally impactful. The International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism (ICSVE Breaking the ISIS Brand – the ISIS Defectors Interviews Project has managed to collect 43 ISIS defector interviews and thus far produce two video clips of ISIS defectors denouncing the group which were focus tested in this research in a small normative college student sample of 75 undergraduate students. The results demonstrate that American college students find the videos authentic, disturbing and turn them away from ISIS, fulfilling the goals that the project is aiming for in producing counter-narrative materials.

  3. Assessing the Use of YouTube Videos and Interactive Activities as a Critical Thinking Stimulator for Tertiary Students: An Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Sethela; Yaacob, Aizan; Kheng, Yeoh Khar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to investigate the use of YouTube videos and interactive activities in stimulating critical thinking among students from a public university in Malaysia. There were 50 students of mixed background, comprised of local and foreign students who participated in this study which lasted for one semester. Data was…

  4. Using Video To Promote and To Enhance Active Student Participation in English Literature Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Marci

    1995-01-01

    Video is an effective educational tool in English Literature classes when the teacher is creative in its application. Video has five specific properties which make it an effective instructional device: (1) condensing or expanding an experience; (2) making the invisible visible; (3) taking the viewers where they could not go; (4) eliciting…

  5. Community of Inquiry and Video in Higher Education: Engaging Students Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to explore how video technology can be effectively used in an online classroom setting. The author found and cited online journals with information about the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. He further explored specific sources that could give readers an idea how online video technology can affect…

  6. Students' Benefit from Video with Interactive Quizzes in a First-Year Calculus Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Nørgaard, Cita; Kjær, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The intention of this project was to study the students’ self-reported learning outcome from different formats of videos in an introductory calculus course.......The intention of this project was to study the students’ self-reported learning outcome from different formats of videos in an introductory calculus course....

  7. The Student with a Thousand Faces: From the Ethics in Video Games to Becoming a Citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Yupanqui J.; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2012-01-01

    Video games, as technological and cultural artifacts of considerable influence in the contemporary society, play an important role in the construction of identities, just as other artifacts (e.g., books, newspapers, television) played for a long time. In this paper, we discuss this role by considering video games under two concepts, othering and…

  8. Learning with Technology: Video Modeling with Concrete-Representational-Abstract Sequencing for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Hughes, Elizabeth M; Shinaberry, Megan

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video modeling intervention with concrete-representational-abstract instructional sequence in teaching mathematics concepts to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A multiple baseline across skills design of single-case experimental methodology was used to determine the effectiveness of the intervention on the acquisition and maintenance of addition, subtraction, and number comparison skills for four elementary school students with ASD. Findings supported the effectiveness of the intervention in improving skill acquisition and maintenance at a 3-week follow-up. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  9. Effect of Video Triggering During Conventional Lectures on Final Grades of Dental Students in an Oral Biology Course: A Two-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Al-Jandan, Badr A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the inclusion of video triggers in conventional face-to-face lectures on the final grades of dental students in an oral biology course. The study consisted of two groups of students taking the course in two academic years at a dental school in Saudi Arabia: group 1, 2013-14 (control); and group 2, 2014-15. The total sample comprised 163 students (n=163; group 1: 71 and group 2: 92). Group 1 received lectures without any videos, whereas group 2 received lectures that included two to three videos of one to five minutes in duration with triggering effect (a video was shown every 10-15 minutes into the lecture). The final examination grades of the students were accessed retrospectively, and the data were compared with a chi-square test. The results confirmed that a higher number of students who received video triggering during lectures (group 2) performed better than their counterparts who did not receive video triggers (group 1); the difference was statistically significant (pvideo triggers may offer an advantage over conventional methods and their inclusion in lectures can be a way to enhance students' learning.

  10. Assessing twenty-first century skills through a teacher created video game for high school biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Holmes, Shawn

    2010-07-01

    As twenty-first century skills become a greater focus in K-12 education, an infusion of technology that meets the needs of today's students is paramount. This study looks at the design and creation of a Multiplayer Educational Gaming Application (MEGA) for high school biology students. The quasi-experimental, qualitative design assessed the twenty-first century skills of digital age literacy, inventive thinking, high productivity, and effective communication techniques of the students exposed to a MEGA. Three factors, as they pertained to these skills, emerged from classroom observations. Interaction with the teacher, discussion with peers, and engagement/time-on-task while playing the MEGA suggested that students playing an educational video game exhibited all of the projected twenty-first century skills while being engrossed in the embedded science content.

  11. The student with a thousand faces: from the ethics in video games to becoming a citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Yupanqui J.; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2012-12-01

    Video games, as technological and cultural artifacts of considerable influence in the contemporary society, play an important role in the construction of identities, just as other artifacts (e.g., books, newspapers, television) played for a long time. In this paper, we discuss this role by considering video games under two concepts, othering and technopoly, and focus on how these concepts demand that we deepen our understanding of the ethics of video games. We address here how the construction of identities within video games involves othering process, that is, processes through which, when signifying and identifying `Ourselves', we create and marginalize `Others'. Moreover, we discuss how video games can play an important role in the legitimation of the technopoly, understood as a totalitarian regime related to science, technology and their place in our societies. Under these two concepts, understanding the ethics of video games goes beyond the controversy about their violence. The main focus of discussion should lie in how the ethics of video games is related to their part in the formation of the players' citizenship. Examining several examples of electronic games, we consider how video games provide a rich experience in which the player has the opportunity to develop a practical wisdom ( phronesis), which can lead her to be a virtuous being. However, they can be also harmful to the moral experiences of the subjects when they show unethical contents related to othering processes that are not so clearly and openly condemned as violence, as in the cases of sexism, racism or xenophobia. Rather than leading us to conclude that video games needed to be banned or censored, this argument makes us highlight their role in the (science) education of critical, socially responsible, ethical, and politically active citizens, precisely because they encompass othering processes and science, technology, and society relationships.

  12. The effect of music video exposure on students' perceived clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Lori F; Mori-Inoue, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of video exposure on music therapy students' perceptions of clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy. Fifty-one participants were randomly divided into two groups and exposed to a popular song in either audio-only or music video format. Participants were asked to indicate clinical applications; specifically, participants chose: (a) possible population(s), (b) most appropriate population(s), (c) possible age range(s), (d) most appropriate age ranges, (e) possible goal area(s) and (f) most appropriate goal area. Data for each of these categories were compiled and analyzed, with no significant differences found in the choices made by the audio-only and video groups. Three items, (a) selection of the bereavement population, (b) selection of bereavement as the most appropriate population and (c) selection of the age ranges of pre teen/mature adult, were additionally selected for further analysis due to their relationship to the video content. Analysis results revealed a significant difference between the video and audio-only groups for the selection of these specific items, with the video group's selections more closely aligned to the video content. Results of this pilot study suggest that music video exposure to popular music can impact how students choose to implement popular songs in the field of music therapy.

  13. EVALUATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF “THREE DIMENSIONAL VIDEOS ON THE COMPREHENSION OF ANATOMY” AMONG NEW STUDENTS OF MEDICINE (FIRST YEAR MBBS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhini Arulselvi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In a modern gadgets era, most of the teaching methods are turning into electronic format even in schools. The new students of medicine (First MBBS use to face difficulty in understanding the complexity of Human Anatomy. Computer technology, including internet can enhance the learning activities. METHODS This Interventional study was conducted among first year MBBS students of VMMC students, Karaikal. A total of 100 students were included in the study, assigned into two groups of 50 each. All subjects were given pre-test and post-test questionnaire of two different clinical based topics. Learning was assessed by written examinations and responses were linked to students’ performances in dissection theatre. RESULT The mean score was significantly higher among the students who had received 3-D video demonstration compared to those who had received traditional method of teaching. Participants stated that visual learning is easier to remember and gives the real appearance of anatomical structure. CONCLUSION This study confirms the three dimensional video demonstration is an effective method for communication and learning anatomy.

  14. How College Students' Conceptions of Newton's Second and Third Laws Change Through Watching Interactive Video Vignettes: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Jonathan

    Changing student conceptions in physics is a difficult process and has been a topic of research for many years. The purpose of this study was to understand what prompted students to change or not change their incorrect conceptions of Newtons Second or Third Laws in response to an intervention, Interactive Video Vignettes (IVVs), designed to overcome them. This study is based on prior research reported in the literature which has found that a curricular framework of elicit, confront, resolve, and reflect (ECRR) is important for changing student conceptions (McDermott, 2001). This framework includes four essential parts such that during an instructional event student conceptions should be elicited, incorrect conceptions confronted, these conflicts resolved, and then students should be prompted to reflect on their learning. Twenty-two undergraduate student participants who completed either or both IVVs were studied to determine whether or not they experienced components of the ECRR framework at multiple points within the IVVs. A fully integrated, mixed methods design was used to address the study purpose. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected iteratively for each participant. Successive data collections were informed by previous data collections. All data were analyzed concurrently. The quantitative strand included a pre/post test that participants took before and after completing a given IVV and was used to measure the effect of each IVV on learning. The qualitative strand included video of each participant completing the IVV as well as an audio-recorded video elicitation interview after the post-test. The qualitative data collection was designed to describe student experiences with each IVV as well as to observe how the ECRR framework was experienced. Collecting and analyzing data using this mixed methods approach helped develop a more complete understanding of how student conceptions of Newtons Second and Third Laws changed through completion of

  15. Medical Student and Tutor Perceptions of Video Versus Text in an Interactive Online Virtual Patient for Problem-Based Learning: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodham, Luke A; Ellaway, Rachel H; Round, Jonathan; Vaughan, Sophie; Poulton, Terry; Zary, Nabil

    2015-06-18

    The impact of the use of video resources in primarily paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) settings has been widely explored. Although it can provide many benefits, the use of video can also hamper the critical thinking of learners in contexts where learners are developing clinical reasoning. However, the use of video has not been explored in the context of interactive virtual patients for PBL. A pilot study was conducted to explore how undergraduate medical students interpreted and evaluated information from video- and text-based materials presented in the context of a branched interactive online virtual patient designed for PBL. The goal was to inform the development and use of virtual patients for PBL and to inform future research in this area. An existing virtual patient for PBL was adapted for use in video and provided as an intervention to students in the transition year of the undergraduate medicine course at St George's, University of London. Survey instruments were used to capture student and PBL tutor experiences and perceptions of the intervention, and a formative review meeting was run with PBL tutors. Descriptive statistics were generated for the structured responses and a thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in the unstructured responses. Analysis of student responses (n=119) and tutor comments (n=18) yielded 8 distinct themes relating to the perceived educational efficacy of information presented in video and text formats in a PBL context. Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text. Student responses indicated that the use of video slowed the pace of PBL and impeded students' ability to review and critically appraise the presented information. Our findings suggest that text was perceived to be a better source of information than video in virtual

  16. Enhancing student interactions with the instructor and content using pen-based technology, YouTube videos, and virtual conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James R

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the incorporation of digital learning elements in organic chemistry and biochemistry courses. The first example is the use of pen-based technology and a large-format PowerPoint slide to construct a map that integrates various metabolic pathways and control points. Students can use this map to visualize the integrated nature of metabolism and how various hormones impact metabolic regulation. The second example is the embedding of health-related YouTube videos directly into PowerPoint presentations. These videos become a part of the course notes and can be viewed within PowerPoint as long as students are online. The third example is the use of a webcam to show physical models during online sessions using web-conferencing software. Various molecular conformations can be shown through the webcam, and snapshots of important conformations can be incorporated into the notes for further discussion and annotation. Each of the digital learning elements discussed in this report is an attempt to use technology to improve the quality of educational resources available outside of the classroom to foster student engagement with ideas and concepts. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 4-9, 2011. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Online video in clinical skills education of oral medication administration for undergraduate student nurses: a mixed methods, prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Agi; Smith, Fiona; McCrossan, Gill; Adamson, Elizabeth; Watt, Susan; Penny, Kay

    2013-06-01

    Improvements in the safety of the prescribing, dispensing and administration of medicines are identified as a priority across international healthcare systems. It is therefore essential that higher education institutions play their part in helping to meet this patient safety objective. New developments in clinical skills education which are aligned to emerging educational theory are available, but evaluations and supportive evidence are limited. To evaluate the use of an online best practice exemplar as an adjunct to the clinical skills teaching of oral medication administration to undergraduate student nurses. Mixed-methods prospective cohort design. Two intakes of undergraduate nursing students (n=168, n=154) undertaking a first year clinical skills based module at a British university. The Control group received standard teaching using lectures and skills classes facilitated by experienced clinical skills lecturers. The Intervention group received the standard teaching and unlimited access to an online video clip of medication administration. Performance and satisfaction were measured using module assessment results and a satisfaction questionnaire. Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups (n=16, n=20). The Intervention group was significantly (p=0.021) more likely to pass the assessment and rate their satisfaction with the teaching significantly higher (pTeaching and Time and when Classroom Learning was positive, the Transfer to Practice of the clinical skill was enhanced. An online video of a best practice exemplar as an adjunct to taught clinical skills sessions improves student assessment results and satisfaction ratings. The video was also reported to positively influence all themes identified in Classroom Learning and was perceived to promote the Transfer to Practice of teaching input. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How College Students' Conceptions of Newton's Second and Third Laws Change through Watching Interactive Video Vignettes: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Changing student conceptions in physics is a difficult process and has been a topic of research for many years. The purpose of this study was to understand what prompted students to change or not change their incorrect conceptions of Newtons Second or Third Laws in response to an intervention, Interactive Video Vignettes (IVVs), designed to…

  19. Promoting Reflexive Thinking and Adaptive Expertise through Video Capturing to Challenge Postgraduate Primary Student Teachers to Think, Know, Feel, and Act Like a Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Steven S.; Williamson-Leadley, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a study of how a 1-year, course-taught, master's level initial teacher education (ITE) program challenged primary student teachers (n = 4) in developing their sense of self-as-teacher. This study examined how the program's incorporation of video capturing technology impacted on these student teachers' development of…

  20. Using a Hero as a Model in Video Instruction to Improve the Daily Living Skills of an Elementary-Aged Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the impact of video hero modelling (VHM) on the daily living skills of an elementary-aged student with autism spectrum disorder. The VHM, in which a character much admired by the student exhibited a correct response, was shown to the participant immediately before the situation where he needed to exhibit the…

  1. Fine and Gross Motor Task Performance When Using Computer-Based Video Models by Students with Autism and Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Swindle, Catherine O.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of video modeling on the fine and gross motor task performance by three students with a diagnosis of moderate intellectual disability (Group 1) and by three students with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (Group 2). Using a multiple probe design across three sets of tasks, the study examined the…

  2. Medical Student and Tutor Perceptions of Video Versus Text in an Interactive Online Virtual Patient for Problem-Based Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Round, Jonathan; Vaughan, Sophie; Poulton, Terry; Zary, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of the use of video resources in primarily paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) settings has been widely explored. Although it can provide many benefits, the use of video can also hamper the critical thinking of learners in contexts where learners are developing clinical reasoning. However, the use of video has not been explored in the context of interactive virtual patients for PBL. Objective A pilot study was conducted to explore how undergraduate medical students interpreted and evaluated information from video- and text-based materials presented in the context of a branched interactive online virtual patient designed for PBL. The goal was to inform the development and use of virtual patients for PBL and to inform future research in this area. Methods An existing virtual patient for PBL was adapted for use in video and provided as an intervention to students in the transition year of the undergraduate medicine course at St George’s, University of London. Survey instruments were used to capture student and PBL tutor experiences and perceptions of the intervention, and a formative review meeting was run with PBL tutors. Descriptive statistics were generated for the structured responses and a thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in the unstructured responses. Results Analysis of student responses (n=119) and tutor comments (n=18) yielded 8 distinct themes relating to the perceived educational efficacy of information presented in video and text formats in a PBL context. Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text. Student responses indicated that the use of video slowed the pace of PBL and impeded students’ ability to review and critically appraise the presented information. Conclusions Our findings suggest that text was perceived to be a

  3. VIDEO BLOGGING AS AN INNOVATIVE FORM OF THE PROJECT ACTIVITY IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING TO JOURNALISM STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Petrova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The appearance of new formats and ways of presenting information inevitably affects the educational process and leads to the necessity to revise the paradigm of pedagogical attitudes and tools of the teaching activity, which in turn generates a number of methodological and didactic problems to be solved. The relevance of the research topic is caused by the current tendency of the distribution of video blogging as an information activity tool that affects the educational environment. There is a steady development of video blogging (a special kind of blog, where the emphasis is made on video information as a new channel of communication in the educational services market, and using it as a separate form of non-educational project activity within the framework of mastering one or another academic discipline. In the conditions of deficiency of classroom hours and increase in student independent work, project-based education is becoming more and more demanded type of training. Currently, interdisciplinary projects are being widely disseminated at high school; these projects are aimed at vocational guidance for a foreign language, they meet the requirements of the new communication reality and the needs of modern educational systems. The aim of the publication is to consider video blogging as an innovative form of project-oriented learning a foreign language and to characterize the features of creating and implementing media content within the framework of a foreign language training course. Methodology and research methods. In the course the research, such theoretical scientific methods as analysis, synthesis, concretization, generalization, as well as hypothetical-deductive and design methods were applied. Results and scientific novelty. For the first time the article deals with the structure of video blogging as a project work and as a form of professionally oriented foreign language teaching as well, also there are formulated basic

  4. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

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    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  5. Effects of prosocial, neutral, and violent video games on college students' affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Muniba; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Recent research reveals that playing prosocial video games increases prosocial cognitions and helpful behaviors [Gentile el al., 2009; Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2009; 2010; 2011]. These results are consistent with social-cognitive models of social behavior [e.g., the "General Learning Model," Buckley and Anderson, 2006]. The social-cognitive learning models suggest that in addition to influencing cognitions, media content may also influence affect. However, past studies on prosocial video games have failed to find a significant effect on affective measures [Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2010]. The present research examined the effects of prosocial, neutral, and violent video games on state hostility and positive affect. Also examined were moderating effects of trait aggressiveness, trait altruistic helping, and trait egoistic helping. Prosocial games reduced state hostility and increased positive state affect. Violent video games had the opposite effects. These effects were moderated by trait physical aggression. Altruistic participants reported relatively more positive affect and less state hostility. Egoistic participants reported relatively more aggravated and mean feelings. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of Video Exposure to Cluttering on Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of a Person Who Clutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lindsey M.; Blanchet, Paul G.; Tillery, Kim L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous research suggests a negative stereotype toward people with fluency disorders (i.e. stuttering and/or cluttering), although recent findings suggest that exposure to an actual person who stutters (e.g. a live or video presentation) leads to more positive perceptions of some personality traits. However, there is a paucity of…

  7. Students’ Perception on Teaching Practicum Evaluation using Video Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee Sern, Lai; ‘Ain Helan Nor, Nurul; Foong, Lee Ming; Hassan, Razali

    2017-08-01

    Video technology has been widely used in education especially in teaching and learning. However, the use of video technology for evaluation purpose especially in teaching practicum is extremely scarce and the benefits of video technology in teaching practicum evaluation have not yet been fully discovered. For that reason, this quantitative research aimed at identifying the perceptions of trainee teachers towards teaching practicum evaluation via video technology. A total of 260 students of Teacher Certification Programme (Program Pensiswazahan Guru - PPG) from the Faculty of Technical and Vocational Education (FPTV) of Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) had been randomly selected as respondents. A set of questionnaire was developed to assess the suitability, effectiveness and satisfaction of using video technology for teaching practicum. Conclusively, this research showed that the trainee teachers have positive perceptions in all three aspects related teaching practicum evaluation using video technology. Apart from that, no significant racial difference was found in the measured aspects. In addition, the trainee teachers also showed an understanding of the vast importance of teaching practicum evaluation via video. These research findings suggest that video technology can be a feasible and practical means of teaching practicum evaluation especially for distance learning program.

  8. Association of gender and specialty interest with video-gaming, three-dimensional spatial analysis, and entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Heather R; Towle Millard, Heather A; Millard, Ralph P; Constable, Peter D; Freeman, Lyn J

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether gender or interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery was associated with video-gaming, 3-D spatial analysis, or entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE A convenience sample of 68 (42 female and 26 male) third-year veterinary students. PROCEDURES Participants completed a survey asking about their interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery. Subsequently, participants' entry-level laparoscopic skills were assessed with 3 procedures performed in box trainers, their video-gaming skills were tested with 3 video games, and their 3-D spatial analysis skills were evaluated with the Purdue University Visualization of Rotations Spatial Test. Scores were assigned for laparoscopic, video-gaming, and 3-D spatial analysis skills. RESULTS Significantly more female than male students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine (23/42 vs 7/26), and significantly more male than female students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery (19/26 vs 19/42). Males had significantly higher video-gaming skills scores than did females, but spatial analysis and laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between males and females. Students interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery had higher video-gaming and spatial analysis skills scores than did students interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine, but laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between these 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For this group of students, neither gender nor interest in specialty certification in internal medicine versus surgery was associated with entry-level laparoscopy skills.

  9. A delivery mode study: The effect of self-paced video learning on first-year college students' achievement in calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviyanthi, Rina; Herman, Tatang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of two different modes of deliver are proposed. The use of self-paced video learning and conventional learning methods in mathematics are compared. The research design classified as a quasi-experiment. The participants were 80 students in the first-year college and divided into two groups. One group as an experiment class received self-paced video learning method and the other group as a control group taught by conventional learning method. Pre and posttest were employed to measure the students' achievement, while questionnaire and interviews were applied to support the pre and posttest data. Statistical analysis included the independent samples t-test showed differences (p Calculus, such as appropriate learning for both audio and visual of students' characteristics, useful to learn Calculus, assisting students to be more engaging and paying attention in learning, helping students in making the concepts of Calculus are visible, interesting media and motivating students to learn independently.

  10. An Analysis of Using Online Video Lecture on Learning Outcome: The Mediating Role of Student Interaction and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Siti Zuraidah Md; Jamaludin, Rozinah; Fathil, Nor Fathimah

    2016-01-01

    The Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015-2025 (Higher Education) was published recently. One of shift is globalised online learning. Therefore, Polytechnics had taken the first step in the use of e-learning system by using flipped classroom method. The purpose of this study is to analyse the effects of using online video lecture on student…

  11. Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: An observational design pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Helen; Bucknall, Tracey K; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical decision-making is a complex activity that is critical to patient safety. Simulation, augmented by feedback, affords learners the opportunity to learn critical clinical decision-making skills. More detailed feedback following simulation exercises has the potential to further enhance student learning, particularly in relation to developing improved clinical decision-making skills. To investigate the feasibility of head-mounted video camera recordings, to augment feedback, following acute patient deterioration simulations. Pilot study using an observational design. Ten final-year nursing students participated in three simulation exercises, each focussed on detection and management of patient deterioration. Two observers collected behavioural data using an adapted version of Gaba's Clinical Simulation Tool, to provide verbal feedback to each participant, following each simulation exercise. Participants wore a head-mounted video camera during the second simulation exercise only. Video recordings were replayed to participants to augment feedback, following the second simulation exercise. Data were collected on: participant performance (observed and perceived); participant perceptions of feedback methods; and head-mounted video camera recording feasibility and capability for detailed audio-visual feedback. Management of patient deterioration improved for six participants (60%). Increased perceptions of confidence (70%) and competence (80%), were reported by the majority of participants. Few participants (20%) agreed that the video recording specifically enhanced their learning. The visual field of the head-mounted video camera was not always synchronised with the participant's field of vision, thus affecting the usefulness of some recordings. The usefulness of the video recordings, to enhance verbal feedback to participants on detection and management of simulated patient deterioration, was inconclusive. Modification of the video camera glasses, to improve

  12. Video Pedagogy as Political Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Asserts that the education of students in the technology of video and audio production is a political act. Discusses the structure and style of production, and the ideologies and values contained therein. Offers alternative approaches to critical video pedagogy. (PRA)

  13. Video games and higher education : What can ‘Call of Duty’ teach our students?

    OpenAIRE

    Nick eTannahill; Patrick eTissington; Carl eSenior

    2012-01-01

    Here it is argued that with game-based learning it is possible, through their inherent teaching mechanisms, to sustain stimulation throughout a class within higher education. That is, the “net generation” (Tapscott, 1999, p. 6) is intrinsically motivated by games and that commercial video games have a potentially important role in the classroom to assist learning of a range of crucial transferable skills. We further argue that commercial off the shelf (COTS) game design is replete with effect...

  14. Video Episodes and Action Cameras in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Eliciting Student Perceptions of Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    A series of quantitative studies investigated undergraduate students' perceptions of their cognitive and affective learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. To explore these quantitative findings, a qualitative research protocol was developed to characterize student learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Students (N = 13)…

  15. Using video podcasting to enhance the learning of clinical skills: A qualitative study of physiotherapy students' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kay M

    2016-10-01

    Video podcasts, or vodcasts are increasingly used by a range of healthcare professions in the mastery of new skills. Little is known about the experiences of using vodcasts in physiotherapy education. Traditional pedagogic strategies have been employed in order to master those skills required for physiotherapy practice. There have been advances in the use of technology in medical education in the nursing, dentistry and medical fields. Vodcasts offer great versatility and potential when used as a pedagogical tool, embedded within a physiotherapy curriculum. To explore students' experiences of using technology enhanced learning, namely vodcasts, in the Physiotherapy curriculum to develop the learning of clinical skills. A series of focus groups were carried out with undergraduate and pre-registration physiotherapy students (n=31). Students valued the versatility and audio-visual nature of vodcasts; helpful in revising for practical examinations and practising their skills prior to, during and after taught skills classes. Watching and practising simultaneously allowed students to practice repeatedly and formulate a process for each skill. When learning a new skill, a combination of teaching and learning approaches was favoured, marrying traditional approaches with those that utilise technology. This study's findings add to the existing body of evidence in skills based teaching and support a multi-media, blended approach in those disciplines involved in the learning and teaching of clinical skills. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on the Role of Video Educational Games with a Linguistic Approach in English Language Education of the 2nd Grade High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Jalalian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The inability of English language learners to recall English concepts is a major challenge faced by teachers. This paper aims to determine the effectiveness of video educational games with a linguistic approach in English language education of the 2nd grade high school students. This is an applied and quasi-experimental study conducted in 2016. For the purpose of this study, we divided the participants into test and control groups and omitted the impacts of covariate (pretest scores measured before execution of any test on the learners. The statistical population consists of 90 students, divided into three groups each consisting of 30 students. Due to the long process of the research, we used availability sampling method in order to minimize the drop in the number of participants. The data was analyzed by SPSS and ANCOVA. The results of this study confirmed that a significant difference exists between English language recalling ability of 2nd grade high school students in test and control groups who are provided with video educational games with and without English language concepts respectively. We concluded that video educational games play an effective role in English language recalling ability of the students. Therefore, it is recommended that video educational games be used for enriching the leisure times of English learners.

  17. Learning based on library automation in mobile devices: The video production by students of Universidade Federal do Cariri Library Science Undergraduate Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vernon VIEIRA

    Full Text Available Abstract The video production for learning has been evident over the last few years especially when it involves aspects of the application of hardware and software for automation spaces. In Librarianship Undergraduate Degrees the need for practical learning focused on the knowledge of the requirements for library automation demand on teacher to develop an educational content to enable the student to learn through videos in order to increase the knowledge about information technology. Thus, discusses the possibilities of learning through mobile devices in education reporting an experience that took place with students who entered in March, 2015 (2015.1 Bachelor Degree in Library Science from the Universidade Federal do Cariri (Federal University of Cariri in state of Ceará, Brazil. The literature review includes articles publicated in scientific journals and conference proceedings and books in English, Portuguese and Spanish on the subject. The methodology with quantitative and qualitative approach includes an exploratory study, where the data collection was used online survey to find out the experience of the elaboration of library automation videos by students who studied in that course. The learning experience using mobile devices for recording of technological environments of libraries allowed them to be produced 25 videos that contemplated aspects of library automation having these actively participated in production of the video and its publication on the Internet.

  18. The development of the learning video for the flipped classroom model on student of open university on human skeletal system and muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrini, V. S.

    2018-05-01

    The objectives of the research are to develop the learning video for the flipped classroom model for Open University’s student and to know the effectiveness of the video. The development of the video used Research and Development ADDIE design (Analyses, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation). The sampling used purposive sampling was 28 students in Open University of Nganjuk. The techniques of data collection were the observation data to know the problems of the students, and learning facilities, the test (pre-test and post-test) to know a knowledge aspect, a questionnaire to know advisability of video learning, a structured interview to confirm their answer. The result of the expert of matter and media showed that the average product score was 3.75 of 4 or very good, the small-scale test showed that the average score was 3.60 of 4 and the large-scale test showed that the average score was 3.80 of 4, it had a very good category. The t-test with paired sample test showed that sig. (2-tailed) video for flipped classroom was effective to be implemented.

  19. Creating Stop-Motion Videos with iPads to Support Students' Understanding of Cell Processes: "Because You Have to Know What You're Talking about to Be Able to Do It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Deaton, Benjamin E.; Ivankovic, Diana; Norris, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is two-fold: (a) describe the implementation of a stop-motion animation video activity to support students' understanding of cell processes, and (b) present research findings about students' beliefs and use of iPads to support their creation of stop-motion videos in an introductory biology course. Data…

  20. Use of Video-Projected Structured Clinical Examination (ViPSCE) instead of the traditional oral (Viva) examination in the assessment of final year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shallaly, Gamal; Ali, Eltayeb

    2004-03-01

    Assessment of medical students using the traditional oral (viva) system has been marred by being highly subjective, non-structured, and biased. The use of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) would circumvent these disadvantages. The OSCE is, however, costly and time-consuming particularly if used for assessment of large numbers of students. The need for another form of examination that enjoys the advantages of the OSCE while avoiding its disadvantages in the face of limited resources has been the inspiration behind this innovative approach. (1) To identify the characteristics of the new Video-Projected Structured Clinical Examination (ViPSCE). (2) To compare the acceptability of ViPSCE and OSCE by students and tutors. (3) To compare the time-effectiveness of ViPSCE and OSCE. We used a slide video projection to assess the surgical knowledge, problem solving and management abilities of 112 final year medical students at Alazhari University, Khartoum, Sudan. Students completed evaluation forms at the end of the examination. The administration of the ViPSCE was smooth and straightforward. Feedback of the students showed that they preferred the ViPSCE to both traditional oral (viva) examination and OSCE. The examination time was 2 hours using video projection compared to the 6 hours that it used to take a class of 112 students to complete a classical OSCE. The ViPSCE is a better replacement for the traditional oral exam. It is much less time- consuming than traditional OSCE.

  1. A University-Industry Collaborative Response to the Growing Global Demand for Student Talent: Using Interpretive Phenomenology to Discover Life-World Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauterin, Johanna Julia; Linnanen, Lassi; Michelsen, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The supply of student talent is now taking on an increasingly global dimension and this has extended the breadth of university-industry interaction. Set in the context of a rapidly growing international student market, knowledge transfer between academia and business through global student talent supply is an emerging practice. This paper…

  2. Online video examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    have large influence on their own teaching, learning and curriculum. The programme offers streamed videos in combination with other learning resources. It is a concept which offers video as pure presentation - video lectures - but also as an instructional tool which gives the students the possibility...... to construct their knowledge, collaboration and communication. In its first years the programme has used Skype video communication for collaboration and communication within and between groups, group members and their facilitators. Also exams have been mediated with the help of Skype and have for all students......, examiners and external examiners been a challenge and opportunity and has brought new knowledge and experience. This paper brings results from a questionnaire focusing on how the students experience the video examination....

  3. Vaccine-critical videos on YouTube and their impact on medical students' attitudes about seasonal influenza immunization: a pre and post study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Pierre; Hawken, Steven; Beard, Leslie; Morra, Dante; Tomlinson, George; Wilson, Kumanan; Keelan, Jennifer

    2012-05-28

    YouTube is a video-sharing platform that is increasingly utilized to share and disseminate health-related information about immunization. Using a pre-post survey methodology, we compared the impact of two of the most popular YouTube videos discussing seasonal influenza vaccine, both vaccine-critical, on the attitudes towards immunizing of first year medical students attending a Canadian medical school. Forty-one medical students were randomized to view either a scientifically styled, seemingly "evidence-based", vaccine-critical video or a video using anecdotal stories of harms and highly sensationalized imagery. In the pre-intervention survey, medical students frequently used YouTube for all-purposes, while 42% used YouTube for health-related purposes and 12% used YouTube to search for health information. While medical students were generally supportive of immunizing, there was suboptimal uptake of annual influenza vaccine reported, and a subset of our study population expressed vaccine-critical attitudes and behaviors with respect to seasonal influenza. Overall there was no significant difference in pre to post attitudes towards influenza immunization nor were there any differences when comparing the two different vaccine-critical videos. The results of our study are reassuring in that they suggest that medical students are relatively resistant to the predominately inaccurate, vaccine-critical messaging on YouTube, even when the message is framed as scientific reasoning. Further empirical work is required to test the popular notion that information disseminated through social media platforms influences health-related attitudes and behaviors. However, our study suggests that there is an opportunity for public health to leverage YouTube to communicate accurate and credible information regarding influenza to medical students and others. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impacting Academic Achievement with Student Learners Teaching Digital Storytelling to Others: The ATTTCSE Digital Video Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, Candace; McCartney, Robin

    2010-01-01

    University researchers, teacher candidates, language and technology instructors, student learners, and families from diverse backgrounds partnered in an invitational teaching/learning experience--middle school student learners teaching their VIPs (very important persons) how to create stories and construct digital movies with reference to their…

  5. Video Self-Modeling Interventions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Kendra A.; Bauman Johnson, Wendi L.

    2016-01-01

    Implementing evidenced-based interventions for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the educational setting is of utmost importance for their long-term success. Unfortunately, interventions often are not implemented with efficacy due to the overwhelming demands on educators attempting to meet the individualized needs of each student.…

  6. Literacy Based Behavioral Interventions and Video Self-Modeling with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Debra; Rodecki, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Educators are continually seeking effective, research-based strategies to address the unique needs of their students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is well documented that students with ASD benefit from direct instruction and visual supports when learning new skills. This article provides step-by-step procedures for using a tiered…

  7. The Role of Live Video Capture Production in the Development of Student Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Michael; Cochrane, Tom A.

    2010-01-01

    Civil and natural resources engineering students at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, take specific courses requiring small group research projects and the presentation of findings to staff and peers. Although one of the aims of these presentations is to assist in the development of the students' communication skills, staff have raised…

  8. Effects of Explicit Vocabulary Videos Delivered through iPods on Students with Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, J. Joneen; Dressler, Emily V.

    2016-01-01

    Poor word learning is a hallmark characteristic of students with specific language impairment (SLI). Explicit vocabulary instruction has shown to positively improve word learning in this population. Mobile technology has many advantages making it conducive for addressing the word learning needs of students with SLI. The current study utilized a…

  9. Hearing the Difference: "Mockingbird" Novel Inspires Student-Led Anti-Racism Video Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Cindy A.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Cindy Coe describes how after wrapping up her eighth grade "To Kill a Mockingbird" unit, one of her students came to her about derogatory terms being used around school and expressed that she wanted to do something about it in light of their recent unit. In a meeting with the principal, the student shared her frustration…

  10. Discrete Trial Teaching Interventions for Students with Autism: Web-Based Video Modeling for Paraprofessionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Jennifer R.; Gabrielsen, Terisa P.; Young, Ellie L.; Hansen, Blake D.; Kellems, Ryan; Hoch, Hannah; Nicksic-Springer, Taryn; Knorr, James

    2017-01-01

    Delivering individualized learning interventions to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is daunting for education professionals already stretched to capacity meeting needs of all of their students. Paraprofessionals (paraeducators) can assume integral roles in classroom support and management, but they may not be consistently trained in…

  11. Comparing Effects of Comedic and Authoritative Video Presentations on Student Knowledge and Attitudes about Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. Elijah; Wiles, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Given the diverse array of media sources available to students today, it stands to reason that some media outlets would be of greater quality than others when communicating particular subjects to students. But what constitutes effectiveness among the many choices in information sourcing might not be easily intuited. For example, previous findings…

  12. Is that really my movement? - Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backåberg, Sofia; Gummesson, Christina; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students' experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12-18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; "Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness," "Experiencing changes in one's own movement," and "Experiencing challenges in the learning process." The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required.

  13. (Re)Counting Meaningful Learning Experiences: Using Student-Created Reflective Videos to Make Invisible Learning Visible during PjBL Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shaunna

    2016-01-01

    This ethnographic case study investigated how the process of learning during a yearlong after-school, project-based learning (PjBL) experience could be documented by student-created reflective videos. Guided by social constructivism, constant comparative analysis was used to explore the meaningful learning that took place in addition to the…

  14. The Effect of Motion Analysis Activities in a Video-Based Laboratory in Students' Understanding of Position, Velocity and Frames of Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleza, Eugenia; Pappas, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we present the results of a qualitative research project on the effect of motion analysis activities in a Video-Based Laboratory (VBL) on students' understanding of position, velocity and frames of reference. The participants in our research were 48 pre-service teachers enrolled in Education Departments with no previous strong…

  15. Examining the Impact of a Video Case-Based Mathematics Methods Course on Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Skills at Analysing Students' Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mara Vanina; Superfine, Alison Castro; Carlton, Theresa; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on results from a study conducted with two cohorts of pre-service teachers (PSTs) in a video case-based mathematics methods course at a large Midwestern university in the US. The motivation for this study was to look beyond whether or not PSTs pay attention to mathematical thinking of students, as shown by previous studies when…

  16. Effects of Nursing Students' Practices Using Smartphone Videos on Fundamental Nursing Skills, Self-Efficacy, and Learning Satisfaction in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, HyeSun

    2017-01-01

    This is a quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent group pre-test and post-test designed to investigate the effects of learning with smartphone video recordings in fundamental nursing practice. General "intramuscular injection" practice for sophomore nursing students was given to the experimental and control groups for two weeks.…

  17. Prevalence of Addiction to the Internet, Computer Games, DVD, and Video and Its Relationship to Anxiety and Depression in a Sample of Iranian High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Amiri, Amin; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Khademalhosseini, Mitra; Khademalhosseini, Zeinab; Gholami, Zeinab; Sharifian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of addiction to the Internet, computer games, DVD, and video and its relationship to anxiety and depression in a sample of Iranian high school students. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 1020 high school students (males and females) were selected randomly from different areas of Shiraz city in southern Iran. They were interviewed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed (DSM-IV) crit...

  18. A pilot project in distance education: nurse practitioner students' experience of personal video capture technology as an assessment method of clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Haakan; Fox-Young, Stephanie; Long, Phil; Bogossian, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a pilot project aimed at exploring postgraduate distance students' experiences using personal video capture technology to complete competency assessments in physical examination. A pre-intervention survey gathered demographic data from nurse practitioner students (n=31) and measured their information communication technology fluency. Subsequently, thirteen (13) students were allocated a hand held video camera to use in their clinical setting. Those participating in the trial completed a post-intervention survey and further data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and deductive content analysis, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh et al., 2003) were used to guide the project. Uptake of the intervention was high (93%) as students recognised the potential benefit. Students were video recorded while performing physical examinations. They described high level of stress and some anxiety, which decreased rapidly while assessment was underway. Barriers experienced were in the areas of facilitating conditions (technical character e.g. upload of files) and social influence (e.g. local ethical approval). Students valued the opportunity to reflect on their recorded performance with their clinical mentors and by themselves. This project highlights the demands and difficulties of introducing technology to support work-based learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 2D and 3D stereoscopic videos used as pre-anatomy lab tools improve students' examination performance in a veterinary gross anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalili, Sereen M; Coppoc, Gordon L

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis for the research described in this article was that viewing an interactive two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) stereoscopic pre-laboratory video would improve efficiency and learning in the laboratory. A first-year DVM class was divided into 21 dissection teams of four students each. Primary variables were method of preparation (2D, 3D, or laboratory manual) and dissection region (thorax, abdomen, or pelvis). Teams were randomly assigned to a group (A, B, or C) in a crossover design experiment so that all students experienced each of the modes of preparation, but with different regions of the canine anatomy. All students were instructed to study normal course materials and the laboratory manual, the Guide, before coming to the laboratory session and to use them during the actual dissection as usual. Video groups were given a DVD with an interactive 10-12 minute video to view for the first 30 minutes of the laboratory session, while non-video groups were instructed to review the Guide. All groups were allowed 45 minutes to dissect the assigned section and find a list of assigned structures, after which all groups took a post-dissection quiz and attitudinal survey. The 2D groups performed better than the Guide groups (p=.028) on the post-dissection quiz, despite the fact that only a minority of the 2D-group students studied the Guide as instructed. There was no significant difference (p>.05) between 2D and 3D groups on the post-dissection quiz. Students preferred videos over the Guide.

  20. Streaming Video--The Wave of the Video Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Videos and DVDs give the teachers more flexibility than slide projectors, filmstrips, and 16mm films but teachers and students are excited about a new technology called streaming. Streaming allows the educators to view videos on demand via the Internet, which works through the transfer of digital media like video, and voice data that is received…

  1. Interactive case vignettes utilizing simulated pathologist-clinician encounters with whole slide imaging and video tutorials of whole slide scans improves student understanding of disease processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Horn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the drawbacks of studying pathology in the second year of medical school in a classroom setting is the relatively limited exposure to patient encounters/clinical rotations, making it difficult to understand and fully appreciate the significance of the course material, specifically the molecular and tissue aspects of disease. In this study, we determined if case vignettes incorporating pathologist-clinician encounters with whole slide imaging (WSI and narrated/annotated videos of whole slide (WS scans in addition to clinical data improved student understanding of pathologic disease processes. Materials and Methods: Case vignettes were created for several genitourinary disease processes that utilized clinical data including narratives of pathologist-clinician encounters, WSI, and annotated video tutorials of WS scans (designed to simulate "double-heading". The students were encouraged to view the virtual slide first, with the video tutorials being provided to offer additional assistance. The case vignettes were created to be interactive with a detailed explanation of each correct and incorrect question choice. The cases were made available to all second year medical students via a website and could be viewed only after completing a 10 question pre-test. A post-test could be completed after viewing all cases followed by a brief satisfaction survey. Results: Ninety-six students completed the pre-test with an average score of 7.7/10. Fifty-seven students completed the post-test with an average score of 9.4/10. Thirty-six students completed the satisfaction survey. 94% agreed or strongly agreed that this was a useful exercise and 91% felt that it helped them better understand the topics. Conclusion: The development of interactive case vignettes incorporating simulated pathologist-clinician encounters with WSI and video tutorials of WS scans helps to improve student enthusiasm to learn and grasp pathologic aspects of disease

  2. Is that really my movement?—Students' experiences of a video-supported interactive learning model for movement awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Backåberg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare staff and students have a great risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. One cause of this is heavy load related work activities such as manual handling, in which the quality of individual work technique may play a major role. Preventive interventions and well-defined educational strategies to support movement awareness and long-lasting movement changes need to be developed. The aim of the present study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of a newly developed interactive learning model for movement awareness. The learning model, which is based on a life-world perspective with focus on interpersonal interaction, has been used with 11 undergraduate students from the second and final year. Each student participated in three individual video sessions with a facilitator. Two individual interviews were carried out with each student during the learning process and one interview 12–18 months after the last session. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur and described by Lindseth and Norberg was used to interpret the interviews and diary notes. The interpretation resulted in three key themes and nine subthemes. The key themes were; “Obtaining better preconditions for bodily awareness,” “Experiencing changes in one's own movement,” and “Experiencing challenges in the learning process.” The interactive learning model entails a powerful and challenging experience that develops movement awareness. The experience of meaningfulness and usefulness emerges increasingly and alternates with a feeling of discomfort. The learning model may contribute to the body of knowledge of well-defined educational strategies in movement awareness and learning in, for example, preventive interventions and ergonomic education. It may also be valuable in other practical learning situations where movement awareness is required.

  3. Discovering an Accessible Enzyme: Salivary [alpha]-Amylase--"Prima Digestio Fit in Ore"--A Didactic Approach for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Isabella

    2005-01-01

    Human salivary [alpha]-amylase is used in this experimental approach to introduce biology high school students to the concept of enzyme activity in a dynamic way. Through a series of five easy, rapid, and inexpensive laboratory experiments students learn what the activity of an enzyme consists of: first in a qualitative then in a semi-quantitative…

  4. Do Visual Aids Really Matter? A Comparison of Student Evaluations before and after Embedding Visuals into Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Kristine; Mun, Jungwon; A'Jontue, RoseAnn

    2016-01-01

    Educational webcasts or video lectures as a teaching tool and a form of visual aid have become widely used with the rising prevalence of online and blended courses and with the increase of web-based video materials. Thus, research pertaining to factors enhancing the effectiveness of video lectures, such as number of visual aids, is critical. This…

  5. Development of Teaching Materials Based on Contextual Video to Improve the Student Higher Order Thingking Skills of Animal Physiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Indriana Hapsari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available he important demands in learning in college is the lecturer should empower the potential of students with various skills primarily related to Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS. These aspects need to attention by the lecture, seeing that in the 21st century learning skills, critical thinking, creative, make decisions, and solve problems is required in the work. Through the development based on contextual video teaching materials is expected to increase HOTS students of animal physiology subjects. The method used in this research is the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. Results of this study was an increase in the average value HOTS activity after treatment where the value of the average highest and lowest C41 analysis indicators are C52 evaluation indicators. Ngain value calculation is equal to 0.2 with a low category. While the results of the validation of two experts in a row both material and media experts in the amount of 3.2 and 3.12 in both categories.

  6. Self-evaluation and peer-feedback of medical students' communication skills using a web-based video annotation system. Exploring content and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Robert L; van der Vloodt, Jane

    2015-03-01

    Self-evaluation and peer-feedback are important strategies within the reflective practice paradigm for the development and maintenance of professional competencies like medical communication. Characteristics of the self-evaluation and peer-feedback annotations of medical students' video recorded communication skills were analyzed. Twenty-five year 4 medical students recorded history-taking consultations with a simulated patient, uploaded the video to a web-based platform, marked and annotated positive and negative events. Peers reviewed the video and self-evaluations and provided feedback. Analyzed were the number of marked positive and negative annotations and the amount of text entered. Topics and specificity of the annotations were coded and analyzed qualitatively. Students annotated on average more negative than positive events. Additional peer-feedback was more often positive. Topics most often related to structuring the consultation. Students were most critical about their biomedical topics. Negative annotations were more specific than positive annotations. Self-evaluations were more specific than peer-feedback and both show a significant correlation. Four response patterns were detected that negatively bias specificity assessment ratings. Teaching students to be more specific in their self-evaluations may be effective for receiving more specific peer-feedback. Videofragmentrating is a convenient tool to implement reflective practice activities like self-evaluation and peer-feedback to the classroom in the teaching of clinical skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using Informal Education through Music Video Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayari, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Music video creation provides students a new way to express themselves and become better performers and consumers of media. This article provides a new perspective on Lucy Green's informal music pedagogy by enabling students to create music videos in music classrooms; thus, students are able to create music videos that informally develop…

  8. First year midwifery students' experience with self-recorded and assessed video of selected midwifery practice skills at Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Carolyn; Patterson, Jean; Miller, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Studying undergraduate midwifery at a distance has advantages in terms of accessibility and community support but presents challenges for practice based competence assessment. Student -recorded videos provide opportunities for completing the assigned skills, self-reflection, and assessment by a lecturer. This research asked how midwifery students experienced the process of completing the Video Assessment of Midwifery Practice Skills (VAMPS) in 2014 and 2015. The aim of the survey was to identify the benefits and challenges of the VAMPS assessment and to identify opportunities for improvement from the students' perspective. All students who had participated in the VAMPS assessment during 2014 and 2015 were invited to complete an online survey. To maintain confidentiality for the students, the Qualtrics survey was administered and the data downloaded by the Organisational Research Officer. Ethical approval was granted by the organisational ethics committee. Descriptive statistics were generated and students' comments were collated. The VAMPS provided an accessible option for the competence assessment and the opportunity for self-reflection and re-recording to perfect their skill which the students appreciated. The main challenges related to the technical aspects of recording and uploading the assessment. This study highlighted some of the benefits and challenges experienced by the midwifery students and showed that practice skills can be successfully assessed at distance. The additional benefit of accessibility afforded by video assessment is a new and unique finding for undergraduate midwifery education and may resonate with other educators seeking ways to assess similar skill sets with cohorts of students studying at distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a skill demonstration video delivered by smartphone on facilitating nursing students' skill competencies and self-confidence: A randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Lai, Fu-Chih; Chang, Chia-Chi; Wan, Hsu-Tien

    2018-07-01

    The correct and appropriate performance of nursing skills by students can ensure patient safety and care quality. However, developing appropriate teaching and learning strategies to enhance nursing students' nursing skills and knowledge are challenging tasks for nursing faculty members. Nowadays, smartphones are popular mobile devices that are used on campuses by students and could be considered a potential tool to deliver learning materials to nursing students. This study aimed to examine the effects of a skill demonstration video delivered by smartphone on facilitating nursing students' nursing skill competency and confidence. A randomized controlled trial study design was used. A convenience sample of nursing students at a university was recruited. After receiving a regular nursing skills lab demonstration, pre-test data were collected from nursing students in an intervention group (n = 44) and a comparison group (n = 43). Then, students in the intervention group downloaded the skill demonstration video onto their smartphones, while the comparison group did not. Post-test data were collected at 2 weeks after the intervention. There were significant differences in students' urinary catheterization knowledge (F = 4.219, p = 0.04) and skills (F = 6.739, p = 0.013), but there was no difference in students' confidence level (F = 2.201, p = 0.142) between the two groups after the intervention. Furthermore, the average score of the satisfaction level regarding the intervention was 4.46 (SD = 0.43) on a scale of 1-5. This study found that delivering learning materials through smartphones to nursing students is suitable. Although there was no significant difference in students' self-confidence level, students' knowledge and skills were improved by the intervention. Smartphones can serve as a supplemental tool for learning nursing skills. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. "Lights, Camera, Action!" Video Technology and Students' Perceptions of Oral Communication in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Dickfos, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of an authentic assessment item on three dimensions of oral communication in accounting education: skills, self-efficacy, and relevance. An explanatory mixed methods design is used to explore students' perceptions of their development. The results indicate that an elevator pitch assessment has a positive impact on…

  11. Medical students' views on the use of video technology in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The role of communicator has been included as a key competency for health science students in South Africa. Owing to the population's diverse language and cultural backgrounds, communication between patients and healthcare professionals is challenging. In this study, the Attention, Generation, Emotion ...

  12. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of the structuralist approach to analyzing the phonemes of a dialect of Bidayuh, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languages spoken in the northern region of Borneo.

  13. Chemistry to music: Discovering how Music-based Teaching affects academic achievement and student motivation in an 8th grade science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, William Gavin Lodge, Jr.

    Teachers should have access to new and innovative tools in order to engage and motivate their students in the classroom. This is especially important as many students view school as an antiquated and dull environment - which they must seemingly suffer through to advance. School need not be a dreaded environment. The use of music as a tool for learning can be employed by any teacher to create an engaging and exciting atmosphere where students actively participate and learn to value their classroom experience. Through this study, a product and process was developed that is now available for any 8th grade science teacher interested in using music to enhance their content. In this study 8th grade students (n=41) in a public school classroom actively interacted with modern songs created to enhance the teaching of chemistry. Data were collected and analyzed in order to determine the effects that the music treatment had on student achievement and motivation, compared to a control group (n=35). Current literature provides a foundation for the benefits for music listening and training, but academic research in the area of using music as a tool for teaching content was noticeably absent. This study identifies a new area of research called "Music-based Teaching" which results in increases in motivation for 8th grade students learning chemistry. The unintended results of the study are additionally significant as the teacher conducting the treatment experienced newfound enthusiasm, passion, and excitement for her profession.

  14. Discover the Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of professional learning is for educators to develop the knowledge, skills, practices, and dispositions they need to help students perform at higher levels. It is not a simple matter to connect the dots between high quality professional learning and student outcomes. However, the theory of action that drives the standards, and indeed…

  15. Hierarchical video summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratakonda, Krishna; Sezan, M. Ibrahim; Crinon, Regis J.

    1998-12-01

    We address the problem of key-frame summarization of vide in the absence of any a priori information about its content. This is a common problem that is encountered in home videos. We propose a hierarchical key-frame summarization algorithm where a coarse-to-fine key-frame summary is generated. A hierarchical key-frame summary facilitates multi-level browsing where the user can quickly discover the content of the video by accessing its coarsest but most compact summary and then view a desired segment of the video with increasingly more detail. At the finest level, the summary is generated on the basis of color features of video frames, using an extension of a recently proposed key-frame extraction algorithm. The finest level key-frames are recursively clustered using a novel pairwise K-means clustering approach with temporal consecutiveness constraint. We also address summarization of MPEG-2 compressed video without fully decoding the bitstream. We also propose efficient mechanisms that facilitate decoding the video when the hierarchical summary is utilized in browsing and playback of video segments starting at selected key-frames.

  16. Automated Indexing and Search of Video Data in Large Collections with inVideo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangbao Paul Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel system, inVideo, for automatically indexing and searching videos based on the keywords spoken in the audio track and the visual content of the video frames. Using the highly efficient video indexing engine we developed, inVideo is able to analyze videos using machine learning and pattern recognition without the need for initial viewing by a human. The time-stamped commenting and tagging features refine the accuracy of search results. The cloud-based implementation makes it possible to conduct elastic search, augmented search, and data analytics. Our research shows that inVideo presents an efficient tool in processing and analyzing videos and increasing interactions in video-based online learning environment. Data from a cybersecurity program with more than 500 students show that applying inVideo to current video material, interactions between student-student and student-faculty increased significantly across 24 sections program-wide.

  17. Video-gaming among high school students: health correlates, gender differences, and problematic gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rani A; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana; Potenza, Marc N

    2010-12-01

    Video game playing may negatively impact youth. However, the existing literature on gaming is inconsistent and often has focused on aggression rather than the health correlates of gaming and the prevalence and correlates of problematic gaming. We anonymously surveyed 4028 adolescents about gaming and reported problems with gaming and other health behaviors. A total of 51.2% of the sample reported gaming (76.3% of boys and 29.2% of girls). There were no negative health correlates of gaming in boys and lower odds of smoking regularly; however, girls who reported gaming were less likely to report depression and more likely to report getting into serious fights and carrying a weapon to school. Among gamers, 4.9% reported problematic gaming, defined as reporting trying to cut back, experiencing an irresistible urge to play, and experiencing a growing tension that could only be relieved by playing. Boys were more likely to report these problems (5.8%) than girls (3.0%). Correlates of problematic gaming included regular cigarette smoking, drug use, depression, and serious fights. Results suggest that gaming is largely normative in boys and not associated with many health factors. In girls, however, gaming seems to be associated with more externalizing behaviors and fewer internalizing symptoms. The prevalence of problematic gaming is low but not insignificant, and problematic gaming may be contained within a larger spectrum of externalizing behaviors. More research is needed to define safe levels of gaming, refine the definition of problematic gaming, and evaluate effective prevention and intervention strategies.

  18. Discovering Science through Art-Based Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Art and science are intrinsically linked; the essence of art and science is discovery. Both artists and scientists work in a systematic but creative way--knowledge and understanding are built up through pieces of art or a series of labs. In the classroom, integrating science and visual art can provide students with the latitude to think, discover,…

  19. Discovering Alaska's Salmon: A Children's Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Laurel

    This children's activity book helps students discover Alaska's salmon. Information is provided about salmon and where they live. The salmon life cycle and food chains are also discussed. Different kinds of salmon such as Chum Salmon, Chinook Salmon, Coho Salmon, Sockeye Salmon, and Pink Salmon are introduced, and various activities on salmon are…

  20. Student-Directed Video Validation of Psychomotor Skills Performance: A Strategy to Facilitate Deliberate Practice, Peer Review, and Team Skill Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBourgh, Gregory A; Prion, Susan K

    2017-03-22

    Background Essential nursing skills for safe practice are not limited to technical skills, but include abilities for determining salience among clinical data within dynamic practice environments, demonstrating clinical judgment and reasoning, problem-solving abilities, and teamwork competence. Effective instructional methods are needed to prepare new nurses for entry-to-practice in contemporary healthcare settings. Method This mixed-methods descriptive study explored self-reported perceptions of a process to self-record videos for psychomotor skill performance evaluation in a convenience sample of 102 pre-licensure students. Results Students reported gains in confidence and skill acquisition using team skills to record individual videos of skill performance, and described the importance of teamwork, peer support, and deliberate practice. Conclusion Although time consuming, the production of student-directed video validations of psychomotor skill performance is an authentic task with meaningful accountabilities that is well-received by students as an effective, satisfying learner experience to increase confidence and competence in performing psychomotor skills.

  1. The effects of video-based and activity-based instruction on high school students' knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions related to seat belt use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tudor Griffith, III

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of video-based science instruction and accompanying activity-based instruction on the knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions of high school students' use of seat belts. Secondarily, the purpose was to determine order effects and interactions between the two treatments used in the study: video-based instruction and hands-on activity-based instruction. The study used Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action to investigate the factors influencing high school students' behavioral intentions regarding seat belt use. This study used a pretest-posttest-posttest treatment design. Data were collected on 194 students in high school introductory biology and chemistry classes in Gainesville, Florida. Ten intact high school science classes (eight treatment and two control) took pretests and posttests measuring physics knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward seat belt use prior to and after participating in the two treatments. The treatment group students participated in at least 500 minutes of instructional time divided among five lessons over 10 instructional days. All participants were pretested on physics knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward seat belt use prior to two treatments. Treatment A was defined as participating in one 50-minute video-based instructional lesson. Treatment B was defined as participating in four hands-on science activities regarding crash-related physics concepts. Cronbach's coefficient alpha was used for analysis of the researcher-designed instruments, and ANOVA was used to analyze the data. The results of the analyses (p young adults.

  2. The association of Self-concept with Substance Abuse and Problematic Use of Video Games in University Students: A Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón Cuberos, Ramón; Zurita Ortega, Félix; Castro Sánchez, Manuel; Espejo Garcés, Tamara; Martínez Martínez, Asunción; Ruiz-Rico Ruiz, Gerardo

    2017-07-14

    This study aims to define and contrast an explanatory model of consumption of alcohol, tobacco consumption, and problematic use of video games based on self-concept and its dimensions in a sample of university students. The research was conducted with a sample of 490 students from the province of Granada (Spain), aged between 20 and 29 years (M = 22.80 ± 3.63), with a homogeneous distribution by gender. The instruments used were the Self-concept Form-5 Questionnaire (García & Musitu, 1999), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (Saunders, Aasland, Babor, De la Fuente, & Grant, 1993), the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (Heatherton, Kozlowski, Frecker, & Fagerström, 1991) and the Questionnaire for Experiences Related to Video Games (Chamarro et al., 2014). A model of structural equations was estimated, which was adjusted properly, χ2(8) = 19.843, p = .011; CFI = .963, NFI = .943, IFI = .965, RMSEA = .055. As main results, a positive relationship between social and physical self-concept and consumption of alcohol was obtained, as well as a negative relationship between social self-concept and problematic use of videogames. Academic dimension was negatively related to alcohol and video game use. Furthermore, alcohol consumption was positively related to tobacco consumption and use of video games. It is concluded that levels of self-concept may represent a risk factor in substance abuse and digital leisure, and their study and consideration are appropriate.

  3. Assessing the Effectiveness of Gravitational Wave Outreach Video Games in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jonathan

    Students and faculty at the Gravitational Wave Group in Birmingham, UK developed a remake of the classic 1972 game of Pong. Black Hole Pong was developed to be used in events such as science fairs as a way to engage children and pique interest in black holes. I present the results of a study which assesses the utility of Black Hole Pong and its successors in raising awareness of gravitational wave research, and in fostering conceptual understanding of astrophysics and gravity. Of particular interest in this study is potential use in high school science classrooms during astrophysics units.

  4. A Field-Based Biomimicry Exercise Helps Students Discover Connections among Biodiversity, Form and Function, and Species Conservation during Earth's Sixth Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Constance M.

    2014-01-01

    In a first-year seminar on mass extinctions, a field-based, paleontology-focused exercise promotes active learning about Earth's biodiversity, form and function, and the biomimicry potential of ancient and modern life. Students study Devonian fossils at a local quarry and gain foundational experience in describing anatomy and relating form to…

  5. Video microblogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornoe, Nis; Barkhuus, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Microblogging is a recently popular phenomenon and with the increasing trend for video cameras to be built into mobile phones, a new type of microblogging has entered the arena of electronic communication: video microblogging. In this study we examine video microblogging, which is the broadcasting...... of short videos. A series of semi-structured interviews offers an understanding of why and how video microblogging is used and what the users post and broadcast....

  6. Association Among Television and Computer/Video Game Use, Victimization, and Suicide Risk Among U.S. High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Whitney L; Basile, Kathleen C; Clayton, Heather B

    2018-03-01

    With the increasing popularity of mobile Internet devices, the exposure of adolescents to media has significantly increased. There is limited information about associations between the types and frequency of media use and experiences of violence victimization and suicide risk. The current study sought to examine the association of bullying and teen dating violence (TDV) victimization, suicide risk with different types of media use (i.e., television and computer/video game use), and number of total media use hours per school day. Data from the nationally representative 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey ( n = 15,624) were used to examine the association between media use and violence victimization and suicide risk. Logistic regression models generated prevalence ratios adjusted for demographic characteristics and substance use behaviors to identify significant associations between media use and victimization and suicide risk, stratified by gender. Media use was associated with TDV victimization for male students only, while media use was related to experiences of bullying and suicide risk for both male and female students. In addition, limited (2 or fewer hours) and excessive (5 or more hours) media use emerged as significant correlates of suicide risk and bullying victimization, with limited media use associated with decreased risk and excessive media use with increased risk. Comprehensive, cross-cutting efforts to prevent different forms of victimization should take into account media use and its potential association with adolescent victimization and suicide risk. The current study results suggest limiting adolescent media use, as part of comprehensive prevention programming, might relate to reductions in risk for victimization and suicide.

  7. Video Measurements: Quantity or Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajkov, Oliver; Mitrevski, Boce

    2012-01-01

    Students have problems with understanding, using and interpreting graphs. In order to improve the students' skills for working with graphs, we propose Manual Video Measurement (MVM). In this paper, the MVM method is explained and its accuracy is tested. The comparison with the standardized video data software shows that its accuracy is comparable…

  8. Using a replica of Leeuwenhoek's microscope to teach the history of science and to motivate students to discover the vision and the contributions of the first microscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepel, Lenira M N; Loreto, Elgion L S; Rocha, João B T

    2009-01-01

    The history of science should be incorporated into science teaching as a means of improving learning and also to increase the students' understanding about the nature of science. In biology education, the history of microscopy deserves a special place. The discovery of this instrument not only opened a new and fantastic microworld but also led to the development of one unifying principle of biological sciences (i.e., cell theory). The microscopes of Leeuwenhoek and Hooke opened windows into the microworld of living organisms. In the present work, the knowledge of these themes was analyzed in a group of students beginning an undergraduate biology course. Our data suggest that the history of microscopy is poorly treated at the secondary school level. We propose a didactic activity using a replica of Leeuwenhoek's microscope made with Plexiglas and a lens obtained from a key chain laser pointer or from a broken CD drive. The proposed activity motivated students to learn about microscopy and helped them to appreciate scientific knowledge from a historical perspective.

  9. Top quark discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Nine months after a careful announcement of tentative evidence for the long-awaited sixth 'top' quark, physicists from the CDF and DO experiments at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider declared on 2 March that they had finally discovered the top quark. Last year (June 1994, page 1), the CDF experiment at the Tevatron reported a dozen candidate top events. These, said CDF, had all the characteristics expected of top, but the difficulties of extracting the tiny signal from a trillion proton-antiproton collisions made them shy of claiming a discovery. For its part, the companion DO Tevatron experiment reported a few similar events but were even more guarded about their interpretation as top quarks. Just after these hesitant announcements, performance at the Tevatron improved dramatically last summer. After the commissioning of a new linear accelerator and a magnet realignment, the machine reached a new world record proton-antiproton collision luminosity of 1.28 x 10 31 per sq cm per s, ten times that originally planned. Data began to pour in at an unprecedented rate and the data sample grew to six trillion collisions. Luminosity has subsequently climbed to 1.7 x 10 31 . The top quark is the final letter in the alphabet of Standard Model particles. According to this picture, all matter is composed of six stronglyinteracting subnuclear particles, the quarks, and six weakly interacting particles, the leptons. Both sextets are neatly arranged as three pairs in order of increasing mass. The fifth quark, the 'beauty' or 'b' quark, was also discovered at Fermilab, back in 1977. Since then physicists have been eagerly waiting for the top to turn up, but have been frustrated by its heaviness - the top is some 40 times the mass of its 'beautiful' partner. Not only is the top quark the heaviest by far, but it is the only quark which has been actively hunted. After the quarry was glimpsed last year, the net has now been

  10. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  11. Tracing Sequential Video Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    2015-01-01

    , for one week in 2014, and collected and analyzed visual data to learn about scientists’ practices. The visual material that was collected represented the agreed on material artifacts that should aid the students' reflective process to make sense of science technology practices. It was up to the student...... video, nature of the interactional space, and material and spatial semiotics....

  12. Robust video object cosegmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguan; Shen, Jianbing; Li, Xuelong; Porikli, Fatih

    2015-10-01

    With ever-increasing volumes of video data, automatic extraction of salient object regions became even more significant for visual analytic solutions. This surge has also opened up opportunities for taking advantage of collective cues encapsulated in multiple videos in a cooperative manner. However, it also brings up major challenges, such as handling of drastic appearance, motion pattern, and pose variations, of foreground objects as well as indiscriminate backgrounds. Here, we present a cosegmentation framework to discover and segment out common object regions across multiple frames and multiple videos in a joint fashion. We incorporate three types of cues, i.e., intraframe saliency, interframe consistency, and across-video similarity into an energy optimization framework that does not make restrictive assumptions on foreground appearance and motion model, and does not require objects to be visible in all frames. We also introduce a spatio-temporal scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) flow descriptor to integrate across-video correspondence from the conventional SIFT-flow into interframe motion flow from optical flow. This novel spatio-temporal SIFT flow generates reliable estimations of common foregrounds over the entire video data set. Experimental results show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art on a new extensive data set (ViCoSeg).

  13. Video Captions for Online Courses: Do YouTube's Auto-Generated Captions Meet Deaf Students' Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Becky Sue

    2016-01-01

    Providing captions for videos used in online courses is an area of interest for institutions of higher education. There are legal and ethical ramifications as well as time constraints to consider. Captioning tools are available, but some universities rely on the auto-generated YouTube captions. This study looked at a particular type of video--the…

  14. Video demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Jack, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This international bestseller and essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide. This is by far the most informative analog and digital video reference available, includes the hottest new trends and cutting-edge developments in the field. Video Demystified, Fourth Edition is a "one stop" reference guide for the various digital video technologies. The fourth edition is completely updated with all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video (Video over DSL, Ethernet, etc.), as well as discussions of the latest standards throughout. The accompanying CD-ROM is updated to include a unique set of video test files in the newest formats. *This essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide *Contains all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video *Completely revised with all the latest and most up-to-date industry standards.

  15. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  16. Video pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Länsitie, Janne; Stevenson, Blair; Männistö, Riku; Karjalainen, Tommi; Karjalainen, Asko

    2016-01-01

    The short film is an introduction to the concept of video pedagogy. The five categories of video pedagogy further elaborate how videos can be used as a part of instruction and learning process. Most pedagogical videos represent more than one category. A video itself doesn’t necessarily define the category – the ways in which the video is used as a part of pedagogical script are more defining factors. What five categories did you find? Did you agree with the categories, or are more...

  17. A randomized comparison of video demonstration versus hands-on training of medical students for vacuum delivery using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Ziad; Kumpernatz, Anne K; Rezniczek, Günther A; Cetin, Cem; Tempfer-Bentz, Eva-Katrin; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2017-03-01

    To compare medical students' skills for vaginal operative delivery by vacuum extraction (VE) after hands-on training versus video demonstration. We randomized medical students to an expert demonstration (group 1) or a hands-on (group 2) training using a standardized VE algorithm on a pelvic training model. Students were tested with a 40-item Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scoring system after training and 4 days later. OSATS scores were the primary outcome. Performance time, self-assessment, confidence, and global rating scale were secondary outcomes. We assessed the constructive validity of OSATS in this VE model comparing metric scores of experts and students. In all, 137 students were randomized. OSATS scores were higher in group 2 (n = 63) compared with group 1 (n = 74) (32.89 ± 6.39 vs 27.51 ± 10.27, respectively; P training is superior to video demonstration for teaching VE on a pelvic model.

  18. Prevalence of Addiction to the Internet, Computer Games, DVD, and Video and Its Relationship to Anxiety and Depression in a Sample of Iranian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Amiri, Amin; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Khademalhosseini, Mitra; Khademalhosseini, Zeinab; Gholami, Zeinab; Sharifian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of addiction to the Internet, computer games, DVD, and video and its relationship to anxiety and depression in a sample of Iranian high school students. In this cross-sectional study 1020 high school students (males and females) were selected randomly from different areas of Shiraz city in southern Iran. They were interviewed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4(th) ed (DSM-IV) criteria. About 50% of the students were females, 277 students (27.2%) were studying in the first year of high school, 242 (23.7%) were in the second year, and others in the third year. The prevalence of anxiety was significantly higher in females than in males (p video CD dependents (p addiction may cause depression and anxiety in high school students. It seems necessary to develop an Internet addiction prevention program for adolescents taking into account the psychological factors such as depression and Internet use habits.

  19. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  20. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  1. A randomized controlled pilot trial comparing the impact of access to clinical endocrinology video demonstrations with access to usual revision resources on medical student performance of clinical endocrinology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, Emily J; Lambert, Tim; Carter, John N; Learoyd, Diana L; Twigg, Stephen; Clarke, Stephen

    2013-10-03

    Demonstrating competence in clinical skills is key to course completion for medical students. Methods of providing clinical instruction that foster immediate learning and potentially serve as longer-term repositories for on-demand revision, such as online videos demonstrating competent performance of clinical skills, are increasingly being used. However, their impact on learning has been little studied. The aim of this study was to determine the value of adjunctive on-demand video-based training for clinical skills acquisition by medical students in endocrinology. Following an endocrinology clinical tutorial program, 2nd year medical students in the pre-assessment revision period were recruited and randomized to either a set of bespoke on-line clinical skills training videos (TV), or to revision as usual (RAU). The skills demonstrated on video were history taking in diabetes mellitus (DMH), examination for diabetes lower limb complications (LLE), and examination for signs of thyroid disease (TE). Students were assessed on these clinical skills in an observed structured clinical examination two weeks after randomization. Assessors were blinded to student randomization status. For both diabetes related clinical skills assessment tasks, students in the TV group performed significantly better than those in the RAU group. There were no between group differences in thyroid examination performance. For the LLE, 91.7% (n = 11/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 40% (n = 4/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.024). For the DMH, 83.3% (n = 10/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 20% (n = 2/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.007). Exposure to high quality videos demonstrating clinical skills can significantly improve medical student skill performance in an observed structured clinical examination of these skills, when

  2. Using "Making Sense of Climate Science Denial" MOOC videos in a college course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.; Cook, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) "Denial101x: Making Sense of Climate Science Denial" teaches students to make sense of the science and respond to climate change denial. The course is made up of a series of short, myth-debunking lecture videos that can be strategically used in college courses. The videos and the visuals within have proven a great resource for an introductory college level climate change course. Methods for using the videos in both online and in-classroom courses will be presented, as well as student reactions and learning from the videos. The videos introduce and explain a climate science topic, then paraphrase a common climate change myth, explain why the myth is wrong by identifying the characteristic of climate denial used, and concludes by reinforcing the correct science. By focusing on common myths, the MOOC has made an archive of videos that can be used by anyone in need of a 5-minute response to debunk a myth. By also highlighting five characteristics of climate denial: fake experts, logical fallacies, impossible expectations, cherry picking, and conspiracy theories (FLICC), the videos also teach the viewer the skills they need to critically examine myths they may encounter in the real world on a variety of topics. The videos also include a series of expert scientist interviews that can be used to drive home points, as well as put some faces to the science. These videos are freely available outside of the MOOC and can be found under the relevant "Most used climate myths" section on the skepticalscience.com webpage, as well as directly on YouTube. Discover ideas for using videos in future courses, regardless of discipline.

  3. Toy Trucks in Video Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Nakamura, Nanami; Larsen, Rainer Rye

    2015-01-01

    discovered that using scale-models like toy trucks has a strongly encouraging effect on developers/designers to collaboratively make sense of field videos. In our analysis of such scale-model sessions, we found some quite fundamental patterns of how participants utilise objects; the participants build shared......Video fieldstudies of people who could be potential users is widespread in design projects. How to analyse such video is, however, often challenging, as it is time consuming and requires a trained eye to unlock experiential knowledge in people’s practices. In our work with industrialists, we have...... narratives by moving the objects around, they name them to handle the complexity, they experience what happens in the video through their hands, and they use the video together with objects to create alternative narratives, and thus alternative solutions to the problems they observe. In this paper we claim...

  4. Differences in the perception of seven behaviour-modifying techniques in paediatric dentistry by undergraduate students using lecturing and video sequences for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwitzki, M; Beyer, C; Meller, C

    2010-11-01

    Whilst preparing undergraduate students for a clinical course in paediatric dentistry, four consecutive classes (n = 107) were divided into two groups. Seven behaviour-modifying techniques were introduced: systematic desensitization, operant conditioning, modelling, Tell, Show, Do-principle, substitution, change of roles and the active involvement of the patient. The behaviour-modifying techniques that had been taught to group one (n = 57) through lecturing were taught to group two (n = 50) through video sequences and vice versa in the following semester. Immediately after the presentations, students were asked by means of a questionnaire about their perceptions of ease of using the different techniques and their intention for clinical application of each technique. After completion of the clinical course, they were asked about which behaviour-modifying techniques they had actually used when dealing with patients. Concerning the perception of ease of using the different techniques, there were considerable differences for six of the seven techniques (P < 0.05). Whilst some techniques seemed more difficult to apply clinically after lecturing, others seemed more difficult after video-based teaching. Concerning the intention for clinical application and the actual clinical application, there were higher percentages for all techniques taught after video-based teaching. However, the differences were significant only for two techniques in each case (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the use of video based teaching enhances the intention for application and the actual clinical application only for a limited number of behaviour-modifying techniques. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. The effect of video interviews with STEM professionals on STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest of middle school students in conservative Protestant Christian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsup, Philip R.

    Inspiring learners toward career options available in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is important not only for economic development but also for maintaining creative thinking and innovation. Limited amounts of research in STEM education have focused on the population of students enrolled in religious and parochial schools, and given the historic conflict between religion and science, this sector of American education is worthy of examination. The purpose of this quantitative study is to extend Gottfredson's (1981) Theory of Circumscription and Compromise as it relates to occupational aspirations. Bem's (1981) Gender Schema Theory is examined as it relates to the role of gender in career expectations, and Crenshaw's (1989) Intersectionality Theory is included as it pertains to religion as a group identifier. Six professionals in STEM career fields were video recorded while being interviewed about their skills and education as well as positive and negative aspects of their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 25-minute video for the purpose of increasing understanding of STEM careers among middle school viewers. The research questions asked whether middle school students from conservative, Protestant Christian schools in a Midwest region increased in STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest as a result of viewing the video and whether gender interacted with exposure to the video. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control groups, pretest/posttest factorial design was employed to evaluate data collected from the STEM Semantic Survey. A Two-Way ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in dependent variables from pretest to posttest. Implications of the findings are examined and recommendations for future research are made. Descriptors: STEM career interest, STEM attitude, STEM gender disparity, Occupational aspirations, Conservative Protestant education.

  6. Video Histories, Memories, and Coincidences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    2012-01-01

    Looping images allows us to notice things that we have never noticed before. Looping a small but exquisite selection of the video tapes of Marcel Odenbach, Dieter Kiessling and Matthias Neuenhofer may allow the discovering of Histories, Coincidences, and Infinitesimal Aesthetics inscribed...

  7. Immersive video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Saied; Katkere, Arun L.; Jain, Ramesh C.

    1996-03-01

    Interactive video and television viewers should have the power to control their viewing position. To make this a reality, we introduce the concept of Immersive Video, which employs computer vision and computer graphics technologies to provide remote users a sense of complete immersion when viewing an event. Immersive Video uses multiple videos of an event, captured from different perspectives, to generate a full 3D digital video of that event. That is accomplished by assimilating important information from each video stream into a comprehensive, dynamic, 3D model of the environment. Using this 3D digital video, interactive viewers can then move around the remote environment and observe the events taking place from any desired perspective. Our Immersive Video System currently provides interactive viewing and `walkthrus' of staged karate demonstrations, basketball games, dance performances, and typical campus scenes. In its full realization, Immersive Video will be a paradigm shift in visual communication which will revolutionize television and video media, and become an integral part of future telepresence and virtual reality systems.

  8. Video mediated teaching of young students in peripheral regions of the Nordic countries - a discussion of problems and potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    Modern labour market is characterized by high educational demands. However, the opportunities for young people living in peripheral regions of countries of meeting such demands are reduced. Modern technology and improvements of video technology widened the possibilities of providing young people...... in these areas with education and has given rise to an increase in the interest of using video mediated teaching. Recent years several experiments have been implemented in Denmark and in the Nordic countries in general. In a Danish region a comprehensive innovation project including video mediated simultaneous...... teaching at two locations was implemented in years 2008 - 2010 (Andreasen, 2012). Drawing on theory of Etienne Wenger (2004) about learning and communities of practice this article discusses results from the dialogue research related to the project. The article will discuss problems and potentials...

  9. Video games

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Vojtěch

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is based on a detailed analysis of various topics related to the question of whether video games can be art. In the first place it analyzes the current academic discussion on this subject and confronts different opinions of both supporters and objectors of the idea, that video games can be a full-fledged art form. The second point of this paper is to analyze the properties, that are inherent to video games, in order to find the reason, why cultural elite considers video games as i...

  10. Effect of an Intervention Program Based on Active Video Games and Motor Games on Health Indicators in University Students: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Zurita-Ortega

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: High levels of physical inactivity caused by sedentary digital screen leisure constitute one of the main causes of the high levels of obesity observed in today’s society; (2 Methods: The present study aims to analyse the effect of a 12-week intervention program based on the application of active video games and motor games on health status indicators, problematic use of video games, and resilience capacity in university students. Besides, the content blocks of the Physical Education (PE field are worked on through these devices, revealing their potential as an Information and Communications Technology (ICT resource. A longitudinal study with a pre-experimental design with pretest–posttest measurements in a single group (n = 47 was performed, using as main instruments a Tanita TBF300® bioimpedance scale, the 20mSRT test for maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max, the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet Test (KIDMED, the Questionnaire for Experiences Related to Video games (QERV and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC; (3 Results: The main results were a discrete improvement in the percentage of fat mass and VO2max, representing a small effect size in both cases. The quality of the diet followed and the confidence and tolerance for adversity as a resilience factor were also improved, representing a medium size effect for this last variable; (4 Conclusions: Despite the limitations of this study as it does not have a control group, the main conclusions are that active video games and motor games can be a motivational resource to follow an active lifestyle, helping to improve health status indicators in young adults.

  11. Students' Perspectives on YouTube Video Usage as an E-Resource in the University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, W. Marc; Roberts, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of 70 prospective teachers about the use of YouTube videos as e-resources to supplement psychology lectures at a university in Trinidad & Tobago. A questionnaire designed for the study was used to collect both quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative analysis included frequency distribution,…

  12. The Impact of Collaborative Scaffolding in Educational Video Games on the Collaborative Support Skills of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loparev, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration is crucial to everything from product development in the workplace to research design in academia, yet there is no consensus on best practice when it comes to teaching collaborative skills. We explore one promising option: collaborative scaffolding in educational video games. Through this methodology, we can impart collaborative…

  13. Comparison of Static Picture and Video Prompting on the Performance of Cooking-Related Tasks by Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Gustafson, Melissa R.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of static photographs and video prompts on the independent task performance of six young men with a diagnosis of autism. An adapted alternating-treatment design with baseline, comparison, withdrawal, and final treatment conditions was used to measure the percentage of cooking-related tasks completed…

  14. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision ... DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home >> NEI YouTube Videos >> ...

  15. A multi-method study to determine the effectiveness of, and student attitudes to, online instructional videos for teaching clinical nursing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary; Lyng, Colette; McGrath, Mary; Cannon, Gerald

    2009-04-01

    E-learning is regularly promoted in higher education settings as a way of fostering more flexible approaches to learning. It has been argued however that the 'potential benefits of new information and communication technology instruments in education' have not been subjected to critical scrutiny (Debande, O., 2004. ICTs and the development of e-learning in Europe: the role of the public and private sectors. European Journal of Education 39 (2), 191-208, p. 192). This paper outlines a multi-method evaluation of an e-learning innovation designed to teach clinical skills to student nurses. Responding to the challenges of teaching clinical skills to large class sizes, we developed a set of instructional videos for one undergraduate skills-based module, which are now integral to the module and available online to students on a continuous basis. Evaluation suggests that students' performance outcomes are unchanged. The students view the flexible and self-management aspects of this method of learning positively, with some attitudinal differences between male and female, and mature and non-mature students. However, it is best used to complement rather than replace lecturer demonstration, lending support to a 'blended' model (Collis, B., van der Wende, M., 2002. Models of Technology and Change in Higher Education: An International Comparative Survey on The Current and Future Use of ICT in Higher Education, University of Twente, Center for Higher Education Policy Studies, The Netherlands).

  16. Association of sleep disturbances with TV and satellite watching and video games playing in 14-17 years old high school students of Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Jalilolghadr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep plays an important role in health. Reduced levels of attention, learning and memory are of adverse outcomes of sleep disorders in students. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the association of sleep disturbances with watching TV and satellite and playing video games in 14-17 years old high school students of Qazvin. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 653 high school students (14-17 years old in Qazvin that were selected by multistage cluster random sampling method (2013-2014. Data were collected through Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ and BEARS questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, T-test, ANOVA and logistic regression analysis. Findings: From 653 students, 392 (60% were female. The mean age was 15.73±0.99 years. The most prevalent sleep disturbances were waking up at night (74.4%, daytime sleepiness (69.8%, napping after school (66.6%, and nightmare (51.1%, respectively. Daytime sleepiness, nightmares, sleep after waking up, falling asleep in school, and nap after school time had significant association with watching satellite. Conclusion: With regards to the results, prevalence of sleep disorders was high in high school students of Qazvin and sleep disturbances were associated with duration of watching satellite.

  17. Akademisk video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dette kapitel har fokus på metodiske problemstillinger, der opstår i forhold til at bruge (digital) video i forbindelse med forskningskommunikation, ikke mindst online. Video har længe været benyttet i forskningen til dataindsamling og forskningskommunikation. Med digitaliseringen og internettet ...

  18. Video Gameplay, Personality and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Matthew; Shute, Valerie; Kim, Yoon Jeon

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between video gameplay, video game genre preference, personality, and GPA was investigated in an online correlational study with university students. In addition to administering self-report measures of GPA and personality, we asked three different questions regarding styles of video gameplay. The first asked the average time…

  19. Improving Chinese nursing students' communication skills by utilizing video-stimulated recall and role-play case scenarios to introduce them to the SBAR technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Liang, Zhan; Blazeck, Alice; Greene, Brian

    2015-07-01

    Effective communication among healthcare workers is critically important for patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate outcomes of a workshop designed to teach Chinese nursing students to use the Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) communication tool and examine their attitudes toward utilizing SBAR as a communication tool. A convenience sample of 18 master's degree nursing students at a Chinese university was introduced to SBAR through a workshop. The workshop combined the SBAR tool, video-stimulated recall and role-play case scenarios to illustrate potential positive and negative communication-related patient outcomes. Students completed a 12-item questionnaire before and after participating in the workshop. Four of the items examined the four elements of the SBAR tool (situation, background, assessment, recommendation, score range 0-20), and eight of the items evaluated students' self-perceived attitudes towards utilizing the SBAR tool in their clinical practice (score range 0-40). Pre- and post-workshop scores on the four elements of the SBAR tool demonstrate significant improvement in knowledge of SBAR (14.0±2.9 vs. 16.6±2.2, respectively; p=0.009). Pre- and post-workshop scores on the items testing students' self-perceived abilities also demonstrate significant improvement (26.9±3.5 vs. 32.6±4.5, respectively; p<0.01) in using SBAR. Total scores increased significantly from 40.9±5.0 to 49.2±5.9 (p<0.01). Moreover, 93.8% of the students agreed and strongly agreed that they would use SBAR during clinical practice. Participating in the SBAR workshop in combination with video-stimulated recall and role-play case scenarios significantly improved the Chinese nursing students' knowledge of SBAR and their self-perceived attitudes towards using SBAR tool. Future studies using a larger sample size and longer post-workshop follow-up are needed to confirm the long-term benefits of the workshop. Copyright

  20. Video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jeanne B

    2005-06-01

    The video game industry insists that it is doing everything possible to provide information about the content of games so that parents can make informed choices; however, surveys indicate that ratings may not reflect consumer views of the nature of the content. This article describes some of the currently popular video games, as well as developments that are on the horizon, and discusses the status of research on the positive and negative impacts of playing video games. Recommendations are made to help parents ensure that children play games that are consistent with their values.

  1. Discovering Hands - México

    OpenAIRE

    Salamanca Cárdenas, Daniela; Castelblanco Domínguez, Junio Andrés; Aguilar Ardila, Laura Andrea

    2016-01-01

    El modelo de Discovering Hands ha sido reconocido internacionalmente como un proyecto innovador que se ha expandido por diferentes países del mundo, como Austria, y se ha empezado a estudiar la propuesta en países como República Checa, India y Colombia. (Discovering Hands, 2016). Esto se debe a que no solo mejora el tratamiento de cáncer de mama, sino que también reduce los costos totales de tratamiento de la enfermedad y aumenta la fuerza laborar de los países donde esté presente. Al represe...

  2. Teacher learning and student outcomes in the context of classroom discourse. Findings from a video-based teacher professional development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Kiemer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an innovative teacher professional development programme (TPD focusing on the re-definition of teachers’ discourse behaviour. We report findings on teacher learning and student outcomes, and reflect on practical implications and directions for future research on the programme. In the “Dialogic Video Cycle” (DVC six teachers participated in a year-long intervention built on effective components of TPD and using videos of teachers’ own practices as tools for reflection and basis for group discussions. We compared the DVC with a traditional TPD programme (n= 4 teachers. Additionally, students (N= 226 were assessed regarding their motivational orientations and individual beliefs. Results show that effective TPD components could successfully be implemented in the DVC and that this new and innovative programme enhances teachers’ performance in classroom discourse and affects students’ interest in the subject, self-efficacy and domain-specific self-concept of ability positively. Thus, the DVC seems a promising tool to foster teacher learning with an impact on perceived student motivation and learning. Presentiamo un programma innovativo per lo sviluppo professionale degli insegnanti (TPD, centrato sulla ridefinizione della conduzione di interazioni verbali in classe. Sono riportati i risultati dell’apprendimento di insegnanti e studenti, e la riflessione sulle implicazioni pratiche per la ricerca futura sul programma. Nel “Dialogic Video Cycle” (DVC sei insegnanti hanno partecipato per un anno a un intervento di TPD mediante videoregistrazioni usate come strumenti di riflessione sulle proprie pratiche e per le discussioni di gruppo. Abbiamo confrontato il DVC con un programma TPD tradizionale (n= 4 insegnanti. Inoltre sono stati valutati gli orientamenti degli studenti (N= 226 in termini di motivazione e fiducia nelle proprie capacità. I risultati mostrano che le componenti efficaci del TPD potrebbero essere attuate con

  3. Video Comparator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Video Comparator is a comparative gage that uses electronic images from two sources, a standard and an unknown. Two matched video cameras are used to obtain the electronic images. The video signals are mixed and displayed on a single video receiver (CRT). The video system is manufactured by ITP of Chatsworth, CA and is a Tele-Microscope II, Model 148. One of the cameras is mounted on a toolmaker's microscope stand and produces a 250X image of a cast. The other camera is mounted on a stand and produces an image of a 250X template. The two video images are mixed in a control box provided by ITP and displayed on a CRT. The template or the cast can be moved to align the desired features. Vertical reference lines are provided on the CRT, and a feature on the cast can be aligned with a line on the CRT screen. The stage containing the casts can be moved using a Boeckleler micrometer equipped with a digital readout, and a second feature aligned with the reference line and the distance moved obtained from the digital display

  4. BEATING ISIS IN THE DIGITAL SPACE: FOCUS TESTING ISIS DEFECTOR COUNTER-NARRATIVE VIDEOS WITH AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Allision McDowell-Smith; Anne Speckhard; Ahmet S. Yayla

    2017-01-01

    ISIS recruits on a 24/7 basis in over 21 languages over the Internet using videos, memes, tweets and other social media postings and swarming in on anyone that retweets, likes or endorses their materials to try to seduce them into the group. Their unprecedented social media drive has resulted in over 30,000 foreign fighters from more than 100 countries migrating to Syria and Iraq. ISIS recruitment in the U.S. is for the most part Internet based and has resulted in the actual and attempted r...

  5. The Effect of Educational Software, Video Modelling and Group Discussion on Social-Skill Acquisition Among Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E; Banin, Irit

    2017-07-01

    People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often demonstrate difficulties in social skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive intervention program on the acquisition of social skills among students with mild IDD. Single subject multiple baseline design across situations was used for teaching five school-age children with mild IDD social skills embedded in school-based situations. Results demonstrate that the intervention program that included video modelling and games embedded with group discussions and simulations increased the level and use of adequate social behaviours within the school's natural environment. Results demonstrate the unique attribution of a comprehensive interactive program for acquisition and transfer of participants' social skills such as language pragmatics and social rules within the school environment. Group discussions and simulations were beneficial and enabled both group and personalized instruction through the unique application of the program designed for the study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Impact of Multimedia Feedback on Student Perceptions: Video Screencast with Audio Compared to Text Based eMail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkoski, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Computer technology provides a plethora of tools to engage students and make the classroom more interesting. Much research has been conducted on the impact of educational technology regarding instruction but little has been done on students' preferences for the type of instructor feedback (Watts, 2007). Mayer (2005) has developed an integrative,…

  7. Using Moos To Help Learn English; Video Jigsaw; Practicing Speaking with Follow-Up Interviews and Student-Read Dictations; "Ask the Expert": Oral Presentations that Work; The Medium Is the Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Reynolds, Judith; Noble, P. C.; Altschuler, Lee; Schauber, Holli

    2001-01-01

    Four short articles provide teaching tips for the English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classroom, including the use of Moos, a video jigsaw, practicing oral language skills with interviews and student-read dictations, an ask the expert activity which builds learner confidence in speaking in front of groups of people. (Author/VWL)

  8. "I Hate Maths: Why Do We Need to Do Maths?" Using iPad Video Diaries to Investigate Attitudes and Emotions towards Mathematics in Year 3 and Year 6 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Kevin; Jorgensen, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Accessing children's feelings and attitudes towards mathematics is a challenging proposition since methods for data collection may be fraught in terms of bias and power relations. This article explores a method of collecting information from young students about their attitudes towards mathematics using iPads, and a video diary technique not…

  9. Teaching Daily Living Skills to Seven Individuals with Severe Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison of Video Prompting to Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Fleming, Courtney; Chung, Yi-Cheih; Wheeler, Geoffrey M.; Basbagill, Abby R.; Singh, Angella H.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic replication of Cannella-Malone et al. by comparing the effects of video prompting to video modeling for teaching seven students with severe disabilities to do laundry and wash dishes. The video prompting and video modeling procedures were counterbalanced across tasks and participants and compared in an alternating…

  10. Learning from Narrated Instruction Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayrac, Jean-Baptiste; Bojanowski, Piotr; Agrawal, Nishant; Sivic, Josef; Laptev, Ivan; Lacoste-Julien, Simon

    2017-09-05

    Automatic assistants could guide a person or a robot in performing new tasks, such as changing a car tire or repotting a plant. Creating such assistants, however, is non-trivial and requires understanding of visual and verbal content of a video. Towards this goal, we here address the problem of automatically learning the main steps of a task from a set of narrated instruction videos. We develop a new unsupervised learning approach that takes advantage of the complementary nature of the input video and the associated narration. The method sequentially clusters textual and visual representations of a task, where the two clustering problems are linked by joint constraints to obtain a single coherent sequence of steps in both modalities. To evaluate our method, we collect and annotate a new challenging dataset of real-world instruction videos from the Internet. The dataset contains videos for five different tasks with complex interactions between people and objects, captured in a variety of indoor and outdoor settings. We experimentally demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically discover, learn and localize the main steps of a task input videos.

  11. Educational Use Of Digital Video In The Context Of Practical Work In Dentistry Prospective Evaluation Survey Of The Optimal Duration Of Educational Films By Second-Year Students Of Dentistry In Rabat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa REGRAGUI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of knowledge is a critical step that requires dedication and logistic assets to achieve the desired objective.Among these advantages is the online launch of educational films on the university's platform which aims at the improvement of understanding by students, and the information provided during practical work. For this, we have made three videos on the implementation of shaped clasps, while fixing the duration of the films successively at 8min50, 5min05 and 3min30. The videos were evaluated by the entire class through a questionnaire distributed to students who were present in the practical work training session. The biostatistical analysis revealed the preference to be for the 8min50 video with an initial viewing percentage of 59.3%. At a second and another viewing, preference was successively in favor of the 5min05 video (54.5% and that of 3min 30 (43.4%. Furthermore, the students’ favorite videos were those with a time interval of 10 to 20 minutes (46.9% for upcoming educational materials.

  12. Video Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    George Nauck of ENCORE!!! invented and markets the Advanced Range Performance (ARPM) Video Golf System for measuring the result of a golf swing. After Nauck requested their assistance, Marshall Space Flight Center scientists suggested video and image processing/computing technology, and provided leads on commercial companies that dealt with the pertinent technologies. Nauck contracted with Applied Research Inc. to develop a prototype. The system employs an elevated camera, which sits behind the tee and follows the flight of the ball down range, catching the point of impact and subsequent roll. Instant replay of the video on a PC monitor at the tee allows measurement of the carry and roll. The unit measures distance and deviation from the target line, as well as distance from the target when one is selected. The information serves as an immediate basis for making adjustments or as a record of skill level progress for golfers.

  13. To Spice Up Course Work, Professors Make Their Own Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    College faculty members have recently begun creating homemade videos to supplement their lectures, using free or low-cost software. These are the same technologies that make it easy for students to post spoof videos on YouTube, but the educators are putting the tools to educational use. Students tune in to the short videos more often than they…

  14. Stochastic Frontier Estimation of Efficient Learning in Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlen, Karla R.

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Frontier Regression Analysis was used to investigate strategies and skills that are associated with the minimization of time required to achieve proficiency in video games among students in grades four and five. Students self-reported their video game play habits, including strategies and skills used to become good at the video games…

  15. Understanding Learning Style by Eye Tracking in Slide Video Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianxia; Nishihara, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    More and more videos are now being used in e-learning context. For improving learning effect, to understand how students view the online video is important. In this research, we investigate how students deploy their attention when they learn through interactive slide video in the aim of better understanding observers' learning style. Felder and…

  16. Interactive Videos Enhance Learning about Socio-Ecological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithwick, Erica; Baxter, Emily; Kim, Kyung; Edel-Malizia, Stephanie; Rocco, Stevie; Blackstock, Dean

    2018-01-01

    Two forms of interactive video were assessed in an online course focused on conservation. The hypothesis was that interactive video enhances student perceptions about learning and improves mental models of social-ecological systems. Results showed that students reported greater learning and attitudes toward the subject following interactive video.…

  17. Using learning styles and viewing styles in streaming video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jelle; Kommers, Piet A. M.; de Brock, Bert

    Improving the effectiveness of learning when students observe video lectures becomes urgent with the rising advent of (web-based) video materials. Vital questions are how students differ in their learning preferences and what patterns in viewing video can be detected in log files. Our experiments

  18. Intellectual Video Filming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    in favour of worthy causes. However, it is also very rewarding to draw on the creativity, enthusiasm and rapidly improving technical skills of young students, and to guide them to use video equipment themselves for documentary, for philosophical film essays and intellectual debate. In the digital era......Like everyone else university students of the humanities are quite used to watching Hollywood productions and professional TV. It requires some didactic effort to redirect their eyes and ears away from the conventional mainstream style and on to new and challenging ways of using the film media...

  19. Comparison of basic life support (BLS video self-instructional system and traditional BLS training in first year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nikandish

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: For several years, educators have criticized the lecture-based  approach  to teaching and learning. Experts have rightly stressed on acquisition  of a number of critical  skills rather than focusing on lectures. Purpose. To compare students'  pe1jormance after self-education  with VCD and manikin,  with thei performance after standard BLS training.Methods: In this randomized controlled study, twenty first-year nursing students were divided into two groups randomly, and were provided with basic life support (BLS instruction either in the traditional format of lecturing or with VCD and manikin without tutor. The students’ Performance was evaluated on a manikin with a checklist including all steps in BLS.Results: With traditional  instruction,  students'  mean score was 42.2±3.91, while it was 46.3±3.86 with self-education,  showing no significant  difference.Conclusion: In nursing students with no previous BLS training, access to VCD and manikin facilitates immediate achievement of educational objectives similar to those  of a standard  BLS course.  Self­ learning BLS with VCD should be enhanced with a short period of hands-on practice.Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, nursing students, cpr skills, education

  20. Personal Digital Video Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte Sølbeck; Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    The drop-out rate among students attending vocational training institutions is higher than for other forms of education at the same entry level (in Denmark, but also generally in Europe). A recent Danish reform has aided students, who enter the first part of the basic program directly from primar...... students are at school and in practical placements with companies. This may increase students’ social engagement and interest in the subject matter, together with greater awareness of professional identity, which could help decrease drop-out rates for vocational training.......The drop-out rate among students attending vocational training institutions is higher than for other forms of education at the same entry level (in Denmark, but also generally in Europe). A recent Danish reform has aided students, who enter the first part of the basic program directly from primary...... multimedia and video productions in Vocational Educational Training (VET). These video productions focused on the subjects of their future profession, and increased students’ motivation and experience of professional pride. Through a semistructured literature review, the paper then argues for a research...

  1. OAS :: Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    subscriptions Videos Photos Live Webcast Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Audios Photos Social Media Facebook Twitter Newsletters Press and Communications Department Contact us at Rights Actions against Corruption C Children Civil Registry Civil Society Contact Us Culture Cyber

  2. Comment on 'Finding viscosity of liquids from Brownian motion at students' laboratory' and 'Brownian motion using video capture'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greczylo, Tomasz; Debowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    The authors make comments and remarks on the papers by Salmon et al (2002 Eur. J. Phys. 23 249-53) and their own (2005 Eur. J. Phys. 26 827-33) concerning Brownian motion in two-dimensional space. New, corrected results of calculations and measurements for students' experiments on finding the viscosity of liquids from Brownian motion are presented. (letters and comments)

  3. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  4. Does Digital Video Enhance Student Learning in Field-Based Experiments and Develop Graduate Attributes beyond the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The connection between fieldwork and development of graduate attributes is explored in this paper. Digital technologies present opportunities to potentially enhance the learning experience of students undertaking fieldwork, and develop core digital attributes and competencies required by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and employers. This…

  5. Matthias Neuenhofer: Videos 1988-1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    -reflexivity of the medium through the phenomenon of video feedback. Between 1988 and 1995 it built the basis of the video works by Matthias Neuenhofer. The presented essay on his Feedback-Videos completes the monograph-‘video-trilogy’ of Slavko Kacunko, which has begun with the book about Marcel Odenbach (1999...... of intention” (M. Baxandall): These are all characteristics of a named but not yet developed, Infinitesimal Aesthetics which ‘origin’ seems to be the repetition, which again, as much as its ‘goal’ must remain unnamed, at least if the distance to the otherwise impending visual dogmatism and image...... to allow the discovering of Histories, Coincidences, and Infinitesimal Aesthetics inscribed into the Video medium as its unsurpassed topicality. [1] Andreas Breitenstein has used this notion in his review of the book Die Winter im Süden of Norbert Gstrein (2008). In: Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 26. August 2008...

  6. Interactive Video, The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, L. R.; Wold-Brennon, R.; Cooper, S. K.; Brinkhuis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Video has the ingredients to reach us emotionally - with amazing images, enthusiastic interviews, music, and video game-like animations-- and it's emotion that motivates us to learn more about our new interest. However, watching video is usually passive. New web-based technology is expanding and enhancing the video experience, creating opportunities to use video with more direct interaction. This talk will look at an Educaton and Outreach team's experience producing video-centric curriculum using innovative interactive media tools from TED-Ed and FlixMaster. The Consortium for Ocean Leadership's Deep Earth Academy has partnered with the Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) to send educators and a video producer aboard three deep sea research expeditions to the Juan de Fuca plate to install and service sub-seafloor observatories. This collaboration between teachers, students, scientists and media producers has proved a productive confluence, providing new ways of understanding both ground-breaking science and the process of science itself - by experimenting with new ways to use multimedia during ocean-going expeditions and developing curriculum and other projects post-cruise.

  7. Learning computer science by watching video games

    OpenAIRE

    Nagataki, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a teaching method that utilizes video games in computer science education. The primary characteristic of this approach is that it utilizes video games as observational materials. The underlying idea is that by observing the computational behavior of a wide variety of video games, learners will easily grasp the fundamental architecture, theory, and technology of computers. The results of a case study conducted indicate that the method enhances the motivation of students for...

  8. Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Video Modeling, Video Prompting, and Video Modeling on Task Completion by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Foster, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effects of three procedures (video prompting: VP, video modeling: VM, and continuous video modeling: CVM) on task completion by three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. The comparison was made across three sets of fundamentally different tasks (putting away household items in clusters of two items;…

  9. Teaching Social Studies with Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguth, Brad M.; List, Jonathan S.; Wunderle, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Today's youth have grown up immersed in technology and are increasingly relying on video games to solve problems, engage socially, and find entertainment. Yet research and vignettes of teachers actually using video games to advance student learning in social studies is scarce (Hutchinson 2007). This article showcases how social studies…

  10. Flipped Classroom: A Comparison Of Student Performance Using Instructional Videos And Podcasts Versus The Lecture-Based Model Of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retta Guy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the results of a study conducted at a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university. A quasi-experimental design was chosen for this study to compare student performance in two different classroom environments, traditional versus flipped. The study spanned 3 years, beginning fall 2012 through spring 2015. The participants included 433 declared business majors who self-enrolled in several sections of the Management Information Systems course during the study. The results of the current study mirrored those of previous works as the instructional method impacted students’ final grade. Thus, reporting that the flipped classroom approach offers flexibility with no loss of performance when compared to traditional lecture-based environments.

  11. Indexed Captioned Searchable Videos: A Learning Companion for STEM Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Tayfun; Subhlok, Jaspal; Barker, Lecia; Shah, Shishir; Johnson, Olin; Hovey, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Videos of classroom lectures have proven to be a popular and versatile learning resource. A key shortcoming of the lecture video format is accessing the content of interest hidden in a video. This work meets this challenge with an advanced video framework featuring topical indexing, search, and captioning (ICS videos). Standard optical character recognition (OCR) technology was enhanced with image transformations for extraction of text from video frames to support indexing and search. The images and text on video frames is analyzed to divide lecture videos into topical segments. The ICS video player integrates indexing, search, and captioning in video playback providing instant access to the content of interest. This video framework has been used by more than 70 courses in a variety of STEM disciplines and assessed by more than 4000 students. Results presented from the surveys demonstrate the value of the videos as a learning resource and the role played by videos in a students learning process. Survey results also establish the value of indexing and search features in a video platform for education. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of ICS videos framework and over 5 years of usage experience in several STEM courses.

  12. Discovering superconductivity an investigative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ireson, Gren

    2012-01-01

    The highly-illustrated text will serve as excellent introduction for students, with and without a physics background, to superconductivity. With a strong practical, experimental emphasis, it will provide readers with an overview of the topic preparing them for more advanced texts used in more advanced undergraduate and post-graduate courses.

  13. Discovering Folklore Through Community Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpter, Magdalena Benavides, Ed.

    The folkways and cultural heritage of the Mexican Americans of South Texas are explored in this volume which is designed to provide the student with the opportunity for cultural enrichment, oral language development, and vocabulary expansion. The first chapter deals with "Creencias" which are common beliefs handed down from generation to…

  14. Growing Self-Estemm and Discovering Intelligences through Oral Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa Dora Liliana

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available After having applied a needs analysis in an eleventh grade course of English, I could notice that there was a big lack of security and self-confidence in the students. They expressed in different data-gathering instruments their fear when speaking in front of the class. Also, they talked about their insecurity when pronouncing English and the need for more opportunities for developing speaking. Therefore, the implementation of an innovation in class was carried out in order to respond to the students¿ needs and make them discover their talents. The implementation was successful and students improved some areas of their communicative competence.

  15. Making Sense of Video Analytics: Lessons Learned from Clickstream Interactions, Attitudes, and Learning Outcome in a Video-Assisted Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail N. Giannakos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Online video lectures have been considered an instructional media for various pedagogic approaches, such as the flipped classroom and open online courses. In comparison to other instructional media, online video affords the opportunity for recording student clickstream patterns within a video lecture. Video analytics within lecture videos may provide insights into student learning performance and inform the improvement of video-assisted teaching tactics. Nevertheless, video analytics are not accessible to learning stakeholders, such as researchers and educators, mainly because online video platforms do not broadly share the interactions of the users with their systems. For this purpose, we have designed an open-access video analytics system for use in a video-assisted course. In this paper, we present a longitudinal study, which provides valuable insights through the lens of the collected video analytics. In particular, we found that there is a relationship between video navigation (repeated views and the level of cognition/thinking required for a specific video segment. Our results indicated that learning performance progress was slightly improved and stabilized after the third week of the video-assisted course. We also found that attitudes regarding easiness, usability, usefulness, and acceptance of this type of course remained at the same levels throughout the course. Finally, we triangulate analytics from diverse sources, discuss them, and provide the lessons learned for further development and refinement of video-assisted courses and practices.

  16. The Design of Video Games in the Implementation of Malay Language Learning among Foreign Students in an Institution of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Fuziah; Alias, Norlidah; Rahman, Mohd Nazri Abdul; Dewitt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at reviewing the curriculum design by including video games in the implementation of the Malay language course at an Institute of Higher Learning. The objective of this study is to obtain expert opinion on the expected manner of implementation of video games in learning the Malay language. The Fuzzy Delphi technique (FDM) is used…

  17. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home >> NEI YouTube Videos >> ...

  18. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision ... DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI YouTube Videos » ...

  19. Digital Video: Get with It!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Several years after the first audiovisual Macintosh computer appeared, most educators are still oblivious of this technology. Almost every other economic sector (including the porn industry) makes abundant use of digital and streaming video. Desktop movie production is so easy that primary grade students can do it. Tips are provided. (MLH)

  20. Destination: Marshall Islands. Video Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legowski, Margaret

    This video guide was developed by the Peace Corps' Office of World Wise Schools. Activities that the guide describes are for use in a 3- to 5-day unit on one of the nations of Oceania, the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The activities are designed to provide students with opportunities to: (1) compare and contrast Marshallese and U.S. culture;…

  1. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and Jobs Fellowships NEI Summer Intern Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI YouTube Videos » ...

  2. Situational simulations in interactive video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Advanced Training Technologies section is using situational simulations in several Interactive Video training courses. Two applications of situational simulations will be discussed. In the first, used in the Hanford General Employee Training course, the student evaluates employee's actions in simulations of possible workplace situations. In the second, used in the Criticality Safety course, students must follow well-defined procedures to complete tasks. Design and incorporation of situational simulations will be discussed. 3 refs.

  3. Situational simulations in interactive video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Advanced Training Technologies section is using situational simulations in several Interactive Video training courses. Two applications of situational simulations will be discussed. In the first, used in the Hanford General Employee Training course, the student evaluates employee's actions in simulations of possible workplace situations. In the second, used in the Criticality Safety course, students must follow well-defined procedures to complete tasks. Design and incorporation of situational simulations will be discussed. 3 refs

  4. Using Video as Pedagogy for Globally Connected Learning about the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Diana; Kabwira, Davie; Mmatli, Tlamelo; Rankopo, Morena; Long, Dennis D.

    2012-01-01

    How might U.S. social work students' perceptions of HIV/AIDS differ from those of social work students in sub-Saharan Africa? Furthermore, what can students learn from hearing how students from other countries view them? Social work students in the United States, Botswana, and Malawi were video-recorded; they then viewed the videos of students at…

  5. Video game as a preoperative warm-up for laparoscopic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Korkes; Marcelo Langer Wroclawski; Alessandro  Tavares; Oseas de Castro-Neves Neto; Marcos  Tobias-Machado; Antonio Carlos Lima  Pompeo; Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of video game as warm-up before dry-lab laparoscopic activities. Methods: Eleven medical students participated in this prospective randomized crossover study. Students were divided into two groups. Students in Group 1 had to execute an interrupted suture with the dominant hand using a standardized technique (non-video game group). Students in Group 2 performed the same suture, but after playing a video game match (video game ...

  6. Learning Science Through Digital Video: Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In science, the use of digital video to document phenomena, experiments and demonstrations has rapidly increased during the last decade. The use of digital video for science education also has become common with the wide availability of video over the internet. However, as with using any technology as a teaching tool, some questions should be asked: What science is being learned from watching a YouTube clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on hydroelectric power generation? What are student preferences (e.g. multimedia versus traditional mode of delivery) with regard to their learning? This study describes 1) the efficacy of watching digital video in the science classroom to enhance student learning, 2) student preferences of instruction with regard to multimedia versus traditional delivery modes, and 3) the use of creating digital video as a project-based educational strategy to enhance learning. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. Additionally, they were asked about their preference for instruction (e.g. text only, lecture-PowerPoint style delivery, or multimedia-video). A majority of students indicated that well-made video, accompanied with scientific explanations or demonstration of the phenomena was most useful and preferred over text-only or lecture instruction for learning scientific information while video-only delivery with little or no explanation was deemed not very useful in learning science concepts. The use of student generated video projects as learning vehicles for the creators and other class members as viewers also will be discussed.

  7. Use of video taping during simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, M.; Young, P.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a video camera for training is not a new idea and is used throughout the country for training in such areas as computers, car repair, music and even in such non-technical areas as fishing. Reviewing a taped simulator training session will aid the student in his job performance regardless of the position he holds in his organization. If the student is to be examined on simulator performance, video will aid in this training in many different ways

  8. Motivation and Learning Engagement through Playing Math Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Daisyane; Vasconcelos, Lucas; Orey, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: With video games being a source of leisure and learning, educators and researchers alike are interested in understanding children's motivation for playing video games as a way to learn. This study explores student motivation and engagement levels in playing two math video games in the game "Club Penguin." Method: This is a…

  9. Lecture Videos in Online Courses: A Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather K.; Cordova, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study regarding online lecture videos, Evans (2014) shows that lecture videos are not superior to still slides. Using two Introduction to American Government courses, taught in a 4-week summer session, she shows that students in a non-video course had higher satisfaction with the course and instructor and performed better on exams than…

  10. Guerrilla Video: Adjudicating the Credible and the Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia; Fadde, Peter Jae

    2010-01-01

    Because video on the web has spread almost virally, video crafted out of an amateur aesthetic has contributed to a disruption of professional communication economies as it prompts us to ask: Can we use digital video to make work-related communication cool? Professional writing pedagogies are beginning to respond to new student expectations about…

  11. Exposure to Violent Video Games Increases Automatic Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Eric; Swanson, Jane

    2004-01-01

    The effects of exposure to violent video games on automatic associations with the self were investigated in a sample of 121 students. Playing the violent video game Doom led participants to associate themselves with aggressive traits and actions on the Implicit Association Test. In addition, self-reported prior exposure to violent video games…

  12. Video Games as Reconstructionist Sites of Learning in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nancy S.

    2008-01-01

    Art education has been in the midst of a transformation shaped by several factors, including changes in contemporary art theories, political and economic factors, and technological developments. Film, music videos, advertisements, video games and other forms of popular culture are shaping how students learn today. Discussions about video gaming…

  13. Glowing Hot Transiting Exoplanet Discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    VLT Spectra Indicate Shortest-Known-Period Planet Orbiting OGLE-TR-3 Summary More than 100 exoplanets in orbit around stars other than the Sun have been found so far. But while their orbital periods and distances from their central stars are well known, their true masses cannot be determined with certainty, only lower limits. This fundamental limitation is inherent in the common observational method to discover exoplanets - the measurements of small and regular changes in the central star's velocity, caused by the planet's gravitational pull as it orbits the star. However, in two cases so far, it has been found that the exoplanet's orbit happens to be positioned in such a way that the planet moves in front of the stellar disk, as seen from the Earth. This "transit" event causes a small and temporary dip in the star's brightness, as the planet covers a small part of its surface, which can be observed. The additional knowledge of the spatial orientation of the planetary orbit then permits a direct determination of the planet's true mass. Now, a group of German astronomers [1] have found a third star in which a planet, somewhat larger than Jupiter, but only half as massive, moves in front of the central star every 28.5 hours . The crucial observation of this solar-type star, designated OGLE-TR-3 [2] was made with the high-dispersion UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It is the exoplanet with the shortest period found so far and it is very close to the star, only 3.5 million km away. The hemisphere that faces the star must be extremely hot, about 2000 °C and the planet is obviously losing its atmosphere at high rate . PR Photo 10a/03 : The star OGLE-TR-3 . PR Photo 10b/03 : VLT UVES spectrum of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10c/03 : Relation between stellar brightness and velocity (diagram). PR Photo 10d/03 : Observed velocity variation of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10e/03 : Observed brightness variation of OGLE-TR-3. The search

  14. Airborne Video Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blask, Steven

    2002-01-01

    The DARPA Airborne Video Surveillance (AVS) program was established to develop and promote technologies to make airborne video more useful, providing capabilities that achieve a UAV force multiplier...

  15. Video Game Vocabulary : The effect of video games on Swedish learners‟ word comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Laveborn, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Video games are very popular among children in the Western world. This study was done in order to investigate if video games had an effect on 49 Swedish students‟ comprehension of English words (grades 7-8). The investigation was based on questionnaire and word test data. The questionnaire aimed to measure with which frequency students were playing video games, and the word test aimed to measure their word comprehension in general. In addition, data from the word test were used to investigate...

  16. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book challenges traditional approach to university autonomy which is based on four pillars: organisational, financial, human resource, and academic. The main thesis is that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a more holistic view of the complex inter......-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and equally pull in opposite directions. The holistic view is expressed in a model of institutional university autonomy that brings together the traditional basic four pillars of autonomy, and five interfaces: government–university; university......–university staff; academic staff–students; university–business; and university–internationalisation. This model is explored through international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are complex, interactive and genuinely...

  17. Scientix in our school- discovering STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcu, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    My name is Cornelia Melcu and I am a primary school teacher in Brasov. Additionally, I am a teacher trainer of Preparatory Class Curriculum, Google Application in Education Course and European Projects Course and a mentor to new teachers and students in university. I am an eTwinning, Scientix and ESERO ambassador too. During the last three school years my school was involved in several STEM projects, part of Scientix community. The main goal of those projects was to develop basic STEM skills of our students based on project work integrated into the curriculum. Open the Gates to the Universe (http://gatestotheuniverse.blogspot.ro; https://twinspace.etwinning.net/12520/home) is an eTwinning project for primary school students started on September 2015 and finished on September 2016. Some of our partners were from the Mediterranean area. The students discovered different aspects of space science and astronomy working on international groups. They explored some aspects of Science included in their curriculum using resources from ESERO, ROEDUSEIS and Space Awareness (e.g. Calculate with Rosetta, Writing the travel diary, Build Rosetta, How to become an astronaut, etc.) The project was a great opportunity to apply integrated learning methods for developing competencies which are a part of the primary school curriculum in Romania. In Language and Communication classes the students talked about their partners living places and their traditions and habits. They learnt some basic words in their partners language related to the weather. They created stories- both in Romanian and English; they described life in space and astronomical phenomena. They talked to the other partners during the several online meetings we organized and wrote short stories in English. In Mathematics and Science they found out about the Milky Way, the Solar System, the weather, famous astronauts and astronomers. They calculated, solved problems, made experiments and explained specific natural phenomena

  18. Physics and Video Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Rhett

    2016-05-01

    We currently live in a world filled with videos. There are videos on YouTube, feature movies and even videos recorded with our own cameras and smartphones. These videos present an excellent opportunity to not only explore physical concepts, but also inspire others to investigate physics ideas. With video analysis, we can explore the fantasy world in science-fiction films. We can also look at online videos to determine if they are genuine or fake. Video analysis can be used in the introductory physics lab and it can even be used to explore the make-believe physics embedded in video games. This book covers the basic ideas behind video analysis along with the fundamental physics principles used in video analysis. The book also includes several examples of the unique situations in which video analysis can be used.

  19. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos » NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Listen NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  20. A video authentication technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Unattended video surveillance systems are particularly vulnerable to the substitution of false video images into the cable that connects the camera to the video recorder. New technology has made it practical to insert a solid state video memory into the video cable, freeze a video image from the camera, and hold this image as long as desired. Various techniques, such as line supervision and sync detection, have been used to detect video cable tampering. The video authentication technique described in this paper uses the actual video image from the camera as the basis for detecting any image substitution made during the transmission of the video image to the recorder. The technique, designed for unattended video systems, can be used for any video transmission system where a two-way digital data link can be established. The technique uses similar microprocessor circuitry at the video camera and at the video recorder to select sample points in the video image for comparison. The gray scale value of these points is compared at the recorder controller and if the values agree within limits, the image is authenticated. If a significantly different image was substituted, the comparison would fail at a number of points and the video image would not be authenticated. The video authentication system can run as a stand-alone system or at the request of another system

  1. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    . Glycolaldehyde is a simpler molecular cousin to table sugar, the scientists say. The sugar molecule was detected in a large cloud of gas and dust some 26,000 light-years away, near the center of our Galaxy. Such clouds, often many light-years across, are the material from which new stars are formed. Though very rarified by Earth standards, these interstellar clouds are the sites of complex chemical reactions that occur over hundreds of thousands or millions of years. So far, about 120 different molecules have been discovered in these clouds. Most of these molecules contain a small number of atoms, and only a few molecules with eight or more atoms have been found in interstellar clouds. The 12 Meter Telescope "Finding glycolaldehyde in one of these interstellar clouds means that such molecules can be formed even in very rarified conditions," said Hollis. "We don't yet understand how it could be formed there," he added. "A combination of more astronomical observations and theoretical chemistry work will be required to resolve the mystery of how this molecule is formed in space." "We hope this discovery inspires renewed efforts to find even more kinds of molecules, so that, with a better idea of the total picture, we may be able to deduce the details of the prebiotic chemistry taking place in interstellar clouds," Hollis said. The discovery was made by detecting faint radio emission from the sugar molecules in the interstellar cloud. Molecules rotate end-for-end, and as they change from one rotational energy state to another, they emit radio waves at precise frequencies. The "family" of radio frequencies emitted by a particular molecule forms a unique "fingerprint" that scientists can use to identify that molecule. The scientists identified glycolaldehyde by detecting six frequencies of radio emission in what is termed the millimeter-wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum -- a region between more-familiar microwaves and infrared radiation. The NRAO 12 Meter Telescope

  2. Discovering workflow nets using integer linear programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zelst, S.J.; van Dongen, B.F.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Verbeek, H.M.W.

    Process mining is concerned with the analysis, understanding and improvement of business processes. Process discovery, i.e. discovering a process model based on an event log, is considered the most challenging process mining task. State-of-the-art process discovery algorithms only discover local

  3. Effectiveness of Video Demonstration over Conventional Methods in Teaching Osteology in Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswasom, Angela A; Jobby, Abraham

    2017-02-01

    Technology and its applications are the most happening things in the world. So, is it in the field of medical education. This study was an evaluation of whether the conventional methods can compete with the test of technology. A comparative study of traditional method of teaching osteology in human anatomy with an innovative visual aided method. The study was conducted on 94 students admitted to MBBS 2014 to 2015 batch of Travancore Medical College. The students were divided into two academically validated groups. They were taught using conventional and video demonstrational techniques in a systematic manner. Post evaluation tests were conducted. Analysis of the mark pattern revealed that the group taught using traditional method scored better when compared to the visual aided method. Feedback analysis showed that, the students were able to identify bony features better with clear visualisation and three dimensional view when taught using the video demonstration method. The students identified visual aided method as the more interesting one for learning which helped them in applying the knowledge gained. In most of the questions asked, the two methods of teaching were found to be comparable on the same scale. As the study ends, we discover that, no new technique can be substituted for time tested techniques of teaching and learning. The ideal method would be incorporating newer multimedia techniques into traditional classes.

  4. Rare Disease Video Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bocanegra, Carlos Luis

    2011-01-01

    Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) is a portal web where contains videos from Youtube including all details from 12 channels of Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) es un portal web que contiene los vídeos de Youtube incluyendo todos los detalles de 12 canales de Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) és un portal web que conté els vídeos de Youtube i que inclou tots els detalls de 12 Canals de Youtube.

  5. The effect of video supplemental instruction on the academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the effect of Video-based Supplemental Instruction on the performance in Mathematics of students whose matric marks did not enable them to be directly admitted to the Science Faculty at the University of Port Elizabeth. Fifteen students who received Video-based Supplemental Instruction in ...

  6. Prepare-Participate-Connect: Active Learning with Video Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Meg; Douglas, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of video provides students with the opportunity to view and engage with audiovisual content in an interactive and participatory way rather than in passive-receptive mode. This article discusses research into the use of video annotation in four vocational programs at RMIT University in Melbourne, which allowed students to interact with…

  7. Cellphones in Classrooms Land Teachers on Online Video Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2007-01-01

    Videos of teachers that students taped in secrecy are all over online sites like YouTube and MySpace. Angry teachers, enthusiastic teachers, teachers clowning around, singing, and even dancing are captured, usually with camera phones, for the whole world to see. Some students go so far as to create elaborately edited videos, shot over several…

  8. [Serious video games in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, D; Tesnière, A; Hadchouel, A

    2018-01-01

    Playing video games has been associated with several negative effects in children. However, serious games, which are video games designed for a primary purpose other than pure entertainment, should not be neglected by pediatricians. In the field of public health, some serious games are a means to decrease drug consumption and improve sexual health behavior in adolescents. In schools, serious games can be used to change students' perception of the disease of one of their classmates, or to train students on basic life support. Serious games are also used with patients: they can distract them from a painful procedure, increase their compliance to treatments, or participate in their rehabilitation. Finally, serious games allow healthcare professionals to train on the management of various medical situations without risk. For every field of application, this review presents the rationale of the use of video games, followed by concrete examples of video games and the results of their scientific evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. How has my learning enabled me to create and share an animated video to assist newly qualified teachers in the creation of a safe critical space for their students?

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents my emergent living theory as it developed while I attempted to address my concern “How has my learning enabled me to create and share an animated video to assist Newly Qualified Teachers in the creation of a safe critical space for their students?” I explore how my learning on the Masters in Education and Training Management (e-learning) has affected me both personally and professionally and how my learning has impacted the learning of others. In particular, I look at t...

  10. "School Shooter" Web Video Game Raises Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    A new video game in which the player stalks and shoots fellow students and teachers in school settings is drawing fire from school district officials. "School Shooter: North American Tour 2012" is a first-person game that allows the player to move around a school and collect points by killing defenseless students and teachers. The game,…

  11. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  12. Decision Mining Revisited – Discovering Overlapping Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannhardt, F.; de Leoni, M.; Reijers, H.A.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Decision mining enriches process models with rules underlying decisions in processes using historical process execution data. Choices between multiple activities are specified through rules defined over process data. Existing decision mining methods focus on discovering mutually-exclusive rules,

  13. Decision Mining Revisited - Discovering Overlapping Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannhardt, F.; De Leoni, M.; Reijers, H.A.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Nurcan, S.; Soffer, P.; Bajec, M.; Eder, J.

    2016-01-01

    Decision mining enriches process models with rules underlying decisions in processes using historical process execution data. Choices between multiple activities are specified through rules defined over process data. Existing decision mining methods focus on discovering mutually-exclusive rules,

  14. Decision mining revisited - Discovering overlapping rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannhardt, Felix; De Leoni, Massimiliano; Reijers, Hajo A.; Van Der Aalst, Wil M P

    2016-01-01

    Decision mining enriches process models with rules underlying decisions in processes using historical process execution data. Choices between multiple activities are specified through rules defined over process data. Existing decision mining methods focus on discovering mutually-exclusive rules,

  15. Did the ancient egyptians discover Algol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Porceddu, S.; Porceddu, S.; Lyytinen, J.; Kajatkari, P.; Markkanen, T.; Toivari-Viitala, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fabritius discovered the first variable star, Mira, in 1596. Holwarda determined the 11 months period of Mira in 1638. Montanari discovered the next variable star, Algol, in 1669. Its period, 2.867 days, was determined by Goodricke (178). Algol was associated with demon-like creatures, "Gorgon" in ancient Greek and "ghoul" in ancient Arab mythology. This indicates that its variability was discovered much before 1669 (Wilk 1996), but this mythological evidence is ambiguous (Davis 1975). For thousands of years, the Ancient Egyptian Scribes (AES) observed stars for timekeeping in a region, where there are nearly 300 clear nights a year. We discovered a significant periodicity of 2.850 days in their calendar for lucky and unlucky days dated to 1224 BC, "the Cairo Calendar". Several astrophysical and astronomical tests supported our conclusion that this was the period of Algol three millennia ago. The "ghoulish habits" of Algol could explain this 0.017 days period increase (Battersby 2012).

  16. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient's history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients' data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan.

  17. Video Games and Software Engineers : Designing a study based on the benefits from Video Games and how they can improve Software Engineers

    OpenAIRE

    Cosic Prica, Srdjan

    2017-01-01

    Context: This is a study about investigating if playing video games can improve any skills and characteristics in a software engineer. Due to lack of resources and time, this study will focus on designing a study that others may use to measure the results and if video games actually can improve software engineers. Objectives: The main objectives are finding the benefits of playing video games and how those benefits are discovered. Meaning what types of games and for how long someone needs to ...

  18. Comparing the Effects of Commercially Available and Custom-Made Video Prompting for Teaching Cooking Skills to High School Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Foster, Ashley L.; Bryant, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    The study compared the effects of using commercially available and custom-made video prompts on the completion of cooking recipes by four high school age males with a diagnosis of autism. An adapted alternating treatments design with continuous baseline, comparison, final treatment, and best treatment condition was used to compare the two…

  19. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Verbally Respond to Questions and Make Purchases in Fast Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Pridgen, Leslie S.; Cronin, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based video instruction (CBVI) was used to teach verbal responses to questions presented by cashiers and purchasing skills in fast food restaurants. A multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of CBVI. Instruction occurred through simulations of three fast food restaurants on the computer using video…

  20. A video for teaching english tenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Unsiah

    2017-04-01

    Students of English Language Education Program in Faculty of Cultural Studies Universitas Brawijaya ideally master Grammar before taking the degree of Sarjana Pendidikan. However, the fact shows that they are still weak in Grammar especially tenses. Therefore, the researchers initiate to develop a video as a media to teach tenses. Objectively, by using video, students get better understanding on tenses so that they can communicate using English accurately and contextually. To develop the video, the researchers used ADDIE model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation. First, the researchers analyzed the students’ learning need to determine the product that would be developed, in this case was a movie about English tenses. Then, the researchers developed a video as the product. The product then was validated by media expert who validated attractiveness, typography, audio, image, and usefulness and content expert and validated by a content expert who validated the language aspects and tenses of English used by the actors in the video dealing with the grammar content, pronunciation, and fluency performed by the actors. The result of validation shows that the video developed was considered good. Theoretically, it is appropriate to be used English Grammar classes. However, the media expert suggests that it still needs some improvement for the next development especially dealing with the synchronization between lips movement and sound on the scenes while the content expert suggests that the Grammar content of the video should focus on one tense only to provide more detailed concept of the tense.

  1. The Use of Culturally Relevant Videos To Draw Attention to Cultural Diversity: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Charlene M.; Rivera, Lourdes M.; Collins, Laura J.

    2000-01-01

    Videos celebrating Hispanic Heritage and Black History month were presented at two regionally and ethnically distinct college campuses. Students (N=62) were interviewed regarding what attracted them to the video. Students of color commented positively on the cultural content as well as the musical and dance components of each video. Presents…

  2. Predictors of Video Game Console Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Bean, Anthony Martin; Ferro, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the aggression levels of college students found in the Northeastern part of the United States following exposure to video games. The 59 participants played their assigned game, Mortal Kombat on Nintendo Wii or Halo 2 on the Xbox, for 45 minutes with a partner. The researchers employed twelve t-tests (alpha adjusted to .004) and three multiple linear regressions to explore the difference of aggression levels in gender, violent video game, and predictors o...

  3. A Video Game Promoting Cancer Risk Perception and Information Seeking Behavior Among Young-Adult College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Georges Elias; Beale, Ivan L; Chen, Minxing; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2016-07-28

    Risky behaviors tend to increase drastically during the transition into young adulthood. This increase may ultimately facilitate the initiation of carcinogenic processes at a young age, highlighting a serious public health problem. By promoting information seeking behavior (ISB), young adults may become aware of cancer risks and potentially take preventive measures. Based on the protection motivation theory, the current study seeks to evaluate the impact of challenge in a fully automated video game called Re-Mission on young adult college students' tendency to perceive the severity of cancer, feel susceptible to cancer, and engage in ISB. A total of 216 young adults were recruited from a university campus, consented, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 3 conditions: an intervention group playing Re-Mission at high challenge (HC; n=85), an intervention group playing Re-Mission at low challenge (LC; n=81), and a control group with no challenge (NC; presented with illustrated pictures of Re-Mission; n=50). Measurement was conducted at baseline, immediate posttest, 10-day follow-up, and 20-day follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effect models were conducted for data analysis of the main outcomes. A total of 101 young adults continued until 20-day follow-up. Mixed-effect models showed that participants in the HC and LC groups were more likely to increase in perceived susceptibility to cancer (P=.03), perceived severity of cancer (P=.02), and ISB (P=.01) than participants in the NC group. The LC group took until 10-day follow-up to show increase in perceived susceptibility (B=0.47, standard error (SE) 0.16, P=.005). The HC group showed an immediate increase in perceived susceptibility at posttest (B=0.43, SE 0.14, P=.002). The LC group exhibited no changes in perceived severity (B=0.40, SE 0.33, P=.24). On the other hand, the HC group showed a significant increase from baseline to posttest (B=0.39, SE 0.14, P=.005), maintaining this increase until

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer ... me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork ...

  5. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos ...

  6. Video Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Christensen, Kasper Skov; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    We introduce Video Design Games to train educators in teaching design. The Video Design Game is a workshop format consisting of three rounds in which participants observe, reflect and generalize based on video snippets from their own practice. The paper reports on a Video Design Game workshop...... in which 25 educators as part of a digital fabrication and design program were able to critically reflect on their teaching practice....

  7. What hinders teachers in using computer and video games in the classroom? Exploring factors inhibiting the uptake of computer and video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Young Kyun

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify factors inhibiting teachers' use of computer and video games in the classroom setting and to examine the degree to which teaching experience and gender affect attitudes toward using games. Six factors that hinder teachers' use of games in the classroom were discovered: Inflexibility of curriculum, Negative effects of gaming, Students' lack of readiness, Lack of supporting materials, Fixed class schedules, and Limited budgets. Lack of supporting material, Fixed class schedules, and Limited budgets were factors that female teachers believed to be more serious obstacles to game use in the classroom than male teachers did. Experienced teachers, more so than inexperienced teachers, believed that adopting games in teaching was hindered by Inflexibility of curriculum and Negative effects of gaming. On the other hand, inexperienced teachers, more so than experienced teachers, believed that adopting games in teaching is less hindered by Lack of supporting materials and Fixed class schedules.

  8. Discovering the Art of Mathematics: Using String Art to Investigate Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renesse, Christine; Ecke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    One goal of our Discovering the Art of Mathematics project is to empower students in the liberal arts to become confident creators of art and imaginative creators of mathematics. In this paper, we describe our experience with using string art to guide liberal arts students in exploring ideas of calculus. We provide excerpts from our inquiry-based…

  9. The Children's Video Marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducey, Richard V.

    This report examines a growing submarket, the children's video marketplace, which comprises broadcast, cable, and video programming for children 2 to 11 years old. A description of the tremendous growth in the availability and distribution of children's programming is presented, the economics of the children's video marketplace are briefly…

  10. Video Self-Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggey, Tom; Ogle, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Video self-modeling (VSM) first appeared on the psychology and education stage in the early 1970s. The practical applications of VSM were limited by lack of access to tools for editing video, which is necessary for almost all self-modeling videos. Thus, VSM remained in the research domain until the advent of camcorders and VCR/DVD players and,…

  11. Improving Listening And Speaking Skills By Using Animation Videos And Discussion Method

    OpenAIRE

    Amalia, Rizka

    2014-01-01

    Listening and speaking are the important skills that have to be mastered by the students. By having these skills, the students can communicate with others easily. There are many strategies that can be used to teach listening and speaking skills. One of the strategies is by using animation videos. Many students of all ages still like watching animation videos for they are interesting. Animation videos can help the students more understand because they present visual context aids that assist th...

  12. Video games and surgical ability: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jeremy; Aughwane, Paul; Hammond, Toby M

    2010-01-01

    Surgical training is rapidly evolving because of reduced training hours and the reduction of training opportunities due to patient safety concerns. There is a popular conception that video game usage might be linked to improved operating ability especially those techniques involving endoscopic modalities. If true this might suggest future directions for training. A search was made of the MEDLINE databases for the MeSH term, "Video Games," combined with the terms "Surgical Procedures, Operative," "Endoscopy," "Robotics," "Education," "Learning," "Simulators," "Computer Simulation," "Psychomotor Performance," and "Surgery, Computer-Assisted,"encompassing all journal articles before November 2009. References of articles were searched for further studies. Twelve relevant journal articles were discovered. Video game usage has been studied in relationship to laparoscopic, gastrointestinal endoscopic, endovascular, and robotic surgery. Video game users acquire endoscopic but not robotic techniques quicker, and training on video games appears to improve performance. Copyright (c) 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wii, Kinect, and Move. Heart Rate, Oxygen Consumption, Energy Expenditure, and Ventilation due to Different Physically Active Video Game Systems in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    SCHEER, KRISTA S.; SIEBRANT, SARAH M.; BROWN, GREGORY A.; SHAW, BRANDON S.; SHAW, INA

    2014-01-01

    Nintendo Wii, Sony Playstation Move, and Microsoft XBOX Kinect are home video gaming systems that involve player movement to control on-screen game play. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that playing Wii is moderate physical activity at best, but Move and Kinect have not been as thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation while playing the games Wii Boxing, Kinect Boxing, and Move Gladiatorial Combat. Heart rate, o...

  14. Conceptualizing RTI in 21st-Century Secondary Science Classrooms: Video Games' Potential to Provide Tiered Support and Progress Monitoring for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Beecher, Constance C.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary schools across the United States are adopting response to intervention (RTI) as a means to identify students with learning disabilities (LD) and provide tiered instructional interventions that benefit all students. The majority of current RTI research focuses on students with reading difficulties in elementary school classrooms.…

  15. Bridging Realty to Virtual Reality: Investigating Gender Effect and Student Engagement on Learning through Video Game Play in an Elementary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard; Mangrum, Jennifer; Holmes, Shawn; Collazo, Kimberly; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' learning of simple machines, a fifth-grade (ages 10-11) forces and motion unit, and student engagement using a teacher-created Multiplayer Educational Gaming Application. This mixed-method study collected pre-test/post-test results to determine student knowledge about simple machines. A survey…

  16. The Use of Videos in Teaching - Some Experiences From the University of Copenhagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Bregnhøj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers videos created and used in different learning patterns. The videos are grouped according to the teaching or learning activities in which they are used. One group of videos are used by the teacher for one-way communication, including: online lectures, experts interacting with one another, instruction videos and introduction videos. Further videos are teacher-student interactive videos, including: feedback on student deliveries, student productions and interactive videos. Examples from different courses at different faculties at The University of Copenhagen of different types of videos (screencasts, pencasts and different kinds of camera recordings, from quick-and-dirty videos made by teachers at their own computer to professionally produced studio recordings as well as audio files are presented with links, as an empirical basis for the discussion. The paper is very practically oriented and looks at e.g. which course design and teaching situation is suitable for which type of video; at which point is an audio file preferable to a video file; and how to produce videos easily and without specialized equipment, if you don’t have access to (or time for professional assistance. In the article, we also point out how a small amount of tips & tricks regarding planning, design and presentation technique can improve recordings made by teachers themselves. We argue that the way to work with audio and video is to start by analyzing the pedagogical needs, in this way adapting the type and use of audio and video to the pedagogical context.

  17. VBR video traffic models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanwir, Savera

    2014-01-01

    There has been a phenomenal growth in video applications over the past few years. An accurate traffic model of Variable Bit Rate (VBR) video is necessary for performance evaluation of a network design and for generating synthetic traffic that can be used for benchmarking a network. A large number of models for VBR video traffic have been proposed in the literature for different types of video in the past 20 years. Here, the authors have classified and surveyed these models and have also evaluated the models for H.264 AVC and MVC encoded video and discussed their findings.

  18. Advanced video coding systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and accessible text/reference presents an overview of the state of the art in video coding technology. Specifically, the book introduces the tools of the AVS2 standard, describing how AVS2 can help to achieve a significant improvement in coding efficiency for future video networks and applications by incorporating smarter coding tools such as scene video coding. Topics and features: introduces the basic concepts in video coding, and presents a short history of video coding technology and standards; reviews the coding framework, main coding tools, and syntax structure of AV

  19. Intelligent video surveillance systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Belonging to the wider academic field of computer vision, video analytics has aroused a phenomenal surge of interest since the current millennium. Video analytics is intended to solve the problem of the incapability of exploiting video streams in real time for the purpose of detection or anticipation. It involves analyzing the videos using algorithms that detect and track objects of interest over time and that indicate the presence of events or suspect behavior involving these objects.The aims of this book are to highlight the operational attempts of video analytics, to identify possi

  20. Continuous Video Modeling to Assist with Completion of Multi-Step Home Living Tasks by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Foster, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated a relatively new video-based procedure, continuous video modeling (CVM), to teach multi-step cleaning tasks to high school students with moderate intellectual disability. CVM in contrast to video modeling and video prompting allows repetition of the video model (looping) as many times as needed while the user completes…

  1. Flip Video for Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hutsko, Joe

    2010-01-01

    The full-color guide to shooting great video with the Flip Video camera. The inexpensive Flip Video camera is currently one of the hottest must-have gadgets. It's portable and connects easily to any computer to transfer video you shoot onto your PC or Mac. Although the Flip Video camera comes with a quick-start guide, it lacks a how-to manual, and this full-color book fills that void! Packed with full-color screen shots throughout, Flip Video For Dummies shows you how to shoot the best possible footage in a variety of situations. You'll learn how to transfer video to your computer and then edi

  2. Brownian motion using video capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, Reese; Robbins, Candace; Forinash, Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Although other researchers had previously observed the random motion of pollen grains suspended in water through a microscope, Robert Brown's name is associated with this behaviour based on observations he made in 1828. It was not until Einstein's work in the early 1900s however, that the origin of this irregular motion was established to be the result of collisions with molecules which were so small as to be invisible in a light microscope (Einstein A 1965 Investigations on the Theory of the Brownian Movement ed R Furth (New York: Dover) (transl. Cowper A D) (5 papers)). Jean Perrin in 1908 (Perrin J 1923 Atoms (New York: Van Nostrand-Reinhold) (transl. Hammick D)) was able, through a series of painstaking experiments, to establish the validity of Einstein's equation. We describe here the details of a junior level undergraduate physics laboratory experiment where students used a microscope, a video camera and video capture software to verify Einstein's famous calculation of 1905. (author)

  3. Scaffolding With and Through Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Khoo, Elaine; Cowie, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    In New Zealand and internationally claims are being made about the potential for information and communication technologies (ICTs) to transform teaching and learning. However, the theoretical underpinnings explaining the complex interplay between the content, pedagogy and technology a teacher needs...... to scaffold learning. It showcases the intricate interplay between teachers’ knowledge about content, digital video technology, and students’ learning needs based on a qualitative study of two science teachers and their students in a New Zealand primary school....... to consider must be expanded. This article explicates theoretical and practical ideas related to teachers’ application of their ICT technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) in science. The article unpacks the social and technological dimensions of teachers’ use of TPACK when they use digital videos...

  4. Reading while Watching Video: The Effect of Video Content on Reading Comprehension and Media Multitasking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Lee, Jennifer; Robertson, Tip

    2011-01-01

    Media multitasking, or engaging in multiple media and tasks simultaneously, is becoming an increasingly popular phenomenon with the development and engagement in social media. This study examines to what extent video content affects students' reading comprehension in media multitasking environments. One hundred and thirty university students were…

  5. Discovering English with the Sketch Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James

    2014-01-01

    "Discovering English with the Sketch Engine" is the title of a new book (Thomas, 2014) which introduces the use of corpora in language study, teaching, writing and translating. It focuses on using the Sketch Engine to identify patterns of normal usage in many aspects of English ranging from morphology to discourse and pragmatics. This…

  6. Two Newly Discovered Plants in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-Chuan Hsu; Jia-Jung Lin; Shih-Wen Chung

    2009-01-01

    Two herbs are newly discovered in Taiwan. Limnophila fragrans (G. Forst.) Seem. (Scrophulariaceae), native in SE Asia, is recognized from southern lowlands. Anagallis minima (L.) E. H. L. Krause (Primulaceae), native in N America and Europe, was found from northern mountainous region at low altitudes. In this study, descriptions, line drawings, color photos and a distribution map of the two species are provided.

  7. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  8. Challenges in service mining : record, check, discover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Daniel, F.; Dolog, P.; Li, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Process mining aims to discover, monitor and improve real processes by extracting knowledge from event logs abundantly available in today’s information systems. Although process mining has been applied in hundreds of organizations and process mining techniques have been embedded in a variety of

  9. Using Short Videos in an Introductory Programming Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Video resources are gradually being introduced in a first year programming course. The course is about imperative programming in C. After each of the first two years with video lectures the students have been asked about their assessments and opinions. The main parts of the paper are based on evi...... experience we also carry out a discussion of future plans for using video resources in the course....

  10. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  11. Fostering science communication and outreach through video production in Dartmouth's IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond Wagner, C. R.; McDavid, L. A.; Virginia, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Dartmouth's NSF-supported IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program has focused on using video media to foster interdisciplinary thinking and to improve student skills in science communication and public outreach. Researchers, educators, and funding organizations alike recognize the value of video media for making research results more accessible and relevant to diverse audiences and across cultures. We present an affordable equipment set and the basic video training needed as well as available Dartmouth institutional support systems for students to produce outreach videos on climate change and its associated impacts on people. We highlight and discuss the successes and challenges of producing three types of video products created by graduate and undergraduate students affiliated with the Dartmouth IGERT. The video projects created include 1) graduate student profile videos, 2) a series of short student-created educational videos for Greenlandic high school students, and 3) an outreach video about women in science based on the experiences of women students conducting research during the IGERT field seminar at Summit Station and Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. The 'Science in Greenland--It's a Girl Thing' video was featured on The New York Times Dot Earth blog and the Huffington Post Green blog among others and received international recognition. While producing these videos, students 1) identified an audience and created story lines, 2) worked in front of and behind the camera, 3) utilized low-cost digital editing applications, and 4) shared the videos on multiple platforms from social media to live presentations. The three video projects were designed to reach different audiences, and presented unique challenges for content presentation and dissemination. Based on student and faculty assessment, we conclude that the video projects improved student science communication skills and increased public knowledge of polar science and the effects of climate change.

  12. Teaching Game Programming using Video Tutorials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver

    . & Squire K. (2004). Design-Based Research: Putting a Stake in the Ground. Journal of Learning Sciences Vol. 13-1. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation, Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Majgaard, G. (2014). Teaching Design of Emerging Embodied Technologies......Background. What are the learning potentials of using online video tutorials as educational tools in game programming of Mixed Reality? The paper reports on the first experiences of teaching third semester engineering students design of Mixed Reality using online step-by-step programming video...... production makes video tutorials a promising alternative to paper tutorials. Software and game engine companies such as Unity has already switched to video and other online materials as the primary medium for their tutorials. It is often hard to find up to date thoroughly worked through textbooks on new...

  13. Using Video Game-Based Instruction in an EFL Program: Understanding the Power of Video Games in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis Guerrero

    2011-01-01

    This small-scale action-research study examines the perceptions of four students in a military academy in Colombia undergoing the processof using a mainstream video game in their EFL classes instead of classic forms of instruction. The video game used served to approach EFL by means of language exploratory activities designed according to the context present in the video game and the course linguistic objectives. This study was conducted on the grounds that computer technology offers the poss...

  14. Student’s Video Production as Formative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gama

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning assessments are subject of discussion both in their theoretical and practical approaches. The process of measuring learning in physics by high school students, either qualitatively or quantitatively, is one in which it should be possible to identify not only the concepts and contents students failed to achieve but also the reasons for the failure. We propose that students’ video production offers a very effective formative assessment tool to teachers: as a formative assessment, it produces information that allows the understanding of where and when the learning process succeeded or failed, of identifying, as a subject or as a group, the deficiencies or misunderstandings related to the theme under analysis and their interpretation by students, and it provides also a different kind of assessment, related to some other life skills, such as ability to carry on a project till its conclusion and to work cooperatively. In this paper, we describe the use of videos produced by high school students as an assessment resource. The students were asked to prepare a short video, which was then presented to the whole group and discussed. The videos reveal aspects of students’ difficulties that usually do not appear in formal assessments such as tests and questionnaires. After the use of the videos as a component of classroom assessments and the use of the discussions to rethink learning activities in the group, the videos were analysed and classified in various categories. This analysis showed a strong correlation between the technical quality of the video and the content quality of the students’ argumentation. Also, it was shown that the students do not prepare their video based on quick and easy production; they usually choose forms of video production that require careful planning and implementation, and this reflects directly on the overall quality of the video and of the learning process.

  15. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses' acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses.

  16. Video Journaling as a Method of Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Janson, Christopher; Singleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine seven school counseling students' experiences of creating reflective video journals during their first internship course. Specifically, this study focused on capturing the essence of the experiences related to personal reactions, feelings, and thoughts about creating two video journal…

  17. Advantages of Live Microscope Video for Laboratory and Teaching Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Kristin K.; Michels, Zachary D.; Hotchkiss, Sara C.

    2016-01-01

    Although spatial reasoning and penetrative thinking skills are essential for many disciplines, these concepts are difficult for students to comprehend. In microscopy, traditional educational materials (i.e., photographs) are static. Conversely, video-based training methods convey dimensionality. We implemented a real-time digital video imaging…

  18. Toward an Analysis of Video Games for Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenholley, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Video games have tremendous potential in mathematics education, yet there is a push to simply add mathematics to a video game without regard to whether the game structure suits the mathematics, and without regard to the level of mathematical thought being learned in the game. Are students practicing facts, or are they problem-solving? This paper…

  19. Constructing Self-Modeling Videos: Procedures and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Johnson, Austin H.; Sanetti, Lisa M. H.; Delcampo, Marisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Although widely recommended, evidence-based interventions are not regularly utilized by school practitioners. Video self-modeling is an effective and efficient evidence-based intervention for a variety of student problem behaviors. However, like many other evidence-based interventions, it is not frequently used in schools. As video creation…

  20. Video Modeling and Prompting in Practice: Teaching Cooking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Mourra, Kjerstin; Morgan, Robert L.; Riesen, Tim; Glasgow, Malinda; Huddleston, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the creation of video modeling (VM) and video prompting (VP) interventions for teaching novel multi-step tasks to individuals with disabilities. This article reviews factors to consider when selecting skills to teach, and students for whom VM/VP may be successful, as well as the difference between VM and VP and circumstances…

  1. Class and Home Problems. Identify-Solve-Broadcast Your Own Transport Phenomenon: Student-Created YouTube Videos to Foster Active Learning in Mass and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fei; Khera, Eshita

    2016-01-01

    Despite the instinctive perception of mass and heat transfer principles in daily life, productive learning in this course continues to be one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. In an effort to enhance student learning in classroom, we initiated an innovative active-learning method titled…

  2. Having Students Create Short Video Clips to Help Transition from Naïve Conceptions about Mechanics to True Newtonian Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten-Gualtieri, Pascale; Ritter, Christian; Plumat, Jim; Keunings, Roland; Lebrun, Marcel; Raucent, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Most students enter their first university physics course with a system of beliefs and intuitions which are often inconsistent with the Newtonian frame of reference. This article presents an experiment of collaborative learning aiming at helping first-year students in an engineering programme to transition from their naïve intuition about dynamics…

  3. The Annie Jump Cannon Video Project at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupfer, C.; Welther, B. L.; Griswold, A.

    1993-05-01

    The heart of this poster paper is the screening of the new 25-minute educational video, ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors.'' It explores the life and work of Annie Jump Cannon through the eyes of sixth-grade students. A production of the Science Media Group at the CfA, the video was created to interest and inspire girls and minorities, in particular, to continue their study of history and physical science in high school. Recent studies show that science teachers are successfully using videotapes in the classroom to supplement traditional methods of teaching. Other reports show that capable girls and minority students tend to drop science in high school. Our goal, then, was to create a video to stimulate the curiosity and natural interest in science of these younger students. With the help of the Public Affairs Office at the CfA, we arranged to visit local schools to talk to sixth-grade science teachers and their students about the video project. Boys and girls were both eager to participate in it. By lottery, we chose a dozen youngsters of multi-cultural backgrounds to attend a three-day workshop, during which we videotaped them discovering facts about Cannon's childhood and career. Barbara Welther, historian and principal investigator, took the group to the Harvard University Archives to look at some Cannon memorabilia. To learn about spectra, each student assembled a spectroscope from a kit and observed solar lines. CfA astronomers then led the group in various activities to explore the types of stellar spectra that Cannon classified and published in The Henry Draper Catalogue 75 years ago.% and that astronomers still study today. ``Annie and the Stars of Many Colors'' shows young people actively engaged in the process of discovery and offers teachers a novel tool to stimulate discussion of topics in science, history, women's studies, and careers. It is intended for use in schools, libraries, museums, planetariums, as well as for personal interest. For more

  4. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  5. Digital Video in Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Is video becoming “the new black” in academia, if so, what are the challenges? The integration of video in research methodology (for collection, analysis) is well-known, but the use of “academic video” for dissemination is relatively new (Eriksson and Sørensen). The focus of this paper is academic......). In the video, I appear (along with other researchers) and two Danish film directors, and excerpts from their film. My challenges included how to edit the academic video and organize the collaborative effort. I consider video editing as a semiotic, transformative process of “reassembling” voices....... In the discussion, I review academic video in terms of relevance and implications for research practice. The theoretical background is social constructivist, combining social semiotics (Kress, van Leeuwen, McCloud), visual anthropology (Banks, Pink) and dialogic theory (Bakhtin). The Bakhtinian notion of “voices...

  6. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  7. Discovering Chemical Aromaticity Using Fragrant Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory organic chemistry is often perceived as inaccessible by students. This article describes a method used to link organic chemistry to everyday experience, asking students to explore whether fragrant molecules are also aromatic in the chemical sense. Students were engaged in this activity, excited about their results, and performed well…

  8. Video interviewing as a learning resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Lars; Søndergaard, Helle Alsted

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out as a pilot study, with the aim of obtaining exploratory insights into the field of learning, and more specifically, how the use of video technology can be used as a mean to excel the outcome of the learning process. The motivation behind the study has its...... basis in the management education literature, and thereby in the discussion of how to organize teaching, in order to equip students with improved skills in reflective realization. Following the notion that experience is the basis for knowledge, the study was set out to explore how students at higher...... education programmes, i.e. at MSc and MBA level, can benefit from utilizing video recorded interviews in their process of learning and reflection. On the basis of the study, it is suggested that video interviewing makes up an interesting alternative to other learning approaches such as Simulation...

  9. Video exams and the external examiners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    to the Master’s programme. The programme offers streamed videos in combination with other learning resources. Oral exams have been mediated with the help of Skype and later with Adobe Connect Professional. It has for all participants - students, examiners and external examiners – been both a challenge...... and an opportunity which has brought about new knowledge and experience. All students in the MPBL Master’s programme responded to a questionnaire [1] that they did not cheat or receive any help from outside. It was also shown that the more experience the respondents had with video exams, the more satisfied they were...... with the exams. Almost all respondents thought that video exams gave the external examiner the possibility to ensure that the demands were in accordance with the defined outcomes and see to that the exams were completed in accordance with the rules. This paper presents results from a questionnaire focusing...

  10. The discovered preference hypothesis - an empirical test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Using stated preference methods for valuation of non-market goods is known to be vulnerable to a range of biases. Some authors claim that these so-called anomalies in effect render the methods useless for the purpose. However, the Discovered Preference Hypothesis, as put forth by Plott [31], offers...... an nterpretation and explanation of biases which entails that the stated preference methods need not to be completely written off. In this paper we conduct a test for the validity and relevance of the DPH interpretation of biases. In a choice experiment concerning preferences for protection of Danish nature areas...... as respondents evaluate more and more choice sets. This finding supports the Discovered Preference Hypothesis interpretation and explanation of starting point bias....

  11. Discovering the secrets of the Olifants sediments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Petersen, C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available is an important component of an aquatic ecosystem in that it provides habitat, feed- ing and spawning areas for aquatic fauna such as fish and benthic Discovering the secrets of THE OLIFANTS SEDIMENTS The polluted Upper Olifants River, in Mpumalanga, has... the distribution of bed material sizes. This allows for the determination ? Top right: The Koffie- spruit, a tributary of the Upper Olifants River. Middle right: Bank erosion was evident throughout the Koffiespruit study reach. This section of river...

  12. Two Newly Discovered Plants in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Chuan Hsu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two herbs are newly discovered in Taiwan. Limnophila fragrans (G. Forst. Seem. (Scrophulariaceae, native in SE Asia, is recognized from southern lowlands. Anagallis minima (L. E. H. L. Krause (Primulaceae, native in N America and Europe, was found from northern mountainous region at low altitudes. In this study, descriptions, line drawings, color photos and a distribution map of the two species are provided.

  13. Discovering More Accurate Frequent Web Usage Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Bayir, Murat Ali; Toroslu, Ismail Hakki; Cosar, Ahmet; Fidan, Guven

    2008-01-01

    Web usage mining is a type of web mining, which exploits data mining techniques to discover valuable information from navigation behavior of World Wide Web users. As in classical data mining, data preparation and pattern discovery are the main issues in web usage mining. The first phase of web usage mining is the data processing phase, which includes the session reconstruction operation from server logs. Session reconstruction success directly affects the quality of the frequent patterns disc...

  14. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  15. Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

    2014-01-01

    Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

  16. Discovering students mobile learning experiences in higher education in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelere, Solomon S.; Suhonen, Jarkko; Shonola, Shaibu A.; Joy, Mike

    2016-01-01

    M-learning plays a progressively significant role in the advancement of teaching and learning in higher education. However, the effective implementation of m-learning in higher education will be based on users’ experiences and motivation to use this technology. Though m-learning has become global, developing countries such as Nigeria are yet to enjoy the full potential offered by m-learning. This study is focused on ascertaining students’ experiences with m-learning, determining the influence...

  17. Engaging Students: Discovering Family and Consumer Sciences History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Sharon Y.; Sewell, Darby; Wilmarth, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The centennial of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) provides an opportunity to explore local as well as national aspects of the field. Studying events that shaped FCS and the women and men who provided early leadership reinforces the role of FCS in improving daily living conditions for the past century. Engaging…

  18. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called "supasulfas", and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents.

  19. Writing Assignments in Disguise: Lessons Learned Using Video Projects in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study describes the instructional approach of using student-created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors' Energy Perspectives science course. Four years of teaching this course provided many reflective teaching moments from which we have enhanced our instructional approach to teaching students how to construct a quality Ken Burn's style science video. Fundamental to a good video documentary is the story told via a narrative which involves significant writing, editing and rewriting. Many students primarily associate a video documentary with visual imagery and do not realize the importance of writing in the production of the video. Required components of the student-created video include: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write an outline, 4) write a narrative, 5) construct a project storyboard, 6) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 7) record the narrative, 8) construct the video documentary, 9) edit and 10) finalize the project. Two knowledge survey instruments (administered pre- and post) were used for assessment purposes. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries and the second survey assessed students' content knowledge acquired from each documentary. This talk will focus on the components necessary for video documentaries and the instructional lessons learned over the years. Additionally, results from both surveys and student reflections of the video project will be shared.

  20. Takahiko iimura: Video and Semiology

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Fred

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of professor Jan-Gunnar Sjölin, following an initial suggestion from doctoral candidate Fred Andersson, Takahiko iimura visited our department during December 1st to December 4th 2003. A selection of mr iimura's video- and media-works from ca 1970 to the present day were screened on the evenings of December 2nd and 3rd. The screenings were attended by a great number of students at all educational levels of the department. A list of the screened works, with mr iimura'...